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Sample records for bee semen storage

  1. Toxicity of cryoprotectants to honey bee semen and queens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, J; Bienefeld, K

    2012-02-01

    Given the threats to the intraspecific biodiversity of Apis mellifera and the pressure on bee breeding to come up with disease-tolerant lines, techniques to cryopreserve drone semen are of great interest. Freeze-thawed drone semen of high viability and/or motility has repeatedly been obtained, but fertility of such semen, when it was measured, was always low. The cryoprotective agent (CPA) most frequently used with drone semen is dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), although this substance has been suspected of causing genetic damage in sperm. No form of sperm washing is currently performed. Using a membrane permeability assay, we measured the short-term toxicity of four possible replacements for DMSO, 1,3-propane diol, 2,3-butane diol, ethylene glycol, and dimethyl formamide. We also tested whether the practice of inseminating queens with CPA-containing semen affects sperm numbers in the storage organs of queens, or sperm fertility. Finally, we tested whether CPA-toxicity in vivo can be reduced by using mixtures of two CPAs, DMSO, and ethylene glycol. Our results show that, although short-term toxicity of all CPAs tested was low, the presence of single CPAs in insemination mixtures at concentrations required for slow freezing greatly reduced the number of sperm reaching the spermatheca. Contrary to earlier reports, this was also true for DMSO. Ethylene glycol was additionally shown to reduce the viability of spermatozoa reaching the storage organ. Mixtures of DMSO and EthGly performed better than either substance used singly at the same concentration. We conclude that the toxicity of CPAs, including DMSO, on honey bee semen and/or queens has been underestimated in the past. This could partly explain the discrepancy between in vitro and in vivo quality of cryopreserved drone semen, described by others. Combinations of several CPAs and techniques to partly remove CPAs after thawing could help to solve this problem. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Preservation of Domesticated Honey Bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Drone Semen.

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    Paillard, M; Rousseau, A; Giovenazzo, P; Bailey, J L

    2017-08-01

    Preservation of honey bee (Apis mellifera L., Hymenoptera: Apidae) sperm, coupled with instrumental insemination, is an effective strategy to protect the species and their genetic diversity. Our overall objective is to develop a method of drone semen preservation; therefore, two experiments were conducted. Hypothesis 1 was that cryopreservation (-196 °C) of drone semen is more effective for long-term storage than at 16 °C. Our results show that after 1 yr of storage, frozen sperm viability was higher than at 16 °C, showing that cryopreservation is necessary to conserve semen. However, the cryoprotectant used for drone sperm freezing, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), can harm the queen and reduce fertility after instrumental insemination. Hypothesis 2 was that centrifugation of cryopreserved semen to reduce DMSO prior to insemination optimize sperm quality. Our results indicate that centrifuging cryopreserved sperm to remove cryoprotectant does not affect queen survival, spermathecal sperm count, or sperm viability. Although these data do not indicate that centrifugation of frozen-thawed sperm improves queen health and fertility after instrumental insemination, we demonstrate that cryopreservation is achievable, and it is better for long-term sperm storage than above-freezing temperatures for duration of close to a year. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Effect of semen extender and storage temperature on ram sperm motility over time

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    Storage of ram semen for long period of time depends on a number of factors, including type of extender and storage temperature. A study compared the effect of semen extender and storage temperature on motility of ram semen stored for 72 h. Semen collected via electroejaculator from 5 mature Katahd...

  4. New methods and media for the centrifugation of honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) drone semen.

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    Wegener, Jakob; May, Tanja; Kamp, Günter; Bienefeld, Kaspar

    2014-02-01

    Centrifugation of Apis mellifera L. drone semen is a necessary step in the homogenization of semen pools for the enlargement of the effective breeding population, as well as in the collection of semen by the so-called washing technique. It is also of interest for the removal of cryoprotectants after cryopreservation. The adoption of methods involving semen centrifugation has been hampered by their damaging effect to sperm. Here, we tested four new diluents as well as three additives (catalase, hen egg yolk, and a protease inhibitor), using sperm motility and dual fluorescent staining as indicators of semen quality. Three of the new diluents significantly reduced motility losses after centrifugation, as compared with the literature standard. Values of motility and propidium iodide negativity obtained with two of these diluents were not different from those measured with untreated semen. The least damaging diluent, a citrate-HEPES buffer containing trehalose, was then tested in an insemination experiment with centrifuged semen. Most queens receiving this semen produced normal brood, and the number of sperm reaching the storage organ of the queen was not significantly different from that in queens receiving untreated semen. These results could improve the acceptance of techniques involving the centrifugation of drone semen. The diluent used in the insemination experiment could also serve as semen extender for applications not involving centrifugation.

  5. Rotation of Boar Semen Doses During Storage Affects Sperm Quality.

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    Schulze, M; Rüdiger, K; Waberski, D

    2015-08-01

    It is common practice to rotate boar semen doses during storage for prevention of sperm sedimentation. In this study, the effect of rotation of boar semen doses during storage on sperm quality was investigated. Manual turning twice daily and automatic rotation five times per hour resulted in the following effects: alkalinization of the BTS-extender, loss of membrane integrity at day 3, and loss of motility and changes in sperm kinematics during a thermoresistance test at day 5. Using a pH-stabilized variant of BTS extender, sperm motility and velocity decreased in continuously rotated samples, whereas membrane integrity and mitochondrial activity remain unaffected. It is concluded that rotation of semen samples adversely affects sperm quality and, therefore, should no longer be recommended for AI practice.

  6. Effects of diluents and plasma on honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) drone frozen-thawed semen fertility.

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    Gül, Aziz; Şahinler, Nuray; Onal, Ali G; Hopkins, Brandon K; Sheppard, Walter S

    2017-10-01

    Cryopreservation is an advanced method used to protect germplasm in liquid nitrogen. Honey bees are of special interest to protect because of their pollination activity and critical role in agriculture. There has been important progress in the cryopreservation of honey bee germplasm in recent years, leading to practical recovery of genetic material for breeding purposes following freezing. However, there remains room for improvement and the goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different "extenders" added post-thaw on the fertilization rate of cryopreserved honey bee semen. The purpose of adding extender post-thaw was to dilute the cryoprotectant to remove chemicals after centrifugation because of potential adverse effects. The control consisted of frozen-thawed semen without the addition of an extender; treatment groups included the addition of one of the following extenders: glucose solution, fresh ram semen plasma, fresh honey bee semen plasma, extender solution. All of the above treatments and frozen-thawed control were compared to fresh semen. For each group, 15 virgin queens were instrumentally inseminated with the semen-diluent solution and introduced into nucleus colonies to determine the brood patterns of the queens. Percentages of worker brood produced in the fresh semen, frozen-thawed semen control, glucose, fresh ram semen plasma, fresh honey bee semen plasma, and extender solution supplemented groups were 98.±1.1%, 47.0 ± 0.9%, 3.0 ± 0.8%, 0.3 ± 0.1%, 48.1 ± 4.1% and 40.3 ± 2.4%, respectively. Similiarly, spermatozoa numbers in the spermathecae of the same treatment groups were 3.6 × 10(6), 1.6 × 10(6), 7.3 × 10(5), 4.7 × 10(5), 8.1 × 10(5), and 4.6 × 10(5) spermatozoa for the same treatment, respectively. The differences in both worker brood percentage and sperm count in the spermatheca were statistically significant (P drone semen plasma group. We found a positive correlation between sperm count in

  7. Liquid semen storage in elephants (Elephas maximus and Loxodonta africana): species differences and storage optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiso, Wendy K; Brown, Janine L; Siewerdt, Frank; Schmitt, Dennis L; Olson, Deborah; Crichton, Elizabeth G; Pukazhenthi, Budhan S

    2011-01-01

    Artificial insemination plays a key role in the genetic management of elephants in zoos. Because freshly extended semen is typically used for artificial insemination in elephants, it has become imperative to optimize conditions for liquid storage and semen transport. The objectives of this study were to examine the interactions between different extenders and storage temperatures on sperm total motility, progressive motility, and acrosomal integrity in Asian (Elephas maximus) and African (Loxodonta africana) elephants. Ejaculates were collected by rectal massage, diluted using a split-sample technique in 5 semen extenders: TL-Hepes (HEP), Modena (MOD), Biladyl (BIL), TEST refrigeration medium (TES), and INRA96 (INR), maintained at 35°C, 22°C, or 4°C. At 0, 4, 6, 12, and 24 hours, aliquots were removed and assessed for sperm total motility, progressive motility, and acrosomal integrity. After 24 hours of storage, African elephant spermatozoa exhibited greater longevity and higher values in sperm quality parameters compared with those of Asian elephants. In both species, semen storage at 35°C resulted in a sharp decline in all sperm quality parameters after 4 hours of storage, whereas storage at 22°C and 4°C facilitated sperm survival. In Asian elephants, MOD and HEP were most detrimental, whereas BIL, TES, and INR maintained motility up to 12 hours when spermatozoa were cooled to 22°Cor4°C. In African elephants, there were no differences among extenders. All media maintained good sperm quality parameters at 22°C or 4°C. However, although MOD, BIL, and INR were most effective at lower temperatures, HEP and TES maintained sperm motility at all storage temperatures. This study demonstrated sperm sensitivity to components of various semen extenders and storage temperatures and offers recommendations for semen extender choices for liquid semen storage for both Asian and African elephants.

  8. The effect of semen collection method and level of egg yolk on capability of dilution and storage of buck semen

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    N.N. Dhaher

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of semen collection method for reduction of the deleterious interaction between the enzymes of bulbourethral gland and egg yolk during the dilution and storage of buck semen by three different level of egg yolk. Ten bucks were used in this study; the bucks were divided into two groups (five bucks in each group. Semen samples were collected once a week for four weeks from the bucks in first group using an artificial vagina, and from the animals in second group using an electroejaculator. The collected semen samples were diluted with sodium citrate extender with three different level of egg yolk (5, 10 and 20%. Extend semen samples were stored at 5 °C for three days. Computer assisted sperm analysis and Sperm Class Analyzer® were used for evaluation of the buck semen samples. Sperm motility parameters were evaluated which includes; percentage of motile sperm, percentage of progressive motile sperm, the value of the linear velocity (VSL, the value of the average velocity (VAP, the value of the curvilinear velocity (VCL, and the amplitude of lateral movement of the head (ALH. Results showed that all sperm motility parameters under the different level of egg yolk in semen samples that collected by artificial vagina were significantly higher than those which collected by electroejaculator. The percentage of motile sperm and progressive motile sperm of samples that collected by artificial vagina were higher at 10% of egg yolk, while these motility parameters were higher at 5% of egg yolk for semen samples that collected by electroejaculator. The differences between the two methods of semen collection in VCL and ALH were clear and the values were higher in samples that collected using the artificial vagina. The values of VSL, VAP and VCL of semen samples that collected by artificial vagina were higher at the second day than first day of semen storage under 10% of egg yolk. In conclusion, there are effects

  9. Effects of sperm concentration at semen collection and storage period of frozen semen on dairy cow conception.

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    Haugan, T; Gröhn, Y T; Kommisrud, E; Ropstad, E; Reksen, O

    2007-01-01

    The present study was based on data obtained from artificial inseminations (AIs) performed with cryopreserved semen from elite bulls used in the Norwegian breeding program. Semen was diluted to standardize the number of spermatozoa to 18 million per AI dose. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the net sperm concentration at semen collection and the storage period in liquid nitrogen have any effect on probability of conception in dairy cattle. We demonstrated that the natural range of sperm concentration at semen collection within some of the bulls was associated with the probability of conception. However, no primary trend among bulls was found on the effect of sperm concentration at semen collection. This appears to be due to differences among bulls in their response to the dilution ratio of seminal plasma to extender. The effect of storage time was investigated in semen that had been stored between 1000 days and 2400 days in AI straws in liquid nitrogen at the AI center. Our findings showed that use of semen with the longest storage period, i.e. 1951-2400 days, resulted in a more than one percentage point lower probability of conception than semen with a shorter storage period. In conclusion, the net sperm concentration at semen collection, which affects the dilution ratio of seminal plasma to extender, should be considered individually among bulls to achieve optimal reproductive performance. Furthermore, this study gives support to the idea that a measurable degree of damage to the spermatozoa could occur during the preservation time in liquid nitrogen.

  10. Effects of Vitamin E Addition to Chicken Semen on Sperm Quality During in Vitro Storage of Semen

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    Saleh Tabatabaei

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the probable effects of the vitamin E addition in different levels to the extender of chicken semen on spermatozoa quality during storage of semen at 4°C for 0, 3, 6, 10 and 24 hours. Eight young Ross broiler breeder strain 308 roosters were used in this experiment. The collected semen from all roosters was mixed together and diluted with modified a Ringer’s solution. The diluted pooled semen was divided into 5 treatments (T. T1 was a control group without any vitamin E addition. For T2 to T5 groups 0.5 %, 1 %, 2 % and 3 % vitamin E (w/v, were added respectively. Treatments were evaluated for sperm motility, sperm viability and probable morphological defects after 0, 3, 6, 10 and 24 hours of incubation at 4°C. The evaluations of spermatozoa immediately after semen collection, were revealed no significant differences among values of treatment groups, whereas after incubating the treatments for different spans of time, the sperm progressive motility and viability rates for groups supplemented with vitamin E were significantly (P < 0.05 higher than that of the control group. In addition, morphological defect rates of chicken spermatozoa in the groups supplemented with different levels of vitamin E were significantly (P < 0.05 lower than that in control group. According to the results of this study we conclude that, the most excellent level of vitamin E for supplementation to the extended semen of chicken in order to improve the sperm motility and viability plus to reduce the morphological defect rates of the spermatozoa up to 24 hours storage time at 4°C is 2 % (w/v.

  11. Effects of semen storage and separation techniques on sperm DNA fragmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Robert E. Jackson; Bormann, Charles L.; Hassun, Pericles A.; Rocha, Andre M.; Motta, Eduardo L. A.; Serafini, Paulo C.; Smith, Gary D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of semen storage and separation techniques on sperm DNA fragmentation.Design: Controlled clinical study.Setting: An assisted reproductive technology laboratory.Patient(s): Thirty normoozospermic semen samples obtained from patients undergoing infertility evaluation.Intervention(s): One aliquot from each sample was immediately prepared (control) for the sperm chromatin dispersion assay (SCD). Aliquots used to assess storage techniques were treated in the foll...

  12. Effect of organic selenium on turkey semen quality during liquid storage.

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    Dimitrov, S G; Atanasov, V K; Surai, P F; Denev, S A

    2007-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of dietary organic selenium on the turkey semen during storage. Twenty males (BUT, Big 6, 40 weeks of age) were divided into control (n=10) and experimental group (n=10). The turkeys in the both groups were fed with a commercial diet containing 0.1 ppm Se in the form of sodium selenite. The experimental birds were additionally supplied with 0.3 ppm organic Se in the form Sel-Plex (Alltech, Inc.). After 30 days of feeding, the semen samples were collected twice a week for the 3 weeks of the study and diluted 1+1(v/v) with TUR-2 diluent, and stored in a water bath (+10 to 15 degrees C) for 6 h. The percentage of motile spermatozoa, the sperm viability (live/dead spermatozoa), total lipids, phospholipids and total cholesterol were assessed in fresh and stored semen. The fertilizing ability of semen was assessed by artificial insemination of 30 hens per group with dose containing 200x10(6) spermatozoa weekly. After 6 h of semen storage, the motility of spermatozoa decreased significantly in the control group (by 8.7 relative percent, P0.05) in experimental group reflecting a protective effect of dietary Se supplementation. The proportion of live spermatozoa was higher in fresh semen and significantly lower in stored semen. The positive effect of Se supplementation was observed on the lipid composition of stored semen: the concentration of the total lipids and phospholipids in the seminal plasma from control group significantly increased, while in the experimental group remained constant. Better semen integrity in the experimental group was associated with an improved fertilizing ability of spermatozoa: the fertility rate of stored spermatozoa in the control group was 88%, while in the experimental group was 90.5%.

  13. Effect of magnetized extender on sperm membrane integrity and development of oocytes in vitro fertilized with liquid storage boar semen.

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    Lee, Sang-Hee; Park, Choon-Keun

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a magnetized extender on sperm membrane damage and development of oocytes in vitro fertilized with liquid storage boar semen. Before semen dilution, extender was flowed through a neodymium magnet (0, 2000, 4000 and 6000G) for 5min and collected semen was preserved for 168h at 18°C. In results, plasma membrane integrity with live sperm was significantly higher in semen treated with extenders magnetized at 4000G than sperm treated with extenders magnetized at 0G during semen preservation for 120-168h (psperm was significantly lower in semen treated with extenders magnetized at 2000G than other groups during semen preservation for 168h. The ability of semen to achieve successful in vitro fertilization was also not significantly different among the groups during preservation. However, when the semen was preserved for 168h, the blastocyst formation rates were significantly higher at 6000G compared to 0 and 2000G (psperm membrane from damage, and improve the ability of rates of in vitro blastocyst development and magnetized semen diluter is beneficial for long liquid preservation of boar semen.

  14. Effects of He-Ne laser irradiation on the storage of turkey semen

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    S. Passarella

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance or improvement of sperm quality during storage could prevent the loss of fertilizing capacity associated with stored turkey semen. Therefore the optimization of stored turkey semen could be useful to breeder industry since the commercial production of this bird relies almost entirely on artificial insemination. Previous research have shown that He-Ne laser irradiation in mammalian sperm increased the motility (Stato, 1986, decreased the mortality, promoted the acrosome reaction, which have a pivotal role in assisted fecundating programmes as therapy for resolving infertility in domestic animals..........

  15. Studies on liquefaction and storage of ejaculated dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius) semen.

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    Wani, N A; Billah, M; Skidmore, J A

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate seminal liquefaction and quality of ejaculated camel semen during storage in different extenders at room (23 degrees C) and refrigeration (4 degrees C) temperature. Semen was collected using an artificial vagina and diluted immediately (1:1), using a split-sample technique, in five extenders [(1) Tris-tes egg yolk, (2) Tris-lactose egg yolk, (3) citrate egg yolk, (4) sucrose egg yolk and (5) Tris-fructose egg yolk], while one fraction was kept without an extender to act as control. The semen was transported to the lab at 37 degrees C, in a portable incubator within half an hour, and thereafter liquefaction of semen was monitored every 15 min. After complete liquefaction of the semen it was evaluated for sperm concentration and morphology and then was extended to a final ratio of 1:3. Aliquots of each semen sample were then stored at refrigeration and room temperature. The average volume of an ejaculate was 4.3+/-0.4 mL and it had a very viscous consistency. The average concentration of spermatozoa was 230.4+/-10.7 x 10(6)mL(-1) and the proportion of spermatozoa with protoplasmic droplets averaged 1.02+/-0.2, while 2.7+/-0.6 and 9.7+/-2.9% had mid-piece and tail abnormalities, respectively. All extended semen samples liquefied within 1.5h at 37 degrees C, however, there was slow liquefaction in the sample without an added extender (control). Best liquefaction was observed in Tris-lactose extender followed by Tris-fructose and citrate egg yolk diluents whereas in the other two extenders there was head-to-head agglutination of the spermatozoa. There was no difference in the initial motility of the spermatozoa in extenders 1-5 after its liquefaction, however, after 24 and 48 h of storage a higher proportion of spermatozoa were motile in extenders 1, 2 and 4 (Pdromedary semen, when added to an extender (1:1) immediately after collection, liquefies within 60-90 min at 37 degrees C. It maintains a high proportion of motile and

  16. Effect of catalase on the liquid storage of mithun (Bos frontalis) semen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P Peruma; JK Chamuah; C Rajkhowa

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of catalase (CAT) on sperm motility, viability, total sperm abnormality, acrosomal and plasma membrane integrity, enzymatic profiles such as aspartate amino transaminase (AST), alanine amino transaminase (ALT), biochemical profiles such as cholesterol efflux and malonaldehyde (MDA) production and antioxidant profiles such as reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Methods: Total numbers of 50 ejaculates were collected twice a week from eight mithun bulls and semen was split into four equal aliquots, diluted with the TEYC extender. Group 1: semen without additives (control), group 2 to group 4: semen was diluted with 50 U/mL, 100 U/mL and 150 U/mL of catalase, respectively. These seminal, enzymatic, biochemical and antioxidant profiles were assessed at 5 ℃ for 0, 6, 12, 24 and 30 h of incubation. Results: Inclusion of catalase into diluent resulted in significant (P < 0.05) decrease in percentages of dead spermatozoa, abnormal spermatozoa and acrosomal abnormalities at different hours of storage periods as compared with control group. Additionally, CAT at 50 and 150 U/mL were inferior to CAT 100 U/mL treatments as regards to these characteristics and CAT at 100 U/mL has significant improvement in quality of mithun semen in in- vitro stored for up to 30 h.Conclusions:It was concluded that the possible protective effects of CAT on sperm parameters are it prevent efflux of cholesterol from cell membrane, MDA production and protect the function of antioxidants during preservation.

  17. Effects of alpha-lipoic acids on sperm membrane integrity during liquid storage of boar semen

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    Laura Parlapan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary studies have shown that sperm membrane from swine shows high sensitivity to cryopreservation process, causing a dramatic reduction in sperm quality. This has been attributed to the production of reactive oxygen species, that cause lipid peroxidation in sperm membranes. The aim of the present study was to minimize the oxidative attack by adding different concentration of alpha-lipoic acid into the sperm liquid storage at 17ºC for 7 days. Freshly ejaculated boar semen was diluted with Beltsville Thawing Solution (BTS and supplemented with 5 levels of alpha-lipoic  acid (0.015, 0.02, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15 mmol/ml. The membrane integrity was evaluated at days 0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 of liquid preservation, using flow cytometer FACSCanto II (BD Biociencias systems. The experiment indicate that supplementation of alpha-lipoic  acid to the semen liquid storage extender improve sperm membrane

  18. Short-term storage of salmonids semen in a sodium alginate-based extender.

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    Merino, O; Figueroa, E; Cheuquemán, C; Valdebenito, I; Isachenko, V; Isachenko, E; Sánchez, R; Farías, J; Risopatrón, J

    2017-06-01

    Short-term storage of semen is a useful strategy for preservation of fish spermatozoa. However, there is a significantly decrease on sperm function mainly due to oxidative stress. In this way, sodium alginate plays an important role as free radical scavenger compound. Accordingly, the aim of our study was to analyse the effect of a sodium alginate-based extender on sperm function in the short-term storage of salmonids semen. Samples of Salmo salar, Oncorhynchus kisutch, and Oncorhynchus mykiss were stored in Storfish(®) (Ext-C) and Storfish(®) supplemented with sodium alginate (Ext-A) during 10 days at 4°C. After storage, motility, viability, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨmit), superoxide anion (O2(-) ) level and DNA fragmentation (DNA Frag) were assessed. Ext-A had positive effect in preservation of sperm motility, viability, ΔΨmit, O2(-) level and DNA integrity in the three species analysed compared to control samples. In Ext-A, the spermatozoa of S. salar and O. mykiss showed significantly higher motility, viability and ΔΨmit than O. kisutch. However, O. kisutch and O. mykiss had significantly lower O2(-) level than S. salar, and DNA fragmentation in O. kisutch and S. salar was significantly lower than in samples of O. mykiss (p sodium alginate-based extender is effective for protecting sperm quality during 10 days of short-term storage. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Performance of Bee Colonies Headed by Queens Instrumentally Inseminated with Semen of Drones Who Come from a Single Colony or Many Colonies

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    Gerula Dariusz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the effect of honey bee worker diversity within the colony on: development, honey productivity, and wintering. Two different levels of diversity within the colony were tested. The appropriate levels of diversity within the colony were obtained by selecting drones for inseminating the queens. Lower genetic diversity was obtained in the colonies headed by a queen inseminated with semen collected from drones originating from a single colony. Higher genetic diversity was obtained in the colonies with queens inseminated with semen from drones of 30 different colonies. Colonies with a higher genetic variation of workers in the colonies had greater levels of functional characteristics. However, apart from the number of dead bees in winter, the genetic diversity level of the workers on the colony development and honey production, did not have a significant influence. There was an averaging effect observed concerning that male component in the colonies with a higher genetic variation of workers - on honey yield, when compared to the non-additive effect of the best drones.

  20. Effect of argan oil on liquid storage of ram semen in Tris or skim milk based extenders.

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    Allai, Larbi; Druart, Xavier; Contell, Jesus; Louanjli, Noureddine; Moula, Anass Ben; Badi, Abdelmoughit; Essamadi, Abdelkhalid; Nasser, Boubker; El Amiri, Bouchra

    2015-09-01

    Due to its high antioxidant content, the argan oil could play a beneficial role in liquid storage of ram semen. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of different concentration of argan oil (ARO) on spermatologic parameters, lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation during liquid storage of ram semen until 48 h. Also effects of extenders and temperature on same parameters were assessed. For these aims, semen samples were collected from Boujaâd rams, extended with Tris egg yolk or skim milk extenders without (control) or supplemented with different concentrations of ARO (1%, 2%, 5% and 10% v/v) at a final concentration of 0.8 × 10(9) sperm/mL and stored until 48 h at 5 °C or 15 °C. The sperm quality assessments were performed at different intervals during storage (0, 8, 24 and 48 h). Sperm progressive motility started to decrease after 8h of storage in all temperatures--extenders combinations and dropped steadily during the 8-48 h interval. However, sperm viability, progressive motility and membrane integrity were markedly higher in ARO groups (especially in 1% in Tris and 5% in skim milk) until 24h and 48 h storage at both temperatures compared to controls. The argan oil also decreased the level of spontaneous and induced malondialdehyde (MDA) and the sperm DNA fragmentation until 48 h storage. In conclusion, it was determined that addition of argan oil to conventional extenders may improve the quality of ram semen during liquid storage in different temperatures.

  1. Transglutaminase-mediated semen coagulation controls sperm storage in the malaria mosquito.

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    David W Rogers

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Insect seminal fluid proteins are powerful modulators of many aspects of female physiology and behaviour including longevity, egg production, sperm storage, and remating. The crucial role of these proteins in reproduction makes them promising targets for developing tools aimed at reducing the population sizes of vectors of disease. In the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae, seminal secretions produced by the male accessory glands (MAGs are transferred to females in the form of a coagulated mass called the mating plug. The potential of seminal fluid proteins as tools for mosquito control demands that we improve our limited understanding of the composition and function of the plug. Here, we show that the plug is a key determinant of An. gambiae reproductive success. We uncover the composition of the plug and demonstrate it is formed through the cross-linking of seminal proteins mediated by a MAG-specific transglutaminase (TGase, a mechanism remarkably similar to mammalian semen coagulation. Interfering with TGase expression in males inhibits plug formation and transfer, and prevents females from storing sperm with obvious consequences for fertility. Moreover, we show that the MAG-specific TGase is restricted to the anopheline lineage, where it functions to promote sperm storage rather than as a mechanical barrier to re-insemination. Taken together, these data represent a major advance in our understanding of the factors shaping Anopheles reproductive biology.

  2. Effect of Addition of Taurine on the Liquid Storage (5°C of Mithun (Bos frontalis Semen

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    P. Perumal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to assess the effect of taurine on sperm motility, viability, total sperm abnormalities, acrosomal and plasma membrane integrity, enzymatic profiles such as reduced glutathione (GSH, glutathione peroxidase (GPX, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase (CAT, and biochemical profiles such as cholesterol efflux and malondialdehyde (MDA production. A total of 50 ejaculates were collected twice a week from 8 mithun bulls, and semen was split into 4 equal aliquots and diluted with the TEYC extender. Group 1: semen was without additives (control; groups 2 to 4: semen was diluted with 25 mM, 50 mM, and 100 mM of taurine, respectively. Seminal parameters and enzymatic and biochemical profiles were assessed at 5°C. Inclusion of taurine into diluent resulted in significant ( decreases in percentages of dead spermatozoa, abnormal spermatozoa, and acrosomal abnormalities after liquid storage compared with the control group. Additionally, taurine at 50 mM has significant improvement in quality of mithun semen than taurine at 25 or 100 mM stored in in vitro at 5°C. It was concluded that the possible protective effects of taurine on sperm parameters are from enhancing the function of antioxidant enzymes, preventing efflux of cholesterol from cell membranes and decreased MDA production.

  3. Characterization of proacrosin/acrosin system after liquid storage and cryopreservation of turkey semen (Meleagris gallopavo).

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    Słowińska, M; Liszewska, E; Dietrich, G J; Ciereszko, A

    2012-09-15

    This study was designed to identify the effect of liquid storage at 4 °C for 48 h and cryopreservation on the proacrosin/acrosin system of turkey spermatozoa. Anti-acrosin I antibodies were produced and used to demonstrate Western blot analysis profile of the proacrosin/acrosin system of sperm and seminal plasma and possible changes in the proacrosin/acrosin system of turkey sperm stored for 2.5, 24, and 48 h or cryopreserved. At the same time acrosin-like activity was examined by the measurement of amidase activity of sperm extracts, sperm suspension, and seminal plasma of turkey semen. A computer-assisted sperm analysis system was used to monitor the sperm motility characteristics of turkey sperm stored for 48 h or cryopreserved. Different profiles of the sperm proacrosin/acrosin system were observed regarding the presence or absence of inhibitors (p-nitrophenyl-p'-guanidine benzoate [NPGB] and Kazal family inhibitor) during the extraction process. When NPGB was present three main bands were observed with the molecular weight ranging from 66 to 35 kDa. Bands corresponding to acrosin I and II were not observed. In sperm extract without NPGB, three or four bands were observed with the molecular weight ranging from 41 to 30 kDa. The bands corresponding to acrosin I and II were observed. During liquid storage a decrease in sperm motility and an increase in sperm-extracted amidase activity were observed. After 24 and 48 h of storage, extracted amidase activity was higher than at 2.5 h by 24% and 31%, respectively. However, no changes in the Western blot analysis profiles of sperm extract and seminal plasma were visible during liquid storage. After cryopreservation a decrease in sperm motility and all sperm motility parameters were observed. In contrast to liquid storage, cryopreservation did not increase extracted amidase activity. However, changes in Western blot analysis profiles were visible in sperm extract and seminal plasma after cryopreservation. After

  4. Preservability of rabbit semen after chilled storage in tris based extender enriched with different concentrations of Propolis ethanolic extract (PEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam El-Sayed El-Seadawy

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To maintain semen quality of male rabbits during chilled storage by enrichment the tris based diluent with different concentrations of propolis ethanolic extracts. Methods: Total phenolic and total flavonoid contents, as well as antioxidant activity was determined in propolis ethanolic extract (PEE. The extract was analysed by HPLC for separation and identification of target metabolites. Semen was collected from 10 rabbit bucks, pooled, then divided into five aliquots (each of 500 µL and diluted each in 5 mL Tris-citric acid-glucose-egg yolk extender (TCGY. The 1st aliquot served as control while PEE was added at concentration of 0.8, 1.2, 1.6 and 2.0 mg/5 mL tris extender in the aliquot 2, 3, 4 and 5 respectively. Diluted semen samples were subjected to cooling at 4 ℃ for 72 h. Sperm motility, sperm viability, sperm abnormality, sperm membrane integrity and acrosome integrity were evaluated in chilled semen allover the chilling period. Results: The resluts revealed presence of a considerable amount of total phenolic compounds (98.67 mg GAE/g extract and total flavonoids (70.16 mg CE/g extract which were parallel to an antioxidant activity assessed as ABTS, DPPH and FRAP (198.65, 180.18 and 306.17 mM TE/g extract respectively. The dominant phenolic acid was chlorogenic acids (3.959 mg/g extract. Other compounds were found in less amounts rosmarinic acid (3.959 mg/g extract, myrcetin (1.946 mg/g extract, kaempferol (1.089 mg/g extract and apeginin-7 glucoside (1.113 mg/g extract. Obtained results clearly demonstrated that the addition of (1.2-1.6 mg PEE in the chilled extended rabbit semen proved to be beneficial for maintaining semen characteristics compared to control and the addition of 0.8 and 2 mg PEE. Conclusions: The enrichment of rabbit semen tris basic extender with (1.2-1.6 mg PEE/5 mL tris-extender (as the best and safe concentrations maintain the sperm characteristics in good condition all over 72 h of chilling.

  5. Effect of Air Space in Storage Vials on Motility of Spermatozoa in Chilled Buck Semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Paul K and Lali F Anand 1

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to find out the effect of air space on the top of glass vial in which semen is stored, on the motility of spermatozoa. 45 samples collected from two bucks over a span of 6 months were used for experiment. Goat milk extender was the diluent used. Two ml each of diluted semen after noting their initial motility was stored in 2 ml and 5 ml vials. Samples were stored at 5°C and motility of spermatozoa noted at 24 and 48 hours. Semen without air space was found to preserve the motility better than semen with air space on 24 and 48 hours of incubation. This could be better attributed to reactive oxygen species production by the spermatozoa, but further investigation is needed in this aspect to confirm it. [Veterinary World 2010; 3(9.000: 421-423

  6. Effect of Addition of Melatonin on the Liquid Storage (5°C of Mithun (Bos frontalis Semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Perumal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to assess the effect of melatonin (MT on sperm motility, viability, total sperm abnormality, acrosomal and plasma membrane integrity, DNA abnormality, antioxidant profiles such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione (GSH and total antioxidant capacity (TAC, enzymatic profiles such as aspartate amino transaminase (AST, alanine amino transaminase (ALT, and biochemical profiles such as malonaldehyde (MDA production and cholesterol efflux. Total numbers of 30 ejaculates were collected twice a week from eight mithun bulls and semen was split into five equal aliquots, diluted with the TEYC extender. Group 1 has semen without additives (control and group 2 to group 5 have semen that was diluted with 1 mM, 2 mM, 3 mM, and 4 mM of melatonin, respectively. These seminal parameters, antioxidant, enzymatic, and biochemical profiles were assessed at 5°C for 0, 6, 12, 24, and 30 h of incubation. Inclusion of melatonin into diluent resulted in significant (P<0.05 decrease in percentages of dead spermatozoa, abnormal spermatozoa, and acrosomal abnormalities at different hours of storage periods as compared with control group. Additionally, melatonin at 3 mM has significant improvement in quality of mithun semen than melatonin at 1 mM, 2 mM or 4 mM stored in in vitro for up to 30 h. It was concluded that the possible protective effects of melatonin on sperm parameters are it prevents MDA production and preserve the antioxidants and intracellular enzymes during preservation.

  7. Effects of long term storage of semen in liquid nitrogen on the viability, motility and abnormality of frozen thawed Frisian Holstein bull spermatozoa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdul MALIK; Muhammad LAILY; Muhammad Irwan ZAKIR

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate effects of long term storage of semen in liquid nitrogen on the motility, concentration, viability, and abnormality of frozen-thawed. Methods: A total of four Friesian Holstein bulls were used for this study. One hundred forty semen straws with produced during period from 2008 to 2013 and stored in the liquid nitrogen at the AI center were used in the research. The sample straw was divided into six groups;each group consist 20 semen straws. For group one all straw semen was produced on the 2013 with storage in liquid nitrogen as long as one year, the group 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 were produced on the 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009 and 2008 with storage in liquid nitrogen as long as 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 year, respectively. Results:The viability of thawed sperm was not significantly different decreased (P>0.05) between storage on the 1 year and storage on the 2 years. Whereas, the viability was significantly different (P0.05) on the storage 1, 2 and 3 years. Whereas, the motility was significantly different (P0.05) on the storage 1, 2 and 3 years. Whereas, the abnormality was significantly increased (P0.05) during storage in liquid nitrogen as long as six years. Conclusions:Based on the results in these experiments, it may be concluded that concentration sperm during one year storage in liquid nitrogen resulted in similar concentration storage as long as six years. However, the viability and motility sperm thawed storage in liquid nitrogen during six years was lower than storage on the 1 and 2 years.

  8. USE OF ALTERNATIVE EXTENDERS AND TEMPERATURES IN LONG TERM STORAGE OF BOAR SEMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Raquel Santos Araújo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of appropriate extenders is important for the success of an artificial insemination program. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of alternative extenders for swine semen at different temperatures (17 to 10 °C. The following extenders were used: Beltsville Thawing Solution (BTS, powdered coconut water (ACP-103®, and skimmed milk powder (LPD. The 50 ejaculates were analyzed daily, in natura and after dilution, during the 5-day period of semen preservation  (D0 to D4, regarding spermatic vigor and motility. Acrosome integrity and sperm viability were evaluated on D0 and D4. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney, Students, Tukey and chi-square tests (p<0.05. The LPD extender at 10 °C presented higher motility and sperm vigor compared to BTS and ACP until D2, and to treatments stored at 17 °C. Acrosome vitality and integrity remained higher (p<0.001 with LPD at 10 °C on D0 and D4. LPD showed to be a good extender for the swine semen at lower temperature (10 °C. Furthermore, it provided better protection to sperm cells, by allowing greater integrity and vitality of the acrosome. Keywords: coconut water; conservation; skimmed milk; semen boar.

  9. Influence of Selected Extenders for Liquid Storage at 4 degrees C of Breeding Chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) Semen on Sperm DNA Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedbała, Piotr; Szeleszczuk, Olga; Kuchta-Gładysz, Marta; Joneczek, Maria; Dobrzyńska, Małgorzata; Maj, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    The influence of two commercial and two laboratory oriented extenders on survival rate and DNA integrity of chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) sperm was determined during liquid storage. Semen was collected using an electroejaculator from 6 adult male chinchillas. Ejaculates (n = 16) were diluted with extenders to obtain a concentration of 40 x 10 (3) sperm/5 μl. After dilution the semen samples were stored at 4"C. The percent motility, progressive motility, and morphology were assessed conventionally, whereas DNA integrity was evaluated by Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (comet) assay at 0 (just after dilution), 24, 48 and 72 h. Conventional assessment of sperm quality showed that commercial extenders are characterized by the lowest sperm survival parameters out of the investigated extenders. In commercial extenders spermatozoa lost their capacity for progressive motility compared to laboratory extenders. After 24 h storage, from 21.67% to 30% of motile sperms were observed in commercial extender whereas total sperm motility was 63.33% (41.67% with progressive motility) in samples in which stallion semen extender was used. After 72 h storage, 10% of sperm were motile in stallion semen extender while no sperm movement was observed in tubes containing the commercial extender. Furthermore, a lower percentage of damaged spermatozoa in laboratory oriented extenders was demonstrated. It was also stated that along with the extended time of semen storage at 4 degrees C, commercial extenders lost their protective action. An analysis of DNA content in the heads of sperm cells and tail moment (TM) showed that the most useful extender for liquid preservation of chinchilla semen was the extender for stallions.

  10. Effects of storage in different semen extenders on the pre-freezing and post-thawing quality of boar spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekońska, A; Zasiadczyk, Ł; Lecewicz, M; Strzeżek, R; Koziorowska-Gilun, M; Fraser, L; Mogielnicka-Brzozowska, M; Kordan, W

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of storage of semen in different commercial extenders on the pre-freezing and post-thawing quality of boar spermatozoa. Semen was diluted in BTS, Androhep (AH) and Gedil (GD), stored for 24 h at 17°C, and then frozen in accordance with the cryopreservation protocol. Analyses of the quality of spermatozoa included: motility, normal apical ridge (NAR) acrosome, plasma membrane integrity (PMI), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), measurements of ATP content and activity of superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Prior to the freezing process, no significant effect of the extender on the sperm quality parameters was noted. After thawing the spermatozoa it was demonstrated that the type of extender used influenced PMI, MMP, ATP content and activity of GPx. In the AH extender the percentage of spermatozoa with PMI and ATP content in spermatozoa was significantly higher (Pboar spermatozoa stored for 24 hours in liquid state can be used. However, the type of extender used prior to freezing may have a significant effect on the post-thawing quality of the spermatozoa. The AH extender better secured the quality of thawed boar spermatozoa as compared with the BTS or GD.

  11. Inter- and intra-breed comparative study of sperm motility and viability in Iberian and Duroc boar semen during long-term storage in MR-A and XCell extenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Hidalgo, D; Barón, F J; Robina, A; Bragado, M J; Llera, A Hurtado de; García-Marín, L J; Gil, M C

    2013-06-01

    During boar semen liquid preservation, extender is one of the factors that influence storage tolerance of spermatozoa. However, there are few studies about intra-breed variation in the preservation of semen quality during storage in different extenders. Similarly, boar breed is generally not considered a possible factor influencing variation in the semen storage tolerance in a particular extender. The aim of this study was to compare boar semen storage potential, in terms of the ability to maintain sperm viability and motility, of two currently used long-term extenders, MR-A and XCell. Extended semen from two breeds, Iberian and Duroc that had been stored at 17°C for up to 7 days was used. Intra- and inter-breed effect was studied. On Days 1, 4 and 7 (Day 0=day of semen collection), motility parameters and the percentage of total motile sperm and progressively motile sperm using a CASA system was evaluated. Viability (SYBR-14/PI) was evaluated by flow cytometry. Within each breed and for each storage day, there were differences between extenders, although semen tolerance to preservation was more influenced by the extender in the Iberian than in the Duroc breed. Neither breed nor extender influenced the percentage of viable spermatozoa during the storage time. Moreover, differences in motility parameters were observed between breeds, although the differences were greater when the XCell extender was used. In conclusion, both extender and breed influence motility characteristics of liquid-stored boar semen, so both aspects have to be considered in the design of comparative studies about stored boar semen quality from different breeds or with different extenders. Further studies are needed to corroborate these findings.

  12. Effect of seasons on semen production, effect of melatonin on the liquid storage (5℃) with correlated study of birth rate in mithun (Bos frontalis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P Perumal; JK Chamuah; AK Nahak; C Rajkhowa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of melatonin (MT) at different seasons of the year on sperm motility, viability, total sperm abnormality, acrosomal membrane, plasma membrane and nuclear integrity, antioxidant profiles such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC), enzymatic profiles such as aspartate amino transaminase (AST), alanine amino transaminase (ALT) and biochemical profiles such as malondialdehyde (MDA) production. Methods: Total numbers of 80 ejaculates (20 ejaculates in each season) were collected twice a week from mithun bulls and semen was split into five equal aliquots, diluted with the tris egg yolk citrate (TEYC) extender. Group 1:semen without additives (control), group 2 to group 5:semen was diluted with 1 mM, 2 mM, 3 mM, and 4 mM of melatonin, respectively. These seminal parameters, antioxidant, enzymatic and biochemical profiles were assessed at liquid storage of mithun semen (5 ℃). Simultaneously, retrospective study was conducted on birth rate of calf at different seasons from 2002 to 2012 from farm birth register of mithun farm. Results: Inclusion of melatonin into diluent resulted in significant (P<0.05) decrease in percentages of dead spermatozoa, abnormal spermatozoa and acrosomal abnormalities at different seasons of the year as compared with control group. Additionally, spring season has highest seminal and antioxidant profiles followed by autumn and winter season, whereas lower values were observed in ejaculates collected from summer season. Similarly retrospective study revealed that highest birth rate was in winter followed by autumn, spring and summer season and breeding was occurred in spring, winter, summer and autumn season, respectively with gestation period of 270- 290 days. Conclusions:The result of present study indicates that the melatonin protects seminal and antioxidant profiles varied in different seasons, semen quality also varied from different seasons and

  13. Effect of radurization on the storage life of pollen substitutes utilized in the feeding of honey bee (Apis mellifera L. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymas, B. (Agricultural Univ., Poznan (Poland)); Przybyl, A. (Agricultural Univ., Poznan (Poland))

    1993-01-01

    In spite of treatment under high pressure and in elevated temperature, the pollen substitutes are not free from microbial contamination, and the pasteurizing effect may be achieved through the use of gamma irradiation. In the case of feed for honey bees, the dose of 5 KGy resulted in decrease of bacterial contamination by 2-3 log cycles. The problem whether such treatment could influence the nutritive value of two protein-rich feeds for honey bees, was the scope of this work. Two protein feeds were used for the feeding studies. The feeds had the following composition: powder milk, casein, Torula fodder yeasts, extruded maize, potato pulp, maltodextrin, sunflower oil, vitamin mixture, milk acid. Besides, feed I contained blood meal and ground rape, while feed II contained fish meal and soya meal instead. On the basis of the experiment, it was found that extruded and radurized protein feeds, after one-years storage at 6 C, did not lose their nutritive value. (orig./vhe)

  14. Pollen storages in nests of bees of the genera Partamona, Scaura and Trigona (Hymenoptera, Apidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Rodrigo Rech

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Bees and angiosperms established a mutualistic relationship along the evolutionary time. The aim of this study is to contribute for the understanding of this relation analyzing pollen stored by stingless bees colonies distributed along the Rio Negro. Fourteen species of Meliponini from the genera Partamona, Scaura, and Trigona were studied with regard to the content of pollen pots. The pollen material was removed from the pollen pots, homogenized, and prepared according to the usual acetolysis technique. The overlap of the trophic niche and the grouping of species by similarity of niches was calculated. The identification revealed 78 pollen types belonging to 36 families, being 37 types attractive and 16 considered as promoters of a temporary specialization event. With the results, it was possible to indicate a list of important plants for meliponiculture in the Amazon.

  15. Changeability of sperm chromatin structure during liquid storage of ovine semen in milk-egg yolk- and soybean lecithin-based extenders and their relationships to field-fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Tarek; Lymberopoulos, Aristotelis

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this experiment was to study the effect of semen extender on sperm chromatin structure and to correlate chromatin integrity with field-fertility of preserved ram semen. Ejaculates of at least 2 × 10(9) sperm/ml and 70 % progressive motility were collected using an artificial vagina from Chios rams (n = 11, 4-6 years old), split-diluted to 1 × 10(9) sperm/ml with milk-egg yolk- and soybean lecithin (Ovixcell®)-based extenders, packaged in 0.5-ml straws and examined after 6, 24 and 48 h of storage at 5 ± 1 °C. Evaluation endpoints were computer-assisted sperm motion analysis, fluorescence-based analysis of chromatin structure by chromomycin A3 and acridine orange assays, and 65-day pregnancy rate (PR) of 34- to 36-h preserved semen after intra-cervical insemination of ewes (n = 154) in progestagen-synchronized estrus. Neither extender nor storage time had any influence on incidence of decondensed chromatin. Unlike Ovixcell® extender, deterioration of sperm motility (P egg yolk extender. Sperm motility accounted for 14.4-18.5 % of variations in chromatin integrity (P egg yolk-stored semen. Nevertheless, PR differed between rams (14.3-71.4 %; P egg yolk extender in preserving chromatin stability and motility. Chromatin defects are negatively associated with sperm fertility.

  16. Study on Effect of Storage in Ambient Temperature of Boar Semen Using Different Diluent%不同稀释液对公猪精液常温保存效果的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈玉霞; 孙克宁; 林峰; 杨婷; 高汉婷; 高腾云

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the storage effect of boar semen, three diluent formulas in ambient temperature was designed to preserve the boar semen, and the acrosome of the sperms was stained after they were preserved.The results showed that the storage time of the sperms stored by formula II was obviously different(P0.05) and all more than 95%.The storage effect of formula Ⅱ for sperms was better than that of formula I and formula Ⅲ in ambient temperature.This study provids the reference basis for the research of the storage technology in ambient temperature of boar semen and the semen diluents formula.%为提高猪精液的保存效果,设计了3种常温保存稀释液配方,并对保存后的精子进行了顶体染色,为猪精液常温保存技术及稀释液配方的研究提供参考依据.结果表明:当精子活率为50%与30%时,配方Ⅱ的精子保存时间均显著高于(P<0.05)配方Ⅰ与配方Ⅲ,且配方Ⅱ所保存精子的总存活时间也显著高于(P<0.05)配方Ⅰ与配方Ⅲ;在精液保存24h后,3种配方保存的精子顶体完整率均在95%以上,且差异不显著(P>0.05),配方Ⅱ对精子的常温保存效果要优于配方Ⅰ与配方Ⅲ.

  17. Liquid storage of equine semen : Assessing the effect of d-penicillamine on longevity of ejaculated and epididymal stallion sperm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brogan, P T; Beitsma, M; Henning, H; Gadella, B M; Stout, T A E

    2015-01-01

    Short-term storage of equine sperm at 5°C in an extender containing milk and/or egg yolk components is common practice in the equine breeding industry. Sperm motility, viability, DNA integrity and, consequently, fertilizing ability decline over time, partly due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) gener

  18. Honey bee males and queens use glandular secretions to enhance sperm viability before and after storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Den Boer, Susanne Petronella A; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan; Baer, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Internal fertilization requires live sperm to be transferred from male to female before egg fertilization. Both males and females assist the insemination process by providing sperm with glandular secretions, which have been inferred to contain subsets of proteins that maintain sperm viability. Here...... we show that in the honeybee (Apis mellifera) secretions of the male accessory glands, the major contributors towards seminal fluid, enhance sperm survival. We further demonstrate that the protein fraction of the male accessory gland secretion is indeed important for achieving the maximal effect...... on sperm survival. After sperm storage, the queens also provide sperm with secretions from spermathecal glands and we show that these secretions have a comparable positive effect on sperm viability. SDS gels show that the proteomic profiles of accessory gland secretion and spermathecal fluid secretion...

  19. A new poultry semen extender. 4. Effect of antibacterials in control of bacterial contamination in chicken semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, T J; Jacobs, L A; McDaniel, G R

    1980-02-01

    Forty antibacterials were qualitatively and quantitatively tested for controlling aerobic bacterial contamination without affecting viability of semen. Semen samples were collected aseptically, diluted 1:4 with the Beltsville poultry semen extender containing one of 40 antibiotics and held for 0, 24, 48, and 72 hr at 5 C. Semen samples were monitored at each storage interval for bacterial counts, sperm motility, sperm counts, and fertilizing capacity. Gentamicin (2.5 microgram/ml), kanamycin (31.2 microgram/ml), neomycin (62.5 microgram/ml), and tobramycin (2.5 microgram/ml) were the only antibacterials tested which controlled microbial growth without affecting sperm viability for up to 24 hr storage at 5 C. Tobramycin maintained fertility equal to that of the non-antibiotic control up to 24 hr storage. Neomycin maintained higher levels of fertility in semen stored for 48 and 72 hr than in semen of controls to all other treatments for the same storage periods and to undiluted, unstored semen. The conclusion from these studies is that the control of aerobic microbial growth in chicken semen has little influence on the maintenance of sperm viability during low temperature storage.

  20. Bee Pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It can also include some nectar and bee saliva. Pollens come from many plants, so the contents ... rash. You may hear claims that bee pollen enzymes (chemical compounds that assist in chemical reactions) provide ...

  1. A successful new approach to honeybee semen cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Jakob; May, Tanja; Kamp, Günter; Bienefeld, Kaspar

    2014-10-01

    Honeybee biodiversity is under massive threat, and improved methods for gamete cryopreservation could be a precious tool for both the in situ- and ex situ-conservation of subspecies and ecotypes. Recent cryoprotocols for drone semen have improved the viability and fertility of frozen-thawed semen by using increased diluent:semen-ratios, but there is still much room for progress. As semen cryopreserved after dilution often appeared hyperactive, we speculated that the disruption of sperm-sperm interactions during dilution and cryopreservation could reduce the fertile lifespan of the cells. We therefore developed protocols to reduce admixture, or abolish it altogether by dialyzing semen against a hypertonic solution of cryoprotectant. Additionally, we tested methods to reduce the cryoprotectant concentration after thawing. Insemination of queens with semen cryopreserved after dialysis yielded 49%, 59% and 79% female (= stemming from fertilized eggs) pupae in three separate experiments, and the numbers of sperm found in the spermathecae of the queens were significantly higher than those previously reported. Post-thaw dilution and reconcentration of semen for cryoprotectant removal reduced fertility, but sizeable proportions of female brood were still produced. Workers stemming from cryopreserved semen did not differ from bees stemming from untreated semen with regard to indicators of fluctuating asymmetry, but were slightly heavier. Cryopreservation after dialysis tended to increase the proportion of cells with DNA-nicks, as measured by the TUNEL-assay, but this increase appears small when compared to the baseline variations of this indicator. Overall, we conclude that cryoprotectant-addition through dialysis can improve the quality of cryopreserved drone semen. Testing of offspring for vitality and genetic integrity should continue.

  2. Effect of seasons on semen production, effect of melatonin on the liquid storage (5 °C with correlated study of birth rate in mithun (Bos frontalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Perumal

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: The result of present study indicates that the melatonin protects seminal and antioxidant profiles varied in different seasons, semen quality also varied from different seasons and was highest in spring and lowest in summer season. It was concluded from the present study that breeding takes place throughout year but the peak breeding season is from November to April (spring and winter season in mithun.

  3. Nosema ceranae, Fipronil and their combination compromise honey bee reproduction via changes in male physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairo, Guillaume; Biron, David G; Ben Abdelkader, Faten; Bonnet, Marc; Tchamitchian, Sylvie; Cousin, Marianne; Dussaubat, Claudia; Benoit, Boris; Kretzschmar, André; Belzunces, Luc P; Brunet, Jean-Luc

    2017-08-17

    The honey bee is threatened by biological agents and pesticides that can act in combination to induce synergistic effects on its physiology and lifespan. The synergistic effects of a parasite/pesticide combination have been demonstrated on workers and queens, but no studies have been performed on drones despite their essential contribution to colony sustainability by providing semen diversity and quality. The effects of the Nosema ceranae/fipronil combination on the life traits and physiology of mature drones were examined following exposure under semi-field conditions. The results showed that the microsporidia alone induced moderate and localized effects in the midgut, whereas fipronil alone induced moderate and generalized effects. The parasite/insecticide combination drastically affected both physiology and survival, exhibiting an important and significant generalized action that could jeopardize mating success. In terms of fertility, semen was strongly impacted regardless of stressor, suggesting that drone reproductive functions are very sensitive to stress factors. These findings suggest that drone health and fertility impairment might contribute to poorly mated queens, leading to the storage of poor quality semen and poor spermathecae diversity. Thus, the queens failures observed in recent years might result from the continuous exposure of drones to multiple environmental stressors.

  4. Effects of long term storage of semen in liquid nitrogen on the viability, motility and abnormality of frozen thawed Frisian Holstein bull spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul MALIK

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: Based on the results in these experiments, it may be concluded that concentration sperm during one year storage in liquid nitrogen resulted in similar concentration storage as long as six years. However, the viability and motility sperm thawed storage in liquid nitrogen during six years was lower than storage on the 1 and 2 years.

  5. Functional characterisation of semen in honeybee queen (A.m.ligustica S. spermatheca and efficiency of the diluted semen technique in instrumental insemination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Galli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Differences over time in the quality of semen present in the honey bee (Apis mellifera ligustica queen spermatheca werestudied. An increase in the non-vital spermatozoa was shown to be evident (P>0.05 between the 12th and 24th month.The study of semen viability demonstrated that the passage of the semen to the spermatheca is due to sperm motility.In the queen inseminated with non-viable spermatozoa, no semen was detected in the spermatheca. Queens inseminatedtwice with a Hyes solution/semen mixture (1:1 stored as many spermatozoa in their spermatheca as those inseminatedonce with the classic technique. Queen replacement, oviposition and other functional characteristics were similarto those observed in the classic insemination procedure.

  6. 不同药物配方对公猪精液常温保存效果研究%Effect of Storage in Ambient Temperature of Boar Semen Using Different Drug Formula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈玉霞; 孙克宁; 林峰; 杨婷; 高汉婷; 高腾云

    2011-01-01

    为提高猪精液的保存效果,为猪精液常温保存技术及稀释液配方的研究提供参考依据,设计了3种常温保存希释液配方,并对保存后的精子进行了顶体染色.结果表明:当精子活率为50%与30%时,配方Ⅱ的精子保存时间均显著高于配方Ⅰ与配方Ⅲ(P<0.05),且配方Ⅱ所保存精子的总存活时间也显著高于配方Ⅰ与配方Ⅲ(P<0.05).上述结果表明,配方Ⅱ对猪精液的常温保存效果要优于配方Ⅰ与配方Ⅲ.%In order to improve the storage effect of boar semen, three diluent formulas in ambient temperature was designed to preserve the boar semen, and the acrosome of the sperms was stained after they were preserved. The results showed that the storage time of the sperms stored by formula II was obviously different(P>0.05)from that of formula I and formula Ⅲ when the sperm motility rate was 50% and 30% . The overall survival time of the sperms stored by formula II was also obviously different (P< 0. 05) from that of formula I and formula Ⅲ.

  7. Bee health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lecocq, Antoine

    with a queen bee, based on their health status. Some of the methodological novelty, set-backs and preliminary results are discussed. In the fourth part, the thesis concludes by zooming out of the confines of the inner hive in order to address recent concerns regarding the potential spill-over of honey bee...

  8. Blood in the semen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... semen URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003163.htm Blood in the semen To use ... and look for signs of: Discharge from the urethra Enlarged or tender ... Saunders; 2016:chap 129. Small EJ. Prostate cancer. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  9. Medicinal and cosmetic uses of Bee's Honey - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediriweera, E R H S S; Premarathna, N Y S

    2012-04-01

    Bee's honey is one of the most valued and appreciated natural substances known to mankind since ancient times. There are many types of bee's honey mentioned in Ayurveda. Their effects differ and 'Makshika' is considered medicinally the best. According to modern scientific view, the best bee's honey is made by Apis mellifera (Family: Apidae). In Sri Lanka, the predominant honey-maker bee is Apis cerana. The aim of this survey is to emphasize the importance of bee's honey and its multitude of medicinal, cosmetic and general values. Synonyms, details of formation, constitution, properties, and method of extraction and the usages of bee's honey are gathered from text books, traditional and Ayurvedic physicians of Western and Southern provinces, villagers of 'Kalahe' in Galle district of Sri Lanka and from few search engines. Fresh bee's honey is used in treatment of eye diseases, throat infections, bronchial asthma, tuberculosis, hiccups, thirst, dizziness, fatigue, hepatitis, worm infestation, constipation, piles, eczema, healing of wounds, ulcers and used as a nutritious, easily digestible food for weak people. It promotes semen, mental health and used in cosmetic purposes. Old bee's honey is used to treat vomiting, diarrhea, rheumatoid arthritis, obesity, diabetes mellitus and in preserving meat and fruits. Highly popular in cosmetic treatment, bee's honey is used in preparing facial washes, skin moisturizers, hair conditioners and in treatment of pimples. Bee's honey could be considered as one of the finest products of nature that has a wide range of beneficial uses.

  10. Bee poison

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002847.htm Bee poison To use the sharing features on this page, ... of insect, if possible Time of the sting Poison Control Your local poison center can be reached ...

  11. Semen quality in Greenland

    OpenAIRE

    Toft, Gunnar; Pedersen, Henning Sloth; Bonde, Jens Peter; research team, INUENDO

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. To quantify semen quality in the Greenlandic population. Study design. A cross-sectional study including recently proven fertile men from four regions including nine municipalities and one settlement in Greenland. Methods. The samples were analysed for sperm cell concentrations and motility using standard methods. Results. In total 201 semen samples were collected. The median sperm cell concentration of fertile men in Greenland was 53 x106 sperm cells/ml, with a median sperm cell ...

  12. Bee health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lecocq, Antoine

    and descriptive work at the colony, smaller social group and individual levels as well as in a greater pollinator context. Its aim is to confirm and deepen our understanding of the biology and life-history of the Western honey bee, Apis mellifera. In an ever-changing landscape of flower patches and increase...... in intensive agricultural practices, the forage availability around a honey bee colony can have a strong impact on its success. In the first part of the thesis, I focus on investigating whether the immediate type of landscape around a colony is a determining factor in the productivity of that colony. Using...... of the year. The successful running of the colony is also affected by the numerous pests mentioned above. Part two of the thesis deals with what effects a microsporidian gut parasite, Nosema ceranae can have on the behaviour of groups of honey bees exposed from early-on in their adult life. The creation...

  13. Comparison of four diluents for the retriever dogs semen preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wicaksono

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The quality of chilled semen depends on the composition of diluent. The choice of the buffer, anti-cold shock and nutrition sources can be the first decision in order to choose appropriate diluents. Nowadays a lot of diluent are used for canine semen preservation such as Tris buffer and Citrate buffer. This study was aimed to observe the differences of diluent for preserving Retriever dog spermatozoa. The semen sample collected from four Retriever dogs with three times repetition. The semen was evaluated macro-and microscopically. The semen with >70% sperm motility was divided into four tubes and diluted with diluter 1 (P1, diluter: P2, P3 and P4 (modified P3. The diluted semen was divided into two tubes and each sample was stored at room and 50C temperature. The viability of chilled semen was observed every 3 hours at room temperature and 12 hours at 50C. The result showed that P2 keep the sperm viability better than the other diluents. On 50C at 24 hours storage P2 showed the highest motile and live sperm percentage (46.25 ± 0.22%; 57.11 ± 0.25%. In room temperature at 6 hours P2 showed the highest motile and live sperm percentage (40.94 ± 0.20%; 52.65 ± 0.23%. It is concluded that P2 can keep the sperm viability by 84 hours of 50C and 21 hours at room temperature.

  14. Comparação de diluentes, diluições e tempo de armazenamento do sêmen sobre fertilidade, eclodibilidade e nascimento de pintos em matrizes pesadas Comparation of diluents, dilutions and storage time of heavy broiler breeder semen on fertility, hatchability and chick production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsio Antonio Pereira de Figueiredo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi identificar o melhor diluente, a diluição e o tempo de armazenamento para sêmen de galo. Um total de 60 galos e 630 galinhas com 55 semanas de idade foi artificialmente inseminado, uma vez por semana, por seis semanas consecutivas, utilizando-se 0,05 mL de sêmen/galinha. Os tratamentos foram: T1 = sêmen diluído com diluente comercial-DC; T2 = sêmen diluído com diluente Beltsville Poultry Sêmen Extender-BPSE; T3 = sêmen diluído com solução de Lake-LAKE; e T4 = sêmen fresco puro (Testemunha. Os níveis de diluição (D foram D=0 (não-diluído, D=2 (1 parte de sêmen: 2 partes de diluente e D = 4 (1 parte de sêmen: 4 partes de diluente. O tempo de repouso (H do sêmen foi H = 0, sem repouso, H = 1, IA 1 hora após a coleta e H=24, IA 24 horas após a coleta (conservado em refrigerador entre 2 e 5°C. Os ovos foram avaliados por ovoscopia e ao nascer com quebra de ovos não-eclodidos. O sêmen puro, não-diluído e sem repouso, produziu os melhores resultados para fertilidade e nascimento, 87,2 e 79,5%, respectivamente. As médias de fertilidade e nascimento de pintos para sêmen diluído na proporção 1:2, com 2 horas de repouso, foram 84,8 e 76,3; 81,7 e 73,6; e 76,0 e 65,9%, respectivamente, para os diluentes LAKE, DC e BPSE. Quando se usou sêmen diluído, a diluição 1:2 produziu melhor resultado que 1:4. O período de repouso do sêmen, após a diluição, deve ser o menor possível. O diluente de Lake apresentou os melhores resultados entre os diluientes, equiparando-se ao uso de sêmen puro não-diluído e inseminado logo após a coleta.The objective of this work was to identify the best semen extender, the dilution rate and the storage time for rooster semen. A total of 60 roosters and 630 hens with 55 weeks of age were artificially inseminated, once a week, by six consecutive weeks, using .05 mL of semen/hen. The treatments were: T1=semen diluted with commercial extender-DC; T2 =semen diluted

  15. Research Development on Cryopreservation Technique to Preserve Avian Semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatan Kostaman

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cryopreservation technique could be used to preserve animal cell, plant or other genetic materials (included semen in frozen. In this case, the cryopreservation technique is a storage technique that carries out at very low temperature in liquid nitrogen at -196oC. At this temperature, semen does not experience the process of metabolism but still has the ability to live on when used later. Semen that is preserved by cryopreservation technique has unlimited shelf life. This method is more efficient in terms of cost, time, space, and labour than other methods. Cryopreservation techniques can be divided into conventional technique (controlled slow freezing and rapid freezing technique. Besides cryopreservation of semen, other genetic material from avian that can be cryopreservesed is Primodial Germ Cells (PGC. Balitnak has succesfully isolated the PGC of some Indonesian native chickens. The success of cryopreservation is indicated by not only the high rate of survival, but also the fertility after cryopreservation.

  16. SEMEN QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF NEW ZEALAND WHITE RABBIT BUCKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyna Błaszczyk

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Rabbits have been extensively used as a model for large animals and humans. All the reproduction techniques employed with farm animals can be performed with the low-cost rabbit model, and certain placental membrane characteristics make them especially relevant for studies of human teratology. The purpose of this study was to assess semen quality of New Zealand White rabbits. The material represents semen samples collected from adult rabbits (n=30. The semen was obtained by means of artificial vagina. All samples were analyzed using CASA Sperm VisionTM system. To assessed spermatozoa morphology (the length and the width of head and tail; presence of abnormal spermatozoa we used QuickPhoto Micro system. Received data were statistically analyzed. Our research showed decrease of semen parameters value after one hour storage in 37°C. Correlation analysis showed negative correlation between presence of spermatozoa with separated flagellum and CASA parameters value e.g. motility, progressive motility, DAP, DCL, DSL, VAP, VCL, VSL, ALH and BCF. From among 3000 analyzed spermatozoa 14.2% posed abnormal forms. We observed negative influence of semen storage on its quality. Also negative correlations between all types of tail defect and motility of spermatozoa were detectedRabbits have been extensively used as a model for large animals and humans. All the reproduction techniques employed with farm animals can be performed with the low-cost rabbit model, and certain placental membrane characteristics make them especially relevant for studies of human teratology. The purpose of this study was to assess semen quality of New Zealand White rabbits. The material represents semen samples collected from adult rabbits (n=30. The semen was obtained by means of artificial vagina. All samples were analyzed using CASA Sperm VisionTM system. To assessed spermatozoa morphology (the length and the width of head and tail; presence of abnormal spermatozoa we used Quick

  17. Modeling Honey Bee Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Torres

    Full Text Available Eusocial honey bee populations (Apis mellifera employ an age stratification organization of egg, larvae, pupae, hive bees and foraging bees. Understanding the recent decline in honey bee colonies hinges on understanding the factors that impact each of these different age castes. We first perform an analysis of steady state bee populations given mortality rates within each bee caste and find that the honey bee colony is highly susceptible to hive and pupae mortality rates. Subsequently, we study transient bee population dynamics by building upon the modeling foundation established by Schmickl and Crailsheim and Khoury et al. Our transient model based on differential equations accounts for the effects of pheromones in slowing the maturation of hive bees to foraging bees, the increased mortality of larvae in the absence of sufficient hive bees, and the effects of food scarcity. We also conduct sensitivity studies and show the effects of parameter variations on the colony population.

  18. Modeling Honey Bee Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, David J.; Ricoy, Ulises M.; Roybal, Shanae

    2015-01-01

    Eusocial honey bee populations (Apis mellifera) employ an age stratification organization of egg, larvae, pupae, hive bees and foraging bees. Understanding the recent decline in honey bee colonies hinges on understanding the factors that impact each of these different age castes. We first perform an analysis of steady state bee populations given mortality rates within each bee caste and find that the honey bee colony is highly susceptible to hive and pupae mortality rates. Subsequently, we study transient bee population dynamics by building upon the modeling foundation established by Schmickl and Crailsheim and Khoury et al. Our transient model based on differential equations accounts for the effects of pheromones in slowing the maturation of hive bees to foraging bees, the increased mortality of larvae in the absence of sufficient hive bees, and the effects of food scarcity. We also conduct sensitivity studies and show the effects of parameter variations on the colony population. PMID:26148010

  19. The equine frozen semen industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, P R

    2001-12-03

    Recent acceptance of frozen semen as a method to produce registered foals by two of the worlds largest breed associations, the American Quarter Horse and American Paint Horse, has stimulated new interest in frozen semen technology. This review will: (a) attempt to identify the major impediments to the development of the frozen semen industry, (b) suggest alternative methods for marketing and application of frozen semen, and (c) present the results of a recent study in our laboratory. The objective of which was to compare pregnancy rates of insemination with cooled and frozen semen. Major impediments to the development of the frozen semen industry include 1. Lower fertility with frozen semen as compared to cooled semen for many stallions. 2. Increased costs associated with management of mares for AI with frozen semen using current insemination protocols. 3. Unfavorable marketing practices for frozen semen. Reports of fertility with cooled transported semen in commercial breeding programs indicate seasonal pregnancy rates ranging from 60 to 90%. We compiled data from three commercial transported cooled semen programs in which semen from 16 stallions was used for insemination of 850 mares throughout North America by local veterinarians. During the 1999 and 2000 breeding seasons, first cycle and seasonal pregnancy rates of 59.4 and 74.7% were obtained. During that same period, first cycle and seasonal pregnancy rates of 51.3 and 75.6% were obtained following insemination of 876 mares with frozen semen from 106 different stallions processed by our laboratory and distributed through our commercial distribution program. First cycle and seasonal pregnancy rates were higher for mares bred outside of North America than for mares bred within North America (53.5 and 81.9 versus 49.4 and 65.6%, respectively). Seasonal pregnancy rates were higher presumably because of the better mare management employed for mares bred with exported semen and the fact that some of the domestic

  20. [Antimutagenic substances in the Armeniacae semen and Persicae semen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K; Osaki, Y; Kato, T; Miyazaki, T

    1992-12-01

    Using the Ames/Salmonella/microsome assay, we examined the antimutagenic effect of the hexane extract of Armeniacae semen (apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) seed), Persicae semen (peach (P. persica Bat.) seed), and seeds of cherry (P. avium L.), plum (P. salicina Lindle) and almond (P. dulcis Mill). Hexane extracts of Armeniacae semen and Persicae semen inhibited the mutagenicity of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), but those of seeds of cherry, plum and almond did not. The mutagenicities of 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-1) and 2-(2-furyl)-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl)acrylamide (AF-2) were also inhibited by the extracts of Armeniacae semen and Persicae semen. Inhibitory substances in Persicae semen were fractionated by silica gel column chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography, and were identified as oleic acid and linoleic acid. The contents of oleic acid and linoleic acid were 0.7 and 0.4% in the hexane extract of Armeniacae semen, and 1.5 and 0.5% in that of Persicae semen, respectively.

  1. Bee-Wild about Pollinators!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bonnie; Kil, Jenny; Evans, Elaine; Koomen, Michele Hollingsworth

    2014-01-01

    With their sunny stripes and fuzzy bodies, bees are beloved--but unfortunately, they are in trouble. Bee decline, of both wild bees as well as managed bees like honey bees, has been in the news for the last several years. Habitat loss, diseases, pests, and pesticides have made it difficult for bees to survive in many parts of our world (Walsh…

  2. Environmental factors and semen quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurewicz, Joanna; Hanke, Wojciech; Radwan, Michal

    2009-01-01

    , trihalomethanes (THMs), mobile phones) on semen quality, by reviewing most recent published literature. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Epidemiological studies focusing on exposure to environmental factors and semen quality for the last ten years were identified by a search of the Pubmed, Medline, Ebsco, Agricola...

  3. Acute bee paralysis virus [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Acute bee paralysis virus [gbvrl]: 14 CDS's (15780 codons) fields: [triplet] [frequ...osomal protein / MAP kinase List of codon usage for each CDS (format) Homepage Acute bee paralysis virus ...

  4. Advances in Boar Semen Cryopreservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heriberto Rodriguez-Martinez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper highlights aspects of the cryopreservation of boar semen, a species with particular large, fractionated ejaculates, and a cumbersome cryotechnology that had prevented its commercial application. With the dramatic increase of use of liquid pig semen for artificial breeding over the past decade, developments on cryopreservation alongside the routine use of stud boar semen for AI had been promoted. Recent advances in our laboratory, accommodating the best use of portions of the sperm-rich fraction of the ejaculate for cryopreservation of the sperm-peak portion (P1 and parallel use of the rest of the collected ejaculated spermatozoa, appears as a suitable commercial alternative.

  5. Pheromonal regulation of starvation resistance in honey bee workers ( Apis mellifera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Patrick; Grozinger, Christina M.

    2008-08-01

    Most animals can modulate nutrient storage pathways according to changing environmental conditions, but in honey bees nutrient storage is also modulated according to changing behavioral tasks within a colony. Specifically, bees involved in brood care (nurses) have higher lipid stores in their abdominal fat bodies than forager bees. Pheromone communication plays an important role in regulating honey bee behavior and physiology. In particular, queen mandibular pheromone (QMP) slows the transition from nursing to foraging. We tested the effects of QMP exposure on starvation resistance, lipid storage, and gene expression in the fat bodies of worker bees. We found that indeed QMP-treated bees survived much longer compared to control bees when starved and also had higher lipid levels. Expression of vitellogenin RNA, which encodes a yolk protein that is found at higher levels in nurses than foragers, was also higher in the fat bodies of QMP-treated bees. No differences were observed in expression of genes involved in insulin signaling pathways, which are associated with nutrient storage and metabolism in a variety of species; thus, other mechanisms may be involved in increasing the lipid stores. These studies demonstrate that pheromone exposure can modify nutrient storage pathways and fat body gene expression in honey bees and suggest that chemical communication and social interactions play an important role in altering metabolic pathways.

  6. Avian artificial insemination and semen preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.; Risser, Arthur C.; Todd, Frank S.

    1983-01-01

    Summary: Artificial insemination is a practical propagation tool that has been successful with a variety of birds. Cooperative, massage, and electroejaculation and modifications of these three basic methods of semen collection are described for a variety of birds. Semen color and consistency and sperm number, moti!ity, and morphology, as discussed, are useful indicators of semen quality, but the most reliable test of semen quality is the production of fertile eggs. Successful cryogenic preservation of avian semen with DMSO or glycerol as the cryoprotectant has been possible. Although the methods for preservation require special equipment, use of frozen semen requires only simple insemination supplies

  7. Viability and fertility of cooled equine semen diluted with skimmed milk or glycine egg yolk-based extenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Pugliesi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Two semen extenders were compared for their ability to maintain viability of horse semen during 24 hours of cold preservation, and for the pregnancy rate after artificial insemination. In the experiment 1, five ejaculates from three stallions were split-diluted in either a skimmed milk-based extender (Kenney extender or a glycine egg yolk-based extender (Foote extender and cooled at 6-8 ºC for 24 hours. Semen samples stored in Kenney extender for 24 hours had higher motility and spermatic vigor compared with those stored in Foote extender. However, samples stored in Foote extender had higher number of reactive sperm by hypoosmotic test and greater viability by epifluorescence test compared with those in Kenney extender. In the experiment 2, 17 and 23 ejaculates from two stallions were split-diluted with Kenney extender and Foote extender. The sperm concentration in each extender was adjusted to 500 million viable sperms per insemination dose. Semen was cooled to 6-8 ºC and stored for 24 hours. Seventy-four cycles of crossbred mares were inseminated with either semen diluted in Kenney extender or semen diluted in Foote extender. The pregnancy rate was higher from semen diluted in Kenney extender than that from semen in Foote extender (0.553 vs. 0.306. The Kenney extender is effective in preserving the motility, vigor and fertility of stallion semen after 24 hours of cold storage, whereas the Foote extender is not acceptable.

  8. Partial replacement of chicken semen by turkey semen in artificial insemination of chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavora, J S; Hodgson, G C

    1976-07-01

    Chicken semen undiluted, diluted with a diluent containing fructose and/or mixed with turkey semen was used to inseminate Leghorn hens. In two of three experiments there was an improvement in fertility from insemination by mixed semen as compared to semen diluted to the same extent with the diluent.

  9. Preservation of mithun (Bos frontalis) semen at refrigeration temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, M; Dhali, A; Mech, A; Khate, K; Rajkhowa, C; Mishra, D P

    2007-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the possibility of preserving mithun (Bos frontalis) spermatozoa at refrigeration temperature using tris-egg yolk diluent. Semen samples were collected from four adult mithun bulls through rectal massage method. Good quality semen samples (n=30) were preserved at 4 degrees C using tris-egg yolk diluent for 72 h. Progressive motility, live spermatozoa count and morphological abnormalities were evaluated every 12 h until 72 h of preservation. The colour, consistency and mass activity of fresh semen samples were found to be creamy white, medium and 3+ to 4+ (5+ scale), respectively. The average (mean+/-S.E.) volume (ml), pH and spermatozoa concentration (10(6) ml(-1)) of fresh semen samples were found to be 0.6+/-0.01, 6.8+/-0.03 and 425+/-48, respectively. Progressive motility and live spermatozoa count were found to be less than 30% (Prefrigeration temperature in tris-egg yolk diluent, which can be further used for artificial insemination within 36 h of storage.

  10. Effect of prolonged freezing of semen on exosome recovery and biologic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Jennifer L; Madison, Marisa N; Margolick, Joseph B; Galvin, Shannon; Gupta, Phalguni; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Dash, Chandravanu; Okeoma, Chioma M

    2017-03-24

    Exosomes are important vehicles of intercellular communication that shape host responses to physiologic, tumorigenic, and pathogenic conditions. The composition and function of exosomes are dynamic and depends on the state and condition of the cellular source. In prior work, we found that semen exosomes (SE) from healthy donors who do not use illicit drugs potently inhibit HIV-1. Following semen donation, specimens are either used immediately or frozen for use at a later time. It has been shown that short-term freezing of semen has no effect on SE-mediated HIV-1 inhibition. However, the effect of illicit drugs and prolonged freezing on SE bioactivity is unknown. Here, we show preservation of SE physical properties, (morphology, concentration, intensity/size) irrespective of illicit drug use or duration of semen freezing. Interestingly, illicit drugs and prolonged freezing decreased the levels of SE-bound CD63/CD9 and acetylcholinesterase activity respectively. Furthermore, we show differential effects of illicit drug use and prolonged freezing on SE-mediated HIV-1 inhibition. Our results highlight the importance of the source of SE and condition of semen storage on SE content and function. In-depth evaluation of donor drug-use and duration of semen storage on SE cargo and bioactivity will advance our understanding of SE composition and function.

  11. Effect of prolonged freezing of semen on exosome recovery and biologic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Jennifer L.; Madison, Marisa N.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Galvin, Shannon; Gupta, Phalguni; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Dash, Chandravanu; Okeoma, Chioma M.

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes are important vehicles of intercellular communication that shape host responses to physiologic, tumorigenic, and pathogenic conditions. The composition and function of exosomes are dynamic and depends on the state and condition of the cellular source. In prior work, we found that semen exosomes (SE) from healthy donors who do not use illicit drugs potently inhibit HIV-1. Following semen donation, specimens are either used immediately or frozen for use at a later time. It has been shown that short-term freezing of semen has no effect on SE-mediated HIV-1 inhibition. However, the effect of illicit drugs and prolonged freezing on SE bioactivity is unknown. Here, we show preservation of SE physical properties, (morphology, concentration, intensity/size) irrespective of illicit drug use or duration of semen freezing. Interestingly, illicit drugs and prolonged freezing decreased the levels of SE-bound CD63/CD9 and acetylcholinesterase activity respectively. Furthermore, we show differential effects of illicit drug use and prolonged freezing on SE-mediated HIV-1 inhibition. Our results highlight the importance of the source of SE and condition of semen storage on SE content and function. In-depth evaluation of donor drug-use and duration of semen storage on SE cargo and bioactivity will advance our understanding of SE composition and function. PMID:28338013

  12. Implications of the pH and temperature of diluted, cooled boar semen on fresh and frozen-thawed sperm motility characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boar semen is typically collected, diluted and cooled for AI use over numerous days, or frozen immediately after shipping to capable laboratories. The storage temperature and pH of the diluted, cooled boar semen could potentially influence the fertility of boar sperm. Therefore, the purpose of thi...

  13. Effect of preputial washing on bacterial load and preservability of semen in Murrah buffalo bulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Meena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the effect of preputial washing on bacterial load, preservability and semen quality in Murrah buffalo bulls Materials and Methods: A total of 36 collections of three Murrah buffalo bulls maintained at Artificial Breeding Research Centre, ICAR-National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal, were collected at weekly intervals from each bull without preputial washing and latter ejaculates from same bull with preputial washing by infusing normal saline (0.85%, KMnO4 (0.02% and savlon (2.0% to first, second and third bull, respectively. The microbial load and semen quality were evaluated during different hours of storage at refrigerated temperature (0, 24 and 48 h and after thrawing of cryopreserved (at −196°C semen. Results: The results of preservation of semen at refrigerated temperature showed that bacterial load was markedly lower in ejaculates of bulls subjected to preputial washing. Semen preserved at refrigerator temperature and cryopreserved, the effect of washing solution was significant for individual motility (IM, non-eosiniphilic count, hypo-osmotic swelling reactivity (HOST, total plate count (TPC and acrosome integrity. KMnO4 was found to be the best in lowering bacterial load, sperm abnormalities and in improving semen quality such as motility, non-eosinophilic count, HOST and acrosome integrity even up to 48 h of preservation and cryopreserved semen. Effect of duration of preservation and stage of cryopreservation was also significant for IM, non-eosiniphilic count, HOST, sperm abnormalities and acrosome integrity. Conclusion: Overall the results suggested that preputial washing with KMnO4 solution improved the semen quality and reduced microbial load of Murrah buffalo bull’s semen preserved at refrigerated temperature and cryopreservation.

  14. Improvement of the Shami goat semen quality by adding bovine serum albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Azawi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed to improve the quality of Shami goat semen diluted with Tris diluent by adding bovine serum albumin. In the current study, six male goats were used. Semen was collected using artificial vagina of one ejaculate per week of every male included in this study. This study was performed during the breeding season from 1 \\ 10 \\ 2012 to 1 \\ 12 \\ 2012. In this study, two semen diluents were use first; Tris- fructose- egg yolk 2.5% and second Tris - fructose - 2.5% egg yolk with 1% of bovine serum albumin. Diluted semen samples were cooled gradually and stored at 5 ° C. Cooled diluted semen samples were examined every 24 h of storage to 144 h. These tests includes the proportion of live sperm and the percentage of secondary abnormalities of the sperm, the percentage of sperm acrosomal defects and percentage of progressive motility using a computer-aided sperm analysis. These results showed that the addition of bovine serum albumin with egg yolk to semen of male goats led to improved qualities of semen significantly (P<0.05 including the proportion of live sperm and the percentage of secondary abnormalities of the sperm, the percentage of sperm acrosomal defects and percentage of progressive motility. It could be concluded from the results of the current study, the possibility of storing goat semen for more than six days with alive sperm of more than 50% and the percentage of the progressive motility of more than 40% when adding bovine albumin serum to dilute goat semen at 1% level and this result has not reached by any previous study.

  15. The Type of Container and Filling Method Have Consequences on Semen Quality in Swine AI Doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulian Ibanescu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The automatic filling of semen doses for artificial insemination in swine shows economic advantages over the old-style, manual filling. However, no data could be found regarding the impact, if any, of this packing method on semen quality. This study aimed to compare two types of containers for boar semen, namely the automatically-filled tube and the manually-filled bottle, in terms of preserving the quality of boar semen. Five ejaculates from five different boars were diluted with the same extender and then divided in two aliquots. First aliquot was loaded in tubes filled by an automatic machine while the second was loaded manually in special plastic bottles. The semen was stored in liquid state at 17°C, regardless of the type of container and examined daily, for five days of storage by means of a computer-assisted sperm analyzer. Both types of containers maintained the semen within acceptable values, but after five days of storage significant differences (p<0.05 between the container types were observed in terms of all selected kinetic parameters. The tube showed better values for sperm motility and velocity, while the bottle showed superior values for straightness and linearity of sperm movement. The automatically-filled tubes offered better sperm motility in every day of the study. Given the fact that sperm motility is still the main criterion in assessing semen quality in semen production centers, the main conclusion of this study is that the automatic loading in tubes is superior and recommended over the old-style manual loading in bottles.

  16. Bee deaths need analysing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonekamp, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Alarm bells are ringing all over the world about the death of bee populations. Although it is not known exactly how severe the decline is, it is important to take the problem seriously. The signals are alarming and the bee is important, not just for natural ecosystems but also for the pollination of

  17. Semenic Mountains’ alpine skiing area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petru BANIAȘ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper presents, after a short history of alpine skiing which describes apparition, necessity, utility and universality of skiing during time, a comparative study referring to the alpine skiing domain in the Semenic Mountains area. In the paper are also presented general notions about alpine skiing methodology together with an ample description of the plateau area form Semenic Mountains, describing localization and touristic potential. Based on the SWOT analysis made for each slope, was realized a complex analysis of the entire skiing domain, an analysis which includes technical, financial, climatic and environmental aspects, along with an analysis of the marketing policy applied for the specific zone.

  18. Bumblebees and solitary bees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Casper Christian I

    Summary: The effects of farming system, flower resources and semi-natural habitats on bumblebees and solitary bees in intensively cultivated landscapes in Denmark were investigated in two sets of studies, in 2011 and 2012. The pan trap colour preferences of bumblebees and solitary bees were also...... assessed. In 2011, bumblebees and solitary bees were trapped in road verges bordering 14 organic (organic sites) and 14 conventional (conventional sites) winter wheat fields. The quantity and quality of local flower resources in the road verge and adjacent field headland were estimated as overall density...... use as a proxy at four different scales (250, 500, 750 and 1000 m). In 2012, the effect of a four-fold larger area of organic arable fields in simple, homogeneous landscapes on bumblebees and solitary bees was investigated in eight circular landscapes (radius 1000 m). Bumblebees and solitary bees were...

  19. Honey bee toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Reed M

    2015-01-01

    Insecticides are chemicals used to kill insects, so it is unsurprising that many insecticides have the potential to harm honey bees (Apis mellifera). However, bees are exposed to a great variety of other potentially toxic chemicals, including flavonoids and alkaloids that are produced by plants; mycotoxins produced by fungi; antimicrobials and acaricides that are introduced by beekeepers; and fungicides, herbicides, and other environmental contaminants. Although often regarded as uniquely sensitive to toxic compounds, honey bees are adapted to tolerate and even thrive in the presence of toxic compounds that occur naturally in their environment. The harm caused by exposure to a particular concentration of a toxic compound may depend on the level of simultaneous exposure to other compounds, pathogen levels, nutritional status, and a host of other factors. This review takes a holistic view of bee toxicology by taking into account the spectrum of xenobiotics to which bees are exposed.

  20. Boar semen bacterial contamination in Italy and antibiotic efficacy in a modified extender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Bresciani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the study were to identify microbial flora in boar semen under field conditions in northern Italy, to investigate antibiotic resistance and sensitivity of isolated bacteria, and to evaluate elimination of bacteria after storage in two types of extenders added with different antibiotics (amikacin vs gentamicin. A total of 60 boars were collected in 13 pig farms. Bacteriological and mycological investigations were performed immediately on raw semen samples, then at 48 and 120 h of storage on semen diluted randomly in a new short-term modified extender (ME-S or in a commercial one (CRONOSTM. Bacterial contamination was found in 63% of raw semen samples and different bacterial species were isolated: E.coli, Serratia marcescens, Staphylococcus epidermidis and aureus, Proteus spp., Streptococcus spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. E. coli was the most isolated contaminant (53%; Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found only in one semen sample. The analysis of variance of factors affecting contamination levels was significant for the farm of origin (P<0.05 and not significant for the breed. Antibiotic resistance of these bacteria was assessed using different antibiotics. Significant differences (P<0.05 between observed and expected frequencies of bacterial isolates resistant or not to the antibiotics contained in the extenders were found. At 48 h of storage a reduction of aerobic contamination was found after ME-S dilution by 85.3% and after CRONOSTM by 63.8%. This paper proved the presence of pathogenic bacteria in semen. We thus believe it is highly advisable to perform periodic microbiological screening of boar semen in the swine industry to avoid the use of low sperm quality.

  1. Effect of feeding a DHA-enriched nutriceutical on the quality of fresh, cooled and frozen stallion semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinsko, Steven P; Varner, Dickson D; Love, Charles C; Blanchard, Terry L; Day, Brian C; Wilson, Mark E

    2005-03-15

    Eight stallions were used in 2 x 2 crossover study to determine if feeding a nutriceutical rich in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) would improve semen quality. Stallions were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups (n = 4 per group). Stallions were fed their normal diet (control) or their normal diet top-dressed with 250 g of a DHA-enriched nutriceutical. Feeding trials lasted for 14 week, after which a 14-week washout period was allowed and the treatment groups were reversed for another 14 week feeding trial. Feeding the nutriceutical resulted in a three-fold increase in semen DHA levels and 50% increase in the ratio of DHA to DPA in semen. Sperm motion characteristics in fresh semen were unaffected by treatment. After 24 h of cooled semen storage in an Equitainer, total and progressive motility did not differ between treatment groups, but sperm from stallions fed the nutriceutical exhibited higher velocity and straighter projectory (P diet, feeding the nutriceutical resulted in improvements in mean progressive motility of sperm after 24 h (P = 0.10) and 48 h (P = 0.03) of storage. Feeding the nutriceutical resulted in similar improvements in motion characteristics being observed in frozen-thawed semen. While it appears that feeding the nutriceutical may improve the motion characteristics of cool-stored stallion semen, it may be most beneficial for stallions of marginal fertility whose sperm do not tolerate the rigors of cooling and storage. The nutriceutical also appeared to improve the freezability of semen. More dramatic improvements in semen quality may be observed if modifications in the main fat content of the diet are incorporated with the DHA supplement.

  2. Fertility results of artificial inseminations performed with liquid boar semen stored in X-cell vs BTS extender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, T; Gaustad, A H; Reksen, O; Gröhn, Y T; Hofmo, P O

    2007-02-01

    The objective of the present field study was to compare the fertility results for boar semen diluted in X-cell stored up to 4-5 days before artificial insemination (AI) with semen diluted in Beltsville thawing solution (BTS) used for AI following 2-3 days of storage (where the first day being the collection day). A total number of 2601 double inseminations in Norwegian herds were included in this two-trial study. All the boars used in the study were mature cross-bred Norwegian Landrace x Duroc (LD), which were routinely used for AI in Norway. The inseminated gilts and sows were Norwegian Landrace x Yorkshire (LY). The AI doses contained 2.5 billion spermatozoa, and consisted of a mixture of semen from three, occasionally four, boars (i.e. heterospermic semen). Fertility was measured in terms of the likelihood of farrowing and subsequent litter size. The fertility of the semen in both of the extenders was satisfactory and no significant differences were found either in semen stored 4-5 days in X-cell compared with 2-3 days in BTS or in semen stored 2-3 days in X-cell compared with 2-3 days in BTS. The storage capability findings for the long-term extender X-cell could significantly simplify the practical issues of semen production and the distribution of AI doses containing 2.5 billion spermatozoa. However, in pig production systems where all semen is used within 2-3 days, the short-term extender BTS is as good as the more expensive extender X-cell.

  3. Survival of chlamydiae in human semen prepared for artificial insemination by donor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Poul; Møller, Birger R.; Halkier-Sørensen, Lars

    1991-01-01

    Semen specimens from 21 men with urethral infection with Chlamydia trachomatis were tested for the presence of the organism before and after cryopreservation for 3 weeks of storage at -196 degrees C. Five specimens were chlamydia-positive before preservation and four of them were still positive a...

  4. Wild bees and agroecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Morandin, Lora

    2005-01-01

    Research in agriculture often focuses on development of new technologies rather than on potential environmental impacts. Pollinators, primarily bees, are essential to agriculture, providing significant yield benefit in over 66% of crop species. Currently, dramatic losses of managed honey bee pollinators in North America along with suspected world-wide losses of wild pollinators are focusing research attention on an impending but still poorly documented pollination crisis. Essential questions ...

  5. Semen Anxiety: Materiality, Agency and the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shand, Alex

    2007-12-01

    Semen is a potent cultural symbol of masculinity. The social life of semen is poorly understood because of the intensely personal nature of its being. But the Internet has opened up new avenues for people to explore sensitive issues without disclosing their identity. This paper examines a set of questions submitted anonymously for answering by a medical team over a three month period to a UK-based consumer health website. The questions are analysed for emergent themes and these are divided into three groups: those concerning the material quality of semen; semen relating to masturbation; and those that concern semen and potency. It argues that far from being a phenomenon isolated to non-western cultures, semen anxiety is present in the UK in the twenty-first century and is the expression of anxieties surrounding shifting gender roles and masculine identities.

  6. Sublethal imidacloprid effects on honey bee flower choices when foraging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Ahmed; Çakmak, Ibrahim; Hranitz, John M; Karaca, Ismail; Wells, Harrington

    2015-11-01

    Neonicotinoids, systemic neuro-active pesticides similar to nicotine, are widely used in agriculture and are being investigated for a role in honey bee colony losses. We examined one neonicotinoid pesticide, imidacloprid, for its effects on the foraging behavior of free-flying honey bees (Apis mellifera anatoliaca) visiting artificial blue and white flowers. Imidacloprid doses, ranging from 1/5 to 1/50 of the reported LD50, were fed to bees orally. The study consisted of three experimental parts performed sequentially without interruption. In Part 1, both flower colors contained a 4 μL 1 M sucrose solution reward. Part 2 offered bees 4 μL of 1.5 M sucrose solution in blue flowers and a 4 μL 0.5 M sucrose solution reward in white flowers. In Part 3 we reversed the sugar solution rewards, while keeping the flower color consistent. Each experiment began 30 min after administration of the pesticide. We recorded the percentage of experimental bees that returned to forage after treatment. We also recorded the visitation rate, number of flowers visited, and floral reward choices of the bees that foraged after treatment. The forager return rate declined linearly with increasing imidacloprid dose. The number of foraging trips by returning bees was also affected adversely. However, flower fidelity was not affected by imidacloprid dose. Foragers visited both blue and white flowers extensively in Part 1, and showed greater fidelity for the flower color offering the higher sugar solution reward in Parts 2 and 3. Although larger samples sizes are needed, our study suggests that imidacloprid may not affect the ability to select the higher nectar reward when rewards were reversed. We observed acute, mild effects on foraging by honey bees, so mild that storage of imidacloprid tainted-honey is very plausible and likely to be found in honey bee colonies.

  7. Performance of two honey bee subspecies during harsh weather and Acacia gerrardii nectar-rich flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awad Mohamed Awad

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Both climatic factors and bee forage characteristics affect the population size and productivity of honey bee colonies. To our knowledge, no scientific investigation has as yet considered the potential effect of nectar-rich bee forage exposed to drastic subtropical weather conditions on the performance of honey bee colonies. This study investigated the performance of the honey bee subspecies Apis mellifera jemenitica Ruttner (Yemeni and Apis mellifera carnica Pollmann (Carniolan in weather that was hot and dry and in an environment of nectar-rich flora. The brood production, food storage, bee population and honey yield of Yemeni (native and Carniolan (imported colonies on Talh trees (Acacia gerrardii Benth., a nectar-rich, subtropical, and summer bee forage source in Central Arabia were evaluated. Owing to their structural and behavioral adaptations, the Yemeni bees constructed stronger (high population size colonies than the Carniolan bees. Although both groups yielded similar amounts of Talh honey, the Yemeni bees consumed their stored honey rapidly if not timely harvested. A. m. jemenitica has a higher performance than A. m. carnica during extremely hot-dry conditions and A. gerrardii nectar-rich flow.

  8. Fertilidad y supervivencia del semen canino criopreservado

    OpenAIRE

    Stornelli, María Alejandra; Sota, Rodolfo Luzbel de la

    2006-01-01

    En la presente revisión se tratan los procedimientos de evaluación seminal, los aspectos más importantes de la criopreservación de semen en el perro y el alcance de la valoración in vitro de la calidad de semen al descongelado. Se realiza también la evaluación de los alcances de la inseminación artificial con semen criopreservado en esta especie.

  9. Semen Allergy Manifesting As Chronic Pruritus Vulva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithran K

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A young woman of 24 with personal and family history of atopy development pruritus vulva each time after sexual intercourse with her husband. History of urticaria of sites of contact with semen on her thighs gave suspicion of contact urticaria. Positive wheal and flare response to pin prick test with semen, excellent therapeutic response to topical steroid and oral Cetirizine and non- recurrence of the problem after using condom by her husband confirmed the diagnosis of semen allergy.

  10. Criopreservação de sêmen humano: comparação entre métodos de congelação e tipos de envase Cryopreservation of human semen: comparison between methods of freezing and types of storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Borges Cavalcante

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: comparar duas diferentes técnicas de congelação e dois tipos de envase do sêmen humano durante processo de criopreservação. MÉTODOS: estudo experimental, no qual foi analisada a criopreservação de 18 amostras de sêmen de 18 voluntários. Após a adição de meio crioprotetor, "Test-yolk buffer" , as amostras de sêmen foram envasadas em palhetas com capacidade de 0,25 mL ou em criotubos de 2 mL e submetidas à criopreservação por dois métodos, um lento e outro rápido, totalizando quatro tratamentos distintos: RP (congelação pelo método rápido e envasado em palheta, RT (rápido-criotubo, LP (lento-palheta e LT (lento-criotubo. As amostras, após 24 horas, foram descongeladas em temperatura ambiente e mantidas a 37ºC. Os dados coletados foram analisados através do teste t de Student, com pPURPOSE: to compare two different methods of freezing and two types of human semen storage during cryopreservation process. METHODS: experimental research in which the cryopreservation of 18 semen samples from 18 volunteers was studied. Following the addition of the cryoprotectant medium, Test-yolk buffer, the semen samples were packaged into 0.25 mL straws or into 2 mL cryotubes and submitted to cryopreservation by slow or rapid methods, in four different treatments: RS (cryopreservation by rapid method and packaged in straws, RT (rapid-cryotubes, SS (slow-straws, and ST (slow-cryotubes. Samples were thawed after 24 hand then maintained at 37ºC. Data collected were analyzed by the Student t-test, with p<0.05, using the SPSS computer program for Windows®, version 11.0.0. RESULTS: the motility of spermatozoa decreased after the cryopreservation process. The initial motility rate was 58.1% and motilities after the different methods of cryopreservation were 19.2% (RS, 27% (RT, 21.1% (SS and 30.3% (ST. There was a significant decrease of the normal morphology. The initial normal morphology was 14.2% and morphologies after the

  11. Semen parameters in polyzoospermic men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sh. Khayat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyzoospermia is extremely high (above 250 mln/ml sperm concentration with normal volume of ejaculate. In the laboratory of genetic disorders of reproduction of Research Centre for Medical Genetics in 2007–2012 years we analyzed more than 14 000 semen samples from infertile men and men with reproductive disorders in order to study the distribution and characteristics of spermatogenesis in polyzoospermic men. Only polyzoospermic men semen analysis results were interpretered in present article. Polyzoospermia (sperm count over 250 mln/ml in volume over 1,5 ml was detected in 191 semen samples (1.3 %. At the same time 15 % of the samples with polyzoospermia were normozoospermic. Among 85 % of the sperm pathology samples asthenozoospermia occured most frequently (77 %, astenoteratozoospermia was detected in 8 % of cases with polyzoospermia. The average proportion of vitality was 90.09 ± 10.02 %, normal morphology – 14.93 ± 8.51 %, and progressive motility – 17.72 ± 11.81 %. The average concentration of spermatozoa in the ejaculate in the examined samples was 313.29 ± 64.78 mln/ml. More than half of the tested samples with polyzoospermia had a concentration 250–300 mln/ml. Concentration of 450 mln/ml and more detected in 3 % of samples. The maximum total number of spermatozoa in the ejaculate in our study was more than 2 billion sperm cells and was observed in two polyzoospermic men. One of these patients had the maximum concentration (615 mln/ml also. We found a high correlation (r = 0.89; p < 0.01 between the volume of ejaculate and the total number of spermatozoa. Immature germ cells from ejaculate were estimated in 7 patients. There was a partial spermatogenesis arrest at meiosis I prophase in 5 out 7 of the examined semen samples. 

  12. Stakeholder Conference on Bee Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    USDA and EPA released a comprehensive scientific report on honey bee health in May 2013. The report points to multiple factors playing a role in honey bee colony declines, including parasites and disease, genetics, poor nutrition, and pesticide exposure.

  13. Comparison of fertility of liquid or frozen semen when varying the interval from CIDR removal to insemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Brittany N; Larimore, Erin L; Walker, Julie A; Utt, Matthew D; DeJarnette, J Mel; Perry, George A

    2017-03-01

    Cryopreservation allows for long-term storage of semen; however, it leads to damage of sperm that may result in complete loss of viability or changes that possibly decrease sperm functionality. Liquid semen is not exposed to these stressors and may result in a longer lifespan in the female reproductive tract, thus increasing the range in timing of insemination without affecting fertility. The objective of this study was to compare fertility of liquid and frozen semen when varying the interval from CIDR removal to AI using the 7-day CO-Synch+CIDR protocol for synchronization of time of estrus. Within age group, crossbred cows (n=389) were randomly assigned to insemination at 36 or 60h after CIDR removal with either liquid or frozen semen (36L, 60L, 36F, and 60F) from one of two Angus bulls. Cows were monitored for estrous activity from CIDR removal until 60h thereafter. Cows that failed to exhibit estrus received GnRH (100μg, i.m.), and a blood sample was collected for analysis of estradiol concentration. There was no difference in pregnancy rates when liquid or frozen semen (53% and 52%) was used, but cows inseminated at 60h had a greater (Pfrozen semen (P=0.06). Cows that became pregnant had greater (Pfrozen semen. However, cows that exhibited estrus and were inseminated at 60h after CIDR removal had greater pregnancy success compared to cows that did not exhibit estrus.

  14. Effect of stress on semen quality in semen donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, M L; Giblin, P T; Ager, J W; Moghissi, K S

    1986-01-01

    Fifty-three donors with good semen quality were studied monthly for sperm count and motility over 9 to 22 months. Medical students (n = 31) in freshman and sophomore years subjected to the stress of twice-yearly examinations were compared with nonstudents (n = 22) not exposed to common stressful periods. Sperm count and quality (count X motility) for the student group were significantly elevated during examination months versus nonexamination months. Controls demonstrated no differences over these months. Differences between individuals, donor selection factors, and the effects of variable degrees of stress on sperm transport may have contributed to this finding.

  15. Stainless steel welding and semen quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, J E; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.

    1988-01-01

    Questionnaire studies of patients from fertility clinics suggest that welders may have an increased risk of reduced semen quality. In this study, welders and nonwelders from the same plants were asked to provide blood, urine, and semen samples. Urine was analyzed for chromium and nickel, and for ...

  16. Ebola Virus Persistence in Semen Ex Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Robert J; Judson, Seth; Miazgowicz, Kerri; Bushmaker, Trent; Munster, Vincent J

    2016-02-01

    On March 20, 2015, a case of Ebola virus disease was identified in Liberia that most likely was transmitted through sexual contact. We assessed the efficiency of detecting Ebola virus in semen samples by molecular diagnostics and the stability of Ebola virus in ex vivo semen under simulated tropical conditions.

  17. Antithrombotic lipids from Semen Persicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nian-Yun; Liu, Li; Tao, Wei-Wei; Duan, Jin-Ao; Liu, Xun-Hong; Huang, Su-Ping

    2011-10-01

    Chemical investigation of Semen Persicae has led to the isolation of decane (1), triolein (2), nonacosanoic acid (3), oleic acid ethyl ester (4), palmitic acid (5), oleic acid (6) and 15,16-dihydroxy-9Z,12Z-octadecadienoic acid 2,3-dihydroxypropyl ester (7). Amongst these, compound 7 is a new lipid. Their structures were elucidated by chemical and extensive spectral analysis. Their anticoagulative activities were also evaluated in vitro, which showed that petroleum ether extract and compounds 5-6 could significantly prolong thrombin time while methanol extract could obviously inhibit platelet aggregation.

  18. EFFECT OF ANTIBIOTICS IN EXTENDER ON FERTILITY OF LIQUID BUFFALO BULL SEMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. AKHTER, M. SAJJAD, S. M. H. ANDRABI1, N. ULLAH1 AND M. QAYYUM

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine if a new antibiotic combination comprising of gentamycin, tylosin and linco-spectin (GTLS in extender is suitable for improvement in fertility of liquid buffalo bull semen through artificial insemination (AI. Two consecutive ejaculates per week (4 weeks were collected from three Nili-Ravi buffalo bulls of known fertility by using artificial vagina. The pooled ejaculates were split-sampled and diluted with skimmed milk extender (37oC; 10x106 motile spermatozoa/ml containing either SP (streptomycin 1000 μg/ml and penicillin 1000 iu/ml or GTLS (gentamycin 500 μg/ml, tylosin 100 μg/ml, lincomycin 300 μg/ml, and spectinomycin 600 μg/ml. Liquid semen was stored at 5°C for seven days. Fertility, based on 90-days first service pregnancy rate, was determined under field conditions. The fertility rates for SP-based vs. GTLS-containing liquid semen of buffalo bull were 58.55 and 60.00%, respectively, the difference was non significant. The fertility rates also did not differ (P>0.05 due to antibiotics at different days of storage of liquid semen at 5oC. In conclusion, GTLS, in skimmed milk extender compared to SP, did not significantly improve the fertility of chilled buffalo bull semen.

  19. Effects of Three Different Diluents on Quality of Boar Semen Stored at 17℃

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Shan; Zhang Xiao-gang; Han Cong; Wei Shuai-yi; Xie Dong-qi; Du Ren-rang; Hu Jian-hong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of different diluents on the quality of the boar semen stored at 17℃, and assess the relationship between sperm motility and the relative levels of enzymes, three commercial diluents (DiluentⅠ, DiluentⅡand DiluentⅢ) and three boar breed semens (Yorkshire, Landrace and Duroc) were utilized. The sperm motility, effective survival time, survival index, catalase (CAT), the total anti-oxidative capacity (T-AOC) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were evaluated. The results showed that there were significant interaction effects between diluents and breeds on the boar sperm motility (P0.05). All of the parameters varied significantly with the increase of the storage time (P<0.001). The survival time increased 12.9% in Yorkshire boar semen diluted with DiluentⅢ than with DiluentⅡ, while the survival time increased 6.6% in Landrace boar semen diluted with DiluentⅡ than with DiluentⅢ. Both CAT and T-AOC levels were significantly positive correlated with sperm motility in all the three boar breeds (P<0.001), while MDA levels were significantly negative correlated with sperm motility (P<0.001). These results indicated that DiluentⅢ and DiluentⅡwere the optimal commercial diluents for Yorkshire and Landrace boar semen stored at 17℃, respectively.

  20. Prevalence of Low Sperm Count and Abnormal Semen Parameters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    elearning

    fertile/infertile men in our environment, semen samples collected from one hundred ... KEY WORDS: Abnormal semen parameters, male partners, genital infection, infertility. ..... have adverse effects on sperm parameters5,12. Other causes of semen abnormalities are stress ... semen quality and quantity, the high prevalence.

  1. Effect of vitamin E on lipid peroxidation and fertility after artificial insemination with liquid-stored turkey semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, J A; Kramer, M

    2003-11-01

    Turkey sperm plasma membranes contain high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids that are susceptible to lipid peroxidation during in vitro storage at 4 degrees C. Herein we assessed the degree of lipid peroxidation and fertility potential of semen liquid-stored for 24 h with the antioxidant vitamin E. Semen was collected weekly from 44 males and pooled as pairs (total = 22); the individuals in paired samples exhibited similar semen quality parameters. After initial semen evaluation, pooled samples were extended with Beltsville Poultry Semen Extender containing no supplement (control) or 10 or 40 microg/mL vitamin E and then stored at 4 degrees C with constant aeration for 24 h. Lipid peroxidation was determined by measuring malonaldehyde (MDA) in aliquots (50 x 10(6) sperm) of fresh (0 h) and stored (24 h) semen. Sperm mobility was also evaluated. A total of 176 hens (8 hens/tom pair; 4 hens/0 h, 4 hens/24 h) were inseminated (150 x 10(6) sperm) weekly for 6 wk, and fertility was determined after 7 d of incubation. Initial MDA values of the 22 tom pairs ranged from 0.928 to 1.36 uM. Males varied in production of MDA during in vitro storage, with most pairs exhibiting a threefold increase. Results indicated that supplemental vitamin E did not reduce lipid peroxidation during liquid storage. Not surprisingly, artificial insemination with stored semen (with much higher MDA values) yielded lower fertility rates than control regardless of the presence of vitamin E. These results demonstrate that lipid peroxidation is a significant factor affecting the fertility of stored turkey sperm and that methods to prevent or reduce lipid peroxidation remain to be elucidated.

  2. Study on Semen Freezing Preservation of German Shepherd Dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang He; Tian Ya-guang; Zheng Peng; Zhang Gui-xue

    2012-01-01

    In order to prolong semen preservation and improve pregnancy rate, semen freezing was studied with German shepherd dogs for experimental animals. The semen of four dogs was collected 40 times in four dilution frozen into two formulations, according to the sperm motility to compare the advantages and disadvantages. The result indicated that the sperm motility of the pellet frozen semen in dilute 2 was significantly higher than that in dilution 1, 3, and 4 (P0.01). The sperm motility of dogs semen with fried smoked method was notablely higher than that of frozen semen of program method (P0.01). The dilution which contained yolk-Tris mainly was the best; the pellet semen frozen with fried smoked method was superior to tuble semen frozen with program freezing method; sperm motility of pellet semen was higher than that of tuble semen in the same dilution. The conception rate and litter size of the natural matting were higher than AI.

  3. Sandhills native bee survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report includes the results of a bee survey conducted in Sandhills region of north and south Carolina on May 18th and 19th 2006. Part of the survey was...

  4. General Stress Responses in the Honey Bee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, Naïla; Devaud, Jean-Marc; Barron, Andrew B.

    2012-01-01

    The biological concept of stress originated in mammals, where a “General Adaptation Syndrome” describes a set of common integrated physiological responses to diverse noxious agents. Physiological mechanisms of stress in mammals have been extensively investigated through diverse behavioral and physiological studies. One of the main elements of the stress response pathway is the endocrine hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which underlies the “fight-or-flight” response via a hormonal cascade of catecholamines and corticoid hormones. Physiological responses to stress have been studied more recently in insects: they involve biogenic amines (octopamine, dopamine), neuropeptides (allatostatin, corazonin) and metabolic hormones (adipokinetic hormone, diuretic hormone). Here, we review elements of the physiological stress response that are or may be specific to honey bees, given the economical and ecological impact of this species. This review proposes a hypothetical integrated honey bee stress pathway somewhat analogous to the mammalian HPA, involving the brain and, particularly, the neurohemal organ corpora cardiaca and peripheral targets, including energy storage organs (fat body and crop). We discuss how this system can organize rapid coordinated changes in metabolic activity and arousal, in response to adverse environmental stimuli. We highlight physiological elements of the general stress responses that are specific to honey bees, and the areas in which we lack information to stimulate more research into how this fascinating and vital insect responds to stress. PMID:26466739

  5. Semen characteristics in pubertal boys. I. Semen quality after first ejaculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczewski, Z; Bablok, L

    1985-01-01

    Semen specimens from 134 pubertal boys were examined, and some 274 assays were made. An analysis of the biological quality of semen in relation to the period of time after first ejaculation brings high values of statistical dependence of the volume of semen, its liquefaction, spermatozoal concentration, percentage of morphologically normal forms of spermatozoa, and normal spermatozoal motility on the period of time after first ejaculation. Normal figures for semen volume, semen liquefaction, spermatozoal concentration, and morphology are observed 12-14 months after first ejaculation. The percentage of normally motile spermatozoa becomes standard 21-23 months after first ejaculation. There were changes in semen characteristics from azoospermia through cryptozoospermia, oligozoospermia, and asthenozoospermia to normospermia. Azoospermia dominates until the fifth month after the first ejaculation, oligozoospermia from the sixth to the eleventh month, asthenozoospermia from the twelfth to the twentieth month, and normospermia from the twenty-first month.

  6. Do cigarette and alcohol affect semen analysis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Zeynel Keskin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: There are a number of studies about the effect of cigarette and alcohol on semen parameters in the literature. There is not a consensus on the relationship between use of cigarette and alchol and semen parameters in those studies. The number of studies in which cigarette and alcohol use are evaluated together is limited. This study was aimed to analyze the effect of cigarette and/or alcohol use on semen parameters. Methods: In this prospective study, 762 patients who applied to an hospital urology polyclinic between January 2015 and March 2015 due to infertility, were questioned for alcohol and cigarette use in anamnesis. The remaining 356 patients were included in our study. Then, semen analysis of the patients was performed. The patients were divided into five groups according to cigarette use, into five groups according to alcohol use and into four groups according to cigarette and/or alcohol use. Significant differences were analyzed between the groups in terms of semen volume, semen concentration, total motility, forward motility and morphological (normality, head anomaly, neck anomaly, tail anomaly values. Results: According to cigarette use, only in group 4 (who use more than 20 package-years cigarette semen volume was significantly lower than the control group (Mann-Whitney U, p = 0.009. There was no significant difference in any of the other parameters and groups compared with the control group (Mann-Whitney U, p > 0,05 Conclusion:According to our study, using more than 20 package- years cigarette decreases semen volume. The reason of this result might be the fact that the threshold value, from which the effect of cigarette and alcohol use on the semen parameters has to be determined.

  7. How bees distinguish colors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horridge A

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Adrian Horridge Biological Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia Abstract: Behind each facet of the compound eye, bees have photoreceptors for ultraviolet, green, and blue wavelengths that are excited by sunlight reflected from the surrounding panorama. In experiments that excluded ultraviolet, bees learned to distinguish between black, gray, white, and various colors. To distinguish two targets of differing color, bees detected, learned, and later recognized the strongest preferred inputs, irrespective of which target displayed them. First preference was the position and measure of blue reflected from white or colored areas. They also learned the positions and a measure of the green receptor modulation at vertical edges that displayed the strongest green contrast. Modulation is the receptor response to contrast and was summed over the length of a contrasting vertical edge. This also gave them a measure of angular width between outer vertical edges. Third preference was position and a measure of blue modulation. When they returned for more reward, bees recognized the familiar coincidence of these inputs at that place. They cared nothing for colors, layout of patterns, or direction of contrast, even at black/white edges. The mechanism is a new kind of color vision in which a large-field tonic blue input must coincide in time with small-field phasic modulations caused by scanning vertical edges displaying green or blue contrast. This is the kind of system to expect in medium-lowly vision, as found in insects; the next steps are fresh looks at old observations and quantitative models. Keywords: vision, honey bee, visual processing, optimum system, picture sorting

  8. Special Issue: Honey Bee Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Pollination of flowering plants is an important ecosystem service provided by wild insect pollinators and managed honey bees. Hence, losses and declines of pollinating insect species threaten human food security and are of major concern not only for apiculture or agriculture but for human society in general. Honey bee colony losses and bumblebee declines have attracted intensive research interest over the last decade and although the problem is far from being solved we now know that viruses are among the key players of many of these bee losses and bumblebee declines. With this special issue on bee viruses we, therefore, aimed to collect high quality original papers reflecting the current state of bee virus research. To this end, we focused on newly discovered viruses (Lake Sinai viruses, bee macula-like virus), or a so far neglected virus species (Apis mellifera filamentous virus), and cutting edge technologies (mass spectrometry, RNAi approach) applied in the field. PMID:26702462

  9. Special Issue: Honey Bee Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Gisder

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pollination of flowering plants is an important ecosystem service provided by wild insect pollinators and managed honey bees. Hence, losses and declines of pollinating insect species threaten human food security and are of major concern not only for apiculture or agriculture but for human society in general. Honey bee colony losses and bumblebee declines have attracted intensive research interest over the last decade and although the problem is far from being solved we now know that viruses are among the key players of many of these bee losses and bumblebee declines. With this special issue on bee viruses we, therefore, aimed to collect high quality original papers reflecting the current state of bee virus research. To this end, we focused on newly discovered viruses (Lake Sinai viruses, bee macula-like virus, or a so far neglected virus species (Apis mellifera filamentous virus, and cutting edge technologies (mass spectrometry, RNAi approach applied in the field.

  10. Special Issue: Honey Bee Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-10-01

    Pollination of flowering plants is an important ecosystem service provided by wild insect pollinators and managed honey bees. Hence, losses and declines of pollinating insect species threaten human food security and are of major concern not only for apiculture or agriculture but for human society in general. Honey bee colony losses and bumblebee declines have attracted intensive research interest over the last decade and although the problem is far from being solved we now know that viruses are among the key players of many of these bee losses and bumblebee declines. With this special issue on bee viruses we, therefore, aimed to collect high quality original papers reflecting the current state of bee virus research. To this end, we focused on newly discovered viruses (Lake Sinai viruses, bee macula-like virus), or a so far neglected virus species (Apis mellifera filamentous virus), and cutting edge technologies (mass spectrometry, RNAi approach) applied in the field.

  11. Semen preparation techniques for intrauterine insemination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, Carolien M.; Heineman, M. J.; Cohlen, B. J.; Farquhar, C.

    2007-01-01

    Background Semen preparation techniques for assisted reproduction, including intrauterine insemination (IUI), were developed to separate the motile morphological normal spermatozoa. Leucocytes, bacteria and dead spermatozoa produce oxygen radicals that negatively influence the ability to fertilize

  12. Semen preparation techniques for intrauterine insemination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, C. M.; Heineman, M. J.; Cohlen, B. J.; Farquhar, C.

    2007-01-01

    Background Semen preparation techniques for assisted reproduction, including intrauterine insemination (IUI), were developed to separate the motile morphological normal spermatozoa. Leucocytes, bacteria and dead spermatozoa produce oxygen radicals that negatively influence the ability to fertilize t

  13. The plight of the bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Marla; Mader, Eric; Vaughan, Mace; Euliss, Ned H.

    2011-01-01

    Some environmental issues polarize people, producing weary political stalemates of indecision and inaction. Others, however, grab hold of our most primeval instincts, causing us to reach deeply into our memories of childhood, and our first direct experiences with nature: the bumble bee nest we poked at with a stick; the man at the county fair with the bee beard. Those memories expand backward in time to our barefoot ancestors who climbed trees and robbed honey. They help define the human experience and provide context to our own place in the world.And so the plight of the bees strikes a common chord. For a brief moment simple matters of politics, economics, and nationality seem irrelevant. Colony collapse disorder, the name for the syndrome causing honey bees (Apis mellifera) to suddenly and mysteriously disappear from their hives - thousands of individual worker bees literally flying off to die - captured public consciousness when it was first named in 2007 (1). Since then, the story of vanishing honey bees has become ubiquitous in popular consciousness - driving everything from ice cream marketing campaigns to plots for The Simpsons. The untold story is that these hive losses are simply a capstone to more than a half-century of more prosaic day-to-day losses that beekeepers already faced from parasites, diseases, poor nutrition, and pesticide poisoning (2). The larger story still is that while honey bees are charismatic and important to agriculture, other important bees are also suffering, and in some cases their fates are far worse (3). These other bees are a subset of the roughly 4000 species of wild bumble bees (Bombus), leafcutter bees (Megachile), and others that are native to North America. While the honey bee was originally imported from Europe by colonists in the early 17th century, it is these native bees that have evolved with our local ecosystems, and, along with honey bees, are valuable crop pollinators. People want to know why bees are dying and how

  14. Applications of sexed semen in cattle production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenboken, W D

    1999-12-01

    Sexed semen will contribute to increased profitability of dairy and beef cattle production in a variety of ways. It could be used to produce offspring of the desired sex from a particular mating to take advantage of differences in value of males and females for specific marketing purposes. Commercial dairy farmers, those who produce and market milk, could use sexed semen to produce replacement daughters from genetically superior cows and beef crossbred sons from the remainder of their cow population. To increase the rate of response to selection, seedstock dairy cattle breeders could produce bulls for progeny testing from a smaller number of elite dams by using sexed semen to ensure that all of them produced a son. Using sexed semen could then reduce the cost of progeny testing those bulls, because fewer matings would be necessary to produce any required number of daughters. Commercial beef cattle farmers, producing animals for eventual slaughter, could use sexed semen to capitalize on the higher value of male than female offspring for meat production. They could also use sexed semen to produce specialized, genetically superior replacement heifers from as small a proportion of the herd as possible. This would allow the remainder of the herd to produce male calves from bulls or breeds with superior genetic merit for growth, feed conversion efficiency, and carcass merit. Single-sex, bred-heifer systems, in which each female is sold for slaughter soon after weaning her replacement daughter, would be possible with the use of X-chromosome-sorted semen. Use of sexed semen would make terminal crossbreeding systems more efficient and sustainable in beef cattle. Fewer females would be required to produce specialized maternal crossbred daughters, and more could be devoted to producing highly efficient, terminal crossbred sons.

  15. Semen collection using phantom in dromedary camel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziapour, S; Niasari-Naslaji, A; Mirtavousi, M; Keshavarz, M; Kalantari, A; Adel, H

    2014-12-10

    Semen collection is relatively long, unsafe, and tedious procedure in dromedary camel. The innovation of safe, hygienic, and simple approach to collect semen could make great progress in development of AI program in this species. This study investigated two methods of semen collection using phantom and artificial vagina in dromedary camel. Semen was collected using phantom (n = 4 bulls; 26 collections) and artificial vagina (n = 6 bulls; 11 collections) and diluted with INRA96 at the ratio of 1:10. The duration of semen collection, semen parameters, and morphometric features of sperm were evaluated. For specimen collected through phantom and AV, the respected duration of semen collection (411.2 ± 48.19 vs 326 ± 37.05 sec), volume (6.6 ± 0.87 vs 6 ± 1.57 ml), osmolarity (328 ± 1.6 vs 319.4 ± 3.21 mOsm/kg H2O), pH (7.7 ± 0.06 vs 7.9 ± 0.16) of semen, concentration (161.4 ± 44.05 × 10(6)/mL vs 160.2 ± 58.42 × 10(6)/mL), total motility (84.1 ± 1.89 vs 78.3 ± 3.97%), progressive forward motility (45.5 ± 3.69 vs 44.3 ± 6.41%), live percentage (72.2 ± 3.11 vs 76 ± 2.53%), and plasma membrane integrity (61.5 ± 2.49 vs 58.9 ± 4.19%) of sperm were similar (P > 0.05). The number of specimens contaminated with visible particles was greater using AV (72.7%) compared to phantom (0%; P dromedary camel.

  16. [Morphological semen changes in Chlamydia trachomatis infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Z; Dziecielski, H; Swierczyński, W; Semmler, G

    1989-06-01

    Semen was examined in 150 men patients of the Andrology Clinic for demonstration of Chlamydia trachomatis and for analysis of the effect of this infection on semen quality depression. A correlation was noted between the degree of infection (large number of organisms per field of vision) and such changes as cryptozoospermia, azoospermia, asthenozoospermia, teratozoospermia, oligoasthenozoospermia, asthenoteratozoospermia. Of interest was a high proportion of infection (56%) with Ch. trachomatis in this group.

  17. Artificial insemination of cranes with frozen semen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.; Sexton, T.J.; Lewis, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    For the first time (1978) artificial insemination (AI) with frozen greater sandhill crane (Grus canadensis tabida) semen resulted in fertile eggs and chicks. During the 2 year (1977-78) study, 6 of 27 eggs produced were fertile. Three chicks hatched. Semen samples used for insemination were frozen and stored in liquid nitrogen for two months or less. Recent improvements in the laboratory indicated that a more effective sample can be prepared and greater fertility rates should be expected.

  18. Detection of Campylobacter or Salmonella in turkey semen and the ability of poultry semen extenders to reduce their concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, A M; Blore, P J; Cole, K; Loskutoff, N M; Donoghue, D J

    2004-10-01

    Campylobacter and Salmonella are the most commonly reported pathogens causing foodborne illness in the United States. In turkeys, the potential that semen used for artificial insemination is contaminated with these foodborne pathogens has not been investigated. Because semen on turkey farms is pooled and then used to inseminate multiple hens, contaminated semen could easily spread these bacteria throughout entire flocks via artificial insemination. The objectives of this study were to 1) determine if semen from commercial turkey farms contained these foodborne pathogens and 2) if present, evaluate the efficacy of semen extenders to reduce or eliminate Campylobacter and Salmonella from semen. Semen was collected from randomized pools of ejaculates from 10 to 30 toms per farm from 6 flocks over a 7-wk period and, on occasion, was found to contain Campylobacter, Salmonella, or both. To evaluate the efficacy of semen extenders to reduce or eliminate pathogens, pooled ejaculates were challenged with Campylobacter or Salmonella and treated with commercial poultry extenders containing various concentrations of antibiotics or an antibiotic combination previously demonstrated to remove Campylobacter from mammalian semen. Results demonstrate that commercial turkey semen may contain Campylobacter or Salmonella, and the semen extenders tested either did not reduce the bacteria or reduced but did not eliminate these bacteria from semen. We concluded that semen may be a potential vehicle for Campylobacter transfer to hens, and, if this is true, development of a method for eliminating pathogens in semen before insemination could reduce the risk of colonization.

  19. Bees brought to their knees: Microbes affecting honey bee health

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biology and health of the honey bee, Apis mellifera, has been of interest to human societies since the advent of beekeeping. Descriptive scientific research on pathogens affecting honey bees have been published for nearly a century, but it wasn’t until the recent outbreak of heavy colony losses...

  20. Bacterial Contamination of Boar Semen and its Relationship to Sperm Quality Preserved in Commercial Extender Containing Gentamicin Sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gączarzewicz, D; Udała, J; Piasecka, M; Błaszczyk, B; Stankiewicz, T

    2016-09-01

    This study was designed to determine the degree and type of bacterial contamination in boar semen (79 ejaculates from Large White and Landrace boars) and its consequences for sperm quality during storage (27 extended semen samples, 16°C for five days) under practical conditions of artificial insemination (AI). The results revealed the presence of aerobic bacteria in 99% of the ejaculates (from 80 to 370 ×106 colony-forming units/mL). Most of the ejaculates contained two or three bacterial contaminants, while the Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Pseudomonas bacterial genera were most frequently isolated. Also detected were Enterobacter spp., Bacillus spp., Proteus spp., Escherichia coli, P. fluorescens, and P. aeruginosa. In general, the growth of certain bacterial types isolated prior to semen processing (Enterobacter spp., E. coli, P. fluorescens, and P. aeruginosa) was not discovered on different days of storage, but fluctuations (with a tendency towards increases) were found in the frequencies of Bacillus spp., Pseudomonas spp., and Staphylococcus spp. isolates up to the end of storage. Semen preserved for five days exhibited decreases in sperm motility and increases in the average number of total aerobic bacteria; this was associated with sperm agglutination, plasma membrane disruption, and acrosome damage. We inferred that, due to the different degrees and types of bacterial contaminants in the boar ejaculates, the inhibitory activity of some antimicrobial agents used in swine extenders (such as gentamicin sulfate) may be limited. Because such agents can contribute to the overgrowth of certain aerobic bacteria and a reduction in the quality of stored semen, procedures with high standards of hygiene and microbiological control should be used when processing boar semen.

  1. Coenzyme Q10 and soyphosphatidylcholine in EK extender on preservation of Rhode Island Red poultry semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Nath

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of EK extender alone or incorporation with CoenzymeQ10 (CoQ10 and/or soyphosphatidylcholine (SPC in poultry semen and their effects on seminal traits during temporal storage at 4⁰C for different time intervals (12 h, 24 h, and 36 h. Heterospermic pooled semen samples diluted (1:4 with EK, EK + SPC, EK+ CoQ10 and EK + SPC + CoQ10 extenders separately, preserved and different spermiogram were assessed. Various seminal traits within the same extender differ significantly (p<0.05 among different groups and with different time intervals of storage. CoQ10 and SPC in the EK extender exhibited favorable synergistic effect on sperm quality and were able to protect the male gametes against cold-stress up to 36h at 4⁰C. In this study, we concluded that incorporation of SPC and CoQ10 together in EK extender possess novel potentiality to maintain seminal quality during liquid storage of poultry semen at 4⁰C and for their safe transportation and further use for Artificial Reproductive technologies (ARTs.

  2. Native bees and plant pollination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, H.S.

    2004-01-01

    Bees are important pollinators, but evidence suggests that numbers of some species are declining. Decreases have been documented in the honey bee, Apis mellifera (which was introduced to North America), but there are no monitoring programs for the vast majority of native species, so we cannot be sure about the extent of this problem. Recent efforts to develop standardized protocols for bee sampling will help us collect the data needed to assess trends in bee populations. Unfortunately, diversity of bee life cycles and phenologies, and the large number of rare species, make it difficult to assess trends in bee faunas. Changes in bee populations can affect plant reproduction, which can influence plant population density and cover, thus potentially modifying horizontal and vertical structure of a community, microclimate near the ground, patterns of nitrogen deposition, etc. These potential effects of changes in pollination patterns have not been assessed in natural communities. Effects of management actions on bees and other pollinators should be considered in conservation planning.

  3. Honey Bees: Sweetness and Mites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey bee colony losses have been in the news lately and the potential reasons for these losses have taken up much space in the news media. In order to clarify what role mites play in the current loss (2006-2007) of bee colonies, called Colony Collapse Disorder, a better understanding of what a mit...

  4. Bee-inspired protocol engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Farooq, Muddassar

    2008-01-01

    Honey bee colonies demonstrate robust adaptive efficient agent-based communications and task allocations without centralized controls - desirable features in network design. This book introduces a multi path routing algorithm for packet-switched telecommunication networks based on techniques observed in bee colonies.

  5. Genetic toolkits for bee health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekeepers, inspectors, and researchers have a shared interest in checking bees and hives for clues related to bee health and disease. These checks take many forms, from lifting fall supers prior to feeding decisions to carrying out sticky board or jar tests for estimating varroa populations. Most d...

  6. Polychlorinated biphenyls in honey bees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morse, R.A.; Culliney, T.W.; Gutenmann, W.H.; Littman, C.B.; Lisk, D.J.

    1987-02-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) may traverse a radius of several miles from their hives and contact innumerable surfaces during their collection of nectar, pollen, propolis and water. In the process, they may become contaminated with surface constituents which are indicative of the type of environmental pollution in their particular foraging area. Honey has also been analyzed as a possible indicator of heavy metal pollution. Insecticides used in the vicinity of bee hives have been found in bees and honey. It has been recently reported that appreciable concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been found in honey bees sampled throughout Connecticut. In the work reported here, an analytical survey was conducted on PCBs in honey bees, honey, propolis and related samples in several states to learn the extent of contamination and possible sources.

  7. Use of Aloe vera-based extender for chilling and freezing collared peccary (Pecari tajacu) semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, A L P; Lima, G L; Peixoto, G C X; Silva, A M; Oliveira, M F; Silva, A R

    2016-05-01

    As an alternative for the conservation of collared peccary semen, this research aims at evaluating the use of Aloe vera (AV) extract as a cryoprotectant for semen chilling and freezing. Five ejaculates were divided in two aliquots that were diluted in Tris plus egg yolk (EY; 20%) or AV extract (20%) and chilled at 5 °C. In both treatments, an adequate semen conservation was achieved and values closer to 40% motile sperm with viability and osmotic response ranging from 20% to 40%, and normal morphology of 80% were found after 36 hours of storage. Moreover, 12 other ejaculates were diluted in Tris plus EY (20%) or AV extract (5, 10, or 20%) and glycerol (3%). Samples were frozen in liquid nitrogen and thawed after 1 week. After thawing, all the treatments containing EY or AV provided similar values for sperm morphology, viability, osmotic response, membrane integrity, sperm motility, amplitude of lateral head, beat cross frequency, and rapid, low, and static subpopulations, but the highest values for straightness and the lowest values for curvilinear velocity were found using 20% AV (P < 0.05). In conclusion, we found that AV extract at a 20% concentration could be used as an alternative substitute to EY in the formulation of Tris extenders for collared peccaries' semen chilling or freezing.

  8. History of febrile illness and variation in semen quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Elisabeth; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Petersen, Jørgen Holm

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of a history of febrile illness on semen quality.......The purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of a history of febrile illness on semen quality....

  9. Ebola May Be Present in Semen for Year or More

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160697.html Ebola May Be Present in Semen for Year or ... 31, 2016 TUESDAY, Aug. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Ebola virus stays present in semen longer than previously ...

  10. Scientists Map DNA of Zika Virus from Semen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_161474.html Scientists Map DNA of Zika Virus From Semen It's another step in trying to ... complete genetic "blueprint" -- genome -- of a sample of Zika virus derived from semen has been obtained by researchers. ...

  11. Demonstration of DSI-semen--A novel DNA methylation-based forensic semen identification assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserstrom, Adam; Frumkin, Dan; Davidson, Ariane; Shpitzen, Moshe; Herman, Yael; Gafny, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Determining whether the source tissue of biological material is semen is important in confirming sexual assaults, which account for a considerable percentage of crime cases. The gold standard for confirming the presence of semen is microscopic identification of sperm cells, however, this method is labor intensive and operator-dependent. Protein-based immunologic assays, such as PSA, are highly sensitive and relatively fast, but suffer from low specificity in some situations. In addition, proteins are less stable than DNA under most environmental insults. Recently, forensic tissue identification advanced with the development of several approaches based on mRNA and miRNA for identification of various body fluids. Herein is described DNA source identifier (DSI)-semen, a DNA-based assay that determines whether the source tissue of a sample is semen based on detection of semen-specific methylation patterns in five genomic loci. The assay is comprised of a simple single tube biochemical procedure, similar to DNA profiling, followed by automatic software analysis, yielding the identification (semen/non-semen) accompanied by a statistical confidence level. Three additional internal control loci are used to ascertain the reliability of the results. The assay, which aims to replace microscopic examination, can easily be integrated by forensic laboratories and is automatable. The kit was tested on 135 samples of semen, saliva, venous blood, menstrual blood, urine, and vaginal swabs and the identification of semen vs. non-semen was correct in all cases. In order to test the assay's applicability in "real-life" situations, 33 actual casework samples from the forensic biological lab of the Israeli police were analyzed, and the results were compared with microscopic examination performed by Israeli police personnel. There was complete concordance between both analyses except for one sample, in which the assay identified semen whereas no sperm was seen in the microscope. This

  12. Semen abnormalities with SSRI antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of widespread use, the adverse effect profile of "selective" serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants has still not been fully elucidated. Studies in male animals have shown delayed sexual development and reduced fertility. Three prospective cohort studies conducted in over one hundred patients exposed to an SSRI for periods ranging from 5 weeks to 24 months found altered semen param-eters after as little as 3 months of exposure: reduced sperm concentration, reduced sperm motility, a higher percentage of abnormal spermatozoa, and increased levels of sperm DNA fragmentation. One clinical trial showed growth retardation in children considered depressed who were exposed to SSRls. SSRls may have endocrine disrupting properties. Dapoxetine is a short-acting serotonin reuptake inhibitor that is chemically related to fluoxetine and marketed in the European Union for men complaining of premature ejaculation. But the corresponding European summary of product characteristics does not mention any effects on fertility. In practice, based on the data available as of mid-2014, the effects of SSRI exposure on male fertility are unclear. However, it is a risk that should be taken into account and pointed out to male patients who would like to father a child or who are experiencing fertility problems.

  13. SIFAT FISIKA PAPAN SEMEN PARTIKEL PELEPAH RUMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusti Ahmad Rahmat Thamrin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Manufacture of cement particle board and testing physical properties are implemented in the laboratory of panels of wood forest products Technology majors Lambung Mangkurat University. Research on physical properties include water content, density, water absorption, and the development of thick. The experimental use is a random complete ral ( 2 nonfaktorial by remedial treatment and 5 times , a particle that is making cement with raw materials pelepah rumbia without the skin and cement making a particle with raw materials pelepah rumbia with skin . Standard used for comparison is SNI-03-2104-1991 . The average levels of the water between the semen of a particle midrib metroxylon sagu without the skin and board cement particles midrib metroxylon sagu with skin successive adalah13,02 % and 10,75 %. Both treatment entry in the SNI (maximum 14%. The average value of the density of the particle cement board without bark and branches and kiray cement particle board with the skin in a row as kiray is 0.73 gr/cm3 and 0.90 gr/cm3. Both treatment entry in the SNI (minimum 0.57 per gr/cm3.The average value of water absorption of cement particle board as kiray without skin and cement particle board with the skin in a row as kiray is 43,86% and 35.86%. The second treatment was not entered in the SNI (10-30%. Keywords: cement particle board, Rumbia’s Midrib ABSTRAK.    Pembuatan papan semen partikel dan pengujian sifat fisika dilaksanakan di Laboratorium Panel-Panel Kayu jurusan Teknologi Hasil Hutan Universitas Lambung Mangkurat. Penelitian sifat fisika meliputi kadar air, kerapatan, penyerapan air, dan pengembangan tebal. Rancangan percobaan yang digunakan adalah Rancangan Acak Lengkap (RAL nonfaktorial dengan 2 perlakuan dan 5 kali ulangan, yaitu pembuatan papan semen partikel dengan bahan baku pelepah rumbia tanpa kulit dan pembuatan papan semen partikel dengan bahan baku pelepah rumbia dengan kulit. Standar yang digunakan untuk perbandingan

  14. Honey bee pathology: current threats to honey bees and beekeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genersch, Elke

    2010-06-01

    Managed honey bees are the most important commercial pollinators of those crops which depend on animal pollination for reproduction and which account for 35% of the global food production. Hence, they are vital for an economic, sustainable agriculture and for food security. In addition, honey bees also pollinate a variety of wild flowers and, therefore, contribute to the biodiversity of many ecosystems. Honey and other hive products are, at least economically and ecologically rather, by-products of beekeeping. Due to this outstanding role of honey bees, severe and inexplicable honey bee colony losses, which have been reported recently to be steadily increasing, have attracted much attention and stimulated many research activities. Although the phenomenon "decline of honey bees" is far from being finally solved, consensus exists that pests and pathogens are the single most important cause of otherwise inexplicable colony losses. This review will focus on selected bee pathogens and parasites which have been demonstrated to be involved in colony losses in different regions of the world and which, therefore, are considered current threats to honey bees and beekeeping.

  15. Sperm DNA fragmentation and morphological degeneration in chilled elephant (Elephas maximus and Loxodonta Africana) semen collected by transrectal massage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, J K; Steinman, K J; Montano, G A; Love, C C; Robeck, T R

    2013-05-01

    Ejaculates from nine Asian and two African elephants were analysed to gain a further understanding of mechanisms underlying variable semen quality after transrectal massage. Semen analysis was performed after collection (0 h; subjective motility parameters only) and after 24 h of chilled storage at 10 °C (24 h; all ejaculate and sperm characteristics). Ejaculates with ≤50% total motility (TM) at 24 h, which represented >90% of collection attempts, contained a sperm population with a high degree of DNA damage (64.2 ± 19.2% fragmented DNA) and an elevated incidence of detached heads (43.3 ± 22.5%). In contrast, good quality ejaculates designated as those with >50% TM at 24 h displayed higher (p < 0.05) values of sperm kinetic parameters, DNA integrity and normal morphology. Fertility potential was high for good quality ejaculates from two males (one Asian and one African bull) based on in vitro characteristics after chilled storage for up to 48 h post-collection. Urine contamination of semen, as assessed quantitatively by creatinine concentration, was confirmed as a significant factor in reduced elephant ejaculate quality. However, the identification of considerable DNA damage and morphological degeneration in the majority of ejaculates after only 24 h of chilled storage indicates that sperm ageing could be a primary contributor to inconsistent semen quality in the elephant.

  16. Utilization of cryopreserved semen in tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, W; Brake, A

    1994-01-01

    Treatment with cytotoxic drugs or with radiation in order to manage a tumor or another life-threatening disease involves a potential hazard to male fertility. In these cases cryopreservation of semen is recommended. However, the number of patients requesting the subsequent insemination of their partner is rather low. It would be of interest if patients with a high probability for desiring use of the cryodeposit for insemination could be identified. During the years 1985-1992 we performed cryopreservation in 29 patients attending our department. One year following cryopreservation the utilization of the cryodeposit was analyzed: 29 patients were not interested in further maintenance, 2 patients died, 3 patients requested use for insemination, 31 patients decided to maintain the semen further in a commercial cryobank, 17 patients had a complete restitution of spermatogenesis within the observation period. In 7 patients the interval is yet below 1 year. The different modes of utilizing the cryodeposit were analyzed in relation to the semen quality, age, status, kind of disease and primary treatment. None of these factors possibly influencing the utilization showed differences between the groups. We conclude that it is impossible to predict the probability of the use of a cryodeposit of semen based on the examined patient characteristics at the time of preservation. We plan to further on offer semen preservation to all patients requiring it in a situation of threatened fertility, bearing in mind that the relative costs of the cryopreservation are low.

  17. Relationship between Thyroid Profile and Semen Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj kumar Sharma, Deepak Parchwani, Pankaj Maheria, Amit Upadhyah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endogenous hormones are critical to spermatogenesis and maintenance of male reproductive function. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, inhibin B and testosterone all serve important and well-known functions in the male hypothalamopituitary-gonadal axis and male reproduction. However, the potential relationship between other hormones, including thyroid hormones, and semen quality are still not completely understood. Thus in the present study an attempt has been made to report the degree of associations between thyroid hormones and semen quality. Methods: Fifty-five men were recruited from an infertility clinic between August 2010 to May 2011. Fresh semen samples were assessed for quality (concentration, motility and morphology and the serum levels of Tetraiodothyronine (T4, Triiodothyronine (T3, and Thyroid stimulation hormone (TSH were measured. Result & Conclusion: We have found that though men with abnormal semen profile had higher total T3, T4 concentrations and lower TSH concentrations compared to those with normal semen profile, only T4 showed significant increase and further it was found that only total T4 was significantly associated with asthenozoospermia. Further studies and observation are needed on a larger number of patients, to validate the correlation with Thyroid status and to justify the trial of a small dose of anti-thyroid drug in asthenozoospermic patients.

  18. Field data analysis of boar semen quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekhuijse, M L W J; Feitsma, H; Gadella, B M

    2011-09-01

    This contribution provides an overview of approaches to correlate sow fertility data with boar semen quality characteristics. Large data sets of fertility data and ejaculate data are more suitable to analyse effects of semen quality characteristics on field fertility. Variation in fertility in sows is large. The effect of semen factors is relatively small and therefore impossible to find in smaller data sets. Large data sets allow for statistical corrections on both sow- and boar-related parameters. Remaining sow fertility variation can then be assigned to semen quality parameters, which is of huge interest to AI (artificial insemination) companies. Previous studies of Varkens KI Nederland to find the contribution to field fertility of (i) the number of sperm cells in an insemination dose, (ii) the sperm motility and morphological defects and (iii) the age of semen at the moment of insemination are discussed in context of the possibility to apply such knowledge to select boars on the basis of their sperm parameters for AI purposes.

  19. Evaluation of semen extenders for short-term storage of ram semen at 4° C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preliminary studies found that progressive motility of ram sperm declined ~75% when stored at 4° C for 24 h, and continued to decline over time when using extenders supplemented with 5% egg yolk. The current study evaluated the effects of different combinations of extenders, ethylene glycol (EG), eg...

  20. Effect of dialysis on the proacrosin/acrosin system and motility of turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) spermatozoa during liquid storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słowińska, M; Dietrich, G J; Liszewska, E; Kozłowski, K; Jankowski, J; Ciereszko, A

    2013-01-01

    1. The effect of dialysis on the proacrosin/acrosin system and motility of turkey spermatozoa were examined after 24 and 48 h of liquid storage at 4°C. 2. Fifteen pools of semen diluted in extender were dialysed against Clemson Turkey Semen Diluent (dialysed semen) or stored in aerobic conditions (undialysed semen). Semen quality was assessed by measuring spermatozoa motility, amidase activity of spermatozoa suspension, spermatozoa extract and seminal plasma and anti-trypsin activity of seminal plasma. 3. Extracted amidase activity of dialysed semen was lower than undialysed by 28%. Higher values for speed parameters of spermatozoa were found in dialysed semen in comparison to undialysed, for example, 81.6 µm/s versus 75.0 µm/s for straight-line velocity (VSL), 114.7 µm/s versus 110.3 µm/s for curvilinear velocity (VCL) and 86.6 µm/s versus 79.8 µm/s for average path velocity (VAP). 4. It was concluded that dialysis caused lower amidase activity of spermatozoa and increased speed parameters of progressively motile turkey spermatozoa during storage. Lower extracted amidase activity of dialysed semen reflected better membrane integrity of dialysed semen and suggests that the proacrosin/acrosin system of dialysed spermatozoa is less susceptible to activation compared to undialysed semen.

  1. Effects of seasons on some semen parameters and bacterial contamination of Awassi ram semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azawi, O I; Ismaeel, M A

    2012-06-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine the effects of season on some semen parameters and bacterial contamination of Awassi ram semen. Semen samples from six mature Awassi rams were used in this study. Semen collection was performed with artificial vagina every week, from September 2009 to October 2010. Volume, sperm concentration, mass motility, individual motility, percentage live sperm and sperm abnormalities were evaluated. Moreover, determination of viable bacterial count of the rams was also recorded weekly. Higher (p highest (p highest values and differed significantly (p highest value of the mean sperm acrosomal defects (13.33 ± 0.63%) was recorded in December. The highest value of the mean viable bacterial count (138.3 ± 21.6) was recorded in July (summer). A significant decrease (p bacterial count was observed from the middle of winter towards the end of spring. The lowest bacterial count was noted in January (60.5 ± 2.98). It could be concluded from the results of the present study that there is an effect of season on ram semen quality, and summer high temperature in northern Iraq has no effect on Awassi ram semen. There is a significant effect of season on bacterial count on Awassi ram semen.

  2. Evaluation of CD52 positive sperms in subfertile human semen samples: Is there any relationship with main semen parameters?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshanak Aboutorabi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Our results showed that the correlation between CD52 labeling and sperm motility was negatively significant, but we did not observe any relation with other semen parameters, such as sperm normal morphology, sperm concentration, and semen viscosity.

  3. Characterization and usage of sexed semen from US field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives were to characterize sexed semen available and its usage from US field data. This included investigating active Holstein proven bulls with sexed semen available, as well as percentages and frequencies of sexed semen matings for heifers and cows. Herds were also characterized for the...

  4. Semen bacterial flora of Rhode Island Breeder cocks in Zaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Semen bacterial flora of Rhode Island Breeder cocks in Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria. ... procedure, 27 of the 77 semen samples (35.1%) contained bacterial isolates. ... Bacteria isolates obtained from the semen include: Escherichia coli, ... destroyed in the interest of the efficient collection, preservation and delivery of highly ...

  5. Semen quality in Peruvian pesticide applicators: association between urinary organophosphate metabolites and semen parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasco Manuel

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organophosphates are broad class of chemicals widely used as pesticides throughout the world. We performed a cross-sectional study of associations between dialkylphosphate metabolites of organophosphates and semen quality among pesticide applicators in Majes (Arequipa, Peru. Methods Thirty-one men exposed to organophosphate (OP pesticides and 31 non-exposed were recruited (age, 20–60 years. In exposed subjects, semen and a blood sample were obtained one day after the last pesticide application. Subjects were grouped according to levels of OP metabolites in urine. Semen samples were analyzed for sperm concentration, percentage of sperm motility, percentage of normal morphology, semen leucocytes and concentrations of fructose and zinc. Exposure to OP was assessed by measuring six urinary OP metabolites (dimethyl and diethyl phosphates and thiophosphates by gas chromatography using a single flame photometric detector. Results Diethyldithiophosphate (p = 0.04 and diethylthiophosphate (p = 0.02 better reflected occupational pesticide exposure than other OP metabolites. Semen analysis revealed a significant reduction of semen volume and an increase in semen pH in men with OP metabolites. Multiple regression analysis showed that both occupational exposure to pesticides and the time of exposure to pesticides were more closely related to alterations in semen quality parameters than the single measurement of OP metabolites in urine. Conclusion The study demonstrated that occupational exposure to OP pesticides was more closely related to alterations in semen quality than a single measurement of urine OP metabolites. Current measurement of OP metabolites in urine may not reflect the full risk.

  6. Urethral anatomy and semen flow during ejaculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Diane

    2016-11-01

    Ejaculation is critical for reproductive success in many animals, but little is known about its hydrodynamics. In mammals, ejaculation pushes semen along the length of the penis through the urethra. Although the urethra also carries urine during micturition, the flow dynamics of micturition and ejaculation differ: semen is more viscous than urine, and the pressure that drives its flow is derived primarily from the rhythmic contractions of muscles at the base of the penis, which produce pulsatile rather than steady flow. In contrast, Johnston et al. (2014) describe a steady flow of semen through the crocodilian urethral groove during ejaculation. Anatomical differences of tissues associated with mammalian and crocodilian urethral structures may underlie these differences in flow behavior.

  7. Chronic boron exposure and human semen parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Wendie A; Xun, Lin; Jia, Juan; Kennedy, Nola; Elashoff, David A; Ping, Liu

    2010-04-01

    Boron found as borates in soil, food, and water has important industrial and medical applications. A panel reviewing NTP reproductive toxicants identified boric acid as high priority for occupational studies to determine safe versus adverse reproductive effects. To address this, we collected boron exposure/dose measures in workplace inhalable dust, dietary food/fluids, blood, semen, and urine from boron workers and two comparison worker groups (n=192) over three months and determined correlations between boron and semen parameters (total sperm count, sperm concentration, motility, morphology, DNA breakage, apoptosis and aneuploidy). Blood boron averaged 499.2 ppb for boron workers, 96.1 and 47.9 ppb for workers from high and low environmental boron areas (pBoron concentrated in seminal fluid. No significant correlations were found between blood or urine boron and adverse semen parameters. Exposures did not reach those causing adverse effects published in animal toxicology work but exceeded those previously published for boron occupational groups.

  8. Effect of captopril on semen quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banihani, S A

    2017-05-01

    Various studies (direct and indirect) have presented the effect of captopril, a universally used antihypertensive medication, on semen quality; yet, this effect is still collectively unreviewed. This review systematically discusses and summarises the effect of captopril on semen quality. We searched all published articles in the MEDLINE electronic database since June 1985 until January 2016 using the keywords "captopril" and "sperm," and certain supporting articles were reviewed and considered, if relevant. In conclusion, up to the present time, captopril does not appear to induce a striking change in semen quality, and hence on male infertility, while it may affect the rate of spermatozoa-egg fusion as it inhibits the activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme that is released during capacitation and the acrosome reaction. Further research, mainly clinical, is still desired to prove these effects. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Ejaculatory process and related semen characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, P W; Moscoso, R; Alarcon, V; Ordoñez, C

    2002-01-01

    South American camelids are dribble ejaculators, and urethral contractions occur throughout copulation, which may last 25 min. The urethral contractions and their association with semen characteristics during copulation were determined in llamas and alpacas. A transrectal probe was held in the rectum of the male while copulating an artificial vagina, which was accessed underneath the dummy through a hole. The semen-collecting tube was changed every 5 min. Semen characteristics, color, volume, consistency, motility, concentration, and percentage of live sperm were determined at 5-min intervals. Urethral contractions were evenly distributed during copulation: 40 in alpacas and 63 in llamas (p < .05), with a general range of 11 to 132. Semen color was milky in 63%, and translucent in 36.5% for alpacas; and creamy (9.9%), milky (47%), and translucent (42%) for llamas. The mean volume of ejaculate was 0.3, 0.4, 0.6, 0.7, 0.6, 0.8, 0.3, and 3.0 mL for 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min, respectively. Semen consistency was variable: viscous (65%) and semiviscous (34%) in alpacas; and viscous (57%) and semiviscous (42%) in llamas. Spermatic motility varied between 60 and 80% for the llama, and 40 and 80% for the alpaca. Spermatic concentration varied between 60 and 188 x 10(3)/mm3 in llamas, and 30 and 170 x 10(3)/mm3 in alpacas. Percentage of live sperm varied the least: 81 to 90% in llamas and 65 to 90% in alpacas. The ejaculate of llamas and alpacas is not fractionated, urethral contractions are evenly distributed, during copulation, and semen characteristics are present throughout the copulatory period.

  10. Effects of insemination quantity on honey bee queen physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Freddie-Jeanne; Tarpy, David R; Grozinger, Christina M

    2007-10-03

    Mating has profound effects on the physiology and behavior of female insects, and in honey bee (Apis mellifera) queens, these changes are permanent. Queens mate with multiple males during a brief period in their early adult lives, and shortly thereafter they initiate egg-laying. Furthermore, the pheromone profiles of mated queens differ from those of virgins, and these pheromones regulate many different aspects of worker behavior and colony organization. While it is clear that mating causes dramatic changes in queens, it is unclear if mating number has more subtle effects on queen physiology or queen-worker interactions; indeed, the effect of multiple matings on female insect physiology has not been broadly addressed. Because it is not possible to control the natural mating behavior of queens, we used instrumental insemination and compared queens inseminated with semen from either a single drone (single-drone inseminated, or SDI) or 10 drones (multi-drone inseminated, or MDI). We used observation hives to monitor attraction of workers to SDI or MDI queens in colonies, and cage studies to monitor the attraction of workers to virgin, SDI, and MDI queen mandibular gland extracts (the main source of queen pheromone). The chemical profiles of the mandibular glands of virgin, SDI, and MDI queens were characterized using GC-MS. Finally, we measured brain expression levels in SDI and MDI queens of a gene associated with phototaxis in worker honey bees (Amfor). Here, we demonstrate for the first time that insemination quantity significantly affects mandibular gland chemical profiles, queen-worker interactions, and brain gene expression. Further research will be necessary to elucidate the mechanistic bases for these effects: insemination volume, sperm and seminal protein quantity, and genetic diversity of the sperm may all be important factors contributing to this profound change in honey bee queen physiology, queen behavior, and social interactions in the colony.

  11. Effects of insemination quantity on honey bee queen physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddie-Jeanne Richard

    Full Text Available Mating has profound effects on the physiology and behavior of female insects, and in honey bee (Apis mellifera queens, these changes are permanent. Queens mate with multiple males during a brief period in their early adult lives, and shortly thereafter they initiate egg-laying. Furthermore, the pheromone profiles of mated queens differ from those of virgins, and these pheromones regulate many different aspects of worker behavior and colony organization. While it is clear that mating causes dramatic changes in queens, it is unclear if mating number has more subtle effects on queen physiology or queen-worker interactions; indeed, the effect of multiple matings on female insect physiology has not been broadly addressed. Because it is not possible to control the natural mating behavior of queens, we used instrumental insemination and compared queens inseminated with semen from either a single drone (single-drone inseminated, or SDI or 10 drones (multi-drone inseminated, or MDI. We used observation hives to monitor attraction of workers to SDI or MDI queens in colonies, and cage studies to monitor the attraction of workers to virgin, SDI, and MDI queen mandibular gland extracts (the main source of queen pheromone. The chemical profiles of the mandibular glands of virgin, SDI, and MDI queens were characterized using GC-MS. Finally, we measured brain expression levels in SDI and MDI queens of a gene associated with phototaxis in worker honey bees (Amfor. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that insemination quantity significantly affects mandibular gland chemical profiles, queen-worker interactions, and brain gene expression. Further research will be necessary to elucidate the mechanistic bases for these effects: insemination volume, sperm and seminal protein quantity, and genetic diversity of the sperm may all be important factors contributing to this profound change in honey bee queen physiology, queen behavior, and social interactions in the

  12. Effect of alternate day collection on semen quality of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) with poor initial fresh semen quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imrat, P.; Mahasawangkul, Sittidet; Thitaram, Chatchote; Suthanmapinanth, P.; Kornkaewrat, K.; Sombutputorn, P.; Jansittiwate, S.; Thongtip, Nikorn; Pinyopummin, A.; Colenbrander, B.; Holt, W.V.; Stout, Tom

    2014-01-01

    In captivity, male Asian elephants often yield poor quality semen after transrectal manually assisted semen collection; however, the reasons for the disappointing semen quality are not clear. Here we test the hypothesis that accumulation of senescent spermatozoa is a contributory factor, and that se

  13. COOLING CURVES OF THE BOAR SEMEN DILUTED IN ACP®103 EXTENDER ADDED OF POWDERED EGG YOLK IN FIXED CONCENTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyane Bandeira Barros

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The conservation of boar semen at lower temperatures might contribute to the further expansion of artificial insemination in this species. Egg yolk cryoprotectant properties have already been extensively tested on sperm cryopreservation of several species. This study aimed to test different temperature curves for the conservation of boar semen diluted with coconut milk powdered (ACP®-103 add 7% egg yolk and to verify which one better maintains sperm viability. For this, 36 ejaculates were diluted and stored at 17, 10 and 5 °C. Daily analysis of vigor and motility were performed, and on days D0, D2, and D4 semen was evaluated regarding vitality, morphology, and osmotic resistance. For the statistical analysis we performed the tests of Kruska-Wallis with Dunns post-test (nonparametric data and ANOVA and Tukey test (parametric data. The storage temperature of 10 °C was the best one   to maintain spermatic motility at appropriate levels to be used in an artificial insemination program. Analyses of viability, morphology, and hypoosmotic test did not show statistical difference among the treatments. In conclusion, the best temperature curve was 10 °C with diluted semen previously kept at 17 °C to maintain the viability of sperm cells in pigs for a longer period. Keywords: boar semen; coconut water powder; conservation; egg yolk.

  14. EFFECT OF PROTEINE CONTENT IN BOAR SEMINAL PLASMA ON THE SPERM MOTILITY IN DILUTED SEMEN STORED FOR 3 DAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Apić

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, it was frequently demonstrated that fertility of sows after artificially inseminated is lower than after mating. This is associated with a reduced fertilization capacity of overdiluted insemination doses. The aim of this study was to investigate the sperm motility in the semen samples, forming from the ejaculates with high or low protein content, stored in vitro on 17oC for 3 days. Progressive motility was significantly higher (p<0.01 in the ejaculates with high, compared to the ejaculates with low protein content (82% vs. 76%. After 3 days of storage, in the1:4 dilution proportion, the average progressive motility was significantly (p<0.01 decreased in relation to this value in native semen from the boars with high (82% to64%, as well from the boars with low protein content in seminal plasma (76% to48%. However, the average diluted semen progressive motility was significantly greater (p<0.01 in the boars with high (64%, compared to the boars with low protein content in seminal plasma (48%. The number of good diluted semen samples (≥65% progressive motility, was also significantly (p<0.01 greater in the boars with high (41%, compared to the boars with low protein content in seminal plasma (12%. These results show that seminal plasma proteins play an important role in maintaining the sperm progressive motility of diluted semen in vitro stored for 3 days.

  15. Bees and their products – importance for sustainable development of plants, animals and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Koszowska

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bees are vital to humans and the environment. They play an important role in the pollination of crops; bee products are often used as therapeutic agents in many diseases. Honey is of rich chemical composition, which determines its nutritional and medicinal properties. Therefore, it is attributed prophylactic activity against many diseases. Bee products are also a source of antioxidants. Their quality depends on the climate, environment, soil, and method of storage. Unfortunately, in the recent years there has been an increase in mortality of these beneficial insects, which is connected with the devastating human impact on the environment. This article is a review of the literature on the healing properties of bee products and their threats.

  16. Nutritional content of fresh, bee-collected and stored pollen of Aloe greatheadii var. davyana (Asphodelaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human, Hannelie; Nicolson, Sue W

    2006-07-01

    Aloe greatheadii var. davyana is the most important indigenous South African bee plant. Fresh, bee-collected and stored pollen of this aloe was collected and analysed for its nutritional content, including amino acid and fatty acid composition. Highly significant differences were found between the three types of pollen. Collection and storage by the bees resulted in increased water (13-21% wet weight) and carbohydrate content (35-61% dry weight), with a resultant decrease in crude protein (51-28% dry weight) and lipid content (10-8% dry weight). Essential amino acids were present in equal or higher amounts than the required minimum levels for honeybee development, with the exception of tryptophan. Fatty acids comprised a higher proportion of total lipid in fresh pollen than in bee-collected and stored pollen. This study is the first to compare the changes that occur in pollen of a single species after collection by honeybees.

  17. Recognition of MIR Data of Semen Armeniacae Amarum and Semen Persicae Using Discrete Wavelet Transformation and BP-Artificial Neural Network

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Cun-Gui; Yu, Peng; Wu, Chang-Shun; Shou, Jia-Ni

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal attenuation total reflection-Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (HATR-FT-IR) is used to measure the Mid-IR (MIR) of semen armeniacae amarum and its confusable varieties semen persicae. In order to extrude the difference between semen armeniacae amarum and semen persicae, discrete wavelet transformation (DWT) is used to decompose the MIR of semen armeniacae amarum and semen persicae. Two main scales are selected as the feature extracting space in the DWT domain. According ...

  18. Semen characteristics in HIV-1 positive men and the effect of semen washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasheeb, A S; King, J; Ball, J K; Curran, R; Barratt, C L; Afnan, M; Pillay, D

    1997-08-01

    We have undertaken an analysis of semen from HIV infected men with regard to sperm counts and motility, non-spermatozoal cells, and viral nucleic acid. Regression analysis showed that sperm concentration and motility were positively associated with blood CD4 cell count. By contrast, non-spermatozoal cell concentration (round cells) was inversely related to CD4 count. Extracellular HIV RNA was detected in the majority of semen samples and proviral DNA in a minority. Percoll gradient washing of 12 semen samples yielded six samples containing adequate sperm concentration for analysis. This washing procedure reduced prewash extracellular RNA to below detectable limits in all cases; proviral DNA present in two of the six prewash samples was also reduced to below detectable limits after washing. We conclude that semen washing before artificial insemination may reduce the risk of HIV transmission from an infected man to an uninfected woman. However, further evidence from prospective analyses of such an approach is required.

  19. Impact of Organophosphorous Pesticide Exposure on Semen Quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-ying LI; Jun-qing WU; Xiao-ping ZOU; Cai-qin XIAO; Wei-jin ZHOU; Er-sheng GAO

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of organophorous pesticide exposure on semen quality and other risk factors of semen qualityMethod Questionnaire investigation, external genital examination and laboratory examination of semen quality were conducted on 322 subjects, who were divided into exposed and control group, each consisting of 161 subjects. Results Multivariate analysis showed that educational level and years of alcohol drinking had effect on semen volume. Compared with subjects with primary school education or lower, those with junior high school education had higher value of semen volume(OR=1.961). Proportion of subjects with high semen volume decreased with the increasing years of alcohol drinking (OR=0.962). Organophosphorous pesticide exposure could result in the decline of the number of sperms with progressive forward progression (OR=0.528), figure of semen density (OR=0.266), semen viability (OR=0.398) and percentage of normal sperm morphology (OR=0.281). There are possible relationships between the season of semen collection and the number of sperms with progressive forward progression, semen viability and percentage of normal sperm morphology. Compared to summer, values of the above three indices would be higher in winter (OR was 2.272, 4.060 and 5.249, respectively).Conclusion Exposure to organophosphorous pesticide could result in the deterioration of semen quality of the peasants.

  20. Honey Bee Viruses in Wild Bees: Viral Prevalence, Loads, and Experimental Inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, Adam G; Hendrix, Stephen D; Scavo, Nicole A; Carrillo-Tripp, Jimena; Harris, Mary A; Wheelock, M Joseph; O'Neal, Matthew E; Toth, Amy L

    2016-01-01

    Evidence of inter-species pathogen transmission from managed to wild bees has sparked concern that emerging diseases could be causing or exacerbating wild bee declines. While some pathogens, like RNA viruses, have been found in pollen and wild bees, the threat these viruses pose to wild bees is largely unknown. Here, we tested 169 bees, representing 4 families and 8 genera, for five common honey bee (Apis mellifera) viruses, finding that more than 80% of wild bees harbored at least one virus. We also quantified virus titers in these bees, providing, for the first time, an assessment of viral load in a broad spectrum of wild bees. Although virus detection was very common, virus levels in the wild bees were minimal-similar to or lower than foraging honey bees and substantially lower than honey bees collected from hives. Furthermore, when we experimentally inoculated adults of two different bee species (Megachile rotundata and Colletes inaequalis) with a mixture of common viruses that is lethal to honey bees, we saw no effect on short term survival. Overall, we found that honey bee RNA viruses can be commonly detected at low levels in many wild bee species, but we found no evidence that these pathogens cause elevated short-term mortality effects. However, more work on these viruses is greatly needed to assess effects on additional bee species and life stages.

  1. Rhabdomyolysis Secondary to Bee Sting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okhan Akdur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Insect stings belonging to Hymenoptera defined as wasps, yellow jackets, bees, or hornets by human usually result in unserious clinical pictures that go with pain. Rhabdomyolysis following a bee sting is a rare condition. This paper emphasizes “rhabdomyolysis” as a rare complication of this frequently observed envenomation. Rare but severe clinical results may occur due to multiple bee stings, such as intravascular hemolysis, rhabdomyolysis, acute renal insufficiency, and hepatic dysfunction. In bee stings as in our case, clinicians should be alert for rhabdomyolysis in cases with generalized body and muscle pain. Early onset alkaline diuresis and management in patients with rhabdomyolysis are vital in protecting the renal functions and preventing morbidity and mortality.

  2. Viral diseases in honey bee queens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, Roy Mathew

    Honey bees are important insects for human welfare, due to pollination as well as honey production. Viral diseases strongly impact honey bee health, especially since the spread of varroa mites. This dissertation deals with the interactions between honey bees, viruses and varroa mites. A new tool...... was developed to diagnose three viruses in honey bees. Quantitative PCR was used to investigate the distribution of two popular viruses in five different tissues of 86 honey bee queens. Seasonal variation of viral infection in honey bee workers and varroa mites were determined by sampling 23 colonies under...

  3. ZigBee-2007 Security Essentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuksel, Ender; Nielson, Hanne Riis; Nielson, Flemming

    2008-01-01

    ZigBee is a fairly new but promising standard for wireless networks due to its low resource requirements. As in other wireless network standards, security is an important issue and each new version of the ZigBee Specification enhances the level of the ZigBee security. In this paper, we present...... the security essentials of the latest ZigBee Specification, ZigBee-2007. We explain the key concepts, protocols, and computations. In addition, we formulate the protocols using standard protocol narrations. Finally, we identify the key challenges to be considered for consolidating ZigBee....

  4. Do Perfluoroalkyl Compounds Impair Human Semen Quality?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, Ulla Nordström; Bossi, Rossana; Leffers, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are found globally in wildlife and humans and are suspected to act as endocrine disruptors. There are no previous reports of PFAA levels in adult men from Denmark or of a possible association between semen quality and PFAA exposure. OBJECTIVES: We investig...

  5. Semen quality improves marginally during young adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perheentupa, Antti; Sadov, Sergey; Rönkä, Riitta

    2016-01-01

    in several studies. The longitudinal development of semen quality in early adulthood is insufficiently understood. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: A longitudinal follow-up of two cohorts of volunteer young adult Finnish men representing the general population was carried out. Cohorts A (discovery cohort, born...

  6. Semen analysis and sperm function testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel R Franken; Sergio Oehninger

    2012-01-01

    Despite controversy regarding the clinical value of semen analysis,male fertility investigation still relies on a standardized analysis of the semen parameters.This is especially true for infertility clinics in both developing and developed countries.Other optional tests or sophisticated technologies have not been widely applied.The current review addresses important changes in the analysis of semen as described in the new World Health Organization (WHO) manual for semen analysis.The most important change in the manual is the use of evidence-based publications as references to determine cutoff values for normality.Apart from the above mentioned changes,the initial evaluation and handling methods remain,in most instances,the same as in previous editions.Furthermore,the review evaluates the importance of quality control in andrology with emphasis on the evaluation of sperm morphology.WHO sperm morphology training programmes for Sub-Saharan countries were initiated at Tygerberg Hospital in 1995.1he external quality control programme has ensured that the majority of participants have maintained their morphological reading skills acquired during initial training.This review reports on current sperm functional tests,such as the induced acrosome reaction,and sperm-zona pellucida binding assays,as well as the impact of sperm qualitv in terms of DNA integritv,and the relationship of sperm function tests to sperm morphologv.

  7. Bumblebees and solitary bees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Casper Christian I

    of dicotyledonous herbs in the flowering stage (quantity) and density of plants containing combined high pollen and nectar amounts (quality). Potential flower and nesting resources (referred to as semi-natural habitats) in the surrounding landscape were assessed using up-to-date, spatially precise registers of land...... larger scales but are more dependent on abundant flower resources from perennial plants found in semi-natural habitats. Conservation efforts must thus consider appropriate management of e.g. field borders and road verges to promote the presence of abundant flowers from perennial plants instead...... abundance of dicotyledonous herbs in both wheat fields and adjacent road verges. Its effect on flower abundance of high value bee plants was even more pronounced, with 10-fold higher mean density in organic wheat fields than in conventional wheat fields and 1.9-fold higher density in road verges bordering...

  8. Cocaine tolerance in honey bees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirik Søvik

    Full Text Available Increasingly invertebrates are being used to investigate the molecular and cellular effects of drugs of abuse to explore basic mechanisms of addiction. However, in mammals the principle factors contributing to addiction are long-term adaptive responses to repeated drug use. Here we examined whether adaptive responses to cocaine are also seen in invertebrates using the honey bee model system. Repeated topical treatment with a low dose of cocaine rendered bees resistant to the deleterious motor effects of a higher cocaine dose, indicating the development of physiological tolerance to cocaine in bees. Cocaine inhibits biogenic amine reuptake transporters, but neither acute nor repeated cocaine treatments caused measurable changes in levels of biogenic amines measured in whole bee brains. Our data show clear short and long-term behavioural responses of bees to cocaine administration, but caution that, despite the small size of the bee brain, measures of biogenic amines conducted at the whole-brain level may not reveal neurochemical effects of the drug.

  9. A comparison of ABAcard(®) p30 and RSID™-Semen test kits for forensic semen identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boward, Emily S; Wilson, Stacey L

    2013-11-01

    The screening and confirmatory tests available to a forensic laboratory allow evidence to be examined for the presence of bodily fluids. With the majority of evidence being submitted involving sexual assaults, it is important to have confirmatory tests for the identification of semen that are straightforward, quick, and reliable. The purpose of this study was to compare two commonly used semen identification kits utilized by forensic laboratories: ABAcard(®) p30 and Rapid Stain Identification of Human Semen (RSID™-Semen). These kits were assessed with aged semen stains, fresh and frozen post-vasectomy semen, post-coital samples collected on different substrates, post-vasectomy semen mixed with blood, saliva, and urine, a series of swabs collected at increasing time intervals after sexual intercourse, and multiple non-semen samples. The test kits were compared on the basis of sensitivity, specificity, and the cost and time effectiveness of each protocol. Overall, both semen identification tests performed well in the studies. Both kits proved specificity for identifying semen, however the ABAcard(®) p30 test surpassed the RSID™-Semen test in sensitivity, cost per test, and simplified test protocol.

  10. Pollen storages in nests of bees of the genera Partamona, Scaura and Trigona (Hymenoptera, Apidae Pólen estocado nos ninhos de abelhas dos gêneros Partamona, Scaura e Trigona (Hymenoptera, Apidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Rodrigo Rech

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Bees and angiosperms established a mutualistic relationship along the evolutionary time. The aim of this study is to contribute for the understanding of this relation analyzing pollen stored by stingless bees colonies distributed along the Rio Negro. Fourteen species of Meliponini from the genera Partamona, Scaura, and Trigona were studied with regard to the content of pollen pots. The pollen material was removed from the pollen pots, homogenized, and prepared according to the usual acetolysis technique. The overlap of the trophic niche and the grouping of species by similarity of niches was calculated. The identification revealed 78 pollen types belonging to 36 families, being 37 types attractive and 16 considered as promoters of a temporary specialization event. With the results, it was possible to indicate a list of important plants for meliponiculture in the Amazon.Abelhas e plantas estabeleceram ao longo do tempo evolutivo uma relação mutualística. Buscando contribuir para o entendimento dessa relação, foi analisado o pólen estocado por colônias de abelhas-sem-ferrão distribuídas ao longo do rio Negro. Foram estudados potes de pólen de 14 espécies de Meliponini dos gêneros Partamona, Scaura e Trigona. O material polínico foi retirado dos potes de pólen, homogeneizado e preparado segundo técnica usual de acetólise. Foram calculados a sobreposição de nicho trófico e o agrupamento das espécies pela similaridade de nichos. Foi identificado o total de 78 tipos polínicos, pertencentes a 36 famílias, sendo 37 destes, considerados atrativos, enquanto 16 foram promotores de eventos de especialização temporária. Com os resultados obtidos foi possível indicar uma lista de plantas de importância para a meliponicultura na Amazônia.

  11. Cryopreservation of canine semen - new challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farstad, W

    2009-07-01

    Egg yolk (EY) protects cell membranes against cold shock, and it prevents or restores the loss of phospholipids from the membrane. EY has been widely used in semen extenders. It has been added to Tris-Glucose buffer and has been widely used for cooling and cryopreservation of canine semen. EY is not a defined entity, but a complex biological compound containing proteins, vitamins, phospholipids, glucose and antioxidants which are all potentially useful for cell membrane integrity. Unfortunately, it also is a biologically hazardous compound. Hence, whole EY needs to be replaced by other chemically defined components for semen processing in dogs. Freezing poor semen does not improve its quality, so attention must be focused on how to cope with dogs whose semen does not freeze well, and on designing individual freezing extenders for semen from such males. Furthermore, differences have been found among canid species in the ability of their spermatozoa to withstand freezing. There are differences in sperm membrane fatty acid composition among species, which may explain part of these differences. If the presence of long-chained polyunsaturated fatty acids contributes to increased membrane fluidity, this relationship may be biphasic, i.e. either too much membrane fluidity, or too little, could compromise successful sperm cryopreservation. An increase in fluidity of the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane has been shown in frozen thawed dog spermatozoa. The protective effect of exogenous lipids may lie in close association with the membrane rather than in modification or rearrangement of the membrane. This also points at lipids as an important, if not entirely new group of substances, which may substitute standard EY-based diluents in preserving sperm survival during freezing. EY-derived phospholipids or lecithin could be used to replace whole EY. Vegetable lecithin is currently investigated to avoid using substances of animal origin. EY also contains antioxidants which

  12. Entomology: A Bee Farming a Fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldroyd, Benjamin P; Aanen, Duur K

    2015-11-16

    Farming is done not only by humans, but also by some ant, beetle and termite species. With the discovery of a stingless bee farming a fungus that provides benefits to its larvae, bees can be added to this list.

  13. Semen phthalate metabolites, semen quality parameters and serum reproductive hormones: A cross-sectional study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Xin; Zeng, Qiang; Sun, Yang; Yang, Pan; Wang, Peng; Li, Jin; Huang, Zhen; You, Ling; Huang, Yue-Hui; Wang, Cheng; Li, Yu-Feng; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to phthalates has been found to have adverse effects on male reproductive function in animals. However, the findings from human studies are inconsistent. Here we examined the associations of phthalate exposure with semen quality and reproductive hormones in a Chinese population using phthalate metabolite concentrations measured in semen as biomarkers. Semen (n = 687) and blood samples (n = 342) were collected from the male partners of sub-fertile couples who presented to the Reproductive Center of Tongji Hospital in Wuhan, China. Semen quality parameters and serum reproductive hormone levels were determined. Semen concentrations of 8 phthalate metabolites were assessed using high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Associations of the semen phthalate metabolites with semen quality parameters and serum reproductive hormones were assessed using confounder-adjusted linear and logistic regression models. Semen phthalate metabolites were significantly associated with decreases in semen volume [mono-n-butyl phthalate (MBP), mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), mono(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate (MEHHP), mono(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate (MEOHP)], sperm curvilinear velocity [monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP), MEHP, the percentage of di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate metabolites excreted as MEHP (%MEHP)], and straight-line velocity (MBzP, MEHP, %MEHP), and also associated with an increased percentage of abnormal heads and tails (MBzP) (all p for trend hormones. Our findings suggest that environmental exposure to phthalates may impair human semen quality.

  14. Differences in the ability of spermatozoa from individual boar ejaculates to withstand different semen-processing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrilla, Inma; del Olmo, David; Sijses, Laurien; Martinez-Alborcia, María J; Cuello, Cristina; Vazquez, Juan M; Martinez, Emilio A; Roca, Jordi

    2012-05-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the ability of spermatozoa from individual boar ejaculates to withstand different semen-processing techniques. Eighteen sperm-rich ejaculate samples from six boars (three per boar) were diluted in Beltsville Thawing Solution and split into three aliquots. The aliquots were (1) further diluted to 3×10(7) sperm/mL and stored as a liquid at 17°C for 72 h, (2) frozen-thawed (FT) at 1×10(9) sperm/mL using standard 0.5-mL straw protocols, or (3) sex-sorted with subsequent liquid storage (at 17°C for 6 h) or FT (2×10(7) sperm/mL using a standard 0.25-mL straw protocol). The sperm quality was evaluated based on total sperm motility (the CASA system), viability (plasma membrane integrity assessed using flow cytometry and the LIVE/DEAD Sperm Viability Kit), lipid peroxidation (assessed via indirect measurement of the generation of malondialdehyde (MDA) using the BIOXYTECH MDA-586 Assay Kit) and DNA fragmentation (sperm chromatin dispersion assessed using the Sperm-Sus-Halomax(®) test). Data were normalized to the values assessed for the fresh (for liquid-stored and FT samples) or the sorted semen samples (for liquid stored and the FT sorted spermatozoa). All of the four sperm-processing techniques affected sperm quality (Psperm and increased MDA generation and percentages of sperm with fragmented DNA. Significant (Pboar (effect of boars within each semen-processing technique) and intra-boar (effect of semen-processing techniques within each boar) differences were evident for all of the sperm quality parameters assessed, indicating differences in the ability of spermatozoa from individual boars to withstand the semen-processing techniques. These results are the first evidence that ejaculate spermatozoa from individual boars can respond in a boar-dependent manner to different semen-processing techniques.

  15. Mathematical prediction of freezing times of bovine semen in straws placed in static vapor over liquid nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M V; Sansinena, M; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2013-02-01

    A widespread practice in cryopreservation is to freeze spermatozoa by suspending the straws in stagnant nitrogen vapor over liquid nitrogen (N(2)V/LN(2)) for variable periods of time before plunging into liquid nitrogen (-196°C) for indefinite storage. A mathematical heat transfer model was developed to predict freezing times (phase change was considered) required for bull semen and extender packaged in 0.5ml plastic straws and suspended in static liquid nitrogen vapor. Thermophysical properties (i.e. thermal conductivity, specific heat, density, initial freezing temperature) of bovine semen and extender as a function of temperature were determined considering the water change of phase. The non-stationary heat transfer partial differential equations with variable properties (nonlinear mathematical problem) were numerically solved considering in series thermal resistances (semen suspension-straw) and the temperature profiles were obtained for both semen suspension and plastic straw. It was observed both the external heat transfer coefficient in stagnant nitrogen vapor and its temperature (controlled by the distance from the surface of liquid nitrogen to the straw) affected freezing times. The accuracy of the model to estimate freezing times of the straws was further confirmed by comparing with experimental literature data. Results of this study will be useful to select "safe" holding times of bull semen in plastic straws placed N(2)V/LN(2) to ensure that complete freezing of the sample has occurred in the nitrogen vapor and avoid cryodamage when plunging in LN(2). Freezing times predicted by the numerical model can be applied to optimize freezing protocols of bull semen in straws.

  16. Honey bee genotypes and the environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meixner, Marina D; Büchler, Ralph; Costa, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Although knowledge about honey bee geographic and genetic diversity has increased tremendously in recent decades, the adaptation of honey bees to their local environment has not been well studied. The current demand for high economic performance of bee colonies with desirable behavioural...

  17. A Review of Bee Virology Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey bees play a vital role in global food production and sustainable ecological systems. However, honey bee colony losses at the rate of 20%-30% per year in recent years have been devastating to the agricultural industry and ecosystem that rely on honey bees for pollination. Among biotic and abiot...

  18. Bumble bees at home and at school

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwak, MM

    1997-01-01

    Do you know how bumble bees live and what they need? You can discover a lot about bumble bees if you watch them while they visit flowers. This article is a shortened version of a chapter from the IBRA publication Bumble bees for pleasure and profit*, and gives you information on how to do

  19. Hologenome theory and the honey bee pathosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent research shows substantial genomic diversity among the parasites and pathogens honey bees encounter, a robust microbiota living within bees, and a genome-level view of relationships across global honey bee races. Different combinations of these genomic complexes may explain regional variatio...

  20. SIFAT FISIKA DAN KETEGUHAN PATAH PAPAN SEMEN PARTIKEL DARI PELEPAH KELAPA SAWIT (Elaeis guineensis Jack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violet Burhanuddin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui kemungkinan pemanfaatan pelepah kelapa sawit sebagai bahan baku papan semen partikel dan untuk mengetahui sifat fisika dan mekanika papan semen partikel pada berbagai perbandingan semen dan partikel dari dua merek semen (Tonasa dan Tiga Roda. Penelitian ini menggunakan Rancangan Acak Lengkap (RAL dengan pola faktorial 2 x 3 sebanyak 5 kali ulangan, dimana faktor A adalah merek semen yaitu semen tonasa dan semen Tiga Roda kemudian faktor B adalah perbandingan antara partikel dan semen. Hasil pengujian sifat fisika dan mekanika masing-masing menunjukan pengaruh yang sangat berbeda nyata, hal ini disebabkan karena semakin banyak penambahan jumlah perekat semen maka semakin baik pula sifat fisika dan mekanika papan semen yang dibuat, sedangkan untuk faktor merek semen tidak menunjukan perbedaan yang nyata. Kata kunci : Pelapah kelapa sawit, sifat fisika dan mekanika, papan semen partikel

  1. SIFAT FISIKA DAN KETEGUHAN PATAH PAPAN SEMEN PARTIKEL DARI PELEPAH KELAPA SAWIT (Elaeis guineensis Jack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violet Burhanuddin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui kemungkinan pemanfaatan pelepah kelapa sawit sebagai bahan baku papan semen partikel dan untuk mengetahui sifat fisika dan mekanika papan semen partikel pada berbagai perbandingan semen dan partikel dari dua merek semen (Tonasa dan Tiga Roda. Penelitian ini menggunakan Rancangan Acak Lengkap (RAL dengan pola faktorial 2 x 3 sebanyak 5 kali ulangan, dimana faktor A adalah merek semen yaitu semen tonasa dan semen Tiga Roda kemudian faktor B adalah perbandingan antara partikel dan semen. Hasil pengujian sifat fisika dan mekanika masing-masing menunjukan pengaruh yang sangat berbeda nyata, hal ini disebabkan karena semakin banyak penambahan jumlah perekat semen maka semakin baik pula sifat fisika dan mekanika papan semen yang dibuat, sedangkan untuk faktor merek semen tidak menunjukan perbedaan yang nyata. Kata kunci : Pelapah kelapa sawit, sifat fisika dan mekanika, papan semen partikel.

  2. Recovery Act: Water Heater ZigBee Open Standard Wireless Controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, William P. [Emerson Electric Co., St. Louis, MO (United States); Buescher, Tom [Emerson Electric Co., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-04-30

    The objective of Emerson's Water Heater ZigBee Open Standard Wireless Controller is to support the DOE's AARA priority for Clean, Secure Energy by designing a water heater control that levels out residential and small business peak electricity demand through thermal energy storage in the water heater tank.

  3. Utilization of Frozen Semen of Wild Yak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阎萍

    2005-01-01

    After domestication of wild yak and utilization of its frozen semen was successful in 1983, frozen semen of wild yak was used to improve domestic yak and local yellow cattle by artificial insemination(AI). Hybrid vigor of their F1 was obvious, i. e. , productive performance of F1 was significantly increased. Their offspring did not only have significant heterosis in performance but also can rejuvenate effectively their adaptability and survival, and can use alpine grassland more efficiently. This resulted in significant social and economic benefits.Compared with dairy cattle, beef cattle and yellow cattle, AI of yak was more difficult. Using AI to improve yak performance was difficult and significant in yak production areas of our country. It is necessary to invest more technique and fund to extend AI.

  4. Swimming of the Honey Bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Chris; Gharib, Morteza

    2016-11-01

    When the weather gets hot, nursing honey bees nudge foragers to collect water for thermoregulation of their hive. While on their mission to collect water, foragers sometimes get trapped on the water surface, forced to interact with a different fluid environment. In this study, we present the survival strategy of the honey bees at the air-water interface. A high-speed videography and shadowgraph were used to record the honey bees swimming. A unique thrust mechanism through rapid vibration of their wings at 60 to 150 Hz was observed. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-1511414; additional support by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144469.

  5. Sperm cell population dynamics in ram semen during the cryopreservation process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ramón

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sperm cryopreservation has become an indispensable tool in biology. Initially, studies were aimed towards the development of efficient freezing protocols in different species that would allow for an efficient storage of semen samples for long periods of time, ensuring its viability. Nowadays, it is widely known that an important individual component exists in the cryoresistance of semen, and efforts are aimed at identifying those sperm characteristics that may allow us to predict this cryoresistance. This knowledge would lead, ultimately, to the design of optimized freezing protocols for the sperm characteristics of each male. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have evaluated the changes that occur in the sperm head dimensions throughout the cryopreservation process. We have found three different patterns of response, each of one related to a different sperm quality at thawing. We have been able to characterize males based on these patterns. For each male, its pattern remained constant among different ejaculates. This latter would imply that males always respond in the same way to freezing, giving even more importance to this sperm feature. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Changes in the sperm head during cryopreservation process have resulted useful to identify the ability of semen of males for freezing. We suggest that analyses of these response patterns would represent an important tool to characterize the cryoresistance of males when implemented within breeding programs. We also propose follow-up experiments to examine the outcomes of the use of different freezing protocols depending on the pattern of response of males.

  6. Uranium quantification in semen by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Todor I; Ejnik, John W; Guandalini, Gustavo; Xu, Hanna; Hoover, Dennis; Anderson, Larry; Squibb, Katherine; McDiarmid, Melissa A; Centeno, Jose A

    2013-01-01

    In this study we report uranium analysis for human semen samples. Uranium quantification was performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. No additives, such as chymotrypsin or bovine serum albumin, were used for semen liquefaction, as they showed significant uranium content. For method validation we spiked 2g aliquots of pooled control semen at three different levels of uranium: low at 5 pg/g, medium at 50 pg/g, and high at 1000 pg/g. The detection limit was determined to be 0.8 pg/g uranium in human semen. The data reproduced within 1.4-7% RSD and spike recoveries were 97-100%. The uranium level of the unspiked, pooled control semen was 2.9 pg/g of semen (n=10). In addition six semen samples from a cohort of Veterans exposed to depleted uranium (DU) in the 1991 Gulf War were analyzed with no knowledge of their exposure history. Uranium levels in the Veterans' semen samples ranged from undetectable (<0.8 pg/g) to 3350 pg/g. This wide concentration range for uranium in semen is consistent with known differences in current DU body burdens in these individuals, some of whom have retained embedded DU fragments.

  7. Uranium quantification in semen by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Todor; Ejnik, John W.; Guandalini, Gustavo S.; Xu, Hanna; Hoover, Dennis; Anderson, Larry W.; Squibb, Katherine; McDiarmid, Melissa A.; Centeno, Jose A.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we report uranium analysis for human semen samples. Uranium quantification was performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. No additives, such as chymotrypsin or bovine serum albumin, were used for semen liquefaction, as they showed significant uranium content. For method validation we spiked 2 g aliquots of pooled control semen at three different levels of uranium: low at 5 pg/g, medium at 50 pg/g, and high at 1000 pg/g. The detection limit was determined to be 0.8 pg/g uranium in human semen. The data reproduced within 1.4–7% RSD and spike recoveries were 97–100%. The uranium level of the unspiked, pooled control semen was 2.9 pg/g of semen (n = 10). In addition six semen samples from a cohort of Veterans exposed to depleted uranium (DU) in the 1991 Gulf War were analyzed with no knowledge of their exposure history. Uranium levels in the Veterans’ semen samples ranged from undetectable (<0.8 pg/g) to 3350 pg/g. This wide concentration range for uranium in semen is consistent with known differences in current DU body burdens in these individuals, some of whom have retained embedded DU fragments.

  8. ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY AS A MARKER OF DOG SEMEN FREEZABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOSINIAK-KAMYSZ K.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigation was performed to evaluate the dog semen freezability and itsquality after thawing allowing its use for artificial insemination (AI. On the basis ofsperm motility, concentration and alkaline phosphatase (AP activity in semenplasma it was possible to establish that AP activity corresponds with the basic factorof semen examination. Significant statistical differences occurred between thequality of ejaculates which were qualified or disqualified to deep freezing and AI.These results show that AP activity in raw dog semen plasma can be used as amarker for the dog semen qualification for deep freezing and AI with 95%probability of the prognosis of the results.

  9. The plight of the bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, M.; Mader, E.; Vaughan, M.; Euliss, N.H.

    2011-01-01

    The loss of biodiversity is a trend that is garnering much concern. As organisms have evolved mutualistic and synergistic relationships, the loss of one or a few species can have a much wider environmental impact. Since much pollination is facilitated by bees, the reported colony collapse disorder has many worried of widespread agricultural fallout and thus deleterious impact on human foodstocks. In this Feature, Spivak et al. review what is known of the present state of bee populations and provide information on how to mitigate and reverse the trend. ?? 2010 American Chemical Society.

  10. Bee cups: Single-use cages for honey bee experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey bees face challenges ranging from poor nutrition to exposure to parasites, pathogens, and environmental chemicals. These challenges drain colony resources and have been tied to both subtle and extreme colony declines, including the enigmatic Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). Understanding how ...

  11. Recognition of FT-IR Data Cuscutae Semen, Japanese Dodder, and Sinapis Semen Using Discrete Wavelet Transformation and RBF Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal attenuation total reflection Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (HATR-FT-IR studies on cuscutae semen and its confusable varieties Japanese dodder and sinapis semen combined with discrete wavelet transformation (DWT and radial basis function (RBF neural networks have been conducted in order to classify them. DWT is used to decompose the FT-IRs of cuscutae semen, Japanese dodder, and sinapis semen. Two main scales are selected as the feature extracting space in the DWT domain. According to the distribution of cuscutae semen, Japanese dodder, and sinapis semen’s FT-IRs, three feature regions are determined at detail 3, and two feature regions are determined at detail 4 by selecting two scales in the DWT domain. Thus five feature parameters form the feature vector. The feature vector is input to the RBF neural networks to train so as to accurately classify the cuscutae semen, Japanese dodder, and sinapis semen. 120 sets of FT-IR data are used to train and test the proposed method, where 60 sets of data are used to train samples, and another 60 sets of FT-IR data are used to test samples. Experimental results show that the accurate recognition rate of cuscutae semen, Japanese dodder, and sinapis semen is average of 100.00%, 98.33%, and 100.00%, respectively, following the proposed method.

  12. Honey Bee Colonies Remote Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Lebrero, Sergio; Quiles-Latorre, Francisco Javier; Ortiz-López, Manuel; Sánchez-Ruiz, Víctor; Gámiz-López, Victoria; Luna-Rodríguez, Juan Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Bees are very important for terrestrial ecosystems and, above all, for the subsistence of many crops, due to their ability to pollinate flowers. Currently, the honey bee populations are decreasing due to colony collapse disorder (CCD). The reasons for CCD are not fully known, and as a result, it is essential to obtain all possible information on the environmental conditions surrounding the beehives. On the other hand, it is important to carry out such information gathering as non-intrusively as possible to avoid modifying the bees’ work conditions and to obtain more reliable data. We designed a wireless-sensor networks meet these requirements. We designed a remote monitoring system (called WBee) based on a hierarchical three-level model formed by the wireless node, a local data server, and a cloud data server. WBee is a low-cost, fully scalable, easily deployable system with regard to the number and types of sensors and the number of hives and their geographical distribution. WBee saves the data in each of the levels if there are failures in communication. In addition, the nodes include a backup battery, which allows for further data acquisition and storage in the event of a power outage. Unlike other systems that monitor a single point of a hive, the system we present monitors and stores the temperature and relative humidity of the beehive in three different spots. Additionally, the hive is continuously weighed on a weighing scale. Real-time weight measurement is an innovation in wireless beehive—monitoring systems. We designed an adaptation board to facilitate the connection of the sensors to the node. Through the Internet, researchers and beekeepers can access the cloud data server to find out the condition of their hives in real time. PMID:28036061

  13. Honey Bee Colonies Remote Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Gil-Lebrero

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bees are very important for terrestrial ecosystems and, above all, for the subsistence of many crops, due to their ability to pollinate flowers. Currently, the honey bee populations are decreasing due to colony collapse disorder (CCD. The reasons for CCD are not fully known, and as a result, it is essential to obtain all possible information on the environmental conditions surrounding the beehives. On the other hand, it is important to carry out such information gathering as non-intrusively as possible to avoid modifying the bees’ work conditions and to obtain more reliable data. We designed a wireless-sensor networks meet these requirements. We designed a remote monitoring system (called WBee based on a hierarchical three-level model formed by the wireless node, a local data server, and a cloud data server. WBee is a low-cost, fully scalable, easily deployable system with regard to the number and types of sensors and the number of hives and their geographical distribution. WBee saves the data in each of the levels if there are failures in communication. In addition, the nodes include a backup battery, which allows for further data acquisition and storage in the event of a power outage. Unlike other systems that monitor a single point of a hive, the system we present monitors and stores the temperature and relative humidity of the beehive in three different spots. Additionally, the hive is continuously weighed on a weighing scale. Real-time weight measurement is an innovation in wireless beehive—monitoring systems. We designed an adaptation board to facilitate the connection of the sensors to the node. Through the Internet, researchers and beekeepers can access the cloud data server to find out the condition of their hives in real time.

  14. From silkworms to bees: Diseases of beneficial insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    The diseases of the silkworm (Bombyx mori) and managed bees, including the honey bee (Apis mellifera), bumbles bees (Bombus spp.), the alfalfa leafcutting bee (Megachile rotundata), and mason bees (Osmia spp.) are reviewed, with diagnostic descriptions and a summary of control methods for production...

  15. Semen quality parameters, their inter-relationship and post-washing sperm attributes of Rhode Island Red roosters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Richard Churchil

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present experiments were conducted (a to evaluate the semen attributes of older Rhode Island Red (RIR roosters and the inter-trait relationships, (b to test sperm washing and storage duration suitable for gene transfer experiments. Materials and Methods: The semen characteristics of older RIR roosters were studied, and Pearson correlation analysis was done to demonstrate the inter-trait relationships. Progressive motility and percent live sperms were tested at different post-washing intervals to identify suitable sperm processing conditions for gene transfer experiments. Results: The volume, appearance score, initial motility, sperm count and percent live and abnormal spermatozoa were 0.38 ml, 3.58, 80.34%, 4.03 × 109 sperms/ml, 83.18% and 4.52% respectively. Positive correlation was observed among appearance score, motility, live sperm and sperm count. Semen volume is negatively correlated with all the other characters except live sperms, whereas, percent abnormal sperms negatively associated with all the other traits. Significant (p<0.05 decrease in terms of motility and live sperm was recorded at 60 min post-washing. Conclusion: The semen attributes of RIR roosters compares well with the other breeds of chicken. The appearance score can be used to assess fertility where microscopic evaluation facilities are limited. The sperm washing protocol tested in the experiment is suitable for gene transfer experiments.

  16. Chronic bee paralysis virus and Nosema ceranae experimental co-infection of winter honey bee workers (Apis mellifera L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) is an important viral disease of adult bees which induces significant losses in honey bee colonies. In this study winter worker bees were experimentally infected using three different experiments. Bees were inoculated orally or topically with CBPV to evaluate the l...

  17. Sickness Behavior in Honey Bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazlauskas, Nadia; Klappenbach, Martín; Depino, Amaicha M.; Locatelli, Fernando F.

    2016-01-01

    During an infection, animals suffer several changes in their normal physiology and behavior which may include lethargy, appetite loss, and reduction in grooming and general movements. This set of alterations is known as sickness behavior and although it has been extensively believed to be orchestrated primarily by the immune system, a relevant role for the central nervous system has also been established. The aim of the present work is to develop a simple animal model to allow studying how the immune and the nervous systems interact coordinately during an infection. We administered a bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into the thorax of honey bees to mimic a bacterial infection, and then we evaluated a set of stereotyped behaviors of the animals that might be indicative of sickness behavior. First, we show that this immune challenge reduces the locomotor activity of the animals in a narrow time window after LPS injection. Furthermore, bees exhibit a loss of appetite 60 and 90 min after injection, but not 15 h later. We also demonstrate that LPS injection reduces spontaneous antennal movements in harnessed animals, which suggests a reduction in the motivational state of the bees. Finally, we show that the LPS injection diminishes the interaction between animals, a crucial behavior in social insects. To our knowledge these results represent the first systematic description of sickness behavior in honey bees and provide important groundwork for the study of the interaction between the immune and the neural systems in an insect model. PMID:27445851

  18. Recent Honey Bee Colony Declines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-20

    production ([http://www.nass.usda.gov/QuickStats/]). Melon production is based on reported 2002 harvested acreage. c. Apricots, avocados , blueberries...crops are almost totally (90%-100%) dependent on honey bee pollination, including almonds, apples, avocados , blueberries, cranberries, cherries, kiwi...is regularly posted to the website of the Mid-Atlantic Apiculture Research and Extension Consortium (MAAREC), which represents beekeeping

  19. Stingless bees (Melipona subnitida) adjust brood production rather than foraging activity in response to changes in pollen stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia-Silva, Camila; Hrncir, Michael; Imperatriz-Fonseca, Vera Lucia; Schorkopf, Dirk Louis P

    2016-10-01

    Highly eusocial bees (honey bees and stingless bees) sustain their colonies through periods of resource scarcity by food stored within the nest. The protein supply necessary for successful brood production is ensured through adjustments of the colonies' pollen foraging according to the availability of this resource in the environment. In honey bees Apis mellifera, in addition, pollen foraging is regulated through the broods' demand for this resource. Here, we investigated the influence of the colony's pollen store level on pollen foraging and brood production in stingless bees (Melipona subnitida). When pollen was added to the nests, colonies increased their brood production and reduced their pollen foraging within 24 h. On the other hand, when pollen reserves were removed, colonies significantly reduced their brood production. In strong contrast to A. mellifera; however, M. subnitida did not significantly increase its pollen foraging activity under poor pollen store conditions. This difference concerning the regulation of pollen foraging may be due to differences regarding the mechanism of brood provisioning. Honey bees progressively feed young larvae and, consequently, require a constant pollen supply. Stingless bees, by contrast, mass-provision their brood cells and temporary absence of pollen storage will not immediately result in substantial brood loss.

  20. Neonicotinoids act like endocrine disrupting chemicals in newly-emerged bees and winter bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, Danica; Wilton, Emily; Pawluk, Abbe; de Gorter, Michael; Chomistek, Nora

    2017-09-08

    Accumulating evidence suggests that neonicotinoids may have long-term adverse effects on bee health, yet our understanding of how this could occur is incomplete. Pesticides can act as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in animals providing characteristic multiphasic dose-response curves and non-lethal endpoints in toxicity studies. However, it is not known if neonicotinoids act as EDCs in bees. To address this issue, we performed oral acute and chronic toxicity studies including concentrations recorded in nectar and pollen, applying acetamiprid, clothianidin, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam to bumble bees, honey bees and leafcutter bees, the three most common bee species managed for pollination. In acute toxicity studies, late-onset symptoms, such as ataxia, were recorded as non-lethal endpoints for all three bee species. Clothianidin and thiamethoxam produced biphasic dose-response curves for all three bee species. Clothianidin and thiamethoxam were extremely toxic to winter worker honey bees prior to brood production in spring, making this the most sensitive bee stage identified to date. Chronic exposure to field-realistic levels of neonicotinoids reduced bee survival and caused significant late-onset symptoms for all three bee species. Given these findings, neonicotinoid risk should be reevaluated to address the EDC-like behavior and the sensitivity of winter worker honey bees.

  1. Evaluation of specimen preservatives for DNA analyses of bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, M.; Droege, S.; Conrad, T.; Prager, S.; Richards, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Large-scale insect collecting efforts that are facilitated by the use of pan traps result in large numbers of specimens being collected. Storage of these specimens can be problematic if space and equipment are limited. In this study, we investigated the effects of various preservatives (alcohol solutions and DMSO) on the amount and quality of DNA extracted from bees (specifically Halictidae, Apidae, and Andrenidae). In addition, we examined the amount and quality of DNA obtained from bee specimens killed and stored at -80 degrees C and from specimens stored for up to 24 years in ethanol. DNA quality was measured in terms of how well it could be PCR-amplified using a set of mitochondrial primers that are commonly used in insect molecular systematics. Overall the best methods of preservation were ultra-cold freezing and dimethyl sulfoxide, but these are both expensive and in the case of ultra-cold freezing, somewhat impractical for field entomologists. Additionally, dimethyl sulfoxide was shown to have adverse effects on morphological characters that are typically used for identification to the level of species. We therefore recommend that the best alternative is 95% ethanol, as it preserves bee specimens well for both morphological and molecular studies.

  2. Serum and semen zinc levels in normozoospermic and oligozoospermic men

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madding, C.I.; Jacob, M.; Ramsay, V.P.; Sokol, R.Z.

    1986-01-01

    We studied 11 unselected men who presented to a Reproductive Endocrinology Clinic with histories of infertility and low sperm counts. Reproductive hormones and semen und serum zinc levels were measured. All men had semen analyses performed on at least three separate occasions. A similar set of laboratory evaluations were performed on 11 other men who had normal semen analyses and no history of infertility. No abnormalities of reproductive hormones were found in either group. Mean serum zinc levels were significantly lower in the infertile men. Mean semen zinc levels were not significantly different. There was no correlation between serum and semen zinc levels in either group. A significant correlation was found between sperm count and semen zinc in the volunteers with normal counts, but not in the oligozoospermic men. The results obtained in this study suggest that lowered serum zinc is more common than formerly appreciated in unselected patients with infertility. The high level of zinc found in semen is due primarily to the secretions of the prostate gland and reflects prostatic stores. Serum zinc is thought to be a reasonable indicator of zinc status. The lack of correlation between serum zinc and semen zinc found in our study suggests that mild zinc deficiency may lower serum zinc while the larger prostatic zinc stores remain unaffected.

  3. The characterisation and cryopreservation of Venda chicken semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masindi L. Mphaphathi

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: In conclusion, the Venda cock semen was subsequently found to have a higher TM% when stored in vitro at 5 °C. DMSO and EG were found to be suitable for the cryopreservation of Venda cock semen.

  4. Parasite infection accelerates age polyethism in young honey bees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lecocq, Antoine; Jensen, Annette Bruun; Kryger, Per;

    2016-01-01

    them to exhibit behaviours typical of older bees. Bees with high N. ceranae spore counts had significantly increased walking rates and decreased attraction to queen mandibular pheromone. Infected bees also exhibited higher rates of trophallaxis (food exchange), potentially reflecting parasite...

  5. AZF Microdeletions in Human Semen Infected with Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayfa H Hassani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are associated with infertility in men. This study was aimed to investigate microdeletions on Yq chromosome in semen infected with bacteria by using bacteriological, biochemical, and serological assays. The investigation showed that 107 of 300 (84.80% semen samples collected from infertile men with primary or secondary infertility were infected with different species of bacteria. Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrheae were the most frequently diagnosed bacteria in the infected semen samples. The percentages of infections of semen samples with C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhea were 42.31% and 35.28% respectively. Genomic DNA from each semen sample infected with predominant bacteria was analyzed for AZF deletions by using multiplex PCR. Different patterns of AZF microdeletions were obtained. It can be concluded that sexually transmitted bacteria may contribute in microdeletions of Yq chromosome by indirectly producing reactive oxygen species and causing gene defect in AZF regions.

  6. Perfluorochemicals and Human Semen Quality: The LIFE Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen; Schisterman, Enrique F.; Kim, Sungduk; Sweeney, Anne M.; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Lynch, Courtney D.; Gore-Langton, Robert E.; Barr, Dana Boyd

    2014-01-01

    Background: The relation between persistent environmental chemicals and semen quality is evolving, although limited data exist for men recruited from general populations. Objectives: We examined the relation between perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) and semen quality among 501 male partners of couples planning pregnancy. Methods: Using population-based sampling strategies, we recruited 501 couples discontinuing contraception from two U.S. geographic regions from 2005 through 2009. Baseline interviews and anthropometric assessments were conducted, followed by blood collection for the quantification of seven serum PFCs (perfluorosulfonates, perfluorocarboxylates, and perfluorosulfonamides) using tandem mass spectrometry. Men collected a baseline semen sample and another approximately 1 month later. Semen samples were shipped with freezer packs, and analyses were performed on the day after collection. We used linear regression to estimate the difference in each semen parameter associated with a one unit increase in the natural log–transformed PFC concentration after adjusting for confounders and modeling repeated semen samples. Sensitivity analyses included optimal Box-Cox transformation of semen quality end points. Results: Six PFCs [2-(N-methyl-perfluorooctane sulfonamido) acetate (Me-PFOSA-AcOH), perfluorodecanoate (PFDeA), perfluorononanoate (PFNA), perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)] were associated with 17 semen quality end points before Box-Cox transformation. PFOSA was associated with smaller sperm head area and perimeter, a lower percentage of DNA stainability, and a higher percentage of bicephalic and immature sperm. PFDeA, PFNA, PFOA, and PFOS were associated with a lower percentage of sperm with coiled tails. Conclusions: Select PFCs were associated with certain semen end points, with the most significant associations observed for PFOSA but with results in varying directions. Citation

  7. Researches Regarding the Testing of Bee Family Resistance to Bee Brood Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia Pătruică; Eliza Căuia; Eliza Simiz; Adrian Siceanu; Marian Bura; Ionut Bănăţean Dunea; Marioara Nicula; Cristian Fiştea

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we tested the resistance of bee families to young bee diseases. The researches were carried out in two apiaries from Timişoara and Comoraste, Caras-Severin County. The biological material was consisted of 10 bee families belonging to the species Apis mellifica carpatica, distributed in two experimental variants of 5 families, with almost equal power. During this experiment, we assessed the degree of cleaning and removing of the young bees that died of freezing. Successive to the...

  8. Effect of single layer centrifugation using Androcoll-E-Large on the sperm quality parameters of cooled-stored donkey semen doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, I; Dorado, J; Ramírez, L; Morrell, J M; Acha, D; Urbano, M; Gálvez, M J; Carrasco, J J; Gómez-Arrones, V; Calero-Carretero, R; Hidalgo, M

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of single layer centrifugation (SLC) using Androcoll-E-Large on donkey sperm quality parameters after 24 h of cool-storage. Ejaculates were collected from Andalusian donkeys and then cooled at 5°C. SLC was carried out after 24 h of cool-storage using Androcoll-E-Large. In the first experiment, all sperm parameters assessed (total and progressive sperm motility, viability, sperm morphology and sperm kinematics VCL, VSL, VAP, LIN, STR, WOB, ALH and BCF) were statistically compared between semen samples processed or not with Androcoll-E-Large. Significant differences (Pdonkeys, increasing the sperm quality of cooled-stored donkey semen doses after 24 h of cool storage.

  9. Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus in Honeybee Queens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amiri, Esmaeil; Meixner, Marina; Büchler, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) is known as a disease of worker honey bees. To investigate pathogenesis of the CBPV on the queen, the sole reproductive individual in a colony, we conducted experiments regarding the susceptibility of queens to CBPV. Results from susceptibility experiment showed...... a similar disease progress in the queens compared to worker bees after infection. Infected queens exhibit symptoms by Day 6 post infection and virus levels reach 1011 copies per head. In a transmission experiment we showed that social interactions may affect the disease progression. Queens with forced...... contact to symptomatic worker bees acquired an overt infection with up to 1011 virus copies per head in six days. In contrast, queens in contact with symptomatic worker bees, but with a chance to receive food from healthy bees outside the cage appeared healthy. The virus loads did not exceed 107...

  10. Comparative Analyses of Proteome Complement Between Worker Bee Larvae of High Royal Jelly Producing Bees (A. m. ligustica) and Carniolian Bees (A. m. carnica)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian; LI Jian-ke

    2009-01-01

    This study is to compare the protein composition of the high royal jelly producing bee (A. m. ligustica) with that of Carniolian bee (A. m. carnica) during their worker larval developmental stage. The experiment was carried out by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The results showed that significant higher numbers of total proteins (283) were detected in larvae of high royal jelly producing bees (Jelly bee) than those of Camiolian bees (152) on 2-d-old larvae. Among them, 110 proteins were presented on both strains of bee larvae, whereas 173 proteins were specific to larvae of Jelly bees, and 42 proteins were exclusive to Carniolian larvae. However, on the 4th d, a significant higher number of total proteins (290) were detected in larvae of Jelly bees than those of Camiolian bees (240), 163 proteins resolved to both bee larvae, and 127 proteins were specific to Jelly bees and 77 proteins to Camiolian bees. Until the 6th d, also a significant higher number of total proteins (236) were detected in larvae of Jelly bees than those of Carniolian bees (180), 132 proteins were constantly expressed in two bee larvae, whereas 104 and 48 proteins are unique to Jelly bee and Camiolian bee larvae, respectively. We tentatively concluded that the metabolic rate and gene expression of Jelly bees larvae is higher than those of Carniolian bees based proteins detected as total proteins and proteins specific to each stage of two strains of bee larvae. Proteins constantly expressed on 3 stages of larval development with some significant differences between two bee strains, and proteins unique to each stage expressed differences in term of quality and quantity, indicating that larval development needed house keeping and specific proteins to regulate its growth at different development phage, but the expression mold is different between two strains of larval development.

  11. Bee sting after seizure and ischemic attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Yurtseven

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Insect bites, bee stings are the most frequently encountered. Often seen after bee stings usually only local allergic reactions. Sometimes with very serious clinical condition may also be confronted. Of this rare clinical findings; polyneuritis, parkinsonism, encephalitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, Guillain-Barre syndrome, myocardial infarction, pulmonary edema, hemorrhage, hemolytic anemia and renal disease has. Here a rare convulsions after a bee sting is presented.

  12. The innate immune and systemic response in honey bees to a bacterial pathogen, Paenibacillus larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foster Leonard J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a major paradox in our understanding of honey bee immunity: the high population density in a bee colony implies a high rate of disease transmission among individuals, yet bees are predicted to express only two-thirds as many immunity genes as solitary insects, e.g., mosquito or fruit fly. This suggests that the immune response in bees is subdued in favor of social immunity, yet some specific immune factors are up-regulated in response to infection. To explore the response to infection more broadly, we employ mass spectrometry-based proteomics in a quantitative analysis of honey bee larvae infected with the bacterium Paenibacillus larvae. Newly-eclosed bee larvae, in the second stage of their life cycle, are susceptible to this infection, but become progressively more resistant with age. We used this host-pathogen system to probe not only the role of the immune system in responding to a highly evolved infection, but also what other mechanisms might be employed in response to infection. Results Using quantitative proteomics, we compared the hemolymph (insect blood of five-day old healthy and infected honey bee larvae and found a strong up-regulation of some metabolic enzymes and chaperones, while royal jelly (food and energy storage proteins were down-regulated. We also observed increased levels of the immune factors prophenoloxidase (proPO, lysozyme and the antimicrobial peptide hymenoptaecin. Furthermore, mass spectrometry evidence suggests that healthy larvae have significant levels of catalytically inactive proPO in the hemolymph that is proteolytically activated upon infection. Phenoloxidase (PO enzyme activity was undetectable in one or two-day-old larvae and increased dramatically thereafter, paralleling very closely the age-related ability of larvae to resist infection. Conclusion We propose a model for the host response to infection where energy stores and metabolic enzymes are regulated in concert with direct

  13. Insulin addition to swine semen diluted and cooled at 15 ºC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro César Pereira Cunha

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding different doses of insulin to swine semen processed and stored at 15 ºC. The experiment used sixteen ejaculates from four commercial breeding pigs, distributed in a randomized block design (ejaculate with split plot along time (0, 24, 48 and 72 hours of storage with four treatments (insulin levels - 0.0 4.0 8.0 and 12.0 IU per dose and 16 repetitions. The experimental unit was made of two insemination doses of 100 mL each, with 3×10(9 spermatozoids. Insulin used was NPH-human, added at the time of processing the doses. The addition of insulin did not affect motility, sperm viability, the percentage of abnormal cells, the osmotic resistance or the degradation rate of motility in 120 minutes. There was a linear decrease in semen quality over storage time, regardless of insulin levels. The addition of insulin at the mentioned concentrations does not influence the quality of insemination dose in pigs.

  14. Honey bee hemocyte profiling by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marringa, William J; Krueger, Michael J; Burritt, Nancy L; Burritt, James B

    2014-01-01

    Multiple stress factors in honey bees are causing loss of bee colonies worldwide. Several infectious agents of bees are believed to contribute to this problem. The mechanisms of honey bee immunity are not completely understood, in part due to limited information about the types and abundances of hemocytes that help bees resist disease. Our study utilized flow cytometry and microscopy to examine populations of hemolymph particulates in honey bees. We found bee hemolymph includes permeabilized cells, plasmatocytes, and acellular objects that resemble microparticles, listed in order of increasing abundance. The permeabilized cells and plasmatocytes showed unexpected differences with respect to properties of the plasma membrane and labeling with annexin V. Both permeabilized cells and plasmatocytes failed to show measurable mitochondrial membrane potential by flow cytometry using the JC-1 probe. Our results suggest hemolymph particulate populations are dynamic, revealing significant differences when comparing individual hive members, and when comparing colonies exposed to diverse conditions. Shifts in hemocyte populations in bees likely represent changing conditions or metabolic differences of colony members. A better understanding of hemocyte profiles may provide insight into physiological responses of honey bees to stress factors, some of which may be related to colony failure.

  15. Environmental Exposure to Triclosan and Semen Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenting; Zhang, Hao; Tong, Chuanliang; Xie, Chong; Fan, Guohua; Zhao, Shasha; Yu, Xiaogang; Tian, Ying; Zhang, Jun

    2016-02-17

    Triclosan (2,4,4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxy-diphenyl ether, TCS) is widely used in personal care, household, veterinary and industrial products. It was considered as a potential male reproductive toxicant in previous in vitro and in vivo studies. However, evidence from human studies is scarce. Our study aims to investigate the relationship between TCS exposure and semen quality. We measured urinary TCS concentrations in 471 men recruited from a male reproductive health clinic. TCS was detected in 96.7% of urine samples, with a median concentration of 0.97 ng (mg·creatinine)(-1) (interquartile range, 0.41-2.95 ng (mg·creatinine)(-1)). A multiple linear regression analysis showed a negative association between natural logarithm (Ln) transformed TCS concentration (Ln-TCS) and Ln transformed number of forward moving sperms (adjusted coefficient β = -0.17; 95% confidence interval (CI) (-0.32, -0.02). Furthermore, among those with the lowest tertile of TCS level, Ln-TCS was negatively associated with the number of forward moving sperms (β = -0.35; 95% CI (-0.68, -0.03)), percentage of sperms with normal morphology (β = -1.64; 95% CI (-3.05, -0.23)), as well as number of normal morphological sperms, sperm concentration and count. Our findings suggest that the adverse effect of TCS on semen quality is modest at the environment-relevant dose in humans. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  16. Tritium concentrations in bees and honey at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1979-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.R.; Pratt, L.H.

    1997-01-01

    Honeybees are effective monitors of environmental pollution. The objective of this study was to summarize tritium ({sup 3}H) concentrations in bees and honey collected from within and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) over an 18-year period. Based on the long-term average, bees from nine out of eleven hives and honey from six out of eleven hives on LANL lands contained {sup 3}H that was significantly higher (p <0.05) than background. The highest average concentration of {sup 3}H in bees (435 pCi mL{sup -1}) collected over the years was from LANL`s Technical Area (TA) 54-a low-level radioactive waste disposal site (Area G). Similarly, the highest average concentration of {sup 3}H in honey (709 pCi mL{sup - 1}) was collected from a hive located near three {sup 3}H storage ponds at LANL TA-53. The average concentrations of {sup 3}H in bees and honey from background hives was 1.0 pCi mL{sup -1} and 1.5 pCi ML{sup -1}, respectively. Although the concentrations of 3H in bees and honey from most LANL and perimeter (White Rock/Pajarito Acres) areas were significantly higher than background, most areas, with the exception of TA-53 and TA-54, generally exhibited decreasing 3H concentrations over time.

  17. Bee Queen Breeding Methods - Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Patruica

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The biological potential of a bee family is mainly generated by the biological value of the queen. Whether we grow queens widely or just for our own apiaries, we must consider the acquisition of high-quality biological material, and also the creation of optimal feeding and caring conditions, in order to obtain high genetic value queens. Queen breeding technology starts with the setting of hoeing families, nurse families, drone-breeding families – necessary for the pairing of young queens, and also of the families which will provide the bees used to populate the nuclei where the next queens will hatch. The complex of requirements for the breeding of good, high-production queens is sometimes hard to met, under the application of artificial methods. The selection of breeding method must rely on all these requirements and on the beekeeper’s level of training.

  18. Semen preservation and artificial insemination in domesticated South American camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, P Walter; Alarcon, V; Baca, L; Cuba, Y; Ordoñez, C; Salinas, J; Tito, F

    2013-01-10

    Semen preservation and artificial insemination in South American camelids are reviewed giving emphasis to work done in Peru and by the authors. Reports on semen evaluation and the preservation process indicate that semen of alpacas and llamas can be manipulated by making it liquid first. Collagenase appears to be the best enzyme to eliminate viscosity. Tris buffer solution maintains a higher motility than egg-yolk citrate, phosphate buffered saline (PBS), Triladyl, and Merck-I extenders. Cooling of semen took 1h after collected, and equilibrated with 7% glycerol presented a better motility and spermatozoa survival at 1, 7, 15 and 30days after being slowly frozen in 0.25mL plastic straws. Trials of artificial insemination with freshly diluted semen and frozen-thawed semen are encouraging and needs to be tested extensively under field conditions. Recently, fertility rates varied from 3 to 67%. Semen preservation and most important, artificial insemination appear to be a reality, and could be used to improve the genetic quality of alpacas and llamas.

  19. Bee sting of the cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G

    1984-04-01

    Irreversible heterochromia-iridis, internal ophthalmoplegia, and punctate subcapsular lenticular opacities developed in a 9-year-old girl after she received a bee sting in her right cornea. These complications persisted even after an 11-month follow-up period. To the author's knowledge, this presentation is the first of its nature. The pathogenesis of these changes is discussed and the literature is reviewed.

  20. Effect of different extenders on ram sperm traits during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeňka Hegedűšová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to test commercial extenders used for short-term and long-term sperm preservation. Semen was collected in the reproduction season, i.e. from June to December. The ejaculates were obtained from single services and the routine analysis of the semen was performed immediately after the collection. The examination included semen volume, colour and texture, sperm concentration and motility, ejaculate turbulence and percentage of sperm with abnormal morphology. The semen was diluted with an extender in the ratio of 1:4. The processed semen was transported in an insulated container at 16–18 °C to the laboratory and stored in a stationary thermostat under the same temperature. Sperm motility tests were performed 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours after the placement in to thermostat. Ejaculates diluted with Ovipro, Optidyl, Triladyl and Andromed CSS gave very good results of viability (81.23 %–83.41 % after 24 hours of storage. After 48 hours, Ovipro, Andromed, Optidyl and Triladyl gave values above 75 %. The Triladyl extender proved to be a good stabilizing agent, showing consistent results during a long-term storage. It was chosen as a control one for overall assessment. Other preservation media did not show any improving or worsening effects. The extender Ovipro showed a high motility effect in the first 48 hours only, and hence it appears to be the best solution for the short-term preservation.

  1. Involuntary reduction in vigour of calves born from sexed semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djedović, Radica; Bogdanović, Vladan; Stanojević, Dragan; Nemes, Zsolt; Gáspárdy, András; Cseh, Sándor

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the reproductive traits of heifers and the development characteristics of their calves following artificial insemination (AI) with sexed and non-sexed semen. The analysed characteristics included conception rate, gestation length, calf birth weight, calf vigour, stillbirth rate, and twinning rate. Data of 530 calves produced with sexed and 1,163 calves produced with non-sexed semen were analysed. The General Linear Model (GLM) was applied to assess the influence of semen type, farm, season of insemination, the calf's sex and the inseminating sire on gestation length and calf birth weight. With the exception of gestation length (P > 0.05), all other traits studied were significantly (P gestation length was 274.6 and 274.9 days, respectively. The mean calf birth weight was 37.47 kg for non-sexed and 36.75 kg for sexed semen. The stillbirth rate was 6.19% for conventional and 7.54% for sexed semen, while the twinning rate was 3.78% for conventional and 1.13% for sexed semen. The calves produced with non-sexed and sexed semen differed significantly in viability (P 0.05); however, artificial insemination with X-sorted sexed semen significantly altered the sex ratio of calves (85.1:14.9%, P < 0.01). The results obtained in this investigation are in agreement with the majority of studies which compared the fertility traits, sex ratio and calf characteristics depending on the application of artificial insemination with sexed or conventional semen.

  2. Evaluation of sperm chromatin structure in boar semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banaszewska Dorota

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was an attempt to evaluate sperm chromatin structure in the semen of insemination boars. Preparations of semen were stained with acridine orange, aniline blue, and chromomycin A3. Abnormal protamination occurred more frequently in young individuals whose sexual development was not yet complete, but may also be an individual trait. This possibility is important to factor into the decision regarding further exploitation of insemination boars. Thus a precise assessment of abnormalities in the protamination process would seem to be expedient as a tool supplementing morphological and molecular evaluation of semen. Disruptions in nucleoprotein structure can be treated as indicators of the biological value of sperm cells.

  3. MicroHLPC determination of amygdalin in Semen pruni armeniacae and Semen pruni persicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, L Y; Li, B M

    1988-11-01

    The application of micro HPLC to the determination of amygdalin in Semen pruni armeniacae and Semen pruni persicae is described. Amygdalin is separated at ambient temperature on a reversed phase column of U-Finepak SIL C18(150 x 0.5 mm) with methanol + water (25:75 v/v) as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 10 microL/min. The results are calculated by the internal standard method. The linear range is 1-7 micrograms. The CV and recovery of pure amygdalin are 1.47% (n = 10) and 98.13%, respectively. The results of analysis are lower than those obtained by TLC, but microHPLC is much simpler, faster, and more sensitive and reproducible than TLC.

  4. Live bee acupuncture (Bong-Chim) dermatitis: dermatitis due to live bee acupuncture therapy in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joon Soo; Lee, Min Jung; Chung, Ki Hun; Ko, Dong Kyun; Chung, Hyun

    2013-12-01

    Live bee acupuncture (Bong-Chim) dermatitis is an iatrogenic disease induced by so-called live bee acupuncture therapy, which applies the honeybee (Apis cerana) stinger directly into the lesion to treat various diseases in Korea. We present two cases of live bee acupuncture dermatitis and review previously published articles about this disease. We classify this entity into three stages: acute, subacute, and chronic. The acute stage is an inflammatory reaction, such as anaphylaxis or urticaria. In the chronic stage, a foreign body granuloma may develop from the remaining stingers, similar to that of a bee sting reaction. However, in the subacute stage, unlike bee stings, we see the characteristic histological "flame" figures resulting from eosinophilic stimulation induced by excessive bee venom exposure. We consider this stage to be different from the adverse skin reaction of accidental bee sting.

  5. Effects of dietary supplementation with an organic source of selenium on characteristics of semen quality and in vitro fertility in boars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speight, S M; Estienne, M J; Harper, A F; Crawford, R J; Knight, J W; Whitaker, B D

    2012-03-01

    Semen characteristics in boars fed organic or inorganic sources of Se were assessed in 3 experiments. Crossbred boars were randomly assigned at weaning to 1 of 3 dietary treatments: I) basal diets with no supplemental Se (control), II) basal diets with 0.3 mg/kg of supplemental Se from an organic source (Sel-Plex, Alltech Inc., Nicholasville, KY), and III) basal diets supplemented with 0.3 mg/kg of supplemental Se from sodium selenite (Premium Selenium 270, North American Nutrition Co. Inc., Lewisburg, OH). For Exp. 1, semen was collected from boars (n = 10/dietary treatment) on 5 consecutive days at 15 mo of age. Effects of treatment × day were detected for the proportions of progressively motile (P = 0.02) and rapidly moving (P = 0.03) spermatozoa, and measures of sperm velocity, including path velocity of the smoothed cell path (P = 0.05) and average velocity measured in a straight line from the beginning to the end of the track (P = 0.05). Negative effects of day of semen collection on sperm motility were least pronounced in boars fed Sel-Plex. Experiment 2 was conducted when boars were 17 mo of age, and semen was collected (n = 10 boars/dietary treatment), diluted in commercially available extenders, and stored at 18°C for 9 d. Effects of treatment × day were detected for percentages of motile (P = 0.01) and static (P = 0.01) spermatozoa, amplitude of lateral head displacement (P = 0.02), frequency with which the sperm track crossed the sperm path (P = 0.04), straightness (P = 0.01), and average size of all sperm heads (P = 0.03). In general, sperm cells from boars fed Sel-Plex were better able to maintain motility during liquid storage compared with boars fed sodium selenite. For Exp. 3, semen was collected from boars (n = 6/dietary treatment) at 23 mo of age, and spermatozoa were evaluated at d 1 and 8 after semen collection using in vitro fertilization procedures. There was a tendency for an effect (P = 0.11) of dietary treatment on fertilization rate

  6. Bacterial communities in semen from men of infertile couples: metagenomic sequencing reveals relationships of seminal microbiota to semen quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Long Weng

    Full Text Available Some previous studies have identified bacteria in semen as being a potential factor in male infertility. However, only few types of bacteria were taken into consideration while using PCR-based or culturing methods. Here we present an analysis approach using next-generation sequencing technology and bioinformatics analysis to investigate the associations between bacterial communities and semen quality. Ninety-six semen samples collected were examined for bacterial communities, measuring seven clinical criteria for semen quality (semen volume, sperm concentration, motility, Kruger's strict morphology, antisperm antibody (IgA, Atypical, and leukocytes. Computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA was also performed. Results showed that the most abundant genera among all samples were Lactobacillus (19.9%, Pseudomonas (9.85%, Prevotella (8.51% and Gardnerella (4.21%. The proportion of Lactobacillus and Gardnerella was significantly higher in the normal samples, while that of Prevotella was significantly higher in the low quality samples. Unsupervised clustering analysis demonstrated that the seminal bacterial communities were clustered into three main groups: Lactobacillus, Pseudomonas, and Prevotella predominant group. Remarkably, most normal samples (80.6% were clustered in Lactobacillus predominant group. The analysis results showed seminal bacteria community types were highly associated with semen health. Lactobacillus might not only be a potential probiotic for semen quality maintenance, but also might be helpful in countering the negative influence of Prevotella and Pseudomonas. In this study, we investigated whole seminal bacterial communities and provided the most comprehensive analysis of the association between bacterial community and semen quality. The study significantly contributes to the current understanding of the etiology of male fertility.

  7. Bees prefer foods containing neonicotinoid pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Sébastien C.; Tiedeken, Erin Jo; Simcock, Kerry L.; Derveau, Sophie; Mitchell, Jessica; Softley, Samantha; Stout, Jane C.; Wright, Geraldine A.

    2015-05-01

    The impact of neonicotinoid insecticides on insect pollinators is highly controversial. Sublethal concentrations alter the behaviour of social bees and reduce survival of entire colonies. However, critics argue that the reported negative effects only arise from neonicotinoid concentrations that are greater than those found in the nectar and pollen of pesticide-treated plants. Furthermore, it has been suggested that bees could choose to forage on other available flowers and hence avoid or dilute exposure. Here, using a two-choice feeding assay, we show that the honeybee, Apis mellifera, and the buff-tailed bumblebee, Bombus terrestris, do not avoid nectar-relevant concentrations of three of the most commonly used neonicotinoids, imidacloprid (IMD), thiamethoxam (TMX), and clothianidin (CLO), in food. Moreover, bees of both species prefer to eat more of sucrose solutions laced with IMD or TMX than sucrose alone. Stimulation with IMD, TMX and CLO neither elicited spiking responses from gustatory neurons in the bees' mouthparts, nor inhibited the responses of sucrose-sensitive neurons. Our data indicate that bees cannot taste neonicotinoids and are not repelled by them. Instead, bees preferred solutions containing IMD or TMX, even though the consumption of these pesticides caused them to eat less food overall. This work shows that bees cannot control their exposure to neonicotinoids in food and implies that treating flowering crops with IMD and TMX presents a sizeable hazard to foraging bees.

  8. The Plight of the Honey Bee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockridge, Emma

    2010-01-01

    The decline of colonies of honey bees across the world is threatening local plant biodiversity and human food supplies. Neonicotinoid pesticides have been implicated as a major cause of the problem and are banned or suspended in several countries. Other factors could also be lowering the resistance of bees to opportunist infections by, for…

  9. Salt preferences of honey bee water foragers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Pierre W; Nieh, James C

    2016-03-01

    The importance of dietary salt may explain why bees are often observed collecting brackish water, a habit that may expose them to harmful xenobiotics. However, the individual salt preferences of water-collecting bees were not known. We measured the proboscis extension reflex (PER) response of Apis mellifera water foragers to 0-10% w/w solutions of Na, Mg and K, ions that provide essential nutrients. We also tested phosphate, which can deter foraging. Bees exhibited significant preferences, with the most PER responses for 1.5-3% Na and 1.5% Mg. However, K and phosphate were largely aversive and elicited PER responses only for the lowest concentrations, suggesting a way to deter bees from visiting contaminated water. We then analyzed the salt content of water sources that bees collected in urban and semi-urban environments. Bees collected water with a wide range of salt concentrations, but most collected water sources had relatively low salt concentrations, with the exception of seawater and swimming pools, which had >0.6% Na. The high levels of PER responsiveness elicited by 1.5-3% Na may explain why bees are willing to collect such salty water. Interestingly, bees exhibited high individual variation in salt preferences: individual identity accounted for 32% of variation in PER responses. Salt specialization may therefore occur in water foragers.

  10. The Plight of the Honey Bee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockridge, Emma

    2010-01-01

    The decline of colonies of honey bees across the world is threatening local plant biodiversity and human food supplies. Neonicotinoid pesticides have been implicated as a major cause of the problem and are banned or suspended in several countries. Other factors could also be lowering the resistance of bees to opportunist infections by, for…

  11. Pattern recognition in bees : orientation discrimination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateren, J.H. van; Srinivasan, M.V.; Wait, P.B.

    1990-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera, worker) were trained to discriminate between two random gratings oriented perpendicularly to each other. This task was quickly learned with vertical, horizontal, and oblique gratings. After being trained on perpendicularly-oriented random gratings, bees could discriminate

  12. HomePort ZigBee Adapter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas; Smedegaard, Jacob Haubach; Hansen, Rene

    The ZigBee protocol is a large and complicated standard with multiple abstraction layers, and it is a substantial undertaking for new players in the field. The purpose of this project is to enable Zigbee networking for a non-ZigBee device, such as the ConLAN keypad. To accomplish this we utilise...

  13. Physiology and biochemistry of honey bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite their tremendous economic importance, honey bees are not a typical model system for studying general questions of insect physiology. This is primarily due to the fact that honey bees live in complex social settings which impact their physiological and biochemical characteristics. Not surpris...

  14. Honey bees selectively avoid difficult choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Clint J; Barron, Andrew B

    2013-11-19

    Human decision-making strategies are strongly influenced by an awareness of certainty or uncertainty (a form of metacognition) to increase the chances of making a right choice. Humans seek more information and defer choosing when they realize they have insufficient information to make an accurate decision, but whether animals are aware of uncertainty is currently highly contentious. To explore this issue, we examined how honey bees (Apis mellifera) responded to a visual discrimination task that varied in difficulty between trials. Free-flying bees were rewarded for a correct choice, punished for an incorrect choice, or could avoid choosing by exiting the trial (opting out). Bees opted out more often on difficult trials, and opting out improved their proportion of successful trials. Bees could also transfer the concept of opting out to a novel task. Our data show that bees selectively avoid difficult tasks they lack the information to solve. This finding has been considered as evidence that nonhuman animals can assess the certainty of a predicted outcome, and bees' performance was comparable to that of primates in a similar paradigm. We discuss whether these behavioral results prove bees react to uncertainty or whether associative mechanisms can explain such findings. To better frame metacognition as an issue for neurobiological investigation, we propose a neurobiological hypothesis of uncertainty monitoring based on the known circuitry of the honey bee brain.

  15. The problem of disease when domesticating bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    When disease strikes a hive of bees, it can devastate the colony and spread to the entire beekeeping operation. All bees are susceptible to diseases, and when they are domesticated, their population densities increase to suit human needs, making them more susceptible. Most attempts at disease contro...

  16. 7 CFR 322.29 - Dead bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dead bees. 322.29 Section 322.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEES, BEEKEEPING BYPRODUCTS, AND BEEKEEPING EQUIPMENT Importation and Transit...

  17. Pattern recognition in bees : orientation discrimination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateren, J.H. van; Srinivasan, M.V.; Wait, P.B.

    1990-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera, worker) were trained to discriminate between two random gratings oriented perpendicularly to each other. This task was quickly learned with vertical, horizontal, and oblique gratings. After being trained on perpendicularly-oriented random gratings, bees could discriminate

  18. Cell culture techniques in honey bee research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cell culture techniques are indispensable in most if not all life science disciplines to date. Wherever cell culture models are lacking scientific development is hampered. Unfortunately this has been and still is the case in honey bee research because permanent honey bee cell lines have not yet been...

  19. Deformed wing virus can be transmitted during natural mating in honey bees and infect the queens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Esmaeil; Meixner, Marina D.; Kryger, Per

    2016-01-01

    Deformed wing virus is an important contributor to honey bee colony losses. Frequently queen failure is reported as a cause for colony loss. Here we examine whether sexual transmission during multiple matings of queens is a possible way of virus infection in queens. In an environment with high prevalence of deformed wing virus, queens (n = 30) were trapped upon their return from natural mating flights. The last drone’s endophallus (n = 29), if present, was removed from the mated queens for deformed wing virus quantification, leading to the detection of high-level infection in 3 endophalli. After oviposition, viral quantification revealed that seven of the 30 queens had high-level deformed wing virus infections, in all tissues, including the semen stored in the spermathecae. Two groups of either unmated queens (n = 8) with induced egg laying, or queens (n = 12) mated in isolation with drones showing comparatively low deformed wing virus infections served as control. None of the control queens exhibited high-level viral infections. Our results demonstrate that deformed wing virus infected drones are competitive to mate and able to transmit the virus along with semen, which occasionally leads to queen infections. Virus transmission to queens during mating may be common and can contribute noticeably to queen failure. PMID:27608961

  20. The Bees among Us: Modelling Occupancy of Solitary Bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIvor, J Scott; Packer, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Occupancy modelling has received increasing attention as a tool for differentiating between true absence and non-detection in biodiversity data. This is thought to be particularly useful when a species of interest is spread out over a large area and sampling is constrained. We used occupancy modelling to estimate the probability of three phylogenetically independent pairs of native-introduced species [Megachile campanulae (Robertson)-Megachile rotundata (Fab.), Megachile pugnata Say-Megachile centuncularis (L.), Osmia pumila Cresson-Osmia caerulescens (L.)] (Apoidea: Megachilidae) being present when repeated sampling did not always find them. Our study occurred along a gradient of urbanization and used nest boxes (bee hotels) set up over three consecutive years. Occupancy modelling discovered different patterns to those obtained by species detection and abundance-based data alone. For example, it predicted that the species that was ranked 4th in terms of detection actually had the greatest occupancy among all six species. The native M. pugnata had decreased occupancy with increasing building footprint and a similar but not significant pattern was found for the native O. pumila. Two introduced bees (M. rotundata and M. centuncularis), and one native (M. campanulae) had modelled occupancy values that increased with increasing urbanization. Occupancy probability differed among urban green space types for three of six bee species, with values for two native species (M. campanulae and O. pumila) being highest in home gardens and that for the exotic O. caerulescens being highest in community gardens. The combination of occupancy modelling with analysis of habitat variables as an augmentation to detection and abundance-based sampling is suggested to be the best way to ensure that urban habitat management results in the desired outcomes.

  1. Assessing grooming behavior of Russian honey bees toward Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The grooming behavior of Russian bees was compared to Italian bees. Overall, Russian bees had significantly lower numbers of mites than the Italian bees with a mean of 1,937 ± 366 and 5,088 ± 733 mites, respectively. This low mite population in the Russian colonies was probably due to the increased ...

  2. Allee effects and colony collapse disorder in honey bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    We propose a mathematical model to quantify the hypothesis that a major ultimate cause of Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) in honey bees is the presence of an Allee effect in the growth dynamics of honey bee colonies. In the model, both recruitment of adult bees as well as mortality of adult bees have...

  3. Antiviral Defense Mechanisms in Honey Bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutscher, Laura M.; Daughenbaugh, Katie F.; Flenniken, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees are significant pollinators of agricultural crops and other important plant species. High annual losses of honey bee colonies in North America and in some parts of Europe have profound ecological and economic implications. Colony losses have been attributed to multiple factors including RNA viruses, thus understanding bee antiviral defense mechanisms may result in the development of strategies that mitigate colony losses. Honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms include RNA-interference, pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) triggered signal transduction cascades, and reactive oxygen species generation. However, the relative importance of these and other pathways is largely uncharacterized. Herein we review the current understanding of honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms and suggest important avenues for future investigation. PMID:26273564

  4. Pharmacological evaluation of bee venom and melittin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila G. Dantas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify the pharmacological effects of bee venom and its major component, melittin, on the nervous system of mice. For the pharmacological analysis, mice were treated once with saline, 0.1 or 1.2 mg/kg of bee venom and 0.1 mg/kg of melittin, subcutaneously, 30 min before being submitted to behavioral tests: locomotor activity and grooming (open-field, catalepsy, anxiety (elevated plus-maze, depression (forced swimming test and apomorphine-induced stereotypy. Haloperidol, imipramine and diazepam were administered alone (positive control or as a pre-treatment (haloperidol.The bee venom reduced motor activity and promoted cataleptic effect, in a similar manner to haloperidol.These effects were decreased by the pretreatment with haloperidol. Both melittin and bee venom decreased the apomorphine-induced stereotypies. The data indicated the antipsychotic activity of bee venom and melittin in a murine model.

  5. Environmental Exposure to Triclosan and Semen Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenting Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Triclosan (2,4,4′-trichloro-2′-hydroxy-diphenyl ether, TCS is widely used in personal care, household, veterinary and industrial products. It was considered as a potential male reproductive toxicant in previous in vitro and in vivo studies. However, evidence from human studies is scarce. Our study aims to investigate the relationship between TCS exposure and semen quality. We measured urinary TCS concentrations in 471 men recruited from a male reproductive health clinic. TCS was detected in 96.7% of urine samples, with a median concentration of 0.97 ng (mg·creatinine−1 (interquartile range, 0.41–2.95 ng (mg·creatinine−1. A multiple linear regression analysis showed a negative association between natural logarithm (Ln transformed TCS concentration (Ln-TCS and Ln transformed number of forward moving sperms (adjusted coefficient β = −0.17; 95% confidence interval (CI (−0.32, −0.02. Furthermore, among those with the lowest tertile of TCS level, Ln-TCS was negatively associated with the number of forward moving sperms (β = −0.35; 95% CI (−0.68, −0.03, percentage of sperms with normal morphology (β = −1.64; 95% CI (−3.05, −0.23, as well as number of normal morphological sperms, sperm concentration and count. Our findings suggest that the adverse effect of TCS on semen quality is modest at the environment-relevant dose in humans. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  6. SPONTANEOUS POTENTIAL INVESTIGATIONS IN SEMENIC MOUNTAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. URDEA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous Potential Investigations in Semenic Mountains. The use of geophysical methods such as that of Spontaneous Potential (SP to investigate areas where the geomorphological processes occur, has the role to identify less visible processes as for example subcutaneous erosion or piping, subsoil water drainage and finding specific spatial differences of these processes. Comparative study of these sites allows correlation between geomorphological factors, soil and climate, but also to observe the evolution of subsurface erosion or underground water infiltration over time. During this investigation a series of mesh grids have been made in areas with different characteristics (lithology, pedology, slope, exposition, etc. at different time periods in order to spot and analyse the change in data in the chosen sites, various conditions given. Values expressed in millivolts (mV obtained by the Spontaneous Potential method have been put into an algorithm for interpolation looking to yield a pattern of values of what is happening in the soil during that period of time. Thus, in the autumn, the investigation site at the nivation niche Baia Vulturilor, returned values of between -22.6 mV and 65.6 mV, while in spring in the same site, values were within the range of -14.4 mV / 30.1 mV. On the other hand, on the site of the cryopediment under the Semenic peak, in the spring, return values ranged from -40.4 mV and -1.1 mV. A particular case is that of the glacis near Piatra Goznei peak; in this area anthropogenic electricity influences on soil can be found. Based on some models a trend of water movement in the soil could be established, this depending heavily on the amount of precipitation infiltration, local lithology, depth of soil and their structure, and evapotranspiration process. Water movement in the soil may be a correlation with sediment movement in soil horizons and instability manifested on the slopes.

  7. History of commercializing sexed semen for cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, D L; Seidel, G E

    2008-04-15

    Although the basic principles controlling the sex of mammalian offspring have been known for a relatively long time, recent application of certain modern cellular methodologies has led to development of a flow cytometric system capable of differentiating and separating living X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm in amounts suitable for AI and therefore, commercialization of this sexing technology. After a very long history of unsuccessful attempts to differentiate between mammalian sperm that produce males from those that produce females, a breakthrough came in 1981 when it was demonstrated that precise DNA content could be measured. Although these initial measurements of DNA content killed the sperm in the process, they led to the ultimate development of a sperm sorting system that was capable, not only of differentiating between live X- and Y-sperm, but of sorting them into relatively pure X- and Y-sperm populations without obvious cellular damage. Initial efforts to predetermine the sex of mammalian offspring in 1989 required surgical insemination, but later enhancements provided sex-sorted sperm in quantities suitable for use with IVF. Subsequent advances in flow sorting provided minimal numbers of sperm sufficient for use in AI. It was not until the flow cytometric sorting system was improved greatly and successful cryopreservation of sex-sorted bull sperm was developed that efficacious approaches to commercialization of sexed semen could be implemented worldwide in cattle. A number of companies now offer sex-sorted bovine sperm. Innovative approaches by a diverse group of scientists along with advances in computer science, biophysics, cell biology, instrumentation, and applied reproductive physiology provided the basis for commercializing sexed semen in cattle.

  8. Variation of semen parameters in healthy medical students due to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that vary most in samples of healthy donors undergoing stressful examination period. ... Assessment of semen quality is based on an evaluation of several parameters ... having a very important impact on infertility in both males and females.

  9. Hypertension And Poor Semen Quality: A New Compelling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of hypertension is usually individualized for optimal results. ... favourable effects on the side not necessarily related to blood pressure lowering effect. ... as preferred first line drugs in hypertension for men with poor quality semen.

  10. Factors predictive of abnormal semen parameters in male partners ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of couples attending the infertility clinic of a tertiary hospital in south-western ... treatment targeted at the identified aetiological factors. .... that prognosis is inversely proportional to the number of abnormal .... Semen parameters and hormone.

  11. Variation of semen parameters in healthy medical students due to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variation of semen parameters in healthy medical students due to exam ... period when compared to samples donated at the beginning of the semester. Conclusion Stress levels of donors might prove to be clinically relevant and important ...

  12. Metatranscriptomic analyses of honey bee colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozkar, Cansu Ö; Kence, Meral; Kence, Aykut; Huang, Qiang; Evans, Jay D

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees face numerous biotic threats from viruses to bacteria, fungi, protists, and mites. Here we describe a thorough analysis of microbes harbored by worker honey bees collected from field colonies in geographically distinct regions of Turkey. Turkey is one of the World's most important centers of apiculture, harboring five subspecies of Apis mellifera L., approximately 20% of the honey bee subspecies in the world. We use deep ILLUMINA-based RNA sequencing to capture RNA species for the honey bee and a sampling of all non-endogenous species carried by bees. After trimming and mapping these reads to the honey bee genome, approximately 10% of the sequences (9-10 million reads per library) remained. These were then mapped to a curated set of public sequences containing ca. Sixty megabase-pairs of sequence representing known microbial species associated with honey bees. Levels of key honey bee pathogens were confirmed using quantitative PCR screens. We contrast microbial matches across different sites in Turkey, showing new country recordings of Lake Sinai virus, two Spiroplasma bacterium species, symbionts Candidatus Schmidhempelia bombi, Frischella perrara, Snodgrassella alvi, Gilliamella apicola, Lactobacillus spp.), neogregarines, and a trypanosome species. By using metagenomic analysis, this study also reveals deep molecular evidence for the presence of bacterial pathogens (Melissococcus plutonius, Paenibacillus larvae), Varroa destructor-1 virus, Sacbrood virus, and fungi. Despite this effort we did not detect KBV, SBPV, Tobacco ringspot virus, VdMLV (Varroa Macula like virus), Acarapis spp., Tropilaeleps spp. and Apocephalus (phorid fly). We discuss possible impacts of management practices and honey bee subspecies on microbial retinues. The described workflow and curated microbial database will be generally useful for microbial surveys of healthy and declining honey bees.

  13. Hygienic behaviour in Brazilian stingless bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Denise A.; Bento, José M. S.; Marchini, Luis C.; Ratnieks, Francis L. W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Social insects have many defence mechanisms against pests and pathogens. One of these is hygienic behaviour, which has been studied in detail in the honey bee, Apis mellifera. Hygienic honey bee workers remove dead and diseased larvae and pupae from sealed brood cells, thereby reducing disease transfer within the colony. Stingless bees, Meliponini, also rear broods in sealed cells. We investigated hygienic behaviour in three species of Brazilian stingless bees (Melipona scutellaris, Scaptotrigona depilis, Tetragonisca angustula) in response to freeze-killed brood. All three species had high mean levels of freeze-killed brood removal after 48 h ∼99% in M. scutellaris, 80% in S. depilis and 62% in T. angustula (N=8 colonies per species; three trials per colony). These levels are greater than in unselected honey bee populations, ∼46%. In S. depilis there was also considerable intercolony variation, ranging from 27% to 100% removal after 2 days. Interestingly, in the S. depilis colony with the slowest removal of freeze-killed brood, 15% of the adult bees emerging from their cells had shrivelled wings indicating a disease or disorder, which is as yet unidentified. Although the gross symptoms resembled the effects of deformed wing virus in the honey bee, this virus was not detected in the samples. When brood comb from the diseased colony was introduced to the other S. depilis colonies, there was a significant negative correlation between freeze-killed brood removal and the emergence of deformed worker bees (P=0.001), and a positive correlation with the cleaning out of brood cells (P=0.0008). This shows that the more hygienic colonies were detecting and removing unhealthy brood prior to adult emergence. Our results indicate that hygienic behaviour may play an important role in colony health in stingless bees. The low levels of disease normally seen in stingless bees may be because they have effective mechanisms of disease management, not because they lack

  14. Metatranscriptomic analyses of honey bee colonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cansu Ozge Tozkar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Honey bees face numerous biotic threats from viruses to bacteria, fungi, protists, and mites. Here we describe a thorough analysis of microbes harbored by worker honey bees collected from field colonies in geographically distinct regions of Turkey. Turkey is one of the World’s most important centers of apiculture, harboring 5 subspecies of Apis mellifera L., approximately 20% of the honey bee subspecies in the world. We use deep ILLUMINA-based RNA sequencing to capture RNA species for the honey bee and a sampling of all non-endogenous species carried by bees. After trimming and mapping these reads to the honey bee genome, approximately 10% of the sequences (9-10 million reads per library remained. These were then mapped to a curated set of public sequences containing ca. 60 megabase-pairs of sequence representing known microbial species associated with honey bees. Levels of key honey bee pathogens were confirmed using quantitative PCR screens. We contrast microbial matches across different sites in Turkey, showing new country recordings of Lake Sinai virus, two Spiroplasma bacterium species, symbionts Candidatus Schmidhempelia bombi, Frischella perrara, Snodgrassella alvi, Gilliamella apicola, Lactobacillus spp., neogregarines, and a trypanosome species. By using metagenomic analysis, this study also reveals deep molecular evidence for the presence of bacterial pathogens (Melissococcus plutonius, Paenibacillus larvae, Varroa destructor-1 virus, Sacbrood virus, Apis filamentous virus and fungi. Despite this effort we did not detect KBV, SBPV, Tobacco ringspot virus, VdMLV (Varroa Macula like virus, Acarapis spp., Tropilaeleps spp. and Apocephalus (phorid fly. We discuss possible impacts of management practices and honey bee subspecies on microbial retinues. The described workflow and curated microbial database will be generally useful for microbial surveys of healthy and declining honey bees.

  15. Hygienic behaviour in Brazilian stingless bees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Al Toufailia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Social insects have many defence mechanisms against pests and pathogens. One of these is hygienic behaviour, which has been studied in detail in the honey bee, Apis mellifera. Hygienic honey bee workers remove dead and diseased larvae and pupae from sealed brood cells, thereby reducing disease transfer within the colony. Stingless bees, Meliponini, also rear broods in sealed cells. We investigated hygienic behaviour in three species of Brazilian stingless bees (Melipona scutellaris, Scaptotrigona depilis, Tetragonisca angustula in response to freeze-killed brood. All three species had high mean levels of freeze-killed brood removal after 48 h ∼99% in M. scutellaris, 80% in S. depilis and 62% in T. angustula (N=8 colonies per species; three trials per colony. These levels are greater than in unselected honey bee populations, ∼46%. In S. depilis there was also considerable intercolony variation, ranging from 27% to 100% removal after 2 days. Interestingly, in the S. depilis colony with the slowest removal of freeze-killed brood, 15% of the adult bees emerging from their cells had shrivelled wings indicating a disease or disorder, which is as yet unidentified. Although the gross symptoms resembled the effects of deformed wing virus in the honey bee, this virus was not detected in the samples. When brood comb from the diseased colony was introduced to the other S. depilis colonies, there was a significant negative correlation between freeze-killed brood removal and the emergence of deformed worker bees (P=0.001, and a positive correlation with the cleaning out of brood cells (P=0.0008. This shows that the more hygienic colonies were detecting and removing unhealthy brood prior to adult emergence. Our results indicate that hygienic behaviour may play an important role in colony health in stingless bees. The low levels of disease normally seen in stingless bees may be because they have effective mechanisms of disease management, not because

  16. Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, William W.

    Described are technological considerations affecting storage of energy, particularly electrical energy. The background and present status of energy storage by batteries, water storage, compressed air storage, flywheels, magnetic storage, hydrogen storage, and thermal storage are discussed followed by a review of development trends. Included are…

  17. Semen Displacement as a Sperm Competition Strategy in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon G. Gallup

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine some of the implications of the possibility that the human penis may have evolved to compete with sperm from other males by displacing rival semen from the cervical end of the vagina prior to ejaculation. The semen displacement hypothesis integrates considerable information about genital morphology and human reproductive behavior, and can be used to generate a number of interesting predictions.

  18. In vitro fertility assessment of Kundhi buffalo bull semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamzo Khan Kunbhar,

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted on in-vitro fertility assessment of frozen thawed semen collected from Kundhi buffalo bull maintained at Department of Animal Reproduction, Faculty of Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Sciences, Sindh Agriculture University Tandojam. Before freezing of semen, each ejaculate was assessed for volume, sperm concentration, mass activity and moss motility percentage. Twenty semen samples having motility 60% or above were frozen for post-thaw assessment. Frozen thawed semen was incubated at 250C for 5 hours and examined for progressive linear motility and live dead sperm count. The mean volume, mass activity, moss motility percentage sperm concentrations and pH of the semen were found to be 2.79±0.217 ml, 2.85±0.111, 71.75±2.621, 11.35±1.255 millions/ml and 5.8185±0.092 respectively of fresh semen. No significant difference was found between the parameters except pH, which was significantly different between the bulls. The mean sperm motility percentage and live dead sperm count % of Kundhi buffalo bull semen was found to be 20.46±1.62 and 6.9± 0.2% for frozen semen. A significant (P< 0.05 difference was found between the bulls for post-thaw motility percentage. It was found that at 01 hour incubation, 43.25±2.95% of sperms were motile having 11.78±0.28 % dead sperm count. It was gradually decline from 0 to 5 hours incubation, After 5 hours, all sperms were found dead. It is concluded that sperms maintaining long term motility and having less live dead sperms count were considered suitable for artificial insemination.

  19. Artificial insemination and cryopreservation of semen from nondomestic birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.; Bakst, M.R.; Wishart, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    Studies of Al and cryopreservation of semen from nondomestic birds began because of the increased emphasis on conservation of avian species threatened with extinction. Over the years, aviculturists have developed techniques for Al and cryopreservation of semen obtained from a variety of birds ranging from passerines to Andean condors. Generally, for each new species, we develop a practical semen collection technique and then evaluate the semen. A commercial semen extender (Beltsville Poultry Semen Extender) is modified and used to dilute the semen and provide support for the sperm during the freezing process (the pH and osmolality of the extender is adjusted to reflect the pH and osmolality of the semen being frozen). We find that the freezing schedule developed by Sexton (1977), which utilizes dimethylsulfoxide (DMS0) as cryoprotectant, works well for many species. We cool the sample sequentially in an ethanol bath, in liquid nitrogen vapor, and lastly in liquid nitrogen. Although we have experimented with a variety of freezing protocols, we prefer a 15-min equilibration period in DMSO at 5 C. We begin the freezing process by cooling at -1 C/min from 5 to -20 C in the ethanol bath. The samples are transferred into a vapor tank at a location just above liquid nitrogen and frozen at -50 C/min to -80 C. To complete the freezing process, the samples are plunged into the liquid nitrogen in the bottom of the vapor tank. The samples remain in liquid nitrogen until they are thawed just before insemination. If necessary, the freezing equipment can be transported in a van to remote locations.

  20. Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) and bee age impact honey bee pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Traynor, Kirsten S; Andree, Michael; Lichtenberg, Elinor M; Chen, Yanping; Saegerman, Claude; Cox-Foster, Diana L

    2017-01-01

    Honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies continue to experience high annual losses that remain poorly explained. Numerous interacting factors have been linked to colony declines. Understanding the pathways linking pathophysiology with symptoms is an important step in understanding the mechanisms of disease. In this study we examined the specific pathologies associated with honey bees collected from colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) and compared these with bees collected from apparently healthy colonies. We identified a set of pathological physical characteristics that occurred at different rates in CCD diagnosed colonies prior to their collapse: rectum distension, Malpighian tubule iridescence, fecal matter consistency, rectal enteroliths (hard concretions), and venom sac color. The multiple differences in rectum symptomology in bees from CCD apiaries and colonies suggest effected bees had trouble regulating water. To ensure that pathologies we found associated with CCD were indeed pathologies and not due to normal changes in physical appearances that occur as an adult bee ages (CCD colonies are assumed to be composed mostly of young bees), we documented the changes in bees of different ages taken from healthy colonies. We found that young bees had much greater incidences of white nodules than older cohorts. Prevalent in newly-emerged bees, these white nodules or cellular encapsulations indicate an active immune response. Comparing the two sets of characteristics, we determined a subset of pathologies that reliably predict CCD status rather than bee age (fecal matter consistency, rectal distension size, rectal enteroliths and Malpighian tubule iridescence) and that may serve as biomarkers for colony health. In addition, these pathologies suggest that CCD bees are experiencing disrupted excretory physiology. Our identification of these symptoms is an important first step in understanding the physiological pathways that underlie CCD and factors

  1. The effects of Bee Venom and Sweet Bee Venom to the preadipocyte proliferation and lipolysis of adipocyte, localized fat accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Ki Kim

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Bee Venom and Sweet Bee Venom to the primary cultured preadipocyte, adipocytes, and localized fat tissue. Methods : Decreased preadipocyte proliferation and decreased lipogenesis are mechanisms to reduce obesity. So, preadipocytes and adipocytes were performed on cell cultures using Sprague-Dawley Rats and treated with 0.01-1mg/㎖ Bee Venom and Sweet Bee Venom. And porcine skin including fat tissue after treated Bee Venom and Sweet Bee Venom according to the dosage dependent variation are investigated the histologic changes after injection of these Pharmacopuncture. Result : Following results were obtained from the preadipocyte proliferation and lipolysis of adipocyte and histologic investigation of fat tissue. 1. Bee Venom and Sweet Bee Venom showed the effect of decreased preadipocyte proliferation depend on concentration. 2. Bee Venom and Sweet Bee Venom showed the effect of decreased the activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase(GPDH significantly. 3. Bee Venom was not showed the effect of lipolysis, but Sweet Bee Venom was increased in low dosage and decreased in high dosage. 4. Investigated the histologic changes in porcine fat tissue after treated Bee Venom and Sweet Bee Venom, we knew that these Pharmacopuncture was activated nonspecific lysis of cell membranes depend on concentration. Conclusion : These results suggest that Bee Venom and Sweet Bee Venom efficiently induces decreased proliferation of preadipocyte and lipolysis in adipose tissue

  2. The utility of nanowater for ram semen cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawski, Maciej; Schwarz, Tomasz; Grygier, Joanna; Patkowski, Krzysztof; Oszczęda, Zdzisław; Jelkin, Igor; Kosiek, Anna; Gruszecki, Tomasz M; Szymanowska, Anna; Skrzypek, Tomasz; Zieba, Dorota A; Bartlewski, Pawel M

    2015-05-01

    Nanowater (NW; water declusterized in the low-temperature plasma reactor) has specific physicochemical properties that could increase semen viability after freezing and hence fertility after artificial insemination (AI) procedures. The main goal of this study was to evaluate ram semen quality after freezing in the media containing NW. Ejaculates from 10 rams were divided into two equal parts, diluted in a commercially available semen extender (Triladyl®; MiniTüb GmbH, Tiefenbach, Germany) prepared with deionized water (DW) or NW, and then frozen in liquid nitrogen. Semen samples were examined for sperm motility and morphology using the sperm class analyzer system and light microscopy. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) was employed to determine the size of extracellular water crystals in frozen semen samples. Survival time at room temperature, aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) concentrations post-thawing as well as conception/lambing rates after laparoscopic intrauterine AI of 120 ewes were also determined. There were no significant differences between DW and NW groups in sperm progressive motility (26.4 ± 12.2 and 30.8 ± 12.4%) or survival time (266.6 ± 61.3 and 270.9 ± 76.7 min) after thawing and no differences in the percentages of spermatozoa with various morphological defects before or after freezing. There were, however, differences (P ram semen and lamb productivity of inseminated ewes.

  3. Study of semen parameters in male partners among infertile couples

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    Sheela N. Kulkarni

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Semen analysis provides valuable information about the etiology and fertility potential of an infertile male. The study was conducted to determine the abnormalities in semen parameters of male partners of infertile couples and to find out contribution of male factors. Methods: The descriptive study with cross sectional design was conducted in the department of Pathology at MIMSR medical college, Latur, Maharashtra, India, between January 2013 to December 2014. A total of 220 cases were analyzed during this period. Semen analysis was performed according to the methods and the standards defined by World Health Organisation (WHO 5th edition 2010. Results: Out of 220 male partners of infertile couples 96 (43.6% men had abnormal semen parameters. The male factor was responsible in 43.6% of cases. Asthenozoospermia constitutes maximum of 19.9%, followed by Oligozoospermia in 18.6%, Azoospermia in 10.9%, Oligoasthenoteratozoospermia in 7.3% and Oligoasthenozoospermia in 6.8% cases. Leucocytospermia was detected in 15.5% cases. Conclusions: Abnormal semen quality remains a significant contribution to overall infertility. Asthenozoospermia is the most common semen abnormality seen. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(4.000: 1016-1019

  4. Cassiae semen: A review of its phytochemistry and pharmacology (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoxv; Fu, Jing; Yin, Xingbin; Yang, Chunjing; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Wenping; Du, Xueying; Wang, Qingling; Ni, Jian

    2017-09-01

    Cassiae semen (Leguminosae), a well‑known traditional Chinese medicine, has been used for a number of centuries in areas of Southeast Asia, including Korea, Japan and China. The present review aims to provide updated and comprehensive information, on the botany, phytochemistry and pharmacology of Cassiae semen. The available information on Cassiae semen was collected using several different resources, including classic books on Chinese herbal medicine and a number of scientific databases, including the China Academic Journals full‑text database, PubMed, SciFinder, the Web of Science and Science Direct. To date >70 chemical compounds have been isolated from Cassiae semen, and the major components have been determined to be anthraquinones, naphthopyrones and volatile oil. The crude extracts and pure compounds of Cassiae semen have been used as effective agents in preclinical and clinical practice due to their beneficial activities, including antihyperlipidemic, antidiabetic, neuroprotective, hepatoprotective, antibacterial, antioxidant and hypotensive activities. With the body of reported data, it has been suggested that Cassiae semen has convincing medicinal potential. However, the pharmacological mechanisms of the main bioactive compounds and the association between structure and activity require further investigation.

  5. Effect of exposing rams to a female stimulus before semen collection on ram libido and semen quality1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A G Fahey; P Duffy; S Fair

    2012-01-01

      Rams with strong libido and desirable semen characteristics can provide more insemination doses per ejaculate and produce more progeny, improving population genetic linkage to improve the accuracy of EBV...

  6. Effect of exposing rams to a female stimulus before semen collection on ram libido and semen quality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fahey, A G; Duffy, P; Fair, S

    2012-01-01

    Rams with strong libido and desirable semen characteristics can provide more insemination doses per ejaculate and produce more progeny, improving population genetic linkage to improve the accuracy of EBV...

  7. Strong adherence to a healthy dietary pattern is associated with better semen quality, especially in men with poor semen quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostingh, Elsje C.; Steegers-Theunissen, Régine P.M.; Vries, de Jeanne H.M.; Laven, Joop S.E.; Koster, Maria P.H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study associations between periconceptional dietary patterns and semen quality parameters. Design: Prospective periconception cohort study. Setting: Tertiary hospital. Patient(s): One hundred and twenty-nine male partners of pregnant women who participated in the Rotterdam

  8. Management of corneal bee sting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razmjoo H

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hassan Razmjoo1,2, Mohammad-Ali Abtahi1,2,4, Peyman Roomizadeh1,3, Zahra Mohammadi1,2, Seyed-Hossein Abtahi1,3,41Medical School, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS; 2Ophthalmology Ward, Feiz Hospital, IUMS; 3Isfahan Medical Students Research Center (IMSRC, IUMS; 4Isfahan Ophthalmology Research Center (IORC, Feiz Hospital, IUMS, Isfahan, IranAbstract: Corneal bee sting is an uncommon environmental eye injury that can result in various ocular complications with an etiology of penetrating, immunologic, and toxic effects of the stinger and its injected venom. In this study we present our experience in the management of a middle-aged male with a right-sided deep corneal bee sting. On arrival, the patient was complaining of severe pain, blurry vision with acuity of 160/200, and tearing, which he had experienced soon after the injury. Firstly, we administered conventional drugs for eye injuries, including topical antibiotic, corticosteroid, and cycloplegic agents. After 2 days, corneal stromal infiltration and edema developed around the site of the sting, and visual acuity decreased to 100/200. These conditions led us to remove the stinger surgically. Within 25 days of follow-up, the corneal infiltration decreased gradually, and visual acuity improved to 180/200. We suggest a two-stage management approach for cases of corneal sting. For the first stage, if the stinger is readily accessible or primary dramatic reactions, including infiltration, especially on the visual axis, exist, manual or surgical removal would be indicated. Otherwise, we recommend conventional treatments for eye injuries. Given this situation, patients should be closely monitored for detection of any worsening. If the condition does not resolve or even deteriorates, for the second stage, surgical removal of the stinger under local or generalized anesthesia is indicated.Keywords: bee sting, stinger, cornea, removal, management, surgery

  9. Integrated control of honey bee diseases in apiculture

    OpenAIRE

    Al Toufailia, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    The honey bee, Apis mellifera, is important both ecologically and economically. Pests and diseases are arguably the greatest current challenge faced by honey bees and beekeeping. This PhD thesis is focused on honey bee disease control including natural resistance by means of hygienic behaviour. It contains eleven independent experiments, ten on honey bee pests and diseases and their control and resistance, and one on stingless bees. Each is written as a separate chapter, Chapters 4 and 14 of ...

  10. Characterization and evaluation of ZigBee modules

    OpenAIRE

    Ramazanali, Hawar

    2006-01-01

    This thesis work started with an extensive literature study in several areas, ZigBee, instruments and measuring methods. The knowledge was implemented in use with the ZigBee modules from the two manufacturers ITN and Chipcon along with ZigBee Software Stack. Measuring methods were developed and software in ZigBee software Stack was developed to use in the ZigBee modules for the measurements. Developing measurement methods and performing measurements was an iterative process for the different ...

  11. Earth sheltered bee wintering and solar honey house. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    The construction and operation of an indoor wintering facility and a passive solar honey house are discussed. Goals for the project included both energy savings and financial savings for the beekeeping industry. The underground winter shelter provided a control temperature of approximately 46/sup 0/F in order to decrease both mortality rates and honey consumption rates of the bees. Three hundred square feet of glazing combined with wall insulation maintained comfortable work space temperatures for the ground level storage of honey. (BCS)

  12. Decline of semen quality among Chinese sperm bank donors within 7 years (2008-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Semen from 5210 sperm bank donors was analyzed and trends in semen quality were evaluated at Shandong Human Sperm Bank between 2008 and 2014. After 2-7 days of abstinence, semen samples were collected. Measurements of semen volume, sperm concentration, sperm forward motility, and total sperm count were performed. There were significant declining trends in semen volume, sperm concentration, sperm forward motility, and total sperm count. Our results indicate that the quality of semen in this cohort of sperm donors had decreased during the study period.

  13. Identifying factors affecting age at first semen freezing and age at first semen use in Sahiwal bulls

    OpenAIRE

    Naha, B. C.; Chakravarty, A. K.; Mir, M. A.; V. Jamuna; Singh, A. P.; Maher, D

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of non-genetic factors on reproduction traits viz. age at first semen freezing and age at first semen use of breeding bulls in Sahiwal bulls by fitting least-squares analysis. Materials and Methods: The information on reproduction traits of 43 Sahiwal breeding bulls belonging to 8 sets of Sahiwal breeding program at Indian Council of Agricultural Research-National Dairy Research Institute (ICAR-NDRI), Karnal (Haryana), India durin...

  14. Identifying factors affecting age at first semen freezing and age at first semen use in Sahiwal bulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. C. Naha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of non-genetic factors on reproduction traits viz. age at first semen freezing and age at first semen use of breeding bulls in Sahiwal bulls by fitting least-squares analysis. Materials and Methods: The information on reproduction traits of 43 Sahiwal breeding bulls belonging to 8 sets of Sahiwal breeding program at Indian Council of Agricultural Research-National Dairy Research Institute (ICAR-NDRI, Karnal (Haryana, India during 27 years (1987-2013 were analyzed using fixed linear model. The information was collected from AI records, reproduction sheets, and bull AI register maintained at different sections of Institute viz. record room of Dairy Cattle Breeding Division (DCB, Cattle Yard, Artificial Breeding Research Centre, ICAR-NDRI, Karnal. Results: The average age at first semen freezing and age at first semen use of Sahiwal breeding bulls was estimated as 3.17±0.01 years and 5.35±0.01 years, with the coefficient of variation 18.93% and 20%, respectively. The overall least squares mean for age at first semen freezing and age at first semen use was estimated as 3.14±0.09 years and 5.25±0.02 years, respectively, in Sahiwal breeding bulls. Period of freezing/use had significant effects on reproductive traits (p<0.01. Season had no significant effect on any of the traits considered in this study. Conclusion: It can be concluded that management inputs such as nutrition, breeding, and optimum environment should be taken care of to optimize age at first semen freezing and age at first semen use for better utilization of superior germplasm.

  15. Association of Blood and Semen Lead and Zinc Level with Semen Parameter in the Male Partner of Infertile Couple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, P; Hossain, M M; Rahman, D; Rahman, M W; Mugni, C R; Sumon, G M; Hossain, H B; Hossain, H N

    2015-07-01

    This cross sectional study was carried out in Center for Assisted Reproduction, Dhaka, and in the Department of Biochemistry, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh from July 2012 to December 2012. The study population was 71 consecutive male partners of infertile couple suffering from at least one year of infertility. Lead and Zinc level was measured in blood and semen in the male partner of infertile couple and compared with semen parameters. Serum zinc at different values did not show any statistically significant change in semen volume, total count of sperm and total motility of sperm. At serum zinc level 80-sperm (54.00 ± 46.67 million/ml) but was not statistically significant. Rapid linear motility and normal sperm morphology was also highest at values 80-zinc level > 90 μg/dl semen lead level was significantly higher (120.73 ± 58.02 μg/dl) and showed statistically significant decrease in rapid linear motility and normal sperm morphology. Total count of sperm was lowest at blood zinc level of 70-Sperm morphology also showed statistically significant improvement at Serum zinc values of 80-zinc level of values 80-zinc levels higher as well as lower than values 80-< 90 μg/dl was associated with increased semen lead values and with negative impact on semen parameters.

  16. Comparative Examination of Capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus L. Behaviour Responses and Semen Quality to Two Methods of Semen Collection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Teresa Łukaszewicz

    Full Text Available Artificial insemination (AI is very helpful in solving the reproductive and biodiversity problems observed in small, closed avian populations. The successful production of fertilized eggs using AI is dependent on the collection of good quality semen. Two methods of male sexual stimulation and semen collection from captive kept capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus L., one of the most seriously endangered grouse species in Europe, are compared in this study. Ejaculates were obtained either with the use of a dummy female or by the dorso-abdominal massage method. Differences in the individual responses of the males to the two methods of semen collection as well as in their semen quality were noted. Only sperm concentration (432.4 x 10(6 mL(-1 with dummy female and 614.5 x 10(6 mL(-1 for massage method was significantly affected by capercaillie stimulation method. Sperm motility and morphology were not affected (P ≥ 0.05. Thus, for semen collection from captive kept capercaillie both methods can be used successfully. The dummy female can be an alternative to dorso-abdominal massage method, commonly used for semen collection from domesticated bird species.

  17. Human semen assays for workplace monitoring. [Monitoring of hazardous materials by determining effects on semen of personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Gledhill, B.L.

    1978-11-07

    Decades of human semen studies have yielded compelling evidence that sperm can be used to access reproductive potential and diagnose pathology. With these studies as background, the small number of detailed semen studies of men exposed to physical and chemical agents point with optimism to the application of human semen assays as efficient, effective means to monitor for reproductive hazards in the workplace. Sperm are the most accessible of human gonadal tissue and provide a means of monitoring exposure induced changes in the human testes, changes which may result in infertility and increased frequencies of genetically abnormal gametes. The focus on semen has precipitated the development of new sperm bioassays which use older conventional andrological methods (i.e., sperm counts, motility, and morphology) as well as recently developed high speed flow and scanning methods for automated cytological analyses. The status of these sperm assays for workplace surveillance is reviewed, procedures are suggested with examples of use, and their effectiveness is evaluated. The available mouse models of induced semen changes are briefly described and the importance of these models for evaluating the genetic implications of findings in human semen is discussed.

  18. A modified scout bee for artificial bee colony algorithm and its performance on optimization problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahid Anuar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The artificial bee colony (ABC is one of the swarm intelligence algorithms used to solve optimization problems which is inspired by the foraging behaviour of the honey bees. In this paper, artificial bee colony with the rate of change technique which models the behaviour of scout bee to improve the performance of the standard ABC in terms of exploration is introduced. The technique is called artificial bee colony rate of change (ABC-ROC because the scout bee process depends on the rate of change on the performance graph, replace the parameter limit. The performance of ABC-ROC is analysed on a set of benchmark problems and also on the effect of the parameter colony size. Furthermore, the performance of ABC-ROC is compared with the state of the art algorithms.

  19. Gentle Africanized bees on an oceanic island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Marchand, Bert; Oskay, Devrim; Giray, Tugrul

    2012-11-01

    Oceanic islands have reduced resources and natural enemies and potentially affect life history traits of arriving organisms. Among the most spectacular invasions in the Western hemisphere is that of the Africanized honeybee. We hypothesized that in the oceanic island Puerto Rico, Africanized bees will exhibit differences from the mainland population such as for defensiveness and other linked traits. We evaluated the extent of Africanization through three typical Africanized traits: wing size, defensive behavior, and resistance to Varroa destructor mites. All sampled colonies were Africanized by maternal descent, with over 65% presence of European alleles at the S-3 nuclear locus. In two assays evaluating defense, Puerto Rican bees showed low defensiveness similar to European bees. In morphology and resistance to mites, Africanized bees from Puerto Rico are similar to other Africanized bees. In behavioral assays on mechanisms of resistance to Varroa, we directly observed that Puerto Rican Africanized bees groomed-off and bit the mites as been observed in other studies. In no other location, Africanized bees have reduced defensiveness while retaining typical traits such as wing size and mite resistance. This mosaic of traits that has resulted during the invasion of an oceanic island has implications for behavior, evolution, and agriculture.

  20. Enhanced production of parthenocarpic cucumbers pollinated with stingless bees and Africanized honey bees in greenhouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euclides Braga Malheiros

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Crops have different levels of dependence on pollinators; this holds true even for cultivars of the same species, as in the case of cucumber (Cucumis sativus. The aim of this research was to assess the attractiveness of flowers of three Japanese parthenocarpic cucumber cultivars and evaluate the importance of Africanized bees (Apis mellifera, and the Brazilian native stingless bees, Jataí (Tetragonisca angustula and Iraí (Nannotrigona testaceicornis on fruit production. Several parameters, including frequency of bee visits to flowers as well as duration of nectar collection and fruit set were examined; additionally, fruit weight, length and diameter were evaluated. Three greenhouses located in Ribeirão Preto, SP, were used for planting three cucumber cultivars (Hokushin, Yoshinari and Soudai. The female flowers were more attractive than male flowers; however, Jataí bees were not observed visiting the flowers. The Africanized and the Iraí bees collected only nectar, with a visitation peak between 10 and 12h. Visits to female flowers had a longer duration than visits to male flower visits in all three cultivars. Africanized bee colonies declined due to loss of bees while in the greenhouse; the native stingless bee colonies did not suffer these losses. When bees were excluded, fruit set was 78%; however, when bees had access to the flowers, fruit set was significantly (19.2% higher. Fruit size and weight did not differ with and without bees. This demonstrates that even in parthenocarpic cucumber cultivars, which do not require pollination in order to from fruits, fruit production is significantly increased by bee pollination.

  1. Single Assay Detection of Acute Bee Paralysis Virus, Kashmir Bee Virus and Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, Roy Mathew; Kryger, Per

    2012-01-01

    A new RT-PCR primer pair designed to identify Acute Bee Paralysis Virus (ABPV), Kashmir Bee Virus (KBV) or Israeli Acute Bee Paralysis Virus (IAPV) of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in a single assay is described. These primers are used to screen samples for ABPV, KBV, or IAPV in a single RT-PCR ......-PCR reaction saving time and money. The primers are located in the predicted overlapping gene (pog/ORFX) which is highly conserved across ABPV, KBV, IAPV and other dicistroviruses of social insects. This study has also identified the first case of IAPV in Denmark....

  2. ZigBee IP应用研究%Research on ZigBee IP Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Skip Ashton

    2013-01-01

    介绍了无线传感网络技术及发展、ZigBee PRO解决方案、以无线传感器网络IP为基础的解决方案的演变.在此基础上,探讨了ZigBee IP规范的细节和用途、使用ZigBee IP的设备实现,以及新的ZigBeeSmart Energy 2.0 IP协议栈的使用.

  3. Synergistic effects of non-Apis bees and honey bees for pollination services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittain, Claire; Williams, Neal; Kremen, Claire; Klein, Alexandra-Maria

    2013-03-07

    In diverse pollinator communities, interspecific interactions may modify the behaviour and increase the pollination effectiveness of individual species. Because agricultural production reliant on pollination is growing, improving pollination effectiveness could increase crop yield without any increase in agricultural intensity or area. In California almond, a crop highly dependent on honey bee pollination, we explored the foraging behaviour and pollination effectiveness of honey bees in orchards with simple (honey bee only) and diverse (non-Apis bees present) bee communities. In orchards with non-Apis bees, the foraging behaviour of honey bees changed and the pollination effectiveness of a single honey bee visit was greater than in orchards where non-Apis bees were absent. This change translated to a greater proportion of fruit set in these orchards. Our field experiments show that increased pollinator diversity can synergistically increase pollination service, through species interactions that alter the behaviour and resulting functional quality of a dominant pollinator species. These results of functional synergy between species were supported by an additional controlled cage experiment with Osmia lignaria and Apis mellifera. Our findings highlight a largely unexplored facilitative component of the benefit of biodiversity to ecosystem services, and represent a way to improve pollinator-dependent crop yields in a sustainable manner.

  4. Semen and reproductive profiles of genetically identical cloned bulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecirlioglu, R Tayfur; Cooney, Melissa A; Korfiatis, Natasha A; Hodgson, Renee; Williamson, Mark; Downie, Shara; Galloway, David B; French, Andrew J

    2006-06-01

    In this comparative study, reproductive parameters and semen characteristics of cloned bulls (n = 3) derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) were compared to their original cell donor Holstein-Friesian (n = 2) bulls from the same enterprise to assess the differences in reproductive potential between a donor bull and its clones. The parameters evaluated included motility of fresh, frozen-thawed and Percoll-treated frozen-thawed spermatozoa, as well as in vitro fertilization (IVF) ability, embryo quality, birth and survival of calves following IVF and embryo transfer with frozen-thawed semen. With fresh semen, spermatozoa from one cloned bull had lower motility than its donor. Cloned bulls had higher velocity parameters in fresh semen, but those effects were not obvious in frozen-thawed or frozen-thawed semen selected with a Percoll gradient. Semen collected from cloned bulls had significantly higher IVF rates compared to donors; however, embryo development per cleaved embryo or quality of blastocysts did not differ between donors and cloned bulls. Pregnancy and live offspring rates from one donor and its cloned bull did not differ between fresh (40%, 16/40 versus 46%, 17/37) and vitrified/thawed (13%, 2/16 versus 25%, 4/16) embryo transfer following IVF. A total of 26 calves were obtained from genotypically identical donor and cloned bulls with no signs of phenotypical abnormalities. These preliminary results suggested that the physiology of surviving postpubertal cloned bulls and quality of collected semen had equivalent reproductive potential to their original cell donor, with no evidence of any deleterious effects in their progeny.

  5. To BEE or not to BEE? South Africa's 'Black Economic Empowerment' (BEE), corporate governance and the state in the South

    OpenAIRE

    Ponte, Stefano; Roberts, Simon; van Sittert, Lance

    2006-01-01

    Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) has been a major policy thrust of the democratic governments in South Africa since 1994 in attempting to redress the effects of apartheid. This paper explores the historical precedents to BEE in South Africa, its origins, and its points of contact with the experience of ‘empowerment’ in Malaysia. The authors review the different steps taken by the South African government in promoting empowerment over the past 12 years, together with some of outcomes to date. ...

  6. Human semen can be air-dried prior to testing for sperm DNA fragmentation with the Halosperm® G2 kit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kailin Yap; Phillip Matson

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To explore a method of semen storage prior to assessment of spermDNA fragmentation. Methods:This study examined a simplified alternative of air-drying semen on a microscope slide and reconstituting in seminal plasma prior to assessment of spermDNA fragmentation using the halosperm®G2 kit.Results:It showed that semen could be air-dried and stored overnight at room temperature with no detrimental effect onDNA quality.A significant correlation between results existed for20 semen samples both air-dried and snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen(r=0.982, P=0.000).A mean difference between the results of only -1.98% confirmed the effectiveness of air-drying compared to snap-freezing.Conclusions:Future studies to refine this technique are required on the effect of extrinsic factors such as the choice of reconstituting medium, and stability over an extended time-frame at different temperatures.

  7. Seed coating with a neonicotinoid insecticide negatively affects wild bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundlöf, Maj; Andersson, Georg K S; Bommarco, Riccardo; Fries, Ingemar; Hederström, Veronica; Herbertsson, Lina; Jonsson, Ove; Klatt, Björn K; Pedersen, Thorsten R; Yourstone, Johanna; Smith, Henrik G

    2015-05-07

    Understanding the effects of neonicotinoid insecticides on bees is vital because of reported declines in bee diversity and distribution and the crucial role bees have as pollinators in ecosystems and agriculture. Neonicotinoids are suspected to pose an unacceptable risk to bees, partly because of their systemic uptake in plants, and the European Union has therefore introduced a moratorium on three neonicotinoids as seed coatings in flowering crops that attract bees. The moratorium has been criticized for being based on weak evidence, particularly because effects have mostly been measured on bees that have been artificially fed neonicotinoids. Thus, the key question is how neonicotinoids influence bees, and wild bees in particular, in real-world agricultural landscapes. Here we show that a commonly used insecticide seed coating in a flowering crop can have serious consequences for wild bees. In a study with replicated and matched landscapes, we found that seed coating with Elado, an insecticide containing a combination of the neonicotinoid clothianidin and the non-systemic pyrethroid β-cyfluthrin, applied to oilseed rape seeds, reduced wild bee density, solitary bee nesting, and bumblebee colony growth and reproduction under field conditions. Hence, such insecticidal use can pose a substantial risk to wild bees in agricultural landscapes, and the contribution of pesticides to the global decline of wild bees may have been underestimated. The lack of a significant response in honeybee colonies suggests that reported pesticide effects on honeybees cannot always be extrapolated to wild bees.

  8. Maternal folic acid supplement intake and semen quality in Danish sons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kristoffer; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst; Thulstrup, Ane Marie

    2011-01-01

    To examine whether maternal folic acid supplement intake during pregnancy is related to better semen quality in male offspring.......To examine whether maternal folic acid supplement intake during pregnancy is related to better semen quality in male offspring....

  9. Semen quality in relation to antioxidant intake in a healthy male population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zareba, Piotr; Colaci, Daniela S; Afeiche, Myriam;

    2013-01-01

    To assess the relationship between dietary antioxidant intake and semen quality in young healthy males.......To assess the relationship between dietary antioxidant intake and semen quality in young healthy males....

  10. Evaluation of semen quality in 1808 university students, from Wuhan, Central China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rao, Meng; Meng, Tian-Qing; Hu, Si-Heng; Guan, Huang-Tao; Wei, Qin-Yu; Xia, Wei; Zhu, Chang-Hong; Xiong, Cheng-Liang

    2015-01-01

    .... Each donor's semen parameters were averaged over two samples and compared with the World Health Organization criteria, and a generalized linear regression model was used to examine several determinants of semen quality...

  11. Expected net present value of pure and mixed sexed semen artificial insemination strategies in dairy heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olynk, N J; Wolf, C A

    2007-05-01

    Sexed semen has been a long-anticipated tool for dairy farmers to obtain more heifer calves, but challenges exist for integrating sexed semen into commercial dairy farm reproduction programs. The decreased conception rates (CR) experienced with sexed semen make virgin heifers better suited for insemination with sexed semen than lactating dairy cows. This research sought to identify when various sexed semen breeding strategies provided higher expected net present value (NPV) than conventional artificial insemination (AI) breeding schemes, indicating which breeding scheme is advisable under various scenarios. Budgets were developed to calculate the expected NPV of various AI breeding strategies incorporating conventional (non-sexed) and sexed semen. In the base budgets, heifer and bull calf values were held constant at $500 and $110, respectively. The percentage of heifers expected to be born after breeding with conventional and sexed semen used was 49.2 and 90%, respectively. Breeding costs per AI were held constant at $15.00 per AI for conventional semen and $45.00 per AI for sexed semen of approximately the same genetic value. Conventional semen CR of 58 and 65% were used, and an AI submission rate was set at 100%. Breeding strategies with sexed semen were assessed for breakeven heifer calf values and sexed semen costs to obtain a NPV equal to that achieved with conventional semen. Breakeven heifer calf values for pure sexed semen strategies with a constant 58 and 65% base CR in which sexed semen achieved 53% of the base CR are $732.11 and $664.26, respectively. Breakeven sexed semen costs per AI of $17.16 and $22.39, compared with $45.00 per AI, were obtained to obtain a NPV equal to that obtained with pure conventional semen for base CR of 58 and 65%, respectively. The strategy employing purely sexed semen, with base CR of both 58 and 65%, yielded a lower NPV than purely conventional semen in all but the best-case scenario in which sexed semen provides 90% of

  12. Deteksi Kerusakan DNA Spermatozoa Semen Segar dan Semen Beku Sapi Menggunakan Pewarnaan Toluidine Blue (DETECTION OF SPERM DNA DAMAGE INFRESH AND FROZEN SEMEN USING TOLUIDINE BLUE STAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langgeng Priyanto

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sperm DNA integrity is very important in the success of fertilization and embryo development.Toluidine blue (TB is a sensitive staining to examine the chromatin structure of sperm. The aim of thisstudy was to detect the sperm DNA damage before and after freezing using TB. Semen was obtained fromeight superior bulls (two Brahman, two Ongole, two Simental and two Limosin belong to Lembang ArtificialInsemination Centre. Semen was collected twice a week using artificial vagina, then was evaluatedmacrocopically and microscopically after collected, including sperm motility, viability, plasma membraneintegrity (MI and acrosome intact (AI, sperm concentration, abnormality and sperm DNA integrity. Thesemen that been used in this study showed the total motility was more than 70%, sperm concentrationwas more than 1000x106, and the sperm abnormality was below 20%. The result showed that the qualityof semen after freezing processed was decreased significantly (P0.05. Sperm DNA integrity offresh and frozen semen were 93.91±4.77% and 92.06 ±2.41% respectively. The decrease of DNA integritywas low (1.84% compared to motility (28.3%, viability (21.6%, MI (14.1%, and AI (11.8%. In conclusion,toluidine blue can be used to detect of DNA damage and the freezing process will not decrease the DNAintegrity.

  13. Deteksi Kerusakan DNA Spermatozoa Semen Segar dan Semen Beku Sapi Menggunakan Pewarnaan Toluidine Blue (DETECTION OF SPERM DNA DAMAGE INFRESH AND FROZEN SEMEN USING TOLUIDINE BLUE STAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langgeng Priyanto

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sperm DNA integrity is very important in the success of fertilization and embryo development.Toluidine blue (TB is a sensitive staining to examine the chromatin structure of sperm. The aim of thisstudy was to detect the sperm DNA damage before and after freezing using TB. Semen was obtained fromeight superior bulls (two Brahman, two Ongole, two Simental and two Limosin belong to Lembang ArtificialInsemination Centre. Semen was collected twice a week using artificial vagina, then was evaluatedmacrocopically and microscopically after collected, including sperm motility, viability, plasma membraneintegrity (MI and acrosome intact (AI, sperm concentration, abnormality and sperm DNA integrity. Thesemen that been used in this study showed the total motility was more than 70%, sperm concentrationwas more than 1000x106, and the sperm abnormality was below 20%. The result showed that the qualityof semen after freezing processed was decreased significantly (P<0.05 on percentage of sperm motility,viability, MI and AI, whereas there was no different on DNA integrity (P>0.05. Sperm DNA integrity offresh and frozen semen were 93.91±4.77% and 92.06 ±2.41% respectively. The decrease of DNA integritywas low (1.84% compared to motility (28.3%, viability (21.6%, MI (14.1%, and AI (11.8%. In conclusion,toluidine blue can be used to detect of DNA damage and the freezing process will not decrease the DNAintegrity.

  14. Neonicotinoid pesticides severely affect honey bee queens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Geoffrey R; Troxler, Aline; Retschnig, Gina; Roth, Kaspar; Yañez, Orlando; Shutler, Dave; Neumann, Peter; Gauthier, Laurent

    2015-10-13

    Queen health is crucial to colony survival of social bees. Recently, queen failure has been proposed to be a major driver of managed honey bee colony losses, yet few data exist concerning effects of environmental stressors on queens. Here we demonstrate for the first time that exposure to field-realistic concentrations of neonicotinoid pesticides during development can severely affect queens of western honey bees (Apis mellifera). In pesticide-exposed queens, reproductive anatomy (ovaries) and physiology (spermathecal-stored sperm quality and quantity), rather than flight behaviour, were compromised and likely corresponded to reduced queen success (alive and producing worker offspring). This study highlights the detriments of neonicotinoids to queens of environmentally and economically important social bees, and further strengthens the need for stringent risk assessments to safeguard biodiversity and ecosystem services that are vulnerable to these substances.

  15. Management of bee-sting anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; O'Donnell, J; Kupa, A; Heddle, R; Skowronski, G; Roberts-Thomson, P

    A retrospective case analysis of 101 adverse reactions to bee-stings and a prospective questionnaire analysis of the proposed management by local medical practitioners and resident hospital staff members of three hypothetical bee-sting reactions has revealed that understanding of the use of adrenaline in patients with reactions to bee envenomation is confused with regard to the indications for its use, dosage and route; that corticosteroid agents are used or are recommended too frequently, sometimes as the sole therapeutic agent; and that there is a lack of awareness of the need for volume replacement in hypotensive shocked patients. These conclusions highlight the urgent need for a greater understanding of the optimal forms of management for patients with acute anaphylactic reactions to bee envenomation.

  16. Semen characteristics in pubertal boys. IV. Semen quality and hormone profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczewski, Z; Bablok, L

    1985-01-01

    The biological quality of semen was contrasted with levels of FSH, LH, and testosterone in plasma. The level of FSH rises significantly from azoospermia/cryptozoospermia (3.87 +/- 1.1 mU/ml) to asthenozoospermia (5.73 +/- 2.11 mU/ml). In normospermia, however (4.63 +/- 1.88 mU/ml), the level of FSH decreases in a statistically significant manner and remains at the standard level. Comparing the level of LH to the quality of semen, it rises in a statistically significant manner from azoospermia/cryptozoospermia (6.46 +/- 1.35 mU/ml) to oligozoospermia (9.03 +/- 3.35 mU/ml). The level decreases in a statistically significant manner in normospermia (7.15 +/- 1.69 mU/ml). The level of testosterone shows a progressive linear growth from azoospermia/cryptozoospermia (6.03 +/- 2.09 micrograms/ml) to normospermia (6.55 +/- 2.12 micrograms/ml). The growth is statistically insignificant.

  17. Using Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling to Analyze Bee Visitation in East Tennessee Crops as an Indicator of Pollination Services Provided by Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L.) and Native Bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael E; Skinner, John A; Wszelaki, Annette L; Drummond, Frank

    2015-12-29

    This study investigated bee visitation on 10 agricultural crops grown on diverse small farms in Tennessee to determine the abundance of native bees and honey bees and the partitioning of visitation among crops. Summaries for each crop are used to generate mean proportions of bee visitation by categories of bees. This shows that native bee visits often occur as frequently, or in greater proportions than non-native honey bee visits. Visitation across multiple crops is then analyzed together with nonmetric multidimensional scaling to show how communities of bees that provide crop pollination change depending on the crop. Within squash and pumpkin plantings, continuous and discrete factors, such as "time of day" and "organic practices," further explain shifts in the community composition of flower visitors. Results from this study show that native bees frequently visit flowers on various crops, indicating that they are likely contributing to pollination services in addition to honey bees. Furthermore, the community of bees visiting flowers changes based on crop type, phenology, and spatial-temporal factors. Results suggest that developing pollinator conservation for farms that grow a wide variety of crops will likely require multiple conservation strategies. Farms that concentrate on a single crop may be able to tailor conservation practices toward the most important bees in their system and geographic locale. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. ANALISIS PENERAPAN TAX PLANNING ATAS PAJAK PENGHASILAN BADAN PADA PT SEMEN TONASA PANGKEP

    OpenAIRE

    WIJAYA, AKBAR

    2014-01-01

    2014 ABSTRAK ANALISIS PENERAPAN TAX PLANNING ATAS PAJAK PENGHASILAN BADAN PADA PT SEMEN TONASA PANGKEP Implementation Analysis of Tax Planning on Board Incoming Tax of Semen Tonasa Ltd. Pangkep Akbar Wijaya Amiruddin Darmawati Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui tax planning yang dilakukan oleh PT Semen Tonasa Pangkep, dan untuk menganalisis penerapan tax planning yang dilakukan oleh PT Semen Tonasa Pangkep dengan undang-undang perpajakan yang berlaku. Data...

  19. ANALISIS PENERAPAN TAX PLANNING ATAS PAJAK PENGHASILAN BADAN PADA PT SEMEN TONASA PANGKEP

    OpenAIRE

    WIJAYA, AKBAR

    2014-01-01

    2014 ABSTRAK ANALISIS PENERAPAN TAX PLANNING ATAS PAJAK PENGHASILAN BADAN PADA PT SEMEN TONASA PANGKEP Implementation Analysis of Tax Planning on Board Incoming Tax of Semen Tonasa Ltd. Pangkep Akbar Wijaya Amiruddin Darmawati Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui tax planning yang dilakukan oleh PT Semen Tonasa Pangkep, dan untuk menganalisis penerapan tax planning yang dilakukan oleh PT Semen Tonasa Pangkep dengan undang-undang perpajakan yang berlaku. Data...

  20. Impact of semen quality of Aseel chicken on induced molting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousaf A

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous chickens are an important source of animal proteins. Aseel is the very famous chicken breed of Pakistan which is facing the reproductive issues. Molting is economically used for the improvement of reproductive performance of male rosters. So the current experiment was designed to investigate the effect of molting on semen quality of indigenous Aseel chicken. Roosters (n=20 were divided into two groups, Group A molted (n=10 and group B non-molted (control (n=10. Molting was performed through the method of feed restrictions. After the molting phase, semen was analyzed for six weeks. The semen quality was significantly (P< 0.05 improved in terms of volume (0.34±0.8 & 0.16±0.4 ml, mortality (73.7±2.5 & 63.5±2.2%, semen concentration (3.36±1.2 & 1.63±0.2 x 115/ml, morphological defect of sperm, (6.5±0.5 & 8.7±0.6 % and livability of sperm (75±2.3 & 64±2.5% were significant (P< 0.05 better for group A as group B. It was concluded that molting could be used for improvement of semen quality of indigenous Aseel chicken to cover the reproductive problems.

  1. HIV-1 Populations in Semen Arise through Multiple Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Anderson

    Full Text Available HIV-1 is present in anatomical compartments and bodily fluids. Most transmissions occur through sexual acts, making virus in semen the proximal source in male donors. We find three distinct relationships in comparing viral RNA populations between blood and semen in men with chronic HIV-1 infection, and we propose that the viral populations in semen arise by multiple mechanisms including: direct import of virus, oligoclonal amplification within the seminal tract, or compartmentalization. In addition, we find significant enrichment of six out of nineteen cytokines and chemokines in semen of both HIV-infected and uninfected men, and another seven further enriched in infected individuals. The enrichment of cytokines involved in innate immunity in the seminal tract, complemented with chemokines in infected men, creates an environment conducive to T cell activation and viral replication. These studies define different relationships between virus in blood and semen that can significantly alter the composition of the viral population at the source that is most proximal to the transmitted virus.

  2. Intranidal worker reactions to volatile compounds identified from cephalic secretions in the stingless bee,Scaptotrigona postica (Hymenoptera, Meliponinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, E; Engels, W; Schröder, W; Francke, W

    1987-02-01

    From pentane extracts of worker heads of the stingless bee (Scaptotrigona postica), 70 volatile compounds were identified by combined gas chromatographic-mass spectroscopic analyses. A bioassay was developed to evaluate intranidal reactions of workers to synthetic volatiles. Thirty-six of the cephalic volatiles were tested. Thirteen types of behavioral reactions were recorded in a semiquantitative manner. The test was run in the brood nest where mainly young nurse bees are present and also in the storage area of the nest with old foragers traffic. The results obtained were compared and discussed in order to understand the chemical communication system of this species. Especially in the dark interior of the nest, which in nature is found in hollow tree cavities, chemical messages obviously play a particularly important role in the communication systems of the bees.

  3. 9 CFR 98.35 - Declaration, health certificate, and other documents for animal semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... establishments in which no case of scrapie had been confirmed during their residency; and (iii) Neither showed clinical signs of scrapie at the time of semen collection nor developed scrapie between the time of semen... not, affected with scrapie. (2) In the region where the semen originates: (i) Scrapie is...

  4. Sensitive detection of Myobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis in bovine semen by real-time PCR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herthnek, D.; Englund, S.; Willemsen, P.T.J.; Bolske, G.

    2006-01-01

    Aims: To develop a fast and sensitive protocol for detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in bovine semen and to make a critical evaluation of the analytical sensitivity. Methods and Results: Processed semen was spiked with known amounts of MAP. Semen from different bulls as

  5. Effects of oxytocin on semen release response in African catfish (Clarias gariepinus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viveiros, A.T.M.; Jatzkowski, A.; Komen, J.

    2003-01-01

    In silurid fishes, semen collection is practically impossible, even after hormonal stimulation. Instead, males are killed and testes macerated to obtain sperm. To understand the endocrine control of semen release in catfishes, we investigated the role of smooth muscle contractors in semen release

  6. Chalkbrood disease in honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronstein, K A; Murray, K D

    2010-01-01

    Chalkbrood is a fungal disease of honey bee brood caused by Ascosphaera apis. This disease is now found throughout the world, and there are indications that chalkbrood incidence may be on the rise. In this review we consolidate both historic knowledge and recent scientific findings. We document the worldwide spread of the fungus, which is aided by increased global travel and the migratory nature of many beekeeping operations. We discuss the current taxonomic classification in light of the recent complete reworking of fungal systematics brought on by application of molecular methods. In addition, we discuss epidemiology and pathogenesis of the disease, as well as pathogen biology, morphology and reproduction. New attempts at disease control methods and management tactics are reviewed. We report on research tools developed for identification and monitoring, and also include recent findings on genomic and molecular studies not covered by previous reviews, including sequencing of the A. apis genome and identification of the mating type locus.

  7. How bees distinguish black from white

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horridge A

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Adrian Horridge Biological Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaAbstract: Bee eyes have photoreceptors for ultraviolet, green, and blue wavelengths that are excited by reflected white but not by black. With ultraviolet reflections excluded by the apparatus, bees can learn to distinguish between black, gray, and white, but theories of color vision are clearly of no help in explaining how they succeed. Human vision sidesteps the issue by constructing black and white in the brain. Bees have quite different and accessible mechanisms. As revealed by extensive tests of trained bees, bees learned two strong signals displayed on either target. The first input was the position and a measure of the green receptor modulation at the vertical edges of a black area, which included a measure of the angular width between the edges of black. They also learned the average position and total amount of blue reflected from white areas. These two inputs were sufficient to help decide which of two targets held the reward of sugar solution, but the bees cared nothing for the black or white as colors, or the direction of contrast at black/white edges. These findings provide a small step toward understanding, modeling, and implementing in silicon the anti-intuitive visual system of the honeybee, in feeding behavior. Keywords: vision, detectors, black/white, color, visual processing

  8. Effects of a lecithin and catalase containing semen extender and a second dilution with different enhancing buffers on the quality of cold-stored canine spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmenta, I; Strohmayer, C; Müller-Schlösser, F; Schäfer-Somi, S

    2011-04-01

    In the present study, a diluent containing 0.8% lecithin (Minitube®, Tiefenbach, G) for the cold storage of canine semen was compared to a Tris-egg yolk extender (TRIS-EY) containing 20% egg yolk. For this purpose, aliquots of 10 mixed ejaculates (main fractions) were either diluted with TRIS-EY or with three lecithin extenders containing 0.8% lecithin with or without catalase and tyrosine. All samples were examined by computer assisted sperm analysis (CASA), chlortetracycline assay (CTC) and flow cytometry, sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) and zona pellucida binding assay (ZBA). Samples were then cold stored for 8 d and examinations repeated at days 3 and 8. Measurement in the CASA were repeated daily and prior to measurement, each sample was diluted with each of 4 enhancers with or without acetylcarnitine. The use of an enhancer proved to be essential for all extenders and after 8 d of cooling, progressive motility (P) and viability (V) still averaged > 70% and > 80% with the lecithin extenders containing additives, whereas with TRIS-EY and without additives it was significantly lower (P lecithin extender with additives was used (P lecithin extender containing catalase, conserved P and V during 8 d of cold storage better than the TRIS-EY extender, however, only when an enhancer was used; addition of acetylcarnitine to the enhancer did not further improve semen quality. The here introduced lecithin extender / enhancer combination is a useful tool for prolonged storage of cooled semen with excellent longevity and binding ability; addition of tyrosine to the extender did not improve semen quality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Relationship between age and semen parameters in men with normal sperm concentration: analysis of 6022 semen samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitas, E; Lunenfeld, E; Weisz, N; Friger, M; Potashnik, G

    2007-04-01

    This study evaluates retrospectively the relationship between age and semen parameters among men with normal sperm concentration. It was based on computerized data and performed in an Academic Fertility and IVF Unit. Six thousand and twenty-two semen samples with sperm concentrations of >or=20 x 10(6) ml(-1) were examined according to WHO criteria and analysed in relation to patients' age. For each age group, mean values +/- SD of semen volume, sperm concentration, percentage of motile spermatozoa, normal morphology, acrosome index, total sperm count/ejaculate, total motile sperm count/ejaculate and sexual abstinence duration were examined. A peak semen volume of 3.51 +/- 1.76 ml(-1) was observed at age >or=30 to age >or=55 years (PSperm motility was found to be inversely related to age with peak motility of 44.39 +/- 20.69% at age age >or=55 years (Psperm, between values of 103.34 +/- 107 x 10(6) at age >or=30 to age >55 years. A statistically significant and inverse relationship was observed between semen volume, sperm quality and patient age, in spite of prolonged sexual abstinence duration. Top sperm parameters were observed at age >or=30 to sperm parameters occurred after the age of 55 years.

  10. [Semen analysis: spermiogram according to WHO 2010 criteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottardo, F; Kliesch, S

    2011-01-01

    Semen analysis plays a key role in the diagnostics of male infertility. Semen analysis has to be performed according to World Health Organisation (WHO) criteria. The updated version of the WHO manual was completed at the end of 2009 and published in 2010. Standard procedures in semen analysis include evaluation of sperm concentration, motility, morphology and vitality. In this new version particular attention has been paid to internal and external quality control, helping to identify and correct incidental and systematic errors both in routine analysis as well as in the field of research. The new manual describes all laboratory solutions, procedures and calculation formulas, and focuses on the definition of cryptozoospermia or azoospermia. A chapter concerning cryopreservation of spermatozoa has been newly integrated. The following overview presents the most important aspects of the updated WHO manual.

  11. Sperm penetration assay and its correlation with semen analysis parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmi Kant Pandey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aim of current study was to determine whether the Sperm Penetration Assay (SPA can be used as a test to discriminate the infertile male from fertile one. We have also correlated the SPA with semen analysis. Methods: Sperm characteristics namely Semen analysis and the sperm penetration assay were tested in 44 infertile and 10 fertile men. Sperm penetration assay was determined by using zona free hamster eggs. Results: With decreasing spermatozoa concentration in the semen there was significant decrease in percentage penetration of zona free Hamster eggs (p0.05. Conclusions: The Sperm penetration assay could discriminate the infertile group from fertile group significantly (p<0.001. The test appeared to be highly reproducible and probably identifies a truly infertile male. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(11.000: 3197-3201

  12. Imidacloprid alters foraging and decreases bee avoidance of predators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Tan

    Full Text Available Concern is growing over the effects of neonicotinoid pesticides, which can impair honey bee cognition. We provide the first demonstration that sublethal concentrations of imidacloprid can harm honey bee decision-making about danger by significantly increasing the probability of a bee visiting a dangerous food source. Apis cerana is a native bee that is an important pollinator of agricultural crops and native plants in Asia. When foraging on nectar containing 40 µg/L (34 ppb imidacloprid, honey bees (Apis cerana showed no aversion to a feeder with a hornet predator, and 1.8 fold more bees chose the dangerous feeder as compared to control bees. Control bees exhibited significant predator avoidance. We also give the first evidence that foraging by A. cerana workers can be inhibited by sublethal concentrations of the pesticide, imidacloprid, which is widely used in Asia. Compared to bees collecting uncontaminated nectar, 23% fewer foragers returned to collect the nectar with 40 µg/L imidacloprid. Bees that did return respectively collected 46% and 63% less nectar containing 20 µg/L and 40 µg/L imidacloprid. These results suggest that the effects of neonicotinoids on honey bee decision-making and other advanced cognitive functions should be explored. Moreover, research should extend beyond the classic model, the European honey bee (A. mellifera, to other important bee species.

  13. Imidacloprid alters foraging and decreases bee avoidance of predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ken; Chen, Weiwen; Dong, Shihao; Liu, Xiwen; Wang, Yuchong; Nieh, James C

    2014-01-01

    Concern is growing over the effects of neonicotinoid pesticides, which can impair honey bee cognition. We provide the first demonstration that sublethal concentrations of imidacloprid can harm honey bee decision-making about danger by significantly increasing the probability of a bee visiting a dangerous food source. Apis cerana is a native bee that is an important pollinator of agricultural crops and native plants in Asia. When foraging on nectar containing 40 µg/L (34 ppb) imidacloprid, honey bees (Apis cerana) showed no aversion to a feeder with a hornet predator, and 1.8 fold more bees chose the dangerous feeder as compared to control bees. Control bees exhibited significant predator avoidance. We also give the first evidence that foraging by A. cerana workers can be inhibited by sublethal concentrations of the pesticide, imidacloprid, which is widely used in Asia. Compared to bees collecting uncontaminated nectar, 23% fewer foragers returned to collect the nectar with 40 µg/L imidacloprid. Bees that did return respectively collected 46% and 63% less nectar containing 20 µg/L and 40 µg/L imidacloprid. These results suggest that the effects of neonicotinoids on honey bee decision-making and other advanced cognitive functions should be explored. Moreover, research should extend beyond the classic model, the European honey bee (A. mellifera), to other important bee species.

  14. Impact of pig insemination technique and semen preparation on profitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Peña, D; Knox, R V; Pettigrew, J; Rodriguez-Zas, S L

    2014-01-01

    Artificial insemination technique and semen preparation impact boar utilization efficiency, genetic dissemination, and biosecurity. Intrauterine (IUI) and deep intrauterine (DUI) AI techniques require lower number of spermatozoa per dose compared to conventional (CON) AI. Frozen semen (FRO) has been associated with lower reproductive performance compared to fresh semen (FRE) preparation. The combined effects of 3 AI techniques (CON, IUI, and DUI) and 2 semen preparations (FRE and FRO) on the financial indicators of a pig crossbreeding system were studied. A 3-tier system was simulated in ZPLAN and the genetic improvement in a representative scenario was characterized. The cross of nucleus lines B and A generated 200,000 BA sows at the multiplier level. The BA sows were inseminated (CON, IUI, or DUI) with FRE or FRO from line C boars at the commercial level. Semen preparation and AI technique were represented by distinct sow:boar ratios in the C × BA cross. A range of farrowing rates (60 to 90%) and litter sizes (8 to 14 liveborn pigs) were tested. Genetic improvement per year for number born alive, adjusted 21-d litter weight, days to 113.5 kg, backfat, and ADG were 0.01 pigs per litter, 0.06 kg, -0.09 d, -0.29 mm, and 0.88 g, respectively. On average, the net profit for FRE (FRO) increased (P-value FRE and FRO were lower than -5%. The difference in variable costs between FRE and FRO ranged from -5.3 (CON) to -24.7% (DUI). Overall, insemination technique and semen preparation had a nonlinear effect on profit. The average relative difference in profit between FRE and FRO was less than 3% for the scenarios studied.

  15. Researches Regarding the Testing of Bee Family Resistance to Bee Brood Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pătruică

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we tested the resistance of bee families to young bee diseases. The researches were carried out in two apiaries from Timişoara and Comoraste, Caras-Severin County. The biological material was consisted of 10 bee families belonging to the species Apis mellifica carpatica, distributed in two experimental variants of 5 families, with almost equal power. During this experiment, we assessed the degree of cleaning and removing of the young bees that died of freezing. Successive to the researches performed, in all the three controls we observed significant differences, from a statistical viewpoint (p<0.05 between the two experimental variants, regarding the number of cells with removed dead young bees.

  16. Cysteine addition on short-term cooled boar semen preservation and its relationship with swine field fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina K Severo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Artificial insemination is routinely used in the swine industry to reduce the costs of production through to increase the efficiency of the refrigerated boar semen process. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different levels of cysteine (CYS added to the Beltsville Thawing Solution (BTS extender semen during cooling for up to 72 hours. Ejaculated from three boars were collected with the gloved-hand technique and semen aliquots were diluted in BTS as follow: BTS only (BTS, BTS + 0.1mM cysteine (CYS0.1, BTS + 0.5mM cysteine (CYS0.5, BTS + 1.0mM cysteine (CYS1.0, BTS + 2.5mM cysteine (CYS2.5, BTS + 5.0mM cysteine (CYS5.0, BTS + 10.0mM cysteine (CYS10.0, and BTS + 20.0mM cysteine (CYS20.0. Evaluation of sperm integrity were analyzed using 0.5mg/ml propidium iodide (plasma membrane, 100µg/ml isothiocynate-conjugated Pisum sativun agglutinin (acrosomal membrane and 153µM 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolyl carbocyanine iodide (mitochondria potential after semen dilution at specific times (0, 24, 48 and 72 hours. Additionally, we also evaluated the effects of 5.0 mM CYS addition in the BTS extender on the maintenance of sperm quality and their influence on fertility in the swine production. After artificial insemination, animals were evaluated based on the estrous return and the number of piglet's born. Cysteine at concentrations of 10.0 and 20.0mM resulted in more pronounced reductions even at the time zero. Semen viability decreased to levels below 10% at these high levels of CYS in the first 24 hour of storage at 17ºC. At the end of the storage time, less than 65% of sperm cells had intact plasma membrane in all groups. The sperm viability decreased significantly when the semen was added at high concentrations of CYS (time "0"; CYS10.0 and CYS20.0; p<0.05, when compared to the other CYS concentrations. The BTS (10.20±0.39 treated group showed a lower rate of estrus return when compared to other (BTSCYS

  17. Replication of honey bee-associated RNA viruses across multiple bee species in apple orchards of Georgia, Germany and Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzevičiūtė, Rita; Theodorou, Panagiotis; Husemann, Martin; Japoshvili, George; Kirkitadze, Giorgi; Zhusupbaeva, Aigul; Paxton, Robert J

    2017-06-01

    The essential ecosystem service of pollination is provided largely by insects, which are considered threatened by diverse biotic and abiotic global change pressures. RNA viruses are one such pressure, and have risen in prominence as a major threat for honey bees (Apis mellifera) and global apiculture, as well as a risk factor for other bee species through pathogen spill-over between managed honey bees and sympatric wild pollinator communities. Yet despite their potential role in global bee decline, the prevalence of honey bee-associated RNA viruses in wild bees is poorly known from both geographic and taxonomic perspectives. We screened members of pollinator communities (honey bees, bumble bees and other wild bees belonging to four families) collected from apple orchards in Georgia, Germany and Kyrgyzstan for six common honey bee-associated RNA virus complexes encompassing nine virus targets. The Deformed wing virus complex (DWV genotypes A and B) had the highest prevalence across all localities and host species and was the only virus complex found in wild bee species belonging to all four studied families. Based on amplification of negative-strand viral RNA, we found evidence for viral replication in wild bee species of DWV-A/DWV-B (hosts: Andrena haemorrhoa and several Bombus spp.) and Black queen cell virus (hosts: Anthophora plumipes, several Bombus spp., Osmia bicornis and Xylocopa spp.). Viral amplicon sequences revealed that DWV-A and DWV-B are regionally distinct but identical in two or more bee species at any one site, suggesting virus is shared amongst sympatric bee taxa. This study demonstrates that honey bee associated RNA viruses are geographically and taxonomically widespread, likely infective in wild bee species, and shared across bee taxa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Winter survival of individual honey bees and honey bee colonies depends on level of Varroa destructor infestation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coby van Dooremalen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent elevated winter loss of honey bee colonies is a major concern. The presence of the mite Varroa destructor in colonies places an important pressure on bee health. V. destructor shortens the lifespan of individual bees, while long lifespan during winter is a primary requirement to survive until the next spring. We investigated in two subsequent years the effects of different levels of V. destructor infestation during the transition from short-lived summer bees to long-lived winter bees on the lifespan of individual bees and the survival of bee colonies during winter. Colonies treated earlier in the season to reduce V. destructor infestation during the development of winter bees were expected to have longer bee lifespan and higher colony survival after winter. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mite infestation was reduced using acaricide treatments during different months (July, August, September, or not treated. We found that the number of capped brood cells decreased drastically between August and November, while at the same time, the lifespan of the bees (marked cohorts increased indicating the transition to winter bees. Low V. destructor infestation levels before and during the transition to winter bees resulted in an increase in lifespan of bees and higher colony survival compared to colonies that were not treated and that had higher infestation levels. A variety of stress-related factors could have contributed to the variation in longevity and winter survival that we found between years. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study contributes to theory about the multiple causes for the recent elevated colony losses in honey bees. Our study shows the correlation between long lifespan of winter bees and colony loss in spring. Moreover, we show that colonies treated earlier in the season had reduced V. destructor infestation during the development of winter bees resulting in longer bee lifespan and higher colony survival after winter.

  19. Colonies of Bumble Bees (Bombus impatiens Produce Fewer Workers, Less Bee Biomass, and Have Smaller Mother Queens Following Fungicide Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia M. Bernauer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bees provide vital pollination services to the majority of flowering plants in both natural and agricultural systems. Unfortunately, both native and managed bee populations are experiencing declines, threatening the persistence of these plants and crops. Agricultural chemicals are one possible culprit contributing to bee declines. Even fungicides, generally considered safe for bees, have been shown to disrupt honey bee development and impair bumble bee behavior. Little is known, however, how fungicides may affect bumble bee colony growth. We conducted a controlled cage study to determine the effects of fungicide exposure on colonies of a native bumble bee species (Bombus impatiens. Colonies of B. impatiens were exposed to flowers treated with field-relevant levels of the fungicide chlorothalonil over the course of one month. Colony success was assessed by the number and biomass of larvae, pupae, and adult bumble bees. Bumble bee colonies exposed to fungicide produced fewer workers, lower total bee biomass, and had lighter mother queens than control colonies. Our results suggest that fungicides negatively affect the colony success of a native bumble bee species and that the use of fungicides during bloom has the potential to severely impact the success of native bumble bee populations foraging in agroecosystems.

  20. The extent of increase in first calving age as a result of implementing various sexed semen breeding strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahereh Joezy-Shekalgorabi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A deterministic simulation was conducted to assess the effects of sexed semen utilization strategies on age at first calving (AFC. Four different strategies were implemented on dairy heifers: continuous use of conventional semen only (CC, continuous use of sexed semen only (SS, utilization of sexed semen for both the first and second services with conventional semen afterwards (S2, and utilization of sexed semen for the first service with conventional semen afterwards (S1. Results indicated that continuous utilization of sexed semen led to the greatest AFC; however at high conception rates, strategies displayed negligible differences on AFC. Increases in estrus detection rate had the greatest effects on decreasing AFC of the SS scenarios. Negative effect of sexed semen on AFC increased when the effect of low estrus detection rate was combined with low conception rate of sexed semen. Results indicated that in the case of access to sexed semen conception rate, prediction of AFC is possible by quadratic polynomial or exponential equations, depending to the applied breeding strategy. Simultaneous utilization of sexed and conventional semen in a herd did not make a substantial change in AFC when a low percentage of sexed semen was employed. Increasing the contribution of different sexed semen strategies led to higher AFC variation, especially for the SS strategy. AFC of strategies that utilize sexed semen is highly dependent on the conception rate, estrus detection rate and the contribution of sex sorted semen in the total number of inseminations of the heifer herd.

  1. The extent of increase in first calving age as a result of implementing various sexed semen breeding strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joezy-Shekalgorabi, S.; Shadparvar, A. A.; Vries, A. de; Gay, K. D.

    2014-06-01

    A deterministic simulation was conducted to assess the effects of sexed semen utilization strategies on age at first calving (AFC). Four different strategies were implemented on dairy heifers: continuous use of conventional semen only (CC), continuous use of sexed semen only (SS), utilization of sexed semen for both the first and second services with conventional semen afterwards (S2), and utilization of sexed semen for the first service with conventional semen afterwards (S1). Results indicated that continuous utilization of sexed semen led to the greatest AFC; however at high conception rates, strategies displayed negligible differences on AFC. Increases in estrus detection rate had the greatest effects on decreasing AFC of the SS scenarios. Negative effect of sexed semen on AFC increased when the effect of low estrus detection rate was combined with low conception rate of sexed semen. Results indicated that in the case of access to sexed semen conception rate, prediction of AFC is possible by quadratic polynomial or exponential equations, depending to the applied breeding strategy. Simultaneous utilization of sexed and conventional semen in a herd did not make a substantial change in AFC when a low percentage of sexed semen was employed. Increasing the contribution of different sexed semen strategies led to higher AFC variation, especially for the SS strategy. AFC of strategies that utilize sexed semen is highly dependent on the conception rate, estrus detection rate and the contribution of sex sorted semen in the total number of inseminations of the heifer herd. (Author)

  2. Influence of chamber type integrated with computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) system on the results of boar semen evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gączarzewicz, D

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of different types of chambers used in computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) on boar sperm concentration and motility parameters. CASA measurements were performed on 45 ejaculates by comparing three commonly used chambers: Leja chamber (LJ), Makler chamber (MK) and microscopic slide-coverslip (SL). Concentration results obtained with CASA were verified by manual counting on a Bürker hemocytometer (BH). No significant differences were found between the concentrations determined with BH vs. LJ and SL, whereas higher (p0.05). The results obtained show that CASA assessment of boar semen should account for the effect of counting chamber on the results of sperm motility and concentration, which confirms the need for further study on standardizing the automatic analysis of boar semen.

  3. A survey of indigenous knowledge of stingless bees (Apidae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and Central America as well as Australia where the bees have been studied ... and hive products, studies on these bees are almost non existent in Africa. Strangely however, the local people showed great wealth of knowledge about the ...

  4. Propolis and bee venom in diabetic wounds; a potential approach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Propolis and bee venom in diabetic wounds; a potential approach that warrants ... in diabetes mellitus is a complex multi-stage process that requires the proper ... Bee products have various properties that make them an important addition to ...

  5. Predicting bee community responses to land-use changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palma, De Adriana; Abrahamczyk, Stefan; Aizen, Marcelo A.; Albrecht, Matthias; Basset, Yves; Bates, Adam; Blake, Robin J.; Boutin, Céline; Bugter, Rob; Connop, Stuart; Cruz-López, Leopoldo; Cunningham, Saul A.; Darvill, Ben; Diekötter, Tim; Dorn, Silvia; Downing, Nicola; Entling, Martin H.; Farwig, Nina; Felicioli, Antonio; Fonte, Steven J.; Fowler, Robert; Franzén, Markus; Goulson, Dave; Grass, Ingo; Hanley, Mick E.; Hendrix, Stephen D.; Herrmann, Farina; Herzog, Felix; Holzschuh, Andrea; Jauker, Birgit; Kessler, Michael; Knight, M.E.; Kruess, Andreas; Lavelle, Patrick; Féon, Le Violette; Lentini, Pia; Malone, Louise A.; Marshall, Jon; Pachón, Eliana Martínez; McFrederick, Quinn S.; Morales, Carolina L.; Mudri-Stojnic, Sonja; Nates-Parra, Guiomar; Nilsson, Sven G.; Öckinger, Erik; Osgathorpe, Lynne; Parra-H, Alejandro; Peres, Carlos A.; Persson, Anna S.; Petanidou, Theodora; Poveda, Katja; Power, Eileen F.; Quaranta, Marino; Quintero, Carolina; Rader, Romina; Richards, Miriam H.; Roulston, Tai; Rousseau, Laurent; Sadler, Jonathan P.; Samnegård, Ulrika; Schellhorn, Nancy A.; Schüepp, Christof; Schweiger, Oliver; Smith-Pardo, Allan H.; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Stout, Jane C.; Tonietto, Rebecca K.; Tscharntke, Teja; Tylianakis, Jason M.; Verboven, Hans A.F.; Vergara, Carlos H.; Verhulst, Jort; Westphal, Catrin; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Purvis, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Land-use change and intensification threaten bee populations worldwide, imperilling pollination services. Global models are needed to better characterise, project, and mitigate bees' responses to these human impacts. The available data are, however, geographically and taxonomically unrepresentati

  6. Late Onset of Acute Urticaria after Bee Stings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Asai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the cases of five patients with a late onset of acute urticaria after a bee sting. The ages of the five Japanese patients ranged from 33 to 86 years (median: 61. All patients had no history of an allergic reaction to bee stings. The onset of urticaria was 6–14 days (median: 10 after a bee sting. Although four of the patients did not describe experiencing a bee sting at their presentation, the subsequent examination detected anti-bee-specific IgE antibodies. So, we think a history of a bee sting should thus be part of the medical interview sheet for patients with acute urticaria, and an examination of IgE for bees may help prevent a severe bee-related anaphylactic reaction in the future.

  7. No increased sperm DNA fragmentation index in semen containing human papillomavirus or herpesvirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Maja Døvling; Bungum, Mona; Fedder, Jens

    2013-01-01

    -based hybridization array that identifies all HHVs and 35 of the most common HPVs. Sperm DNA integrity was determined by the sperm chromatin structure assay. HPVs or HHVs, or both, were found in 57% of semen samples; however, sperm DNA fragmentation index was not increased in semen containing these viruses.......It remains unknown whether human papillomaviruses (HPVs) or human herpesviruses (HHVs) in semen affect sperm DNA integrity. We investigated whether the presence of these viruses in semen was associated with an elevated sperm DNA fragmentation index. Semen from 76 sperm donors was examined by a PCR...

  8. Bees wax and its unsaponifiables as natural preservative for butter and cottonseed oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farag, R. S.

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available Simple model systems consisting of butter oil or refined cottonseed oil mixed with melted bees wax and its unsaponifiables were designated to study their hydrolytic and oxidative rancidity during storage. Whole bees wax at 0,5 and 1% levels possessed significant pro-hydrolytic activity whilst its unsaponifiables at 0,25 and 0,5% exhibited antihydrolytic effect on butter oil. The addition of whole bees wax at 0,5 and 1 % caused no effect on peroxide and thiobarbituric acid values of butter oil. However, bees wax unsaponifiables significantly reduced both peroxide and thiobarbituric acid values of stored butter oil. Bees wax unsaponifiables added to refined cottonseed oil had no effect on the acid value, whilst whole bees wax possessed significant prohydrolytic activity. The data for peroxide and thiobarbituric acid values of refined cottonseed oil demonstrated that both whole bees wax and its unsaponifiables had approximately the same antioxidant efficacy. The effectiveness of the added materials on the secondary oxidation products of refined cottonseed oil can be ranked according to its inhibition activity as follows: BHT (200 ppm > bees wax (1% > bees wax (0,5% > bees wax unsaponifiables (0,5% > bees wax unsaponifiables (0,25% > control.

    aceites de semilla de algodón Sistemas modelo simples consistentes en aceite de mantequilla o aceite de semilla de algodón refinado mezclado con cera de abeja derretida y su insaponificable fueron diseñados para estudiar su rancidez oxidativa e hidrolítica durante el almacenamiento. La cera de abeja íntegra a niveles del 0,5 y 1% tuvo una actividad pro-hidrolítica significativa, mientras que su insaponificable al 0,25 y 0,5% exhibió efecto antihidrolítico sobre el aceite de mantequilla. La adición de cera de abeja íntegra al 0,5 y 1% no causó efecto sobre el índice de peróxido y ácido tiobarbitúrico del aceite de mantequilla. Sin embargo, el insaponificable de cera de abeja redujo

  9. Optimizing ZigBee Security using Stochastic Model Checking

    OpenAIRE

    Yuksel, Ender; Nielson, Hanne Riis; Nielson, Flemming; Fruth, Matthias; Kwiatkowska, Marta

    2012-01-01

    ZigBee is a fairly new but promising wireless sensor network standard that offers the advantages of simple and low resource communication. Nevertheless, security is of great concern to ZigBee, and enhancements are prescribed in the latest ZigBee specication: ZigBee-2007. In this technical report, we identify an important gap in the specification on key updates, and present a methodology for determining optimal key update policies and security parameters. We exploit the stochastic model checki...

  10. Interaction of extender composition and freezing method for effective semen cryopreservation in the North American river otter (Lontra canadensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Helen L; Swanson, William F

    2017-10-01

    Semen cryopreservation and storage in genome resource banks (GRBs), in combination with artificial insemination (AI), could be invaluable for genetic management and conservation of endangered otter species. For any applied conservation benefit, effective methods for otter sperm processing and cryopreservation first must be established. In this study, our objective was to develop an effective semen cryopreservation method for the North American river otter, evaluating the effect of extender composition (i.e., glycerol concentration, Equex STM paste supplementation) and freezing protocol (timing of glycerol addition, pre-freeze cooling rate, freezing/packaging method) on post-thaw sperm motility, longevity and acrosome status. Semen was collected from 14 otters housed at 9 zoos, and following cryopreservation in an egg-yolk based extender, thawed to assess sperm motility and acrosome status immediately post-thaw and during 6 h of in vitro culture. Results indicated that extender containing 4% glycerol was preferable (p  0.05) post-thaw sperm parameters. Treatments with extender containing Equex and frozen by pelleting on dry ice showed greater (p < 0.05) motility and percentage of intact acrosomes compared to treatments frozen in extender without Equex, regardless of pre-freeze cooling rate. In the absence of Equex, pelleting provided superior post-thaw sperm motility (p < 0.01) and higher (p < 0.001) percentage of sperm with intact acrosomes compared to samples frozen in straws over liquid nitrogen vapor. Results of this study indicate that cryopreservation of otter sperm using an egg-yolk -TEST based extender containing 4% glycerol and 1% Equex, with the pellet freezing method, provided superior post-thaw sperm motility, longevity and acrosomal integrity compared to other combinations. Neither alterations in timing of glycerolated extender addition nor pre-freeze cooling rate had a discernable effect on post-thaw otter sperm parameters. These findings

  11. Effects of dilution and centrifugation on the survival of spermatozoa and the structure of motile sperm cell subpopulations in refrigerated Catalonian donkey semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró, J; Taberner, E; Rivera, M; Peña, A; Medrano, A; Rigau, T; Peñalba, A

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effects of dilution and centrifugation (i.e., two methods of reducing the influence of the seminal plasma) on the survival of spermatozoa and the structure of motile sperm cell subpopulations in refrigerated Catalonian donkey (Equus asinus) semen. Fifty ejaculates from nine Catalonian jackasses were collected. Gel-free semen was diluted 1:1, 1:5 or 1:10 with Kenney extender. Another sample of semen was diluted 1:5, centrifuged, and then resuspended with Kenney extender until a final dilution of 25x10(6) sperm/ml was achieved (C). After 24 h, 48 h or 72 h of refrigerated storage at 5 degrees C, aliquots of these semen samples were incubated at 37 degrees C for 5 min. The percentage of viable sperm was determined by staining with eosin-nigrosin. The motility characteristics of the spermatozoa were examined using the CASA system (Microptic, Barcelona, Spain). At 24h, more surviving spermatozoa were seen in the more diluted and in the centrifuged semen samples (1:1 48.71%; 1:5 56.58%, 1:10 62.65%; C 72.40%). These differences were maintained at 48 h (1:1 34.31%, 1:5 40.56%, 1:10 48.52%, C 66.30%). After 72 h, only the C samples showed a survival rate of above 25%. The four known donkey motile sperm subpopulations were maintained by refrigeration. However, the percentage of motile sperms in each subpopulation changed with dilution. Only the centrifuged samples, and only at 24h, showed exactly the same motile sperm subpopulation proportions as recorded for fresh sperm. However, the 1:10 dilutions at 24 and 48 h, and the centrifuged semen at 48 h, showed few variations compared to fresh sperm. These results show that the elimination of seminal plasma increases the survival of spermatozoa and the maintenance of motility patterns. The initial sperm concentration had a significant (P<0.05) influence on centrifugation efficacy, but did not influence the number of spermatozoa damaged by centrifugation. In contrast, the percentage of live

  12. Do Ureaplasma urealyticum infections in the genital tract affect semen quality?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Wang; Cui-Ling Liang; Jun-Qing Wu; Chen Xu; Shi-Xiao Qin; Er-Sheng Gao

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the relationship between Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU) infection and semen quality. Methods:From 2001 to 2003, 346 eligible patients aged 20-45 years were invited from two hospitals in Shanghai, China, to participate in an investigation which included questionnaires about general and reproductive health, an external genital tract examination, UU culture and semen analysis. Multiple linear regression models were used to examine whether UU had a significant effect on semen quality after adjustment for confounding factors. Results: Findings suggested that UU infection was associated with higher semen viscosity and lower semen pH value. Sperm concentration was lower in UU positive subjects than that in UU negative subjects (54.04 × 106/mL vs.70.58 × 106/mL). However, Uudid not significantly affect other semen quality indexes. Conclusion: UU infection of the male genital tract could negatively influence semen quality.

  13. Apoptosis induction of Persicae Semen extract in human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hee-Young; Hong, Seon-Pyo; Hahn, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Jeong Hee

    2003-02-01

    The major ingredient of Persicae Semen is a cynogenic compound, amygdalin (D-mandelonitrile-beta-gentiobioside). Controversial results on the anticancer activity of amygdalin were reported due to its conversion to its inactive isomer, neoamygdalin. In order to inhibit the epimerization of amygdalin, we used newly developed simple acid boiling method in preparation of Persicae Semen extract. HPLC analysis revealed most of amygdalin in Persicae Semen extract was active D-form. Persicae Semen extract was used to analyze its effect on cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells. Persicae Semen extract was cytotoxic to HL-60 cells with IC50 of 6.4 mg/mL in the presence of 250 nM of beta-glucosidase. The antiproliferative effects of Persicae Semen extract appear to be attributable to its induction of apoptotic cell death, as Persicae Semen extract induced nuclear morphology changes and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation.

  14. Maintaining semen quality by improving cold chain equipment used in cattle artificial insemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Daniel; McClure, Elizabeth; Harston, Stephen; Madan, Damian

    2016-06-01

    Artificial insemination of dairy cattle is a common practice in the developing world that can improve farmer incomes and food security. Maintaining the fertilizing potential of frozen semen as it is manipulated, transported and stored is crucial to the success of this process. Here we describe simple technological improvements to protect semen from inadvertent thermal fluctuations that occur when users mishandle semen using standard equipment. We show that when frozen semen is mishandled, characteristics of semen biology associated with fertility are negatively affected. We describe several design modifications and results from thermal performance tests of several improved prototypes. Finally, we compare semen that has been mishandled in standard and improved equipment. The data suggest that our canister improvements can better maintain characteristics of semen biology that correlate with fertility when it is mishandled.

  15. Reproduction in nondomestic birds: Physiology, semen collection, artificial insemination and cryopreservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.; Bertschinger, H.; Donoghue, A.M.; Blanco, J.; Soley, J.

    2004-01-01

    Pioneering work by Quinn and Burrows in the late 1930s led to successful artificial insemination (AI) programs in the domestic poultry industry. A variety of species specific modifications to the Quinn and Burrows massage technique made AI possible in nondomestic birds. Massage semen collection and insemination techniques span the entire range of species from sparrows to ostriches. Also, cooperative semen collection and electroejaculation have found limited use in some nondomestic species. Artificial insemination produces good fertility, often exceeding fertility levels in naturally copulating populations. However, aviculturists should explore other ways to improve fertility before resorting to AI. Artificial insemination is labor intensive and may pose risks to nondomestic birds as well as handlers associated with capture and insemination. Semen collection and AI makes semen cryopreservation and germ plasma preservation possible. Yet, semen cryopreservation techniques need improvement before fertility with frozen-thawed semen will equal fertility from AI with fresh semen.

  16. Nutrigenomics in honey bees: digital gene expression analysis of pollen's nutritive effects on healthy and varroa-parasitized bees

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alaux, Cédric; Dantec, Christelle; Parrinello, Hughes; Le Conte, Yves

    2011-01-01

    .... In honey bees (Apis mellifera), pollen, which is the main dietary source of proteins, amino acids and lipids, is essential to adult bee physiological development while reducing their susceptibility to parasites and pathogens...

  17. Insights into semen analysis:a Chinese perspective on the fifth edition of the WHO laboratory manual for the examination and processing of human semen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Hong Lu; Yi-Qun Gu

    2010-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, We are very glad to see that the Asian Journal of Andrology published a Special Issue on Semen Analysis in 21st Century Medicine, which well revealed some behind-the-scene controversies of the 5th edition of the WHO laboratory manual for the examination and processing of human semen [1]. Three articles from the special issue, two on the reference values of semen parameters [2,3] and another presenting the investigation results of 118 laboratories performing semen analysis in Mainland China [4], are very thoughtprovoking and we would like to share some of our views on these topics.

  18. Bee sting of the cornea: A running case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Höllhumer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bee stings that present with ocular sequelae are infrequently reported in the literature. The present report is of a retained corneal bee stinger with a delayed presentation. A review of case reports reveals a number of potential ocular complications of bee stings. The ocular sequelae and treatment options are reviewed.

  19. The honey bee parasite Nosema ceranae: transmissible via food exchange?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L Smith

    Full Text Available Nosema ceranae, a newly introduced parasite of the honey bee, Apis mellifera, is contributing to worldwide colony losses. Other Nosema species, such as N. apis, tend to be associated with increased defecation and spread via a fecal-oral pathway, but because N. ceranae does not induce defecation, it may instead be spread via an oral-oral pathway. Cages that separated older infected bees from young uninfected bees were used to test whether N. ceranae can be spread during food exchange. When cages were separated by one screen, food could be passed between the older bees and the young bees, but when separated by two screens, food could not be passed between the two cages. Young uninfected bees were also kept isolated in cages, as a solitary control. After 4 days of exposure to the older bees, and 10 days to incubate infections, young bees were more likely to be infected in the 1-Screen Test treatment vs. the 2-Screen Test treatment (P=0.0097. Young bees fed by older bees showed a 13-fold increase in mean infection level relative to young bees not fed by older bees (1-Screen Test 40.8%; 2-Screen Test 3.4%; Solo Control 2.8%. Although fecal-oral transmission is still possible in this experimental design, oral-oral infectivity could help explain the rapid spread of N. ceranae worldwide.

  20. Invasion of Varroa mites into honey bee brood cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    The parasitic mite Varroa-jacobsoni is one of the most serious pests of Western honey bees, Apis mellifera. The mites parasitize adult bees, but reproduction only occurs while parasitizing on honey bee brood. Invasion into a drone or a worker cell is therefore a crucial step in the life of Varroa m

  1. Multiyear survey targeting disease incidence in US honey bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US National Honey Bee Disease Survey sampled colony pests and diseases from 2009 to 2014. We verified the absence of Tropilaelaps spp., the Asian honey bee (Apis cerana), and slow bee paralysis virus. Endemic health threats were quantified, including Varroa destructor, Nosema spp., and eight hon...

  2. Trap-nests for stingless bees (Hymenoptera, Meliponini)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveira, Ricardo Caliari; Menezes, Cristiano; Egea Soares, Ademilson Espencer; Imperatriz Fonseca, Vera Lucia

    2013-01-01

    Most stingless bee species build their nests inside tree hollows. In this paper, we present trap-nest containers which simulate nesting cavities so as to attract swarms of stingless bees. Although regularly used by stingless bee beekeepers in Brazil, this technique to obtain new colonies has not yet

  3. Assessing Patterns of Admixture and Ancestry in Canadian Honey Bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canada has a large beekeeping industry comprised of 8483 beekeepers managing 672094 23 colonies. Canadian honey bees, like all honey bees in the New World, originate from centuries of importation of predominately European honey bees, but their precise ancestry remains unknown. There have been no i...

  4. Bee sting keratopathy with retained stinger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lott Pooi Wah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report aims to report an uncommon case of bee sting keratopathy with retained stinger. A 55-year-old man presented with left cornea bee sting while gardening two days prior to first visit. He complained of severe eye pain with redness, tearing and blurring of vision. On examination, his right eye visual acuity was 6/6 and in left eye was hand movement. There was generalized conjunctival hyperemia and cornea showing significant descemet striae. A bee stinger with surrounding infiltration noted at 2 o'clock was associated with striate keratitis. It was deeply seated at the posterior third of cornea stroma near to paracentral area. Pupil was mid-dilated with absence of relative afferent pupillary defect. There was neither hypopyon nor cataract. The posterior segment could not be visualized due to severe corneal edema. However, B-scan ultrasound was normal. Bee stinger was removed under local anaesthesia on the day of presentation. Post-operatively, patient was administered with topical moxifloxacin and topical non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Three weeks later, there was resolution of cornea infiltrate with improvement of striate keratitis and his vision was improved to 1/60. However, cornea edema did not regress but ended up with bullous keratopathy. The patient has undergone descemet-stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty and his vision was improved to 6/9. We recommend early stinger removal to reduce the possible sequelae of bee sting toxicity for better visual outcome.

  5. Honey Bee Infecting Lake Sinai Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daughenbaugh, Katie F; Martin, Madison; Brutscher, Laura M; Cavigli, Ian; Garcia, Emma; Lavin, Matt; Flenniken, Michelle L

    2015-06-23

    Honey bees are critical pollinators of important agricultural crops. Recently, high annual losses of honey bee colonies have prompted further investigation of honey bee infecting viruses. To better characterize the recently discovered and very prevalent Lake Sinai virus (LSV) group, we sequenced currently circulating LSVs, performed phylogenetic analysis, and obtained images of LSV2. Sequence analysis resulted in extension of the LSV1 and LSV2 genomes, the first detection of LSV4 in the US, and the discovery of LSV6 and LSV7. We detected LSV1 and LSV2 in the Varroa destructor mite, and determined that a large proportion of LSV2 is found in the honey bee gut, suggesting that vector-mediated, food-associated, and/or fecal-oral routes may be important for LSV dissemination. Pathogen-specific quantitative PCR data, obtained from samples collected during a small-scale monitoring project, revealed that LSV2, LSV1, Black queen cell virus (BQCV), and Nosema ceranae were more abundant in weak colonies than strong colonies within this sample cohort. Together, these results enhance our current understanding of LSVs and illustrate the importance of future studies aimed at investigating the role of LSVs and other pathogens on honey bee health at both the individual and colony levels.

  6. Bee sting keratopathy with retained stinger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lott Pooi Wah; Syed Shoeb Ahmad; Yew Yih Voon; Shuaibah Abdul Ghani; Visvaraja AL Subrayan

    2016-01-01

    This case report aims to report an uncommon case of bee sting keratopathy with retained stinger. A 55-year-old man presented with left cornea bee sting while gardening two days prior to first visit. He complained of severe eye pain with redness, tearing and blurring of vision. On examination, his right eye visual acuity was 6/6 and in left eye was hand movement. There was generalized conjunctival hyperemia and cornea showing significant descemet striae. A bee stinger with surrounding infiltration noted at 2 o'clock was associated with striate keratitis. It was deeply seated at the posterior third of cornea stroma near to paracentral area. Pupil was mid-dilated with absence of relative afferent pupillary defect. There was neither hypopyon nor cataract. The posterior segment could not be visualized due to severe corneal edema. However, B-scan ultrasound was normal. Bee stinger was removed under local anaesthesia on the day of presentation. Post-operatively, patient was administered with topical moxifloxacin and topical non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Three weeks later, there was resolution of cornea infiltrate with improvement of striate keratitis and his vision was improved to 1/60. However, cornea edema did not regress but ended up with bullous keratopathy. The patient has undergone descemet-stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty and his vision was improved to 6/9. We recommend early stinger removal to reduce the possible sequelae of bee sting toxicity for better visual outcome.

  7. Honey Bee Infecting Lake Sinai Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie F. Daughenbaugh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Honey bees are critical pollinators of important agricultural crops. Recently, high annual losses of honey bee colonies have prompted further investigation of honey bee infecting viruses. To better characterize the recently discovered and very prevalent Lake Sinai virus (LSV group, we sequenced currently circulating LSVs, performed phylogenetic analysis, and obtained images of LSV2. Sequence analysis resulted in extension of the LSV1 and LSV2 genomes, the first detection of LSV4 in the US, and the discovery of LSV6 and LSV7. We detected LSV1 and LSV2 in the Varroa destructor mite, and determined that a large proportion of LSV2 is found in the honey bee gut, suggesting that vector-mediated, food-associated, and/or fecal-oral routes may be important for LSV dissemination. Pathogen-specific quantitative PCR data, obtained from samples collected during a small-scale monitoring project, revealed that LSV2, LSV1, Black queen cell virus (BQCV, and Nosema ceranae were more abundant in weak colonies than strong colonies within this sample cohort. Together, these results enhance our current understanding of LSVs and illustrate the importance of future studies aimed at investigating the role of LSVs and other pathogens on honey bee health at both the individual and colony levels.

  8. Does bee pollen cause to eosinophilic gastroenteropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güç, Belgin Usta; Asilsoy, Suna; Canan, Oğuz; Kayaselçuk, Fazilet

    2015-09-01

    Bee pollen is given to children by mothers in order to strengthen their immune systems. There are no studies related with the side effects of bee polen in the literature. In this article, the literature was reviewed by presenting a case of allergic eosinophilic gastropathy related with bee polen. A 5-year old child was admitted due to abdominal pain. Edema was detected on the eyelids and pretibial region. In laboratory investigations, pathology was not detected in terms of hepatic and renal causes that would explain the protein loss of the patient diagnosed with hypoproteinemia and hypoalbuminemia. Urticaria was detected during the follow-up visit. When the history of the patient was deepened, it was learned that bee pollen was given to the patient every day. The total eosinophil count was found to be 1 800/mm(3). Allergic gastroenteropathy was considered because of hypereosinophilia and severe abdominal pain and endoscopy was performed. Biopsy revealed abundant eosinophils in the whole gastric mucosa. A diagnosis of allergic eosinophilic gastropathy was made. Bee polen was discontinued. Abdominal pain and edema disappeared in five days. Four weeks later, the levels of serum albumin and total eosinophil returned to normal.

  9. [Eosinophilic gastroenteritis caused by bee pollen sensitization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, S; Iñíguez, A; Subirats, M; Alonso, M J; Polo, F; Moneo, I

    1997-05-10

    A 34-year-old Spanish woman with a lifelong history of seasonal rhinoconjunctivitis and honey intolerance (pyrosis and abdominal pain) developed, 3 weeks after starting ingestion of bee pollen, astenia, anorexia, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, peripheral blood hypereosinophilia and elevated serum total IgE levels. A duodenal biopsy showed eosinophilic infiltration of the mucosal layer. Other causes of hypereosinophilia were not found. Repeated parasitological stool studies, as well as a duodenal aspirate showed negative results. Symptoms, hypereosinophilia and elevated IgE levels resolved after bee pollen ingestion was stopped. This is a typical case of eosinophilic gastroenteritis by ingestion of bee pollen in a woman with intolerance to honey bee, because the patient fulfilled the usual diagnostic criteria: gastrointestinal symptoms were present, eosinophilic infiltration of the digestive tract was demonstrated by biopsy, no eosinophilic infiltration of other organs was found and the presence of parasites was excluded. Honey intolerance and/or bee pollen administration should be considered as a cause of eosinophilic gastroenteritis.

  10. Social apoptosis in honey bee superorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Paul; Lin, Zheguang; Buawangpong, Ninat; Zheng, Huoqing; Hu, Fuliang; Neumann, Peter; Chantawannakul, Panuwan; Dietemann, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Eusocial insect colonies form superorganisms, in which nestmates cooperate and use social immunity to combat parasites. However, social immunity may fail in case of emerging diseases. This is the case for the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, which switched hosts from the Eastern honeybee, Apis cerana, to the Western honey bee, Apis mellifera, and currently is the greatest threat to A. mellifera apiculture globally. Here, we show that immature workers of the mite’s original host, A. cerana, are more susceptible to V. destructor infestations than those of its new host, thereby enabling more efficient social immunity and contributing to colony survival. This counterintuitive result shows that susceptible individuals can foster superorganism survival, offering empirical support to theoretical arguments about the adaptive value of worker suicide in social insects. Altruistic suicide of immature bees constitutes a social analogue of apoptosis, as it prevents the spread of infections by sacrificing parts of the whole organism, and unveils a novel form of transgenerational social immunity in honey bees. Taking into account the key role of susceptible immature bees in social immunity will improve breeding efforts to mitigate the unsustainably high colony losses of Western honey bees due to V. destructor infestations worldwide. PMID:27264643

  11. Influence of addition of different antibiotics in semen diluent on viable bacterial count and spermatozoal viability of Awassi ram semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O I Azawi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study were to determine the effects of six different antibiotics in controlling the growth of semen contaminating bacteria and if these antibiotics have any adverse effect on Awassi ram spermatozoa. Semen samples from six mature Awassi rams were used in this study. A total number of 120 ejaculates were collected from the rams using an artificial vagina once a week. Semen ejaculates were evaluated for volume, sperm concentration, mass motility, individual motility, percentage live sperm, sperm abnormalities, and viable bacterial count. Semen samples were diluted by sodium citrate-fructose-egg yolk. The diluted semen sample was divided into 7 parts. Six types of antibiotics were added to the semen diluent parts including; penicillin G 1000 IU ml-1 with streptomycin 1 mg ml-1, gentamicin sulphate 250 mg ml-1, tetracycline 0.5 mg ml-1, lincomycin 1 mg ml-1, cefoperazone sodium 1mg ml-1, cefdinir 1 mg ml-1 and the seventh part considered as a control group without antibiotic addition. The diluted semen samples were cooled and preserved at 5 Co for 5 days. Cooled diluted semen samples were examined for individual motility, percent of live sperm, sperm abnormalities, acrosomal defects and bacterial count every 24 h until 5 days. Comparing with the control, all the antibiotics examined were effective in controlling bacterial growth (P<0.05 from 24 h to 96 h of preservation at 5 Co. Cefdinir and cefoperazone sodium proved to be significantly (P<0.05 effective than other antibiotics in controlling bacterial growth at 96 h of preservation as the bacterial count were 23.3 ± 3.7 x 103 / ml and 25.4 ± 6.2 x 103 / ml, respectively. Lincomycin, gentamicin sulphate and tetracycline proved ineffective in controlling bacterial growth at 96 h of preservation as the bacterial count were 57.1 ± 20.1 x 103 / ml, 52.5 ± 29.4 x 103 / ml and 46.5 ± 8.8 x 103 / ml, respectively. The addition of tetracycline to diluted ram semen

  12. Mapping sleeping bees within their nest: spatial and temporal analysis of worker honey bee sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrett Anthony Klein

    Full Text Available Patterns of behavior within societies have long been visualized and interpreted using maps. Mapping the occurrence of sleep across individuals within a society could offer clues as to functional aspects of sleep. In spite of this, a detailed spatial analysis of sleep has never been conducted on an invertebrate society. We introduce the concept of mapping sleep across an insect society, and provide an empirical example, mapping sleep patterns within colonies of European honey bees (Apis mellifera L.. Honey bees face variables such as temperature and position of resources within their colony's nest that may impact their sleep. We mapped sleep behavior and temperature of worker bees and produced maps of their nest's comb contents as the colony grew and contents changed. By following marked bees, we discovered that individuals slept in many locations, but bees of different worker castes slept in different areas of the nest relative to position of the brood and surrounding temperature. Older worker bees generally slept outside cells, closer to the perimeter of the nest, in colder regions, and away from uncapped brood. Younger worker bees generally slept inside cells and closer to the center of the nest, and spent more time asleep than awake when surrounded by uncapped brood. The average surface temperature of sleeping foragers was lower than the surface temperature of their surroundings, offering a possible indicator of sleep for this caste. We propose mechanisms that could generate caste-dependent sleep patterns and discuss functional significance of these patterns.

  13. Mapping sleeping bees within their nest: spatial and temporal analysis of worker honey bee sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Barrett Anthony; Stiegler, Martin; Klein, Arno; Tautz, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Patterns of behavior within societies have long been visualized and interpreted using maps. Mapping the occurrence of sleep across individuals within a society could offer clues as to functional aspects of sleep. In spite of this, a detailed spatial analysis of sleep has never been conducted on an invertebrate society. We introduce the concept of mapping sleep across an insect society, and provide an empirical example, mapping sleep patterns within colonies of European honey bees (Apis mellifera L.). Honey bees face variables such as temperature and position of resources within their colony's nest that may impact their sleep. We mapped sleep behavior and temperature of worker bees and produced maps of their nest's comb contents as the colony grew and contents changed. By following marked bees, we discovered that individuals slept in many locations, but bees of different worker castes slept in different areas of the nest relative to position of the brood and surrounding temperature. Older worker bees generally slept outside cells, closer to the perimeter of the nest, in colder regions, and away from uncapped brood. Younger worker bees generally slept inside cells and closer to the center of the nest, and spent more time asleep than awake when surrounded by uncapped brood. The average surface temperature of sleeping foragers was lower than the surface temperature of their surroundings, offering a possible indicator of sleep for this caste. We propose mechanisms that could generate caste-dependent sleep patterns and discuss functional significance of these patterns.

  14. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activity in avian semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partyka, Agnieszka; Lukaszewicz, Ewa; Niżański, Wojciech

    2012-10-01

    The present study compared the antioxidant system and lipid peroxidation in semen of two avian species: chicken and goose. The experiment was conducted on Greenleg Partridge roosters and White Koluda(®) ganders, each represented by 10 mature males. Malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were determined in sperm cells and seminal plasma. In gander spermatozoa, the amount of MDA was 10 times greater (Pantioxidant enzymes had greater (Pactivity in goose than chicken sperm. Catalase activity was detected in seminal plasma and spermatozoa from both studied species for the first time. In seminal plasma, the activity of GPx was two times greater (Pactivity was less (Pactivity of antioxidant defense and LPO. The greater amount of lipid peroxidation and greater activity of antioxidant enzymes in goose semen might suggest that spermatozoa were under greater oxidative stress and the enzymes were not utilized for the protection of functionally and structurally impaired cells. In turn, in fresh chicken semen a lesser activity of antioxidant enzymes accompanied with a lesser lipid peroxidation amount and good semen quality could indicate that fowl spermatozoa were under oxidative stress, but the enzymes were employed to protect and maintain sperm quality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Semen analysis and sperm function tests: How much to test?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S S Vasan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Semen analysis as an integral part of infertility investigations is taken as a surrogate measure for male fecundity in clinical andrology, male fertility, and pregnancy risk assessments. Clearly, laboratory seminology is still very much in its infancy. In as much as the creation of a conventional semen profile will always represent the foundations of male fertility evaluation, the 5th edition of the World Health Organization (WHO manual is a definitive statement on how such assessments should be carried out and how the quality should be controlled. A major advance in this new edition of the WHO manual, resolving the most salient critique of previous editions, is the development of the first well-defined reference ranges for semen analysis based on the analysis of over 1900 recent fathers. The methodology used in the assessment of the usual variables in semen analysis is described, as are many of the less common, but very valuable, sperm function tests. Sperm function testing is used to determine if the sperm have the biologic capacity to perform the tasks necessary to reach and fertilize ova and ultimately result in live births. A variety of tests are available to evaluate different aspects of these functions. To accurately use these functional assays, the clinician must understand what the tests measure, what the indications are for the assays, and how to interpret the results to direct further testing or patient management.

  16. Beneficial effects of semen purification with magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current techniques for sperm quality evaluation are mostly informative. They become useful when ejaculates of high index males not meeting quality standard are still discarded. Here we developed a molecular-based magnetic conjugates allowing selective elimination of damaged spermatozoa from semen ej...

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Zika Virus Isolated from Semen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Victoria; Lewandowski, Kuiama; Dowall, Stuart D.; Pullan, Steven T.; Hewson, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging pathogenic flavivirus currently circulating in numerous countries in South America, the Caribbean, and the Western Pacific Region. Using an unbiased metagenomic sequencing approach, we report here the first complete genome sequence of ZIKV isolated from a clinical semen sample. PMID:27738033

  18. Effect of L-carnitine supplementation on drake semen quality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sp3

    2014-01-30

    Jan 30, 2014 ... It reduces fat deposition by reducing the availability of lipids ... composition, performance of chickens, and hatchability. He found that performance ... different levels of L-carnitine on the semen quality of drakes. Materials and ..... of Leydig cells and testosterone production in the interstitial tissue of the testis.

  19. Seasonal variation in semen quality of Dorper rams using different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Botswana

    2014-02-08

    Feb 8, 2014 ... 2 Department of Animal, Wildlife and Grassland Sciences, ... semen wave motion, sperm motility, sperm cell concentration, sperm ... sheep numbers in South Africa, but also realises superior prices at sales and auctions (Milne, 2000; ..... Possibly the rams had become accustomed to the stress inflicted by ...

  20. Association of Sleep Disturbances With Reduced Semen Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Kold; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Skakkebæk, Niels Erik;

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have found an association between sleep duration and morbidity and mortality, but no previous studies have examined the association between sleep disturbances and semen quality. We conducted a cross-sectional study among 953 young Danish men from the general population who were re...

  1. Effect of air-conditioner exposure on semen quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min-LiLu; Jun-QingWu; Qiu-YingYang; Wei-JinZhou; Er-ShengGao

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of air-conditioner exposure on semen quality. Methods: The data came from the healthy male volunteers, aged 22 to 30 years, who went to centers for maternity and children health for premarital physical examination in Shanghai,Henan, Zbejiang and Hebei from December 1998 to February 2000.

  2. Effect of various levels of catalase antioxidant in semen extenders on lipid peroxidation and semen quality after the freeze-thawing bull semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Asadpour

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate effect of different concentrations of catalase in two extenders on motility, viability and lipid peroxidation bull spermatozoa during semen freezing process. Thirty ejaculates collected from ten Holstein bulls were pooled and evaluated at 37 °C. Pool ejaculated was split into two main experimental groups, 1 and 2. In experiment 1, specimen was diluted to a final concentration of 30 × 106 spermatozoa with citrate-egg yolk and in experiment 2; specimen was diluted with tris-egg yolk extender to the same concentration. In both experiments diluted semen was divided into three aliquots, including a control and two test groups. Each aliquot was rediluted with an equal volume of extender either without (control or with one of the antioxidants contained one of the following antioxidants: catalase (CAT; 100 IU mL-1 catalase (CAT; 200 IU mL-1 and control group. No significant differences were observed in sperm viability and motility following addition of catalase enzyme at concentration of 100 IU mL-1 and 200 IU mL-1 to citrate-egg yolk extender. But the highest sperm viability was achieved by addition of 100 IU mL-1 and 200 IU mL-1 catalase to tris-egg yolk semen extender compared with the control group (P < 0.05. Malondialdehyde levels did not change with addition of catalase in both extenders compared with the control group. The obtained results provide a new approach to the cryopreservation of bull semen, and could positively contribute to intensive cattle production.

  3. The challenge of accurately documenting bee species richness in agroecosystems: bee diversity in eastern apple orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Laura; Park, Mia; Gibbs, Jason; Danforth, Bryan

    2015-09-01

    Bees are important pollinators of agricultural crops, and bee diversity has been shown to be closely associated with pollination, a valuable ecosystem service. Higher functional diversity and species richness of bees have been shown to lead to higher crop yield. Bees simultaneously represent a mega-diverse taxon that is extremely challenging to sample thoroughly and an important group to understand because of pollination services. We sampled bees visiting apple blossoms in 28 orchards over 6 years. We used species rarefaction analyses to test for the completeness of sampling and the relationship between species richness and sampling effort, orchard size, and percent agriculture in the surrounding landscape. We performed more than 190 h of sampling, collecting 11,219 specimens representing 104 species. Despite the sampling intensity, we captured <75% of expected species richness at more than half of the sites. For most of these, the variation in bee community composition between years was greater than among sites. Species richness was influenced by percent agriculture, orchard size, and sampling effort, but we found no factors explaining the difference between observed and expected species richness. Competition between honeybees and wild bees did not appear to be a factor, as we found no correlation between honeybee and wild bee abundance. Our study shows that the pollinator fauna of agroecosystems can be diverse and challenging to thoroughly sample. We demonstrate that there is high temporal variation in community composition and that sites vary widely in the sampling effort required to fully describe their diversity. In order to maximize pollination services provided by wild bee species, we must first accurately estimate species richness. For researchers interested in providing this estimate, we recommend multiyear studies and rarefaction analyses to quantify the gap between observed and expected species richness.

  4. Current Pesticide Risk Assessment Protocols Do Not Adequately Address Differences Between Honey Bees (Apis mellifera and Bumble Bees (Bombus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Stoner

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has demonstrated colony-level sublethal effects of imidacloprid on bumble bees, affecting foraging and food consumption, and thus colony growth and reproduction, at lower pesticide concentrations than for honey bee colonies. However, these studies may not reflect the full effects of neonicotinoids on bumble bees because bumble bee life cycles are different from those of honey bees. Unlike honey bees, bumble bees live in colonies for only a few months each year. Assessing the sublethal effects of systemic insecticides only on the colony level is appropriate for honey bees, but for bumble bees, this approach addresses just part of their annual life cycle. Queens are solitary from the time they leave their home colonies in fall until they produce their first workers the following year. Queens forage for pollen and nectar, and are thus exposed to more risk of direct pesticide exposure than honey bee queens. Almost no research has been done on pesticide exposure to and effects on bumble bee queens. Additional research should focus on critical periods in a bumble bee queen’s life which have the greatest nutritional demands, foraging requirements, and potential for exposure to pesticides, particularly the period during and after nest establishment in the spring when the queen must forage for the nutritional needs of her brood and for her own needs while she maintains an elevated body temperature in order to incubate the brood.

  5. Winter Survival of Individual Honey Bees and Honey Bee Colonies Depends on Level of Varroa destructor Infestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dooremalen, van C.; Gerritsen, L.J.M.; Cornelissen, B.; Steen, van der J.J.M.; Langevelde, van F.; Blacquiere, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recent elevated winter loss of honey bee colonies is a major concern. The presence of the mite Varroa destructor in colonies places an important pressure on bee health. V. destructor shortens the lifespan of individual bees, while long lifespan during winter is a primary requirement to

  6. Winter Survival of Individual Honey Bees and Honey Bee Colonies Depends on Level of Varroa destructor Infestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dooremalen, van C.; Gerritsen, L.J.M.; Cornelissen, B.; Steen, van der J.J.M.; Langevelde, van F.; Blacquiere, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recent elevated winter loss of honey bee colonies is a major concern. The presence of the mite Varroa destructor in colonies places an important pressure on bee health. V. destructor shortens the lifespan of individual bees, while long lifespan during winter is a primary requirement to s

  7. The presence of Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus infection in Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presence of Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) infection in the U.S. is reported for the first time. Using molecular methods, the evidence of infection of honey bees with CBPV has been detected in both symptomatic and asymptomatic bees. While our seven year’s survey showed that the CBPV infect...

  8. Collective thermoregulation in bee clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocko, Samuel A.; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-01-01

    Swarming is an essential part of honeybee behaviour, wherein thousands of bees cling onto each other to form a dense cluster that may be exposed to the environment for several days. This cluster has the ability to maintain its core temperature actively without a central controller. We suggest that the swarm cluster is akin to an active porous structure whose functional requirement is to adjust to outside conditions by varying its porosity to control its core temperature. Using a continuum model that takes the form of a set of advection–diffusion equations for heat transfer in a mobile porous medium, we show that the equalization of an effective ‘behavioural pressure’, which propagates information about the ambient temperature through variations in density, leads to effective thermoregulation. Our model extends and generalizes previous models by focusing the question of mechanism on the form and role of the behavioural pressure, and allows us to explain the vertical asymmetry of the cluster (as a consequence of buoyancy-driven flows), the ability of the cluster to overpack at low ambient temperatures without breaking up at high ambient temperatures, and the relative insensitivity to large variations in the ambient temperature. Our theory also makes testable hypotheses for the response of the cluster to external temperature inhomogeneities and suggests strategies for biomimetic thermoregulation. PMID:24335563

  9. Screening for sexually transmitted infection pathogens in semen samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeling, Rw; Embree, J

    2005-03-01

    The transmission of sexually transmitted infection (STI) pathogens from an infected donor to the recipient of a semen donation in assisted conception may result not only in acute infection but also in long-term reproductive complications or adverse outcomes of pregnancy, including infection of the offspring. Screening for bacterial STI pathogens, Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae is strongly recommended because these pathogens can cause serious reproductive complications in the recipients of semen donations and infection in their offspring. Screening for these pathogens should be performed using the most sensitive methods, such as nucleic acid amplified tests. False-negative results due to inhibitory substances in the semen sample should be monitored using amplification controls. Where specimen transport is not a problem and culture facilities are available, N gonorrhoeae can also be detected by culture. Laboratories performing screening should subscribe to proficiency programs and have strict quality controls. Although Trichomonas vaginalis, group B streptococcus and genital mycoplasmas have been associated with adverse outcomes of pregnancy, the frequent finding of these organisms in healthy individuals brings into question the validity of mandatory inclusion of these organisms in the screening panel. Although viral STI pathogens and Treponema pallidum - the causative agent of syphilis - may be detected in semen, their presence may be more sensitively detected through antibody testing of the donor. Screening donors for HIV, hepatitis B and syphilis by serology is uniformly recommended in all of the guidelines, but the value of screening either donors or semen samples for cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex viruses and human papilloma viruses is less clear.

  10. Screening for Sexually Transmitted Infection Pathogens in Semen Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RW Peeling

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The transmission of sexually transmitted infection (STI pathogens from an infected donor to the recipient of a semen donation in assisted conception may result not only in acute infection but also in long-term reproductive complications or adverse outcomes of pregnancy, including infection of the offspring. Screening for bacterial STI pathogens, Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae is strongly recommended because these pathogens can cause serious reproductive complications in the recipients of semen donations and infection in their offspring. Screening for these pathogens should be performed using the most sensitive methods, such as nucleic acid amplified tests. False-negative results due to inhibitory substances in the semen sample should be monitored using amplification controls. Where specimen transport is not a problem and culture facilities are available, N gonorrhoeae can also be detected by culture. Laboratories performing screening should subscribe to proficiency programs and have strict quality controls. Although Trichomonas vaginalis, group B streptococcus and genital mycoplasmas have been associated with adverse outcomes of pregnancy, the frequent finding of these organisms in healthy individuals brings into question the validity of mandatory inclusion of these organisms in the screening panel. Although viral STI pathogens and Treponema pallidum -- the causative agent of syphilis -- may be detected in semen, their presence may be more sensitively detected through antibody testing of the donor. Screening donors for HIV, hepatitis B and syphilis by serology is uniformly recommended in all of the guidelines, but the value of screening either donors or semen samples for cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex viruses and human papilloma viruses is less clear.

  11. Large Carpenter Bees as Agricultural Pollinators

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    Tamar Keasar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Large carpenter bees (genus Xylocopa are wood-nesting generalist pollinators of broad geographical distribution that exhibit varying levels of sociality. Their foraging is characterized by a wide range of food plants, long season of activity, tolerance of high temperatures, and activity under low illumination levels. These traits make them attractive candidates for agricultural pollination in hot climates, particularly in greenhouses, and of night-blooming crops. Carpenter bees have demonstrated efficient pollination service in passionflower, blueberries, greenhouse tomatoes and greenhouse melons. Current challenges to the commercialization of these attempts lie in the difficulties of mass-rearing Xylocopa, and in the high levels of nectar robbing exhibited by the bees.

  12. Why do Varroa mites prefer nurse bees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xianbing; Huang, Zachary Y.; Zeng, Zhijiang

    2016-01-01

    The Varroa mite, Varroa destructor, is an acarine ecto-parasite on Apis mellifera. It is the worst pest of Apis mellifera, yet its reproductive biology on the host is not well understood. In particular, the significance of the phoretic stage, when mites feed on adult bees for a few days, is not clear. In addition, it is not clear whether the preference of mites for nurses observed in the laboratory also happens inside real colonies. We show that Varroa mites prefer nurses over both newly emerged bees and forgers in a colony setting. We then determined the mechanism behind this preference. We show that this preference maximizes Varroa fitness, although due to the fact that each mite must find a second host (a pupa) to reproduce, the fitness benefit to the mites is not immediate but delayed. Our results suggest that the Varroa mite is a highly adapted parasite for honey bees. PMID:27302644

  13. Predictive markers of honey bee colony collapse.

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    Benjamin Dainat

    Full Text Available Across the Northern hemisphere, managed honey bee colonies, Apis mellifera, are currently affected by abrupt depopulation during winter and many factors are suspected to be involved, either alone or in combination. Parasites and pathogens are considered as principal actors, in particular the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, associated viruses and the microsporidian Nosema ceranae. Here we used long term monitoring of colonies and screening for eleven disease agents and genes involved in bee immunity and physiology to identify predictive markers of honeybee colony losses during winter. The data show that DWV, Nosema ceranae, Varroa destructor and Vitellogenin can be predictive markers for winter colony losses, but their predictive power strongly depends on the season. In particular, the data support that V. destructor is a key player for losses, arguably in line with its specific impact on the health of individual bees and colonies.

  14. Infecciones de transmisión sexual, calidad del semen e infertilidad Sexually transmitted diseases, quality of semen, and infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertha Victoria Rodríguez Pendás

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El propósito de este trabajo es insistir en la asociación que existe entre el incremento de las infecciones de transmisión sexual y la infertilidad masculina. Se muestran numerosas investigaciones realizadas en este campo que demuestran el rol de estas infecciones en la etiología de la infertilidad, y se describen algunas de las principales infecciones en el semen que provocan la declinación de la fertilidad masculina y sus consecuencias en la salud reproductiva de los hombres. Con este trabajo de revisión nos proponemos resaltar la necesidad de incluir en el estudio de la infertilidad masculina el control microbiológico del semen, particularmente útil en los servicios de salud reproductiva, donde el riesgo de prevalencia de infecciones asociadas a la infertilidad provoca una reproducción fallida con consecuencias emocionales y sociales en la parejaAim of this paper is to insist on association between the sexually transmitted diseases increase and male infertility. We present most researches performed in this field emphasizing the role of these infections in infertility origin, and we describe also some of main semen infections causing decrease of male fertility, and its consequences on reproductive health of men. Aim of this review paper is to highlight the need of to include in male infertility study, the metabolic control of semen, where risk of infections prevalence associated to infertility provokes a failure reproduction with emotional and social consequences in couple

  15. Supplementing oregano essential oil to boar diet with strengthened fish oil: Effects on semen antioxidant status and semen quality parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q; Duan, R J; Zhou, Y F; Wei, H K; Peng, J; Li, J L

    2017-02-22

    Previous research has shown benefits of dietary fish oil supplementation on semen quality of boars. However, little is known about how antioxidant protects lipid peroxidation on spermatozoa from n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) addition. This study evaluated the effect of oregano essential oil (OEO) supplementation on semen antioxidant status and semen quality in boars fed a diet enriched with fish oil. Thirty-four mature boars of proven fertility, received daily 2.5 kg basal diet top-dressed with 45 g soybean oil and 15 g fish oil to meet the n-3 PUFA requirement of spermatozoa, randomly allocated to one of four groups supplemented with 100 mg α-tocopheryl acetate kg(-1) (control), or 250 or 500 or 750 mg OEO kg(-1) for 16 weeks. Semen was collected at weeks 0, 8, 12 and 16 for measurements of sperm production, motion characteristics, sperm α-tocopherol content, antioxidant enzyme activities, reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA damage (8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, 8-OHdG), lipoperoxidation (malondialdehyde, MDA) and seminal total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Sperm production and motion characteristics were similar (p > .05) among groups throughout the experimental week 16, but increased (p oil has a positive effect on antioxidant capacity in boar when used fish oil.

  16. An Evaluation of the Honey Bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Safety Profile of a New Systemic Insecticide, Flupyradifurone, Under Field Conditions in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joshua W; Cabrera, Ana R; Stanley-Stahr, Cory; Ellis, James D

    2016-10-01

    Flupyradifurone (Sivanto) is a novel systemic insecticide from the butenolide class developed by Bayer. Based on available data (USEPA 2014), this insecticide appears to have a favorable safety profile for honey bee colonies. As a result, the label permits the product to be applied during prebloom and bloom in various crops, including citrus, except when mixed with azole fungicides during the blooming period. We placed 24 honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies adjacent to eight flowering buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) fields that either had been sprayed with the maximum label rate of flupyradifurone or with water only (control fields), with three colonies placed adjacent to each field. We conducted colony strength assessments during which the number of adult bees, eggs, uncapped brood cells, capped brood cells, food storage cells, and weights of honey supers and brood chambers were determined prior to, during, and after the flowering period. We also analyzed bee-collected pollen and nectar for flupyradifurone residues. Overall, there were no differences in any colony strength parameter for colonies placed at control and flupyradifurone-treated buckwheat fields. Residue analyses showed that pollen (x =  565.8 ppb) and nectar (x  =  259.4 ppb) gathered by bees on fields treated with flupyradifurone contained significantly higher flupyradifurone residues than did bee bread and unprocessed nectar collected by bees from control fields (75% of samples honey bee colonies when following label directions. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Study on Bee venom and Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung-Seok Yun

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to study Bee venom and Pain, We searched Journals and Internet. The results were as follows: 1. The domestic papers were total 13. 4 papers were published at The journal of korean acupuncture & moxibustion society, 3 papers were published at The journal of korean oriental medical society, Each The journal of KyoungHee University Oriental Medicine and The journal of korean sports oriental medical society published 1 papers and Unpublished desertations were 3. The clinical studies were 4 and the experimental studies were 9. 2. The domestic clinical studies reported that Bee venom Herbal Acupuncture therapy was effective on HIVD, Subacute arthritis of Knee Joint and Sequale of sprain. In the domestic experimental studies, 5 were related to analgesic effect of Bee vnom and 4 were related to mechanism of analgesia. 3. The journals searched by PubMed were total 18. 5 papers were published at Pain, Each 2 papers were published at Neurosci Lett. and Br J Pharmacol, and Each Eur J Pain, J Rheumatol, Brain Res, Neuroscience, Nature and Toxicon et al published 1 paper. 4. In the journals searched by PubMed, Only the experimental studies were existed. 8 papers used Bee Venom as pain induction substance and 1 paper was related to analgesic effects of Bee venom. 5. 15 webpage were searched by internet related to Bee Venom and pain. 11 were the introduction related to arthritis, 1 was the advertisement, 1 was the patient's experience, 1 was the case report on RA, 1 was review article.

  18. Yoghurt enrichment with natural bee farming products

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    N. Lomova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bee pollen is a unique and unparalleled natural bioactive substances source. Using it in conjunction with the popular functional fermented milk product -yogurt will expand its product range and increase the biological value. Materials and Methods. Dried bee pollen’s moisture determination was made by gravimetry methods, based on the sample weight loss due to desiccation, until constant weight was reached.Test and control yogurt samples were studied by applying standard techniques for milk and milk products set forth in the regulations of Ukraine. Results and discussion. It is found that bee pollen pellet drying to a moisture content of 2 -4%, increases the flow rate of powder almost by 90%. The sample having moisture content of 2% will have a bulk density exceeding 12.5% compared to the sample having moisture content of 10%. Raw output will also increase by 3.7%. By contrast, apparent density and weight fraction of losses decreases, which has a positive impact on pollen efficiency of use and distribution in bulk yogurt. Moreover, the weight fraction of losses decreases by fourfold (4.6% vs. 1%. It was experimentally determined that pollen can deteriorate microbiological characteristics of yogurt. It was proved that treatment of crushed bee pollen pellet sample with ultraviolet allows improving yogurt microbiological safety indicators. Namely, to reduce the presence of coli-forms to 0, mould –to 10 CFU/cm³. Conclusions. The proposed bee pollen pellet treatment method will improve the technological and microbiological characteristics of pollen powder. This provides for yoghurt production biotechnology using bee farming products.

  19. Pathogen webs in collapsing honey bee colonies.

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    R Scott Cornman

    Full Text Available Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized characteristics of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new or resurgent pathogens. Here we explore the incidence and abundance of currently known honey bee pathogens in colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD, otherwise weak colonies, and strong colonies from across the United States. Although pathogen identities differed between the eastern and western United States, there was a greater incidence and abundance of pathogens in CCD colonies. Pathogen loads were highly covariant in CCD but not control hives, suggesting that CCD colonies rapidly become susceptible to a diverse set of pathogens, or that co-infections can act synergistically to produce the rapid depletion of workers that characterizes the disorder. We also tested workers from a CCD-free apiary to confirm that significant positive correlations among pathogen loads can develop at the level of individual bees and not merely as a secondary effect of CCD. This observation and other recent data highlight pathogen interactions as important components of bee disease. Finally, we used deep RNA sequencing to further characterize microbial diversity in CCD and non-CCD hives. We identified novel strains of the recently described Lake Sinai viruses (LSV and found evidence of a shift in gut bacterial composition that may be a biomarker of CCD. The results are discussed with respect to host-parasite interactions and other environmental stressors of honey bees.

  20. Pathogen webs in collapsing honey bee colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornman, R Scott; Tarpy, David R; Chen, Yanping; Jeffreys, Lacey; Lopez, Dawn; Pettis, Jeffery S; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Evans, Jay D

    2012-01-01

    Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized characteristics of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new or resurgent pathogens. Here we explore the incidence and abundance of currently known honey bee pathogens in colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), otherwise weak colonies, and strong colonies from across the United States. Although pathogen identities differed between the eastern and western United States, there was a greater incidence and abundance of pathogens in CCD colonies. Pathogen loads were highly covariant in CCD but not control hives, suggesting that CCD colonies rapidly become susceptible to a diverse set of pathogens, or that co-infections can act synergistically to produce the rapid depletion of workers that characterizes the disorder. We also tested workers from a CCD-free apiary to confirm that significant positive correlations among pathogen loads can develop at the level of individual bees and not merely as a secondary effect of CCD. This observation and other recent data highlight pathogen interactions as important components of bee disease. Finally, we used deep RNA sequencing to further characterize microbial diversity in CCD and non-CCD hives. We identified novel strains of the recently described Lake Sinai viruses (LSV) and found evidence of a shift in gut bacterial composition that may be a biomarker of CCD. The results are discussed with respect to host-parasite interactions and other environmental stressors of honey bees.

  1. Critical sources of bacterial contamination and adoption of standard sanitary protocol during semen collection and processing in Semen Station

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    Chandrahas Sannat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present investigation was conducted to locate the critical sources of bacterial contamination and to evaluate the standard sanitation protocol so as to improve the hygienic conditions during collection, evaluation, and processing of bull semen in the Semen Station. Materials and Methods: The study compared two different hygienic procedures during the collection, evaluation and processing of semen in Central Semen Station, Anjora, Durg. Routinely used materials including artificial vagina (AV inner liner, cone, semen collection tube, buffer, extender/diluter, straws; and the laboratory environment like processing lab, pass box and laminar air flow (LAF cabinet of extender preparation lab, processing lab, sealing filling machine, and bacteriological lab were subjected to bacteriological examination in two phases of study using two different sanitary protocols. Bacterial load in above items/environment was measured using standard plate count method and expressed as colony forming unit (CFU. Results: Bacterial load in a laboratory environment and AV equipments during two different sanitary protocol in present investigation differed highly significantly (p<0.001. Potential sources of bacterial contamination during semen collection and processing included laboratory environment like processing lab, pass box, and LAF cabinets; AV equipments, including AV Liner and cone. Bacterial load was reduced highly significantly (p<0.001 in AV liner (from 2.33±0.67 to 0.50±0.52, cone (from 4.16±1.20 to 1.91±0.55, and extender (from 1.33±0.38 to 0 after application of improved practices of packaging, handling, and sterilization in Phase II of study. Glasswares, buffers, and straws showed nil bacterial contamination in both the phases of study. With slight modification in fumigation protocol (formalin @600 ml/1000 ft3, bacterial load was significantly decreased (p<0.001 up to 0-6 CFU in processing lab (from 6.43±1.34 to 2.86±0.59, pass box (from 12

  2. Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus and Nosema ceranae Experimental Co-Infection of Winter Honey Bee Workers (Apis mellifera L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toplak, Ivan; Jamnikar Ciglenečki, Urška; Aronstein, Katherine; Gregorc, Aleš

    2013-01-01

    Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) is an important viral disease of adult bees which induces significant losses in honey bee colonies. Despite comprehensive research, only limited data is available from experimental infection for this virus. In the present study winter worker bees were experimentally infected in three different experiments. Bees were first inoculated per os (p/o) or per cuticle (p/c) with CBPV field strain M92/2010 in order to evaluate the virus replication in individual bees. In addition, potential synergistic effects of co-infection with CBPV and Nosema ceranae (N. ceranae) on bees were investigated. In total 558 individual bees were inoculated in small cages and data were analyzed using quantitative real time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). Our results revealed successful replication of CBPV after p/o inoculation, while it was less effective when bees were inoculated p/c. Dead bees harbored about 1,000 times higher copy numbers of the virus than live bees. Co-infection of workers with CBPV and N. ceranae using either method of virus inoculation (p/c or p/o) showed increased replication ability for CBPV. In the third experiment the effect of inoculation on bee mortality was evaluated. The highest level of bee mortality was observed in a group of bees inoculated with CBPV p/o, followed by a group of workers simultaneously inoculated with CBPV and N. ceranae p/o, followed by the group inoculated with CBPV p/c and the group with only N. ceranae p/o. The experimental infection with CBPV showed important differences after p/o or p/c inoculation in winter bees, while simultaneous infection with CBPV and N. ceranae suggesting a synergistic effect after inoculation. PMID:24056674

  3. The Comparison of Effectiveness between Bee Venom and Sweet Bee Venom Therapy on Low back pain with Radiating pain

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    Lee Tae-ho

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The aim of this study is to investigate if Sweet Bee Venom therapy has the equal effect in comparison with Bee Venom Therapy on Low back pain with Radiation pain. Methods : Clinical studies were done 24 patients who were treated low back pain with radiation pain to Dept. of Acupuncture & Moxibusition, of Oriental Medicine Se-Myung University from April 1, 2007 to September 30, 2007. Subjects were randomly divided into two groups ; Bee Venom treated group(Group A, n=10, Sweet Bee Venom treatred group(Group B, n=14. In Bee Venom treated group(Group A, we treated patients with dry needle acupuncture and Bee Venom therapy. In Sweet Bee Venom treatred group(Group B, we treated patients with dry needle acupuncture and Sweet Bee Venom therapy. All process of treatment were performed by double blinding method. To estimate the efficacy of controlling pain. we checked Visual Analog Scale(VAS. For evaluating functional change of patients, Straight Leg Raising Test(S.L.R.T was measured. Results :1. In controlling pain, Sweet Bee Venom treatred group(Group B had similar ability in comparison with Bee Venom treated group(Group A. 2. In promoting function, Sweet Bee Venom treatred group(Group B had similar ability in comparison with Bee Venom treated group(Group A. Conclusions : It may be equal effects as compared with using Bee Venom to treat low back pain with radiation pain using Sweet Bee Venom. We can try to treat other disease known to have effect with Bee Venom.

  4. Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus and Nosema ceranae Experimental Co-Infection of Winter Honey Bee Workers (Apis mellifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Gregorc

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV is an important viral disease of adult bees which induces significant losses in honey bee colonies. Despite comprehensive research, only limited data is available from experimental infection for this virus. In the present study winter worker bees were experimentally infected in three different experiments. Bees were first inoculated per os (p/o or per cuticle (p/c with CBPV field strain M92/2010 in order to evaluate the virus replication in individual bees. In addition, potential synergistic effects of co-infection with CBPV and Nosema ceranae (N. ceranae on bees were investigated. In total 558 individual bees were inoculated in small cages and data were analyzed using quantitative real time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR. Our results revealed successful replication of CBPV after p/o inoculation, while it was less effective when bees were inoculated p/c. Dead bees harbored about 1,000 times higher copy numbers of the virus than live bees. Co-infection of workers with CBPV and N. ceranae using either method of virus inoculation (p/c or p/o showed increased replication ability for CBPV. In the third experiment the effect of inoculation on bee mortality was evaluated. The highest level of bee mortality was observed in a group of bees inoculated with CBPV p/o, followed by a group of workers simultaneously inoculated with CBPV and N. ceranae p/o, followed by the group inoculated with CBPV p/c and the group with only N. ceranae p/o. The experimental infection with CBPV showed important differences after p/o or p/c inoculation in winter bees, while simultaneous infection with CBPV and N. ceranae suggesting a synergistic effect after inoculation.

  5. Nutrigenomics in honey bees: digital gene expression analysis of pollen's nutritive effects on healthy and varroa-parasitized bees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parrinello Hughes

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malnutrition is a major factor affecting animal health, resistance to disease and survival. In honey bees (Apis mellifera, pollen, which is the main dietary source of proteins, amino acids and lipids, is essential to adult bee physiological development while reducing their susceptibility to parasites and pathogens. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying pollen's nutritive impact on honey bee health remained to be determined. For that purpose, we investigated the influence of pollen nutrients on the transcriptome of worker bees parasitized by the mite Varroa destructor, known for suppressing immunity and decreasing lifespan. The 4 experimental groups (control bees without a pollen diet, control bees fed with pollen, varroa-parasitized bees without a pollen diet and varroa-parasitized bees fed with pollen were analyzed by performing a digital gene expression (DGE analysis on bee abdomens. Results Around 36, 000 unique tags were generated per DGE-tag library, which matched about 8, 000 genes (60% of the genes in the honey bee genome. Comparing the transcriptome of bees fed with pollen and sugar and bees restricted to a sugar diet, we found that pollen activates nutrient-sensing and metabolic pathways. In addition, those nutrients had a positive influence on genes affecting longevity and the production of some antimicrobial peptides. However, varroa parasitism caused the development of viral populations and a decrease in metabolism, specifically by inhibiting protein metabolism essential to bee health. This harmful effect was not reversed by pollen intake. Conclusions The DGE-tag profiling methods used in this study proved to be a powerful means for analyzing transcriptome variation related to nutrient intake in honey bees. Ultimately, with such an approach, applying genomics tools to nutrition research, nutrigenomics promises to offer a better understanding of how nutrition influences body homeostasis and may help reduce

  6. ZigBee standardin toiminta ja periaatteet

    OpenAIRE

    Kallioniemi, Tapio

    2009-01-01

    Tutkintotyön tarkoituksena on rakentaa Jennicin kehitysalustoja apuna käyttäen pieni Zigbee verkko. Apuna verkon tutkimisessa käytämme Daintreen sensoriverkkoanalysaattoria. Tutkintotyössä perehdytään pintapuolisesti ZigBee standardin periaatteisiin sekä verkon rakenteeseen, toimintaan ja mahdollisiin käyttötarkoituksiin nykypäivänä ja tulevaisuudessa. This thesis meaning is to build a small ZIGBEE network and learn how to ZigBee network topology works. To help us we will use Daintree ...

  7. Acute paralysis viruses of the honey bee

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunsheng; Hou; Nor; Chejanovsky

    2014-01-01

    <正>The alarming decline of honey bee(Apis mellifera)colonies in the last decade drove the attention and research to several pathogens of the honey bee including viruses.Viruses challenge the development of healthy and robust colonies since they manage to prevail in an asymptomatic mode and reemerge in acute infections following external stresses,as well as they are able to infect new healthy colonies(de Miranda J R,et al.,2010a;de Miranda J R,et al.,2010b;Di Prisco G,et al.,2013;Nazzi F,et al.,2012;Yang X L,et al.,2005).

  8. Effect of semen extender and density gradient centrifugation on the motility and fertility of turkey spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, J M; Persson, B; Tjellström, H; Laessker, A; Nilsson, H; Danilova, M; Holmes, P V

    2005-12-01

    In the absence of commercially viable methods for cryopreserving turkey spermatozoa, new processing methods are required to extend the functional life of stored turkey spermatozoa for artificial insemination. The present study evaluates the efficacy of a new extender (Turkey Semen Extend) and investigates the use of density gradient centrifugation in processing turkey spermatozoa for artificial insemination. The new extender is compared with two commercially available turkey semen extenders, Beltsville Poultry Semen Extender and Ovodyl. Turkey spermatozoa in Turkey Semen Extend were still motile 20 h after collection, representing a considerable improvement over the other semen extenders (40%, 0% and 8% for Turkey Semen Extend, Beltsville Poultry Semen Extender and Ovodyl, respectively). A field trial on a commercial turkey farm showed improved fertilization rates following insemination of turkey hens with semen extended in Turkey Semen Extend (89.7%) compared with Beltsville Poultry Semen Extender (86.9%). This difference is statistically significant (p < 0.05). Processing on a density gradient, optimized for turkey spermatozoa, also increased sperm survival (50% gradient-prepared spermatozoa still motile after 18 h compared with <10% non-processed spermatozoa). Preliminary studies indicate that gradient preparation of spermatozoa may aid survival during cryopreservation.

  9. Parasite infection accelerates age polyethism in young honey bees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lecocq, Antoine; Jensen, Annette Bruun; Kryger, Per

    2016-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are important pollinators and their health is threatened worldwide by persistent exposure to a wide range of factors including pesticides, poor nutrition, and pathogens. Nosema ceranae is a ubiquitous microsporidian associated with high colony mortality. We used lab...... micro-colonies of honey bees and video analyses to track the effects of N. ceranae infection and exposure on a range of individual and social behaviours in young adult bees. We provide detailed data showing that N. ceranae infection significantly accelerated the age polyethism of young bees, causing...... them to exhibit behaviours typical of older bees. Bees with high N. ceranae spore counts had significantly increased walking rates and decreased attraction to queen mandibular pheromone. Infected bees also exhibited higher rates of trophallaxis (food exchange), potentially reflecting parasite...

  10. Refrigerated storage of ram sperm in presence of Trolox and GSH antioxidants: effect of temperature, extender and storage time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Campuzano, María; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Manuel; Tamayo-Canul, Julio; López-Urueña, Elena; de Paz, Paulino; Anel, Luis; Martínez-Pastor, Felipe; Álvarez, Mercedes

    2014-12-30

    Antioxidants have a potential to improve the quality and fertility of refrigerated-stored ram semen. Reduced glutathione (GSH) and Trolox (0.2, 1 and 5mM) were evaluated in ram semen preserved at 15 and 5°C up to 48 and 96h, respectively. Extenders were also evaluated (15°C: Tris-citrate-fructose, TCF, without lipids, and TES-Tris-fructose 10% egg yolk, TTF-EY; 5°C: TTF-EY and 3.5% soybean lecithin, TTF-SL; INRA96 at both temperatures). Storage at 5°C resulted in poorer quality than 15°C up to 48h, while allowing acceptable quality at 96h. Antioxidants had few effects on sperm quality, with use of Trolox resulting in reduced motility and viability in TCF. Storage at 15°C in the TCF extender resulted in decreased motility, viability and mitochondrial activity compared with use of TTF-EY. Sperm quality when storage was at 5°C was similar, but storage in TTF-SL resulted in decreased motility and mitochondrial activity. Acrosomal status was only slightly affected by extender and antioxidant. Mitochondrial activity was improved by antioxidants in TTF-SL, and GSH at 5mM when semen was stored at 5°C in TTF-EY. A preliminary artificial insemination trial indicated that supplementation with GSH has the potential for improving lambing (Pram semen. Use of Trolox negatively impacted sperm quality and GSH had some positive impacts. The use of soybean lecithin requires further research to assess its impact on mitochondria.

  11. Karakteristik Semen Segar dan Kualitas Semen Cair Kuda dalam Pengencer Dimitropoulos yang Disuplementasi dengan Fruktosa, Trehalosa dan Rafinosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the experiment was to study the characteristics of stallion fresh semen and the quality of sperm preserved in Dimitropoulos extender (DV supplemented with different concentration of fructose, trehalose and raffinose. Semen were collected using artificial vagina from three stallions. Semen characteristics and quality were evaluated macro- and microscopically. Prior to extension, semen were centrifugated at 3000 rpm for 20 minutes. The condensed sperm were re-suspended in DV supplemented with different types of carbohydrate to meet the concentration of 200 million spz/ml. All samples were stored at room and chilled temperature, and were evaluated for motility and viability every 3 h and 12 h. The results of the experiments indicated that fresh semen characteristics were fair good; the volume, consistency, motility, live-dead ratio, concentration (106/ml, total spermatozoa (109/ejaculate and abnormality were 29.25±9.33 ml, watery, 7.00±0.12, 67.08±9.08%, 77.89±6.46%, 211.88±21.15, 6.28±2.45 and 27.26±4.64%, respectively. The supplementation of different type and concentration of carbohydrates did not significantly affect the motility and viability. However, the supplementation of 50 mM fructose significantly increased the motility and viability of the sperm compared to the control. In conclusion, carbohydrate supplementation in DV may not maintain the sperm quality, particularly in the medium with the osmolarity higher than 400 mOsm/kg.

  12. An optimal energy management system for islanded Microgrids based on multi-period artificial bee colony combined with Markov Chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marzband, Mousa; Azarinejadian, Fatemeh; Savaghebi, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    neural network combined with a Markov chain (ANN-MC) approach is used to predict nondispatchable power generation and load demand considering uncertainties. Furthermore, other capabilities such as extendibility, reliability, and flexibility are examined about the proposed approach......., the DR magnitude, the duration, and the minimum cost of energy. In this paper, a multiperiod artificial bee colony optimization algorithm is implemented for economic dispatch considering generation, storage, and responsive load offers. The better performance of the proposed algorithm is shown...

  13. Can poisons stimulate bees? Appreciating the potential of hormesis in bee-pesticide research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, G Christopher; Rix, Rachel R

    2015-10-01

    Hormesis, a biphasic dose response whereby exposure to low doses of a stressor can stimulate biological processes, has been reported in many organisms, including pest insects when they are exposed to low doses of a pesticide. However, awareness of the hormesis phenomenon seems to be limited among bee researchers, in spite of the increased emphasis of late on pollinator toxicology and risk assessment. In this commentary, we show that there are several examples in the literature of substances that are toxic to bees at high doses but stimulatory at low doses. Appreciation of the hormetic dose response by bee researchers will improve our fundamental understanding of how bees respond to low doses of chemical stressors, and may be useful in pollinator risk assessment.

  14. Iridovirus and microsporidian linked to honey bee colony decline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry J Bromenshenk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2010 Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD, again devastated honey bee colonies in the USA, indicating that the problem is neither diminishing nor has it been resolved. Many CCD investigations, using sensitive genome-based methods, have found small RNA bee viruses and the microsporidia, Nosema apis and N. ceranae in healthy and collapsing colonies alike with no single pathogen firmly linked to honey bee losses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used Mass spectrometry-based proteomics (MSP to identify and quantify thousands of proteins from healthy and collapsing bee colonies. MSP revealed two unreported RNA viruses in North American honey bees, Varroa destructor-1 virus and Kakugo virus, and identified an invertebrate iridescent virus (IIV (Iridoviridae associated with CCD colonies. Prevalence of IIV significantly discriminated among strong, failing, and collapsed colonies. In addition, bees in failing colonies contained not only IIV, but also Nosema. Co-occurrence of these microbes consistently marked CCD in (1 bees from commercial apiaries sampled across the U.S. in 2006-2007, (2 bees sequentially sampled as the disorder progressed in an observation hive colony in 2008, and (3 bees from a recurrence of CCD in Florida in 2009. The pathogen pairing was not observed in samples from colonies with no history of CCD, namely bees from Australia and a large, non-migratory beekeeping business in Montana. Laboratory cage trials with a strain of IIV type 6 and Nosema ceranae confirmed that co-infection with these two pathogens was more lethal to bees than either pathogen alone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings implicate co-infection by IIV and Nosema with honey bee colony decline, giving credence to older research pointing to IIV, interacting with Nosema and mites, as probable cause of bee losses in the USA, Europe, and Asia. We next need to characterize the IIV and Nosema that we detected and develop management practices to reduce honey

  15. Iridovirus and microsporidian linked to honey bee colony decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromenshenk, Jerry J; Henderson, Colin B; Wick, Charles H; Stanford, Michael F; Zulich, Alan W; Jabbour, Rabih E; Deshpande, Samir V; McCubbin, Patrick E; Seccomb, Robert A; Welch, Phillip M; Williams, Trevor; Firth, David R; Skowronski, Evan; Lehmann, Margaret M; Bilimoria, Shan L; Gress, Joanna; Wanner, Kevin W; Cramer, Robert A

    2010-10-06

    In 2010 Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), again devastated honey bee colonies in the USA, indicating that the problem is neither diminishing nor has it been resolved. Many CCD investigations, using sensitive genome-based methods, have found small RNA bee viruses and the microsporidia, Nosema apis and N. ceranae in healthy and collapsing colonies alike with no single pathogen firmly linked to honey bee losses. We used Mass spectrometry-based proteomics (MSP) to identify and quantify thousands of proteins from healthy and collapsing bee colonies. MSP revealed two unreported RNA viruses in North American honey bees, Varroa destructor-1 virus and Kakugo virus, and identified an invertebrate iridescent virus (IIV) (Iridoviridae) associated with CCD colonies. Prevalence of IIV significantly discriminated among strong, failing, and collapsed colonies. In addition, bees in failing colonies contained not only IIV, but also Nosema. Co-occurrence of these microbes consistently marked CCD in (1) bees from commercial apiaries sampled across the U.S. in 2006-2007, (2) bees sequentially sampled as the disorder progressed in an observation hive colony in 2008, and (3) bees from a recurrence of CCD in Florida in 2009. The pathogen pairing was not observed in samples from colonies with no history of CCD, namely bees from Australia and a large, non-migratory beekeeping business in Montana. Laboratory cage trials with a strain of IIV type 6 and Nosema ceranae confirmed that co-infection with these two pathogens was more lethal to bees than either pathogen alone. These findings implicate co-infection by IIV and Nosema with honey bee colony decline, giving credence to older research pointing to IIV, interacting with Nosema and mites, as probable cause of bee losses in the USA, Europe, and Asia. We next need to characterize the IIV and Nosema that we detected and develop management practices to reduce honey bee losses.

  16. Chem I Supplement: Bee Sting: The Chemistry of an Insect Venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Rod; Peck, Larry

    1980-01-01

    Considers various aspects of bee stings including the physical mechanism of the venom apparatus in the bee, categorization of physiological responses of nonprotected individuals to bee sting, chemical composition of bee venom and the mechanisms of venom action, and areas of interest in the synthesis of bee venom. (CS)

  17. Effects of stingless bee and honey bee propolis on four species of bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    FARNESI, A. P.; AQUINO-FERREIRA, R.; de Jong, D.; Bastos,J. K.; Soares,A.E.E.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the antibacterial activities of several types of propolis, including Africanized honey bee green propolis and propolis produced by meliponini bees. The antibacterial activity of green propolis against Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus was superior to that of Melipona quadrifasciata and Scaptotrigona sp propolis. Only two samples of propolis (green propolis and Scaptotrigona sp propolis) were efficient against Escherichia coli. Melipona quadrifasciata propolis was better...

  18. Pesticides and reduced-risk insecticides, native bees and pantropical stingless bees: pitfalls and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Wagner F; Smagghe, Guy; Guedes, Raul Narciso C

    2015-08-01

    Although invertebrates generally have a low public profile, the honey bee, Apis mellifera L., is a flagship species whose popularity likely derives from the products it provides and its perceived ecological services. Therefore, the raging debate regarding honey bee decline has surpassed the realm of beekeepers, academia, industry and regulatory agencies and now also encompasses non-governmental agencies, media, fiction writers and the general public. The early interest and concern about honey bee colony collapse disorder (CCD) soon shifted to the bigger issue of pollinator decline, with a focus on the potential involvement of pesticides in such a phenomenon. Pesticides were previously recognised as the potential culprits of the reported declines, particularly the neonicotinoid insecticides owing to their widespread and peculiar use in agriculture. However, the evidence for the potential pivotal role of these neonicotinoids in honey bee decline remains a matter of debate, with an increased recognition of the multifactorial nature of the problem and the lack of a direct association between the noted decline and neonicotinoid use. The focus on the decline of honey bee populations subsequently spread to other species, and bumblebees became another matter of concern, particularly in Europe and the United States. Other bee species, ones that are particularly important in other regions of the world, remain the object of little concern (unjustifiably so). Furthermore, the continuous focus on neonicotinoids is also in need of revision, as the current evidence suggests that a broad spectrum of compounds deserve attention. Here we address both shortcomings.

  19. Clinical and biochemical correlates of successful semen collection for cryopreservation from 12-18-year-old patients: a single-center study of 86 adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagenäs, Isabella; Jørgensen, Niels; Rechnitzer, Catherine;

    2010-01-01

    Cryopreservation of semen should be offered to adults before gonadotoxic treatment. However, the experience with semen collection in adolescents is still limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate potential correlates of successful semen sampling in adolescents....

  20. Bilateral Optic Neuritis After Bee Sting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Türkyılmaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Corneal edema, hyphema, lens dislocation, iris atrophy, cataract and glaucoma cases due to bee sting are frequently reported. Optic neuropathy developing after a bee sting is rarely reported. A 46-year-old man applied to our clinic with visual loss. He had a history of transient loss of consciousness and bilateral severe visual loss after a bee sting 10 days ago. His first diagnosis was myocardial infarction and coronary angiography was applied in a private hospital; the angiography was found normal. In our clinic, his best-corrected visual acuity was 0.5 in the right eye and 0.7 in the left eye. The diagnosis was bilateral optic neuritis, and 64 mg/day oral methylprednisolone treatment was applied. Visual acuity improved to 1.0 in both eyes 39 days later. Optic neuritis due to bee sting is a rare case that can cause severe visual loss and responds well to systemic corticosteroid treatment. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 72-4

  1. Testing Honey Bees' Avoidance of Predators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jesse Wade; Nieh, James C.; Goodale, Eben

    2012-01-01

    Many high school science students do not encounter opportunities for authentic science inquiry in their formal coursework. Ecological field studies can provide such opportunities. The purpose of this project was to teach students about the process of science by designing and conducting experiments on whether and how honey bees (Apis mellifera)…

  2. USDA research and honey bee health

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USDA - Agricultural Research Service Bee Research Laboratory (BRL) is comprised of nine full-time federal employees and a team of 20+ students and collaborators from the U.S., England, Thailand, Spain, and China. The mission of the BRL is to provide innovative tools and insights for building and...

  3. Parkinsonism following Bee Sting: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchika Mittal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting here a rare case of Parkinsonism (Hypokinetic dysarthria caused after a bee stung, a member of the hymenoptera order. The main aim of this report is to orient the clinicians with the possibility of extrapyramidal syndromes because of hymenoptera stings.

  4. BEES, HONEY AND HEALTH IN ANTIQUITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Cilliers

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available

    In antiquity bees and honey had a very special significance. Honey was indeed considered to drip from heaven as the food of the gods. As an infant Zeus was fed on honey in the cave of Dicte, by bees and the beautiful Melissa, whose name became the Greek word for “bee”. When the ancient Romans wished you luck they said “May honey drip on you!” and for the Israelites Palestine was a “land of milk and honey” (Forbes 1957:85-87. In his Georgics Vergil likened the inhabitants of the new Golden Age to an orderly swarm of bees (Johnson 1980:90-105, and the word “honeymoon” probably derived from the ancient custom of newlyweds to drink mead (honey-wine for a month after their wedding (Hajar 2002:5-6. Allsop and Miller state that even today honey is popularly associated with warmth, nostalgia, goodness and flattery (1996:513-520.

    In this study the origins of apiculture (bee-keeping and the status and uses of honey in antiquity are analysed – with emphasis on its assumed value as a health promoting agent.

  5. Self-reported mobile phone use and semen parameters among men from a fertility clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ryan C; Mínguez-Alarcón, Lidia; Meeker, John D; Williams, Paige L; Mezei, Gabor; Ford, Jennifer B; Hauser, Russ

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing concern that use of mobile phones, a source of low-level radio-frequency electromagnetic fields, may be associated with poor semen quality, but the epidemiologic evidence is limited and conflicting. The relationship between mobile phone use patterns and markers of semen quality was explored in a longitudinal cohort study of 153 men that attended an academic fertility clinic in Boston, Massachusetts. Information on mobile phone use duration, headset or earpiece use, and the body location in which the mobile phone was carried was ascertained via nurse-administered questionnaire. Semen samples (n=350) were collected and analyzed onsite. To account for multiple semen samples per man, linear mixed models with random intercepts were used to investigate the association between mobile phone use and semen parameters. Overall, there was no evidence for a relationship between mobile phone use and semen quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of Semen Celosiae and Cockscomb Flower Using Continuous Wavelet Transform with FTIR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changjiang Zhang; Cungui Cheng

    2006-01-01

    Infrared spectra of semen celosiae and cockscomb flower can be obtained directly, quickly and accurately employing Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) with OMNI sampler. Continuous wavelet transform (CWT) is employed to zoom in local region of infrared spectra of semen celosiae and cockscomb flower. Thus difference of infrared spectra between semen celosiae and cockscomb flower is greatly extruded. Identification rate is greatly improved.Daubechies wavelet is used as mother wavelet. CWT is implemented to the infrared spectra of semen celosiae and cockscomb flower. The difference between semen celosiae and cockscomb flower is observed at all scales in the continuous wavelet domain. An optimal scale is selected to identify semen celosiae and cockscomb flower. Experimental results show that it is effective to apply CWT on the basis of FTIR to identify traditional Chinese medicinal materials, which are the same general but different species.

  7. Concentrations of Perfluorooctane Sulfonate (PFOS) and Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and Their Associations with Human Semen Quality Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymer, James H.; Michael, Larry C.; Studabaker, William B.; Olsen, Geary W.; Sloan, Carol S.; Wilcosky, Timothy; Walmer, David K.

    2011-01-01

    A total of 256 men were studied to evaluate whether serum concentrations of perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) impacted semen quality or reproductive hormones. Blood and semen were collected and analyzed for perfluorochemicals and reproductive and thyroid hormones. Semen quality was assessed using standard clinical methods. Linear and logistic modeling was performed with semen profile measurements as outcomes and PFOS and PFOA in semen and plasma as explanatory variables. Adjusting for age, abstinence, and tobacco use, there was no indication that PFOA or PFOS was significantly associated with volume, sperm concentration, percent motility, swim-up motility and concentration, and directional motility (a function of motility and modal progression.) Follicle stimulating hormone was not associated with either PFOA or PFOS. Luteinizing hormone was positively correlated with plasma PFOA and PFOS, but not semen PFOS. Important methodological concerns included the lack of multiple hormonal measurements necessary to address circadian rhythms. PMID:21736937

  8. Compensated reduction in Leydig cell function is associated with lower semen quality variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, N.; Joensen, U. N.; Toppari, J.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Is the Leydig cell function of young European men associated with semen quality? SUMMARY ANSWER: Compensated reduction in Leydig cell function, defined as increased LH concentration combined with adequate testosterone production is associated with lower semen quality. WHAT...... IS ALREADY KNOWN: Semen quality of young European men shows a heterogeneous pattern. Many have sperm counts below and in the lower WHO reference where there nevertheless is a significant risk of subfecundity. Little is known about differences in Leydig cell function between men with semen quality below......, Lithuania, and Spain. The men originated from the general populations, all were young, almost all were unaware of their fecundity and each provided a semen and blood sample. Associations between semen parameters and serum levels of testosterone and luteinising hormone (LH), calculated free testosterone...

  9. Genetic gain in dairy cattle populations is increased using sexed semen in commercial herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Kargo; Andersen, Jakob Voergaard; Pedersen, Louise Dybdahl

    2011-01-01

    with 100 cows each. Each year 50 young bulls (YB), 10 active sires and 215 BD were selected on best linear unbiased prediction estimated breeding values by truncation selection across the simulated population, and the YB were tested within the population. Use of sexed semen alone gave a positive increase......Using stochastic simulation, the effect of using sexed semen to cow dams (CD) in a dairy cattle breeding scheme, with or without use of multiple ovulation and embryo transfer (MOET) to bull dams (BD), on annual genetic gain at the population level was examined. Three levels of sexed semen were...... combined with three levels of MOET: no sexed semen, sexed semen to the best CD and sexed semen to all heifers, combined with no MOET, MOET on all BD and MOET randomly on 20% of the BD. In total, nine scenarios were compared. The simulated population was monitored for 30 years and included 450 herds...

  10. Effect of different antioxidant additives in semen diluent on cryopreservability (−196°C of buffalo semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardik A. Patel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different antioxidant additives in standard tris-fructose-egg yolkglycerol (TFYG extender on the cryopreservability of buffalo semen. Materials and Methods: Semen collection using artificial vagina, twice weekly for 5 weeks from three pedigreed health breeding bulls of Mehsani breed, aged between 6 and 8 years. Immediately after initial evaluation all 30 qualifying ejaculates (10/bull were split into three aliquots and diluted at 34°C keeping the concentration of 100 million spermatozoa/ml with standard TFYG extender as control and TFYG having two antioxidant additives - Cysteine HCl at 1 mg/ml and ascorbic acid at 0.2 mg/ml to study their comparative performance. Semen filled in French Mini straws using IS-4 system and gradually cooled to 4°C and equilibrated for 4 h in cold handing cabinet. After completion of equilibration, straws were cryopreserved in LN2 by Programmable Bio-freezer. Semen was examined at post-dilution, post-equilibration, and post-thaw stages for sperm quality parameters, and at each stage plasma was separated for enzymatic analysis of aspartate aminotransferase (AST, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, and alkaline phosphatase (AKP. Results: The mean percentage of sperms in TFYG, TFYG + cysteine HCl and TFYG + ascorbic acid diluents at postthaw stage in terms of progressive motility (52.83±0.52, 57.83±0.52, 57.83±0.52, livability (78.70±0.21, 82.33±0.23, 81.73±0.22, and abnormality (5.43±0.21, 5.03±0.17, 5.23±0.18 varied significantly (p<0.05 between control TFYG and TFYG having antioxidant additives. The mean U/L activities of AST (78.70±0.47, 72.80±0.48, 73.30±0.54, LDH (172.70±0.41, 155.78±0.42, 156.33±0.41, and AKP (103.61±0.34, 90.20±0.34, 91.03±0.34 in semen diluted with TFYG, TFYG + cysteine HCl and TFYG + ascorbic acid diluents at post-thaw stage, respectively, which showed significantly (p<0.05 higher leakage of enzymes in control TFYG than TFYG

  11. Biological and therapeutic properties of bee pollen: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisow, Bożena; Denisow-Pietrzyk, Marta

    2016-10-01

    Natural products, including bee products, are particularly appreciated by consumers and are used for therapeutic purposes as alternative drugs. However, it is not known whether treatments with bee products are safe and how to minimise the health risks of such products. Among others, bee pollen is a natural honeybee product promoted as a valuable source of nourishing substances and energy. The health-enhancing value of bee pollen is expected due to the wide range of secondary plant metabolites (tocopherol, niacin, thiamine, biotin and folic acid, polyphenols, carotenoid pigments, phytosterols), besides enzymes and co-enzymes, contained in bee pollen. The promising reports on the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticariogenic antibacterial, antifungicidal, hepatoprotective, anti-atherosclerotic, immune enhancing potential require long-term and large cohort clinical studies. The main difficulty in the application of bee pollen in modern phytomedicine is related to the wide species-specific variation in its composition. Therefore, the variations may differently contribute to bee-pollen properties and biological activity and thus in therapeutic effects. In principle, we can unequivocally recommend bee pollen as a valuable dietary supplement. Although the bee-pollen components have potential bioactive and therapeutic properties, extensive research is required before bee pollen can be used in therapy. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Microbial communities of three sympatric Australian stingless bee species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara D Leonhardt

    Full Text Available Bacterial symbionts of insects have received increasing attention due to their prominent role in nutrient acquisition and defense. In social bees, symbiotic bacteria can maintain colony homeostasis and fitness, and the loss or alteration of the bacterial community may be associated with the ongoing bee decline observed worldwide. However, analyses of microbiota associated with bees have been largely confined to the social honeybees (Apis mellifera and bumblebees (Bombus spec., revealing--among other taxa--host-specific lactic acid bacteria (LAB, genus Lactobacillus that are not found in solitary bees. Here, we characterized the microbiota of three Australian stingless bee species (Apidae: Meliponini of two phylogenetically distant genera (Tetragonula and Austroplebeia. Besides common plant bacteria, we find LAB in all three species, showing that LAB are shared by honeybees, bumblebees and stingless bees across geographical regions. However, while LAB of the honeybee-associated Firm4-5 clusters were present in Tetragonula, they were lacking in Austroplebeia. Instead, we found a novel clade of likely host-specific LAB in all three Australian stingless bee species which forms a sister clade to a large cluster of Halictidae-associated lactobacilli. Our findings indicate both a phylogenetic and geographical signal of host-specific LAB in stingless bees and highlight stingless bees as an interesting group to investigate the evolutionary history of the bee-LAB association.

  13. Learning at old age: a study on winter bees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Behrends

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Ageing is often accompanied by a decline in learning and memory abilities across the animal kingdom. Understanding age-related changes in cognitive abilities is therefore a major goal of current research. The honey bee is emerging as a novel model organism for age-related changes in brain function, because learning and memory can easily be studied in bees under controlled laboratory conditions. In addition, genetically similar workers naturally display life expectancies from six weeks (summer bees to six months (winter bees. We studied whether in honey bees, extreme longevity leads to a decline in cognitive functions. Six-month-old winter bees were conditioned either to odours or to tactile stimuli. Afterwards, long-term memory and discrimination abilities were analysed. Winter bees were kept under different conditions (flight /no flight opportunity to test for effects of foraging activity on learning performance. Despite their extreme age, winter bees did not display an age-related decline in learning or discrimination abilities, but had a slightly impaired olfactory long-term memory. The opportunity to forage indoors led to a slight decrease in learning performance. This suggests that in honey bees, unlike in most other animals, age per se does not impair associative learning. Future research will show which mechanisms protect winter bees from age-related deficits in learning.

  14. Nutritional status influences socially regulated foraging ontogeny in honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Amy L; Kantarovich, Sara; Meisel, Adam F; Robinson, Gene E

    2005-12-01

    In many social insects, including honey bees, worker energy reserve levels are correlated with task performance in the colony. Honey bee nest workers have abundant stored lipid and protein while foragers are depleted of these reserves; this depletion precedes the shift from nest work to foraging. The first objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that lipid depletion has a causal effect on the age at onset of foraging in honey bees (Apis mellifera L.). We found that bees treated with a fatty acid synthesis inhibitor (TOFA) were more likely to forage precociously. The second objective of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship between social interactions, nutritional state and behavioral maturation. Since older bees are known to inhibit the development of young bees into foragers, we asked whether this effect is mediated nutritionally via the passage of food from old to young bees. We found that bees reared in social isolation have low lipid stores, but social inhibition occurs in colonies in the field, whether young bees are starved or fed. These results indicate that although social interactions affect the nutritional status of young bees, social and nutritional factors act independently to influence age at onset of foraging. Our findings suggest that mechanisms linking internal nutritional physiology to foraging in solitary insects have been co-opted to regulate altruistic foraging in a social context.

  15. Embryo production with sex-sorted semen in superovulated dairy heifers and cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaimio, I; Mikkola, M; Lindeberg, H; Heikkinen, J; Hasler, J F; Taponen, J

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of sex-sorted semen on the number and quality of embryos recovered from superovulated heifers and cows on commercial dairy farm conditions in Finland. The data consist of 1487 commercial embryo collections performed on 633 and 854 animals of Holstein and Finnish Ayrshire breeds, respectively. Superovulation was induced by eight intramuscular injections of follicle-stimulating hormone, at 12-hour intervals over 4 days, involving declining doses beginning on 9 to 12 days after the onset of standing estrus. The donors were inseminated at 9 to 15-hour intervals beginning 12 hours after the onset of estrus with 2 + 2 (+1) doses of sex-sorted frozen-thawed semen (N = 218) into the uterine horns or with 1 + 1 (+1) doses of conventional frozen-thawed semen (N = 1269) into the uterine corpus. Most conventional semen (222 bulls) straws contained 15 million sperm (total number 30-45 million per donor). Sex-sorted semen (61 bulls) straws contained 2 million sperm (total number 8-14 million per donor). Mean number of transferable embryos in recoveries from cows bred with sex-sorted semen was 4.9, which is significantly lower than 9.1 transferable embryos recovered when using conventional semen (P ≤ 0.001). In heifers, no significant difference was detected between mean number of transferable embryos in recoveries using sex-sorted semen and conventional semen (6.1 and 7.2, respectively). The number of unfertilized ova was higher when using sex-sorted semen than when using conventional semen in heifers (P cows (P cows (P protocol used seemed to be adequate for heifers. In superovulated cows, an optimal protocol for using sex-sorted semen remains to be found.

  16. Gallic Acid Is an Antagonist of Semen Amyloid Fibrils That Enhance HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoRicco, Josephine G; Xu, Changmingzi Sherry; Neidleman, Jason; Bergkvist, Magnus; Greene, Warner C; Roan, Nadia R; Makhatadze, George I

    2016-07-01

    Recent in vitro studies have demonstrated that amyloid fibrils found in semen from healthy and HIV-infected men, as well as semen itself, can markedly enhance HIV infection rates. Semen fibrils are made up of multiple naturally occurring peptide fragments derived from semen. The best characterized of these fibrils are SEVI (semen-derived enhancer of viral infection), made up of residues 248-286 of prostatic acidic phosphatase, and the SEM1 fibrils, made up of residues 86-107 of semenogelin 1. A small molecule screen for antagonists of semen fibrils identified four compounds that lowered semen-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 infectivity. One of the four, gallic acid, was previously reported to antagonize other amyloids and to exert anti-inflammatory effects. To better understand the mechanism by which gallic acid modifies the properties of semen amyloids, we performed biophysical measurements (atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, thioflavin T and Congo Red fluorescence assays, zeta potential measurements) and quantitative assays on the effects of gallic acid on semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection and inflammation. Our results demonstrate that gallic acid binds to both SEVI and SEM1 fibrils and modifies their surface electrostatics to render them less cationic. In addition, gallic acid decreased semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection but did not decrease the inflammatory response induced by semen. Together, these observations identify gallic acid as a non-polyanionic compound that inhibits semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection and suggest the potential utility of incorporating gallic acid into a multicomponent microbicide targeting both the HIV virus and host components that promote viral infection.

  17. Identification and determination of (+)-sesamin in Semen Cuscutae by capillary GC and GC-MS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    (+)-Sesamin was found in Semen Cuscutae for the first time. A rapid and simple approach for the analysis of (+)-sesamin in different sources of Semen Cuscutae is proposed, which used GC-FID for the determination of (+)-sesamin and GC-MS for its identification. The result suggested that this approach could be used to identify Semen Cuscutae from various sources based on the different content of (+)-sesamin in them.

  18. ANALISIS ECONOMIC VALUE ADDED UNTUK MENILAI KINERJA KEUANGAN PERUSAHAAN SEMEN YANG TERDAFTAR DI BURSA EFEK INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    PATA, MARIANUS

    2015-01-01

    2015 Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui kinerja keuangan pada perusahaan semen yang terdaftar di Bursa Efek Indonesia melalui metode analisis Economic Value Added sebagai alat ukur kinerja keuangan pada perusahaan semen yang terdaftar di Bursa Efek Indonesia. Data penelitian ini diperoleh dari laporan keuangan tahun 2011-2013 masing-masing perusahaan yang terdaftar di Bursa Efek Indonesia. Hasil analisis kinerja keuangan dari 5 perusahaan semen yang ter...

  19. Parental age at delivery and a man's semen quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priskorn, Lærke; Jensen, Tina K; Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune;

    2014-01-01

    the possibility that a trend may have been identified with a still larger sample. In addition, the Danish Civil Registration System is merely administrative and hence does not discriminate between biological and adopted children. However, the low rate of adoption (≈2%) suggests that misclassification would have......STUDY QUESTION: Is parental age at delivery associated with a man's semen quality? SUMMARY ANSWER: In this large register-based study both mother's and father's age are found to have minimal effects on semen quality in men. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Both maternal and paternal age have been associated...... with a range of adverse health effects in the offspring. Given the varied health effects of parental age upon offspring, and the sensitivity of genital development to external factors, it is plausible that the age of a man's mother and father at conception may impact his reproductive health. To our knowledge...

  20. Bull breeding soundness, semen evaluation and cattle productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenoweth, P J; McPherson, F J

    2016-06-01

    The bull breeding soundness evaluation (BBSE) has evolved as a cost-effective veterinary procedure which provides benefits such as risk-reduction and improvements in strategic bull usage, herd fertility and economics. Semen evaluation is an important component of the BBSE when performed appropriately; a consideration that is increasingly addressed by third party andrology laboratories. The combination of competent physical/reproductive exams (including scrotal circumference measurements) and semen evaluations can contribute greatly to the fertility and economics of individual herds as well as adding to understanding of those factors which affect cattle fertility. Despite such advantages, there remain challenges in achieving full acceptance of BBSEs, particularly by the dairy industry and in developing countries.

  1. Semen collection and evaluation of captive coatis (Nasua nasua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C.R. Paz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Semen samples (n=105 were collected through eletroejaculation from six adult male coatis (Nasua nasua between January 2007 and December 2008 at Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso Zoo, Cuiabá, Brazil. Mean values were: volume (mL; concentration (sperm/mL; total motility (%; progressive sperm motility (scale, 0-5; live spermatozoa (%; acrossome integrity (%; primary defects (%; and secondary defects (%. There was high correlation between total motility and live sperm; total motility and progressive sperm motility; total motility and acrossome integrity; live sperm and progressive motility; live sperm and acrossome integrity and volume and concentration. The method for semen collection was considered safe and efficient. It can be used for the evaluation of breeding potential of coati in captivity and for the establishment of new assisted reproductive technology (ART for threatened neotropical carnivores species.

  2. [Sperm DNA fragmentation: association with semen parameters in young men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchuk, L V; Tataru, D A; Kuznetsova, N N; Kleshev, M A; Markova, E V; Svetlakov, A V

    2016-12-01

    Abnormal sperm DNA integrity is an important risk factor for male infertility. The aim of this work was to examine sperm DNA fragmentation in a cohort of young male volunteers (n=111; age 21.0+/-0.2 years) from the general population and establish the association between the level of sperm DNA fragmentation and sperm functional parameters. Sperm DNA fragmentation index (DFI) was determined by SCSA (sperm chromatin structure assay) using flow cytometry. Standard semen parameters (concentration, motility, and morphology) were evaluated according to the WHO guidelines (2010). and conclusions. In the study cohort, 79.0%, 12.4% and 8.6% of men had normal (DFIfragmentation, respectively. Men with impaired spermatogenesis had greater IDF values (14.53+/-1.43%) than men with normal semen parameters (8.88+/-0.77%, pfragmentation using SCSA technique can be employed in epidemiological studies of male fertility.

  3. Effects of different concentrations of BHT on microscopic and oxidative parameters of Mahabadi goat semen following the freeze-thaw process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naijian, Hamid Reza; Kohram, Hamid; Shahneh, Ahmad Zare; Sharafi, Mohsen; Bucak, Mustafa Numan

    2013-04-01

    Oxidative damage to sperm is one of the main causes for decline in motility and fertility of frozen-thawed sperm. Thus, it is crucial to use cryoprotectant agents in extender in order to prevent lethal intracellular ice crystal formation. The present study aims to evaluate the effects of different concentrations of the antioxidant butylated hyroxytoluene (BHT) on sperm parameters post-thaw. Semen was diluted into five equal aliquots of extender containing different concentrations of BHT (0, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4mM), aspirated into 0.25 mL straws, and equilibrated at 5°C for 2h. After equilibration, straws were frozen in liquid nitrogen vapor and plunged into liquid nitrogen for storage. Sperm parameters, including motility and progressive motility, viability, membrane integrity, acrosome integrity and capacitation status, were assessed. Malondialdehiyde (MDA) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activity were also evaluated after freezing-thawing. Results of this experiment show that addition of 1mM of BHT to the extender for freezing of goat semen can improve motility, progressive motility and viability (PBHT (P>0.05). Therefore, we conclude that the optimum concentration of BHT for cryopreservation of goat semen is 1mM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. EFFECT OF OSMOTIC PRESSURE AND pH ON THE SHORT-TERM STORAGE AND FERTILITY OF BROILER BREEDER SPERM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Latif, A. Ijaz, M. Aleem and A. Mahmud1

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Effect of osmotic pressure and pH on the short-term storage of cockerel semen using modified Van Wambeke milk based extender ‘Experimental Extender’ was studied. Six broiler breeder cockerels were used and 7 ejaculates were collected from each cockerel every second day. In experiment 1, semen was diluted in the Experimental Extender with osmotic pressures 350, 375 or 400 mOsm and pH 7.0 and stored at 5ºC. In experiment 2, semen was diluted in the Experimental Extender with osmotic pressure 375 mOsm and pH 6.4, 7.0 or 7.4 and stored at 5ºC. The effect of osmotic pressure and pH on percentage motility, sperm speed and clumping was evaluated at 4, 24 and 48 hr. There was a significant difference (P<0.05 among the osmotic pressures evaluated in terms of percentage motility, speed of sperm cells and extent of clumping during 48 hr of semen storage. The 375 mOsm osmotic pressure was found to be best (P<0.05 for the short-term storage of cockerel semen. There was a significant difference (P<0.05 among different pH values evaluated in terms of percentage motility after 24 and 48 hr of semen storage. pH 7.0 and/or 7.4 were found to be optimum (P<0.05 for the short-term storage of cockerel semen. Fertility/hatchability was higher (88%, P<0.05 when sperm were stored in the Experimental Extender with osmotic pressure 375mOsm and pH 7.0, and in Fecondil (86% as compared to normal saline (79%. In conclusion, the Experimental Extender with 375 mOsm osmotic pressure and pH 7.0 is suitable for the short-term storage of poultry semen and it improves fertility of the spermatozoa as well.

  5. Liposome encapsulated soy lecithin and cholesterol can efficiently replace chicken egg yolk in human semen cryopreservation medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutalik, Srinivas; Salian, Sujith Raj; Avadhani, Kiran; Menon, Jyothsna; Joshi, Haritima; Hegde, Aswathi Raju; Kumar, Pratap; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Adiga, Satish Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Cryopreservation of spermatozoa plays a significant role in reproductive medicine and fertility preservation. Chicken egg yolk is used as an extender in cryopreservation of human spermatozoa using glycerol egg yolk citrate (GEYC) buffered medium. Even though 50% survival of spermatozoa is generally achieved with this method, the risk of high levels of endotoxins and transmission pathogens from chicken egg yolk is a matter of concern. In the present study we attempted to establish a chemically defined cryopreservation medium which can replace the chicken egg yolk without affecting sperm survival. Ejaculates from 28 men were cryopreserved with GEYC based freezing medium or liposome encapsulated soy lecithin-cholesterol based freezing medium (LFM). The semen samples were subjected to rapid thawing after 14 days of storage in liquid nitrogen. Post-thaw analysis indicated significantly higher post-thaw motility and sperm survival in spermatozoa cryopreserved with LFM compared to conventional GEYC freezing medium. The soy lecithin and cholesterol at the ratio of 80:20 with sucrose showed the highest percentage of post-thaw motility and survival compared to the other compositions. In conclusion, chemically defined cryopreservation medium with liposome encapsulated soy lecithin and cholesterol can effectively replace the chicken egg yolk from human semen cryopreservation medium without compromising post-thaw outcome.

  6. PROSTAGLANDIN F2α SUPPLEMENTED SEMEN IMPROVES LANDRACE BOARS SPERM MOTILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOANA SGURĂ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether the sperm motility from Landrace boars improves when PGF2α (Dinolytic®; 5 mg PGF2α /ml was added to diluted semen. Boars from one large production unit, were manually collected; semen was either enriched with PGF2α (group 1, n=38, either untreated (group 2, n=32. Total volume of semen collected, percent of motility and number of obtained doses were recorded. The highest sperm volume collected from the two groups is corresponding to ejaculates from Landrace boars with PGF2α supplemented semen (267.6 ml. Regarding motility, the sperm collected from Landrace boars with PGF2α supplemented semen was higher from the one collected from Landrace boars with untreated semen (81.37% and very significant differences were statistically determined. The ejaculates with highest number of obtained doses is corresponding to the ones collected from boars with PGF2α supplemented semen (25.21. Only boars from the first group (with PGF2α supplemented semen showed motility over 70% and even 100%. The untreated semen showed motility values around 65-70%.

  7. Strategies to improve the fertility of fresh and frozen donkey semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, José Victor; Oliveira, Pedro Victor de Luna Freire; Melo e Oña, Cely Marini; Guasti, Priscilla Nascimento; Monteiro, Gabriel Augusto; Sancler da Silva, Yamê Fabres Robaina; Papa, Patrícia de Mello; Alvarenga, Marco Antônio; Dell'Aqua Junior, Jose Antonio; Papa, Frederico Ozanam

    2016-04-15

    Fertility rates of donkey semen in jennies are lower compared to mares. The aims of this study were to evaluate different sperm cryopreservation methods and insemination strategies to improve the fertility of donkey semen in jennies. Three experiments were performed: (1) the comparison of two freezing methods of donkey semen (conventional method and automated method); (2) the determination of a suitable insemination dose of fresh donkey semen for jennies and mares; and (3) the influence of the semen deposition site on fertility of jennies inseminated with frozen donkey semen. For experiment 1, no differences were observed in total motility, angular velocity, curvilinear velocity, straight-line velocity, and plasma membrane integrity between samples frozen with the conventional (Styrofoam box) and the automated method (TK 4000C). However, the automated method provided higher values of progressive motility and rapid cells in frozen-thawed samples in comparison with the conventional method (P frozen-thawed donkey semen. No pregnancies were achieved with inseminations performed in the UB (0/12). The pregnancy rate for uterine horn group was 28.26% (13/46) and thus significantly higher than the UB group (0%; 0/12; P frozen-thawed donkey semen increased the pregnancy rate in jennies, and the multiple inseminations may be an option to improve the fertility rates of donkey semen in jennies.

  8. Cadmium may impair prostate function as measured by prostate specific antigen in semen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreucci, Alessandro; Mocevic, Emina; Jönsson, Bo A G

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the association between cadmium in blood and the concentration of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) in semen, including the modifying effects of zinc or the CAG polymorphism in the androgen receptor (AR). Blood and semen samples were collected from 504 partners of pregnant women.......0009). Inverse trends between cadmium and PSA were found when semen zinc concentrations were below the median value for men from Ukraine and Greenland. These outcomes suggest that cadmium may impair prostate function, as measured by PSA in semen, while high zinc levels and a low number of CAG repeats protects...

  9. Pengaruh Berbagai Konsentrasi Dimethylsulfoxide terhadap Kualitas Semen Beku Ayam Hutan Hijau Post Thawing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayan Bebas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of freezing and thawing on semen can lead to physical stress, often called cold shock, and couses the structural and biochemical damage that affecting cell function and ultimately lead to the death of the cell The aim of this study was to know the effect of the addition of various concentrations of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO as the intracellular cryoprotectant in phosphate yolk diluent on the post thowing quality of the green jungle fowl semen. The study used eight green jungle fowl semens which were collected with massage techniques. Semen was evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. Good quality semen was diluted with phosphate yolk which was added four different concentration of DMSO, namely 4%, 6%, 8%, and 10%. Semen was then filled and sealed in a mini straw (0.25 mL with the concentration of 150.106 cells, and equilibrated at 4oC for 4 hours. The semen freezing was processed using conventional method. Evaluation was performed on post thawing semen. The evaluation of semen quality included the progressive motility and plasma membrane intact. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance. If there were any significant differences, the data were futher analyzed by Duncan test. The results showed that addition of DMSO concentration of 6% has resulted the progressive motility and intact plasma membrane higher significantly (P <0.05 than those of the addition of DMSO concentration 4%, 8%, and 10%.

  10. HIV-1 imposes rigidity on blood and semen cytokine networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisco, Andrea; Introini, Andrea; Munawwar, Arshi; Vanpouille, Christophe; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Blank, Paul; Singh, Sarman; Margolis, Leonid

    2012-12-01

    Although it is established that the levels of individual cytokines are altered by HIV-1 infection, the changes in cytokine interrelations that organize them into networks have been poorly studied. Here, we evaluated these networks in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals in fluid compartments that are critical for HIV-1 pathogenesis and transmission, namely blood and semen. In samples collected from therapy-naïve HIV-1-infected and HIV-1-uninfected individuals, we measured HIV-1-load, CD4 cell count, and levels of 21 cytokines using a multiplex bead assay. Cytokine networks in blood and semen were different for HIV-1-infected and HIV-1-uninfected individuals. In both compartments of HIV-1-infected individuals, the cytokine networks were more interlocked than in controls: HIV-1 infection resulted in the establishment of new correlations and in the strengthening of pre-existing correlations between different cytokines. In blood and semen of HIV-infected patients, there were, respectively, 68 and 72 statistically significant correlations between cytokines, while in uninfected individuals, there were 18 and 21 such correlations. HIV-1 infection reorganizes the cytokine networks, establishing new strong correlations between various cytokines and thus imposes a high rigidity on the cytokine network. This rigidity may reflect the impairment of the ability of the immune system to respond to microbial challenges. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Semen quality in Schistosoma haematobium infected men in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutscher, Peter D C; Høst, Erik; Reimert, Claus M

    2009-01-01

    The seminal vesicles and the prostate are frequently affected by egg-induced inflammation in Schistosoma haematobium infected men. The objective of this study was to assess the semen quality in men with male genital schistosomiasis (MGS). The examination of the semen samples was performed in men aged 15 to 49 years living an S. haematobium endemic area in Madagascar prior to anti-schistosoma treatment with praziquantel and five months later. Men from the high endemic Sirama sugarcane plantation with positive egg excretion in the urine and circulating anodic antigen (CAA) present in serum (n=85) were compared to men (without egg excretion and no CAA) from the neighbouring low-endemic Mataipako village (n=57). The proportion of men with egg excretion in semen was significantly higher in Sirama than in Mataipako (53% versus 4%), whereas the median ejaculate volume was significantly lower in Sirama (1.8 ml versus 2.4 ml). There was no statistical difference in median spermatocyte counts and in the proportions of men detected with azoospermia. The mean apoptotic rate was 7.8% in a subgroup of 30 men from Sirama. A positive correlation was found between apoptotic rate and seminal eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) level (rho=0.560; Pinfection is associated with sperm apoptosis and a reduced production of seminal fluid. Egg induced inflammation in the seminal vesicles and the prostate could be underlying mechanism for both observations.

  12. Antioxidant supplements and semen parameters: An evidence based review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Sedigheh; Bashiri, Reihane; Ghadiri-Anari, Akram; Nadjarzadeh, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have focused on male infertility. There is limited evidence about the influence of nutrition on quality of semen. Approximately, 30-80% of infertility cases are caused by oxidative stress and decreased level of seminal total antioxidant capacity. This study was aimed to review the effects of oral antioxidant supplements on improving major semen parameters such as sperm concentration, motility, morphology, DNA damage, and fertility rate. Data were extracted from PubMed and Google scholar database by using the terms “antioxidant”, “multivitamin”, “carnitine”, “CoQ10”, “vitamin C”, “vitamin E”, “zinc”, “folic acid”, “N-acetyl cysteine” and “selenium” combined with “male infertility”, “semen”, and “sperm” to generate a set of relevant citations. Supplements such as CoQ10 and alpha-tocopherol significantly improve sperm count. Also, carnitine has positive effects on sperm motility and morphology. Simultaneous administration of vitamin E and vitamin C reduces the sperm DNA damage. However, in some studies, one or more factors have not changed substantially. In most of the studies, antioxidant supplementation improved the number, motility, morphology and sometimes DNA integrity of sperm. The present study showed that antioxidant supplements, especially a combination of antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E, and CoQ10 intake can effectively improve semen parameters in infertile men. PMID:28066832

  13. Decreases in Human Semen Quality with Age Among Healthy Men

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskenazi, B.; Wyrobek, A.J.; Kidd, S.A.; Moore, L.; Young, S.S.; Moore, D.

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this report is to characterize the associations between age and semen quality among healthy active men after controlling for identified covariates. Ninety-seven healthy, nonsmoking men between 22 and 80 years without known fertility problems who worked for or retired from a large research laboratory. There was a gradual decrease in all semen parameters from 22-80 years of age. After adjusting for covariates, volume decreased 0.03 ml per year (p = 0.001); sperm concentration decreased 2.5% per year (p = 0.005); total count decreased 3.6% per year of age (p < 0.001); motility decreased 0.7% per year (P < 0.001); progressive motility decreased 3.1% per year (p < 0.001); and total progressively motile sperm decreased 4.8% per year (p < 0.001). In a group of healthy active men, semen volume, sperm concentration, total sperm count, and sperm motility decrease continuously between 22-80 years of age, with no evidence of a threshold.

  14. Semen analysis standardization: is there any problem in Polish laboratories?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak-Jedrzejowska, Renata; Marchlewska, Katarzyna; Oszukowska, Elzbieta; Filipiak, Eliza; Bergier, Leszek; Slowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the degree of compliance of Polish laboratories with World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations, with regard to semen analysis methodology. A survey requesting information about methods of semen analysis was distributed to employees of 55 laboratories. Respondents who had participated in external seminological workshops (31%) were termed certified respondents (CR), the remaining (69%)-non-certified respondents (NCR). Only one laboratory (6%) in the CR group and none in the NCR were compliant with WHO guidelines for methods and equipment used to evaluate seminal volume, sperm motility, concentration, vitality and morphology. Most problems were of volume measurement (weighing method was reported by 17% of CR and 10% of NCR) and staining method for sperm morphology (Papanicolau or Diff-Quik were found in 33% of CR and 23% of NCR). A three- or four-point grading of sperm motility was used by the majority of respondents; however, 17% of CR and 37% of NCR did not use a laboratory counter to tally spermatozoa. Although a haemocytometer method was used by 80% of laboratories in each group, the improved Neubauer chamber was used only by 42% of CR and 19% of NCR. In each group, 24% of laboratories did not perform a vitality test. Procedural errors and the interchangeable utilization of two or even three methods to analyse a given parameter was observed in both groups. The results indicate a need for standardisation of the methods and continuous, unified training in semen analysis in Polish laboratories.

  15. Effects of work and life stress on semen quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janevic, Teresa; Kahn, Linda G; Landsbergis, Paul; Cirillo, Piera M; Cohn, Barbara A; Liu, Xinhua; Factor-Litvak, Pam

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate associations between work-related stress, stressful life events, and perceived stress and semen quality. Cross-sectional analysis. Northern California. 193 men from the Child Health and Development Studies evaluated between 2005-2008. None. Measures of stress including job strain, perceived stress, and stressful life events; outcome measures of sperm concentration, percentage of motile sperm, and percentage of morphologically normal sperm. We found an inverse association between perceived stress score and sperm concentration (estimated coefficient b=-0.09×10(3)/mL; 95% confidence interval [CI]=-0.18, -0.01), motility (b=-0.39; 95% CI=-0.79, 0.01), and morphology (b=-0.14; 95% CI, -0.25, -0.04) in covariate-adjusted linear regression analyses. Men who experienced two or more stressful life events in the past year compared with no stressful events had a lower percentage of motile sperm (b=-8.22; 95% CI, -14.31, -2.13) and a lower percentage of morphologically normal sperm (b=-1.66; 95% CI, -3.35, 0.03) but a similar sperm concentration. Job strain was not associated with semen parameters. In this first study to examine all three domains of stress, perceived stress and stressful life events but not work-related stress were associated with semen quality. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) provides antioxidant protection for boar semen cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malo, C; Gil, L; Cano, R; González, N; Luño, V

    2012-05-01

    Boar semen is extremely vulnerable to cold shock and it is also sensitive to peroxidation due to the high content of unsaturated fatty acids in the plasma membrane. Antioxidants exert a protective effect on the plasma membrane of frozen boar sperm. Fennel has been shown to contain antioxidant substances. Therefore, this study was performed to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of fennel added to the freezing extender on boar semen quality and lipid peroxidation after thawing. Semen collected from four boars was cryopreserved in lactose-egg-yolk extender or in the same extender with varying concentration of fennel essences: low (LF); medium (MF); high (HF). Analysis of data clearly indicated that higher concentrations of fennel produced significant improvement in total motility. Moreover, when fennel was included in the extender, a dose-dependent tendency to increase sperm viability was observed. In contrast, the addition of fennel had no effect on acrosome integrity or hypoosmotic swelling test (HOST) compared with the control. Malondialdehyde (MDA) formation decreased significantly in fennel groups, yielding similar results for MF and HF. Fennel seems a new antioxidant for use in sperm cryopreservation, but its particular effects on sperm physiology must be further studied, especially the causes of motility stimulation and its effect on lipoxidation.

  17. Prospective surveillance of semen quality in the workplace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenker, M.B.; Samuels, S.J.; Perkins, C.; Lewis, E.L.; Katz, D.F.; Overstreet, J.W.

    1988-04-01

    We performed a prospective surveillance of semen quality among workers in the plant where 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane was first recognized as an occupational cause of impaired semen quality and of infertility. All male employees of the Agricultural Chemical Division were required to participate. Ninety-seven workers (92% participation) provided 258 semen samples over the 4 years of the program. Most samples were analyzed at the plant with a mini-laboratory designed for the study. Motility and shape measures were made objectively. Sixty-six subjects (68%) were non-azoospermic. Generalized multiple regression showed no significant predictors for any response, with the exception of the motility measures, which were reduced with longer times between ejaculation and assay. Between- and within-person standard deviations and correlations were calculated. Comparison of this population with fertile artificial insemination donors (16 men, 498 ejaculates) revealed generally higher ejaculate-to-ejaculate standard deviations in the worker samples. This is probably due to less well controlled conditions of sperm collection in the workplace setting. For cross-sectional studies, one ejaculate per worker is recommended as sufficient; for estimating an individual worker's mean, even three ejaculates may not provide enough precision.

  18. Glyph-Based Video Visualization for Semen Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Duffy, Brian

    2015-08-01

    © 2013 IEEE. The existing efforts in computer assisted semen analysis have been focused on high speed imaging and automated image analysis of sperm motility. This results in a large amount of data, and it is extremely challenging for both clinical scientists and researchers to interpret, compare and correlate the multidimensional and time-varying measurements captured from video data. In this work, we use glyphs to encode a collection of numerical measurements taken at a regular interval and to summarize spatio-temporal motion characteristics using static visual representations. The design of the glyphs addresses the needs for (a) encoding some 20 variables using separable visual channels, (b) supporting scientific observation of the interrelationships between different measurements and comparison between different sperm cells and their flagella, and (c) facilitating the learning of the encoding scheme by making use of appropriate visual abstractions and metaphors. As a case study, we focus this work on video visualization for computer-aided semen analysis, which has a broad impact on both biological sciences and medical healthcare. We demonstrate that glyph-based visualization can serve as a means of external memorization of video data as well as an overview of a large set of spatiotemporal measurements. It enables domain scientists to make scientific observation in a cost-effective manner by reducing the burden of viewing videos repeatedly, while providing them with a new visual representation for conveying semen statistics.

  19. EFFECT OF TWO PROTOCOLS OF CRYOPRESERVATION ON FERTILIZING CAPACITY OF STALLION (Equus caballus SEMEN EFECTO DE DOS PROTOCOLOS DE CRIOPRESERVACIÓN SOBRE LA CAPACIDAD FECUNDANTE DE SEMEN EQUINO (Equus caballus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Restrepo Betancur

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Semen cryopreservation is a fundamental process for the development of biotechnologies for assisted reproduction in horses. The use of cryopreservation techniques with changes in concentrations and the nature of the cryoprotectant, as well as, the different types of vials for storage of semen, have become an alternative to improve the protocols used. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of two protocols of cryopreservation (freezing and vitrification on the fertilizing capacity of stallion semen. The study was conducted with horses of the Criollo Colombiano breed. For freezing was used a extender supplemented with egg yolk (4% and dimethyl formamide (5%, and 0.5 mL straws as vials, whereas for vitrification, the extender was supplemented with egg yolk (8% and dimethyl formamide (8%, and cryovials were used as carriers. As post thaw parameters were evaluated: progressive motility, vitality, normal morphology and integrity of the plasma membrane through the hypoosmotic swelling test (HOS. For statistical evaluation was fitted a generalized linear model (GLM and means were compared by the Tukey test. Were found average percentages of progressive motility, vitality, normal morphology and HOS of 41.6 ± 11.8 and 37 ± 8.5, 54.3 ± 10.2 and 52.3 ± 7.8, 83.1 ± 5.4 and 83.6 ± 5.8, 41.7 ± 9.8 and 38.9 ± 3.6, for cryopreserved semen by freezing and vitrification, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences (P ≤ 0.05 between treatments for any of the parameters evaluated. The fertilizing capacity of equine semen cryopreserved by vitrification is comparable to that obtained by conventional freezing.Resumen. La criopreservación de semen es un proceso fundamental en el desarrollo de biotecnologías para la reproducción asistida en equinos. El uso de diferentes técnicas de criopreservación con cambios en las concentraciones y la naturaleza de los crioprotectores, así como en los diferentes tipos de

  20. The bee microbiome: Impact on bee health and model for evolution and ecology of host-microbe interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Philipp; Kwong, Waldan K.; McFrederick, Quinn; Anderson, Kirk E.; Barribeau, Seth Michael; Chandler, James Angus; Cornman, Robert S.; Dainat, Jacques; de Miranda, Joachim R.; Doublet, Vincent; Emery, Olivier; Evans, Jay D.; Farinelli, Laurent; Flenniken, Michelle L.; Granberg, Fredrik; Grasis, Juris A.; Gauthier, Laurent; Hayer, Juliette; Koch, Hauke; Kocher, Sarah; Martinson, Vincent G.; Moran, Nancy; Munoz-Torres, Monica; Newton, Irene; Paxton, Robert J.; Powell, Eli; Sadd, Ben M.; Schmid-Hempel, Paul; Schmid-Hempel, Regula; Song, Se Jin; Schwarz, Ryan S.; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Dainat, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    As pollinators, bees are cornerstones for terrestrial ecosystem stability and key components in agricultural productivity. All animals, including bees, are associated with a diverse community of microbes, commonly referred to as the microbiome. The bee microbiome is likely to be a crucial factor affecting host health. However, with the exception of a few pathogens, the impacts of most members of the bee microbiome on host health are poorly understood. Further, the evolutionary and ecological forces that shape and change the microbiome are unclear. Here, we discuss recent progress in our understanding of the bee microbiome, and we present challenges associated with its investigation. We conclude that global coordination of research efforts is needed to fully understand the complex and highly dynamic nature of the interplay between the bee microbiome, its host, and the environment. High-throughput sequencing technologies are ideal for exploring complex biological systems, including host-microbe interactions. To maximize their value and to improve assessment of the factors affecting bee health, sequence data should be archived, curated, and analyzed in ways that promote the synthesis of different studies. To this end, the BeeBiome consortium aims to develop an online database which would provide reference sequences, archive metadata, and host analytical resources. The goal would be to support applied and fundamental research on bees and their associated microbes and to provide a collaborative framework for sharing primary data from different research programs, thus furthering our understanding of the bee microbiome and its impact on pollinator health.

  1. Conservation and modification of genetic and physiological toolkits underpinning diapause in bumble bee queens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsalem, Etya; Galbraith, David A; Cnaani, Jonathan; Teal, Peter E A; Grozinger, Christina M

    2015-11-01

    Diapause is the key adaptation allowing insects to survive unfavourable conditions and inhabit an array of environments. Physiological changes during diapause are largely conserved across species and are hypothesized to be regulated by a conserved suite of genes (a 'toolkit'). Furthermore, it is hypothesized that in social insects, this toolkit was co-opted to mediate caste differentiation between long-lived, reproductive, diapause-capable queens and short-lived, sterile workers. Using Bombus terrestris queens, we examined the physiological and transcriptomic changes associated with diapause and CO2 treatment, which causes queens to bypass diapause. We performed comparative analyses with genes previously identified to be associated with diapause in the Dipteran Sarcophaga crassipalpis and with caste differentiation in bumble bees. As in Diptera, diapause in bumble bees is associated with physiological and transcriptional changes related to nutrient storage, stress resistance and core metabolic pathways. There is a significant overlap, both at the level of transcript and gene ontology, between the genetic mechanisms mediating diapause in B. terrestris and S. crassipalpis, reaffirming the existence of a conserved insect diapause genetic toolkit. However, a substantial proportion (10%) of the differentially regulated transcripts in diapausing queens have no clear orthologs in other species, and key players regulating diapause in Diptera (juvenile hormone and vitellogenin) appear to have distinct functions in bumble bees. We also found a substantial overlap between genes related to caste determination and diapause in bumble bees. Thus, our studies demonstrate an intriguing interplay between pathways underpinning adaptation to environmental extremes and the evolution of sociality in insects.

  2. In-depth proteomics characterization of embryogenesis of the honey bee worker (Apis mellifera ligustica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yu; Feng, Mao; Han, Bin; Lu, Xiaoshan; Ramadan, Haitham; Li, Jianke

    2014-09-01

    Identifying proteome changes of honey bee embryogenesis is of prime importance for unraveling the molecular mechanisms that they underlie. However, many proteomic changes during the embryonic period are not well characterized. We analyzed the proteomic alterations over the complete time course of honey bee worker embryogenesis at 24, 48, and 72 h of age, using mass spectrometry-based proteomics, label-free quantitation, and bioinformatics. Of the 1460 proteins identified the embryo of all three ages, the core proteome (proteins shared by the embryos of all three ages, accounting for 40%) was mainly involved in protein synthesis, metabolic energy, development, and molecular transporter, which indicates their centrality in driving embryogenesis. However, embryos at different developmental stages have their own specific proteome and pathway signatures to coordinate and modulate developmental events. The young embryos (proteins related to nutrition storage and nucleic acid metabolism may correlate with the cell proliferation occurring at this stage. The middle aged embryos (24-48 h) enhanced expression of proteins associated with cell cycle control, transporters, antioxidant activity, and the cytoskeleton suggest their roles to support rudimentary organogenesis. Among these proteins, the biological pathways of aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis, β-alanine metabolism, and protein export are intensively activated in the embryos of middle age. The old embryos (48-72 h) elevated expression of proteins implicated in fatty acid metabolism and morphogenesis indicate their functionality for the formation and development of organs and dorsal closure, in which the biological pathways of fatty acid metabolism and RNA transport are highly activated. These findings add novel understanding to the molecular details of honey bee embryogenesis, in which the programmed activation of the proteome matches with the physiological transition observed during embryogenesis. The identified biological

  3. Strategies for commercialization of cryopreserved fish semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence R. Tiersch

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Initial success in sperm cryopreservation occurred at about the same time for aquatic species and livestock. However, in the 50 plus years since then cryopreserved sperm of livestock has grown into a billion-dollar global industry, while cryopreserved sperm of aquatic species remains a research activity with little commercial application despite work in more than 90 species and more than 200 published reports. Most research work has focused on large-bodied culture and sport fishes, such as salmon, trout, carp, and catfish, and mollusks such as commercially important oyster and abalone species. However, only a few studies have addressed sperm cryopreservation in small fishes such as zebrafish, or in endangered species. Overall, this work has yielded techniques that are being applied with varied levels of success around the world. Barriers to expanded application include a diverse and widely distributed literature base, technical problems, small sperm volumes, variable results, a general lack of access to the technology, and most importantly, a lack of standardization in practices and reporting. The benefits of cryopreservation include at least five levels of improvements for existing industries and for creation of new industries. First, cryopreservation can be used to improve existing hatchery operations by providing sperm on demand and simplifying the timing of induced spawning. Second, frozen sperm can enhance efficient use of facilities and create new opportunities in the hatchery by eliminating the need to maintain live males, potentially freeing resources for use with females and larvae. Third, valuable genetic lineages such as endangered species, research models or improved farmed strains can be protected by storage of frozen sperm. Fourth, cryopreservation opens the door for rapid genetic improvement. Frozen sperm can be used in breeding programs to create improved lines and shape the genetic resources available for aquaculture. Finally

  4. Survival of honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) spermatozoa incubated at room temperature from drones exposed to miticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Lisa M; Fell, Richard D; Saacke, Richard G

    2008-08-01

    We conducted research to examine the potential impacts ofcoumaphos, fluvalinate, and Apilife VAR (Thymol) on drone honey bee, Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae), sperm viability over time. Drones were reared in colonies that had been treated with each miticide by using the dose recommended on the label. Drones from each miticide treatment were collected, and semen samples were pooled. The pooled samples from each treatment were subdivided and analyzed for periods of up to 6 wk. Random samples were taken from each treatment (n = 6 pools) over the 6-wk period. Sperm viability was measured using dual-fluorescent staining techniques. The exposure of drones to coumaphos during development and sexual maturation significantly reduced sperm viability for all 6 wk. Sperm viability significantly decreased from the initial sample to week 1 in control colonies, and a significant decrease in sperm viability was observed from week 5 to week 6 in all treatments and control. The potential impacts of these results on queen performance and failure are discussed.

  5. Bats and bees are pollinating Parkia biglobosa in The Gambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Kristin Marie; Ræbild, Anders; Hansen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    A pollination experiment was conducted with Parkia biglobosa (Fabaceae) in The Gambia. P. biglobosa is integrated in the farming systems and produces fruit pulp and seeds used in cooking. The species is bat-pollinated, and in areas with few bats the main pollinators are assumed to be honey bees....... A higher rate of effective pollination will in many instances increase fruit production, and the aim of this study was to investigate pollination efficiency of different pollinators. Access of flower visiting animals to flowers was controlled by nets with differently sized mesh, using five trees...... as replicates. The pollinators’ identity, efficiency, and relative effect were determined. Bats, honey bees, and stingless bees were able to pollinate the species. Bat-visited capitula produced more pods, but not significantly more than honey bees. Honey bees were more efficient than stingless bees, resulting...

  6. Enhanced Bee Colony Algorithm for Complex Optimization Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Suriya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimization problems are considered to be one kind of NP hard problems. Usually heuristic approaches are found to provide solutions for NP hard problems. There are a plenty of heuristic algorithmsavailable to solve optimization problems namely: Ant Colony Optimization, Particle Swarm Optimization, Bee Colony Optimization, etc. The basic Bee Colony algorithm, a population based search algorithm, is analyzed to be a novel tool for complex optimization problems. The algorithm mimics the food foraging behavior of swarmsof honey bees. This paper deals with a modified fitness function of Bee Colony algorithm. The effect of problem dimensionality on the performance of the algorithms will be investigated. This enhanced Bee Colony Optimization will be evaluated based on the well-known benchmark problems. The testing functions like Rastrigin, Rosenbrock, Ackley, Griewank and Sphere are used to evaluavate the performance of the enhanced Bee Colony algorithm. The simulation will be developed on MATLAB.

  7. SOCIAL COMPLEXITY AND LEARNING FORAGING TASKS IN BEES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMAYA-MÁRQUEZ MARISOL

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Social complexity and models concerning central place foraging were tested with respect to learning predictions using the social honey bee (Apis mellifera and solitary blue orchard bee (Osmia lignaria when given foraging problems. Both species were presented the same foraging problems, where 1 only reward molarity varied between flower morphs, and 2 only reward volume varied between flower morphs. Experiments utilized blue vs. white flower patches to standardize rewards in each experimental situation. Although honey bees learned faster than blue orchard bees when given a molarity difference reward problem, there was no significant difference in learning rate when presented a volume difference reward problem. Further, the rate at which blue orchard bees learned the volume difference problem was not significantly different from that with which honey bees learned about reward molarity differences. The results do not support the predictions of the social complexity theory, but do support those of the central place model

  8. Summertime blues: August foraging leaves honey bees empty-handed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvillon, Margaret J; Fensome, Katherine A; Quah, Shaun Kl; Schürch, Roger

    2014-01-01

    A successful honey bee forager tells her nestmates the location of good nectar and pollen with the waggle dance, a symbolic language that communicates a distance and direction. Because bees are adept at scouting out profitable forage and are very sensitive to energetic reward, we can use the distance that bees communicate via waggle dances as a proxy for forage availability, where the further the bees fly, the less forage can be found locally. Previously we demonstrated that bees fly furthest in the summer compared with spring or autumn to bring back forage that is not necessarily of better quality. Here we show that August is also the month when significantly more foragers return with empty crops (P = 7.63e-06). This provides additional support that summer may represent a seasonal foraging challenge for honey bees.

  9. Varroa-Virus Interaction in Collapsing Honey Bee Colonies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, Roy Mathew; Nielsen, Steen L.; Kryger, Per

    2013-01-01

    Varroa mites and viruses are the currently the high-profile suspects in collapsing bee colonies. Therefore, seasonal variation in varroa load and viruses (Acute-Kashmir-Israeli complex (AKI) and Deformed Wing Virus (DWV)) were monitored in a year-long study. We investigated the viral titres...... in honey bees and varroa mites from 23 colonies (15 apiaries) under three treatment conditions: Organic acids (11 colonies), pyrethroid (9 colonies) and untreated (3 colonies). Approximately 200 bees were sampled every month from April 2011 to October 2011, and April 2012. The 200 bees were split to 10...... subsamples of 20 bees and analysed separately, which allows us to determine the prevalence of virus-infected bees. The treatment efficacy was often low for both treatments. In colonies where varroa treatment reduced the mite load, colonies overwintered successfully, allowing the mites and viruses...

  10. Semen analysis in chronic bacterial prostatitis: diagnostic and therapeutic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Vittorio; Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Montanari, Emanuele; Marras, Emanuela; Orlandi, Viviana; Restelli, Antonella; Torresani, Erminio; Naber, Kurt G; Perletti, Gianpaolo

    2009-01-01

    The significance and diagnostic value of semen analysis in chronic bacterial prostatitis has been extensively debated and remains controversial. To investigate the diagnostic relevance of semen culture in the bacteriological workup of prostatitis patients, we retrospectively analyzed a clinical database of 696 symptomatic patients. All patients were routinely subjected to a four-glass test, followed by semen culture and analysis. This allowed to dissect from the database three different diagnostic scenarios, and to compare the 'two-glass' pre-/post- massage test and the standard 'four-glass' test with a 'five-glass' test (four-glass plus post-VB3 semen culture). The 'five-glass' test showed 3.6- or 6.5-fold increases in relative sensitivity and lesser reductions (−13.2% or −14.7%) in relative specificity for traditional uropathogens (TUs) compared with the four-glass or two-glass test, respectively. The area under the ROC curve and Jouden's index were increased, whereas positive and negative likelihood ratios were lower than comparators, indicating that the 'five-glass' assay may be superior in confirming the negative outcome of both standard tests. The five-, four-, and two-glass tests detected TUs (Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococci, etc.) in 120, 33, and 20 patients and unusual pathogens (Streptococci, other Gram-positive species, Mycoplasmata, and others) in 130, 56, and 45 patients, respectively. When patients were subjected to pharmacological treatment, including a combination of a fluoroquinolone and a macrolide, no differences in eradication rates were observed between groups diagnosed with different tests, irrespective of pathogen category. Eradication was associated with long-term sign/symptom remission; no significant intergroup differences in sign/symptom scores were observed throughout a 24-month off-therapy follow-up period. In conclusion, our data support the usefulness of semen analysis in the diagnostic workup of prostatitis patients when this

  11. Honey Bees, Satellites and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaias, W.

    2008-05-01

    Life isn't what it used to be for honey bees in Maryland. The latest changes in their world are discussed by NASA scientist Wayne Esaias, a biological oceanographer with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. At Goddard, Esaias has examined the role of marine productivity in the global carbon cycle using visible satellite sensors. In his personal life, Esaias is a beekeeper. Lately, he has begun melding his interest in bees with his professional expertise in global climate change. Esaias has observed that the period when nectar is available in central Maryland has shifted by one month due to local climate change. He is interested in bringing the power of global satellite observations and models to bear on the important but difficult question of how climate change will impact bees and pollination. Pollination is a complex, ephemeral interaction of animals and plants with ramifications throughout terrestrial ecosystems well beyond the individual species directly involved. Pollinators have been shown to be in decline in many regions, and the nature and degree of further impacts on this key interaction due to climate change are very much open questions. Honey bee colonies are used to quantify the time of occurrence of the major interaction by monitoring their weight change. During the peak period, changes of 5-15 kg/day per colony represent an integrated response covering thousands of hectares. Volunteer observations provide a robust metric for looking at spatial and inter-annual variations due to short term climate events, complementing plant phenology networks and satellite-derived vegetation phenology data. In central Maryland, the nectar flows are advancing by about -0.6 d/y, based on a 15 yr time series and a small regional study. This is comparable to the regional advancement in the spring green-up observed with MODIS and AVHRR. The ability to link satellite vegetation phenology to honey bee forage using hive weight changes provides a basis for applying satellite

  12. Impact of silymarin enriched semen extender on bull sperm preservability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Sheshtawy RI

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of silymarin on bull spermatozoa during cooling and cryopreservation. Methods: Pooled bull semen were diluted by Tris-Citrate-Fructose egg yolk diluents, purified silymarin powder (obtained from the milk thistle silybum marianum, purchased from Unipharma, Al Obour city, Egypt, was soaked in Tris-citric acid-fructose diluent for 48 h at 10 ℃ making a stock solution (70 mg/mL, from this stock solution we obtained concentrations of 0.18 mg/mL, 0.36 mg/mL, 0.54 mg/mL, 0.72 mg/mL, 0.90 mg/mL in addition to the control (0.00 mg/mL reaching a final volume of 5 mL in each tube. Egg yolk was added to each tube to obtain silymarin enriched semen extender (SEE with 20% egg yolk, cooled slowly up to 5 曟 and equilibrated for 4 h. Semen was packed into 0.25 mL polyvinyl French straws (IMV, France. After equilibration periods, the straws were placed horizontally on a rack and frozen in a vapor 4 cm above liquid nitrogen for 10 min and were then dipped in liquid nitrogen. Extended semen was subjected to evaluation (motility, alive%, abnormality%, intact sperm membrane (HOST% and conception rate in both chilled and frozen semen. Results: Table 1 revealed that Sperm motility of the concentrations 2, 3 and 4 after 8 d of chilling were significantly (P<0.02 higher than control. Sperm motility of the concentration 2 (45.00%±2.89% after 9 d of chilling was higher than control and the other concentrations. Addition of SEE in concentration 1 and 2 gave post thawing sperm motility as high as the control (47.50±2.81 and 45.00±2.58, respectively while other concentration have lower effects on motility as compared to the control. Addition of silymarin improved post thawing alive% and was significantly higher (P<0.000 1 than the control. SEE decreased significantly (P<0.000 1 the % of post thawing abnormal sperm in concentration 3 and 4 (11.83±0.65 and 16.00±0.58, respectively. SEE improved significantly (P<0.018 the % of post

  13. Habitat Fragmentation and Native Bees: a Premature Verdict?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H. Cane

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Few studies directly address the consequences of habitat fragmentation for communities of pollinating insects, particularly for the key pollinator group, bees (Hymenoptera: Apiformes. Bees typically live in habitats where nesting substrates and bloom are patchily distributed and spatially dissociated. Bee studies have all defined habitat fragments as remnant patches of floral hosts or forests, overlooking the nesting needs of bees. Several authors conclude that habitat fragmentation is broadly deleterious, but their own data show that some native species proliferate in sampled fragments. Other studies report greater densities and comparable diversities of native bees at flowers in some fragment size classes relative to undisrupted habitats, but find dramatic shifts in species composition. Insightful studies of habitat fragmentation and bees will consider fragmentation, alteration, and loss of nesting habitats, not just patches of forage plants, as well as the permeability of the surrounding matrix to interpatch movement. Inasmuch as the floral associations and nesting habits of bees are often attributes of species or subgenera, ecological interpretations hinge on authoritative identifications. Study designs must accommodate statistical problems associated with bee community samples, especially non-normal data and frequent zero values. The spatial scale of fragmentation must be appreciated: bees of medium body size can regularly fly 1-2 km from nest site to forage patch. Overall, evidence for prolonged persistence of substantial diversity and abundances of native bee communities in habitat fragments of modest size promises practical solutions for maintaining bee populations. Provided that reserve selection, design, and management can address the foraging and nesting needs of bees, networks of even small reserves may hold hope for sustaining considerable pollinator diversity and the ecological services pollinators provide.

  14. Parasite infection accelerates age polyethism in young honey bees

    OpenAIRE

    Antoine Lecocq; Annette Bruun Jensen; Per Kryger; Nieh, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are important pollinators and their health is threatened worldwide by persistent exposure to a wide range of factors including pesticides, poor nutrition, and pathogens. Nosema ceranae is a ubiquitous microsporidian associated with high colony mortality. We used lab micro-colonies of honey bees and video analyses to track the effects of N. ceranae infection and exposure on a range of individual and social behaviours in young adult bees. We provide detailed data sho...

  15. Flight of the bumble bee: Buzzes predict pollination services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Struttmann, Nicole E; Heise, David; Schul, Johannes; Geib, Jennifer C; Galen, Candace

    2017-01-01

    Multiple interacting factors drive recent declines in wild and managed bees, threatening their pollination services. Widespread and intensive monitoring could lead to more effective management of wild and managed bees. However, tracking their dynamic populations is costly. We tested the effectiveness of an inexpensive, noninvasive and passive acoustic survey technique for monitoring bumble bee behavior and pollination services. First, we assessed the relationship between the first harmonic of the flight buzz (characteristic frequency) and pollinator functional traits that influence pollination success using flight cage experiments and a literature search. We analyzed passive acoustic survey data from three locations on Pennsylvania Mountain, Colorado to estimate bumble bee activity. We developed an algorithm based on Computational Auditory Scene Analysis that identified and quantified the number of buzzes recorded in each location. We then compared visual and acoustic estimates of bumble bee activity. Using pollinator exclusion experiments, we tested the power of buzz density to predict pollination services at the landscape scale for two bumble bee pollinated alpine forbs (Trifolium dasyphyllum and T. parryi). We found that the characteristic frequency was correlated with traits known to affect pollination efficacy, explaining 30-52% of variation in body size and tongue length. Buzz density was highly correlated with visual estimates of bumble bee density (r = 0.97), indicating that acoustic signals are predictive of bumble bee activity. Buzz density predicted seed set in two alpine forbs when bumble bees were permitted access to the flowers, but not when they were excluded from visiting. Our results indicate that acoustic signatures of flight can be deciphered to monitor bee activity and pollination services to bumble bee pollinated plants. We propose that applications of this technique could assist scientists and farmers in rapidly detecting and responding to bee

  16. Studies on Bee Venom and Its Medical Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mahmoud Abdu Al-Samie Mohamed

    2012-07-01

    Use of honey and other bee products in human treatments traced back thousands of years and healing properties are included in many religious texts including the Veda, Bible and Quran. Apitherapy is the use of honey bee products for medical purposes, this include bee venom, raw honey, royal jelly, pollen, propolis, and beeswax. Whereas bee venom therapy is the use of live bee stings (or injectable venom) to treat various diseases such as arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis (MS), lupus, sciatica, low back pain, and tennis elbow to name a few. It refers to any use of venom to assist the body in healing itself. Bee venom contains at least 18 pharmacologically active components including various enzymes, peptides and amines. Sulfur is believed to be the main element in inducing the release of cortisol from the adrenal glands and in protecting the body from infections. Contact with bee venom produces a complex cascade of reactions in the human body. The bee venom is safe for human treatments, the median lethal dose (LD50) for an adult human is 2.8 mg of venom per kg of body weight, i.e. a person weighing 60 kg has a 50% chance of surviving injections totaling 168 mg of bee venom. Assuming each bee injects all its venom and no stings are quickly removed at a maximum of 0.3 mg venom per sting, 560 stings could well be lethal for such a person. For a child weighing 10 kg, as little as 93.33 stings could be fatal. However, most human deaths result from one or few bee stings due to allergic reactions, heart failure or suffocation from swelling around the neck or the mouth. As compare with other human diseases, accidents and other unusual cases, the bee venom is very safe for human treatments.

  17. [Risk of bee or wasp stings in various vacation destinations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauss, V

    2014-09-01

    The risk for tourists who are allergic to bee or wasp venom to be stung in various holiday destinations is mainly influenced by the structure of the regional bee or wasp community affected by zoogeographical and ecological factors. Information is presented for important destinations of German holiday-makers concerning distribution of honey bees (Apinae, Apis) and social wasps (Polistinae, Vespinae) as well as places and season of danger.

  18. Pollination value of male bees: the specialist bee Peponapis pruinosa (Apidae) at summer squash (Cucurbita pepo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cane, James H; Sampson, Blair J; Miller, Stephanie A

    2011-06-01

    Male bees can be abundant at flowers, particularly floral hosts of those bee species whose females are taxonomic pollen specialists (oligolecty). Contributions of male bees to host pollination are rarely studied directly despite their prevalence in a number of pollination guilds, including those of some crop plants. In this study, males of the oligolectic bee, Peponapis pruinosa Say, were shown to be effective pollinators of summer squash, Cucurbita pepo L. Seven sequential visits from male P. pruinosa maximized squash fruit set and growth. This number of male visits accumulated during the first hour of their foraging and mate searching at flowers soon after sunrise. Pollination efficacy of male P. pruinosa and their abundances at squash flowers were sufficient to account for most summer squash production at our study sites, and by extrapolation, to two-thirds of all 87 North American farms and market gardens growing squashes that were surveyed for pollinators by collaborators in the Squash Pollinators of the Americas Survey. We posit that the substantial pollination value of male Peponapis bees is a consequence of their species' oligolecty, their mate seeking strategy, and some extreme traits of Cucurbita flowers (massive rewards, flower size, phenology).

  19. Optimizing Drone Fertility With Spring Nutritional Supplements to Honey Bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Andrée; Giovenazzo, Pierre

    2016-03-27

    Supplemental feeding of honey bee (Apis melliferaL., Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies in spring is essential for colony buildup in northern apicultural regions. The impact of pollen and syrup feeding on drone production and sperm quality is not well-documented, but may improve fecundation of early-bred queens. We measured the impact of feeding sucrose syrup, and protein supplements to colonies in early spring in eastern Canada. Drones were reared under different nutritional regimes, and mature individuals were then assessed in regard to size, weight, and semen quality (semen volume, sperm count, and viability). Results showed significant increases in drone weight and abdomen size when colonies were fed sucrose and a protein supplement. Colonies receiving no additional nourishment had significantly less semen volume per drone and lower sperm viability. Our study demonstrates that feeding honey bee colonies in spring with sucrose syrup and a protein supplement is important to enhance drone reproductive quality. RÉSUMÉ: L'administration de suppléments alimentaires aux colonies de l'abeille domestique (Apis melliferaL., Hymenoptera: Apidae) au printemps est essentielle pour le bon développement des colonies dans les régions apicoles nordiques. L'impact de la supplémentation des colonies en pollen et en sirop sur la production des faux-bourdons et la qualité du sperme demeure peu documenté mais pourrait résulter en une meilleure fécondation des reines produites tôt en saison. Nous avons mesuré l'impact de la supplémentation en sirop et/ou en supplément de pollen sur les colonies d'abeilles tôt au printemps dans l'est du Canada. Les faux-bourdons ont été élevé sous différents régimes alimentaires et les individus matures ont ensuite été évalués pour leur taille, leur poids ainsi que la qualité de leur sperme (volume de sperme, nombre et viabilité des spermatozoïdes. Les résultats montrent une augmentation significative du poids et de la taille

  20. Persistence of DNA from laundered semen stains: Implications for child sex trafficking cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayley-Morris, Helen; Sorrell, Amber; Revoir, Andrew P; Meakin, Georgina E; Court, Denise Syndercombe; Morgan, Ruth M

    2015-11-01

    In sexual assault cases, particularly those involving internal child sex trafficking (ICST), victims often hide their semen-stained clothing. This can result in a lag time of several months before the items are laundered and subsequently seized during a criminal investigation. Although it has been demonstrated previously that DNA can be recovered from clothing washed immediately after semen deposition, laundered items of clothing are not routinely examined in ICST cases, due to the assumption that the time delay and washing would result in no detectable DNA. The aim of this study was to examine whether viable DNA profiles could be recovered from laundered semen stains where there has been a significant lag time between semen deposition from one or more individuals and one or more washes of the stained clothing. Items of UK school uniform (T-shirts, trousers, tights) were stained with fresh semen (either from a single donor or a 1:1 mixture from two donors) and stored in a wardrobe for eight months. Stained and unstained items (socks) were then washed at 30 °C or 60 °C and with non-biological or biological detergent. DNA samples extracted from the semen-stained sites and from the unstained socks were quantified and profiled. High quantities of DNA, (6-18 μg) matching the DNA profiles of the semen donors, were recovered from all semen-stained clothing that had been laundered once, irrespective of wash conditions. This quantity,and profile quality,did not decline significantly with multiple washes. The two donor semen samples yielded ∼ 10-fold more DNA from the T-shirts than from the trousers. This disparity resulted in the T-shirts yielding a ∼ 1:1 mixture of DNA from the two donors, whereas the trousers yielded a major DNA profile matching only that of the second donor. The quantities of DNA recovered from the unstained socks were an order of magnitude lower, with most of the DNA being attributable to the donor of the semen on the stained clothing within the

  1. Survey of carnitine content of human semen using a semiquantitative auxanographic method: decreased semen total carnitine concentration in patients with azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffer, Y; Shalev, D P; Weissenberg, R; Orenstein, H; Nebel, L; Lewin, L M

    1981-01-01

    A microbiological method, using the carnitine-requiring yeast, Torulopsis bovina ATCC 26014, was developed to identify samples of human semen which contained low levels (less than 250 micron M) of total carnitine. Of 399 semen samples from a male infertility clinic which were tested, 30 (7.5%) were low in carnitine. Of these, 14 were azoospermic and 16 were severely oligozoospermic. Some azoospermic samples (19 = 58%) and severely oligozoospermic samples (51 = 79%) did not give evidence of low carnitine concentrations. These results indicate that decreased total carnitine concentration in semen occurs in certain classes of azoospermic and severely oligozoospermic patients.

  2. Flora bacteriana del semen de toro antes y después de la congelación (Bacterial flora of bull semen before and after freezing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique A. Silveira Prado

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Se investigó por bacteriología general el semen fresco y después de la congelación de 50 toros de inseminación artificial y se efectuó el conteo total de unidades formadoras de colonias (UFC. A l5 de los toros se les realizó el examen bacteriológico de sus lavados prepuciales. En todas las muestras de semen fresco se obtuvo crecimiento bacteriano y los gérmenes más frecuentemente aislados fueron: Escherichia coli (50,0%, Staphylococcus aureus (36,0% y Staphylococcus coagulasa negativa (28,0%. En el semen congelado solamente se obtuvo crecimiento en el 20,0%. El 74,0% del semen fresco alcanzó conteos  1 x 104 UFC/mL antes de ser procesado; después de la congelación el 80,0% fue estéril. En el total de lavados prepuciales se obtuvo crecimiento y se detectó en mayor proporción el Staphylococcus coagulasa negativa (60,0%, microorganismo también aislado en el semen fresco de estos toros. Se concluyó que la adición de antibióticos al menstruo y posterior congelación en pastillas, disminuye notablemente la carga microbiana presente en el semen. It was investigated through general bacteriology both fresh semen and after the freezing process, carried out in 50 bulls of artificial insemination, total counting of colony forming units (CFU was made. A bacteriological analysis of the prepucial washing was made on 15 of these bulls. In all samples of fresh semen there was bacterial growing. The most frequently germs were: Escherichia coli (50,0%, Staphylococcus aureus (36,0% and coagulase negative Staphylococcus (28,0%. In samples of frozen semen growth was only obtained in the 20,0%. The 74,0% of samples of fresh semen reached counts  1 x 104 CFU/mL before being processed; after freezing 80,0% of the samples were sterile. In all prepucial washings it was obtained growth and mostly detected coagulase negative Staphylococcus (60.0%, was also isolated in the fresh semen of these bulls. We concluded that the addition of antibiotics to

  3. Body mass index in relation to semen quality and reproductive hormones among 1,558 Danish men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Kold; Andersson, Anne-Maria; Jørgensen, Niels

    2004-01-01

    To examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and semen quality among young men from the general population.......To examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and semen quality among young men from the general population....

  4. Effect of species, breed, and age on bacterial load in bovine and bubaline semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrahas Sannat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of species, breed and age on bacterial load in fresh and frozen semen of Cattle and Buffalo bull. Materials and Methods: Present study covered 56 cow and 10 buffalo bulls stationed at Central Semen Station Anjora, Durg (Chhattisgarh. Impact of breeds on bacterial load in semen was assessed using six breeds of cattle viz. Sahiwal, Gir, Red Sindhi, Tharparkar, Jersey and Holstein Friesian (HF cross. Cow bulls were categorized into four different groups based on their age ( 6 years to study variation among age groups. Bacterial load was measured in fresh and frozen semen samples from these bulls using the standard plate count (SPC method and count was expressed as colony forming unit (CFU per ml of semen. Results: Higher bacterial load was reported in fresh (2.36 × 104 ± 1943 CFU/ml and frozen (1.00 × 10 ± 90 CFU/ml semen of cow bulls as compared to buffalo bulls (1.95 × 104 ± 2882 and 7.75 × 102 ± 160 CFU/ml in fresh and frozen semen, respectively. Jersey bull showed significantly higher bacterial count (p < 0.05 both in fresh (4.07 × 104 ± 13927 CFU/ ml and frozen (1.92 × 103 ± 178 CFU/ml semen followed by HF cross, Sahiwal, Gir, Red Sindhi and Tharparkar bull. Bulls aged < 4 years and more than 6 years yielded increased bacterial load in their semen. Although a minor variation was reported between species and among age groups, no significant differences were measured. Conclusion: Bacterial load in semen did not differ significantly between species and age groups; however significant variation was reported among different breeds. Bulls of Jersey breed showed significantly higher bacterial load in semen as compared to the crossbred and indigenous bull.

  5. Lead level in seminal plasma may affect semen quality for men without occupational exposure to lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Hsien-Ming

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infertility affects approximately 10–15% of reproductive-age couples. Poor semen quality contributes to about 25% of infertile cases. Resulting from the direct effect on testicular function or hormonal alterations, heavy metals exposure has been related to impaired semen quality. The objective of this study was to assess the level of lead in the seminal plasma in men without occupational exposure to lead, and to determine the relationship between semen quality and lead concentration in the semen. Methods This is a prospective and nonrandomized clinical study conducted in University infertility clinic and academic research laboratory. Three hundred and forty-one male partners of infertile couples undergoing infertility evaluation and management were recruited to the study. Semen samples collected for the analyses of semen quality were also used for the measurement of lead concentrations. Semen samples were evaluated according to the WHO standards. Results All subjects were married and from infertile couples without occupational exposure to lead. There is a significant inverse correlation between the lead concentration in seminal plasma and sperm count. A higher semen lead concentration was correlated with lower sperm count, but not with semen volume, sperm motility or sperm morphology as assessed by simple linear regression. Conclusions We found that semen lead concentration was significantly higher among the patients with lower sperm count. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that a high level of lead accumulation in semen may reduce the sperm count contributing to infertility of men without occupational exposure to lead.

  6. An effective method for improving the fertility of glycerol-exposed poultry semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, J A; Kulkarni, G

    2004-09-01

    Semen cryopreservation is necessary for banking germplasm from critical poultry stocks. To date, glycerol is the most effective cryoprotectant for poultry sperm; however, the contraceptive effects of glycerol require a significant reduction of the cryoprotectant from thawed semen before artificial insemination (AI). The effectiveness of glycerol reduction by dialysis, Percoll density gradient centrifugation, or washing through 12% (wt/vol) Accudenz was evaluated by fertility trials with highly inbred chicken research lines and commercial turkey lines. Semen was extended 1:1 and then diluted with glycerolized extender to yield a final 11% (vol/vol) glycerol concentration. Glycerolized rooster semen was aliquoted for control, Accudenz centrifugation, and dialysis treatments. A total of 90 pure line and 85 F1 hybrid chicken hens were each inseminated with 100 x 10(6) sperm at 7-d intervals for 4 to 6 wk. All eggs from the glycerolized control semen treatments were infertile, and fertility rates from dialyzed semen decreased steadily from 26.4 to 0% within the first 4 wk for the pure lines. In contrast, fertility rates for Accudenz-processed semen increased from 17.9 to 37.17% during the first 4 wk. Similar fertility rates occurred with the F1 hybrid cross lines. For turkey fertility trials, the dialysis treatment was not used; glycerolized turkey semen was processed by Accudenz or Percoll centrifugation to reduce glycerol. A total of 36 hens were inseminated with 150 x 10(6) sperm at 7-d intervals for 6 wk. Similar to the chicken trials, fertility rates of Accudenz-processed semen steadily increased to 49.4% by the sixth week of insemination. The average fertility of Percoll-processed semen was only 19.1%. These data demonstrate that Accudenz centrifugation is an acceptable glycerol reduction method for nonfrozen poultry semen.

  7. The Potential Influence of Bumble Bee Visitation on Foraging Behaviors and Assemblages of Honey Bees on Squash Flowers in Highland Agricultural Ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhenghua; Pan, Dongdong; Teichroew, Jonathan; An, Jiandong

    2016-01-01

    Bee species interactions can benefit plant pollination through synergistic effects and complementary effects, or can be of detriment to plant pollination through competition effects by reducing visitation by effective pollinators. Since specific bee interactions influence the foraging performance of bees on flowers, they also act as drivers to regulate the assemblage of flower visitors. We selected squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) and its pollinators as a model system to study the foraging response of honey bees to the occurrence of bumble bees at two types of sites surrounded by a high amount of natural habitats (≥ 58% of land cover) and a low amount of natural habitats (≤ 12% of land cover) in a highland agricultural ecosystem in China. At the individual level, we measured the elapsed time from the departure of prior pollinator(s) to the arrival of another pollinator, the selection of honey bees for flowers occupied by bumble bees, and the length of time used by honey bees to explore floral resources at the two types of sites. At the community level, we explored the effect of bumble bee visitation on the distribution patterns of honey bees on squash flowers. Conclusively, bumble bee visitation caused an increase in elapsed time before flowers were visited again by a honey bee, a behavioral avoidance by a newly-arriving honey bee to select flowers occupied by bumble bees, and a shortened length of time the honey bee takes to examine and collect floral resources. The number of overall bumble bees on squash flowers was the most important factor explaining the difference in the distribution patterns of honey bees at the community level. Furthermore, decline in the number of overall bumble bees on the squash flowers resulted in an increase in the number of overall honey bees. Therefore, our study suggests that bee interactions provide an opportunity to enhance the resilience of ecosystem pollination services against the decline in pollinator diversity.

  8. The Potential Influence of Bumble Bee Visitation on Foraging Behaviors and Assemblages of Honey Bees on Squash Flowers in Highland Agricultural Ecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghua Xie

    Full Text Available Bee species interactions can benefit plant pollination through synergistic effects and complementary effects, or can be of detriment to plant pollination through competition effects by reducing visitation by effective pollinators. Since specific bee interactions influence the foraging performance of bees on flowers, they also act as drivers to regulate the assemblage of flower visitors. We selected squash (Cucurbita pepo L. and its pollinators as a model system to study the foraging response of honey bees to the occurrence of bumble bees at two types of sites surrounded by a high amount of natural habitats (≥ 58% of land cover and a low amount of natural habitats (≤ 12% of land cover in a highland agricultural ecosystem in China. At the individual level, we measured the elapsed time from the departure of prior pollinator(s to the arrival of another pollinator, the selection of honey bees for flowers occupied by bumble bees, and the length of time used by honey bees to explore floral resources at the two types of sites. At the community level, we explored the effect of bumble bee visitation on the distribution patterns of honey bees on squash flowers. Conclusively, bumble bee visitation caused an increase in elapsed time before flowers were visited again by a honey bee, a behavioral avoidance by a newly-arriving honey bee to select flowers occupied by bumble bees, and a shortened length of time the honey bee takes to examine and collect floral resources. The number of overall bumble bees on squash flowers was the most important factor explaining the difference in the distribution patterns of honey bees at the community level. Furthermore, decline in the number of overall bumble bees on the squash flowers resulted in an increase in the number of overall honey bees. Therefore, our study suggests that bee interactions provide an opportunity to enhance the resilience of ecosystem pollination services against the decline in pollinator diversity.

  9. Application of Bees Algorithm in Multi-Join Query Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Alamery

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-join query optimization is an important technique for designing and implementing database management system. It is a crucial factor that affects the capability of database. This paper proposes a Bees algorithm that simulates the foraging behavior of honey bee swarm to solve Multi-join query optimization problem. The performance of the Bees algorithm and Ant Colony Optimization algorithm are compared with respect to computational time and the simulation result indicates that Bees algorithm is more effective and efficient.

  10. ECONOMIC EFFICIENCY OF VARIOUS QUEEN BEES MAINTENANCE SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A POPESCU

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The modern queens maintenance systems are based on the use of artificial insemination, queens’ maintenance in the so called „queens bank” , in this way assuring an increased economic efficiency in beekeeping. This study aimed to compare the economic efficiency of the implementation of A.I. to various queen bees maintenance systems. Three alternatives have been taken into account: V1-a queen bee in a cage together with her bees, V2- a queen bank system and V3 – a queen bee in a nucleus. For each queen bee maintenance alternative have been evaluated the most important indicators such as: expenses, incomes, profit, number of marketable inseminated and selected queen bees, honey production, cost/queen, revenue/queen, profit/queen, profit rate. The most effective alternative was the queen bank system assuring 2,400 marketable queen bees and 20 kg honey delivered yearly, USD 12,442 incomes, USD 3,400 expenses, USD 9,042 profit, that is USD 3.77/queen bee and 265.72 % profit rate under the condition as A.I. costs are just USD 1,058, representing 31.1 % of total queen bees maintenance costs.

  11. Polygonal Approximation Using an Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Chien Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A polygonal approximation method based on the new artificial bee colony (NABC algorithm is proposed in this paper. In the present method, a solution is represented by a vector, and the objective function is defined as the integral square error between the given curve and its corresponding polygon. The search process, including the employed bee stage, the onlooker bee stage, and the scout bee stage, has been constructed for this specific problem. Most experiments show that the present method when compared with the DE-based method can obtain superior approximation results with less error norm with respect to the original curves.

  12. Independent component analysis based on adaptive artificial bee colony

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shi Zhang; Chao-Wei Bao; Hai-Bin Shen

    2016-01-01

    .... An independent component analysis method based on adaptive artificial bee colony algorithm is proposed in this paper, aiming at the problems of slow convergence and low computational precision...

  13. Optimizing ZigBee Security using Stochastic Model Checking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuksel, Ender; Nielson, Hanne Riis; Nielson, Flemming

    ZigBee is a fairly new but promising wireless sensor network standard that offers the advantages of simple and low resource communication. Nevertheless, security is of great concern to ZigBee, and enhancements are prescribed in the latest ZigBee specication: ZigBee-2007. In this technical report......, we identify an important gap in the specification on key updates, and present a methodology for determining optimal key update policies and security parameters. We exploit the stochastic model checking approach using the probabilistic model checker PRISM, and assess the security needs for realistic...

  14. Optimizing ZigBee Security using Stochastic Model Checking

    CERN Document Server

    Yüksel, Ender; Nielson, Flemming; Fruth, Matthias; Kwiatkowska, Marta

    2012-01-01

    ZigBee is a fairly new but promising wireless sensor network standard that offers the advantages of simple and low resource communication. Nevertheless, security is of great concern to ZigBee, and enhancements are prescribed in the latest ZigBee specication: ZigBee-2007. In this technical report, we identify an important gap in the specification on key updates, and present a methodology for determining optimal key update policies and security parameters. We exploit the stochastic model checking approach using the probabilistic model checker PRISM, and assess the security needs for realistic application scenarios.

  15. Bioactivity-guided fractionation identifies amygdalin as a potent neurotrophic agent from herbal medicine semen persicae extract

    OpenAIRE

    Chuanbin Yang; Jia Zhao; Yuanyuan Cheng; Xuechen Li; Jianhui Rong

    2014-01-01

    Herbal medicine Semen Persicae is widely used to treat blood stasis in Chinese medicine and other oriental folk medicines. Although little is known about the effects of Semen Persicae and its active compounds on neuron differentiation, our pilot study showed that Semen Persicae extract promoted neurite outgrowth in rat dopaminergic PC12 cells. In the present study, we developed a bioactivity-guided fractionation procedure for the characterization of the neurotrophic activity of Semen Persicae...

  16. Native plants are the bee's knees: local and landscape predictors of bee richness and abundance in backyard gardens

    OpenAIRE

    Pardee, GL; Philpott, SM

    2014-01-01

    Urban gardens may support bees by providing resources in otherwise resource-poor environments. However, it is unclear whether urban, backyard gardens with native plants will support more bees than gardens without native plants. We examined backyard gardens in northwestern Ohio to ask: 1) Does bee diversity, abundance, and community composition differ in backyard gardens with and without native plants? 2) What characteristics of backyard gardens and land cover in the surrounding landscape corr...

  17. Assessing the comparative risk of plant protection products to honey bees, non-target arthropods and non-Apis bees

    OpenAIRE

    Miles, Mark J.; Alix, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the European Union the placing of pesticides on the market requires as a prerequisite that a risk assessment demonstrates low risks to human health and the environment, among which includes pollinators. Currently risks are evaluated for honey bees and for non-target arthropods (NTA) of cultivated ecosystems. The actual protection of pollinators other than the honey bees, as for example for non-Apis bees, in relation to these risk assessments has recently been questioned and req...

  18. Not Only Single Mating in Stingless Bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Robert J.; Weißschuh, Nicole; Engels, Wolf; Hartfelder, Klaus; Quezada-Euan, J. Javier G.

    Queens of the large, pantropical and fully eusocial taxon Meliponinae (stingless bees) are generally considered to be singly mated. We indirectly estimated queen mating frequency in two meliponids, Melipona beecheii and Scaptotrigona postica, by examining genotypes of workers at microsatellite DNA loci. Microsatellites were highly variable, providing suitable markers with which to assign patrilinial origin of workers within colonies headed by single queens. Queen mating frequency varied between 1 and 3 (M. beecheii) and 1 and 6 (S. postica), representing the first clear documentation of polyandry in the Meliponinae. Effective paternity frequency, me, was lower, although above 2 for S. postica. Stingless bees may provide suitable subjects for the testing of recent inclusive fitness arguments describing intracolony kin conflict in social Hymenoptera.

  19. THE VISUAL ACUITY OF THE HONEY BEE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, S; Wolf, E

    1929-07-20

    1. Bees respond by a characteristic reflex to a movement in their visual field. By confining the field to a series of parallel dark and luminous bars it is possible to determine the size of bar to which the bees respond under different conditions and in this way to measure the resolving power or visual acuity of the eye. The maximum visual acuity of the bee is lower than the lowest human visual acuity. Under similar, maximal conditions the fineness of resolution of the human eye is about 100 times that of the bee. 2. The eye of the bee is a mosaic composed of hexagonal pyramids of variable apical angle. The size of this angle determines the angular separation between adjacent ommatidia and therefore sets the structural limits to the resolving power of the eye. It is found that the visual angle corresponding to the maximum visual acuity as found experimentally is identical with the structural angular separation of adjacent ommatidia in the region of maximum density of ommatidia population. When this region of maximum ommatidia population is rendered non-functional by being covered with an opaque paint, the maximum visual acuity then corresponds to the angular separation of those remaining ommatidia which now constitute the maximum density of population. 3. The angular separation of adjacent ommatidia is much smaller in the vertical (dorso-ventral) axis than in the horizontal (anterio-posterior) axis. The experimentally found visual acuity varies correspondingly. From this and other experiments as well as from the shape of the eye itself, it is shown that the bee's eye is essentially an instrument for uni-directional visual resolution, functional along the dorso-ventral axis. The resolution of the visual pattern is therefore determined by the vertical angular separation of those ocular elements situated in the region of maximum density of ommatidia population. 4. The visual acuity of the bee varies with the illumination in much the same way that it does for the human

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: honey bee [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available honey bee Apis mellifera Arthropoda Apis_mellifera_L.png Apis_mellifera_NL.png Apis_mellife...ra_S.png Apis_mellifera_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Apis+mellifera&t=L h...ttp://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Apis+mellifera&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Apis+mellife...ra&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Apis+mellifera&t=NS ...

  1. Thi Qar Bee Farm Thi Qar, Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    vegetation and fields where bees once gathered pollen and beekeepers face hardships from droughts and lack of financial assistance. 1... Beekeeping in the Fertile Crescent dates back to ancient Mesopotamia. However, beekeeping was virtually unknown in southern Iraq. In 2005, a small group of...engineers and farmers in Thi Qar province formed the Iraqi Beekeeping Association of Thi Qar and started to disseminate the culture of beekeeping

  2. Ecology of Urban Bees: A Review of Current Knowledge and Directions for Future Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon W. Frankie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban bee ecology is an emerging field that holds promise for advancing knowledge of bee community dynamics and promoting bee conservation. Published studies of bee communities in urban and suburban habitats are fewer than those documenting bees in agricultural and wildland settings. As land lost to urbanization is predicted to increase in coming years the necessity of studying urban bee populations is growing. We reviewed 59 publications on urban bee ecology with the following goals, to assess current knowledge, to highlight areas in need of further research, and to suggest applications of study findings to bee conservation. Identified trends in urban areas included the following, negative correlation between bee species richness and urban development, increase in abundance of cavity-nesters in urban habitats, and scarcity of floral specialists. Future directions for studying urban bee ecology include incorporation of landscape-scale assessments, conducting manipulative experiments and actively designing urban bee habitats.

  3. Why does bee health matter? The science surrounding honey bee health concerns and what we can do about it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Marla S; Browning, Zac; Goblirsch, Mike; Lee, Katie; Otto, Clint R.; Smart, Matthew; Wu-Smart, Judy

    2017-01-01

    A colony of honey bees is an amazing organism when it is healthy; it is a superorganism in many senses of the word. As with any organism, maintaining a state of health requires cohesiveness and interplay among cells and tissues and, in the case of a honey bee colony, the bees themselves. The individual bees that make up a honey bee colony deliver to the superorganism what it needs: pollen and nectar collected from flowering plants that contain nutrients necessary for growth and survival. Honey bees with access to better and more complete nutrition exhibit improved immune system function and behavioral defenses for fighting off effects of pathogens and pesticides (Evans and Spivak 2010; Mao, Schuler, and Berenbaum 2013; Wahl and Ulm 1983). Sadly, as this story is often told in the headlines, the focus is rarely about what it means for a honey bee colony to be healthy and is instead primarily focused on colony survival rates. Bee colonies are chronically exposed to parasitic mites, viruses, diseases, miticides, pesticides, and poor nutrition, which weaken and make innate defenses insufficient at overcoming these combined stressors. Colonies that are chronically weakened can be even more susceptible to infections and levels of pesticide exposure that might otherwise be innocuous, further promoting a downward spiral of health. Sick and weakened bees diminish the colony’s resiliency, ultimately leading to a breakdown in the social structure, production, efficiency, immunity, and reproduction of the colony, and eventual or sudden colony death.

  4. 9 CFR 98.38 - Restrictions on the importation of swine semen from the APHIS-defined EU CSF region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... swine semen from the APHIS-defined EU CSF region. 98.38 Section 98.38 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... Semen § 98.38 Restrictions on the importation of swine semen from the APHIS-defined EU CSF region. In...-defined EU CSF region must meet the following conditions, except as noted in paragraph (h) of this...

  5. Comparison of Holstein service-sire fertility for heifer and cow breedings with conventional and sexed semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sire conception rate (SCR), a service-sire fertility evaluation implemented in August 2008, is based on up to 7 conventional-semen breedings for parities 1 through 5 (Ccow). The same procedure was used to derive SCR for other types of breedings: sexed semen for cows (Scow) and conventional semen and...

  6. Effect of sexed-semen use on Holstein conception rate, calf sex, dystocia, and stillbirth in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most artificial-insemination organizations in the United States now market sex-sorted semen. For 10.8 million US Holstein breedings with conventional semen since January 2006 and 122,705 sexed-semen breedings, data were available from all breedings for conception rate, 12 and 9% of breedings for cal...

  7. Energy storage

    CERN Document Server

    Brunet, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Energy storage examines different applications such as electric power generation, transmission and distribution systems, pulsed systems, transportation, buildings and mobile applications. For each of these applications, proper energy storage technologies are foreseen, with their advantages, disadvantages and limits. As electricity cannot be stored cheaply in large quantities, energy has to be stored in another form (chemical, thermal, electromagnetic, mechanical) and then converted back into electric power and/or energy using conversion systems. Most of the storage technologies are examined: b

  8. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids in honey and bee pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dübecke, A; Beckh, G; Lüllmann, C

    2011-03-01

    A total of 3917 honey samples and 119 'bee pollen' samples (pollen collected by honeybees) were analysed for pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs). Some 0.05 M sulphuric acid was used for extraction followed by a clean-up step by means of solid-phase extraction. Separation and detection was achieved by target analysis using an LC-MS/MS system. PAs were found in 66% of the raw honeys (bulk honey not yet packaged in containers for sale in retail outlets) and in 94% of honeys available in supermarkets (retail honey). A total of 60% of the bee pollen samples were PA positive. The PA pattern was used to identify the potential origin of the PAs in honey, which was verified for the genus Echium by relative pollen analysis. The results give an estimate of the impact of PA-containing plants belonging to the genera Echium, Senecio and, to a certain extent, Eupatorium on PA levels in honey and can serve as a decision basis for beekeepers in order to find the most suitable location for the production of honey and bee pollen low in PAs.

  9. [Optic neuritis after a bee sting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano-Infantino, Rosanna de Carmen; Piñieríia-Gonsálvez, Jean Félix; Montaño, César; Rodríguez, Carlos

    2013-06-01

    Optic neuritis is an acute inflammation of the optic nerve and, in its atypical form, is caused by inflammation of the optic nerve as part of infectious, immune, granulomatous, or contiguity processes. Hymenoptera stings (bees, wasps and ants) have been associated with different clinical presentations, ranging from local events to systemic manifestations, such as anaphylaxis, glomerulonephritis and central nervous system involvement (ischemic vascular lesions, optic neuritis and demyelinating lesions). This is a report of the case of a 62-year-old woman that after three days of being stung by a bee in the left lower eyelid, showed decreased visual acuity of both eyes and central scotoma, concomitant bilateral headache and eye pain, exacerbated by eye movements. The ophthalmological examination showed that visual acuity was decreased and the bilateral fundus examination revealed blurred optic disks edges. Hyperintense thickening of the left optic nerve was observed with an ocular MRI. Due to the clinical manifestations and epidemiological history, the diagnosis of bilateral optic neuritis was established. Treatment with pulses of 1 g/daily of methylprednisolone was initiated, for three days, with clinical improvement within 24 hours after receiving the first dose. Since 1960, cases of optic neuritis associated with hymenoptera stings have been documented, which take the form of anterior optic neuritis. A case of a patient who presented clinical features of bilateral optic neuritis after been stung by a bee, with a good clinical outcome after treatment with methylprednisolone is reported.

  10. The Status of Honey Bee Health in Italy: Results from the Nationwide Bee Monitoring Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porrini, Claudio; Mutinelli, Franco; Bortolotti, Laura; Granato, Anna; Laurenson, Lynn; Roberts, Katherine; Gallina, Albino; Silvester, Nicholas; Medrzycki, Piotr; Renzi, Teresa; Sgolastra, Fabio; Lodesani, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In Italy a nation-wide monitoring network was established in 2009 in response to significant honey bee colony mortality reported during 2008. The network comprised of approximately 100 apiaries located across Italy. Colonies were sampled four times per year, in order to assess the health status and to collect samples for pathogen, chemical and pollen analyses. The prevalence of Nosema ceranae ranged, on average, from 47-69% in 2009 and from 30-60% in 2010, with strong seasonal variation. Virus prevalence was higher in 2010 than in 2009. The most widespread viruses were BQCV, DWV and SBV. The most frequent pesticides in all hive contents were organophosphates and pyrethroids such as coumaphos and tau-fluvalinate. Beeswax was the most frequently contaminated hive product, with 40% of samples positive and 13% having multiple residues, while 27% of bee-bread and 12% of honey bee samples were contaminated. Colony losses in 2009/10 were on average 19%, with no major differences between regions of Italy. In 2009, the presence of DWV in autumn was positively correlated with colony losses. Similarly, hive mortality was higher in BQCV infected colonies in the first and second visits of the year. In 2010, colony losses were significantly related to the presence of pesticides in honey bees during the second sampling period. Honey bee exposure to poisons in spring could have a negative impact at the colony level, contributing to increase colony mortality during the beekeeping season. In both 2009 and 2010, colony mortality rates were positively related to the percentage of agricultural land surrounding apiaries, supporting the importance of land use for honey bee health.

  11. Can we disrupt the sensing of honey bees by the bee parasite Varroa destructor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurit Eliash

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor, is considered to be one of the most significant threats to apiculture around the world. Chemical cues are known to play a significant role in the host-finding behavior of Varroa. The mites distinguish between bees from different task groups, and prefer nurses over foragers. We examined the possibility of disrupting the Varroa--honey bee interaction by targeting the mite's olfactory system. In particular, we examined the effect of volatile compounds, ethers of cis 5-(2'-hydroxyethyl cyclopent-2-en-1-ol or of dihydroquinone, resorcinol or catechol. We tested the effect of these compounds on the Varroa chemosensory organ by electrophysiology and on behavior in a choice bioassay. The electrophysiological studies were conducted on the isolated foreleg. In the behavioral bioassay, the mite's preference between a nurse and a forager bee was evaluated. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that in the presence of some compounds, the response of the Varroa chemosensory organ to honey bee headspace volatiles significantly decreased. This effect was dose dependent and, for some of the compounds, long lasting (>1 min. Furthermore, disruption of the Varroa volatile detection was accompanied by a reversal of the mite's preference from a nurse to a forager bee. Long-term inhibition of the electrophysiological responses of mites to the tested compounds was a good predictor for an alteration in the mite's host preference. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate the potential of the selected compounds to disrupt the Varroa--honey bee associations, thus opening new avenues for Varroa control.

  12. The Status of Honey Bee Health in Italy: Results from the Nationwide Bee Monitoring Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Porrini

    Full Text Available In Italy a nation-wide monitoring network was established in 2009 in response to significant honey bee colony mortality reported during 2008. The network comprised of approximately 100 apiaries located across Italy. Colonies were sampled four times per year, in order to assess the health status and to collect samples for pathogen, chemical and pollen analyses. The prevalence of Nosema ceranae ranged, on average, from 47-69% in 2009 and from 30-60% in 2010, with strong seasonal variation. Virus prevalence was higher in 2010 than in 2009. The most widespread viruses were BQCV, DWV and SBV. The most frequent pesticides in all hive contents were organophosphates and pyrethroids such as coumaphos and tau-fluvalinate. Beeswax was the most frequently contaminated hive product, with 40% of samples positive and 13% having multiple residues, while 27% of bee-bread and 12% of honey bee samples were contaminated. Colony losses in 2009/10 were on average 19%, with no major differences between regions of Italy. In 2009, the presence of DWV in autumn was positively correlated with colony losses. Similarly, hive mortality was higher in BQCV infected colonies in the first and second visits of the year. In 2010, colony losses were significantly related to the presence of pesticides in honey bees during the second sampling period. Honey bee exposure to poisons in spring could have a negative impact at the colony level, contributing to increase colony mortality during the beekeeping season. In both 2009 and 2010, colony mortality rates were positively related to the percentage of agricultural land surrounding apiaries, supporting the importance of land use for honey bee health.

  13. The Status of Honey Bee Health in Italy: Results from the Nationwide Bee Monitoring Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotti, Laura; Granato, Anna; Laurenson, Lynn; Roberts, Katherine; Gallina, Albino; Silvester, Nicholas; Medrzycki, Piotr; Renzi, Teresa; Sgolastra, Fabio; Lodesani, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In Italy a nation-wide monitoring network was established in 2009 in response to significant honey bee colony mortality reported during 2008. The network comprised of approximately 100 apiaries located across Italy. Colonies were sampled four times per year, in order to assess the health status and to collect samples for pathogen, chemical and pollen analyses. The prevalence of Nosema ceranae ranged, on average, from 47–69% in 2009 and from 30–60% in 2010, with strong seasonal variation. Virus prevalence was higher in 2010 than in 2009. The most widespread viruses were BQCV, DWV and SBV. The most frequent pesticides in all hive contents were organophosphates and pyrethroids such as coumaphos and tau-fluvalinate. Beeswax was the most frequently contaminated hive product, with 40% of samples positive and 13% having multiple residues, while 27% of bee-bread and 12% of honey bee samples were contaminated. Colony losses in 2009/10 were on average 19%, with no major differences between regions of Italy. In 2009, the presence of DWV in autumn was positively correlated with colony losses. Similarly, hive mortality was higher in BQCV infected colonies in the first and second visits of the year. In 2010, colony losses were significantly related to the presence of pesticides in honey bees during the second sampling period. Honey bee exposure to poisons in spring could have a negative impact at the colony level, contributing to increase colony mortality during the beekeeping season. In both 2009 and 2010, colony mortality rates were positively related to the percentage of agricultural land surrounding apiaries, supporting the importance of land use for honey bee health. PMID:27182604

  14. [Evaluation of the quality of the human spermatozoon: comparison between spermatic DNA integrity and semen variables].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Ibis; Colmenares, Melisa; Berrueta-Carrillo, Leidith; Gomez-Perez, Roald; Montes, Henry; Berrueta, Lisbeth; Salmen, Siham; Osuna, Jesús Alfonso

    2010-03-01

    Semen analysis does not have an absolute predictive value on fertility, however it is a reflection of male fertility potential, which is related to its spermatozoa quality and other semen variables. Great variability in human semen parameters has been demonstrated within a single individual, an observation that could explain why a male with low semen quality can successfully fertilize an egg. Although conventional semen analysis, such as sperm concentration, motility and morphology, provide important information about the clinical status of male fertility, new procedures to predict the sperm functional capability have been developed in the last decade, such as analysis of nuclear DNA integrity, which have improved considerably the clinical diagnosis of male infertility, and increased the knowledge about spermatozoa function. DNA fragmentation consist in interruptions, both in single and double DNA strains, that frequently occur in sperm samples from infertile patients. We have conducted a clinical study in semen samples from patients who have attended the Andrology laboratory of the University of Los Andes, between March 2007 and March 2009. The aim of this study was to compare sperm DNA integrity, analyzed by flow cytometry, with traditional semen parameters. Our results show remarkable correlations between conventional human semen variables and sperm chromatin integrity, contributing to asses an integral evaluation of sperm quality allowing the analysis of its fertilizing potential in clinical studies.

  15. Ebola Virus RNA in Semen from an HIV-Positive Survivor of Ebola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Emerson; Baller, April; White, Stephen; Soka, Moses; Choi, Mary J.; Mahmoud, Nuha; Wasunna, Christine; Massaquoi, Moses; Kollie, Jomah; Dweh, Straker; Bemah, Philip; Ladele, Victor; Kpaka, Jonathan; Jawara, Mary; Mugisha, Margaret; Subah, Onyekachi; Faikai, Mylene; Bailey, Jeff A.; Rollin, Pierre; Marston, Barbara; Nyenswah, Tolbert; Gasasira, Alex; Knust, Barbara; Nichol, Stuart; Williams, Desmond

    2017-01-01

    Ebola virus is known to persist in semen of male survivors of Ebola virus disease (EVD). However, maximum duration of, or risk factors for, virus persistence are unknown. We report an EVD survivor with preexisting HIV infection, whose semen was positive for Ebola virus RNA 565 days after recovery from EVD. PMID:28287374

  16. Phthalate Exposure and Human Semen Quality in Shanghai A Cross-sectional Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUN-HUI ZHANG; LI-XING ZHENG; BING-HENG CHEN

    2006-01-01

    Objective To monitor the level of phthalates in human semen samples and to analyze the relationship between phthalate levels and semen parameters. Methods Concentrations of three kinds of commonly used phthalates (di-ethyl phthalate, DEP; di-n-butyl phthalate, DBP; di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate, DEHP) were measured using reversed-phase HPLC. Semen parameters were measured by computer aided sperm analysis (CASA). Results The three phthalates were detected in most of the biological samples, With median levels of 0.30 mg/L (0.08-1.32 mg/L) in semen specimens. There was a significant positive association between liquefied time of semen and phthalate concentrations of semen. The correlation coefficient was 0.456 for DEP, 0.475 for DBP, and 0.457 for DEHP, respectively. There was no significant difference between phthalate concentrations of semen and sperm density or livability, though the correlation coefficients were negative. Conclusion These results suggest that people who reside in Shanghai are exposed to phthalates, especially to DBP and DEHP. Although the level of phthalates is relatively mild, an association of phthalate levels and reduced quality of human semen has been shown in the present study.

  17. Application of computer-assisted semen analysis to explain variations in pig fertility.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhuijse, M.L.W.J.; Sostaric, E.; Feitsma, H.; Gadella, B.M.

    2012-01-01

    Sperm quality is often evaluated through computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) and is an indicator of boar fertility. The aim of this research was to study the relationship between CASA motility parameters and fertility results in pigs. Insemination records and semen parameters from a total of 45,

  18. Resazurin reduction and other tests of semen quality and fertility of bulls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RobertH.Foote

    1999-01-01

    Aim: This study was undertaken to compare the reduction in color of two dyes methylene blue (MBRT) anddye (RRT) with other tests of bull semen quality and to examine their relationship to fertility. Methods: One hundredsixty-four ejaculates from 59 bulls were examined, processed, fertility, and semen from these bulls averaged

  19. Semen quality in adult male survivors 5 years after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X M; Chen, S M; Yue, H X; Lin, L; Wu, Y B; Liu, B; Jiang, M; Ma, Y X

    2016-12-01

    The influence of the Wenchuan earthquake on semen quality of adult male survivors is unclear. We investigated the semen quality included 673 male survivors from the worse-affected counties in the earthquake between Aug 2008 and July 2013. Semen parameters including pH, volume, concentration, motility and morphology were measured according to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance was used to examine the statistical differences between years, and a logistic regression was used to analyse the impacts caused by earthquake on the changes of semen quality. We found the medians (5th and 95th) were 2.5 ml (0.6-5.5) for semen volume, 59.0 × 10(6)  ml(-1) [(13.0-133.0)] × 10(6)  ml(-1) for semen concentration, 46% (13-64%) for sperm progressive motility and 3.0% (0-17.5%) for normal morphology for adult male survivors. Semen concentration, the percentage of sperm progressive motility, total motility and sperm normal morphology were all decreased in the first 3 years, and the differences among years 1, 2 and 3 were significant except the percentage of sperm progressive motility (P earthquake had a negative effect on semen quality. The main findings will provide further diagnosis and therapy basis of male fertility by data, for affected populations in the earthquake. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Semen quality of male partners of infertile couples living with HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Chukwujekwu Ezechi

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: Male factor contributes about one third of infertility in this study and severity of HIV diseases impacts on semen quality. Further studies are needed to evaluate if antiretroviral therapy will reverse the effect of HIV infection on semen quality. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(5.000: 1423-1427