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Sample records for bedside paediatric early

  1. Evaluation of dysphagia in early stroke patients by bedside, endoscopic, and electrophysiological methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umay, Ebru Karaca; Unlu, Ece; Saylam, Guleser Kılıc; Cakci, Aytul; Korkmaz, Hakan

    2013-09-01

    We aimed in this study to evaluate dysphagia in early stroke patients using a bedside screening test and flexible fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FFEES) and electrophysiological evaluation (EE) methods and to compare the effectiveness of these methods. Twenty-four patients who were hospitalized in our clinic within the first 3 months after stroke were included in this study. Patients were evaluated using a bedside screening test [including bedside dysphagia score (BDS), neurological examination dysphagia score (NEDS), and total dysphagia score (TDS)] and FFEES and EE methods. Patients were divided into normal-swallowing and dysphagia groups according to the results of the evaluation methods. Patients with dysphagia as determined by any of these methods were compared to the patients with normal swallowing based on the results of the other two methods. Based on the results of our study, a high BDS was positively correlated with dysphagia identified by FFEES and EE methods. Moreover, the FFEES and EE methods were positively correlated. There was no significant correlation between NEDS and TDS levels and either EE or FFEES method. Bedside screening tests should be used mainly as an initial screening test; then FFEES and EE methods should be combined in patients who show risks. This diagnostic algorithm may provide a practical and fast solution for selected stroke patients.

  2. A multicentre, randomised intervention study of the Paediatric Early Warning Score: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus Sixtus; Aagaard, Hanne; Olesen, Hanne Vebert

    2017-01-01

    and is used in two regions in Denmark. However, healthcare professionals experience difficulties in relation to measuring blood pressure and to the lack of assessment of children's level of consciousness. In addition, is it noteworthy that in 23,288-hour studies, all seven items of the Bedside Paediatric......,000 children should be included to gain a power of 80% (with a 5% significance level) and to detect a clinically significant difference of 30% of unplanned transfers to intensive care or from regional hospitals to the paediatric department at the university department. A safety interim analysis...

  3. Paediatric early warning systems for detecting and responding to clinical deterioration in children: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Veronica; Matthews, Anne; MacDonell, Rachel; Fitzsimons, John

    2017-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the available evidence on paediatric early warning systems (PEWS) for use in acute paediatric healthcare settings for the detection of, and timely response to, clinical deterioration in children. Method The electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE and Cochrane were searched systematically from inception up to August 2016. Eligible studies had to refer to PEWS, inclusive of rapid response systems and teams. Outcomes had to be specific to the identification of and/or response to clinical deterioration in children (including neonates) in paediatric hospital settings (including emergency departments). 2 review authors independently completed the screening and selection process, the quality appraisal of the retrieved evidence and data extraction; with a third reviewer resolving any discrepancies, as required. Results were narratively synthesised. Results From a total screening of 2742 papers, 90 papers, of varied designs, were identified as eligible for inclusion in the review. Findings revealed that PEWS are extensively used internationally in paediatric inpatient hospital settings. However, robust empirical evidence on which PEWS is most effective was limited. The studies examined did however highlight some evidence of positive directional trends in improving clinical and process-based outcomes for clinically deteriorating children. Favourable outcomes were also identified for enhanced multidisciplinary team work, communication and confidence in recognising, reporting and making decisions about child clinical deterioration. Conclusions Despite many studies reporting on the complexity and multifaceted nature of PEWS, no evidence was sourced which examined PEWS as a complex healthcare intervention. Future research needs to investigate PEWS as a complex multifaceted sociotechnical system that is embedded in a wider safety culture influenced by many organisational and human factors. PEWS should be embraced as a part of a

  4. Paediatric Early Warning Score - A multi-center randomized controlled intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus Sixtus; Aagaard, Hanne; Olesen, Hanne Vebert

    of the clinical condition of hospitalised patients is often preceded by physiological changes up to 24 hours before death. Despite this several reports show that lack of identification and proper actions in patients developing acute and critical illness remains a problem. Challenges in assessing if a child...... is critically ill are related to the child’s symptoms of serious illness often being uncharacteristic. Children can seem relatively unaffected until a short time before circulatory insufficiency and cardiac arrest. Thus, there is a need for developing and investigating if an Paediatric Early Warning System...

  5. Effects of Early Bedside Cycle Exercise on Intracranial Pressure and Systemic Hemodynamics in Critically Ill Patients in a Neurointensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelandersson, Anneli; Nellgård, Bengt; Ricksten, Sven-Erik; Cider, Åsa

    2016-12-01

    Physiotherapy is an important part of treatment after severe brain injuries and stroke, but its effect on intracranial and systemic hemodynamics is minimally investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effects of an early bedside cycle exercise on intracranial and systemic hemodynamics in critically ill patients when admitted to a neurointensive care unit (NICU). Twenty critically ill patients suffering from brain injuries or stroke were included in this study performed in the NICU at Sahlgrenska University Hospital. One early implemented exercise session was performed using a bedside cycle ergometer for 20 min. Intracranial and hemodynamic variables were measured two times before, three times during, and two times after the bedside cycling exercise. Analyzed variables were intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), and stroke volume variation (SVV). The cycling intervention was conducted within 7 ± 5 days after admission to the NICU. Cycle exercise increased MAP (p = 0.029) and SV (p = 0.003) significantly. After exercise CO, SV, MAP, and CPP decreased significantly, while no changes in HR, SVV, SpO2, or ICP were noted when compared to values obtained during exercise. There were no differences in data obtained before versus after exercise. Early implemented exercise with a bedside cycle ergometer, for patients with severe brain injuries or stroke when admitted to a NICU, is considered to be a clinically safe procedure.

  6. [Results of applying a paediatric early warning score system as a healthcare quality improvement plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-Martín, M J; Prieto-Martínez, S; García-Solano, M; Montilla-Pérez, M; Tena-Martín, E; Ballesteros-García, M M

    2016-06-01

    The aims of this study were to introduce a paediatric early warning score (PEWS) into our daily clinical practice, as well as to evaluate its ability to detect clinical deterioration in children admitted, and to train nursing staff to communicate the information and response effectively. An analysis was performed on the implementation of PEWS in the electronic health records of children (0-15 years) in our paediatric ward from February 2014 to September 2014. The maximum score was 6. Nursing staff reviewed scores >2, and if >3 medical and nursing staff reviewed it. Monitoring indicators: % of admissions with scoring; % of complete data capture; % of scores >3; % of scores >3 reviewed by medical staff, % of changes in treatment due to the warning system, and number of patients who needed Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) admission, or died without an increased warning score. The data were collected from all patients (931) admitted. The scale was measured 7,917 times, with 78.8% of them with complete data capture. Very few (1.9%) showed scores >3, and 14% of them with changes in clinical management (intensifying treatment or new diagnostic tests). One patient (scored 2) required PICU admission. There were no deaths. Parents or nursing staff concern was registered in 80% of cases. PEWS are useful to provide a standardised assessment of clinical status in the inpatient setting, using a unique scale and implementing data capture. Because of the lack of severe complications requiring PICU admission and deaths, we will have to use other data to evaluate these scales. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Early childhood measles vaccinations are not associated with paediatric IBD: a population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Souradet Y; Blanchard, James F; Bernstein, Charles N

    2015-04-01

    Early childhood vaccinations have been hypothesized to contribute to the emergence of paediatric inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] in developed countries. Using linked population-based administrative databases, we aimed to explore the association between vaccination with measles-containing vaccines and the risk for IBD. This was a case-control study using the University of Manitoba IBD Epidemiology Database [UMIBDED]. The UMIBDED was linked to the Manitoba Immunization Monitoring System [MIMS], a population-based database of immunizations administered in Manitoba. All paediatric IBD cases in Manitoba, born after 1989 and diagnosed before March 31, 2008, were included. Controls were matched to cases on the basis of age, sex, and region of residence at time of diagnosis. Measles-containing vaccinations received in the first 2 years of life were documented, with vaccinations categorized as 'None' or 'Complete', with completeness defined according to Manitoba's vaccination schedule. Conditional logistic regression models were fitted to the data, with models adjusted for physician visits in the first 2 years of life and area-level socioeconomic status at case date. A total of 951 individuals [117 cases and 834 controls] met eligibility criteria, with average age of diagnosis among cases at 11 years. The proportion of IBD cases with completed vaccinations was 97%, compared with 94% of controls. In models adjusted for physician visits and area-level socioeconomic status, no statistically significant association was detected between completed measles vaccinations and the risk of IBD (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.5-4.4; p = 0.419]. No significant association between completed measles-containing vaccination in the first 2 years of life and paediatric IBD could be demonstrated in this population-based study. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  8. Paediatric early warning scores on a children's ward: a quality improvement initiative.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ennis, Linda

    2014-09-09

    The aim of this quality improvement initiative was to incorporate a paediatric early warning score (PEWS) and track and trigger system in the routine care of children in an acute general children\\'s ward at a regional hospital in the Republic of Ireland. In the absence of a nationally recommended specific PEWS strategy, a local plan was developed. The experience of structuring and implementing the PEWS and track and trigger system is presented in this article. Data from the first year of use were collected to evaluate the clinical utility and effectiveness of this system. In the busy acute children\\'s service, the PEWS initiative was found to benefit processes of early detection, prompt referral and timely, appropriate management of children at potential risk of clinical deterioration. Nursing staff were empowered and supported to communicate concerns immediately and to seek rapid medical review, according to an agreed PEWS escalation plan. Outcomes were significantly improved.

  9. The role and reliability of rapid bedside diagnostic test in early diagnosis and treatment of bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Debata, Pradeep Kumar; Ranjan, Amitabh; Gaind, Rajani

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the role and reliability of rapid bedside diagnostic test in early diagnosis and treatment of bacterial meningitis in children using reagent strips. This prospective, single blinded study was conducted in the Department of Pediatrics of VMMC & Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi in collaboration with the Department of Microbiology of VMMC & Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi, over a period of 15 mo (August 2009 to Nov 2010). Seventy-five children aged 3 mo to 12 y admitted in the pediatric ward with suspected diagnosis of acute meningitis were included. All enroled patients underwent lumbar puncture. CSF samples were taken and divided in 2 parts for laboratory evaluation and rapid strip analysis. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and the negative predictive values of the reagent strips for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis were calculated. Accuracy of the reagent strips was established using kappa statistics. Latex agglutination for antigen detection and microbiological culture were also done. Highly significant association was observed between CSF examination in routine laboratory method and dipstick method. The number of laboratory values that correlated were- for cells 71(94.63%), for protein 68 (90.67%), for glucose 68(90.67%) out of total 75 cases. The sensitivity and specificity of reagent strip in diagnosing acute bacterial meningitis were 96.7% and 97.8% respectively. The positive predictive and negative predictive values of reagent strip in diagnosing acute bacterial meningitis were 96.7% and 97.8% respectively. Staphylococcus aureus was found to be the most common organism isolated (50%). Thus reagent strip analysis is a very rapid, reliable and effective method for diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis in children. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common organism isolated.

  10. Development of new strategies for early diagnosis of mucormycosis from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Thomas J; Skiada, Anna; Cornely, Oliver A; Roilides, Emmanuel; Ibrahim, Ashraf; Zaoutis, Theoklis; Groll, Andreas; Lortholary, Olivier; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Petrikkos, George

    2014-12-01

    Early diagnosis and initiation of amphotericin B (AmB) for treatment of mucormycosis increases survival from approximately 40% to 80%. The central objective of a new study of the European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM) and the International Society for Human and Animal Mycology (ISHAM) Zygomycosis Working Group is to improve the clinical and laboratory diagnosis of mucormycosis. The diagnostic tools generated from this study may help to significantly improve survival from mucormycosis worldwide. The study has three major objectives: to conduct a prospective international registration of patients with mucormycosis using a well-established global network of centres; to construct a predictive risk model for patients at risk for mucormycosis; and to establish an international archive of specimens of tissues, fluids, and organisms linked from the patients enrolled into the registry that will be used for development of leading edge molecular, proteomic, metabolic and antigenic systems for mucormycosis.

  11. The importance of early involvement of paediatric palliative care for patients with severe congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaud, Sophie; Lloyd, David F A; Laddie, Joanna; Razavi, Reza

    2016-10-01

    Growing numbers of patients with severe congenital heart disease (CHD) are surviving into late childhood and beyond. This increasingly complex patient group may experience multiple formidable and precarious interventions, lifelong morbidity and the very real risk of premature death on many occasions throughout their childhood. In this paper, we discuss the advantages of a fully integrated palliative care ethos in patients with CHD, offering the potential for improved symptom control, more informed decision-making and enhanced support for patients and their families throughout their disease trajectory. These core principles may be delivered alongside expert cardiac care via non-specialists within pre-existing networks or via specialists in paediatric palliative care when appropriate. By broaching these complex issues early-even from the point of diagnosis-an individualised set of values can be established around not just end-of-life but also quality-of-life decisions, with clear benefits for patients and their families regardless of outcome.

  12. Partial Cricotracheal Resection (PCTR), a Rewarding Outcome for Paediatric Subglottic Stenosis: An Early Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, B S; Roopesh, S; Marina, M B; Abdullah, S M

    2014-02-01

    This is a retrospective study examining the outcome of paediatric patients with subglottic stenosis who underwent partial cricotracheal resection (PCTR) as a primary open procedure from 2004 to 2012. There were 5 patients identified aged from 3 to 18 years old. All the subglottic stenosis were acquired type. All of them were secondary to prolonged intubation. Three patients were classified as Myer-Cotton grade III and the other two were Myer-Cotton grade IV. Two of the patients had concomitant bilateral vocal cord immobility. All patients underwent two staged PCTR . All patients underwent two staged PCTR, and one patient underwent posterior cordectomy apart from partial CTR at different setting. All patients were successfully decannulated at various durations postoperatively. Although this is an early experience in our institution, PCTR has shown to be effective and safe procedure in patients with subglottic stenosis especially those with Myer-Cotton grade III and IV.

  13. TP53 codon 72 polymorphism may predict early tumour progression in paediatric pilocytic astrocytoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascelli, Samantha; Nozza, Paolo; Jones, David T.W.; Colin, Carole; Pistorio, Angela; Milanaccio, Claudia; Ravegnani, Marcello; Consales, Alessandro; Witt, Olaf; Morana, Giovanni; Cama, Armando; Capra, Valeria; Biassoni, Roberto; Pfister, Stefan M.; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Garrè, Maria Luisa; Raso, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma and ganglioglioma may occur in inaccessible or surgically difficult areas. In case of incomplete resection, the availability of biological predictors of tumour progression could be particularly important. To this end, an analysis of p53 codon 72 polymorphism and assessment of its role as prognostic marker were performed. The status of the p53 Arg72Pro polymorphism was evaluated by pyrosequencing method in a multicenter cohort of 170 paediatric patients. Genotype/phenotype associations were investigated either by means of bivariate or multivariate analyses. In the partially resected pilocytic astrocytomas, the Arg/Arg variant predicts early tumour progression (median survival time: 23.1 months) and is associated with poor event-free survival (p value = 0.0009). This finding remains true also in case of adjuvant therapies, with a 5-year event-free survival of 30.6% for cases with Arg/Arg variant vs. 78.7% for those with other genotypes. There is no association between ganglioglioma and the polymorphism. The assessment of Arg/Arg variant could improve the management of pilocytic astrocytoma. TP53 codon 72 analysis could distinguish low-risk cases, in which surgery could be conservative, from high-risk cases needing an aggressive surgery plan. PMID:27374106

  14. TP53 codon 72 polymorphism may predict early tumour progression in paediatric pilocytic astrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascelli, Samantha; Nozza, Paolo; Jones, David T W; Colin, Carole; Pistorio, Angela; Milanaccio, Claudia; Ravegnani, Marcello; Consales, Alessandro; Witt, Olaf; Morana, Giovanni; Cama, Armando; Capra, Valeria; Biassoni, Roberto; Pfister, Stefan M; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Garrè, Maria Luisa; Raso, Alessandro

    2016-07-26

    Pilocytic astrocytoma and ganglioglioma may occur in inaccessible or surgically difficult areas. In case of incomplete resection, the availability of biological predictors of tumour progression could be particularly important. To this end, an analysis of p53 codon 72 polymorphism and assessment of its role as prognostic marker were performed.The status of the p53 Arg72Pro polymorphism was evaluated by pyrosequencing method in a multicenter cohort of 170 paediatric patients. Genotype/phenotype associations were investigated either by means of bivariate or multivariate analyses.In the partially resected pilocytic astrocytomas, the Arg/Arg variant predicts early tumour progression (median survival time: 23.1 months) and is associated with poor event-free survival (p value = 0.0009). This finding remains true also in case of adjuvant therapies, with a 5-year event-free survival of 30.6% for cases with Arg/Arg variant vs. 78.7% for those with other genotypes. There is no association between ganglioglioma and the polymorphism.The assessment of Arg/Arg variant could improve the management of pilocytic astrocytoma. TP53 codon 72 analysis could distinguish low-risk cases, in which surgery could be conservative, from high-risk cases needing an aggressive surgery plan.

  15. Early clinical experience with a new preloaded one-piece intraocular lens in paediatric cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, D B; Chan, T K J

    2016-09-01

    PurposeTo report the clinical experience of using the Tecnis PCB00 (Abbott Medical Optics, Santa Ana, CA, USA) preloaded one-piece intraocular lens (IOL) in the setting of a tertiary referral centre for paediatric cataract.MethodsA retrospective case note review of all paediatric cataract surgeries using the Tecnis PCB00 IOL, at a single UK paediatric ophthalmology department.ResultsNine eyes in seven patients received the IOL between December 2014 and January 2016. All patients underwent lens aspiration and insertion of the IOL 'in the bag.' The indications for surgery included developmental cataract (8/9) and traumatic cataract (1/9). Mean age at the time of surgery was 7 years (range 2-14). The median improvement in logMAR best-corrected visual acuity was 0.475 (range 0.250-1.500). The mean follow-up duration was 5 months (range 1-13). No operative or post-operative complications occurred as a result of using the device.ConclusionThe Tecnis PCB00 preloaded IOL appears to be a safe and effective device in treating paediatric cataract.

  16. Key paediatric messages from Amsterdam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Grigg

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Paediatric Assembly of the European Respiratory Society (ERS maintained its high profile at the 2015 ERS International Congress in Amsterdam. There were symposia on preschool wheeze, respiratory sounds and cystic fibrosis; an educational skills workshop on paediatric respiratory resuscitation; a hot topic session on risk factors and early origins of respiratory diseases; a meet the expert session on paediatric lung function test reference values; and the annual paediatric grand round. In this report the Chairs of the Paediatric Assembly's Groups highlight the key messages from the abstracts presented at the Congress.

  17. Early bedside care during preclinical medical education: can technology-enhanced patient simulation advance the Flexnerian ideal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, James A; Hayden, Emily M; Ahmed, Rami A; Pawlowski, John B; Khoury, Kimberly N; Oriol, Nancy E

    2010-02-01

    Flexner wanted medical students to study at the patient bedside-a remarkable innovation in his time-so that they could apply science to clinical care under the watchful eye of senior physicians. Ever since his report, medical schools have reserved the latter years of their curricula for such an "advanced" apprenticeship, providing clinical clerkship experiences only after an initial period of instruction in basic medical sciences. Although Flexner codified the segregation of preclinical and clinical instruction, he was committed to ensuring that both domains were integrated into a modern medical education. The aspiration to fully integrate preclinical and clinical instruction continues to drive medical education reform even to this day. In this article, the authors revisit the original justification for sequential preclinical-clinical instruction and argue that modern, technology-enhanced patient simulation platforms are uniquely powerful for fostering simultaneous integration of preclinical-clinical content in a way that Flexner would have applauded. To date, medical educators tend to focus on using technology-enhanced medical simulation in clinical and postgraduate medical education; few have devoted significant attention to using immersive clinical simulation among preclinical students. The authors present an argument for the use of dynamic robot-mannequins in teaching basic medical science, and describe their experience with simulator-based preclinical instruction at Harvard Medical School. They discuss common misconceptions and barriers to the approach, describe their curricular responses to the technique, and articulate a unifying theory of cognitive and emotional learning that broadens the view of what is possible, feasible, and desirable with simulator-based medical education.

  18. Are the Duke criteria really useful for the early bedside diagnosis of infective endocarditis? Results of a prospective multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchi, Enrico; Trinchero, Rita; Imazio, Massimo; Forno, Davide; Dal Conte, Ivano; Lipani, Filippo; Brusca, Antonio; Gnavi, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    To date, no studies have evaluated the usefulness of the Duke vs the modified Duke criteria for the early diagnosis of infective endocarditis (IE), nor is it known whether a probabilistic approach may be useful in establishing an early clinical diagnosis of IE. The aim of this study was (1) to assess and compare the clinical usefulness of the Duke vs the modified Duke criteria for the early diagnosis of IE, and (2) to evaluate the diagnostic utility of a probabilistic approach based on the echocardiographic criterion. From January 2000 to December 2001, 267 consecutive patients with suspected IE were enrolled in a prospective multicenter trial. IE was diagnosed in 147 cases (55%) and rejected in 120 cases (45%). The Duke and the modified Duke criteria had a high similar sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. The time to diagnosis was 8.15 +/- 7.4 days for the Duke criteria and 8.18 +/- 7.1 days for the modified Duke criteria. The time to diagnosis based on a probabilistic approach was shorter than that based on the Duke and the modified Duke criteria (4.96 +/- 7.1 days, for all p < 0.001). Although the Duke and the modified Duke criteria have a very similar sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, the delay in the time to diagnosis may be significant. A probabilistic approach based on clinical suspicion and echocardiographic evidence may be useful for decision-making, whilst awaiting case definition by means of the Duke criteria.

  19. Bedside Blood Glucose Monitoring in Hospitals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    American Diabetes Association

    2004-01-01

    Bedside Blood Glucose Monitoring in Hospitals American Diabetes Association The modern management of hospitalized patients with diabetes includes capillary blood glucose determinations at the bedside...

  20. Bedside ocular ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Pedro J; Hatch, Nicholas; Barr, Laurel; Wu, Teresa S

    2014-04-01

    Many ocular emergencies are difficult to diagnose in the emergency setting with conventional physical examination tools. Additionally, persistent efforts to re-examine the eye may be deleterious to a patient's overall condition. Ultrasound is an important tool because it affords physicians a rapid, portable, accurate, and dynamic tool for evaluation of a variety of ocular and orbital diseases. The importance of understanding orbital anatomy, with attention to the firm attachment points of the various layers of the eye, cannot be understated. This article describes the relevant eye anatomy, delves into the ultrasound technique, and illustrates a variety of orbital pathologies detectable by bedside ultrasound.

  1. Value of early follow-up CT in paediatric tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronikou, Savvas [University of Cape Town, Department of Radiology, Cape Town (South Africa); Wieselthaler, Nicky; Smith, Bruce; Douis, Hassan [Red Cross Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Cape Town (South Africa); Fieggen, A. Graham; Toorn, Ronald van; Wilmshurst, Jo [Red Cross Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Cape Town (South Africa); Red Cross Children' s Hospital, Department of Neurosciences, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2005-11-01

    The value of CT in the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM) in children is well reported. Follow-up CT scanning for these patients is, however, not well described and, in particular, the value of early follow-up CT has not been addressed for children with TBM. To assess the value of early follow-up CT in children with TBM in identifying diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutically relevant features of TBM. A retrospective 4-year review of CT scans performed within 1 week and 1 month of initial CT in children with proven (CSF culture-positive) and probable TBM (CSF profile-positive but culture-negative) and comparison with initial CT for the diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic CT features of TBM. The CT scans of 50 children were included (19 ''definite'' TBM; 31 ''probable'' TBM). Of these, 30 had CT scans performed within 1 week of the initial CT. On initial CT, 44 patients had basal enhancement. Only 24 patients had contrast medium-enhanced follow-up scans. Important findings include: 8 of 29 patients (who were not shunted) developed new hydrocephalus. New infarcts developed in 24 patients; 45% of those who did not have infarction initially developed new infarcts. Three of the six patients who did not show basal enhancement on initial scans developed this on the follow-up scans, while in seven patients with pre-existing basal enhancement this became more pronounced. Two patients developed hyperdensity in the cisterns on non-contrast medium scans. Eight patients developed a diagnostic triad of features. Three patients developed CT features of TBM where there was none on the initial scans. Early follow-up CT is useful in making a diagnosis of TBM by demonstrating features that were not present initially and by demonstrating more sensitive, obvious or additional features of TBM. In addition, follow-up CT is valuable as a prognostic indicator as it demonstrates additional infarcts which may have developed or become more

  2. Paediatric cardiac intensive care unit: current setting and organization in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraisse, Alain; Le Bel, Stéphane; Mas, Bertrand; Macrae, Duncan

    2010-10-01

    Over recent decades, specialized paediatric cardiac intensive care has emerged as a central component in the management of critically ill, neonatal, paediatric and adult patients with congenital and acquired heart disease. The majority of high-volume centres (dealing with over 300 surgical cases per year) have dedicated paediatric cardiac intensive care units, with the smallest programmes more likely to care for paediatric cardiac patients in mixed paediatric or adult intensive care units. Specialized nursing staff are also a crucial presence at the patient's bedside for quality of care. A paediatric cardiac intensive care programme should have patients (preoperative and postoperative) grouped together geographically, and should provide proximity to the operating theatre, catheterization laboratory and radiology department, as well as to the regular ward. Age-appropriate medical equipment must be provided. An optimal strategy for running a paediatric cardiac intensive care programme should include: multidisciplinary collaboration and involvement with paediatric cardiology, anaesthesia, cardiac surgery and many other subspecialties; a risk-stratification strategy for quantifying perioperative risk; a personalized patient approach; and anticipatory care. Finally, progressive withdrawal from heavy paediatric cardiac intensive care management should be institutionalized. Although the countries of the European Union do not share any common legislation on the structure and organization of paediatric intensive care or paediatric cardiac intensive care, any paediatric cardiac surgery programme in France that is agreed by the French Health Ministry must perform at least '150 major procedures per year in children' and must provide a 'specialized paediatric intensive care unit'.

  3. The Bedside Sherlock Holmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Faith T.; Tierney, Lawrence M.

    1982-01-01

    There are a multitude of diagnostic clues contained in clothing, jewelry, possessions and other extracorporeal attachments that each patient brings with him or her to a physician. Because of the emphasis of classic physical diagnosis on the body of a patient solely, and because of modern practices that may have patients stripped of these articles before the first encounter with their physician, these interesting and enlightening findings are often ignored or unavailable. Incorporation of these observations into the panoply of data obtained from the history and physical examination will enhance both the accuracy and adventure of differential diagnosis. Such exercises in observation, moreover, may increase general physical diagnostic skills as well as enliven bedside rounds. PMID:7135953

  4. The bedside Sherlock Holmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, F T; Tierney, L M

    1982-08-01

    There are a multitude of diagnostic clues contained in clothing, jewelry, possessions and other extracorporeal attachments that each patient brings with him or her to a physician. Because of the emphasis of classic physical diagnosis on the body of a patient solely, and because of modern practices that may have patients stripped of these articles before the first encounter with their physician, these interesting and enlightening findings are often ignored or unavailable. Incorporation of these observations into the panoply of data obtained from the history and physical examination will enhance both the accuracy and adventure of differential diagnosis. Such exercises in observation, moreover, may increase general physical diagnostic skills as well as enliven bedside rounds.

  5. Bedside Ultrasound in a Case of Blunt Scrotal Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Cannis

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This case study describes a patient who suffered blunt force trauma to the scrotum. Use of bedsideemergency ultrasound facilitated early diagnosis of a ruptured testicle and allowed for prompturological consultation and timely surgical repair. The utility of bedside emergency ultrasound inthe evaluation of testicular trauma, as well as the outcome of our case, is discussed here.

  6. Metastatic paediatric colorectal carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Woods, R

    2012-03-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented to our unit with crampy abdominal pain, change in bowel habit, a subjective impression of weight loss and a single episode of haematochezia. She was found to have a rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma and proceeded to laparoscopic anterior resection, whereupon peritoneal metastases were discovered. She received chemotherapy and is alive and well ten month later with no radiological evidence of disease. Colorectal carcinoma is rare in the paediatric population but is increasing in incidence. Early diagnosis is critical to enable optimal outcomes.

  7. Paediatric rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, G; Xatzipsalti, M; Borrego, L M

    2013-01-01

    Rhinitis is a common problem in childhood and adolescence and impacts negatively on physical, social and psychological well-being. This position paper, prepared by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Taskforce on Rhinitis in Children, aims to provide evidence-based recommendat......Rhinitis is a common problem in childhood and adolescence and impacts negatively on physical, social and psychological well-being. This position paper, prepared by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Taskforce on Rhinitis in Children, aims to provide evidence......-based recommendations for the diagnosis and therapy of paediatric rhinitis. Rhinitis is characterized by at least two nasal symptoms: rhinorrhoea, blockage, sneezing or itching. It is classified as allergic rhinitis, infectious rhinitis and nonallergic, noninfectious rhinitis. Similar symptoms may occur with other...... conditions such as adenoidal hypertrophy, septal deviation and nasal polyps. Examination by anterior rhinoscopy and allergy tests may help to substantiate a diagnosis of allergic rhinitis. Avoidance of relevant allergens may be helpful for allergic rhinitis (AR). Oral and intranasal antihistamines and nasal...

  8. Diagnosis of Necrotizing Fasciitis with Bedside Ultrasound: the STAFF Exam

    OpenAIRE

    Erik Castleberg; Natasa Jenson; Vi Am Dinh

    2014-01-01

    The early diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis is often ambiguous. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, while sensitive and specific modalities, are often time consuming or unavailable. We present a case of necrotizing fasciitis that was rapidly diagnosed using bedside ultrasound evaluating for subcutaneous thickening, air, and fascial fluid (STAFF). We propose the STAFF ultrasound exam may be beneficial in the rapid evaluation of unstable patients with consideration of necrotizi...

  9. A focus on paediatric hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Pier Paolo Bassareo; Giuseppe Mercuro

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension can begin early in childhood, as occasional increases in blood pressure or abnormal blood pressure responses to physical or emotional stress. High blood pressure in juvenile age is defined as a blood pressure repeatedly above the 95th percentile of specific nomograms. Its worldwide prevalence ranges from 1% to about 10%. The purpose of this paper is to perform an overview about characteristics, diagnosis, risk factors, therapy, and prognosis of paediatric hypertension.

  10. Mantra meditation as a bedside spiritual intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Roxane Raffin

    2014-01-01

    The increased acceptance of integrative care allows nurses to investigate their role as active providers of spiritual care at the bedside. Lack of clear role expectations and interventions support the need for a simple, flexible spiritual bedside intervention. The use of a meditation mantra is discussed.

  11. Nutrition algorithms and bedside nutrient delivery practices in pediatric intensive care units: an international multicenter cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Enid E; Bechard, Lori J; Mehta, Nilesh M

    2014-06-01

    Enteral nutrition (EN) delivery is associated with improved outcomes in critically ill patients. We aimed to describe EN practices, including details of algorithms and individual bedside practices, in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). Available EN algorithm details from 31 international PICUs were obtained. Daily nutrient intake data from 524 mechanically ventilated patients, 1 month to 18 years old, were prospectively documented, including EN delivery, adjunct therapies, and energy prescription. Practices associated with higher percentage adequacy of EN delivery were determined by regression analysis. Nine EN algorithms were available. All algorithms defined advancement and EN intolerance; 7 of 9 defined intolerance by gastric residual volume; 3 of 9 recommended nutrition screening and fasting guidelines. Few elements were in agreement with the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. Of the 341 patients who received EN exclusively 32.9% received ≥66.6% of prescribed energy on day 7. Percentage adequacy of EN delivered was inversely associated with days to EN initiation (-8.92; P algorithms, promotility agents, or postpyloric feeding. A minority of PICUs employ EN algorithms; recommendations were variable and not in agreement with national guidelines. Optimal EN delivery was achieved in less than one-third of our cohort. EN adjunct therapies were not associated with increased EN delivery. Studies aimed at promoting early EN and decreasing interruptions may optimize energy delivery in the PICU.

  12. Paediatric trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physical examination can be difficult, in particular in small children, but also ... risk of radiation-induced malignancy has ... in a high care/intensive care or ward ... admission and restriction of activity based ... pressure early and to perform an ... (preventing the injury), secondary (dealing with the injury in the most efficient.

  13. Paediatrics: messages from Munich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Midulla

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to describe paediatric highlights from the 2014 European Respiratory Society (ERS International Congress in Munich, Germany. Abstracts from the seven groups of the ERS Paediatric Assembly (Respiratory Physiology and Sleep, Asthma and Allergy, Cystic Fibrosis, Respiratory Infection and Immunology, Neonatology and Paediatric Intensive Care, Respiratory Epidemiology, and Bronchology are presented in the context of the current literature.

  14. What's new in paediatric dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, M. C.

    2016-03-01

    Since the early 80's, the use of laser has been introduced in the daily dental practice and the technological development has also provided over time to optimize its use. Various types of lasers with different wavelengths have been developed for use in a handy, easy and ergonomic manner. In daily paediatric dentistry, laser could be a very useful medical device which can completely replace the traditional high hand-piece and bur to realize a "micro-invasive" dentistry and a "clean" surgery, without bleeding and sutures. According to the international literature and in the light of recent researches, this work could give an overview on assisted laser therapy in paediatric dentistry, highlighting advantages and disadvantages of this new technology and pointing out the high compliance of the young patient.

  15. Paediatric diagnostic audiology testing in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodley, Selvarani

    2016-03-01

    With the increased emphasis on the importance of early identification of paediatric hearing loss within developing countries such as South Africa and Nigeria there has been a recognition of the ethical obligation to ensure access to timely diagnostic and intervention services for children identified with hearing loss; regardless of their geographic or socioeconomic status. There are limited studies on diagnosis of paediatric hearing loss in a developing world context. The objective of this study was to determine processes used for diagnosis of paediatric hearing loss in South Africa, across the private and public healthcare sectors, and to profile the age of testing for each component of the diagnostic test battery. Diagnostic audiology testing data of 230 children enrolled in an early intervention programme was analysed to profile the reporting of diagnostic audiology testing as well as diagnostic audiology procedures employed. Results were analysed according to province as well as healthcare sector to compare diagnostic services across regions as well as healthcare sectors. The differences in audiology practice and tests employed with paediatric clients across the regions of Gauteng, Kwazulu Natal and Western Cape indicates that services across regions and across the public and private sector are not equitable. Each region is equally unlikely to complete a full, comprehensive diagnostic evaluation on paediatric clients. The age of testing highlights the increased age of diagnosis of hearing loss. Paediatric diagnostic audiology is a section of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention services that requires attention in terms of the appropriateness of procedures as well as equity of services. Further studies on diagnostic practice and resources in South Africa will provide information on factors that are preventing adherence to international best practice guidelines for paediatric diagnostic audiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Paediatric radiopharmaceutical administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassmann, Michael; Treves, S Ted; Borgwardt, Lise

    2014-01-01

    In 2008 the EANM published their paediatric dosage card. In 2011 the North American consensus guidelines recommended a set of administered activities for paediatric nuclear medicine. During the EANM congress in 2012 a working group of the EANM and the SNMMI met to study the possibility of harmoni...

  17. Safety in paediatric imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, D.; Filice, I.; Murray, D.; Thomas, K. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-01-01

    Those of us working in a dedicated paediatric environment are aware of the important safety issues with regard to paediatrics. Our goal when working with paediatric patients, the goal is to obtain the best quality images while keeping patients safe and their distress to a minimum. This article will discuss some of the issues regarding paediatric safety in a diagnostic imaging department, including radiation doses and the risk to paediatric patients, reducing medication errors, safe sedation practice and environmental safety. Also discussed are some conditions requiring special consideration to maintain patient safety such as epiglottitis and suspected child abuse. Promotion of a patient/family-centered care system will create an environment of trust where parents or guardians will know that their children are being well cared for in a safe, effective environment. (author)

  18. Comparing portable computers with bedside computers when administering medications using bedside medication verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig-Beymer, Patti; Williams, Phillip; Stimac, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    This research examined bedside medication verification administration in 2 adult critical care units, using portable computers and permanent bedside computers. There were no differences in the number of near-miss errors, the time to administer the medications, or nurse perception of ease of medication administration, care of patients, or reliability of technology. The percentage of medications scanned was significantly higher with the use of permanent bedside computers, and nurses using permanent bedside computers were more likely to agree that the computer was always available.

  19. Bedside Teaching and Respecting the Pediatric Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touyz, Sarah Judith Jean

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bedside teaching involving patients, physicians, and students is a ubiquitous technique used for medical training. Respect, valid informed consent, and transparency are key to ethical and effective teaching. Patient refusal in participating in bedside teaching must be respected. These ought to apply to patients of all ages, including children, who may not fully understand or be capable of consenting to participating in teaching.

  20. The bedside evaluation: ritual and reason.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Abraham; Brady, Erika; Kapur, Cari Costanzo; Horwitz, Ralph I

    2011-10-18

    The bedside evaluation, consisting of the history and physical examination, was once the primary means of diagnosis and clinical monitoring. The recent explosion of imaging and laboratory testing has inverted the diagnostic paradigm. Physicians often bypass the bedside evaluation for immediate testing and therefore encounter an image of the patient before seeing the patient in the flesh. In addition to risking delayed or missed diagnosis of readily recognizable disease, physicians who forgo or circumvent the bedside evaluation risk the loss of an important ritual that can enhance the physician-patient relationship. Patients expect that some form of bedside evaluation will take place when they visit a physician. When physicians complete this evaluation in an expert manner, it can have a salutary effect. If done poorly or not at all, in contrast, it can undermine the physician-patient relationship. Studies suggest that the context, locale, and quality of the bedside evaluation are associated with neurobiological changes in the patient. Recognizing the importance of the bedside evaluation as a healing ritual and a powerful diagnostic tool when paired with judicious use of technology could be a stimulus for the recovery of an ebbing skill set among physicians.

  1. Effects of "minimally invasive curricular surgery" - a pilot intervention study to improve the quality of bedside teaching in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raupach, Tobias; Anders, Sven; Pukrop, Tobias; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Harendza, Sigrid

    2009-09-01

    Bedside teaching is an important element of undergraduate medical education. However, the impact of curricular course structure on student outcome needs to be determined. This study assessed changes in fourth-year medical students' evaluations of clinical teaching sessions before and after the introduction of a new course format. The curricular structure of bedside teaching sessions in cardiology was modified without changing the amount of teaching time. Clinical teachers were instructed about the new teaching format and learning objectives. The new format implemented for adult but not paediatric cardiology sessions was piloted with 143 students in winter 2007/08. By computing effect sizes, evaluation results were compared to data obtained from 185 students before the intervention. Significant rating increases were observed for adult cardiology teaching sessions (Cohen's d = 0.66) but not paediatric cardiology sessions (d = 0.22). In addition to improving the structure and organization of the course, the intervention significantly impacted on students' perceptions of their learning outcome regarding practical skills (d = 0.69). Minimal curricular changes combined with basic faculty development measures significantly increase students' perception of learning outcome. Curricular structure needs to be considered when planning bedside teaching sessions in medical undergraduate training.

  2. Paediatric Metabolic Conditions of the Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elroy P. Weledji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paediatric metabolic disorders with the most clinical manifestations of deranged hepatic metabolism are discussed. The conditions which will be stressed are those for which effective treatment is available and early diagnosis is essential. Accurate diagnosis of other disorders for which no treatment is, as yet, available is also important as a guide to prognosis and for accurate genetic counselling. With the advancement in amniocentesis techniques there is a growing role for gene therapy. For selected metabolic disorders, paediatric liver transplantations have been successful.

  3. Paediatric talus fracture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, Ann-Maria

    2012-01-01

    Paediatric talus fractures are rare injuries resulting from axial loading of the talus against the anterior tibia with the foot in dorsiflexion. Skeletally immature bone is less brittle, with higher elastic resistance than adult bone, thus the paediatric talus can sustain higher forces before fractures occur. However, displaced paediatric talus fractures and those associated with high-energy trauma have been associated with complications including avascular necrosis, arthrosis, delayed union, neurapraxia and the need for revision surgery. The authors present the rare case of a talar neck fracture in a skeletally immature young girl, initially missed on radiological review. However, clinical suspicion on the part of the emergency physician, repeat examination and further radiographic imaging revealed this rare paediatric injury.

  4. Paediatric cochlear implantation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chantel

    and can conduct impulses carrying auditory information to the brain.2. PAEDIATRIC ... tory mechanisms, including speech ... resources in the auditory cortex.1. Conversely ... culties associated with cochlear ... with cognitive and/or motor devel-.

  5. Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics a quarterly journal publishes original articles, brief reports on ... Prevalence and pattern of intestinal parasites among pupils of private and public primary schools in an urban ... IP Oloyede, PU Essien, 81-83 ...

  6. Paediatric trauma care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this review, paediatric trauma care will be considered primarily for ... to technology increases, injury becomes a major source of childhood ..... reached include the nursing profession, workers in industry, ... New York: Freeman, 1984. 21.

  7. Paediatric pain management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    age, however paediatric pain expression is dependent on the child's cognitive development and sociocultural background. Children normally ... Middle childhood ... can use the visual analogue pain (VAP) scale in the same manner as adults.

  8. Diagnosis of necrotizing faciitis with bedside ultrasound: the STAFF Exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleberg, Erik; Jenson, Natasa; Dinh, Vi Am

    2014-02-01

    The early diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis is often ambiguous. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, while sensitive and specific modalities, are often time consuming or unavailable. We present a case of necrotizing fasciitis that was rapidly diagnosed using bedside ultrasound evaluating for subcutaneous thickening, air, and fascial fluid (STAFF). We propose the STAFF ultrasound exam may be beneficial in the rapid evaluation of unstable patients with consideration of necrotizing fasciitis, in a similar fashion to the current use of a focused assessment with sonography for trauma exam in the setting of trauma.

  9. Medical students' perceptions of bedside teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, David; Cozar, Octavian; Lefroy, Janet

    2017-06-01

    Bedside teaching is recognised as a valuable tool in medical education by both students and faculty members. Bedside teaching is frequently delivered by consultants; however, junior doctors are increasingly engaging in this form of clinical teaching, and their value in this respect is becoming more widely recognised. The aim of this study was to supplement work completed by previous authors who have begun to explore students' satisfaction with bedside teaching, and their perceptions of the relationship with the clinical teachers. Specifically, we aimed to identify how students perceive bedside teaching delivered by junior doctors compared with consultants. We aimed to identify how students perceived bedside teaching delivered by junior doctors compared with consultants METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to all third-year medical students at Keele University via e-mail. Responses were submitted anonymously. Forty-six students responded (37.4%), 73.3 per cent of whom said that they felt more comfortable having bedside teaching delivered by junior doctors than by consultants. Consultants were perceived as more challenging by 60 per cent of respondents. Students appeared to value feedback on their performance, trust the validity of taught information, and to value the overall educational experience equally, regardless of the clinical grade of the teacher. Student preference does not equate to the value that they place on their bedside teaching. Junior doctors are perceived as being more in touch with students and the curriculum, whereas consultants are perceived as having higher expectations and as being both stricter and more knowledgeable. The clinical teacher's approachable manner and enthusiasm for teaching are more important than clinical grade, as is the ability to deliver well-structured constructive feedback. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The use of pulse oximetry as a screening assessment for paediatric neurogenic dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, A T; Omahoney, R; Francis, H

    2008-01-01

    Early screening and intervention for dysphagia is crucial to offset potential outcomes such as compromised nutrition or reduced respiratory function. Current paediatric dysphagia screening tests are subjective with poor sensitivity and specificity. The present study examined whether an objective method, pulse oximetry (measuring oxygen saturation (SpO2) levels), could differentiate between children with and without dysphagia, in relation to (1) Average pre-feeding baseline SpO2 levels; (2) Average feeding SpO2 levels; (3) Average post-feeding SpO2 levels; and (4) The number of events of oxygen desaturation pre-, during and after feeding. Nine participants with chronic neurological disability (CND) (7 F, 2 M) (9; 7-15; 11 years) and nine control participants matched for age (9; 5-16; 0 years) and sex were assessed using a clinical bedside evaluation (CBE) and pulse oximetry. A statistically significant difference was found in SpO2 levels between the two groups (p dysphagia experienced 'events' of SpO2 desaturation during feeding. Pulse oximetry may provide a useful adjunct to the CBE for dysphagia screening, with average SpO2 levels during feeding predicting those with and without dysphagia with moderate levels of sensitivity and specificity. The finding of individual variation in desaturation 'events', however, warrants the provision of further data on large homogenous populations to provide definitive criterion for pathological SpO2 levels associated with dysphagia during oral feeding.

  11. Genodermatoses in paediatric age group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sunil

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Pattern of genodermatoses in paediatric age group was studied. The relative incidence of genodermatoses in paediatric dermatology out patient department was 0.62%. The commonest genodermatoses observed was ichthyosis.

  12. Paediatric musculoskeletal interventional radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolantonio, Guglielmo; Fruhwirth, Rodolfo; Alvaro, Giuseppe; Parapatt, George K; Toma', Paolo; Rollo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Interventional radiology technique is now well established and widely used in the adult population. Through minimally invasive procedures, it increasingly replaces surgical interventions that involve higher percentages of invasiveness and, consequently, of morbidity and mortality. For these advantageous reasons, interventional radiology in recent years has spread to the paediatric age as well. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the development, use and perspectives of these procedures in the paediatric musculoskeletal field. Several topics are covered: osteomuscle neoplastic malignant and benign pathologies treated with invasive diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures such as radiofrequency ablation in the osteoid osteoma; invasive and non-invasive procedures in vascular malformations; treatment of aneurysmal bone cysts; and role of interventional radiology in paediatric inflammatory and rheumatic inflammations. The positive results that have been generated with interventional radiology procedures in the paediatric field highly encourage both the development of new ad hoc materials, obviously adapted to young patients, as well as the improvement of such techniques, in consideration of the fact that childrens' pathologies do not always correspond to those of adults. In conclusion, as these interventional procedures have proven to be less invasive, with lower morbidity and mortality rates as well, they are becoming a viable and valid alternative to surgery in the paediatric population. PMID:26235144

  13. [What's new in paediatric dermatology?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantin, P

    2014-12-01

    Regular analysis of the major journals in dermatology and paediatrics has been used to select forty articles which are representative of the past year in paediatric dermatology. This selection is not exhaustive but rather reflects the interests of the author and also the dominant topics in paediatric dermatology in 2013-2014.

  14. African Journal of Paediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Journal of Paediatric Surgery aims to promote research, post- ... AJPS welcomes original articles, case reports, letters to the editor, editorials, commentaries, special communications and innovations related to ... Vol 11, No 2 (2014) ... A Canadian association of paediatric surgeons: Association of paediatric ...

  15. Implementing bedside handover: strategies for change management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, Anne; Chaboyer, Wendy; Wallis, Marianne; Fetherston, Cathy

    2010-09-01

    To identify factors influencing change in two hospitals that moved from taped and verbal nursing handover to bedside handover. Bedside handover is based on patient-centred care, where patients participate in communicating relevant and timely information for care planning. Patient input reduces care fragmentation, miscommunication-related adverse events, readmissions, duplication of services and enhances satisfaction and continuity of care. Analysing change management was a component of a study aimed at developing a standard operating protocol for bedside handover communication. The research was undertaken in two regional acute care hospitals in two different states of Australia. Data collection included 532 semi-structured observations in six wards in the two hospitals and 34 in-depth interviews conducted with a purposive sample of nursing staff involved in the handovers. Observation and interview data were analysed separately then combined to generate thematic analysis of factors influencing the change process in the transition to bedside handover. Themes included embedding the change as part of the big picture, the need to link the project to standardisation initiatives, providing reassurance on safety and quality, smoothing out logistical difficulties and learning to listen. We conclude that change is more likely to be successful when it is part of a broader initiative such as a quality improvement strategy. Nurses are generally supportive of quality improvement initiatives, particularly those aimed at standardising care. For successful implementation, change managers should be mindful of clinicians' attitudes, motivation and concerns and their need for reassurance when changing their practice. This is particularly important when change is dramatic, as in moving from verbal handover, conducted in the safety of the nursing office, to bedside handover where there is greater transparency and accountability for the accuracy and appropriateness of communication

  16. Electrodiagnosis in paediatric ophthalmogenetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Pkarian (Patricia)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn the present overview, practical application of the visual evoked potential (VEP) in paediatric neuro-ophthalmology is described across a wide range of ophthalmogenetic disorders, including albinism, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease and spastic paraplegia. The VEP approach is based on a fo

  17. Paediatric psychological problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Allan; Harrison, Christopher; Charles, Janice; Britt, Helena

    2014-04-01

    A 2011 BEACH-based study showed that over the past 40 years there has been increasing general practitioner (GP) involvement in the management of paediatric mental health in Australia. There has also been a changing mix of psychological conditions managed, including increased management of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

  18. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF PAEDIATRIC IDIOPATHIC HYPEREOSINOPHILIA

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Summary Hypereosinophilic syndromes (HES) include a group of heterogeneous diseases characterized by the persistent increase of the number of eosinophils in blood and bone marrow. Few cases of paediatric hypereosinophilia (pHES) have been described in the literature. Early identification of pHES that may evolve towards a lymphomyeloproliferative disease is relevant in light of prognostic and therapeutic implications. Molecular features of 10 pHES patients were analysed...

  19. Paediatric pharmacokinetics: key considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Hannah Katharine; Marriott, John Francis

    2015-01-01

    A number of anatomical and physiological factors determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug. Differences in physiology in paediatric populations compared with adults can influence the concentration of drug within the plasma or tissue. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of anatomical and physiological changes that affect pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs to understand consequences of dose adjustments in infants and children. Pharmacokinetic clinical trials in children are complicated owing to the limitations on blood sample volumes and perception of pain in children resulting from blood sampling. There are alternative sampling techniques that can minimize the invasive nature of such trials. Population based models can also limit the sampling required from each individual by increasing the overall sample size to generate robust pharmacokinetic data. This review details key considerations in the design and development of paediatric pharmacokinetic clinical trials. PMID:25855821

  20. Prosthetics in Paediatric Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vulićević Zoran

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Premature loss of teeth in children may lead to both functional and esthetic problems. Missing teeth in both anterior and posterior regions may cause malfunctions in mastication and proper pronunciation. If the missing teeth are not replaced, further complications may occur, including adjacent tooth migration, loss of alveolar bone, and irregular occlusion. Considering the sensitive nature of children, loss of teeth may cause the development of insecurities and low self esteem problems. Due to dynamic nature of growth in children and adolescents, prosthetic appliances must not hinder development of orofacial system, and must meet adequate esthetic and functional standards. Dental prosthetic appliances in paediatrics must be planned with respect to the special conditions that led to tooth loss or damage. Multi-disciplinary approach is needed, under constant supervision of paediatric dentist and orthodontist, as well as regular checkups with clinical and radiographical examinations.

  1. Equine cellular therapy--from stall to bench to bedside?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Janina; Badylak, Stephen F; Kelly, Jeremy; Brehm, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Pioneering clinical stem cell research is being performed in the horse, a recipient of cutting edge veterinary medicine as well as a unique animal model, paving the way for human medical applications. Although demonstrable progress has been made on the clinical front, in vitro characterization of equine stem cells is still in comparatively early stages. To translate the promising results of clinical stem cell therapy in the horse, advances must be made in the characterization of equine stem cells. Aiming to improve communication between veterinarians and other natural scientists, this review gives an overview of veterinary "bedside" achievements, focusing on stem cell therapies in equine orthopedics as well as the current state of in vitro characterization of equine multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and equine embryonic stem cells (ESCs).

  2. Litigation in paediatrics

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphu, JFA

    2011-03-01

    on the issue. This is understandable. Most individuals are healthy during their childhood and have less need of and less interaction with medical services when compared with adults. However, Paediatric litigation does happen and furthermore it is likely to increase in parallel with other specialties. Carroll and Buddenbaum1 have described the pattern of Paediatric litigation in the US. The annual incidence of malpractice claims has been quoted to be as high as 6.6 claims per 100 Paediatricians per year. Almost 30% of Paediatricians have been sued with many being sued on more than one occasion. Of these cases 36% were settled out of court, 33% were dropped by the plaintiff with the remainder going before the judiciary. The authors point out that in the US medical malpractice is a hotly debated issue. Litigation has a questionable impact on health care quality, cost, and access to services. The AMA believes that rising premiums are resulting in the curtailment of medical care particularly in states with high medico-legal rates. The Physician Insurers Association of America (PIAA) is a trade organisation which insures 60% of all private practicing physicians and surgeons has been a useful source of data. In the 20 year period 1985-2005 among a total of 214,226 claims there were 6363 (2.9%) Paediatric claims which ranked it 10th among the 28 specialties covered. The claims arose in equal numbers from the hospital and Paediatrician’s office settings. Common reasons for Paediatric litigation were errors in diagnosis (32%), incorrect performance of a medical or surgical procedure (13%), failure to monitor or manage a case effectively (10%) and medication error (5%). The top five medico-legal conditions were meningitis, routine infant or child checks, newborn respiratory problems, appendicitis and brain-damaged infants as a co-defendant with Obstetrics. Good quality information about litigation is important because the discussion among doctors is frequently confused by

  3. Dental fluorosis in the paediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atia, Gahder-Sara; May, Joanna

    2013-12-01

    Exposure to excessive fluoride intake during the early childhood years can disrupt the normal development of enamel, resulting in dental fluorosis. This varies in severity, ranging from white opacities in mild cases to more severe black and brown discoloration or enamel pitting. This article aims to give the reader a better understanding of the aetiology, diagnosis and subsequent treatment of dental fluorosis in the paediatric patient. Fluorosis can have a marked effect on dental aesthetics. The prevalence of fluorosis in the United Kingdom may increase following the publication of Delivering Better Oral Health, published by the Department of Health in 2007, which suggested changes to fluoride levels in children's toothpastes. This article highlights the importance of accurate diagnosis of fluorosis and also explains the treatment options available to paediatric patients.

  4. Fast tracking in paediatric cardiac anaesthesia : an update.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lake Carol

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A care plan in which cardiac surgical patients progress quickly through the perioperative course to hospital discharge is often referred to as a Fast Track. Such care plans have been used extensively in adult cardiac patients but are also applicable to paediatric patients. Although no randomised controlled trials are available to document a reduction in hospital costs and avoidance of iatrogenic complications with paediatric fast tracks, many healthcare administrators encourage their use. Fast Track clinical guidelines usually include same day surgery, use of short- acting anaesthetic drugs, early extubation, effective pain management, and reduced intensive care unit stays. These protocols are certainly appropriate for simple procedures such as repair of atrial or ventricular septal defects or ligation of a patent ductus arteriosus. However, many paediatric cardiac anaesthesiologists consider that all paediatric patients without significant pulmonary or residual cardiac pathology can be managed using expedited postoperative protocols. Essential components in a "fast track" protocol include use of minimally invasive surgical techniques, modified ultrafiltration during cardiopulmonary bypass, transoesophageal echocardiography to evaluate the cardiac repair, and postoperative pain control. Using such techniques, 80-90% of paediatric patients can be extubated in the operating room or within 2-4 hours postoperatively. Despite the opinions of recognised experts, an appropriately sized and powered multicentre, controlled, randomised, prospective study is still needed to conclusively document the efficiency and effectiveness of the Fast Track in paediatric cardiac patients.

  5. The EU paediatric regulation: effects on paediatric psychopharmacology in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanova-Beninska, Violeta V; Wohlfarth, Tamar; Isaac, Maria; Kalverdijk, Luuk J; van den Berg, Henk; Gispen-de Wied, Christine

    2011-08-01

    Child and adolescent psychiatry is a relatively young field and the recognition, classification, and treatment of disorders in children and adolescents lag behind those in adults. In recent years there is an increasing awareness of the differences between children and adults in psychopathology and pharmacology. Related to this new paediatric regulations have been introduced. This article reviews the regulatory and legislative measures that were adopted in the EU in 2007 and the subsequent impact of these measures on the field of paediatric psychopharmacology. The consequences of the paediatric regulation in the EU are reflected in several domains: regulatory, research aimed at drug development and clinical practices. In the regulatory domain, the consequences include: new paediatric indications, inclusion of special (class) warnings, specification of dose regimens, and information on safety specific to children and adolescents, and development of new medicinal formulations. The paediatric regulation leads to timely development of paediatric friendly formulations and better quality of the clinical evidence. In clinical practices, an increased awareness of the uniqueness of paediatric pharmacology is emerging among medical professionals, and subsequent improvement of medical care (i.e. correct doses, appropriate formulation, monitoring for expected adverse events). In addition, clinical guidelines will have to be revised more frequently in order to integrate the recently acquired knowledge. The new regulations stimulate transparency and discussions between academia, pharmaceutical industry, and regulators. The purpose is to optimize clinical research and obtain evidence for paediatric psychopharmacology, thereby providing adequate support for treatment.

  6. Drugs for the paediatric heart

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Cape, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Stellenbosch University ... Paediatric cardiologist, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, ... Correspondence to: John Lawrenson (jlawrens@pgwc.gov.za) .... Dental work is still .... an area where resuscitation equipment ... Africa and the diagnosis is easy to miss.

  7. Minimally invasive paediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacha, Emile; Kalfa, David

    2014-01-01

    The concept of minimally invasive surgery for congenital heart disease in paediatric patients is broad, and has the aim of reducing the trauma of the operation at each stage of management. Firstly, in the operating room using minimally invasive incisions, video-assisted thoracoscopic and robotically assisted surgery, hybrid procedures, image-guided intracardiac surgery, and minimally invasive cardiopulmonary bypass strategies. Secondly, in the intensive-care unit with neuroprotection and 'fast-tracking' strategies that involve early extubation, early hospital discharge, and less exposure to transfused blood products. Thirdly, during postoperative mid-term and long-term follow-up by providing the children and their families with adequate support after hospital discharge. Improvement of these strategies relies on the development of new devices, real-time multimodality imaging, aids to instrument navigation, miniaturized and specialized instrumentation, robotic technology, and computer-assisted modelling of flow dynamics and tissue mechanics. In addition, dedicated multidisciplinary co-ordinated teams involving congenital cardiac surgeons, perfusionists, intensivists, anaesthesiologists, cardiologists, nurses, psychologists, and counsellors are needed before, during, and after surgery to go beyond apparent technological and medical limitations with the goal to 'treat more while hurting less'.

  8. Creating a unique, multi-stakeholder Paediatric Oncology Platform to improve drug development for children and adolescents with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassal, Gilles; Rousseau, Raphaël; Blanc, Patricia; Moreno, Lucas; Bode, Gerlind; Schwoch, Stefan; Schrappe, Martin; Skolnik, Jeffrey; Bergman, Lothar; Bradley-Garelik, Mary Brigid; Saha, Vaskar; Pearson, Andy; Zwierzina, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Seven years after the launch of the European Paediatric Medicine Regulation, limited progress in paediatric oncology drug development remains a major concern amongst stakeholders - academics, industry, regulatory authorities, parents, patients and caregivers. Restricted increases in early phase paediatric oncology trials, legal requirements and regulatory pressure to propose early Paediatric Investigation Plans (PIPs), missed opportunities to explore new drugs potentially relevant for paediatric malignancies, lack of innovative trial designs and no new incentives to develop drugs against specific paediatric targets are some unmet needs. Better access to new anti-cancer drugs for paediatric clinical studies and improved collaboration between stakeholders are essential. The Cancer Drug Development Forum (CDDF), previously Biotherapy Development Association (BDA), with Innovative Therapy for Children with Cancer Consortium (ITCC), European Society for Paediatric Oncology (SIOPE) and European Network for Cancer Research in Children and Adolescents (ENCCA) has created a unique Paediatric Oncology Platform, involving multiple stakeholders and the European Union (EU) Commission, with an urgent remit to improve paediatric oncology drug development. The Paediatric Oncology Platform proposes to recommend immediate changes in the implementation of the Regulation and set the framework for its 2017 revision; initiatives to incentivise drug development against specific paediatric oncology targets, and repositioning of drugs not developed in adults. Underpinning these changes is a strategy for mechanism of action and biology driven selection and prioritisation of potential paediatric indications rather than the current process based on adult cancer indications. Pre-competitive research and drug prioritisation, early portfolio evaluation, cross-industry cooperation and multi-compound/sponsor trials are being explored, from which guidance for innovative trial designs will be

  9. The paediatric overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Stuart H. [Neurology Department, Institute of Child Health, University of Birmingham, Whittall Street, B4 6NH, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2004-01-01

    Stroke in children, both ischaemic and haemorrhagic, is increasingly recognised as an important paediatric illness. This review looks at the wide number of causes, highlighting the fact that often no single factor is causative on its own. There has been an increased recognition worldwide of the importance of sickle cell disease and of the importance of venous sinus thrombosis. Radiology is mandatory in diagnosis and management. Unfortunately, it is not always possible to extrapolate experience from adult stroke in terms of management of these children, and further detailed trials are necessary to understand the natural history, outcome and best forms of management. (orig.)

  10. Bedside ultrasound diagnosis of pulmonary contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Michael B; Secko, Michael A

    2009-12-01

    A 10-year-old boy presented to the emergency department after being struck by a van while crossing the street. He complained of right side chest pain, and a chest radiography was suggestive of pulmonary contusion. The treating physician performed a bedside ultrasound that revealed a right-sided pulmonary contusion that was subsequently confirmed on computed tomography of the thorax. The sonographic features of pulmonary contusion are described, and the possible role of lung sonography in the assessment of pediatric thoracic trauma is discussed.

  11. Bone tissue engineering: from bench to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Woodruff

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The drive to develop bone grafts for the filling of major gaps in the skeletal structure has led to a major research thrust towards developing biomaterials for bone engineering. Unfortunately, from a clinical perspective, the promise of bone tissue engineering which was so vibrant a decade ago has so far failed to deliver the anticipated results of becoming a routine therapeutic application in reconstructive surgery. Here we describe our bench to bedside concept, the first clinical results and a detailed analysis of long-term bone regeneration studies in preclinical animal models, exploiting methods of micro- and nano analysis of biodegradable composite scaffolds.

  12. Teaching Evidence-Based Physical Diagnosis: Six Bedside Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Steven

    2016-12-01

    Evidence-based physical diagnosis is an essential part of the bedside curriculum. By using the likelihood ratio, a simple measure of diagnostic accuracy, teachers can quickly adapt this approach to their bedside teaching. Six recurring themes in evidence-based physical diagnosis are fully reviewed, with examples, in this article.

  13. Bedside teaching in medical education: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Max; Ten Cate, Olle

    2014-04-01

    Bedside teaching is seen as one of the most important modalities in teaching a variety of skills important for the medical profession, but its use is declining. A literature review was conducted to reveal its strengths, the causes of its decline and future perspectives, the evidence with regard to learning clinical skills and patient/student/teacher satisfaction. PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane library were systematically searched with regard to terms related to bedside teaching. Articles regarding the above-mentioned subjects were included. Bedside teaching has shown to improve certain clinical diagnostic skills in medical students and residents. Patients, students/residents and teachers all seem to favour bedside teaching, for varying reasons. Despite this, the practice of bedside teaching is declining. Reasons to explain this decline include the increased patient turnover in hospitals, the assumed violation of patients' privacy and an increased reliance on technology in the diagnostic process. Solutions vary from increasingly using residents and interns as bedside teachers to actively educating staff members regarding the importance of bedside teaching and providing them with practical essentials. Impediments to bedside teaching need to be overcome if this teaching modality is to remain a valuable educational method for durable clinical skills.

  14. 母婴床旁护理对新生儿早期发育及产妇抑郁焦虑、泌乳量的影响%Maternal bedside care on early development of newborn and maternal depression and anxiety,lactation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗隽; 郑加永

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨母婴床旁护理对新生儿早期发育及产妇抑郁焦虑、泌乳量的影响。方法选择2013年1月至2015年6月收治的足月健康新生儿及产妇120例,随机分为对照组和观察组,各60例。两组新生儿及产妇均给予常规护理包括新生儿脐部护理和臀部护理,产妇护理包括外阴或腹部刀口换药,新生儿均常规接种疫苗,对照组采用将新生儿抱到公共婴儿沐浴室进行集中沐浴。观察组在此基础上实施母婴床旁护理方式,在床旁为新生儿沐浴并进行抚触,每天带新生儿进行游泳。采用焦虑评分(SAS)量表及抑郁评分(SDS)量表对两组产妇护理前后抑郁及焦虑状态进行评价,观察两组产妇不同时间泌乳量变化,测定新生儿神经测定评分(NBNA)及身高、体质量指数、头围的增长情况。结果护理后,两组产妇 SAS 及 SDS 评分较护理前均有所下降,且观察组患者 SAS 及 SDS 评分下降程度高于对照组,差异均有统计学意义(t =3.46、4.21,均 P <0.05)。护理后两组产妇泌乳量开始增长,观察组产妇泌乳量增长情况始终优于对照组,差异均有统计学意义(χ2=9.34、4.53,χ2=6.79,均 P <0.05).观察组新生儿的 NBNA 评分、头围、身高、提质量指数的增长均优于对照组,差异均有统计学意义(t =1.98、1.65、2.73、3.63,均 P <0.05)。结论母婴床旁护理可显著改善产妇抑郁焦虑评分,增加产妇泌乳量,并在新生儿早期发育中具有一定促进作用,因此值得临床推广应用。%Objective To investigate the influence of maternal and child care bedside on early development of newborns and maternal depression and anxiety,lactation.Methods From January 2013 to June 2015,120 cases of healthy full -term newborns and maternal admitted in our hospital were randomly divided into control group and

  15. Utility and potential of bedside ultrasound in palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekta Dhamija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bedside ultrasound is an important tool in modern palliative care practice. It can be utilized for rapid diagnostic evaluation or as an image guidance to perform invasive therapeutic procedures. With advent of portable ultrasound machines, it can also be used in community or home care settings, apart from palliative care wards. Major applications of bedside ultrasound include drainage of malignant pleural effusions and ascites, nerve blocks, venous access, evaluation of urinary obstruction, deep vein thrombosis and abscesses. Bedside ultrasound leads to better clinical decision-making as well as more accurate and faster invasive therapeutic procedures. It also enhances patient comfort and reduces cost burden. However, use of bedside ultrasound is still not widespread among palliative care givers, owing to initial cost, lack of basic training in ultrasound and apprehensions about its use. A team approach involving radiologists is important to develop integration of bedside ultrasound in palliative care.

  16. Bedside ultrasound procedures: musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlani, Lydia; Thompson, Laura; Vira, Amar; Panchal, Ashish R

    2016-04-01

    The widespread availability of ultrasound (US) technology has increased its use for point of care applications in many health care settings. Focused (point of care) US is defined as the act of bringing US evaluation to the bedside for real-time performance. These images are collected immediately by the practitioner, allowing for direct integration into the physician's medical decision-making process. The real-time bedside diagnostic ability of US becomes a key tool for the management of patients. The purpose of this review is to (1) provide a general description of the use of focused US for bedside procedures; (2) specify the indications and common techniques used in bedside US procedures; and (3) describe the techniques used for each bedside intervention.

  17. PREVALENCE OF BETA-HAEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCAL THROAT INFECTIONS IN PAEDIATRIC AGE GROUP IN MADURAI

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sugumari Chandrasegaran; Mahesh Prabhu Subramaniyan

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess the prevalence of Streptococcal sore throat infections in the paediatric age group in order to provide prompt treatment at an early stage to reduce the fatal consequences of post-infectious sequelae...

  18. Bedside screening to detect oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with neurological disorders: an updated systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertscher, Berit; Speyer, Renée; Palmieri, Maria; Plant, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a highly prevalent comorbidity in neurological patients and presents a serious health threat, which may le to outcomes of aspiration pneumonia ranging from hospitalization to death. Therefore, an early identification of risk followed by an accurate diagnosis of oropharyngeal dysphagia is fundamental. This systematic review provides an update of currently available bedside screenings to identify oropharyngeal dysphagia in neurological patients. An electronic search was carried out in the databases PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PsychInfo (formerly PsychLit), and all hits from 2008 up to December 2012 were included in the review. Only studies with sufficient methodological quality were considered, after which the psychometric characteristics of the screening tools were determined. Two relevant bedside screenings were identified, with a minimum sensitivity and specificity of ≥70 and ≥60 %, respectively.

  19. Cardiac Arrest after Local Anaesthetic Toxicity in a Paediatric Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Maria Torres de Araújo Azi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a paediatric patient undergoing urological procedure in which a possible inadvertent intravascular or intraosseous injection of bupivacaine with adrenaline in usual doses caused subsequent cardiac arrest, completely reversed after administration of 20% intravenous lipid emulsion. Early diagnosis of local anaesthetics toxicity and adequate cardiovascular resuscitation manoeuvres contribute to the favourable outcome.

  20. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: the paediatric perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Alison [Birmingham Children' s Hospital, Department of Adolescent Rheumatology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); McDonagh, Janet E. [Birmingham Children' s Hospital, Institute of Child Health, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    Paediatric rheumatology is a relatively new specialty that has developed rapidly over the last 30 years. There have been major advances, which have included improvements in the classification and management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The former has led to enhanced international collaboration with disease registries, multicentre research and the development of new therapeutic agents. This has resulted in improved disease control and remission induction in many. There is, however, still significant morbidity associated with JIA during childhood, adolescence and adulthood, and challenges for the future include early identification of those with a poorer prognosis, appropriate administration of safe therapies and optimizing outcomes as young people move through adolescence into adulthood. (orig.)

  1. Prebiotics as a modulator of gut microbiota in paediatric obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolucci, A C; Reimer, R A

    2017-08-01

    This review highlights our current understanding of the role of gut microbiota in paediatric obesity and the potential role for dietary manipulation of the gut microbiota with prebiotics in managing paediatric obesity. The aetiology of obesity is multifactorial and is now known to include microbial dysbiosis in the gut. Prebiotics are non-digestible carbohydrates which selectively modulate the number and/or composition of gut microbes. The goal of prebiotic consumption is to restore symbiosis and thereby confer health benefits to the host. There is convincing evidence that prebiotics can reduce adiposity and improve metabolic health in preclinical rodent models. Furthermore, there are several clinical trials in adult humans highlighting metabolic and appetite-regulating benefits of prebiotics. In paediatric obesity, however, there are very limited data regarding the potential role of prebiotics as a dietary intervention for obesity management. As the prevalence of paediatric obesity and obesity-associated comorbidities increases globally, interventions that target the progression of obesity from an early age are essential in slowing the obesity epidemic. This review emphasizes the need for further research assessing the role of prebiotics, particularly as an intervention in effectively managing paediatric obesity. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  2. Macrophage Activation Syndrome in Paediatric Rheumatic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M I; Talukder, M K; Islam, M M; Laila, K; Rahman, S A

    2017-04-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a potentially fatal complication of rheumatic disorders, which commonly occurs in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA).This study was carried out with the aims of describing the clinical features, laboratory findings and outcomes of MAS associated with paediatric rheumatic diseases in the Department of Paediatrics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) and compare these results with previous studies on MAS. This retrospective study was conducted in the paediatric rheumatology wing of the Department of Paediatrics, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh. Clinical and laboratory profile of all the diagnosed cases of MAS were analyzed from the medical records from January 2010 to July 2015. Among 10 MAS patients, 6 were female and 4 were male. Seven patients of systemic JIA, two patients of SLE and one patient with Kawasaki Disease developed MAS in their course of primary disease. Mean duration of primary disease prior to development of MAS was 2.9 years and mean age of onset was 9.1 years. High continued fever and new onset hepatosplenomegaly were the hallmark of the clinical presentation. White blood cell count and platelet count came down from the mean of 16.2 to 10.2×10⁹/L and 254 to 90×10⁹/L. Mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate was dropped from 56 to 29 mm/hr. Six patients had abnormal liver enzyme level (ALT) and 5 had evidence of coagulopathy (prolonged prothrombin time and APTT) at the onset of disease. Hyperferritinnemia were found in all the patients. Bone marrow study was done in 5 patients but features of hamophagocytosis were found only in 2 patients. All patients received intravenous steroid and 3 patients who did not respond to steroid received additional cyclosporine. Mortality rate was 30% in this series. Macrophage activation syndrome is a fatal complication of paediatric rheumatic diseases among which s-JIA was predominant. Early diagnosis and

  3. Bedside ultrasound in pediatric emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Jason A; Noble, Vicki E

    2008-05-01

    Bedside emergency ultrasound has been used by emergency physicians for >20 years for a variety of conditions. In adult centers, emergency ultrasound is routinely used in the management of victims of blunt abdominal trauma, in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and biliary disease, and in women with first-trimester pregnancy complications. Although its use has grown dramatically in the last decade in adult emergency departments, only recently has this tool been embraced by pediatric emergency physicians. As the modality advances and becomes more available, it will be important for primary care pediatricians to understand its uses and limitations and to ensure that pediatric emergency physicians have access to the proper training, equipment, and experience. This article is meant to review the current literature relating to emergency ultrasound in pediatric emergency medicine, as well as to describe potential pediatric applications.

  4. Characterization of Early Disease Status in Treatment-Naive Male Paediatric Patients with Fabry Disease Enrolled in a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijburg, Frits A.; Bénichou, Bernard; Bichet, Daniel G.; Clarke, Lorne A.; Dostalova, Gabriela; Fainboim, Alejandro; Fellgiebel, Andreas; Forcelini, Cassiano; An Haack, Kristina; Hopkin, Robert J.; Mauer, Michael; Najafian, Behzad; Scott, C. Ronald; Shankar, Suma P.; Thurberg, Beth L.; Tøndel, Camilla; Tylki-Szymańska, Anna; Ramaswami, Uma

    2015-01-01

    Trial Design This analysis characterizes the degree of early organ involvement in a cohort of oligo-symptomatic untreated young patients with Fabry disease enrolled in an ongoing randomized, open-label, parallel-group, phase 3B clinical trial. Methods Males aged 5–18 years with complete α-galactosidase A deficiency, without symptoms of major organ damage, were enrolled in a phase 3B trial evaluating two doses of agalsidase beta. Baseline disease characteristics of 31 eligible patients (median age 12 years) were studied, including cellular globotriaosylceramide (GL-3) accumulation in skin (n = 31) and kidney biopsy (n = 6; median age 15 years; range 13–17 years), renal function, and glycolipid levels (plasma, urine). Results Plasma and urinary GL-3 levels were abnormal in 25 of 30 and 31 of 31 patients, respectively. Plasma lyso-GL-3 was elevated in all patients. GL-3 accumulation was documented in superficial skin capillary endothelial cells (23/31 patients) and deep vessel endothelial cells (23/29 patients). The mean glomerular filtration rate (GFR), measured by plasma disappearance of iohexol, was 118.1 mL/min/1.73 m2 (range 90.4–161.0 mL/min/1.73 m2) and the median urinary albumin/creatinine ratio was 10 mg/g (range 4.0–27.0 mg/g). On electron microscopy, renal biopsy revealed GL-3 accumulation in all glomerular cell types (podocytes and parietal, endothelial, and mesangial cells), as well as in peritubular capillary and non-capillary endothelial, interstitial, vascular smooth muscle, and distal tubules/collecting duct cells. Lesions indicative of early Fabry arteriopathy and segmental effacement of podocyte foot processes were found in all 6 patients. Conclusions These data reveal that in this small cohort of children with Fabry disease, histological evidence of GL-3 accumulation, and cellular and vascular injury are present in renal tissues at very early stages of the disease, and are noted before onset of microalbuminuria and development of

  5. Development of a subspecialty cardiology curriculum for paediatric registrars in Malawi: Implementation of a long-distance hybrid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Laura; Kennedy, Neil; Greene, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Malawi has a high burden of paediatric cardiac disease but a limited number of health providers familiar with these chronic diseases. Given the rising number of Malawian postgraduate paediatric trainees at the University of Malawi College of Medicine, we sought to remedy this lack of basic cardiology training with a long-distance, module-based curriculum that could be utilised independently, as needed, with on-site teaching. We also wished to evaluate the initial modules for utility and improvement in knowledge and confidence in each topic. After an initial site visit to determine curriculum needs, online modules with interactive evaluations and quizzes were developed by a paediatric cardiologist in the United States, in collaboration with paediatric registrar training directors in Malawi. This online interactive curriculum was followed by several site visits to Malawi, by the United States-based paediatric cardiologist, to provide bedside teaching, case-based discussions and hands-on skill training in cardiac ultrasound and electrocardiogram interpretation. Evaluation of the curriculum model included post-module quizzes on cardiac topics as well as registrar self-assessments regarding confidence in content areas. The average post-module quiz score was 93.6%. Repeat testing with the same questions four months later yielded an average score of 78%, with a range from 60 to 100%. Pre- and post-module registrar self-assessment regarding confidence in content areas showed a substantial gain in knowledge and confidence mean. In their qualitative feedback, registrars noted that the modules were helpful in studying for their certifying examinations, and all four of the registrars sitting Part I of their Malawian and South African paediatric certifying examinations passed. Our innovative hybrid approach, combining online educational modules with in-person teaching visits, is a useful approach in expanding paediatric cardiology subspecialty education in Malawi.

  6. The evaluation of bedside teaching – an instrument for staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to role-model professional behaviour. These qualities .... The bedside teaching evaluation questionnaire (Fig.1) was adapted ... on a scale of 1 - 5, with 1 meaning 'not done' and 5 .... study relates to issues such as students' motivation to learn,.

  7. Improving nurse–physician teamwork through interprofessional bedside rounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkin, Stanislav; Chon, Tony Y; Christopherson, Marie L; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Worden, Lindsey M; Ratelle, John T

    2016-01-01

    Background Teamwork between physicians and nurses has a positive association with patient satisfaction and outcomes, but perceptions of physician–nurse teamwork are often suboptimal. Objective To improve nurse–physician teamwork in a general medicine inpatient teaching unit by increasing face-to-face communication through interprofessional bedside rounds. Intervention From July 2013 through October 2013, physicians (attendings and residents) and nurses from four general medicine teams in a single nursing unit participated in bedside rounding, which involved the inclusion of nurses in morning rounds with the medicine teams at the patients’ bedside. Based on stakeholder analysis and feedback, a checklist for key patient care issues was created and utilized during bedside rounds. Assessment To assess the effect of bedside rounding on nurse–physician teamwork, a survey of selected items from the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) was administered to participants before and after the implementation of bedside rounds. The number of pages to the general medicine teams was also measured as a marker of physician–nurse communication. Results Participation rate in bedside rounds across the four medicine teams was 58%. SAQ response rates for attendings, residents, and nurses were 36/36 (100%), 73/73 (100%), and 32/73 (44%) prior to implementation of bedside rounding and 36 attendings (100%), 72 residents (100%), and 14 (19%) nurses after the implementation of bedside rounding, respectively. Prior to bedside rounding, nurses provided lower teamwork ratings (percent agree) than residents and attendings on all SAQ items; but after the intervention, the difference remained significant only on SAQ item 2 (“In this clinical area, it is not difficult to speak up if I perceive a problem with patient care”, 64% for nurses vs 79% for residents vs 94% for attendings, P=0.02). Also, resident responses improved on SAQ item 1 (“Nurse input is well received in this area

  8. Blind bedside insertion of small bowel feeding tubes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duggan, SN

    2009-12-01

    The use of Naso-Jejunal (NJ) feeding is limited by difficulty in feeding tube placement. Patients have traditionally required transfer to Endoscopy or Radiology for insertion of small bowel feeding tubes, with clear resource implications. We hypothesised that the adoption of a simple bedside procedure would be effective and reduce cost. Clinical nutrition and nurse specialist personnel were trained in the 10\\/10\\/10 method of blind bedside NJ insertion.

  9. Paediatric leptospirosis: A population based case-control study from Chennai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, R; Sumathi, G; Prabhakaran, S G; Shanmughapriya, S; Natarajaseenivasan, K

    2016-01-01

    The surveillance in Chennai identified 134 children and 443 adults clinically suspected for leptospirosis. Of these, 35 (26.1%) children and 118 (26.6%) adults had laboratory confirmed diagnosis for leptospirosis. The paediatric leptospirosis exhibited a higher frequency of classic features of Weil's disease. The prevalent serovar encountered was Icterohaemorrhagiae with no difference in the pattern of infecting serovars between the two groups. Further, confirmation of diagnosis was achieved by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a positivity of 28.4% (specificity 96%). Univariate analysis showed significant association of paediatric leptospirosis with rat infestation (odds ratio 87.4). Thus, PCR facilitates early diagnosis of febrile illness among paediatric cases.

  10. The "basic" approach: a single-centre experience with a cost-reducing model for paediatric cardiac extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padalino, Massimo A; Tessari, Chiara; Guariento, Alvise; Frigo, Anna C; Vida, Vladimiro L; Marcolongo, Andrea; Zanella, Fabio; Harvey, Michael J; Thiagarajan, Ravi R; Stellin, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a lifesaving but expensive therapy in terms of financial, technical and human resources. We report our experience with a 'basic' ECMO support model, consisting of ECMO initiated and managed without the constant presence of a bedside specialist, to assess safety, clinical outcomes and financial impact on our health system. We did a retrospective single-centre study of paediatric cardiac ECMO between January 2001 and March 2014. Outcomes included postimplant complications and survival at weaning and at discharge. We used activity based costing to compare the costs of current basic ECMO with those of a 'full optional' dedicated ECMO team (hypothesis 1); ECMO with a bedside nurse and perfusionist (hypothesis 2), and ECMO with a bedside perfusionist (hypothesis 3). Basic cardiac ECMO was required for 121 patients (median age 75 days, median weight 4.4 kg). A total of 107 patients (88%) had congenital heart disease; 37 had univentricular physiology. The median duration of ECMO was 7 days (interquartile range [IQR], 4-15 days). Overall survival at weaning and at 30 days in the neonatal and paediatric age groups was 58.6% and 30.6%, respectively; these results were not significantly different from Extracorporeal Life Support Organization data. Cost analysis revealed a saving of €30 366, €22 144 and €13 837 for each patient on basic ECMO for hypotheses 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Despite reduced human, technical and economical resources, a basic ECMO model without a bedside specialist was associated with satisfactory survival and lower costs.

  11. [Toxicology screening in paediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Algar, Óscar; Cuadrado González, Ainoha; Falcon, María

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of acute or chronic exposure to substances of abuse in paediatric patients, from the neonatal period to adolescence, is not well established as most cases go unnoticed. Regardless of clinical cases of acute poisoning leading to visits to emergency room, the exposure is usually detected by a questionnaire to the parents or children. In the last few years, new validated analytical methodologies have been developed in order to detect parent drugs and their metabolites in different biological matrices. These biological matrices have different time windows for detection of the exposure: acute (i.e., urine, blood, oral fluid), and chronic (i.e., hair, meconium or teeth). The aim of this paper was to review the scenarios where the use of biological matrices is indicated for the detection of acute or chronic exposure to substances of abuse. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. A CLINICAL STUDY AND MANAGEMENT OF PAEDIATRIC CATARACT, OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish D. Shet

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Control of childhood blindness is one of the priorities identified for achieving the goals of Vision-2020 by WHO. This is considered a priority because blind-years (number of years that a blind person lives after going blind due to childhood blindness are second only to cataract and half of childhood blindness is avoidable (treatable/preventable. Paediatric cataract accounts for 12% of the 1.4 million blind children globally. The prevalence of childhood cataract has been reported as 1 to 15 cases in 10,000 children in developing countries. Compared to industrialised countries, this figure is 10 times higher. Early detection and timely treatment of various childhood disorders such as congenital cataract are the most crucial factors for successful outcome. A suitable measure to address amblyopia and posterior capsule opacification post operatively is imperative for successful visual rehabilitation of such children. The objectives of this study were- 1 To study the clinical profile of paediatric cataract. 2 To evaluate the visual outcome after cataract surgery in these patients. 3 To evaluate different causes of visual impairment following management. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective study conducted at Karnataka institute of medical sciences department of ophthalmology from October 2015 to September 2016. All children below 14 years of age presenting with cataract will undergo thorough ophthalmologic examination and cataract surgery. RESULTS The results of the present study with 25 paediatric patients (36 eyes indicates that excellent vision can be expected after cataract surgery and posterior chamber IOL implantation coupled with appropriate amblyopia therapy. CONCLUSION The paediatric cataract patients are referred from primary health centers, and district hospital from north Karnataka to KIMS Hubli. All paediatric patients are from lower socio economic status. Early detection of cataracts and referrals to the ophthalmologist can

  13. Training auscultatory skills: computer simulated heart sounds or additional bedside training? A randomized trial on third-year medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solheim Svein

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study compares the value of additional use of computer simulated heart sounds, to conventional bedside auscultation training, on the cardiac auscultation skills of 3rd year medical students at Oslo University Medical School. Methods In addition to their usual curriculum courses, groups of seven students each were randomized to receive four hours of additional auscultation training either employing a computer simulator system or adding on more conventional bedside training. Cardiac auscultation skills were afterwards tested using live patients. Each student gave a written description of the auscultation findings in four selected patients, and was rewarded from 0-10 points for each patient. Differences between the two study groups were evaluated using student's t-test. Results At the auscultation test no significant difference in mean score was found between the students who had used additional computer based sound simulation compared to additional bedside training. Conclusions Students at an early stage of their cardiology training demonstrated equal performance of cardiac auscultation whether they had received an additional short auscultation course based on computer simulated training, or had had additional bedside training.

  14. Systematic meta-analyses and field synopsis of genetic and epigenetic studies in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Song, Peige; Timofeeva, Maria; Meng, Xiangrui; Rudan, Igor; Little, Julian; Satsangi, Jack; Campbell, Harry; Theodoratou, Evropi

    2016-01-01

    We provide a comprehensive field synopsis of genetic and epigenetic associations for paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). A systematic review was performed and included 84 genetic association studies reporting data for 183 polymorphisms in 71 genes. Meta-analyses were conducted for 20 SNPs in 10 genes of paediatric Crohn’s disease (CD) and for 8 SNPs in 5 genes of paediatric ulcerative colitis (UC). Five epigenetic studies were also included, but formal meta-analysis was not possible. Venice criteria and Bayesian false discovery probability test were applied to assess the credibility of associations. Nine SNPs in 4 genes were considered to have highly credible associations with paediatric CD, of which four variants (rs2066847, rs12521868, rs26313667, rs1800629) were not previously identified in paediatric GWAS. Differential DNA methylation in NOD2 and TNF-α, dysregulated expression in let-7 and miR-124 were associated with paediatric IBD, but not as yet replicated. Highly credible SNPs associated with paediatric IBD have also been implicated in adult IBD, with similar magnitudes of associations. Early onset and distinct phenotypic features of paediatric IBD might be due to distinct epigenetic changes, but these findings need to be replicated. Further progress identifying genetic and epigenetic susceptibility of paediatric IBD will require international collaboration, population diversity and harmonization of protocols. PMID:27670835

  15. Paediatric and adult malignant glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Chris; Perryman, Lara; Hargrave, Darren

    2012-01-01

    Gliomas in children differ from their adult counterparts by their distribution of histological grade, site of presentation and rate of malignant transformation. Although rare in the paediatric population, patients with high-grade gliomas have, for the most part, a comparably dismal clinical outcome...... to older patients with morphologically similar lesions. Molecular profiling data have begun to reveal the major genetic alterations underpinning these malignant tumours in children. Indeed, the accumulation of large datasets on adult high-grade glioma has revealed key biological differences between...... the adult and paediatric disease. Furthermore, subclassifications within the childhood age group can be made depending on age at diagnosis and tumour site. However, challenges remain on how to reconcile clinical data from adult patients to tailor novel treatment strategies specifically for paediatric...

  16. Blood gas analysis for bedside diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Virendra; Khatana, Shruti; Gupta, Pranav

    2013-07-01

    Arterial blood gas is an important routine investigation to monitor the acid-base balance of patients, effectiveness of gas exchange, and the state of their voluntary respiratory control. Majority of the oral and maxillofacial surgeons find it difficult to interpret and clinically correlate the arterial blood gas report in their everyday practice. This has led to underutilization of this simple tool. The present article aims to simplify arterial blood gas analysis for a rapid and easy bedside interpretation. In context of oral and maxillofacial surgery, arterial blood gas analysis plays a vital role in the monitoring of postoperative patients, patients receiving oxygen therapy, those on intensive support, or with maxillofacial trauma with significant blood loss, sepsis, and comorbid conditions like diabetes, kidney disorders, Cardiovascular system (CVS) conditions, and so on. The value of this analysis is limited by the understanding of the basic physiology and ability of the surgeon to interpret the report. Using a systematic and logical approach by using these steps would make the interpretation simple and easy to use for oral and maxillofacial surgeons.

  17. Clonidine In Paediatrics - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha Basker

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Clonidine, an alpha-2 agonist is a known antihypertensive agent. Because of its sedative and analgesic effects, it is gaining popularity in anaesthesiology. It can be used to premedicate children, as an adjuvant to regional and general anaesthesia and it has several other applications in paediatric anaesthesia. It has also found use in the paediatric intensive care as a sedative, analgesic and to ensure haemodynamic stability. As in the case ol′any other anaesthetic drug, its use has to be vigilantly monitored.

  18. Interventional radiology for paediatric trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidhu, Manrita K. [Everett Clinic, AIC, Seattle Radiologists, Seattle, WA (United States); University of Washington School of Medicine, Radiology Department, Children' s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Hogan, Mark J. [The Ohio State University, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States); Shaw, Dennis W.W. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Radiology Department, Children' s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Burdick, Thomas [University of Washington School of Medicine, Interventional Radiology, Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2009-05-15

    Paediatric interventional radiology plays a cornerstone role in the management of paediatric trauma. In the acute setting, interventional radiology techniques allow minimally invasive control of haemorrhage or re-establishment of blood flow. Percutaneous stenting and drainage can allow disruptions in urinary or biliary systems to heal without the need for further surgery. Interventional radiology techniques also have a significant role in treating delayed complications of trauma, including embolization of arterial pseudoaneurysms and pulmonary embolism prophylaxis in individuals immobilized due to the trauma or its operative treatment. (orig.)

  19. The emerging global epidemic of paediatric inflammatory bowel disease--causes and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmborg, P; Hildebrand, H

    2016-03-01

    Two decades ago, paediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) drew only modest interest from the international paediatric community. Since then, dramatically globally increasing incidence rates have made childhood-onset IBD a priority for most paediatric gastroenterologists. The emerging pandemia of paediatric IBD has fuelled a quest to identify the recent changes in early life exposures that could explain the increasing risk for IBD amongst today's children. Treatment of children with IBD should aim for symptom control but should also target restoration of growth and prevention of pubertal delay. The paediatric IBD phenotype seems to be characterized by more extensive disease location, and some comparative studies have suggested that childhood-onset IBD also represents a more severe phenotype than the adult-onset IBD form. In this review, we analyse recent global incidence trends of paediatric IBD. We present an update on the known and suggested risk factors that could explain the emerging global epidemia of paediatric IBD. We also draw attention to differences in treatment between children and adults with IBD. Finally, we highlight latest follow-up studies that question the proposed dynamic and aggressive nature of childhood-onset IBD.

  20. Paediatric orofacial tumours: new oral health concern in paediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoregie, F O; Akpata, O

    2014-03-01

    This study aims to determine the incidence, age, gender, orofacial sites and histological pattern of paediatric orofacial tumours in a Nigerian population. The yearly findings will be analysed to identify the interval for increase in the incidence of paediatric orofacial tumours. A 21-year (1990 to 2010) retrospective analysis of paediatric orofacial tumours in children younger than 16 years was carried out in the Department of Oral Pathology/Oral Medicine, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria. Of the 1013 diagnosed lesions within the study period, there were 137 (13.5%) paediatric orofacial tumours, among which 71 (51.8%) cases occurred within the last 6 years (2005 to 2010). There was male predilection for the lesions (78 males to 59 females, ratio = 1.3:1). The mean age was 9 + 4.3 years, with peak age group of 11 to 15 years (n=60, 43.8%). The mandible (n=44, 32.1%), followed by the maxilla (n=42, 30.7%) and orofacial soft tissue (n=19, 13.9%) were the most common sites. The benign tumours (n=72, 52.6%) were slightly more than the malignant tumours (n=65, 47.4%). There were more malignant tumours (n=23, 16.8%) than benign tumours (n=20, 14.6%) within the last 3 years (2008 to 2010) under review. Burkitt's lymphoma (n=38, 27.7%) was the commonest malignant lesion. This study showed a recent increase in the incidence of paediatric orofacial tumours, particularly due to a higher incidence of Burkitt's lymphoma.

  1. FDG PET/CT in initial staging and early response to chemotherapy assessment of paediatric rhabdomyosarcomas; Apport de la TEP/TDM au {sup 18}FDG dans la stadification initiale et l'evaluation precoce de la reponse therapeutique des rhabdomyosarcomes pediatriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eugene, T.; Ansquer, C.; Oudoux, A.; Carlier, T.; Kraeber-Bodere, T.; Bodet-Milin, C. [Services de medecine nucleaire, CHU Hotel Dieu, 44 - Nantes (France); Corradini, N.; Thomas, C. [Services d' oncologie pediatrique, CHU Hotel Dieu, 44 - Nantes (France); Dupas, B. [Service de radiologie, CHU Hotel Dieu, 44 - Nantes (France)

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the impact of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), in comparison with conventional imaging modalities (CIM), for initial staging and early therapy assessment in paediatric rhabdomyosarcoma. Patients and methods: Prior to treatment, 18 patients (age range, 9 months to 18 years) with histologically proven rhabdomyosarcoma underwent FDG PET/CT in addition to CIM (magnetic resonance imaging of primary site, whole body CT and bone scintigraphy). After three courses of chemotherapy, 12 patients underwent FDG PET/CT in addition to CIM. RECIST criteria and visual analysis of FDG uptake were used for assessment of response. The standard of reference was determined by an interdisciplinary tumor board based on imaging material, histopathology and follow-up data (median = 5 years). Results: PET/CT sensitivity was superior to CIM's concerning lymph node involvement (100% versus 83%, respectively) and metastases detection (100% versus 50%, respectively). PET/CT results changed therapeutic management in 11% of cases. After three courses of chemotherapy, the rate of complete response was 66% with PET/CT versus 8% with CIM. Five percent of patients relapsed during follow-up (median = 5 years). Conclusion: This study confirms that PET/CT depicts important additional information in initial staging of paediatric rhabdomyosarcomas and suggests a superior prognostic value of PET/CT in early response to chemotherapy assessment. (authors)

  2. Autoimmune paediatric liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgina Mieli-Vergani; Diego Vergani

    2008-01-01

    Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis in childhood include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC),and de novo AIH after liver transplantation.AIH is divided into two subtypes according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA,type 1) or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1,type 2).There is a female predominance in both.LKM1 positive patients tend to present more acutely,at a younger age,and commonly have partial IgA deficiency,while duration of symptoms before diagnosis,clinical signs,family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders,response to treatment,and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC.The clinical,biochemical, immunological,and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH type 1.In both,there are high IgG,non-organ specific autoantibodies,and interface hepatitis.Diagnosis is made by cholangiography.Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates,times to normalization of biochemical parameters, and decreased inflammatory activity on follow up liver biopsies. However,the cholangiopathy can progress.There may be evolution from AIH to ASC over the years,despite treatment.De novo AIH after liver transplantation affects patients not transplanted for autoimmune disorders and is strikingly reminiscent of classical AIH,including elevated titres of serum antibodies, hypergammaglobulinaemia,and histological findings of interface hepatitis,bridging fibrosis,and collapse.Like classical AIH,it responds to treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine.De novo AIH post liver transplantation may derive from interference by calcineurin inhibitors with the intrathymic physiological mechanisms of T-cell maturation and selection.Whether this condition is a distinct entity or a form of

  3. Prolonged unexplained fatigue in paediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    Prolonged Unexplained Fatigue in Paediatrics. Fatigue, as the result of mental or physical exertion, will disappear after rest, drinks and food. Fatigue as a symptom of illness will recover with the recovering of the illness. But when fatigue is ongoing for a long time, and not the result of exertio

  4. Predictors of paediatric injury mortality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Wesley Guild Hospital Unit, Obafemi Awolowo University ... 90% of global deaths due to injuries in children occur in low-income ... sought and obtained by carefully explaining the purpose and benefits ..... terms of mortality and development of neurological sequelae.4-7,16 In.

  5. Methodologies to assess paediatric adiposity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Horan, M

    2014-05-04

    Childhood obesity is associated with increased risk of adult obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer. Appropriate techniques for assessment of childhood adiposity are required to identify children at risk. The aim of this review was to examine core clinical measurements and more technical tools to assess paediatric adiposity.

  6. Migraine patients consistently show abnormal vestibular bedside tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Teixeira Maranhão

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine and vertigo are common disorders, with lifetime prevalences of 16% and 7% respectively, and co-morbidity around 3.2%. Vestibular syndromes and dizziness occur more frequently in migraine patients. We investigated bedside clinical signs indicative of vestibular dysfunction in migraineurs.Objective To test the hypothesis that vestibulo-ocular reflex, vestibulo-spinal reflex and fall risk (FR responses as measured by 14 bedside tests are abnormal in migraineurs without vertigo, as compared with controls.Method Cross-sectional study including sixty individuals – thirty migraineurs, 25 women, 19-60 y-o; and 30 gender/age healthy paired controls.Results Migraineurs showed a tendency to perform worse in almost all tests, albeit only the Romberg tandem test was statistically different from controls. A combination of four abnormal tests better discriminated the two groups (93.3% specificity.Conclusion Migraine patients consistently showed abnormal vestibular bedside tests when compared with controls.

  7. Repeated bedside echocardiography in children with respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jehlicka Petr

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to verify the benefits and limitations of repeated bedside echocardiographic examinations in children during mechanical ventilation. For the purposes of this study, we selected the data of over a time period from 2006 to 2010. Methods A total of 235 children, average age 3.21 (SD 1.32 years were included into the study and divided into etiopathogenic groups. High-risk groups comprised: Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS, return of spontaneous circulation after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ROSC, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD, cardiomyopathy (CMP and cardiopulmonary disease (CPD. Transthoracic echocardiography was carried out during mechanical ventilation. The following data were collated for statistical evaluation: right and left ventricle myocardial performance indices (RV MPI; LV MPI, left ventricle shortening fraction (SF, cardiac output (CO, and the mitral valve ratio of peak velocity of early wave (E to the peak velocity of active wave (A as E/A ratio. The data was processed after a period of recovery, i.e. one hour after the introduction of invasive lines (time-1 and after 72 hours of comprehensive treatment (time-2. The overall development of parameters over time was compared within groups and between groups using the distribution-free Wilcoxons and two-way ANOVA tests. Results A total of 870 echocardiographic examinations were performed. At time-1 higher average values of RV MPI (0.34, SD 0.01 vs. 0.21, SD 0.01; p Conclusion Echocardiography complements standard monitoring of valuable information regarding cardiac load in real time. Chest excursion during mechanical ventilation does not reduce the quality of the acquired data.

  8. Eating disorders: from bench to bedside and back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetani, Silvana; Romano, Adele; Provensi, Gustavo; Ricca, Valdo; Lutz, Thomas; Passani, Maria Beatrice

    2016-12-01

    The central nervous system and viscera constitute a functional ensemble, the gut-brain axis, that allows bidirectional information flow that contributes to the control of feeding behavior based not only on the homeostatic, but also on the hedonic aspects of food intake. The prevalence of eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa, binge eating and obesity, poses an enormous clinical burden, and involves an ever-growing percentage of the population worldwide. Clinical and preclinical research is constantly adding new information to the field and orienting further studies with the aim of providing a foundation for developing more specific and effective treatment approaches to pathological conditions. A recent symposium at the XVI Congress of the Societá Italiana di Neuroscienze (SINS, 2015) 'Eating disorders: from bench to bedside and back' brought together basic scientists and clinicians with the objective of presenting novel perspectives in the neurobiology of eating disorders. Clinical studies presented by V. Ricca illustrated some genetic aspects of the psychopathology of anorexia nervosa. Preclinical studies addressed different issues ranging from the description of animal models that mimic human pathologies such as anorexia nervosa, diet-induced obesity, and binge eating disorders (T. Lutz), to novel interactions between peripheral signals and central circuits that govern food intake, mood and stress (A. Romano and G. Provensi). The gut-brain axis has received increasing attention in the recent years as preclinical studies are demonstrating that the brain and visceral organs such as the liver and guts, but also the microbiota are constantly engaged in processes of reciprocal communication, with unexpected physiological and pathological implications. Eating is controlled by a plethora of factors; genetic predisposition, early life adverse conditions, peripheral gastrointestinal hormones that act directly or indirectly on the central nervous system, all are

  9. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Chae

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing has been embraced by early adopters to produce medical imaging-guided 3D printed biomodels that facilitate various aspects of clinical practice. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. With increasing accessibility, investigators are now able to convert standard imaging data into Computer Aided Design (CAD files using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography (SLA, multijet modeling (MJM, selective laser sintering (SLS, binder jet technique (BJT, and fused deposition modeling (FDM. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without out-sourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. In this review the existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice, spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative aesthetics, are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, patient and surgical trainee education, and the development of intraoperative guidance tools and patient-specific prosthetics in everyday surgical practice.

  10. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Michael P; Rozen, Warren M; McMenamin, Paul G; Findlay, Michael W; Spychal, Robert T; Hunter-Smith, David J

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  11. 急性大面积ST段抬高型心肌梗死患者早期床旁应用主动脉内气囊反搏术预后观察%Observation on the prognosis of early application of bedside intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation in patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志娟; 李春燕; 董平栓; 杨旭明; 刘威; 王可; 李治国; 赵玉伟; 靳国青; 李转珍

    2012-01-01

    目的:研究急性大面积ST段抬高型心肌梗死(STEMI)患者在择期经皮冠状动脉介入治疗(PCI)前尽早床旁应用主动脉内气囊反搏术(IABP)对预后的观察.方法:选取发病12 ~72 h的STEMI患者150例,随机分为2组,IABP组72例,对照组78例,2组均给予规范的药物治疗,IABP组同时床旁应用IABP.2组均于发病10~14d行冠脉造影,必要时行PCI术,评价梗死相关血管PCI术前及术后冠脉血流,术后4周心功能、IABP主要不良心脏事件的发生情况.结果:2组患者PCI术前TIMI血流、PCI术后4周主要不良心脏事件的发生率、左心室射血分数(LVEF)均有显著性差异(P<0.05).结论:对于急性大面积STEMI患者择期行PCI,尽早床旁应用IABP能改善梗死相关血管的TIMI血流,改善心功能,减少主要不良心脏事件的发生率,临床应用安全可行.%Objective: To evaluate the effect of early application of intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation (IABP) on prognosis of patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) before elective percutaneous coronary interventional (PCI). Methods; One hundred and fifty patients with STEMI were randomly divided into two groups: 72 patients in IABP group and 78 in control group. All patients in IABP group receiving bedside IABP support treatment while patients in control group do not. All patients were performed PCI after 10 to 14 days. The blood flow rate of infart related coronary vessel was observed before and after PCI. The major adverse cardiac events ( MACE) and heart function at 4 weeks were studied. Results; In IABP group, blood flow rate of related coronary vessel, the occurance of MACE at 4 weeks, left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) were significant different in two groups (P < 0. 05). Conclusions; Early application of IABP for patients with STEMI before elective PCI is safe and effective, which can reduce the incidence of MACE, and improve heart function.

  12. Performance of Bedside Lung Ultrasound by a Pediatric Resident

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhan, Chen; Grundtvig, Natalia; Klug, Bent Helmuth

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Recent studies suggest that lung ultrasound is a good, radiation-free alternative to chest radiography in children with pneumonia. We investigated how bedside lung ultrasound performed by a pediatric resident compared with chest radiography in children with suspected pneumonia. METHODS......: This was a prospective study comparing bedside lung ultrasound to chest radiography as the reference standard. Children aged 0 to 15 years with suspected pneumonia at a pediatric emergency department were included and underwent chest radiography and lung ultrasound. A pediatric resident with minimal practical ultrasound...

  13. Bedside ultrasound education in Canadian medical schools: A national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Steinmetz

    2016-04-01

    Results:  Approximately half of the 13 responding medical schools had integrated bedside ultrasound teaching into their undergraduate curriculum. The most common trends in undergraduate ultrasound teaching related to duration (1-5 hours/year in 50% of schools, format (practical and theoretical in 67% of schools, and logistics (1:4 instructor to student ratio in 67% of schools. The majority of responding vice-deans indicated that bedside ultrasound education should be integrated into the medical school curriculum (77%, and cited a lack of ultrasound machines and infrastructure as barriers to integration. Conclusions: This study documents the current characteristics of undergraduate ultrasound education in Canada.

  14. Effects of continuing paediatric education in interpersonal communication skills.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, A.M. van; Holl, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Paediatric care places great demands on interpersonal communication skills, especially as regards the handling of psychosocial issues. Recent shifts in paediatric morbidity and increases in patient empowerment furthermore emphasize the need for continuing paediatric education in communication

  15. Effects of continuing paediatric education in interpersonal communication skills.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, A.M. van; Holl, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Paediatric care places great demands on interpersonal communication skills, especially as regards the handling of psychosocial issues. Recent shifts in paediatric morbidity and increases in patient empowerment furthermore emphasize the need for continuing paediatric education in communication skills

  16. [Current treatment strategies for paediatric burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küntscher, M V; Hartmann, B

    2006-06-01

    Paediatric burns occupy the third place in the severe accident statistics in Germany after traffic injuries and drowning. The paper reviews current treatment concepts of pre-hospital management, fluid resuscitation and surgical therapy in paediatric burned patients. Specific features in the approximation of the total body surface area burn and indications for transfer of paediatric burn victims to specialized units are discussed. The therapy of severe paediatric burns requires an interdisciplinary team consisting of especially skilled plastic or paediatric surgeons,anaesthetists, psychiatrists or psychologists, specifically trained nurses, physiotherapists and social workers. The rehabilitation process starts basically with admission to the burn unit. A tight cooperation between therapists and the relatives of the paediatric burn victim is needed for psychological recovery and reintegration into society.'The adaptation to the suffered trauma resulting in life-long disability and disfigurement is the main task of psychotherapy.

  17. Common paediatric cardiac emergencies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    presentations in older infants and children that are essential to recognise early in order to institute ... spell constitutes an emergency, as there is a high risk of hypoxic brain injury, stroke and even death. Clinical features. The clinical features ...

  18. Hypnosis in paediatric respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Joshua J; Vlieger, Arine M; Anbar, Ran D

    2014-03-01

    Hypnotherapy is an often misunderstood yet effective therapy. It has been reported to be useful within the field of paediatric respiratory medicine as both a primary and an adjunctive therapy. This article gives a brief overview of how hypnotherapy is performed followed by a review of its applications in paediatric patients with asthma, cystic fibrosis, dyspnea, habit cough, vocal cord dysfunction, and those requiring non-invasive positive pressure ventilation. As the available literature is comprised mostly of case series, retrospective studies, and only a single small randomized study, the field would be strengthened by additional randomized, controlled trials in order to better establish the effectiveness of hypnosis as a treatment, and to identify the processes leading to hypnosis-induced physiologic changes. As examples of the utility of hypnosis and how it can be taught to children with respiratory disease, the article includes videos that demonstrate its use for patients with cystic fibrosis.

  19. [Current aspects of paediatric cholesteatomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J P; Volkenstein, S; Minovi, A; Dazert, S

    2013-05-01

    Cholesteatomas can be subclassified into genuine and acquired forms. Whilst epidermoid formations are the generally accepted cause of genuine cholesteatomas, metaplasia, immigration, proliferation and retraction pocket theories have all been proposed to explain the development of acquired cholesteatomas. Clinically, paediatric cholesteatomas exhibit more extensive and aggressive growth than those arising in adulthood. Molecular biological differences in terms of angiogenesis, cytokine expression and particularly the more marked inflammatory responses of the perimatrix could potentially explain these clinical differences. The surgical therapy of paediatric cholesteatomas should be adapted to the individual pathological findings, although where possible a canal wall up procedure is preferred during initial surgery. The "inside-out" mastoidectomy tracking-technique combines the benefits of a good surgical overview with those of a physiological postoperative auditory canal.

  20. Trismus in the paediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shires, Peter M; Chow, Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    Trismus is a rare presentation affecting neonates, children, and adults. In newborns there are serious implications, with potential to affect feeding, cause airway problems, and make intubation difficult. Causes of trismus seen in the paediatric patient are discussed in this review article; they are divided into intra- and extra-articular types. The extra-articular group consists of congenital and acquired disorders. The acquired group includes infective causes such as tetanus, iatrogenic causes related to drugs, cancer or dental treatment, and trauma causing articulation difficulty or triggering a rare type of bone growth in myositis ossificans. Changes in the mouth resulting from oral submucous fibrosis can undergo malignant transformation. This review aims to raise awareness of potential causes of trismus in paediatric populations, helping clinicians identify the underlying pathology so appropriate strategies for treatment be applied, with the ultimate aim of improving long-term outlook and quality of life for affected children. © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  1. Paediatric bacteraemias in tropical Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Jeremy; Wallis, Peter; Maloney, Samuel; Norton, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Bacteraemias in children are an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Knowledge of local epidemiology and trends is important to inform practitioners of likely pathogens in the sick child. This study aimed to determine trends over time in pathogenic organisms causing paediatric bacteraemia in North Queensland and to audit a hospital's blood culture results with respect to contamination rate. This was a retrospective review of 8385 blood cultures collected from children attending a tertiary centre in North Queensland over a 10-year period (2001-2010). There were 696 positive blood cultures (8.3%) with 70 different bacterial species detected. Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria accounted for 48.6% and 51.4% of isolates, respectively. Overall, bacteraemia accounted for 4.7 per 1000 admissions. The rate of contamination was 60.6% among positive blood cultures and 5.0% for all blood cultures sampled. These results were compared with previous published reports. Notable differences were seen in the frequencies of Salmonella and group A Streptococcus bacteraemias in North Queensland when compared with other reports. There was also a decline in vaccine-preventable infections such as S. pneumoniae and an increasing trend of community-acquired MRSA bacteraemia. This study has demonstrated the unique profile of causative pathogens of paediatric bacteraemias in tropical Australia. In light of the increasing prevalence of MRSA, empiric treatment for sepsis for children in this region needs to be reconsidered. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  2. Essentials of paediatric infection control

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Dorothy L

    2001-01-01

    Young children readily transmit and acquire nosocomial infections. Children are also vulnerable to endogenous infections as a result of the breakdown of their normal defences by disease, invasive procedures or therapy. The increasing acuity of illness in hospitalized children and therapeutic advances have resulted in a patient population that is increasingly at higher risk for nosocomial infections. Antibiotic resistance has emerged as a problem in some paediatric hospitals, usually in intens...

  3. The bedside assistant in robotic surgery--keys to success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuh, Bertram

    2013-01-01

    Taking on the position of bedside assistant for a surgical robotic team can be a daunting task. Keys to success include preparation, proper operation set up, effective use of instruments to augment the actions of the console surgeon, and readiness for surgical emergencies. Effective communication, repetitive execution, and readiness facilitate the efforts of the surgical team.

  4. Accidental Carotid Artery Cannulation Detected by Bedside Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiles, Kris

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This report highlights the importance of using bedside ultrasound in the emergency department to confirm guide-wire placement when performing central venous catheter placement prior to dilating and cannulating the vessel. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(1:100-101.

  5. Beyond bench and bedside: disentangling the concept of translational research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, van der Anna Laura; Boenink, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    The label ‘Translational Research’ (TR) has become ever more popular in the biomedical domain in recent years. It is usually presented as an attempt to bridge a supposed gap between knowledge produced at the lab bench and its use at the clinical bedside. This is claimed to help society harvest the b

  6. Onset symptoms in paediatric multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Magnus Spangsberg; Sellebjerg, Finn; Blinkenberg, Morten

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Paediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) carries a relatively higher mortality and morbidity than adult MS. Paediatric MS symptoms and paraclinical findings at the first demyelinating event have never before been characterised in a Danish setting. The aim of this study was to compare...

  7. Recent developments in neonatal and paediatric emergencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turner, Nigel M.

    The present article is intended as an update for anaesthesiologists on recent developments in life-threatening paediatric emergencies and paediatric resuscitation. It is assumed that the reader has at least a basic knowledge of the general principles of emergency medicine, such as the ABCDE-approach

  8. Processes of care in paediatric rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siebes, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis the paediatric rehabilitation treatment process in the Netherlands is described with a focus on the parents' perspective. To what extent are parents involved in the different stages of the paediatric rehabilitation treatment process? What is being done in treatment? Is there a clear r

  9. Improving Treatment Response for Paediatric Anxiety Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ege, Sarah; Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie Louise

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is considered the treatment of choice for paediatric anxiety disorders, yet there remains substantial room for improvement in treatment outcomes. This paper examines whether theory and research into the role of information-processing in the underlying psychopat......Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is considered the treatment of choice for paediatric anxiety disorders, yet there remains substantial room for improvement in treatment outcomes. This paper examines whether theory and research into the role of information-processing in the underlying...... psychopathology of paediatric anxiety disorders indicate possibilities for improving treatment response. Using a critical review of recent theoretical, empirical and academic literature, the paper examines the role of information-processing biases in paediatric anxiety disorders, the extent to which CBT targets...... in improving response to CBT for paediatric anxiety disorders. Many important questions remain to be answered....

  10. Transfusion therapy in paediatric trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nystrup, Kristin Brønnum; Stensballe, Jakob; Bøttger, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Haemorrhage is a leading cause of death in paediatric trauma patients. Predefined massive transfusion protocols (MTP) have the potential to significantly reduce mortality by treating haemorrhagic shock and coagulopathy, in adhering to the principles of haemostatic resuscitation with rapid...... in paediatric trauma patients is challenging, and the optimal blood product ratio that will increase survival in massively bleeding paediatric trauma patients has yet to be determined. To date, only a few small descriptive studies and case reports have investigated the use of predefined MTP in paediatric trauma...... patients.MTP with increased FFP or PLT to RBC ratios combined with viscoelastic haemostatic assay (VHA) guided haemostatic resuscitation have not yet been tested in paediatric populations but based on results from adult trauma patients, this therapeutic approach seems promising.Considering the high...

  11. Model-Driven Paediatric Cardiomyopathy Pathways - A Clinical Impact Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroetmann, Karl A; Thiel, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Intermediate results from an ongoing health technology assessment exercise of a simulation model of paediatric cardiomyopathy are reported. Comprehensive data on paediatric cardiomyopathy/heart failure, treatment options, incidence and prevalence, prognoses for different outcomes to be expected were collected. Based on this knowledge, a detailed clinical pathway model was developed and validated against the clinical workflow in a tertiary paediatric care hospital. It combines three disease stages and various treatment options with estimates of the probabilities of a child moving from one stage to another. To reflect the complexity of initial decision taking by clinicians, a three-stage Markov model was combined with a decision tree approach - a Markov decision process. A Markov Chain simulation tool was applied to compare estimates of transition probabilities and cost data of present standard of care treatment options for a cohort of children over ten years with expected improvements from using a clinical decision support tool based on the disease model under development. Early results indicate a slight increase of overall costs resulting from the extra cost of using such a tool in spite of some savings to be expected from improved care. However, the intangible benefits in life years saved of severely ill children and the improvement in QoL to be expected for moderately ill ones should more than compensate for this.

  12. Paediatric Dupuytren′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeoth Mukundan Korambayil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dupuytren′s disease of the hand has only been rarely reported in children and is rarer still in infants. Only a few histologically confirmed diagnoses are found in literature. We report a case in a 4-month-old infant with Dupuytren′s disease of palm and thumb who required surgery at 6 months of age. Histology confirmed the diagnosis of Dupuytren′s disease. The purpose of this report is to show the importance of differential diagnosis of nodules and fibrotic bands in children′s hands as paediatric patients may be seen by a variety of treating physicians, not only plastic surgeons or pathologists.

  13. Canadian Paediatric Neurology Workforce Survey and Consensus Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doja, Asif; Orr, Serena L; McMillan, Hugh J; Kirton, Adam; Brna, Paula; Esser, Michael; Tang-Wai, Richard; Major, Philippe; Poulin, Chantal; Prasad, Narayan; Selby, Kathryn; Weiss, Shelly K; Yeh, E Ann; Callen, David Ja

    2016-05-01

    Little knowledge exists on the availability of academic and community paediatric neurology positions. This knowledge is crucial for making workforce decisions. Our study aimed to: 1) obtain information regarding the availability of positions for paediatric neurologists in academic centres; 2) survey paediatric neurology trainees regarding their perceptions of employment issues and career plans; 3) survey practicing community paediatric neurologists 4) convene a group of paediatric neurologists to develop consensus regarding how to address these workforce issues. Surveys addressing workforce issues regarding paediatric neurology in Canada were sent to: 1) all paediatric neurology program directors in Canada (n=9) who then solicited information from division heads and from paediatric neurologists in surrounding areas; 2) paediatric neurology trainees in Canada (n=57) and; 3) community paediatric neurologists (n=27). A meeting was held with relevant stakeholders to develop a consensus on how to approach employment issues. The response rate was 100% from program directors, 57.9% from residents and 44% from community paediatric neurologists. We found that the number of projected positions in academic paediatric neurology is fewer than the number of paediatric neurologists that are being trained over the next five to ten years, despite a clinical need for paediatric neurologists. Paediatric neurology residents are concerned about job availability and desire more career counselling. There is a current and projected clinical demand for paediatric neurologists despite a lack of academic positions. Training programs should focus on community neurology as a viable career option.

  14. Human dimensions in bedside teaching: focus group discussions of teachers and learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Subha; Orlander, Jay D

    2013-01-01

    Clinical teaching has moved from the bedside to conference rooms; many reasons are described for this shift. Yet, essential clinical skills, professionalism, and humanistic patient interactions are best taught at the bedside. Clinical teaching has moved from the bedside to conference rooms; many reasons are described for this decline. This study explored perceptions of teachers and learners on the value of bedside teaching and the humanistic dimensions of bedside interactions that make it imperative to shift clinical teaching back to the bedside. Focus group methodology was used to explore teacher and learner opinions. Four teacher groups consisted of (a) Chief Residents, (b) Residency Program Directors, (c) skilled bedside teachers, and (d) a convenience group of other Department of Medicine faculty at Boston University School of Medicine. Six learner groups consisted 2 each of 3rd-year students, PGY1 medicine residents, and PGY2 medicine residents. Each discussion lasted 60 to 90 minutes. Sessions were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using qualitative methods. Teachers and learners shared several opinions on bedside teaching, particularly around humanistic aspects of bedside interactions. The key themes that emerged included (a) patient involvement in discussions, (b) teachers as role models of humanism, (c) preserving learner autonomy, (d) direct observation and feedback of learners at the bedside, (e) interactions with challenging patients, and (e) admitting limitations. Within these themes, participants noted some behaviors best avoided at the bedside. Teachers and learners regard the bedside as a valuable venue in which to learn core values of medicine. They proposed many strategies to preserve these humanistic values and improve bedside teaching. These strategies are essential for true patient-centered care.

  15. Citation context and impact of 'sleeping beauties' in paediatric research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Završnik, Jernej; Kokol, Peter; Del Torso, Stefano; Blažun Vošner, Helena

    2016-12-01

    Objectives 'Sleeping beauties', i.e. publications that are not cited for a long while, present interesting findings in science. This study analysed the citation trends of sleeping beauties in paediatric research. Methods The study used bibliometric software to analyse the papers citing sleeping beauties in paediatric research, to understand the context in which paediatric sleeping beauties were finally cited and the impact of these sleeping beauties on paediatric research. Results Two paediatric sleeping beauties, addressing medical homes and the transition from paediatric to adult health care, respectively, awakened in response to organizational needs. Both presented novel concepts of paediatric service organization that became important because of an increased need for optimization of services. Conclusion All sleeping beauties bring new knowledge that becomes important only after several years. Paediatric sleeping beauties exhibited unique characteristics; however, their presence in paediatric research shows that knowledge acquisition in paediatrics resembles that in other disciplines.

  16. Provision of general paediatric surgical services in a regional hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zgraj, O

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: In Ireland, specialist paediatric surgery is carried out in paediatric hospitals in Dublin. General surgeons\\/consultants in other surgical specialities provide paediatric surgical care in regional centres. There has been a failure to train general surgeons with paediatric skills to replace these surgeons upon retirement. AIM: To assess paediatric surgical workload in one regional centre to focus the debate regarding the future provision of general paediatric surgery in Ireland. METHODS: Hospital in-patient enquiry (HIPE) system was used to identify total number of paediatric surgical admissions and procedures. Cases assessed requiring hospital transfer. RESULTS: Of 17,478 surgical patients treated, 2,584 (14.8%) were under 14 years. A total of 2,154 procedures were performed. CONCLUSION: Regional centres without dedicated paediatric surgeons deliver care to large numbers of paediatric patients. The demand for care highlights the need for formal paediatric services\\/appropriate surgical training for general surgical trainees.

  17. Elevated Intracranial Pressure Diagnosis with Emergency Department Bedside Ocular Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Amin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bedside sonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter can aid in the diagnosis of elevated intracranial pressure in the emergency department. This case report describes a 21-year-old female presenting with 4 months of mild headache and 2 weeks of recurrent, transient binocular vision loss. Though limited by patient discomfort, fundoscopic examination suggested the presence of blurred optic disc margins. Bedside ocular ultrasound (BOUS revealed wide optic nerve sheath diameters and bulging optic discs bilaterally. Lumbar puncture demonstrated a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF opening pressure of 54 cm H2O supporting the suspected diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Accurate fundoscopy can be vital to the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of patients with suspected elevated intracranial pressure, but it is often technically difficult or poorly tolerated by the photophobic patient. BOUS is a quick and easily learned tool to supplement the emergency physician’s fundoscopic examination and help identify patients with elevated intracranial pressure.

  18. Bedside diagnosis of mitochondrial dysfunction in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, A.; Nielsen, T. H.; Nilsson, O.

    2014-01-01

    to diagnose and separate cerebral ischemia and mitochondrial dysfunction bedside. The study explores whether cerebral biochemical variables in SAH patients most frequently exhibit a pattern indicating ischemia or mitochondrial dysfunction. Methods - In 55 patients with severe SAH, intracerebral microdialysis...... was performed during neurocritical care with bedside analysis and display of glucose, pyruvate, lactate, glutamate, and glycerol. The biochemical patterns observed were compared to those previously described in animal studies of induced mitochondrial dysfunction as well as the pattern obtained in patients...... with recirculated cerebral infarcts. Results - In 29 patients, the biochemical pattern indicated mitochondrial dysfunction while 10 patients showed a pattern of cerebral ischemia, six of which also exhibited periods of mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial dysfunction was observed during 5162 h. An ischemic...

  19. Bench-to-bedside review: An approach to hemodynamic monitoring--Guyton at the bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magder, Sheldon

    2012-10-29

    Hemodynamic monitoring is used to identify deviations from hemodynamic goals and to assess responses to therapy. To accomplish these goals one must understand how the circulation is regulated. In this review I begin with an historical review of the work of Arthur Guyton and his conceptual understanding of the circulation and then present an approach by which Guyton's concepts can be applied at the bedside. Guyton argued that cardiac output and central venous pressure are determined by the interaction of two functions: cardiac function, which is determined by cardiac performance; and a return function, which is determined by the return of blood to the heart. This means that changes in cardiac output are dependent upon changes of one of these two functions or of both. I start with an approach based on the approximation that blood pressure is determined by the product of cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance and that cardiac output is determined by cardiac function and venous return. A fall in blood pressure with no change in or a rise in cardiac output indicates that a decrease in vascular resistance is the dominant factor. If the fall in blood pressure is due to a fall in cardiac output then the role of a change in the return function and cardiac function can be separated by the patterns of changes in central venous pressure and cardiac output. Measurement of cardiac output is a central component to this approach but until recently it was not easy to obtain and was estimated from surrogates. However, there are now a number of non-invasive devices that can give measures of cardiac output and permit the use of physiological principles to more rapidly appreciate the primary pathophysiology behind hemodynamic abnormalities and to provide directed therapy.

  20. Pancreatic cancer: from bench to bedside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yaokai; Wu, Qing; Li, Xin; Gu, Xiaoqiang; Xu, Jiahua

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is recognized as the king of carcinoma, and the gap between basic research and clinical practice is difficult to improve the treatment effect. Translational medicine builds an important bridge between pancreatic cancer basic research and clinical practice from the pathogenesis, early diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma, drug screening, treatment strategies and metastasis prediction. This article will carry on the concrete elaboration to the above several aspects.

  1. THE PREDICTION OF DIFFICULT INTUBATION WITH BEDSIDE SCORING SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Gerçek, Arzu; Lim, Sema; İşler, Banu; Eti, Zeynep; Göğüs, Yılmaz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation of sex, age, bedside scoring systems and body mass index with laryngoscopic view in patients with clinically difficult intubation.Methods: Five hundred patients, aged 20-70 years, were included in the study. The age, sex, weight and height of the patients were recorded preoperatively and body mass index was calculated. The patients were examined for Mallampati classification, thyromental distance, mouth opening, neck mobility an...

  2. Parental knowledge of paediatric vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borràs Eva

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although routine vaccination is a major tool in the primary prevention of some infectious diseases, there is some reluctance in a proportion of the population. Negative parental perceptions of vaccination are an important barrier to paediatric vaccination. The aim of this study was to investigate parental knowledge of paediatric vaccines and vaccination in Catalonia. Methods A retrospective, cross-sectional study was carried out in children aged Results An association was observed between greater vaccination coverage of the 4:4:4:3:1 schedule (defined as: 4 DTPa/w doses, 4 Hib doses, 4 OPV doses, 3 MenC doses and 1 MMR dose and maternal age >30 years (OR: 2.30; 95% CI: 1.20–4.43 and with a knowledge of vaccination score greater than the mean (OR: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.28–0.72. The score increased with maternal educational level and in parents of vaccinated children. A total of 20.47% of parents stated that vaccines could have undesirable consequences for their children. Of these, 23.26% had no specific information and 17.83% stated that vaccines can cause adverse reactions and the same percentage stated that vaccines cause allergies and asthma. Conclusion Higher vaccination coverage is associated with older maternal age and greater knowledge of vaccination. Vaccination coverage could be raised by improving information on vaccines and vaccination.

  3. Information technology in paediatric rheumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolaro, Alessandro; Morgan, Esi M; Giancane, Gabriella; Rosina, Silvia; Lanni, Stefano; Ravelli, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Information technology in paediatric rheumatology has seen several exciting developments in recent years. The new multidimensional questionnaires for juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile dermatomyositis, and juvenile autoinflammatory diseases integrate all major parent- and child-reported outcomes (PCROs) used in these diseases into a single tool, and provide an effective guide to manage, document change in health, assess effectiveness of therapeutic interventions, and verify the parent and child satisfaction with illness outcome. The Pharmachild registry is aimed to gain information concerning the long-term effectiveness and safety of the medications currently used in juvenile idiopathic arthritis, particularly biologic agents, through collection of prospective data in a large, multinational sample of patients. Children and their parents are directly involved in the data collection by means of the regular completion of a digital version of a multidimensional questionnaire. The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) employs modern measurement science to advance assessment of PCROs, particularly HRQL, and offers multidimensional profile measures. The conceptual link of paediatric PROMIS with adult instruments facilitates harmonisation of assessments made in children and adolescents with those carried out in young adults in the process of transition of medical care. Development of electronic versions of questionnaires that permit their completion through smartphones or touch-screen devices will revolutionise information collection from parents and children, foster the regular collection of PCROs in routine care, and ultimately improve the quality of self-reported health data, and patient outcomes.

  4. Do lean practices lead to more time at the bedside?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackett, Tiffany; Comer, Linda; Whichello, Ramona

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to evaluate the application of value-added processes in healthcare, with an emphasis on their effects on bedside nursing. Literature relevant to Lean methodology and inpatient care was reviewed, excluding all research related to other service lines (i.e., surgical services, emergency services, laboratory, radiology, etc.). Increased value is also an important tenet of transforming care at the bedside (TCAB), an initiative launched by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). Therefore, articles concerning TCAB were also included in this review. A systematic study of the literature revealed varied applications of Lean principles in practice, ranging from the implementation of a single tool, to full organizational restructuring. All articles reviewed reported positive results, although the majority lacked strong supporting evidence for claims of improvement. Even though there is some indication that the application of Lean principles to nursing processes is successful in improving specific outcomes, the authors cannot conclude that the implementation of Lean methodology or TCAB greatly influences direct patient care, or increases time spent at the bedside. © 2011 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  5. Bedside ultrasonography-Applications in critical care: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Chacko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Point of care ultrasonography, performed by acute care physicians, has developed into an invaluable bedside tool providing important clinical information with a major impact on patient care. In Part II of this narrative review, we describe ultrasound guided central venous cannulation, which has become standard of care with internal jugular vein cannulation. Besides improving success rates, real-time guidance also significantly reduces the incidence of complications. We also discuss compression ultrasonography - a quick and effective bedside screening tool for deep vein thrombosis of the lower extremity. Abdominal ultrasound offers vital clues in the emergency setting; in the unstable trauma victim, a focused examination may provide immediate answers and has largely superseded diagnostic peritoneal lavage in diagnosing intraperitoneal bleed. From estimation of intracranial pressure to transcranial Doppler studies, ultrasound is becoming increasingly relevant to neurocritical care. Ultrasound may also help with airway management in several situations, including percutaneous tracheostomy. Clearly, bedside ultrasonography has become an indispensable part of intensive care practice - in the rapid assessment of critically ill-patients as well as in enhancing the safety of invasive procedures.

  6. Framework conditions facilitating paediatric clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfarez Deborah

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of unlicensed and "off-label" medicines in children is widespread. Between 50-80% of the medicines currently administered to children have neither been tested nor authorized for their use in the paediatric population which represents approximately 25% of the whole European population. On 26 January 2007, entered into force the European Regulation of Paediatric Medicines. It aims at the quality of research into medicines for children but without subjecting the paediatric population to unnecessary clinical trial. This article addresses ethical and legal issues arising from the regulation and makes recommendations for the framework conditions facilitating the development of clinical research with children.

  7. Medical management of paediatric burn injuries: best practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Leo K P; Martin, Hugh C O; Holland, Andrew J A

    2012-04-01

    Burns commonly occur in children and their first aid remains inadequate despite burn prevention programmes. While scald injuries predominate, contact and flame burns remain common. Although typically less severe injuries overall than those in adults, hypertrophic scarring complicating both the burn wound and even donor sites occur more frequently in children. The heterogeneous nature of burn wounds, coupled with the difficulties associated with the early clinical assessment of burn depth, has stimulated the application of novel technologies to predict burn wound outcome. This review explores current best practice in the management of paediatric burns, with a focus on prevention, optimal first aid, resuscitation, burn wound prediction and wound management strategies.

  8. Diagnosis and Management of Bacterial Meningitis in the Paediatric Population: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine L. Tacon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paediatric bacterial meningitis is a neurological emergency which, despite advances in medical management, still has a significant morbidity and mortality. Over recent decades new vaccines have led to a change in epidemiology of the disease; however, it remains a condition that requires a high index of suspicion, prompt diagnosis, and early management in the emergency department. New laboratory techniques and clinical tools are aiding the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis, yet some controversies still exist in its management. This paper outlines the changing epidemiology of the disease, current diagnostic techniques as well as controversies and advances in the management of bacterial meningitis in the paediatric population.

  9. Impact of the European paediatric legislation in paediatric rheumatology: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Vesely, Richard; Saint-Raymond, Agnes; Martini, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    Conducting clinical trials in paediatric rheumatology has been difficult mainly because of the lack of funding for academic studies and the lack of interest by pharmaceutical companies in the small and non-rewarding paediatric market. The situation changed dramatically a few years ago with the introduction of the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act in the USA and of specific legislation for the development of paediatric medicines (Paediatric Regulation) in the European Union (EU). The EU Paediatric Regulation had a positive impact in paediatric rheumatology-in particular, on the development of new treatments for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Some problems remain, however, such as greater harmonisation of the regulatory aspects of medicines, how to handle me-too agents, how to conduct adequate pharmacokinetic studies and develop age-appropriate formulations, ethical problems in study review and implementation, and a change in the current JIA classification. The introduction of specific legislation, coupled with the existence of large international networks such as the Pediatric Rheumatology Collaborative Study Group (PRCSG at http://www.prcsg.org), covering North America, and the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO at http://www.printo.it), covering more than 50 countries, has led to great advances in paediatric rheumatology. Future changes might increase the possibility of conducting trials with similar approaches in other paediatric rheumatological conditions and provide evidence-based treatments for children affected by rheumatic diseases.

  10. Paediatrics and psychoanalysis--Miss Anna Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Miss Anna Freud died during the winter at the age of 86. She had been a pioneer in the understanding of children through psychoanalysis and a great champion of the rights of children. Her life began in Vienna as the youngest child of Sigmund Freud, and her early work with children was in Austria. In 1938, because of the Nazi régime and even though she was nursing her father during his terminal illness, she had to escape with him to London. Her work with homeless children and with those in residential nurseries in London during the second world war is well known, as is her work on child development and psychopathology in the postwar years. But one less well known aspect of her life that was of immense importance to a few fortunate British paediatricians was the 'paediatric group' that she ran for over a quarter of a century and which Dr Christine Cooper recalled at the memorial meeting in London earlier this year. PMID:6344806

  11. Familial adenomatous polyposis: from bedside to benchside.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, M J

    2012-02-03

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a dominantly inherited cancer-predisposition syndrome with an incidence of between 1:17,000 and 1:5,000. The condition has been causally linked to mutation of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene located at 5q21. Virtually all mutations in the APC gene are truncating mutations, resulting in loss of function of the APC protein. Spontaneous germline mutation of this gene occurs frequently and accounts for the high incidence of FAP. The gene is somatically mutated at an early point in the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma progression. Somatic mutations of the APC gene are also frequently observed in a variety of other human carcinomas. Isolation of the APC gene has led to the recognition of genotype-phenotype correlations and, together with protein studies, has helped to elucidate the structure and function of the APC protein. This report aims to take the reader from a clinical appreciation to a molecular understanding of FAP.

  12. Bedside Analysis of Acid-Base Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. S. Podlesskikh

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory service is one of the most hang-the-expense items in the cost of treatment of patients in an intensive care unit. Isolated acid-base balance (ABB impairments are rare in clinical practice. These impairments are generally combined and they frequently cause a drastic change in the pH value of blood. Early detection of their origin and its elimination are of profound importance in these situations. Miniaturization of analyzers has made it possible to conduct some investigations and particularly to determine ABB just in the intensive care unit or operating suite. The attached software permits creation of a database and transmission of information to the laboratory network. One year’s experience has indicated that the quality of reagents and reference substances allows real-time determination of the values of ABB with a high degree of accuracy and reproducibility at a patient’s bed. 

  13. STUDY OF AETIOLOGICAL FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO PAEDIATRIC STRABISMUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dharmaraju

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To know various causes, sex distribution, socioeconomic status, onset, severity, visual prognosis of paediatric strabismus. METHODOLOGY The present study was undertaken for a period of 18 months. All the patients were selected from those attending the outpatient department. 50 cases of squint were evaluated thoroughly to know the various factors responsible for squint and how it was caused. RESULTS Total Number of Patients who attended OPD were 72,431 (4000 per month. Total Number of Paediatric squint cases among them were 121. So, Incidence of Paediatric squint in general OP was-0.16%. In the present study of total 121 paediatric squint cases, 21 cases did not fulfil the inclusion criteria and in the remaining 100, cases were included by taking every 2nd patient. Esotropia is seen in 38 children contributing to 76% of total and exotropia is seen in 12 children contributing 24% of total cases. Most common cause of esotropia is Essential Infantile Esotropia contributing to 31% of total esotropias. Males are affected more commonly than females with an incidence of 60%. Esotropia is seen in 38 children contributing to 76% of total and exotropia is seen in 12 children contributing 24% of total cases. In this study, males are affected more commonly than females contributing to 60% of total and females constitute 40% of the total. In this study, incidence of paediatric squint is more commonly seen in lower socioeconomic population contributing 60% of the total. 15 cases are of congenital in onset constituting 30% of total and 35 cases are of acquired in onset constituting 70% of total. Small angle Esotropia and large angle Esotropia: In this study out of total 38 cases of esotropia, large angle esotropias are more common and contributing to 89% of the total. Out of total 50 cases, 16% had an angle of 30⁰. Out of 50 cases, significant family history was present in 15 cases contributing to 30% of total cases. Following early

  14. Chvostek's sign in paediatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Zeeshaan U; Absamara, Rania; Ahmed, Mas

    2014-01-01

    Chvostek's Sign was first described in 1876, as a clinical clue associated with patients who suffered from latent tetany, and is induced by percussion of the angle of the jaw. However, over the years many clinicians have called into question the strength of the association with latent tetany, particularly in paediatric practice. This review examines the variation in techniques used to elicit the sign in studies conducted on this phenomenon in children as well as how differences in the classification of a positive Chvostek's sign have lead to varied reports on the strength of the association. Furthermore, an appraisal of the literature regarding the proposed mechanism of Chvostek's sign is reported alongside analysing other diseases which have been associated with Chvostek's sign to uncover any unifying mechanism for the presence of this clinical sign in children.

  15. Steroid assays in paediatric endocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honour, John W

    2010-01-01

    Most steroid disorders of the adrenal cortex come to clinical attention in childhood and in order to investigate these problems, there are many challenges to the laboratory which need to be appreciated to a certain extent by clinicians. The analysis of sex steroids in biological fluids from neonates, over adrenarche and puberty present challenges of specificities and concentrations often in small sample sizes. Different reference ranges are also needed for interpretations. For around 40 years, quantitative assays for the steroids and their regulatory peptide hormones have been possible using immunoassay techniques. Problems are recognised and this review aims to summarise the benefits and failings of immunoassays and introduce where tandem mass spectrometry is anticipated to meet the clinical needs for steroid analysis in paediatric endocrine investigations. It is important to keep a dialogue between clinicians and the laboratory, especially when any laboratory result does not make sense in the clinical investigation.

  16. Therapeutic clowning in paediatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Fiona; Baverstock, Anna; Lenton, Simon

    2014-10-01

    Over the past 30 years, there has been much research into the health benefits of humour and laughter. Although often viewed very positively, rigorous evaluation of the therapeutic effect of clowning is complex. Clowning is a multi-modal intervention, which may have an impact on medical conditions, procedures, family functioning and health care teams. Clowns help children to adapt to their hospital surroundings and can distract from, and demystify, painful or frightening procedures through 'doses of fun' to complement traditional clinical interventions. This paper provides a review of the paediatric literature and reveals studies looking at the effect of clown interventions on various practical procedures and individual medical conditions, and the effects of clowning within clinical teams.

  17. Diagnostic reference levels for paediatric computed tomography ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To establish local diagnostic reference levels (LDRLs) for ... and dose length product (DLP) data from uncontrasted paediatric head CT scans ... LDRL values were compared with several national DRLs from Europe and Australia.

  18. Job satisfaction and burnout among paediatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Ozlem; Ozturk, Candan; Bektas, Murat; Ayar, Dijle; Armstrong, Merry A

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to determine factors of job satisfaction and burnout levels of paediatric nurses. A total of 165 nurses working in paediatric clinics completed the Minnesota job satisfaction scale and the Maslach burnout scale. Average scores of the emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation score were low, while personal accomplishment scores were high. A high level of job satisfaction, being married, increased age and a decreased number of assigned patients were significantly associated with a low level of burnout. Paediatric nurses experience burnout at significant levels. The most important variable that affected job satisfaction was income. The results of the study could guide development of strategies that might prevent or alleviate burnout of paediatric nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Paediatric Neurological Conditions Seen at the Physiotherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paediatric Neurological Conditions Seen at the Physiotherapy Department of Federal Medical Centre, ... of published works on the patterns of neurological conditions seen in Nigerian physiotherapy clinics of rural locations. ... Article Metrics.

  20. Paediatric horse-related trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Jane E; Theodore, Sigrid G; Stockton, Kellie A; Kimble, Roy M

    2017-06-01

    This retrospective cohort study reported on the epidemiology of horse-related injuries for patients presenting to the only tertiary paediatric trauma hospital in Queensland. The secondary outcome was to examine the use of helmets and adult supervision. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) was examined in relation to helmet use. Morbidity and mortality were also recorded. Included were all patients presenting with any horse-related trauma to the Royal Children's Hospital in Brisbane from January 2008 to August 2014. Data were retrospectively collected on patient demographics, hospital length of stay (LOS), mechanism of injury (MOI), safety precautions taken, diagnoses and surgical procedures performed. Included in the analysis were 187 incidents involving 171 patients. Most patients were aged 12-14 years (36.9%) and female (84.5%). The most common MOI were falls while riding horses (97.1%). Mild TBI (24.6%) and upper limb fractures (20.9%) were common injuries sustained. Patients who wore helmets had significantly reduced hospital LOS and severity of TBI when compared with those who did not wear helmets (P < 0.001 and P = 0.028, respectively). Morbidity was reported in 7.5% of patients. There were three deaths in Queensland. Helmet use is recommended for non-riders when handling horses, in addition to being a compulsory requirement whilst horse riding. Prompts in documentation may assist doctors to record the use of safety attire and adult supervision. This will allow future studies to further investigate these factors in relation to clinical outcomes. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  1. The european paediatric legislation: benefits and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocchi Francesca

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lack of availability of appropriate medicines for children is an extensive and well known problem. Paediatricians and Physicians who take care of the paediatric population are primarily exposed to cope with this negative situation very often as more than half of the children are prescribed off-label or unlicensed medicines. Discussion Medicinal products used to treat this population should be subjected to ethical research of high quality and be explicitly authorised for use in children as it happens in adults. For that reason, and following the US experience, the European Paediatric Regulation has been amended in January 2007 by the European Commission. The objective of the Paediatric Regulation is to improve the development of high quality and ethically researched medicines for children aged 0 to 17 years, to facilitate the availability of information on the use of medicines for children, without subjecting children to unnecessary trials, or delaying the authorisation of medicines for use in adults. Summary The Paediatric Regulation is dramatically changing the regulatory environment for paediatric medicines in Europe and is fuelling an increased number of clinical trials in the paediatric population. Nevertheless, there are some risks and pitfalls that need to be anticipated and controlled in order to ensure that children will ultimately benefit from this European initiative.

  2. Exploring resilience in paediatric oncology nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Melissa; Hutton, Alison; King, Lindy

    2013-01-01

    Resilience has been suggested as an important coping strategy for nurses working in demanding settings, such as paediatric oncology. This qualitative study explored paediatric oncology nurses' perceptions of their development of resilience and how this resilience underpinned their ability to deal with work-related stressors. Five paediatric oncology nurses were interviewed about their understanding of the concept of resilience, their preferred coping mechanisms, and their day-today work in paediatric oncology. Using thematic analysis, the interviews were subsequently grouped together into seventeen initial themes. These themes were then grouped into seven major aspects that described how the participants perceived resilience underpinned their work. These "seven aspects of forming resilience" contributed to an initial understanding of how paediatric oncology nurses develop resilience in the face of their personal and professional challenges. Several key strategies derived from the findings, such as improved rostering, support to a nurse's friend and family, and a clinical support nursing role, could be implemented at an organizational level to support resilience development within the paediatric oncology setting.

  3. The World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery: "The Olympics of our profession".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo-Hamman, Christopher; Jacobs, Jeffery Phillip

    2012-12-01

    The first World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology was held in London, United Kingdom, in 1980, organised by Dr. Jane Somerville and Prof. Fergus Macartney. The idea was that of Jane Somerville, who worked with enormous energy and enthusiasm to bring together paediatric cardiologists and surgeons from around the world. The 2nd World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology took place in New York in 1985, organised by Bill Rashkind, Mary Ellen Engle, and Eugene Doyle. The 3rd World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology was held in Bangkok, Thailand, in 1989, organised by Chompol Vongraprateep. Although cardiac surgeons were heavily involved in these early meetings, a separate World Congress of Paediatric Cardiac Surgery was held in Bergamo, Italy, in 1988, organised by Lucio Parenzan. Thereafter, it was recognised that surgeons and cardiologists working on the same problems and driven by a desire to help children should really rather meet together. A momentous decision was taken to initiate a Joint World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery. A steering committee was established with membership comprising the main organisers of the four separate previous Congresses, and additional members were recruited in an effort to achieve numerical equality of cardiologists and surgeons and a broad geographical representation. The historic 1st "World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery" took place in Paris in June, 1993, organised by Jean Kachaner. The next was to be held in Japan, but the catastrophic Kobe earthquake in 1995 forced relocation to Hawaii in 1997. Then followed Toronto, Canada (2001, organised by Bill Williams and Lee Benson), Buenos Aires, Argentina (2005, organised by Horatio Capelli and Guillermo Kreutzer), and most recently Cairns, Australia (2009, organised by Jim Wilkinson). Having visited Europe (1993), Asia-Pacific (1997), North America (2001), South America (2005), and Australia (2009), and reflecting the "African Renaissance", the

  4. Appraisal of logicality and safety of intramedullary fixation of paediatric diaphyseal fractures by titanium elastic nails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Vashisht

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: The intramedullary fixation of paediatric bones with TENs appears quite logical in terms of fracture stability for early mobilisation, early return to school, lesser hospital stay, and lesser parental off-duty. The technique is safe, does not interfere with fracture healing and does not violate the physis as nails are not passed through the physis. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(3.000: 866-870

  5. From the Heart: Interatrial Septal Aneurysm Identified on Bedside Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Butterfield

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 61 year-old man presented to the Emergency Department for one day of nonspecific chest pain. Bedside echocardiogram performed by the emergency physician revealed normal systolic cardiac function but also showed a large ( > 10mm bicornuate interatrial septal aneurysm (IASA projecting into the right atrium (Figure 1, Video 1. There was no evidence of intraatrial thrombus. A formal echocardiogram performed later that day confirmed the diagnosis and also detected a patent foramen ovale (PFO with a left-to-right shunt that reversed with Valsalva maneuver. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(6:719–720

  6. EULAR recommendations for vaccination in paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijstek, M. W.; de Bruin, L. M. Ott; Bijl, M.; Borrow, R.; van der Klis, F.; Kone-Paut, I.; Fasth, A.; Minden, K.; Ravelli, A.; Abinun, M.; Pileggi, G. S.; Borte, M.; Wulffraat, N. M.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based recommendations for vaccination of paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases (PaedRD) were developed by following the EULAR standardised procedures for guideline development. The EULAR task force consisted of (paediatric) rheumatologists/immunologists, one expert in vaccine

  7. Update on bedside ultrasound (US) diagnosis of acute cholecystitis (AC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenobii, Maria Francesca; Accogli, Esterita; Domanico, Andrea; Arienti, Vincenzo

    2016-03-01

    Acute cholecystitis (AC) represents a principal cause of morbidity worldwide and is one of the most frequent reasons for hospitalization due to gastroenteric tract diseases. AC should be suspected in presence of clinical signs and of gallstones on an imaging study. Upper abdominal US represents the first diagnostic imaging step in the case of suspected AC. Computed tomography (CT) with intravenous contrast (IV) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium contrast and technetium hepatobiliary iminodiacetic acid (Tc-HIDA) can be employed to exclude complications. US examination should be performed with right subcostal oblique, with longitudinal and intercostal scans. Normal gallbladder US findings and AC major and minor US signs are described. Polyps, sludge and gallbladder wall thickening represent the more frequent pitfalls and they must be differentiated from stones, duodenal artifacts and many other non-inflammatory conditions that cause wall thickening, respectively. By means of bedside ultrasound, the finding of gallstones in combination with acute pain, when the clinician presses the gallbladder with the US probe (the sonographic Murphy's sign), has a 92.2 % positive predictive value for AC. In our preliminary experience, bedside US-performed by echoscopy (ES) and/or point-of-care US (POCUS) demonstrated good reliability in detecting signs of AC, and was always integrated with physical examination and performed by a skilled operator.

  8. Bedside coaching to improve nurses' recognition of delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Susan Jean; Melillo, Karen Devereaux; Nannini, Angela; Lakatos, Barbara E

    2013-10-01

    Delirium is a widespread complication of hospitalization and is frequently unrecognized by nurses and other healthcare professionals. Patients with neuroscience diagnoses are at increased risk for delirium as compared with other patients. The aims of this quality improvement project were to (1) increase neuroscience nurses' knowledge of delirium, (2) integrate coaching into evidence-based practice, and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of this combined approach to improve nurses' recognition of delirium on a neuroscience unit. Institutional review board approval was obtained. A retrospective chart review of randomly selected patients admitted before the intervention was completed. The (modified) Nurse's Knowledge of Delirium Tool was electronically administered to nursing staff (n = 47), followed within 2 weeks by a didactic presentation on delirium. Bedside coaching was performed over a period of 4 weeks. The (modified) Nurses Knowledge of Delirium Tool was electronically readministered to nurses 4 weeks later to determine the change in aggregate knowledge. A postintervention chart review was conducted. SPSS software was used to analyze descriptive statistics with regard to chart reviews, documentation, and change in questionnaire scores. Findings reveal that neuroscience nurses recognize the absence of delirium 94.4% of the time and the presence of delirium 100% of the time after a didactic session and coaching. The postintervention chart review showed a statistically significant increase (p = .000) in the documentation of delirium screening results. Expert coaching at the bedside may be a reliable method for teaching nurses to use evidence-based screening tools to detect delirium in patients with neuroscience diagnoses.

  9. Congenital anomalies in paediatric surgery in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Jangra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenitalmal formation represents defects in morphogenesis during early foetal life. Congenital anomalies account for 8-15% of perinatal deaths and 13-16% of neonatal deaths in India. The proportion of perinatal deaths due to congenital malformations is increasing as a result of reduction of mortality due to other causes owing to the improvement in perinatal and neonatal care. Materials and Methods: A retrospective record based study was conducted in the Paediatric Surgery Department of a Tertiary Care Institute of North India. The records of over a decade (2003-2012 were analysed. A total of 4305 cases of congenital anomalies were recorded in the study. All the data were entered in the excel spread sheet and analysed in SPSS version 17. (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, a software package used for statistical analysis, officially named "IBM SPSS Statistics". Results: Over the decade, a total of 14264 children were admitted in the paediatric surgery department with various problems. Out of these about one-third children (30.18% had one or other type of congenital anomalies. This trend remained almost constant over the decade within a range of 26.8-33.6%. About half of the total congenital anomalies belonged to the gastro-intestinal tract, followed by genitourinary tract, central nervous system and other anomalies. All the anomalies were more common in males and were found in children belonging to rural communities. Conclusions: All the neonates should be examined with scrutiny for overt as well as occult congenital anomalies and Paediatric surgical care should be considered as an essential component of child health programmes in developing populations. Moreover, it is necessary to establish a registry system for congenital anomalies.

  10. Phase synchronization in electroencephalographic recordings prognosticates outcome in paediatric coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenadovic, Vera; Perez Velazquez, Jose Luis; Hutchison, James Saunders

    2014-01-01

    Brain injury from trauma, cardiac arrest or stroke is the most important cause of death and acquired disability in the paediatric population. Due to the lifetime impact of brain injury, there is a need for methods to stratify patient risk and ultimately predict outcome. Early prognosis is fundamental to the implementation of interventions to improve recovery, but no clinical model as yet exists. Healthy physiology is associated with a relative high variability of physiologic signals in organ systems. This was first evaluated in heart rate variability research. Brain variability can be quantified through electroencephalographic (EEG) phase synchrony. We hypothesised that variability in brain signals from EEG recordings would correlate with patient outcome after brain injury. Lower variability in EEG phase synchronization, would be associated with poor patient prognosis. A retrospective study, spanning 10 years (2000-2010) analysed the scalp EEGs of children aged 1 month to 17 years in coma (Glasgow Coma Scale, GCS, <8) admitted to the paediatric critical care unit (PCCU) following brain injury from TBI, cardiac arrest or stroke. Phase synchrony of the EEGs was evaluated using the Hilbert transform and the variability of the phase synchrony calculated. Outcome was evaluated using the 6 point Paediatric Performance Category Score (PCPC) based on chart review at the time of hospital discharge. Outcome was dichotomized to good outcome (PCPC score 1 to 3) and poor outcome (PCPC score 4 to 6). Children who had a poor outcome following brain injury secondary to cardiac arrest, TBI or stroke, had a higher magnitude of synchrony (R index), a lower spatial complexity of the synchrony patterns and a lower temporal variability of the synchrony index values at 15 Hz when compared to those patients with a good outcome.

  11. Phase synchronization in electroencephalographic recordings prognosticates outcome in paediatric coma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Nenadovic

    Full Text Available Brain injury from trauma, cardiac arrest or stroke is the most important cause of death and acquired disability in the paediatric population. Due to the lifetime impact of brain injury, there is a need for methods to stratify patient risk and ultimately predict outcome. Early prognosis is fundamental to the implementation of interventions to improve recovery, but no clinical model as yet exists. Healthy physiology is associated with a relative high variability of physiologic signals in organ systems. This was first evaluated in heart rate variability research. Brain variability can be quantified through electroencephalographic (EEG phase synchrony. We hypothesised that variability in brain signals from EEG recordings would correlate with patient outcome after brain injury. Lower variability in EEG phase synchronization, would be associated with poor patient prognosis. A retrospective study, spanning 10 years (2000-2010 analysed the scalp EEGs of children aged 1 month to 17 years in coma (Glasgow Coma Scale, GCS, <8 admitted to the paediatric critical care unit (PCCU following brain injury from TBI, cardiac arrest or stroke. Phase synchrony of the EEGs was evaluated using the Hilbert transform and the variability of the phase synchrony calculated. Outcome was evaluated using the 6 point Paediatric Performance Category Score (PCPC based on chart review at the time of hospital discharge. Outcome was dichotomized to good outcome (PCPC score 1 to 3 and poor outcome (PCPC score 4 to 6. Children who had a poor outcome following brain injury secondary to cardiac arrest, TBI or stroke, had a higher magnitude of synchrony (R index, a lower spatial complexity of the synchrony patterns and a lower temporal variability of the synchrony index values at 15 Hz when compared to those patients with a good outcome.

  12. Good long-term survival after paediatric heart transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Charlotte Duhn; Helvind, Morten; Jensen, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The brain-death criterion was introduced in Denmark in 1990. The first Danish paediatric heart transplantation (HTx) was performed at Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, in Copenhagen in 1991. We describe our experiences during the first 20 years with paediatric HTx.......The brain-death criterion was introduced in Denmark in 1990. The first Danish paediatric heart transplantation (HTx) was performed at Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, in Copenhagen in 1991. We describe our experiences during the first 20 years with paediatric HTx....

  13. Good long-term survival after paediatric heart transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Charlotte Duhn; Helvind, Morten; Jensen, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The brain-death criterion was introduced in Denmark in 1990. The first Danish paediatric heart transplantation (HTx) was performed at Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, in Copenhagen in 1991. We describe our experiences during the first 20 years with paediatric HTx.......The brain-death criterion was introduced in Denmark in 1990. The first Danish paediatric heart transplantation (HTx) was performed at Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, in Copenhagen in 1991. We describe our experiences during the first 20 years with paediatric HTx....

  14. Citation context and impact of 'sleeping beauties' in paediatric research

    OpenAIRE

    Završnik, Jernej; Kokol, Peter; del Torso, Stefano; Blažun, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: ‘Sleeping beauties’, i.e. publications that are not cited for a long while, present interesting findings in science. This study analysed the citation trends of sleeping beauties in paediatric research. Methods: The study used bibliometric software to analyse the papers citing sleeping beauties in paediatric research, to understand the context in which paediatric sleeping beauties were finally cited and the impact of these sleeping beauties on paediatric research. Results: ...

  15. [A Paediatric Orthopaedic outpatient clinic referral patterns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraleda, L; Castellote, M

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the commonest referrals to a paediatric orthopaedic outpatient clinic and, therefore, to be able to improve the paediatric residency program in managing musculoskeletal problems. Demographic data, referrals and final diagnosis were collected prospectively on all patients that were evaluated in a paediatric orthopaedic outpatient clinic. The majority of referrals were to evaluate musculoskeletal pain (37%), foot deformity (20%), spine deformity (15%), walking pattern (11%), alignment of the lower limbs (4%), and development of the hip (4%). A normal physical examination or a normal variation was observed in 42% of patients. A mild condition was observed in 17% of patients that should have only been referred to a paediatric orthopaedic clinic after failing to resolve pain with anti-inflammatories or physiotherapy. A mild deformity that only needed treatment if it became symptomatic was seen in 8% of patients. The majority of referrals were due to a normal variation or mild conditions that only required symptomatic treatment. Paediatric residency programs do not reflect the prevalence of musculoskeletal conditions in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Paediatric Virology: A rapidly increasing educational challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammas, Ioannis N.; Theodoridou, Maria; Kramvis, Anna; Thiagarajan, Prakash; Gardner, Sharryn; Papaioannou, Georgia; Melidou, Angeliki; Koutsaki, Maria; Kostagianni, Georgia; Achtsidis, Vassilis; Koutsaftiki, Chryssie; Calachanis, Marcos; Zaravinos, Apostolos; Greenough, Anne; Spandidos, Demetrios A.

    2017-01-01

    The ‘2nd Workshop on Paediatric Virology’, which took place on Saturday the 8th of October 2016 in Athens, Greece, provided an overview on recent views and advances on Paediatric Virology. Emphasis was given to HIV-1 management in Greece, a country under continuous financial crisis, hepatitis B vaccination in Africa, treatment options for hepatitis C virus in childhood, Zika virus in pregnancy and infancy, the burden of influenza on childhood, hand-foot-mouth disease and myocarditis associated with Coxsackie viruses. Other general topics covered included a critical evaluation of Paediatric Accident and Emergency viral infections, multimodality imaging of viral infections in children, surgical approaches of otolaryngologists to complex viral infections, new advances in the diagnosis and treatment of viral conjunctivitis and novel molecular diagnostic methods for HPV in childhood. A brief historical overview of the anti-vaccination movement was also provided, as well as presentations on the educational challenge of Paediatric Virology as a new subspecialty of Paediatrics. This review highlights selected lectures and discussions of the workshop. PMID:28352303

  17. MULTIMODALITIES OF MANAGEMENT OF PAEDIATRIC ILEOCOLIC INTUSSUSCEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshava Murthy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available : Intussusception is a life-threatening illness and occurs when a portion of the intestine folds like a telescope with one segment slipping inside another segment. Hirschsprung was the first to publish a series of reports on successful hydrostatic reduction in 1876. Intussusception remains one of the most commonly encountered paediatric surgical emergencies. Enema reduction still remains the mainstay of non-operative care today. Barium and more recently air contrast enemas have been the initial diagnostic and therapeutic investigation of choice. Successful reduction rates vary widely from 42 to 95% (eee. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Aims and objectives of this article with a series of cases of intussusception is to review the various clinical presentation and to study the effectiveness of non-surgical intervention using contrast or AIR enema reduction under fluoroscopic guidance. METHODS AND RESULTS: A prospective study from October 2010 to September 2015 was carried out in hospitals in Bangalore. Complete review of medical records for clinical and demographic information was only performed for those cases fulfilling diagnostic criteria. During the study, A total of 62 patients diagnosed cases were included in this study. Cases identified in the study were similar in presentation and demographics as those observed in other South Asian Countries. These patients were haemodynamically stabilized and were subjected to definitive procedure; enema reduction was tried in all patients. Multimodalities of management included nonoperative reduction that is hydrostatic enema reduction in 2 cases (3.2, barium enema reduction 45 cases (72.5 and air enema recution in 12 cases (19.3, finally 3 cases (4.8 which failed enema reduction were operated. One case (1.61 intussusception - associated death was recorded. CONCLUSION: Surgical intervention in intussusception can be prevented by nonoperative reduction, especially if presented early and no signs of peritonitis.

  18. Oral medicines for children in the European paediatric investigation plans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Riet-Nales, Diana A; Römkens, Erwin G A W; Saint-Raymond, Agnes; Kozarewicz, Piotr; Schobben, Alfred F A M; Egberts, Toine C G; Rademaker, Carin M A

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Pharmaceutical industry is no longer allowed to develop new medicines for use in adults only, as the 2007 Paediatric Regulation requires children to be considered also. The plans for such paediatric development called Paediatric Investigation Plans (PIPs) are subject to agreement by th

  19. Practical application of natriuretic peptides in paediatric cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Julie; Goetze, Jens P; Andersen, Claus B

    2010-01-01

    It is still uncertain if cardiac natriuretic peptides are useful biomarkers in paediatric cardiology. In this review we identify four clinical scenarios in paediatric cardiology, where clinical decision-making can be difficult, and where we feel the paediatric cardiologists need additional...

  20. Practical application of natriuretic peptides in paediatric cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Julie; Goetze, Jens P; Andersen, Claus B

    2010-01-01

    It is still uncertain if cardiac natriuretic peptides are useful biomarkers in paediatric cardiology. In this review we identify four clinical scenarios in paediatric cardiology, where clinical decision-making can be difficult, and where we feel the paediatric cardiologists need additional...

  1. Early

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Abd Elaziz Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Early PDT is recommended for patients who require prolonged tracheal intubation in the ICU as outcomes like the duration of mechanical ventilation length of ICU stay and hospital stay were significantly shorter in early tracheostomy.

  2. Diagnostic radiology in paediatric palliative care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Preena; Koh, Michelle; Carr, Lucinda; McHugh, Kieran [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15

    Palliative care is an expanding specialty within paediatrics, which has attracted little attention in the paediatric radiological literature. Paediatric patients under a palliative care team will have numerous radiological tests which we traditionally categorise under organ systems rather than under the umbrella of palliative medicine. The prevalence of children with life-limiting illness is significant. It has been estimated to be one per thousand, and this may be an underestimate. In this review, we will focus on our experience at one institution, where radiology has proven to be an invaluable partner to palliative care. We will discuss examples of conditions commonly referred to our palliative care team and delineate the crucial role of diagnostic radiology in determining treatment options. (orig.)

  3. Is paediatric trauma severity overestimated at triage?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DO, H Q; Hesselfeldt, R; Steinmetz, J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe paediatric trauma is rare, and pre-hospital and local hospital personnel experience with injured children is often limited. We hypothesised that a higher proportion of paediatric trauma victims were taken to the regional trauma centre (TC). METHODS: This is an observational...... follow-up study that involves one level I TC and seven local hospitals. We included paediatric (trauma patients with a driving distance to the TC > 30 minutes. The primary end-point was the proportion of trauma patients arriving in the TC. RESULTS: We included 1934...... trauma patients, 238 children and 1696 adults. A total of 33/238 children (13.9%) vs. 304/1696 adults (17.9%) were transported to the TC post-injury (P = 0.14). Among these, children were significantly less injured than adults [median Injury Severity Score (ISS) 9 vs. 14, P 

  4. Assessment of knowledge about childhood autism among paediatric and psychiatric nurses in Ebonyi state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achor Justin U

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing public and professional awareness of autism spectrum disorders with early recognition, diagnosis and interventions that are known to improve prognosis. Poor knowledge about childhood autism among paediatric and psychiatric nurses who are members of multidisciplinary teams that care for such children may be a major barrier to early interventions that could improve quality of life and prognosis in childhood autism. Factors that influence knowledge about childhood autism among these nurses are not known. This study assessed knowledge about childhood autism among paediatric and psychiatric nurses in Ebonyi state, Nigeria and determined the factors that could be influencing such knowledge. Methods Forty specialist paediatric and forty psychiatric nurses, making a total sample of eighty, were randomly selected from all the health care facilities in Ebonyi state, Nigeria. A socio-demographic questionnaire and knowledge about childhood autism among health workers (KCAHW questionnaire were administered to them and the study was a point survey. Results The total mean score on the KCAHW questionnaire among the nurses that participated in the study was 12.56 ± 3.23 out of a total of 19 possible. The mean score for the paediatric nurses was 11.78 ± 3.64 while psychiatric nurses had mean score of 13.35 ± 2.58. The mean scores in Domain 1 were 6.17 ± 1.75 for the paediatric nurses and 6.52 ± 1.43 for the psychiatric nurses. The mean scores in Domain 2 were 0.65 ± 0.48 for the paediatric nurses and 0.80 ± 0.41 for the psychiatric nurses. Domain 3 showed mean scores of 1.97 ± 1.25 for the paediatric nurses while psychiatric nurses scored 2.62 ± 1.23. Domain 4 yielded the mean scores of 2.97 ± 1.54 and 3.42 ± 0.98 for the paediatric and psychiatric nurses respectively. There was significant relationship between the total mean score on the KCAHW questionnaire for the two groups and the area of specialisation of

  5. Neonatology/Paediatrics – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusch, C.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available There are special challenges in implementing parenteral nutrition (PN in paediatric patients, which arises from the wide range of patients, ranging from extremely premature infants up to teenagers weighing up to and over 100 kg, and their varying substrate requirements. Age and maturity-related changes of the metabolism and fluid and nutrient requirements must be taken into consideration along with the clinical situation during which PN is applied. The indication, the procedure as well as the intake of fluid and substrates are very different to that known in PN-practice in adult patients, e.g. the fluid, nutrient and energy needs of premature infants and newborns per kg body weight are markedly higher than of older paediatric and adult patients. Premature infants <35 weeks of pregnancy and most sick term infants usually require full or partial PN. In neonates the actual amount of PN administered must be calculated (not estimated. Enteral nutrition should be gradually introduced and should replace PN as quickly as possible in order to minimise any side-effects from exposure to PN. Inadequate substrate intake in early infancy can cause long-term detrimental effects in terms of metabolic programming of the risk of illness in later life. If energy and nutrient demands in children and adolescents cannot be met through enteral nutrition, partial or total PN should be considered within 7 days or less depending on the nutritional state and clinical conditions.

  6. Bedside arterial blood gas monitoring system using fluorescent optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnik, Daniel J.; Rymut, Russell A.

    1995-05-01

    We describe a bedside arterial blood gas (ABG) monitoring system which uses fluorescent optical sensors in the measurement of blood pH, PCO2 and PO2. The Point-of-Care Arterial Blood Gas Monitoring System consists of the SensiCathTM optical sensor unit manufactured by Optical Sensors Incorporated and the TramTM Critical Care Monitoring System with ABG Module manufactured by Marquette Electronics Incorporated. Current blood gas measurement techniques require a blood sample to be removed from the patient and transported to an electrochemical analyzer for analysis. The ABG system does not require removal of blood from the patient or transport of the sample. The sensor is added to the patient's existing arterial line. ABG measurements are made by drawing a small blood sample from the arterial line in sufficient quantity to ensure an undiluted sample at the sensor. Measurements of pH, PCO2 and PO2 are made within 60 seconds. The blood is then returned to the patient, the line flushed and results appear on the bedside monitor. The ABG system offers several advantages over traditional electrochemical analyzers. Since the arterial line remains closed during the blood sampling procedure the patient's risk of infection is reduced and the caregiver's exposure to blood is eliminated. The single-use, disposable sensor can be measure 100 blood samples over 72 hours after a single two-point calibration. Quality Assurance checks are also available and provide the caregiver the ability to assess system performance even after the sensor is patient attached. The ABG module integrates with an existing bedside monitoring system. This allows ABG results to appear on the same display as ECG, respiration, blood pressure, cardiac output, SpO2, and other clinical information. The small module takes up little space in the crowded intensive care unit. Performance studies compare the ABG system with an electrochemical blood gas analyzer. Study results demonstrated accurate and precise blood

  7. Virtual colonoscopy in paediatric patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrascosa, Patricia [Diagnostico Maipu, Av. Maipu 1668, Vicente Lopez (B1602ABQ), Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: patriciacarrascosa@diagnosticomaipu.com.ar; Lopez, Elba Martin; Capunay, Carlos; Vallejos, Javier; Carrascosa, Jorge [Diagnostico Maipu, Av. Maipu 1668, Vicente Lopez (B1602ABQ), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-04-15

    Objective: To determine the usefulness of perspective-filet view for polypoid lesions in paediatric patients in comparison with conventional virtual colonoscopy (VC) analysis and optical colonoscopy. Methods: Sixty-one patients (mean age 5 years old) with a previous episode of rectal bleeding were studied using a 16 slices CT scanner. All patients underwent a colonic preparation. Two acquisitions were done in supine and prone positions with slices of 2 mm thickness; increment 1 mm, 30-50 mA; 90-120 kV. In a workstation an experienced radiologist reviewed images twice. The first read was done using the conventional virtual colonoscopy technique with the evaluation of two-dimensional (2D), three-dimensional (3D) and endoscopical images. Later, in a second session, perspective-filet view was used. It shows a 360 deg. unrolled visualization of the inner colon. The presence, size and location of the lesions were determined. A record of the reading time was made. Results: At per patient evaluation the conventional virtual colonoscopy analysis obtained a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 98%. The perspective-filet view obtained a sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 99%. In the evaluation on a per lesion basis the conventional analysis had a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 88%. Perspective-filet view, had a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 90%. The average total reading time using conventional colonoscopy technique was 18 {+-} 3 min, versus 4 {+-} 1 min using the perspective-filet view. Conclusion: Virtual colon dissection with perspective-filet view is more time-efficient than conventional virtual colonoscopy evaluation with correct correlation in results.

  8. Resuscitation of general paediatrics in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacogne, I; Scott-Jupp, R; Chambers, T

    2006-12-01

    "The report of my death was an exaggeration", said Mark Twain. For a dying specialty, general paediatrics has certainly been looking very healthy recently. It is timely to examine why our specialty was thought to be at such risk, and to explore why, although in many cases shocked and confused, it is well on the way to recovery. This article explores what is needed to keep it healthy to ensure that the general paediatrician is at the centre of the delivery of paediatrics in the UK.

  9. Nonunion of paediatric talar neck fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindal Nipun

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Fractures of the paediatric talus are infrequent injuries, most complicated by posttraumatic arthrosis and avascular necrosis in the course of treatment. Non- union in children has not been reported before in literature. We report a case of a 12-year-old boy who had a nonunion of Hawkins type II fracture of talar neck. The nonunion was treated surgically with a good clinical outcome. The goals of management in nonunion of paediatric talar neck fracture are different from those in fresh fractures. A suboptimal reduction should be acceptable without trying a radical surgery which may cause further impairment.

  10. A disjointed effort: paediatric musculoskeletal examination.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gill, Irwin

    2012-07-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) symptoms are a frequent cause of emergency department attendance for children, and while most often indicative of benign or self-limiting disease, such symptoms can occasionally be the first presentation of serious illness such as leukaemia or juvenile idiopathic arthritis. MSK examination, however, is often not included as part of the routine paediatric examination. The authors aimed to evaluate how often and how thoroughly MSK examination was performed during admissions to the paediatric ward and to compare it with the examination of other symptoms in relation to the presenting complaint and eventual diagnosis.

  11. Development and User Research of a Smart Bedside Station System toward Patient-Centered Healthcare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Lee, Kee-Hyuck; Baek, Hyunyoung; Ryu, Borim; Chung, Eunja; Kim, Kidong; Yi, Jay Chaeyong; Park, Soo Beom; Hwang, Hee

    2015-09-01

    User experience design that reflects real-world application and aims to support suitable service solutions has arisen as one of the current issues in the medical informatics research domain. The Smart Bedside Station (SBS) is a screen that is installed on the bedside for the personal use and provides a variety of convenient services for the patients. Recently, bedside terminal systems have been increasingly adopted in hospitals due to the rapid growth of advanced technology in healthcare at the point of care. We designed user experience (UX) research to derive users' unmet needs and major functions that are frequently used in the field. To develop the SBS service, a service design methodology, the Double Diamond Design Process Model, was undertaken. The problems or directions of the complex clinical workflow of the hospital, the requirements of stakeholders, and environmental factors were identified through the study. The SBS system services provided to patients were linked to the hospital's main services or to related electronic medical record (EMR) data. Seven key services were derived from the results of the study. The primary services were as follows: Bedside Check In and Out, Bedside Room Service, Bedside Scheduler, Ready for Rounds, My Medical Chart, Featured Healthcare Content, and Bedside Community. This research developed a patient-centered SBS system with improved UX using service design methodology applied to complex and technical medical services, providing insights to improve the current healthcare system.

  12. [Vertigo in the Emergency Department: new bedside tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamás, T László; Garai, Tibor; Tompos, Tamás; Szirmai, Ágnes

    2016-03-13

    According to international statistics, the first examination of 25% of patients with vertigo is carried out in Emergency Departments. The most important task of the examining physician is to diagnose life threatening pathologic processes. One of the most difficult otoneurological diagnostic challange in Emergency Departments is to differentiate between dangerous posterior scale stroke presenting with isolated vertigo and the benign vestibular neuritis.These two disorders can be safely differentiated using fast, non-invasive, evidence based bedside tests which have been introduced in the past few years. 35% of stroke cases mimicking vestibular neuritis (pseudoneuritis) are misdiagnosed at the Emergency Department, and 40% of these cases develop complications. During the first 48 hours, sensitivity for stroke of the new test that is based on the malfunction of the oculomotor system is better than the diffusion-weighted cranial magnetic resonance imaging. Using special test glasses each component of the new test can be made objective and repeatable.

  13. Implementing interprofessional bedside rounding at the prequalification stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuite DR

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Daniel R Tuite,1 David Healy,1 Thomas S MacKinnon2 1Faculty of Medicine, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, 2School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UKWe read with great interest the paper by Henkin et al,1 demonstrating that the use of interprofessional bedside rounding (IBR significantly improved nurse–physician teamwork, particularly from the nurses’ point of view. This finding is relevant when one takes into account the importance of interdisciplinary teamwork; a review conducted by Epstein concluded that effective interprofessional teamwork both maximizes patient safety and increases job satisfaction and efficiency.2 We, as medical students, believe that inadequate emphasis is placed on interprofessional collaboration at the prequalification phase, and therefore, we suggest that implementing IBR at the university level could represent a method to improve teamwork between the nurses and doctors of the future.  View the original paper by Henkin et al.  

  14. Elderly Woman with Abdominal Pain: Bedside Ultrasound Diagnosis of Diverticulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason D. Heiner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A 72-year-old otherwise healthy female presented to the emergency department with two weeks of worsening abdominal pain. She was afebrile with normal vital signs. Her physical examination was notable for moderate abdominal tenderness without rebound to the left and suprapubic regions of the abdomen. Laboratory studies were remarkable for a white blood cell count of 13,000/mm3. A focused bedside ultrasound over the patient’s region of maximal discomfort revealed a thickened bowel wall and several small contiguous hypoechoic projections surrounding a hyperechoic center, suggestive of diverticulitis (Figure. She was given metronidazole and ciprofloxacin and her diagnosis of uncomplicated colonic diverticulitis was confirmed by computed tomography (CT.

  15. Prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy measured by simple bedside tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrberg, Torben Bech; Benn, Jette; Christiansen, J S

    1981-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy, five simple bedside tests, beat-to-beat variation during quiet respiration, beat-to-beat variation during forced respiration, heart rate and blood pressure response to standing, heart rate response to exercise, and heart rate response....... The prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy in the whole diabetic population indicated by abnormal response in beat-to-beat variation during forced respiration was 27%. Diabetic autonimic neuropathy increased in frequency with duration of disease. Patients with nephropathy or proliferative retinopathy had...... a significantly higher prevalence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy as indicated by abnormal beat-to-beat variation during forced respirations (p less than 0.01) than patients without these complications....

  16. Ability of medical students to calculate drug doses in children after their paediatric attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshikoya KA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Dose calculation errors constitute a significant part of prescribing errors which might have resulted from informal teaching of the topic in medical schools. Objectives: To determine adequacy of knowledge and skills of drug dose calculations in children acquired by medical students during their clinical attachment in paediatrics.Methods: Fifty two 5th year medical students of the Lagos State University College of Medicine (LASUCOM, Ikeja were examined on drug dose calculations from a vial and ampoules of injections, syrup and suspension, and tablet formulation. The examination was with a structured questionnaire mostly in the form of multiple choice questions.Results: Thirty-six (69.2% and 30 (57.7% students were taught drug dose calculation in neonatal posting and during ward rounds/ bed-side teaching, respectively. Less than 50% of the students were able to calculate the correct doses of each of adrenaline, gentamicin, chloroquine and sodium bicarbonate injections required by the patient. Dose calculation was however relatively better with adrenalin when compared with the other injections. The proportion of female students that calculated the correct doses of quinine syrup and cefuroxime suspension were significantly higher than those of their male counterparts (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively; Chi-square test. When doses calculated in mg/dose and mL/dose was compared for adrenalin injection and each of quinine syrup and cefuroxime suspension, there were significant differences (adrenaline and quinine, p=0.005; adrenaline and cefuroxime, p=0.003: Fischer’s exact test. Dose calculation errors of similar magnitude to injections, syrup and suspension were also observed with tablet formulation.Conclusions: LASUCOM medical students lacked the basic knowledge of paediatric drug dose calculations but were willing to learn if the topic was formally taught. Drug dose calculations should be given a prominent consideration in the undergraduate medical

  17. Bedside ultrasound reliability in locating catheter and detecting complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payman Moharamzadeh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Central venous catheterization is one of the most common medical procedures and is associated with such complications as misplacement and pneumothorax. Chest X-ray is among good ways for evaluation of these complications. However, due to patient’s excessive exposure to radiation, time consumption and low diagnostic value in detecting pneumothorax in the supine patient, the present study intends to examine bedside ultrasound diagnostic value in locating tip of the catheter and pneumothorax. Materials and methods: In the present cross-sectional study, all referred patients requiring central venous catheterization were examined. Central venous catheterization was performed by a trained emergency medicine specialist, and the location of catheter and the presence of pneumothorax were examined and compared using two modalities of ultrasound and x-ray (as the reference standard. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predicting values were reported. Results: A total of 200 non-trauma patients were included in the study (58% men. Cohen’s Kappa consistency coefficients for catheterization and diagnosis of pneumothorax were found as 0.49 (95% CI: 0.43-0.55, 0.89 (P<0.001, (95% CI: 97.8-100, respectively. Also, ultrasound sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing pneumothorax were 75% (95% CI: 35.6-95.5, and 100% (95% CI: 97.6-100, respectively. Conclusion: The present study results showed low diagnostic value of ultrasound in determining catheter location and in detecting pneumothorax. With knowledge of previous studies, the search still on this field.   Keywords: Central venous catheterization; complications; bedside ultrasound; radiography;

  18. Paediatric surveillance of pertussis in 1998

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melker HE de; Neppelenbroek SN; Schellekens JFP; Suijkerbuijk AWM; Conyn- van Spaendonck MAE; CIE; LIS

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To gain insight into the severity of pertussis in hospitalised cases. Methods: In 1998, hospitalisation data were collected through paediatric surveillance. Results: From 115 hospitalisation admissions collected, 55% of the patients were younger than 3 months of age and not vaccinated; 12

  19. Ingested foreign bodies in the paediatric patient.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, G C

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Paediatric foreign body (FB) ingestion is a common problem and while most can be managed conservatively, a sub-population require intervention. AIMS: To establish clear guidelines for management of paediatric FB ingestion. METHODS: A retrospective chart review analysing all paediatric admissions with FB ingestion over a 10-year period from 1990 to 1999. RESULTS: Of 339 patients presenting to the accident and emergency department with FB ingestion, 59 required admission. Ingestion was accidental in 93.0% of patients. The reasons for admission were as follows: large FBs; dangerous FBs; and living far from the hospital. Nineteen patients (32.2%) were discharged without intervention. Thirty-seven (62.7%) required endoscopic retrieval. In two, the FB was not identified at endoscopy. Only three (5%) required surgery. CONCLUSION: Conservative management of FB ingestion in the paediatric population is possible in the majority of cases. However, a minority require intervention. While guidelines for intervention are ill-defined, definitive indications include symptomatic patients, or dangerous objects.

  20. Whole-body MRI in paediatric oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Littooij, Annemieke S.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and follow-up of paediatric malignancies. Until recently, computed tomography (CT) has been the imaging technique of choice in children with cancer, but nowadays there is an increasing interest in the use of functional imaging techniques like positron em

  1. Recent developments in paediatric neuraxial blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrushali Chandrashekhar Ponde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paediatric anaesthesia and paediatric regional anaesthesia are intertwined. Almost all surgeries unless contradicted could be and should be supplemented with a regional block. The main objective of this review is to elaborate on the recent advances of the central neuraxial blocks, such as application of ultrasound guidance and electrical stimulation in the pursuit of safety and an objective end point. This review also takes account of the traditional technique and understand the benefits as well the risk of each as compared with the recent technique. The recent trends in choosing the most appropriate peripheral block for a given surgery thereby sparing the central neuroaxis is considered. A penile block for circumcision or a sciatic block for unilateral foot surgery, rather than caudal epidural would have a better risk benefit equation. Readers will find a special mention on the recent thoughts on continuous epidural analgesia in paediatrics, especially its rise and fall, yet its unique importance. Lastly, the issue of block placements under sedation or general anaesthesia with its implication in this special population is dealt with. We conducted searches in MEDLINE (PubMed and assessed the relevance of the abstracts of citations identified from literature searches. The search was carried out in English, for last 10 years, with the following key words: Recent advances in paediatric regional anaesthesia; ultrasound guidance for central neuraxial blocks in children; role of electrical stimulation in neuraxial blocks in children; complications in neuraxial block. Full-text articles of potentially relevant abstracts were retrieved for further review.

  2. Antibiotic utilisation for hospitalised paediatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luinge, K; Kimpen, JLL; van Houten, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Antibiotics are among the most commonly prescribed drugs in paediatrics. Because of an overall rise in health care costs, lack of uniformity in drug prescribing and the emergence of antibiotic resistance, monitoring and control of antibiotic use is of growing concern and strict antibiotic policies a

  3. Diagnosis. Severity scoring system for paediatric FMF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livneh, Avi

    2012-04-17

    Severity scoring systems for adult familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) are established and used as important clinical and analytical tools in disease management and research. A recent paper highlights the need for a paediatric FMF severity measure. How should such a score be built and what challenges might be faced?

  4. A review of paediatric tuberculosis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatleberg, Camilla; Prahl, Julie B; Rasmussen, Jeppe Nørgaard

    2014-01-01

    Paediatric tuberculosis (TB) is a key indicator for recent transmission and presents a reservoir for the disease. We describe trends in epidemiology, microbiological characteristics and treatment outcome in Denmark between 2000 and 2009. Data was retrieved from the national TB surveillance system...

  5. The delivery of general paediatric surgery in Ireland: a survey of higher surgical trainees.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, E

    2012-12-01

    The delivery of general paediatric surgery is changing in Ireland. Fewer paediatric surgical procedures are being performed by newly appointed consultant general surgeons, resulting in increased referrals to the specialist paediatric surgeons of uncomplicated general paediatric surgical problems. We surveyed current higher surgical trainees about their views on provision of paediatric surgical services.

  6. Paediatric HIV treatment failure: a silent epidemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M Bernheimer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Paediatric antiretroviral treatment (ART failure is an under-recognized issue that receives inadequate attention in the field of paediatrics and within HIV treatment programmes. With paediatric ART failure rates ranging from 19.3% to over 32% in resource limited settings, a comprehensive evaluation of the causes of failure along with approaches to address barriers to treatment adherence are urgently needed.In partnership with the local Department of Health, a pilot programme has been established by Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF in Khayelitsha, South Africa, to identify and support paediatric HIV patients with high viral loads and potential treatment failure. Through detailed clinical and psychosocial evaluations and adherence support with an innovative counselling model, treatment barriers are identified and addressed.Demographic and clinical characteristics from the cohort show a delayed median start date for ART, prolonged viraemia including a large number of patients who have never achieved viral load (VL suppression, a low rate of regimen changes despite failure, and a high percentage of pre-adolescent and adolescent patients who have not gone through the disclosure process.Stemming this epidemic of paediatric treatment failure requires programmatic responses to high viral loads in children, starting with improved “case finding” of previously undiagnosed HIV-infected children and adolescents. Viral load testing needs to be prioritized over CD4 count monitoring, and flagging systems to identify high VL results should be developed in clinics. Clinicians must understand that successful treatment begins with good adherence, and that simple adherence support strategies can often dramatically improve adherence. Moreover, appropriate adherence counselling should begin not when the child fails to respond to treatment. Establishing good adherence from the beginning of treatment, and supporting ongoing adherence during the milestones in these

  7. What's new in paediatrics? (Review)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-02-23

    Feb 23, 2009 ... genes. This particularly applies to the so-called imprinted genes with uniparental ... Increasingly, the actual composition and balance of nutrients in early infancy is also ... proportion of total energy intake was associated with ...

  8. Bedside Evaluation of Cerebral Energy Metabolism in Severe Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Schulz, Mette; Jacobsen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    community-acquired meningitis utilizing intracerebral microdialysis and bedside biochemical analysis. According to previous studies, cerebral ischemia was defined as lactate/pyruvate (LP) ratio >30 with intracerebral pyruvate level

  9. Bedside diagnosis of imported malaria using the Binax Now malaria antigen detection test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiese, Lothar; Bruun, Brita; Baek, Leif

    2006-01-01

    a period of 14 months. The Binax Now Malaria rapid test was used at the bedside and in the clinical microbiology laboratory. The training of clinical staff was monitored and their experience with the use of the test was recorded. 542 patients were included, 80 of whom had malaria diagnosed by microscopy....... The rapid test used at the bedside had a sensitivity of 88% for the detection of P. falciparum compared to 95% when the test was performed in the microbiology laboratory. The risk of technical problems and invalid tests was highest when the test was used at the bedside. The rapid diagnostic test may...... be useful for the diagnosis of P. falciparum malaria when used by routine laboratory staff, but could lead to misdiagnoses when used at the bedside. Microscopy is still essential in order to identify the few missed diagnoses, to determine the degree of parasitaemia, and to ensure species diagnosis...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging based functional imaging in paediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manias, Karen A; Gill, Simrandip K; MacPherson, Lesley; Foster, Katharine; Oates, Adam; Peet, Andrew C

    2017-02-01

    Imaging is central to management of solid tumours in children. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard imaging modality for tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) and limbs and is increasingly used in the abdomen. It provides excellent structural detail, but imparts limited information about tumour type, aggressiveness, metastatic potential or early treatment response. MRI based functional imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion and perfusion weighted imaging, probe tissue properties to provide clinically important information about metabolites, structure and blood flow. This review describes the role of and evidence behind these functional imaging techniques in paediatric oncology and implications for integrating them into routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Unusual presentations of osteoarticular tuberculosis in two paediatric patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Ho, Kenneth Wai Yip; Lam, Ying Lee; Shek, Tony Wai Hung

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a universal mimicker and thus could be a differential diagnosis of any osteolytic lesion. Bone biopsy is crucial in these cases for culture and histological proof of tuberculous infection. This is a case report of two paediatric patients with unusual presentations of tuberculosis. One patient presented with knee pain and had imaged findings of an osteolytic lesion at the epiphysis. Interval scan showed spread of the lesion through the physis to the metaphyseal region. The second patient presented with hip pain and an osteolytic lesion of the acetabulum. He was subsequently found to have involvement of the brain and spine as well. Both patients were diagnosed with tuberculosis by bone biopsy for culture and pathological examination. They were treated successfully with antituberculous medications without chronic sequelae. These two patients showed that early recognition and prompt treatment are critical for management of tuberculosis to avoid chronic sequelae. PMID:23087272

  12. Trichilemmal Cyst of the Penis in a Paediatric Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Madan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paediatric penile cysts are uncommon. We report a five-year-old child with an asymptomatic progressively growing cyst on the ventral aspect of the penis after a hypospadias repair. The patient presented to the Cooper Health Clinic, Dubai, United Arab Emirates, in March 2012. A complete excision of the cyst was performed. Histology results delineated a capsulated benign trichilemmal cyst. No recurrence or complications were reported in the 26 months following the excision. We recommend an early and complete excision of all penile cysts to prevent the risk of urethral obstruction, infection, inflammation and rare malignant changes. This is the first reported case of a penile trichilemmal cyst in a child.

  13. Discovering Ways That Influence the Older Nurse to Continue Bedside Practice

    OpenAIRE

    LeeAnna Spiva; Patricia Hart; Frank McVay

    2011-01-01

    A descriptive qualitative approach was used to investigate older nurses practicing bedside nursing and to identify ways to influence older nurses to continue bedside practice. A purposive sample of 18 older nurses was recruited from a healthcare system located in the Southeastern United States. Interpretative analysis of interviews resulted in the identification of three constitutive patterns and eight themes. The first constitutive pattern identified was attributes of the older nurse. The th...

  14. [Yes, we should keep ABO agglutination test within bedside transfusion checks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daurat, G

    2008-11-01

    ABO incompatible transfusions are still a frequent cause of serious adverse transfusion reactions. Bedside check is intended to detect patient errors and prevent ABO mismatch. France is one of the few countries that includes ABO agglutination test for red blood cells in bedside checks. Evaluation of this ABO agglutination test, performed with a special card, shows that, on the field, despite frequent users' mishandling, it can detect up to 93% of ABO incompatibilities. This is not enough to rely on this sole test for bedside checks. But, linking it with an another test, currently, checks that the right blood is given to the right patient, rises the sensitivity of the whole bedside procedure up to an estimated 99.65%, for detection of ABO incompatibilities. This linkage has been introduced in the French regulation in 2003. Since then, the incidence of ABO incompatible transfusions has decreased dramatically and faster than in any other country, so France has now, probably, the lowest rate of ABO incompatible transfusions. The investigation of the few ABO accidents that still occur, shows that professionals have always bypassed this linkage. On the other hand, introducing bedside recipient and blood products barcode or radio-chip checks in all the 1500 French hospitals, though technically possible, would provide very little enhancement and lead to major difficulties and expenses. Linkage of ABO agglutination test to patient and blood checks within the bedside procedure has proved to be efficient and should be kept.

  15. Paediatric UK demyelinating disease longitudinal study (PUDDLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likeman Marcus

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence that at least 5% of Multiple sclerosis (MS cases manifest in childhood. Children with MS present with a demyelinating episode involving single or multiple symptoms prior to developing a second event (usually within two years to then meet criteria for diagnosis. There is evidence from adult cohorts that the incidence and sex ratios of MS are changing and that children of immigrants have a higher risk for developing MS. A paediatric population should reflect the vanguard of such changes and may reflect trends yet to be observed in adult cohorts. Studying a paediatric population from the first demyelinating event will allow us to test these hypotheses, and may offer further valuable insights into the genetic and environmental interactions in the pathogenesis of MS. Methods/Design The Paediatric UK Demyelinating Disease Longitudinal Study (PUDDLS is a prospective longitudinal observational study which aims to determine the natural history, predictors and outcomes of childhood CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases. PUDDLS will involve centres in the UK, and will establish a cohort of children affected with a first CNS inflammatory demyelinating event for long-term follow up by recruiting for approximately 5 years. PUDDLS will also establish a biological sample archive (CSF, serum, and DNA, allowing future hypothesis driven research. For example, the future discovery of a biomarker will allow validation within this dataset for the evaluation of novel biomarkers. Patients will also be requested to consent to be contacted in the future. A secondary aim is to collaborate internationally with the International Paediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group when future collaborative studies are proposed, whilst sharing a minimal anonymised dataset. PUDDLS is the second of two jointly funded studies. The first (UCID-SS is an epidemiological surveillance study that already received ethical approvals, and started on the 1st

  16. Current views and advances on Paediatric Virology: An update for paediatric trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAMMAS, IOANNIS N.; GREENOUGH, ANNE; THEODORIDOU, MARIA; KRAMVIS, ANNA; CHRISTAKI, ILIANA; KOUTSAFTIKI, CHRYSSIE; KOUTSAKI, MARIA; PORTALIOU, DIMITRA M.; KOSTAGIANNI, GEORGIA; PANAGOPOULOU, PARASKEVI; SOURVINOS, GEORGE; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric Virology is a bold new scientific field, which combines Paediatrics with Virology, Epidemiology, Molecular Medicine, Evidence-based Medicine, Clinical Governance, Quality Improvement, Pharmacology and Immunology. The Workshop on Paediatric Virology, which took place on Saturday October 10, 2015 in Athens, Greece, provided an overview of recent views and advances on viral infections occurring in neonates and children. It was included in the official programme of the 20th World Congress on Advances in Oncology and the 18th International Symposium on Molecular Medicine, which attracted over 500 delegates from the five continents. During the Workshop, the topics covered included the challenges of vaccine implementation against human papillomaviruses in countries under financial crisis, strategies for eradicating poliomyelitis and its 60th vaccine anniversary, as well as the debate on the association between autism and vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella. Among the non-vaccine related topics, emphasis was given to viral infections in prematurely born infants and their long-term outcomes, new paediatric intensive care management options for bronchiolitis related to respiratory syncytial virus, the clinical implications of hepatitis B virus and cytomegalovirus genotyping, the Ebola virus threat and preparedness in Paediatric Emergency Departments, oral, oropharynx, laryngeal, nasal and ocular viral infections and Merkel cell polyomavirus as a novel emerging virus of infancy and childhood. In this review, we provide selected presentations and reports discussed at the Workshop. PMID:26889211

  17. Institutional review boards' attitudes towards remuneration in paediatric research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flege, Marius M; Thomsen, Simon F

    2017-01-01

    Remuneration in paediatric research poses an ethical dilemma. Too large a sum might cause parents to enrol their children in research projects with no benefit for the child, whereas too modest a sum might hamper recruitment. The institutional review boards have the responsibility to only approve...... remuneration in paediatric trials with ethically sound research plans. However, little is known about which factors influence institutional review boards' evaluation of remuneration in paediatric research....

  18. A blended approach to invasive bedside procedural instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenchus, Joshua; Issenberg, S Barry; Murphy, Daniel; Everett-Thomas, Ruth; Erben, Laura; Arheart, Kristopher; Birnbach, David J

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the impact of a blended, standardized curriculum for invasive bedside procedural training on medical knowledge and technical skills for Internal Medicine residents. The investigators developed a curriculum in procedural instruction and performance for Internal Medicine house staff, and implemented the program at a tertiary care academic medical center with a primary affiliation with a US medical school. The investigators chose procedures recommended for technical competence by the American Board of Internal Medicine: lumbar puncture, thoracentesis, paracentesis, central venous catheter insertion, and knee arthrocentesis. The program included: (1) assessment of baseline medical knowledge and technical proficiency on mannequins, (2) video instruction of procedure, (3) faculty-led discussion of critical concepts, (4) faculty demonstration of the procedure on mannequin, (5) individual practice on simulators, (6) post-intervention knowledge evaluation, and (7) post-intervention skills evaluation. The performance achieved during the initial skills evaluation on a mannequin was compared to the performance achieved on the first patient subsequent to the instructional portion. All participants with complete data demonstrated a statistically significant pre-intervention to post-intervention improvement (p instruction can significantly improve performance in participants' medical knowledge and technical skills.

  19. Bedside Tested Ocular Motor Disorders in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Servillo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. Ocular motor disorders (OMDs are a common feature of multiple sclerosis (MS. In clinical practice, if not reported by patients, OMDs are often underdiagnosed and their prevalence is underestimated. Methods. We studied 163 patients (125 women, 76.7%, 38 men, 23.3%; median age 45.0 years; median disease duration 10 years; median EDSS 3.5 with definite MS (n=150, 92% or clinically isolated syndrome (n=13, 8% who underwent a thorough clinical examination of eye movements. Data on localization of previous relapses, MS subtype, and MRI findings were collected and analyzed. Results. Overall, 111/163 (68.1% patients showed at least one abnormality of eye movement. Most frequent OMDs were impaired smooth pursuit (42.3%, saccadic dysmetria (41.7%, unilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia (14.7%, slowing of saccades (14.7%, skew deviation (13.5%, and gaze evoked nystagmus (13.5%. Patients with OMDs had more severe disability (P=0.0005 and showed more frequently infratentorial MRI lesions (P=0.004. Localization of previous relapses was not associated with presence of OMDs. Conclusion. OMDs are frequent in patients with stable (no relapses MS. A precise bedside examination of eye motility can disclose abnormalities that imply the presence of subclinical MS lesions and may have a substantial impact on definition of the diagnosis and on management of MS patients.

  20. Bedside tests to predict laryngoscopic difficulty in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansano, André Marques; Módolo, Norma Sueli Pinheiro; Silva, Leopoldo Muniz da; Ganem, Eliana Maria; Braz, Leandro Gobbo; Knabe, Andrea de Carvalho; Freitas, Fernanda Moreira de

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric airway management is a priority during anesthesia, critical care and emergency medicine. The purpose of this study is to validate bedside tests that predict airway management difficulty in anesthetized children. Children under 12 years of age were recruited in a cross-sectional study to assess the value of some anthropometric measures as predictors of laryngoscopic difficulty. The patients were divided into three groups by age. Weight, height, neck circumference, BMI (body mass index), inter incisors distance thyromental distance, sternomental distance, frontal plane to chin distance (FPCD) and the Mallampati index were determined and were correlated with the CML (Cormack & Lehane classification). The incidence of difficult laryngoscopy (CML 3 or 4) was 3.58%. Factors that were significantly associated with laryngoscopic difficulty included short inter incisors distance, high FPCD, thyromental distance, sternomental distance and the Mallampati index. The FPCD/weight index exhibited a higher area under the ROC curve than any other variable considered. This study confirms that the FPCD and the FPCD/weight ratio are the most consistent predictors of laryngoscopic difficulty in pediatric patients. For patients over 6 months of age, the IID also correlated with laryngoscopic difficulty. For children who were capable of obeying simple orders, the Mallampati test correlated better with laryngoscopic difficulty than did the Mallampati test with phonation. Our results strongly suggest that skilled professionals should perform airway management in children, especially in patients with a high FPCD or a high FPCD/weight ratio. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Paediatric nephrology: the last 50 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausman, Joshua Y; Powell, Harley R

    2015-01-01

    In 1965, the specialty of paediatric nephrology was in its infancy. Following the development of a landmark collaborative research study, the International Study of Kidney Disease in Childhood in the mid-1960s, the first specialist societies were formed: the European Society of Pediatric Nephrology in 1967 and the American Society of Pediatric Nephrology in 1969. The extraordinary improvements in care delivered to children with kidney disease over the past 50 years are too broad to cover in any one paper. They traverse the spectrum of diagnosis, classification, therapeutics, social well-being and transition to adult care. We have selected four case scenarios to highlight these changes in key areas of paediatric nephrology: post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, nephrotic syndrome, haemolytic uraemic syndrome and neonatal dialysis and childhood transplantation.

  2. Imaging of accidental paediatric head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Phua Hwee [KK Women' s and Children' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Singapore (Singapore); Lim, Choie Cheio Tchoyoson [National Neuroscience Institute, Department of Neuroradiology, Singapore (Singapore)

    2009-05-15

    Head trauma is the most common form of injury sustained in serious childhood trauma and remains one of the top three causes of death despite improved road planning and safety laws. CT remains the first-line investigation for paediatric head trauma, although MRI may be more sensitive at picking up the full extent of injuries and may be useful for prognosis. Follow-up imaging should be tailored to answer the specific clinical question and to look for possible complications. (orig.)

  3. Ciprofloxacin safety in paediatrics: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adefurin, Abiodun; Sammons, Helen; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Choonara, Imti

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the safety of ciprofloxacin in paediatric patients in relation to arthropathy, any other adverse events (AEs) and drug interactions. Methods A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CENTRAL and bibliographies of relevant articles was carried out for all published articles, regardless of design, that involved the use of ciprofloxacin in any paediatric age group ≤17 years. Only articles that reported on safety were included. Results 105 articles met the inclusion criteria and involved 16 184 paediatric patients. There were 1065 reported AEs (risk 7%, 95% CI 3.2% to 14.0%). The most frequent AEs were musculoskeletal AEs, abnormal liver function tests, nausea, changes in white blood cell counts and vomiting. There were six drug interactions (with aminophylline (4) and methotrexate (2)). The only drug related death occurred in a neonate who had an anaphylactic reaction. 258 musculoskeletal events occurred in 232 paediatric patients (risk 1.6%, 95% CI 0.9% to 2.6%). Arthralgia accounted for 50% of these. The age of occurrence of arthropathy ranged from 7 months to 17 years (median 10 years). All cases of arthropathy resolved or improved with management. One prospective controlled study estimated the risk of arthropathy as 9.3 (OR 95% CI 1.2 to 195). Pooled safety data of controlled trials in this review estimated the risk of arthropathy as 1.57 (OR 95% CI 1.26 to 1.97). Conclusion Musculoskeletal AEs occur due to ciprofloxacin use. However, these musculoskeletal events are reversible with management. It is recommended that further prospective controlled studies should be carried out to evaluate the safety of ciprofloxacin, with particular focus on the risk of arthropathy. PMID:21785119

  4. Creating and being created: the changing panorama of paediatric rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helders, Paul J M; Engelbert, Raoul H H; Custers, Jan W H; Gorter, Jan Willem; Takken, Tim; van der Net, Janjaap

    2003-01-01

    Paediatric rehabilitation as a discipline is rapidly changing, especially during the last decades. In the past, paediatric rehabilitation was characterized by merely adult intervention strategies in a miniaturized form, delivered by a merely adult patients-oriented profession. Theories on childhood development, however, changed, as did the focus of interventions: from impairments to function, from the child itself to family, community and peers. The call for outcome-oriented and evidence-based medicine lastly, changed paediatric rehabilitation into a mature paediatric profession with it's own scientific framework. This is reflected among other things in the increasing number of paediatric measures and instruments specifically geared to the paediatric rehabilitation profession, for example the Gross Motor Function Measure, Paediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory and Movement ABC. More recently, paediatric exercise physiologists are pointing to the benefits of an active lifestyle and training for patients with chronic diseases and disabilities. Several studies have evaluated the effects of such training programmes and came up with positive results. It shows that paediatric rehabilitation continues to develop as a dynamic profession, having growth, childhood development and childhood activities as it's core business.

  5. Multi-detector CT in the paediatric urinary tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damasio, M.B., E-mail: mariabdamasio@ospedale-gaslini.ge.it [Paediatric Radiology, Giannina Gaslini Institute, Genoa (Italy); Darge, K. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia (United States); Riccabona, M. [Department of Radiology, Division of Paediatric Radiology, University Hospital Graz (Austria)

    2013-07-15

    The use of paediatric multi-slice CT (MSCT) is rapidly increasing worldwide. As technology advances its application in paediatric care is constantly expanding with an increasing need for radiation dose control and appropriate utilization. Recommendations on how and when to use CT for assessment of the paediatric urinary tract appear to be an important issue. Therefore the European Society of Paediatric Radiology (ESPR) uroradiology task force and European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) paediatric working groups created a proposal for performing renal CT in children that has recently been published. The objective of this paper is to discuss paediatric urinary tract CT (uro-CT) in more detail and depth. The specific aim is not only to offer general recommendations on clinical indications and optimization processes of paediatric CT examination, but also to address various childhood characteristics and phenomena that facilitate understanding the different approach and use of uro-CT in children compared to adults. According to ALARA principles, paediatric uro-CT should only be considered for selected indications provided high-level comprehensive US is not conclusive and alternative non-ionizing techniques such as MR are not available or appropriate. Optimization of paediatric uro-CT protocols (considering lower age-adapted kV and mAs) is mandatory, and the number of phases and acquisition series should be kept as few as possible.

  6. Fitting and flailing: recognition of paediatric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, H; Patel, J; Fernandez, D; Sharples, P; Ramanan, A V

    2014-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a systemic autoimmune condition where the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies is thought to predispose to thrombotic events. It is uncommon in the paediatric population, but current diagnostic criteria are based on adult population studies, making assessment of its true paediatric prevalence difficult. We present two cases of paediatric APS, who presented with primary neurological events, and discuss approaches to diagnosis, interpretation of screening investigations, including antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) antibodies and lupus anticoagulant. Possible approaches to the management of paediatric APS are discussed.

  7. Paediatric Virology in the Hippocratic Corpus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammas, Ioannis N.; Spandidos, Demetrios A.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocrates (Island of Kos, 460 B.C.-Larissa, 370 B.C.) is the founder of the most famous Medical School of the classical antiquity. In acknowledgement of his pioneering contribution to the new scientific field of Paediatric Virology, this article provides a systematic analysis of the Hippocratic Corpus, with particular focus on viral infections predominating in neonates and children. A mumps epidemic, affecting the island of Thasos in the 5th century B.C., is described in detail. ‘Herpes’, a medical term derived from the ancient Greek word ‘ἕρπειν’, meaning ‘to creep’ or ‘crawl’, is used to describe the spreading of cutaneous lesions in both childhood and adulthood. Cases of children with exanthema ‘resembling mosquito bites’ are presented in reference to varicella or smallpox infection. A variety of upper and lower respiratory tract viral infections are described with impressive accuracy, including rhinitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, laryngitis, bronchiolitis and bronchitis. The ‘cough of Perinthos’ epidemic, an influenza-like outbreak in the 5th century B.C., is also recorded and several cases complicated with pneumonia or fatal outcomes are discussed. Hippocrates, moreover, describes conjunctivitis, otitis, lymphadenitis, meningoencephalitis, febrile convulsions, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, poliomyelitis and skin warts, along with proposed treatment directions. Almost 2,400 years later, Hippocrates' systematic approach and methodical innovations can inspire paediatric trainees and future Paediatric Virology subspecialists. PMID:27446241

  8. [The latest in paediatric resuscitation recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Herce, Jesús; Rodríguez, Antonio; Carrillo, Angel; de Lucas, Nieves; Calvo, Custodio; Civantos, Eva; Suárez, Eva; Pons, Sara; Manrique, Ignacio

    2017-04-01

    Cardiac arrest has a high mortality in children. To improve the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, it is essential to disseminate the international recommendations and the training of health professionals and the general population in resuscitation. This article summarises the 2015 European Paediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation recommendations, which are based on a review of the advances in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and consensus in the science and treatment by the International Council on Resuscitation. The Spanish Paediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation recommendations, developed by the Spanish Group of Paediatric and Neonatal Resuscitation, are an adaptation of the European recommendations, and will be used for training health professionals and the general population in resuscitation. This article highlights the main changes from the previous 2010 recommendations on prevention of cardiac arrest, the diagnosis of cardiac arrest, basic life support, advanced life support and post-resuscitation care, as well as reviewing the algorithms of treatment of basic life support, obstruction of the airway and advanced life support. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  9. Paediatric suicidal burns: A growing concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segu, Smitha; Tataria, Rachana

    2016-06-01

    An alarming rise in rates of paediatric population committing self-immolation acts is a growing social and medical problem. In recent times there seems to be a rising concern in paediatric population. A study was conducted at a government tertiary care burn centre over 5 years in paediatric age group of middle and upper lower class families. Most had deep partial thickness burns. Psychiatric and personality disorder were found in 24.03% and 31.46% patients respectively. Kerosene was the main agent chosen to inflict injury. The average length of hospital stay was 19.8 days. The crude mortality rate observed was 38.2%. With cultural and socio-economic changes children and adolescents are exposed to increased levels of stress and peer pressure leaving them vulnerable. A multidisciplinary care involving medical, psychological and social support is required. Identifying children at risk and proper counselling and support can form an important strategy at prevention rather than cure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  10. Injuries in the competitive paediatric motocross athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, C B; Holbert, J A; Hennrikus, W L

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the spectrum of injuries sustained by competitive paediatric motocross athletes at a level I trauma centre. A retrospective study of paediatric competitive motocross injuries treated at a level I trauma centre between 2004 and 2014 was performed. Athletes were included if aged less than 18 years and injured while practising or competing on a competitive motocross track. Medical records were reviewed for age, gender, race, location of accident, use of safety equipment, mechanism of injury, injury type and severity, Glasgow Coma Score at hospital presentation and Injury Severity Score (ISS). In total, 35 athletes were studied. The average age was 14 years. One athlete died. Thirty athletes were injured during competition; five were injured during practice. Twenty-four athletes (69%) suffered an orthopaedic injury with a total of 32 fractures and two dislocations. Two fractures were open (6.3%). Lower extremity fractures were twice as common as upper extremity fractures. Surgery was more common for lower extremity fractures-83% versus 30%. The most common fractures were femoral shaft (18.8%), fibula (12.5%), clavicle (12.5%), tibial shaft (9.4%) and forearm (9.4%). Competitive paediatric motocross athletes suffer serious, potentially life-threatening injuries despite the required use of protective safety equipment. Femoral shaft, fibula and clavicle were found to be the most commonly fractured bones. Further prospective research into track regulations, protective equipment and course design may reduce the trauma burden in this athlete population.

  11. The paediatric psychiatric emergency population in a university teaching hospital in Belgium (2003-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuypers, Pieter J V; Danckaerts, Marina; Sabbe, Marc; Demyttenaere, Koen; Bruffaerts, Ronny

    2014-10-01

    In the last few decades, there has been a remarkable increase in the number of children and adolescents presenting with psychiatric complaints to the emergency department in the USA. In Europe, however, less is known about the paediatric psychiatric emergency population. This study provides a clinical and demographic profile of this population and its service use in a European context. From 2003 to 2008, we registered 989 paediatric psychiatric patients consulting the psychiatric emergency services (PES) of a large university hospital in Belgium. During this period the number of patients increased more than three-fold. Patients were predominantly female (57.3%) and adolescent (83.3%) and mostly referred for hostility and violence towards others (18.5%) and suicidal ideation (17.8%). For about 1/4 of the patients, PES was the first ever mental health treatment contact. PES could serve as a place for early detection and intervention and as an entry point to mental health services.

  12. Economic analysis of bedside ultrasonography (US) implementation in an Internal Medicine department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Americo; Francesconi, Andrea; Giannuzzi, Rosangela; Berardi, Silvia; Sbraccia, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    The economic crisis, the growing healthcare demand, and Defensive Medicine wastefulness, strongly recommend the restructuring of the entire medical network. New health technology, such as bedside ultrasonography, might successfully integrate the clinical approach optimizing the use of limited resources, especially in a person-oriented vision of medicine. Bedside ultrasonography is a safe and reliable technique, with worldwide expanding employment in various clinical settings, being considered as "the stethoscope of the 21st century". However, at present, bedside ultrasonography lacks economic analysis. We performed a Cost-Benefit Analysis "ex ante", with a break-even point computing, of bedside ultrasonography implementation in an Internal Medicine department in the mid-term. Number and kind estimation of bedside ultrasonographic studies were obtained by a retrospective study, whose data results were applied to the next 3-year period (foresight study). All 1980 foreseen bedside examinations, with prevailing multiorgan ultrasonographic studies, were considered to calculate direct and indirect costs, while specific and generic revenues were considered only after the first semester. Physician professional training, equipment purchase and working time represented the main fixed and variable cost items. DRG increase/appropriateness, hospitalization stay shortening and reduction of traditional ultrasonography examination requests mainly impacted on calculated revenues. The break-even point, i.e. the volume of activity at which revenues exactly equal total incurred costs, was calculated to be 734 US examinations, corresponding to € 81,998 and the time considered necessary to reach it resulting 406 days. Our economic analysis clearly shows that bedside ultrasonography implementation in clinical daily management of an Internal Medicine department can produce consistent savings, or economic profit according to managerial choices (i.e., considering public or private targets

  13. Italian contributions to Turkish paediatrics during the Ottoman Empire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurdakok, Murat; Cataldi, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    The Ottoman Empire maintained close relations with the neighbouring Italian city states in the 16th and 17th century. Yacub Pasha (1425-1481), personal physician of Mehmed II the Conqueror, was an Italian Jew who advanced to the title of pasha and vizier. Domenico Hierosolimitano (ca. 1552-1622), the third physician to Sultan Murad III, was a Jerusalemite rabbi. His book is an important source about everyday life and medical practice in Istanbul at the time. Nuh bin Abd al-Mennab (1627-1707), also of Italian stock, was the Chief Physician of the Ottoman Empire, who translated a pharmacopoeia into Turkish. In the same century, two Italians, Israel Conegliano (Conian) and Tobia Cohen became private physicians to leading Ottoman pashas and the Grand Vizier. A. Vuccino (1829-1893) and Antoine Calleja Pasha (1806-1893) taught at the Istanbul Medical School. Italy was a favoured country for medical education during the early period of Ottoman westernisation. Sanizade Mehmet Ataullah Efendi (1771-1826) translated the first medical book printed in the Ottoman Empire from Italian into Turkish. Mustafa Behcet Efendi (1774-1833), chief physician to the Sultan and the founder of the first western medical school in Turkey, translated several medical books from Italian into Turkish. The first printed pharmacopeia in the Ottoman Empire was also originally Italian In the 19th century, Edouard Ottoni and his son Giuseppe Ottoni were well-known military pharmacists, both under the name of Faik Pasha. Probably the most influential physician of Italian origin was Giovanni Battista Violi (1849-1928), who had practiced paediatrics in Turkey for more than fifty years. Violi was the founder of the first children's hospital, the first vaccine institute, and the first paediatric journal in the Ottoman Empire.

  14. When to start paediatric testing of the adult HIV cure research agenda?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Seema K

    2017-01-01

    Ethical guidelines recommend that experimental interventions should be tested in adults first before they are tested and approved in children. Some challenge this paradigm, however, and recommend initiating paediatric testing after preliminary safety testing in adults in certain cases. For instance, commentators have argued for accelerated testing of HIV vaccines in children. Additionally, HIV cure research on the use of very early therapy (VET) in infants, prompted in part by the Mississippi baby case, is one example of a strategy that is currently being tested in infants before it has been well tested in adults. Because infants’ immune systems are still developing, the timing of HIV transmission is easier to identify in infants than in adults, and infants who receive VET might never develop the viral reservoirs that make HIV so difficult to eradicate, infants may be uniquely situated to achieve HIV cure or sustained viral remission. Several commentators have now argued for earlier initiation of HIV cure interventions other than (or in addition to) VET in children. HIV cure research is therefore a good case for re-examining the important question of when to initiate paediatric research. I will argue that, despite the potential for HIV cure research to benefit children and the scientific value of involving children in this research, the HIV cure agenda should not accelerate the involvement of children for the following reasons: HIV cure research is highly speculative, risky, aimed at combination approaches and does not compare favourably with the available alternatives. I conclude by drawing general implications for the initiation of paediatric testing, including that interventions that have to be used in combination with others and cures for chronic diseases may not be valuable enough to justify early paediatric testing. PMID:27259546

  15. Analysis of Arterial Blood Gas Report in Chronic Kidney Diseases – Comparison between Bedside and Multistep Systematic Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhat, Vaishali; Tilak, Mona A; Roy, Indranath

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acid Base Disorders (ABDs) are commonly encountered in critically ill Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) patients. Timely and correct analysis of Arterial Blood Gases (ABG) is critical for the diagnosis, treatment and prediction of outcome of the patients. Aim The aim was to explore type and prevalence of ABDs in 31 critically ill CKD patients from a tertiary care hospital in Maharashtra, to compare two methods of analysis- bedside and systematic approaches and to clinically correlate the nature of ABDs in these patients. Materials and Methods The initial ABG reports of 31 consecutive CKD patients were analysed by two methods. Medica Easy stat analyser was the equipment for analysis with Principle of potentiometry and ion selective electrode for pH and pCO2 and amperometry for pO2. Serum albumin was also measured by Bromocresol green dye binding method using liquixx albumin kit in Erba XL 300 autoanalyser. Statistical Analysis Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis using Epi Info version 3.5.4 and SPSS 14.0 softwares. Results The systematic method showed a significantly higher prevalence of mixed disorders (50%) compared to bedside method (12.9%). Most prevalent disorder by bedside method was metabolic acidosis in 15 cases (48.39%). By the systematic method, 3 reports were invalid. As a single category, most prevalent type was both simple respiratory alkalosis and mixed metabolic acidosis with respiratory alkalosis- 6 of 31 cases in each type (19.36% each). As a whole, metabolic acidosis (including both High Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis or HAGMA and Non Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis or NAGMA with 4 in each type) was most prevalent- 8 of 31(25.8%). Conclusion Systematic approach was more effective in diagnosing mixed acid base disorders. By systematic method the findings of analysis in most cases could be correlated with the clinical condition and provisional diagnosis. Thus interpretation of ABDs by using stepwise approach could be useful to the

  16. Cardio-thoracic surgical patients' experience on bedside nursing handovers: Findings from a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupieri, Giulia; Creatti, Chiara; Palese, Alvisa

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences of postoperative cardio-thoracic surgical patients experiencing nursing bedside handover. A descriptive qualitative approach was undertaken. A purposeful sampling technique was adopted, including 14 patients who went through cardio-thoracic surgery and witnessed at least two bedside handovers. The study was performed in a Cardio-thoracic ICU localised in a Joint Commission International accredited Academic Hospital in north-eastern Italy from August to November 2014. The experience of patients participating at the bedside handover is based on four main themes: (1) 'discovering a new nursing identity', (2) 'being apparently engaged in a bedside handover', (3) 'experiencing the paradox of confidentiality' and (4) 'having the situation under control'. With the handover performed at the bedside in a postoperative setting, two interconnected potential effects may be achieved with regard to patients, nurses and the nursing profession. Nurses have a great opportunity to express their closeness to patients and to promote awareness of the important growth that nursing has achieved over the years as a profession and discipline. Therefore, patients may better perceive nursing competence and feel safer during the postoperative care pathway. They can appreciate nurses' humanity in caring and trust their competence and professionalism.

  17. Bedside prediction of right subclavian venous catheter insertion length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Ji Choi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: The present study aimed to evaluate whether right subclavian vein (SCV catheter insertion depth can be predicted reliably by the distances from the SCV insertion site to the ipsilateral clavicular notch directly (denoted as I-IC, via the top of the SCV arch, or via the clavicle (denoted as I-T-IC and I-C-IC, respectively. Method: In total, 70 SCV catheterizations were studied. The I-IC, I-T-IC, and I-C-IC distances in each case were measured after ultrasound-guided SCV catheter insertion. The actual length of the catheter between the insertion site and the ipsilateral clavicular notch, denoted as L, was calculated by using chest X-ray. Results: L differed from the I-T-IC, I-C-IC, and I-IC distances by 0.14±0.53, 2.19±1.17, and -0.45 ±0.68 cm, respectively. The mean I-T-IC distance was the most similar to the mean L (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.89. The mean I-IC was significantly shorter than L, while the mean I-C-IC was significantly longer. Linear regression analysis provided the following formula: Predicted SCV catheter insertion length (cm = -0.037 + 0.036 × Height (cm + 0.903 × I-T-IC (cm (adjusted r2 =0.64. Conclusion: The I-T-IC distance may be a reliable bedside predictor of the optimal insertion length for a right SCV cannulation.

  18. Cyclotron production of (44)Sc: From bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meulen, Nicholas P; Bunka, Maruta; Domnanich, Katharina A; Müller, Cristina; Haller, Stephanie; Vermeulen, Christiaan; Türler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger

    2015-09-01

    (44)Sc, a PET radionuclide, has promising decay characteristics (T1/2 = 3.97 h, Eβ(+)av = 632 keV) for nuclear imaging and is an attractive alternative to the short-lived (68)Ga (T1/2 = 68 min, Eβ(+)av = 830 keV). The aim of this study was the optimization of the (44)Sc production process at an accelerator, allowing its use for preclinical and clinical PET imaging. (44)CaCO3 targets were prepared and irradiated with protons (~11 MeV) at a beam current of 50 μA for 90 min. (44)Sc was separated from its target material using DGA extraction resin and concentrated using SCX cation exchange resin. Radiolabeling experiments at activities up to 500 MBq and stability tests were performed with DOTANOC by investigating different scavengers, including gentisic acid. Dynamic PET of an AR42J tumor-bearing mouse was performed after injection of (44)Sc-DOTANOC. The optimized chemical separation method yielded up to 2 GBq (44)Sc of high radionuclidic purity. In the presence of gentisic acid, radiolabeling of (44)Sc with DOTANOC was achieved with a radiochemical yield of ~99% at high specific activity (10 MBq/nmol) and quantities which would allow clinical application. The dynamic PET images visualized increasing uptake of (44)Sc-DOTANOC into AR42J tumors and excretion of radioactivity through the kidneys of the investigated mouse. The concept "from-bench-to-bedside" was clearly demonstrated in this extended study using cyclotron-produced (44)Sc. Sufficiently high activities of (44)Sc of excellent radionuclidic purity are obtainable for clinical application, by irradiation of enriched calcium at a cyclotron. This work demonstrates a promising basis for introducing (44)Sc to clinical routine of nuclear imaging using PET. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A paediatric bone index derived by automated radiogrammetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thodberg, H.H.; van Rijn, R.R.; Tanaka, T.; Martin, D.D.; Kreiborg, S.

    2010-01-01

    Hand radiographs are obtained routinely to determine bone age of children. This paper presents a method that determines a Paediatric Bone Index automatically from such radiographs. The Paediatric Bone Index is designed to have minimal relative standard deviation (7.5%), and the precision is

  20. EULAR recommendations for vaccination in paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijstek, M. W.; de Bruin, L. M. Ott; Bijl, M.; Borrow, R.; van der Klis, F.; Kone-Paut, I.; Fasth, A.; Minden, K.; Ravelli, A.; Abinun, M.; Pileggi, G. S.; Borte, M.; Wulffraat, N. M.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based recommendations for vaccination of paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases (PaedRD) were developed by following the EULAR standardised procedures for guideline development. The EULAR task force consisted of (paediatric) rheumatologists/immunologists, one expert in vaccine evaluati

  1. Use of Zoledronic Acid in Paediatric Craniofacial Fibrous Dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Di Pede

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of a paediatric patient affected by mandibular fibrous dysplasia (FD with severe and chronic pain who was successfully treated with zoledronic acid (ZOL: a third-generation bisphosphonate. Further research is needed to assess its safety and efficacy as a treatment option for FD in the paediatric population.

  2. The Manchester Triage System in paediatric emergency care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Veen (Mirjam)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn the first part of the thesis performance of the Manchester Triage System in paediatric emergency care was evaluated. In chapter 1 we reviewed the literature to evaluate realibility and validity of triage systems in paediatric emergency care. The Manchester Triage System was used to tr

  3. Paediatric lung function testing : determinants and reference values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Marije

    2011-01-01

    Paediatric lung function tests provide objective measures in diagnosis and follow-up of lung diseases, and give insight in the pathophysiology of lung growth and development. In the first part of the thesis, paediatric lung function tests were used to investigate determinants of lung growth and

  4. Complications of paediatric elbow trauma treatment by traditional bonesetters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Mohammad Farooq; Dhar, Shabir Ahmad; Gani, Naseem Ul; Kawoosa, Altaf A

    2009-04-01

    This is a retrospective review of paediatric elbow trauma, which was initially treated by bonesetters and subsequently reported to the hospital for management. This paper describes the pattern of trauma and the complications of unscientific management. The report also recommends a basic training program for the bonesetters so as to make them aware of the potential complications involved in managing paediatric elbow trauma.

  5. Paediatric lung function testing : determinants and reference values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Marije

    2011-01-01

    Paediatric lung function tests provide objective measures in diagnosis and follow-up of lung diseases, and give insight in the pathophysiology of lung growth and development. In the first part of the thesis, paediatric lung function tests were used to investigate determinants of lung growth and deve

  6. A comparison of paediatric dentists' and general dental practitioners' care patterns in paediatric dental care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schorer-Jensma, M.A.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.

    2010-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to compare the care patterns of paediatric dentists and general dentists in the dental treatment of children in the Netherlands. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A case control study was completed based on the financial records of one of the largest Dutch health insurance com

  7. Evaluation of new grids for bedside chest radiotherapy. Effects of X-ray beam misalignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatemura, Masahiro; Ikeda, Ryuji; Katsuda, Noboru; Moribe, Nobuyuki; Takada, Takao; Takahashi, Mutsumasa [Kumamoto University (Japan). Hospital; Higashida, Yoshiharu

    1997-06-01

    We investigated the effects of different degrees of misalignment on the performance of new grids in bedside radiography. Two types of new grids (a conventional grid with a grid ratio of 3 : 1 and a parallel hole grid) designed for bedside radiography were compared with a conventional 5 : 1 grid. The effects of scatter fraction, contrast improvement factor, bucky factor, and tolerance to misalignment on grid performance were examined. The scatter rejection and contrast improvement of the new grids were significantly lower compared with a 5 : 1 grid at accurate alignment. However, the two new grids have much more tolerance to misalignment than the conventional grid. The two new grids may be used for bedside radiography without the need for accurate alignment. (author)

  8. Pancreaticoduodenectomy in children: optimising outcome of uncommon paediatric procedures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yeap, B H

    2012-02-01

    Contemporary surgical practice is increasingly dominated by subspecialisation in response to improved outcome from high volume centres, though uncertainties persist for uncommon paediatric procedures. Three paediatric pancreaticoduodenectomies performed at Our Lady\\'s Children\\'s Hospital, Dublin, over a period of 9 years were evaluated to substantiate their continuing performance by paediatric rather than adult pancreatic surgeons. With ages ranging from 18 months to 8 years old, the mean operating time was 263 minutes, while the average hospital stay was 12 days. There was no perioperative mortality, although complication rate was 100%. Re-operation was required in 33%. The long term outcome of this small paediatric cohort was comparable to adult series despite the low patient accrual, underscoring the advantages of a multidisciplinary approach afforded by tertiary paediatric institutions for intricate yet infrequent operations in children.

  9. Non-invasive bedside assessment of central venous pressure: scanning into the future.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Rizkallah

    Full Text Available Noninvasive evaluation of central venous pressure (CVP can be achieved by assessing the Jugular Venous Pressure (JVP, Peripheral Venous Collapse (PVC, and ultrasound visualization of the inferior vena cava. The relative accuracy of these techniques compared to one another and their application by trainees of varying experience remains uncertain. We compare the application and utility of the JVP, PVC, and handheld Mini Echo amongst trainees of varying experience including a medical student, internal medicine resident, and cardiology fellow. We also introduce and validate a new physical exam technique to assess central venous pressures, the Anthem sign.Patients presenting for their regularly scheduled echocardiograms at the hospital echo department had clinical evaluations of their CVP using these non-invasive bedside techniques. The examiners were blinded to the echo results, each other's assessments, and patient history; their CVP estimates were compared to the gold standard level 3 echo-cardiographer's estimates at the completion of the study.325 patients combined were examined (mean age 65, s.d. 16 years. When compared to the gold standard of central venous pressure by a level 3 echocardiographer, the JVP was the most sensitive at 86%, improving with clinical experience (p<0.01. The classic PVC technique and Anthem sign had better specificity compared to the JVP. Mini Echo estimates were comparable to physical exam assessments.JVP evaluation is the most sensitive physical examination technique in CVP assessments. The PVC techniques along with the newly described Anthem sign may be of value for the early learner who still has not mastered the art of JVP assessment and in obese patients in whom JVP evaluation is problematic. Mini Echo estimates of CVPs are comparable to physical examination by trained clinicians and require less instruction. The use of Mini Echo in medical training should be further evaluated and encouraged.

  10. Learning Clinical Skills during Bedside Teaching Encounters in General Practice: A Video-Observational Study with Insights from Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajjawi, Rola; Rees, Charlotte; Monrouxe, Lynn V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore how opportunities for learning clinical skills are negotiated within bedside teaching encounters (BTEs). Bedside teaching, within the medical workplace, is considered essential for helping students develop their clinical skills. Design/methodology/approach: An audio and/or video observational study examining…

  11. The status of bedside teaching in the United Kingdom: the student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones P

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Jones, Bhavan Prasad Rai Department of Surgery, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, UK Purpose: Bedside teaching holds a strong tradition as a key-learning platform for clinical examination in the basic medical clerkship. There is a growing body of literature expressing concern for its witnessed decline in medical school curricula. However, the views of students toward this patient-centered cornerstone in surgical education remain under-reported. The purpose of this study was to gain a nationwide perspective on bedside teaching according to medical students in the United Kingdom. Materials and methods: An adapted Delphi method was employed to formulate the question series as part of a multi-step process including a pilot study, which was used to construct this survey. The target population was medical undergraduates in the United Kingdom and participants were recruited via social media. Outcomes assessed included exposure to bedside teaching, perceived benefits of clinical simulation, and junior doctors as clinical teachers. Barriers to clinical examination were also evaluated. Results: Overall, 368 completed surveys were received (completion rate 98.9%. Final year students were significantly more likely to report receiving insufficient bedside teaching (P<0.01. Seventy-eight percent of the study group agreed that clinical simulation is a good learning tool for clinical examination. Seventy percent of students felt junior doctors were as able as senior doctors to teach. Lack of confidence was identified as the commonest barrier to overcome when examining patients and two-thirds of students felt they burdened patients during bedside teaching. Conclusion: This prospective study confirms the exposure deficit, which medical students experience in bedside teaching. The junior doctor represents a dynamic clinical teacher in the face of working time directives. Peer learning is a novel solution to such pressures. Work is needed to re-establish the

  12. An epidemiological study of paediatric motocross injuries in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rohit; Malhotra, Akshay; Kyle, Nigel; Hay, Stuart

    2015-10-01

    Although off-road motorcycling is one of the most popular sports activities practised by millions of people worldwide, little has been written on motocross injuries and their prevention. In the UK alone, motocross has grown into a phenomenally ambitious and popular franchise. There are >200 motocross clubs across the country holding >900 events annually. The aim of this study is to categorise and quantify the magnitude of motocross paediatric injuries and associated morbidity. Data were collected prospectively over 4 years (2010-2014) at our unit. All injuries caused by motocross biking that were referred to our trauma and orthopaedic department were included in this study, regardless of whether the rider was performing the sport competitively or recreationally. During the study period, 130 patients (aged 4-17 years) were identified with a total of 142 injuries, ranging from one to six injuries per patient. Most of the injuries were sustained within the early spring and summer months, representing the start of the motocross season; 76 patients required hospital admission, with 60 (42 %) requiring surgical intervention. We present the first epidemiological study of motocross paediatric injuries in the UK. The results from this study highlight the frequency and severity of motocross-related injuries in the paediatric population in the UK. This may assist in providing recommendations and guidelines to governing bodies and to parents. The injuries sustained during motocross have significant resource implications, especially for smaller rural hospitals, as shown by the number of injuries doubling over the past 4 years.

  13. Evidence-based paediatric surgical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losty, Paul D

    2016-10-01

    Surgeons play a pivotal role in the decision-making and multidisciplinary management of childhood solid tumours.(1) Evidence-based medicine-"aims to optimise decision making by emphasising on the use of best evidence from well-designed conducted research." This article offers a brief overview in an effort to demonstrate how a selection of well-conducted, recently published studies can help address some topical and controversial themes in paediatric surgical oncology practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Onset symptoms in paediatric multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Magnus Spangsberg; Sellebjerg, Finn; Blinkenberg, Morten

    2014-01-01

    at disease onset, cerebrospinal fluid findings, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and evoked potentials at the first demyelinating event. These data were compared with similar nationwide data from adults in Denmark. RESULTS: The median age was 14 (range 10-15) years at the first demyelinating event......: 66-100%) of paediatric MS subjects, 77% (CI: 46-95%) had an elevated IgG index and 85% (CI: 55-98%) had oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid. MRI showed characteristic white matter lesions in all children (CI: 80-100%). CONCLUSION: MS symptoms at the first demyelinating event and diagnostic...

  15. [Emergency medical aid in a paediatrics context].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branchard, Delphine; Tentillier, Éric; Gillet, Stéphane; Naud, Julien

    2016-01-01

    In France, the organisation of aid involves the intervention of the emergency medical services (Samu), which coordinate the medical regulation platforms for site 15 and the mobile emergency and intensive care services (Smur). Since they were created, the Samu have been tirelessly adapting their response to the various characteristics of pre-hospital assignments. Pre- and inter-hospital paediatrics has seen the development of specialised teams with the aim of providing effective aid which is adapted to the youngest and most vulnerable patients.

  16. The Investigation of Proptosis in Paediatric Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms Sayantani Ghosh

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective review of 65 cases of paediatric proptosispresenting to a rural teaching hospital in India, from February2006 to June 2008. There were 17 cases with orbital cellulitisand 15 with retinoblastoma. We report the history, clinicalexamination, radiological findings and diagnosis. Most caseshad a characteristic history and pathognomonic eye signs.Computer Tomography (CT correlated with histopathology inmost cases. CT is widely available, even within a remotesetting, and is a convenient investigation. Thus, a detailedhistory, clinical examination and CT scan were the mostfruitful approach to the diagnosis of childhood proptosis inthis series.

  17. Bedside ultrasound in the diagnosis of uterine rupture following surgical abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derr, Charlotte; Henry, Melinda

    2013-04-01

    Reports of uterine rupture following surgical abortion are rare but may result in hemorrhage, sepsis, and even death. In this unique case, we describe how a transabdominal pelvic ultrasound performed at the bedside by an emergency department physician identified uterine rupture with retained products of conception and led to an emergent laparotomy and hysterectomy. This case illustrates how bedside ultrasound may be used in patients presenting with abdominopelvic pain following surgical abortion to shorten the time to definitive treatment and ultimately lower the morbidity and mortality associated with a diagnosis of life-threatening uterine rupture.

  18. The role of bedside ultrasound in the diagnosis of pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Goodman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This review article discusses two clinical cases of patients presenting to the emergency department with pericardial effusions. The role of bedside ultrasound in the detection of pericardial effusions is investigated, with special attention to the specific ultrasound features of cardiac tamponade. Through this review, clinicians caring for patients with pericardial effusions will learn to rapidly diagnose this condition directly at the bedside. Clinicians will also learn to differentiate between simple pericardial effusions in contrast to more complicated effusions causing cardiac tamponade. Indications for emergency pericardiocentesis are covered, so that clinicians can rapidly determine which group of patients will benefit from an emergency procedure to drain the effusion.

  19. Addressing adolescent substance use in a paediatric health-care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Natalie Lynette; Milne, Bronwyn; Silsbury, Catherine; Zappia, Popi; Zehetner, Anthony; Klineberg, Emily; Towns, Susan; Steinbeck, Katharine

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to review the operation of a specialist adolescent drug and alcohol consultation liaison service in a tertiary paediatric hospital. A retrospective review of patient records was conducted to identify patient characteristics and assess service utilisation. Two hundred adolescents were referred over 4 years. Most presented during mid-adolescence (14-16 years). Alcohol, cannabis and nicotine were the most frequently reported substances, and almost half of referrals involved polysubstance use. Mental health diagnoses and behavioural problems were commonly reported. Almost two-thirds (63.5%) attended an appointment for drug and alcohol assessment and intervention (n = 92) or were referred to appropriate services (n = 35). Adolescents more likely to engage and attend an appointment with the specialist adolescent addiction medicine service included those with amphetamine use, polysubstance use, chronic illness, any mental health diagnosis and mood disorder. Indigenous Australians and those with a history of aggression were more difficult to engage. Adolescents present to paediatric health settings with drug- and alcohol-related issues, including associated harms. These comprise, but are not limited to, physical and sexual assault, family conflict, mood and behavioural concerns (including psychosis), and forensic issues. Early intervention aims to reduce long-term risks such as dependence in adulthood. Specialist adolescent drug and alcohol services may assist in identifying and engaging these high-risk and often complex young people in developmentally appropriate treatment. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  20. [Computerized decision support systems: EBM at the bedside].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capobussi, Matteo; Banzi, Rita; Moja, Lorenzo; Bonovas, Stefanos; González-Lorenzo, Marien; Liberati, Elisa Giulia; Polo Friz, Hernan; Nanni, Oriana; Mangia, Massimo; Ruggiero, Francesca

    2016-11-01

    One of the aims of Evidence-Based Medicine is to improve quality and appropriateness of care by the expedition of the knowledge transfer process. Computerized Decision Support Systems (CDSSs) are computer programs that provide alerts to the prescribing doctor directly at the moment of medical examination. In fact, alerts are integrated within the single patient electronic health record. CDSS based on the best available and updated evidence and guidelines may be an efficient tool to facilitate the transfer of the latest results from clinical research directly at the bedside, thus supporting decision-making. The CODES (COmputerized DEcision Support) trial is a research program funded by the Italian Ministry of Health and the Lombardy Region. It aims to evaluate the feasibility of the implementation of a CDSS at the hospital level and to assess its efficacy in daily clinical practice. The CODES project includes two pragmatic RCTs testing a CDSS (i.e. the EBMeDS - MediDSS) in two large Italian hospitals: the first is a general hospital in Vimercate (Lombardy), the second is an oncologic research center in Meldola (Emilia Romagna). The CDSS supports a full spectrum of decisions: therapy, drug interactions, diagnosis, and management of health care services are covered by a hundreds of reminders. However only few reminders are activated per patient, highlighting crucial problems in the delivery of high-quality care. The two trials have similar design and primary outcome, the rate at which alerts detected by the software are resolved by a decision of the clinicians. The project also includes the assessment of barriers and facilitators in the adoption of these new technologies by hospital staff members and the retrospective evaluation of the repeated risks in prescription habits. The trials are ongoing and currently more than 10,000 patients have been randomized. The qualitative analysis revealed a progressive shift in the perception of the tool. Doctors are now seeing it

  1. Outcome of poor response Paediatric AML using early SCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wareham, Neval E; Heilmann, Carsten; Abrahamsson, Jonas;

    2013-01-01

    treated with SCT. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Treatment was given according to the NOPHO-AML 2004 protocol. All patients received AIET (Cytarabine, Idarubicin, Etoposide, Thioguanine) and AM (Cytarabine, Mitoxantrone) as induction. We included poor response defined as > 15% blasts on day 15 after AIET (n = 17......) or > 5% blasts after AM (n = 14, refractory disease). Poor response patients received intensively timed induction and proceeded to SCT when a donor was available. RESULTS: Thirty-one of 267 evaluable patients (12%) had a poor response. SCT was performed in 25; using matched unrelated donors in 13...

  2. CURRENT TRENDS IN PAEDIATRIC INTUSUSCEPTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshava Murthy

    2015-09-01

    guided barium enema, those who failed among them, one (2.5 was reduc ed by pneumatic reduction , one (2.5 was reduced by ultrasound guided pneumatic reduction and only one (2.5% patient required surgical interventions, reduced manually during surgery. No mortalities were recorded during the study. There was one recurrence noted in our study 15 days after discharge and was subsequently treated with fluoroscopic guided contrast reduction. CONCLUSION: Surgical intervention in intussusception can be prevented by non - operative reduction especially if presented early and no signs of peritonitis.

  3. Citation context and impact of ‘sleeping beauties’ in paediatric research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Završnik, Jernej; del Torso, Stefano; Blažun Vošner, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Objectives ‘Sleeping beauties’, i.e. publications that are not cited for a long while, present interesting findings in science. This study analysed the citation trends of sleeping beauties in paediatric research. Methods The study used bibliometric software to analyse the papers citing sleeping beauties in paediatric research, to understand the context in which paediatric sleeping beauties were finally cited and the impact of these sleeping beauties on paediatric research. Results Two paediatric sleeping beauties, addressing medical homes and the transition from paediatric to adult health care, respectively, awakened in response to organizational needs. Both presented novel concepts of paediatric service organization that became important because of an increased need for optimization of services. Conclusion All sleeping beauties bring new knowledge that becomes important only after several years. Paediatric sleeping beauties exhibited unique characteristics; however, their presence in paediatric research shows that knowledge acquisition in paediatrics resembles that in other disciplines. PMID:27834306

  4. Bedside functional brain imaging in critically-ill children using high-density EEG source modeling and multi-modal sensory stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Eytan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute brain injury is a common cause of death and critical illness in children and young adults. Fundamental management focuses on early characterization of the extent of injury and optimizing recovery by preventing secondary damage during the days following the primary injury. Currently, bedside technology for measuring neurological function is mainly limited to using electroencephalography (EEG for detection of seizures and encephalopathic features, and evoked potentials. We present a proof of concept study in patients with acute brain injury in the intensive care setting, featuring a bedside functional imaging set-up designed to map cortical brain activation patterns by combining high density EEG recordings, multi-modal sensory stimulation (auditory, visual, and somatosensory, and EEG source modeling. Use of source-modeling allows for examination of spatiotemporal activation patterns at the cortical region level as opposed to the traditional scalp potential maps. The application of this system in both healthy and brain-injured participants is demonstrated with modality-specific source-reconstructed cortical activation patterns. By combining stimulation obtained with different modalities, most of the cortical surface can be monitored for changes in functional activation without having to physically transport the subject to an imaging suite. The results in patients in an intensive care setting with anatomically well-defined brain lesions suggest a topographic association between their injuries and activation patterns. Moreover, we report the reproducible application of a protocol examining a higher-level cortical processing with an auditory oddball paradigm involving presentation of the patient's own name. This study reports the first successful application of a bedside functional brain mapping tool in the intensive care setting. This application has the potential to provide clinicians with an additional dimension of information to manage

  5. The imaging of paediatric thoracic trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael A.; Westra, Sjirk J. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Wallace, E.C. [UMass Memorial Medical Center and University of Massachusetts Medical School, Department of Radiology, Worcester, MA (United States)

    2009-05-15

    Major chest trauma in a child is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It is most frequently encountered within the context of multisystem injury following high-energy trauma such as a motor vehicle accident. The anatomic-physiologic make-up of children is such that the pattern of ensuing injuries differs from that in their adult counterparts. Pulmonary contusion, pneumothorax, haemothorax and rib fractures are most commonly encountered. Although clinically more serious and potentially life threatening, tracheobronchial tear, aortic rupture and cardiac injuries are seldom observed. The most appropriate imaging algorithm is one tailored to the individual child and is guided by the nature of the traumatic event as well as clinical parameters. Chest radiography remains the first and most important imaging tool in paediatric chest trauma and should be supplemented with US and CT as indicated. Multidetector CT allows for the accurate diagnosis of most traumatic injuries, but should be only used in selected cases as its routine use in all paediatric patients would result in an unacceptably high radiation exposure to a large number of patients without proven clinical benefit. When CT is used, appropriate modifications should be incorporated so as to minimize the radiation dose to the patient whilst preserving diagnostic integrity. (orig.)

  6. Recent advances in paediatric cardiac anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Vakamudi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paediatric cardiac anaesthesia involves anaesthetizing very small children with complex congenital heart disease for major surgical procedures. The unique nature of this patient population requires considerable expertise and in-depth knowledge of the altered physiology. There have been several developments in the last decade in this subspecialty that has contributed to better care and improved outcome in this vulnerable group of patients. The purpose of this review is to present some of the recent advances in the anesthetic management of these children from preoperative evaluation to postoperative care. This article reviews the role of magnetic resonance imaging and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in preoperative evaluation, the use of ultrasound to secure vascular access, the use of cuffed endotracheal tubes, the optimal haematocrit and the role of blood products, including the use of recombinant factor VIIa. It also deals with the advances in technology that have led to improved monitoring, the newer developments in cardiopulmonary bypass, the use of centrifugal pumps and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and the role of DHCA. The role of new drugs, especially the α-2 agonists in paediatric cardiac anesthetic practice, fast tracking and effective postoperative pain management have also been reviewed.

  7. MR imaging of paediatric uterovaginal anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, I.M.; Babyn, P. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging; Oliver, G.D. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Gynaecology

    1999-03-01

    Background. Transabdominal ultrasound (US) has not proved completely reliable in Muellerian duct anomalies. One study has shown it useful in obstructed uterovaginal anomalies. We are unaware of a study that has used endovaginal ultrasound in children to investigate uterovaginal anomalies. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now gaining wide acceptance in imaging congenital abnormalities of the genital tract. Objective. To identify the problems and potential pitfalls of using MRI to evaluate the female genital tract in paediatric patients. Materials and methods. A retrospective review of the MRI scans of 19 patients, aged 3 months to 19 years (mean 14 years), with uterovaginal anomalies. Results. The uterovaginal anomalies were categorised into three groups: (1) congenital absence of the Muellerian ducts, or the Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome (n = 7), (2) disorders of vertical fusion (n = 2) and (3) disorders of lateral fusion (n = 10). Conclusions. MRI is a reliable method for evaluating paediatric uterovaginal anomalies, but should be analysed in conjunction with other imaging modalities (US and genitography). Previous surgery makes interpretation more difficult and, if possible, MRI should be carried out prior to any surgery. An accurate MRI examination can be extremely helpful prior to surgery and it is important for the radiologist to have knowledge of how these complex anomalies are managed and what pitfalls to avoid. (orig.) With 7 figs., 4 tabs., 24 refs.

  8. A paediatric X-ray exposure chart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, Stephen P, E-mail: stephen.knight@health.qld.gov.au [Department of Medical Imaging, Royal Children' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2014-09-15

    The aim of this review was to develop a radiographic optimisation strategy to make use of digital radiography (DR) and needle phosphor computerised radiography (CR) detectors, in order to lower radiation dose and improve image quality for paediatrics. This review was based on evidence-based practice, of which a component was a review of the relevant literature. The resulting exposure chart was developed with two distinct groups of exposure optimisation strategies – body exposures (for head, trunk, humerus, femur) and distal extremity exposures (elbow to finger, knee to toe). Exposure variables manipulated included kilovoltage peak (kVp), target detector exposure and milli-ampere-seconds (mAs), automatic exposure control (AEC), additional beam filtration, and use of antiscatter grid. Mean dose area product (DAP) reductions of up to 83% for anterior–posterior (AP)/posterior–anterior (PA) abdomen projections were recorded postoptimisation due to manipulation of multiple-exposure variables. For body exposures, the target EI and detector exposure, and thus the required mAs were typically 20% less postoptimisation. Image quality for some distal extremity exposures was improved by lowering kVp and increasing mAs around constant entrance skin dose. It is recommended that purchasing digital X-ray equipment with high detective quantum efficiency detectors, and then optimising the exposure chart for use with these detectors is of high importance for sites performing paediatric imaging. Multiple-exposure variables may need to be manipulated to achieve optimal outcomes.

  9. [Treatment of pain in hospital paediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, J; Sagaseta de Ilúrdoz, M; Busto, N; Lezáun, I; Cía, M L; Carrascosa, S; Azanza, M J

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a review of pain at the paediatric age, which can be considered a question of maximum interest given the novel application of analgesia or other procedures for avoiding and controlling the different types of pain in the course of normal practice during childhood. After a brief introduction on the history of pain and the scarce attention that it has received until recently, the concepts and different actions for dealing with pain are set out, which depend on its aetiology and localisation: pain in oncology, post-operational pain, pain in chronic or acute diseases, pain in intensive care, etc. Tables are presented with the normal doses used at these ages in the different situations required by the child and which the professional might find himself facing. The non-pharmacological attitude is set out as this can be of great use in the initial stages of controlling pain at these ages, and the different forms of sedation and analgesia at the paediatric age are explained, with regard to the medicines employed, the form of administering them and the importance of a multidisciplinary team: paediatricians, child anaesthetists, nursing personnel as well as the necessary technical support for taking the corresponding action.

  10. Nurse titrated analgesia and sedation in intensive care increases the frequency of comfort assessment and reduces midazolam use in paediatric patients following cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Grace E; McKeever, Stephen

    2017-03-08

    Pain and sedation protocols are suggested to improve the outcomes of patients within paediatric intensive care. However, it is not clear how protocols will influence practice within individual units. Evaluate a nurse led pain and sedation protocols impact on pain scoring and analgesic and sedative administration for post-operative cardiac patients within a paediatric intensive care unit. A retrospective chart review was performed on 100 patients admitted to a tertiary paediatric intensive care unit pre and post introduction of an analgesic and sedative protocol. Stata12 was used to perform Chi 2 or student t tests to compare data between the groups. Post protocol introduction documentation of pain assessments increased (pre protocol 3/24h vs post protocol 5/24h, p=0.006). Along with a reduction in administration of midazolam (57.6mcg/kg/min pre protocol vs 24.5mcg/kg/min post protocol, p=0.0001). Children's pain scores remained unchanged despite this change, with a trend towards more scores in the optimal range in the post protocol group (5 pre protocol vs 12 post protocol, p=0.06). Introducing a pain and sedation protocol changed bedside nurse practice in pain and sedation management. The protocol has enabled nurses to provide pain and sedation management in a consistent and timely manner and reduced the dose of midazolam required to maintain comfort according to the patients COMFORT B scores. Individual evaluation of practice change is recommended to units who implement nurse led analgesic and sedative protocols to monitor changes in practice. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Retained Products of Conception: An Atypical Presentation Diagnosed Immediately with Bedside Emergency Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Adkins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Retained products of conception is an important diagnosis to consider in patients presenting with postpartum complaints. Bedside ultrasound is a rapid, accurate, noninvasive modality to evaluate these patients. Objective. To report an atypical case of retained products of conception diagnosed with bedside ultrasound in the emergency department. Case Report. A 27-year-old female who was 1-month postpartum presented with vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain, and no fever. At the time of initial H&P, bedside ultrasound revealed echogenic material within the endometrial cavity with blood flow seen by color Doppler consistent with retained products of conception. The bedside ultrasound rapidly narrowed the differential and allowed a definitive diagnosis immediately. Ob/Gyn was consulted and dilation and curettage was performed in the operating room. Conclusions. Retained products of conception is an important diagnosis for the emergency physician to consider in at-risk patients. The sonographic findings are easily obtained and interpreted by emergency physicians. Earlier diagnosis of this disease process should lead to more focused patient evaluations and management.

  12. Bench, Bedside, Curbside, and Home: Translational Research to Include Transformative Change Using Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felege, Christopher; Hahn, Emily; Hunter, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Translational research originated in the medical field during the 1990s to describe taking discovery based research through the steps of applying it to clinical research and patient-oriented care. This model is implicitly linear, depicting the flow of information from researchers' bench, to a clinical trial bedside, to a primary care physician's…

  13. Discovering Ways That Influence the Older Nurse to Continue Bedside Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeeAnna Spiva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A descriptive qualitative approach was used to investigate older nurses practicing bedside nursing and to identify ways to influence older nurses to continue bedside practice. A purposive sample of 18 older nurses was recruited from a healthcare system located in the Southeastern United States. Interpretative analysis of interviews resulted in the identification of three constitutive patterns and eight themes. The first constitutive pattern identified was attributes of the older nurse. The themes comprising this pattern were (a professional growth in confidence and skills through experience and (b passion and love for nursing. The second constitutive pattern was enduring stress and frustration. The themes comprising this pattern were (a physical and mental changes associated with aging, (b increased patient acuity and patient load, (c constant change, and (d time constraints. The third constitutive pattern was enhancements needed for older nurses to continue bedside nursing. The themes comprising this pattern were (a work environment enhancements and (b organizational relationship enhancements. Findings may provide a better understanding of the older nurse's role in bedside nursing.

  14. Transillumination test: A bedside aid for differentiating meningocele from myelomeningocele: Point of care testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakash Pandita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transillumination test is a bedside and simple technique to illuminate the body cavity by transmission of light through the cavity. Transillumination test is used in a variety of conditions like hydrocele, Hydrocephalus, pneumoperitonium and pneumothorax in neonatology. We describe use of transillumination for differentiating meningocele and myelomeningocele.

  15. The bedside examination of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR): an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheradmand, A; Zee, D S

    2012-10-01

    Diagnosing dizzy patients remains a daunting challenge to the clinician in spite of modern imaging and increasingly sophisticated electrophysiological testing. Here we review the major bedside tests of the vestibulo-ocular reflex and how, when combined with a proper examination of the other eye movement systems, one can arrive at an accurate vestibular diagnosis.

  16. STUDY ABOUT CLINICAL APPLICATION OF BRAIN ATLAS IN PAEDIATRICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Fanhang; LIU Cuiping; RENG Xiaoping; JIANG Lian

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To explore clinical application on brain atlas in paediatrics. Methode: Brain atlas was applied in diagnosis and treatment of paediatric diseases and its clinical value was discussed in 1990 ~2001. The manifestation of these diseases in brain atlas were analysed and the manifestation of CT of 67 cases and manifestations of EEG of 37 cases with that of BA were compared. Results The changes of cerebral electrical activity of these diseases were reflected objectively and showed directly in BA. Conclusion Brain atlas not only can point out quality of disease but also define position of disease. Therefore, brain atlas has important clinical value in paediatrics.

  17. Clinical practice audit concerning antimicrobial prophylaxis in paediatric neurosurgery: results from a German paediatric oncology unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Katja; Simon, Arne; Graf, Norbert; Schöpe, Jakob; Oertel, Joachim; Linsler, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis (PAP) has been identified as an important target for internal audits, concerning the judicious use of antibiotics. Paediatric oncology patients with brain tumours face an increased risk of surgical site infection (SSI) after neurosurgery and receive routine PAP in this setting. All patients younger than 18 years admitted to the paediatric oncology centre (POC) with a neurosurgical intervention. Systematic audit of routine clinical data is divided in two groups: retrospective (Jan 01, 2012-March 31, 2014) and prospective (April 01, 2014-March 31, 2015) referring to an internal PAP guideline, invented in Jan. 2014). Surveillance of SSI up to 30 days after the operation with standard criteria (Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, USA). In total, 53 neurosurgical operations were analysed in 33 paediatric oncology patients. Twelve patients received more than one operation. The detailed analysis of PAP revealed prophylactic cefuroxim doses about 30 mg/kg instead of 50 mg/kg and no repeated dosing in operations lasting longer than 4 h. In addition, Cefotaxim, which is not indicated as PAP in neurosurgery, was used instead of Cefuroxim (or Ampicillin-Sulbactam) in 23 % of all cases in the retrospective and 18 % of all cases in the prospective audit. PAP for more than 3 doses (>24 h) was administered in 66 % in the retrospective group and in 60 % in the prospective group (p = n.s.). In both groups, no SSI was detected. This first comprehensive audit of PAP in paediatric oncology patients undergoing neurosurgery outlines significant opportunities to improve clinical practice in terms of correct dosing, the correct choice of the antibiotic, a correct timing schedule and a shorter duration of PAP. In addition, our results illustrate in detail the challenges in clinical practice when an evidence-based approach to improve a standard workflow has to be implemented.

  18. [Transition from paediatric to adult cystic fibrosis care centre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durieu, I; Reynaud, Q; Nove-Josserand, R

    2016-02-01

    The number of adolescents and young adults with chronic diseases has increased dramatically over the last decade. This led paediatric teams to organize the transition to adult centres with the aim to ensure the quality of care and prognosis, adherence to survey and treatment. To promote a good work and family life is also a challenge. Several studies have shown the importance of a successful transition in cystic fibrosis (CF) in order to prevent complications and loss monitoring and to improve the perception of patients and their families. In France in 2003, cystic fibrosis centres (CRCM) have been identified and among them of adult CF centres. The regular increase of the adult centre's active file requires improving the transition process. It is necessary to improve the transition process and to prepare the young patient and their family early during adolescence. The process in place should concern the whole aspects of care, i.e., medical, psychological and educational. The transition to adulthood will be successful if it results in a stable state of the disease allowing family and career plans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. A 360-degree overview of paediatric NAFLD: recent insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, Valerio; Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca; Alisi, Anna; Miele, Luca; Valenti, Luca; Vajro, Pietro

    2013-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a multi-faceted disorder, which ranges from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with/without fibrosis. The effects of specific risk factors, such as obesity and sedentary lifestyle, on predisposing genetic settings eventually lead to the development of NAFLD in children. The complex interplay between genes and environment in NAFLD pathogenesis is sustained by multiple mechanisms that involve liver crosstalk with other organs and tissues, especially gut and adipose tissue. Unfortunately, natural history of paediatric NAFLD is lacking, and the etiopathogenesis is still in the process of being defined. Potential early predictors and suitable non-invasive diagnostic tools can be discovered based on the pathogenetic mechanisms and histological patterns. This will also help design novel treatments and a comprehensive and successful management strategy for patients. In this review, we discuss the recent advances made in genetics, etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapeutic management of NAFLD, focusing especially on the obesity-related steatotic liver condition. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A STUDY OF POSTOPERATIVE LARYNGOSPASM IN PAEDIATRIC AGE GROUP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Nagaprasad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Postoperative laryngospasm is an anaesthetic emergency that is still responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in paediatric patients. It is relatively a frequent complication and requires prompt recognition and early correction by resorting to different manoeuvres and medications. METHODS A study had been done to know the incidence of postoperative laryngospasm in our institute in the year 2014. The reported cases of laryngospasm were managed by a protocol set in algorithm and the efficacy of each step in the management algorithm was evaluated. RESULTS The incidence of Postoperative Laryngospasm in our study was found to be 9.32/1000, which was similar to that published in the literature. We also found that majority of laryngospasms can be managed by simple manoeuvres like Chin lift, Jaw thrust, Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation {IPPV} or Continuous Positive Airway Pressure {CPAP} with 100% O2. An Intravenous bolus dose of Propofol was found to be effective in the treatment of postoperative laryngospasm. CONCLUSION Laryngospasm even though an alarming postoperative complication can be managed effectively by simple manoeuvres and some pharmacological intervention if it is tackled by a set protocol based algorithm.

  1. Paediatric emergency and acute care in resource poor settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Trevor; Cheema, Baljit

    2016-02-01

    Acute care of seriously ill children is a global public health issue, and there is much scope for improving quality of care in hospitals at all levels in many developing countries. We describe the current state of paediatric emergency and acute care in the least developed regions of low and middle income countries and identify gaps and requirements for improving quality. Approaches are needed which span the continuum of care: from triage and emergency treatment, the diagnostic process, identification of co-morbidities, treatment, monitoring and supportive care, discharge planning and follow-up. Improvements require support and training for health workers and quality processes. Effective training is that which is ongoing, combining good technical training in under-graduate courses and continuing professional development. Quality processes combine evidence-based guidelines, essential medicines, appropriate technology, appropriate financing of services, standards and assessment tools and training resources. While initial emergency treatment is based on common clinical syndromes, early differentiation is required for specific treatment, and this can usually be carried out clinically without expensive tests. While global strategies are important, it is what happens locally that makes a difference and is too often neglected. In rural areas in the poorest countries in the world, public doctors and nurses who provide emergency and acute care for children are revered by their communities and demonstrate daily that much can be carried out with little.

  2. [Quality of initial trauma care in paediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez Pradas, Vicente; Pérez Montejano, Rut

    2017-04-18

    Trauma care in Spain is not provided in specific centres, which means that health professionals have limited contact to trauma patients. After the setting up of a training program in paediatric trauma, the aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of the initial care provided to these patients before they were admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) of a third level hospital (trauma centre), as an indirect measurement of the increase in the number of health professionals trained in trauma. Two cohorts of PICU admissions were reviewed, the first one during the four years immediately before the training courses started (Group 1, period 2001-2004), and the second one during the 4 years (Group 2, period 2012-2015) after nearly 500 professionals were trained. A record was made of the injury mechanism, attending professional, Glasgow coma score (GCS), and paediatric trauma score (PTS). Initial care quality was assessed using five indicators: use of cervical collar, vascular access, orotracheal intubation if GCS ≤ 8, gastric decompression if PTS≤8, and number of actions carried out from the initial four recommended (neck control, provide oxygen, get vascular access, provide IV fluids). Compliance was compared between the 2 periods. A P<.05 was considered statistically significant. A total of 218 patient records were analysed, 105 in Group 1, and 113 in Group 2. The groups showed differences both in injury mechanism and in initial care team. A shift in injury mechanism pattern was observed, with a decrease in car accidents (28% vs 6%; P<.0001). Patients attended to in low complexity hospitals increased from 29.4% to 51.9% (P=.008), and their severity decreased when assessed using the GCS ≤ 8 (29.8% vs 13.5%; P=.004), or PTS≤8 (48.5% vs 29.7%; P=.005). As regards quality indicators, only the use of neck collar improved its compliance (17.3% to 32.7%; P=.01). Patients who received no action in the initial care remained unchanged (19% vs 11%%; P=.15

  3. Acquisition and Long-term Retention of Bedside Ultrasound Skills in First-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Peter; Oleskevich, Sharon; Lewis, John

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess bedside ultrasound skill acquisition and retention in medical students after completion of the first year of a new undergraduate bedside ultrasound curriculum at McGill University. Skill acquisition was assessed in first-year medical students (n = 195) on completion of their bedside ultrasound instruction. Instruction included 6 clinically based 60-minute practical teaching sessions evenly spaced throughout the academic year. Students' ability to meet course objectives was measured according to a 4-point Likert rating scale. Evaluations were performed by both instructors and the students themselves. Retention of skill acquisition was evaluated 8 months later on a year-end practical examination. The mean percentage ± SD of students assigned a rating of "strongly agree" or "agree" by instructors was 98% ± 0.4% for all 6 teaching sessions (strongly agree, 52% ± 3%; agree, 46% ± 3%). According to student self-evaluations, the mean percentage of students assigned a rating of strongly agree was significantly greater than the percentage assigned by instructors for all teaching sessions (86% ± 2% versus 52% ± 3%; P year-end examination showed that 91% ± 2% of students were assigned a rating of strongly agree or agree for their ability to demonstrate skills learned 8 months previously. Ninety-five percent of students reported that bedside ultrasound improved their understanding of anatomy for all 6 teaching sessions (mean, 95% ± 0.01%). These results demonstrate that first-year medical students show acquisition and long-term retention of basic ultrasound skills on completion of newly implemented bedside ultrasound instruction.

  4. Bedside teaching in undergraduate medical education: issues, strategies, and new models for better preparation of new generation doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Abdus; Siraj, Harlina Halizah; Mohamad, Nabishah; Das, Srijit; Rabeya, Yousuf

    2011-03-01

    Bedside teaching is a vital component of medical education. It is applicable to any situation where teaching is imparted in the presence of patients. In teaching in the patients' presence, learners have the opportunities to use all of their senses and learn the humanistic aspect of medicine such as role modeling, which is vital but difficult to communicate in words. Unfortunately, bedside teaching has been on the decline. To investigate the reasons for the decline in bedside teaching, its importance and its revival, a review of literature was carried out using PubMed and other data bases. The review revealed that the major concerns of bedside teaching were time constraint, false preceptors' concern about patients' comfort, short stay of patients in hospitals, learner distraction by technology, lack of experience and unrealistic faculty expectation. Whatsoever the reasons, bedside teaching cannot be replaced with anything else. There are newer approaches of effective bedside teaching, and the core focus of all such approaches is educational process. A bedside teacher must learn how to involve patients and learners in the educational processes. Moreover, bedside teaching is the process through which learners acquire the skills of communication by asking patients' permission, establishing ground rules, setting time limit, introducing the team, diagnosing learner, diagnosing patient, conducting focused teaching, using simple language, asking patient if there is any question, closing with encouraging thanks, and giving feedback privately. It is most important to ensure a comfortable environment for all participants, the learner, the patient and the bedside teacher. Ongoing faculty development programs on educational processes and realistic faculty expectations may overcome the problems.

  5. Eosinophilic heart disease in a paediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedieu, Natalie; Giardini, Alessandro; Khambadkone, Sachin; Marek, Jan

    2011-01-01

    A 12-year-old child with no previous medical history was referred with a 4-day history of cough, shortness of breath, and peripheral blood eosinophilia. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a soft tissue infiltrating the left ventricular free wall, the lateral mitral annulus, and the mitral valve leaflets. A soft tissue strand connecting the lateral left atrial wall and mitral leaflets across the mitral valve orifice was also identified, causing reduced opening and functional mitral stenosis. The diagnosis of Löeffler endocarditis was made, and after 10 weeks of treatment with oral prednisolone, there was complete resolution of symptoms and of the infiltrative tissue with normalization of mitral valve function. The present case highlights some atypical features of eosinophilic heart disease-like occurrence in paediatric age, the complete preservation of the right ventricle and left ventricular apex, and the presentation with mitral stenosis compared with mitral regurgitation typically observed in the late phase of the disease.

  6. Informed consent & ethical issues in paediatric psychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Savita; Subodh, B N

    2009-01-01

    Issues relating to informed consent and ethics in paediatric psychopharmacology limit research in this population. Children vary in their levels of cognitive development, and presence of psychiatric disorder may further impair their ability to give informed consent. In decisional impairment subjects, various methods used for consent are assent/dissent; inclusion of advance directives; and/or alternative decision-makers. India is emerging as a new market for clinical trials in recent years. Moreover, in India the sociocultural realities are different from those in the western countries making it necessary for professionals to be cautious in conducting drug trials. In this review, issues regarding informed consent in children and adolescent with psychiatric diagnosis are discussed for information, discussion and debate by professionals, parents, society and legal experts to create awareness and to facilitate development of guidelines that are appropriate and applicable to the Indian system.

  7. Action, prevention and epidemiology of paediatric obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissau, Inge

    2005-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The overall aim of this paper is to describe important issues regarding paediatric obesity as a public health problem. This paper focuses on actions taken, and on the prevalence of obesity in children, teens and adults in Denmark. In addition, the paper describes some important...... prevention studies, all of which are performed outside Denmark. Thus, this paper is not a classical review but rather a highlight of some aspects that the author finds important. The latest Danish national figures show a marked increase in the prevalence of obesity, especially among young men-a sevenfold...... increase from 1987 to 2000 (0.7 to 4.9%). Among young women aged 16-24, the increase is threefold in the same period. Among teens, the prevalence has increased by 2-3 times in recent decades. Nevertheless, compared to other European countries and the US, Denmark has a relatively low prevalence of obesity...

  8. New hazards in paediatric poisoning presentations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, C

    2015-02-01

    Accidental ingestion is an important preventable cause of childhood morbidity. All accidental ingestion presentations (n = 478) to a tertiary paediatric ED from January 2010 to December 2011 were analysed. These results were compared with a similar study in the same institution ten years previously in 2001 and showed that while accidental ingestions constituted a higher proportion of presentations (0.5% in this study v 0.45% in 2001), fewer had investigations performed (21% v 35%) and fewer were admitted (7% v 20%). Accidental ingestions account for 0.5% of presentations and are an important focus of home safety information for parents and guardians. Paracetamol (n = 67, 14%) and liquid detergent capsules (n = 44, 9.2%) were the two most common substances implicated in these presentations, and have the potential to cause severe morbidity and mortality.

  9. Paediatric radiology from a psychosocial lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Sharbaugh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Globally, hospitals and medical centres have a reputation of causing individual patients an increased level of anxiety, stress and pain owing to their foreign environments, intimidating examinations and rigorous treatments. Because of children’s cognitive and developmental levels of understanding and communication, they are more susceptible to increased levels of stress and trauma associated with medical examinations and hospitalisation. Certified Child Life Specialists (CCLSs are professionals trained in child development and family systems expertise who work directly with children and families to meet their psychosocial and emotional needs in order to help them overcome some of life’s most challenging events, including hospitalisation, illness and trauma. This article aims to address the history of the child life profession and the significance of child life in a paediatric imaging unit, and to discuss the current and future status of psychosocial services in South Africa.

  10. Review article: Paediatric bone and joint infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, N Susan

    2001-06-01

    Paediatric musculoskeletal infection remains an important cause of morbidity. Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus is still the most common organism although the incidence of methicillin resistant S. aureus in the community is rising. Osteomyelitis and septic arthritis due to Haemophilus influenzae is decreasing in incidence secondary to immunisation and in some units has been replaced by infections with the gram negative bacillus, Kingella kingae. Recent prospective studies indicate that uncomplicated osteomyelitis can be treated by three to four weeks of antibiotics. However, there is still a small group of children who will have overwhelming disseminated infection. These children require aggressive surgical and medical intervention. Two recent reports have identified an increased incidence of septic arthritis in children who have hemophilia and are HIV positive.

  11. glomerular filtration rate profiles in paediatric patients on cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-05-28

    May 28, 2013 ... optimising the dose of many drugs used in paediatric oncology for allowing clinical monitoring of the ... anticancer drugs and has been shown to be a leading cause of ..... with cancer. Cancer chemotherapy and pharmacology.

  12. A 3D digital medical photography system in paediatric medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Susanne K; Ellis, Lloyd A; Williams, Gigi

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, traditional clinical photography services at the Educational Resource Centre were extended using new technology. This paper describes the establishment of a 3D digital imaging system in a paediatric setting at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne.

  13. Use of complementary/alternative medicine among paediatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Hanne; Andersen, Susie; Nielsen, Rasmus Gaardskaer

    2003-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The use of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing. The aim was to characterise the use of CAM among patients in a paediatric department. All patients (aged 0-18 years), out-patients or hospitalised, in contact with the Department of Paediatrics, Odense University......: Of the paediatric patients, 53% had tried complementary/alternative medicine, which was used as a supplement to conventional medicine although we did not know how long it was used. Paediatric patients should be interviewed about their use of complementary/alternative medicine with regard to side...... Hospital during a 2 week period in the autumn of 2001 were asked to participate. In total, 622 (92%) patients participated. The data were collected in an interviewer administered questionnaire during a short structured interview with the patient and parents. CAM was divided into herbal medicine (herbal...

  14. Apartheid and healthcare access for paediatric systemic lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lupus erythematosus (SLE), as a framework for evaluating the structural challenges to ... Paediatric SLE (pSLE) is more severe than the adult disease, and children with SLE .... exploration using a geographical information system. Soc Sci Med ...

  15. Irreducible Inguinal Hernias in the Paediatric Age Group | Ezomike ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Irreducible Inguinal Hernias in the Paediatric Age Group. ... Nigerian Journal of Medicine ... Irreducibility is an ever present risk in untreated inguinal hernias and its management remains an important part of pediatric surgery practice. When a ...

  16. Adverse drug reactions from psychotropic medicines in the paediatric population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lise; Hansen, Ebba H

    2010-01-01

    ADRs reported for psychotropic medicines in the Danish paediatric population over a decade. FINDINGS: All spontaneous ADR reports from 1998 to 2007 for children from birth to 17 years of age were included. The unit of analysis was one ADR. We analysed the distribution of ADRs per year, seriousness, age......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The prescribing of psychotropic medicines for the paediatric population is rapidly increasing. In attempts to curb the use of psychotropic medicine in the paediatric population, regulatory authorities have issued various warnings about risks associated with use...... of serious ADRs reported in children from birth up to 2 years of age were presumably caused by mothers' use of psychotropic medicines during pregnancy. CONCLUSION: The high number of serious ADRs reported for psychotropic medicines in the paediatric population should be a concern for health care...

  17. Clinical features of paediatric pulmonary hypertension : a registry study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, Rolf M. F.; Beghetti, Maurice; Humpl, Tilman; Raskob, Gary E.; Ivy, D. Dunbar; Jing, Zhi-Cheng; Bonnet, Damien; Schulze-Neick, Ingram; Barst, Robyn J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Paediatric pulmonary hypertension, is an important cause of morbidity and mortality, and is insufficiently characterised in children. The Tracking Outcomes and Practice in Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension (TOPP) registry is a global, prospective study designed to provide information about

  18. Percutaneous K-wire fixation in paediatric Supracondylar fractures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Percutaneous K-wire fixation in paediatric Supracondylar fractures of humerus: A retrospective study. ... Nigerian Medical Journal ... conducted in the Department of Orthopaedic surgery in M. M. Medical College from July 2005 to July 2010.

  19. Paediatric cardiac anaesthesia in sickle cell disease: a case series

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This case series details experience of four paediatric patients with SCD who underwent corrective cardiac surgery at Red ..... Increased LV stroke volume, increased cardiac output & heart rate ... Hydroxyurea treatment may cause bone marrow.

  20. Pattern recognition in paediatric ecgs: the hidden secrets to clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    typical ECG patterns commonly found in routine paediatric cardiac examination, ECG .... an anterolateral myocardial infarct pattern. Deep Q waves .... The light, which can penetrate tissue and bone, stimulates cell mitochondria to kick-start a ...

  1. Cost of treatment of paediatric femoral shaft fractures: compression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cost of treatment of paediatric femoral shaft fractures: compression plating versus conservative treatment. ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Results: Thirty-one patients who had ORIF and 31 matched controls were ...

  2. paediatric endocrine disorders at the university college hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infectious diseases, childhood endocrine disorders constitute a significant cause of morbidity and mortality.2. In developed countries, paediatric ... present in 6.4%, obesity in 3.2% while the least common disorder was Diabetes insipidus (1%).

  3. Eliminating paediatric infections and keeping mothers alive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray G

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The global plan of reducing the number of new child HIV infections and a reduction in the number of HIV-related maternal deaths by 2015 will require inordinate political commitment and strengthening of health systems in Sub-Saharan Africa where the burden of HIV infections in pregnant women is the highest. Preventing HIV infection in women of child-bearing age and unwanted pregnancies in HIV-positive women forms the cornerstone of long-term control of paediatric HIV infections. To achieve the goal of eliminating paediatric HIV infection by 2015, health systems strengthening to address prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission cascade attrition and focusing on the elimination of breastmilk transmission is critical. Understanding the pathogenesis of breastmilk transmission and the mechanisms by which antiretroviral therapy impacts on transmission through this compartment will drive future interventions. Identifying and retaining HIV-positive pregnant women in care and committed to long-term antiretroviral therapy will improve maternal outcomes and concomitant reductions in maternal mortality. Research assessing the natural history of HIV infection and long-term outcomes in women who interrupt antiretroviral therapy post-weaning is urgently required. Data on the outcome of women who opt to continue the long-term use of antiretroviral therapy after initiating therapy during pregnancy will determine future policy in countries considering option B+. The prevalence of antiretroviral resistance and impact on survival in infants who sero-convert whilst receiving neonatal prophylaxis, or are exposed to maternal HAART through breastmilk at a population level, are currently unknown. In addition to the provision of biomedical interventions, healthcare workers and policy makers must address the structural, cultural and community issues that impact on treatment uptake, adherence to medication and retention in care.

  4. Paediatric acute retropharyngeal abscesses: An experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan A Nazir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To describe our experience of paediatric patients with acute retropharyngeal abscess in terms of clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and complications. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was done for a period of 4 years (Jan 2009 to Jan 2013 on paediatric patients (< 15 years with acute retropharyngeal abscess at two tertiary hospitals in Srinagar. Diagnosis was made on the basis of X-ray, CECT scan findings and confirmed on incision and drainage. Pus was aspirated from all patients and sent for culture and sensitivity. Data for clinical presentation, X-ray, CECT scan findings, causes, complications, bacteriology and management were collected. Thirty-five abscesses were drained while 5 with small abscesses on CECT were managed conservatively. Results: A total of 40 patients were diagnosed as acute retropharyngeal abscesses. Males were commonly affected, and most of the patients were less than 6 years of age. Most common symptom at presentation was fever (35 followed by neck pain (30 Dysphagia/odynophagia (22, swelling in neck (19. Most common clinical sign observed was oropharyngeal swelling and limitation of neck movements (30, cervical swelling/lymphadenopathy in 22 patients. Torticollosis and drooling were seen in 15 patients. Complications were seen in 8 patients. Most common X-ray finding was pre-vertebral thickening. Success rate with primary surgical drainage was 95% while 3 patients in conservative group failed. Conclusion: Children with RPA most commonly present with restricted neck movements, fever and cervical lymphadenopathy, and rarely with respiratory distress or stridor. Surgical intervention is necessary for most of these patients.

  5. Paediatric cyclical Cushing's disease due to corticotroph cell hyperplasia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Noctor, E

    2015-06-01

    Cushing\\'s disease is very rare in the paediatric population. Although uncommon, corticotroph hyperplasia causing Cushing\\'s syndrome has been described in the adult population, but appears to be extremely rare in children. Likewise, cyclical cortisol hypersecretion, while accounting for 15 % of adult cases of Cushing\\'s disease, has only rarely been described in the paediatric population. Here, we describe a very rare case of a 13-year old boy with cyclical cortisol hypersecretion secondary to corticotroph cell hyperplasia.

  6. The family history: An integral component of paediatric health assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Shugar, Andrea L

    2003-01-01

    Conducting the paediatric health history is a vital skill for the paediatrician. However, published guidelines on this topic often fail to emphasize the value that the family history adds to paediatric health assessment. For the healthy child, the family history may reveal risk factors for juvenile and/or adult-onset conditions, the adverse effects of which may be ameliorated with medical intervention or surveillance. For the child with a health problem, a detailed family history may help to ...

  7. How readable are Australian paediatric oral health education materials?

    OpenAIRE

    Arora, Amit; Lam, Andy SF; Karami, Zahra; Do, Loc Giang; Harris, Mark Fort

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to analyse the readability of paediatric oral health education leaflets available in Australia. Methods Forty paediatric oral health education materials were analysed for general readability according to the following parameters: Thoroughness; Textual framework; Terminology; and Readability (Flesch-Kincaid grade level (FKGL), Gunning Fog index (Fog) and Simplified Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG)). Results Leaflets produced by the industry were among t...

  8. Immobilisation in Australian paediatric medical imaging: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, S; Spuur, K; Nielsen, S

    2017-05-01

    The primary aim of this study is to document the use of paediatric immobilisation techniques in medical imaging. Secondary aims are to investigate differences between current practice of paediatric and non-paediatric facilities and radiographer gender and to investigate immobilisation protocols. A SurveyMonkey link was distributed through the Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy (ASMIRT) newsletter. Radiographer members of ASMIRT were invited to participate. Frequency percentage analysis was undertaken; as the 'frequency of immobilisation' response was on a Likert scale and the ages categorical, a Fisher's exact test could determine dependency. The use of paediatric immobilisation techniques was determined to be related to age. The most commonly used technique in general X-ray was "other people"; in computed tomography, Velcro, verbal reminders and distraction techniques; and in magnetic resonance imaging, sedation and Velcro. A comparison of immobilisation techniques demonstrated that Velcro use in X-ray was dependent on facility (p = 0.017) with paediatric facilities using it up to 17 years. Immobilisation frequency was dependent in 13-17 years (p = 0.035) with paediatric facilities rarely immobilising and non-paediatric facilities never. No dependencies resulted upon comparing genders. Immobilisation frequency was not dependent between protocols or current practice. The use of paediatric immobilisation technique is related to age with "other people", sedation, Velcro, verbal reminders and distraction techniques being regularly used. The dependency of Velcro use and immobilisation frequency in 13-17 years is for unknown reasons and further investigation is required. A larger study should be carried out to validate these findings. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Brugada syndrome in the paediatric population: a comprehensive approach to clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Corcia, M Cecilia; de Asmundis, Carlo; Chierchia, Gian-Battista; Brugada, Pedro

    2016-08-01

    Brugada syndrome is an inherited arrhythmogenic disorder, characterised by coved-type ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads, and is associated with increased risk of sudden death. It is genetically and clinically heterogeneous, presenting typically in the fourth or fifth decade of life. The prevalence of Brugada syndrome in the paediatric population is low compared with the adult population. Interestingly, over the last several years, there has been growing evidence in the literature of onset of the disease during childhood. Most of the paediatric cases reported in the literature consist of asymptomatic Brugada syndrome; however, some patients manifest the disease at different regions of the cardiac conduction system at a young age. Early expression of the disease can be affected by multiple factors, including genetic substrate, hormonal changes, and still unknown environmental exposures. The initial manifestation of Brugada syndrome in children can include sinus node dysfunction and atrial arrhythmias. Brugada syndrome can also manifest as ventricular arrhythmias leading to sudden death at an early age. In symptomatic children, performance of the ajmaline test by an experienced team can be safely used as a diagnostic tool to unmask latent Brugada syndrome. Defining indications for an implantable cardioverter defibrillator in children with the diagnosis of Brugada syndrome remains challenging. Given the rarity of the syndrome in children, most paediatric cardiologists will only rarely see a young patient with Brugada syndrome and there is still no universal consensus regarding the optimal management approach. Care should be individualised according to the specific clinical presentation, taking into account the family history, genetic data, and the family's specific preferences.

  10. Risk of surgical site infection in paediatric herniotomies without any prophylactic antibiotics: A preliminary experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay Vaze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different studies underline the use of pre-operative antibiotic prophylaxis in clean surgeries like herniotomy and inguinal orchiopexy. But, the meta-analyses do not recommend nor discard the use of prophylactic pre-operative antibiotics. The scarcity of controlled clinical trials in paediatric population further vitiates the matter. This study assessed the difference in the rate of early post-operative wound infection cases in children who received single dose of pre-operative antibiotics and children who did not receive antibiotics after inguinal herniotomy and orchiopexy. Materials and Methods: This randomised prospective study was conducted in Paediatric Surgery department of PGIMER Chandigarh. Out of 251 patients, 112 patients were randomised to the case group and 139 were ascribed to the control group. The patients in control group were given a standard regimen of single dose of intravenous antibiotic at the time of induction followed by 3-4 days of oral antibiotic. Case group patients underwent the surgical procedure in similar manner with no antibiotic either at the time of induction or post-operatively. Results: The incidence of surgical site infection in case group was 3.73 % and that in control group was 2.22%. The observed difference in the incidence of surgical site infection was statistically insignificant (P value = 0.7027. The overall infection rate in case and control group was 2.89%. Conclusions: Our preliminary experience suggests that there is no statistically significant difference in the proportion of early post-operative wound infection between the patients who received single dose of pre-operative antibiotics and the patients who received no antibiotics after inguinal herniotomy and orchiopexy. The risk of surgical site infection in paediatric heriotomies does not increase even if the child′s weight is less than his/her expected weight for age.

  11. Diagnostic reference levels for paediatric radiography in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiljunen, T.; Jaervinen, H.; Parviainen, T.; Komppa, T. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority - STUK, Helsinki, (Finland). Radiation Practices Regulation; Savolainen, S. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland). Dept. of Radiology

    2005-09-15

    The Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) in Finland has responsibility to set the national Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs) for the most common radiological examinations. Paediatric patients deserve a special attention due to the higher radiation risk compared with adults. The purpose was to present a method which takes into account patient size when setting DRLs in paediatrics. The overall data used in the study consisted of patient doses collected from eight hospitals: for 700 chest examinations, 100 micturating cystourethography (MCU) fluoroscopy examinations and 10 - 30 other conventional or fluoroscopy examinations. The method established by the National Radiation Protection Board (UK) for setting DRLs was found to produce extra uncertainty in the procedure and it was also troublesome to use. Reference levels for paediatric chest examinations could be given as linear curve on half logarithmic scale as a function of patient projection thickness. STUK has been collecting the data on paediatric patient doses in almost 30 Finnish hospitals as the current available data is insufficient and partly outdated. The collection is carried out by a questionnaire in which hospitals record paediatric patient doses of chest, skull, sinus, abdomen, pelvis and micturating cystourethography examinations. The DRLs will be given during the year 2005 for the most common paediatric radiographic examinations.

  12. Pattern of paediatric trauma in Sokoto, North West Nigeria

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    Muhammad Oboirien

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paediatric trauma has become a major cause of mortality, disability and socioeconomic burden in developing countries and the World Health Organization (WHO projects that by 2020 it will be the leading disease globally. This study described the pattern of paediatric injuries seen at a regional trauma center in North West, Nigeria. Settings and Design: Trauma centre of a tertiary hospital in North-Western Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A retrospective look at the trauma register for records of paediatric trauma from January to December 2010 was performed. Information obtained include age and sex, causes and pattern of injury. The limit of 16 years was set for paediatric in our centre. Results: The numbers of paediatric trauma seen over the 12-month period were 567 out of a total of 3984 trauma cases representing 14.2%. The number of males was 407(71.8% and females were 160(28.2% with M: F ratio of 2.5:1. The mean age was 7.77 and standard deviation of 0.19. Road Traffic Accidents (RTA and Domestic injuries representing 44.8 and 42.0%, respectively, were the commonest causes of injuries. Laceration and bruises, head injuries including extremities were the commonest types of injuries seen. Conclusion: Road traffic accidents and domestic injuries as common causes of paediatric trauma need to be ′addressed by the authorities′ so as to reduce the burden of trauma on the vulnerable children in our society.

  13. Role of CSF-CRP as a bedside diagnostic test in children with meningitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Sadat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningitis is a formidable illness with high mortality and morbidity in India. Delay in distinguishing pyogenic meningitis from tuberculous and viral meningitis and delay in starting therapy on one hand and irrational use of antibiotics on the other hand may have irrevocable consequences, so, early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of pyogenic meningitis is very vital to prevent permanent neurological deficits. Detection of C-reative protein in CSF is a bed side rapid diagnostic test to distinguish pyogenic from tuberculous and viral meningitis. So, present study was undertaken to study the usefulness of c-reactive protein in CSF as a rapid diagnostic test in differentiating pyogenic from tuberculous and viral meningitis.This study was conducted at Smt Shardaben Hospital from Sept-2008 to Nov-2010. Total 150 cases admitted in paediatric department and neonates admitted to the sick nursery suspected of having meningitis were included. Samples of CSF were taken for bed side diagnostic test of CSF-CRP. The major advantage of this method is rapid two minute reaction time. Our study revealed that out of 150 cases of suspected meningitis 64 (42.66% patient were having meningitis out of which 18 (12% patients were diagnosed as pyogenic meningitis and CSF CRP was positive in 10 (55.55 % patients out of 18 pyogenic meningitis patients and CSF-CRP was negative in all other groups Applying chisquare test, correlation between CSF-CRP positivity and pyoganic meningitis was highly significant (x2 = 31(i.e.> 3.84

  14. Intima media thickness measurement in children: A statement from the Association for European Paediatric Cardiology (AEPC) Working Group on Cardiovascular Prevention endorsed by the Association for European Paediatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Pozza, Robert; Ehringer-Schetitska, Doris; Fritsch, Peter; Jokinen, Eero; Petropoulos, Andreas; Oberhoffer, Renate

    2015-02-01

    Atherosclerosis causing cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death in the developed world. Early precursors of vascular changes - subclinical atherosclerosis - warrant special attention as this process can be stabilized or even reversed if treated in time. Sonographic Intima Media Thickness measurement of the carotid artery (cIMT: carotid Intima-Media-Thickness) is considered a valid surrogate marker for cardiovascular risk allowing assessment of atherosclerotic changes at a very early stage. It is easy to apply due to its non-invasive character. Moreover, cIMT has been proven to provide reliable and reproducible results both in adult and adolescent patients. For the paediatric age group, several characteristics deserve special consideration. The heterogeneity of techniques of scanning, measurement and interpretation impede the comparison and interpretation of IMT values so far. Also, age- and sex-dependent normative data have to be considered for interpretation. Thus, the Association for European Paediatric Cardiology (AEPC) Working Group on Cardiovascular Prevention concludes to refer a statement on cIMT scanning, measurement and interpretation with special focus on paediatric patients. This statement includes an overview on normative data available as well as a practical guideline for the setting, scanning, measurement and interpretation of IMT values. Synchronizing different measurement methods will allow for comparing the results of several research centers. By that, in a large patient number, sufficient information may be given to assess the long-term endpoints of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  15. Bed Utilisation in an Irish Regional Paediatric Unit A Cross-Sectional Study Using the Paediatric Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (PAEP)

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ó hAiseadha, Coilín

    2016-05-01

    Increasing demand for limited healthcare resources raises questions about appropriate use of inpatient beds. In the first paediatric bed utilisation study at a regional university centre in Ireland, we conducted a cross-sectional study to audit the utilisation of inpatient beds at the Regional Paediatric Unit (RPU) in University Hospital Limerick (UHL), Limerick, Ireland and also examined hospital activity data, to make recommendations for optimal use of inpatient resources.

  16. Bench-to-bedside review: Early tracheostomy in critically ill trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Shirawi, Nehad; Arabi, Yaseen

    2005-01-01

    A significant proportion of trauma patients require tracheostomy during intensive care unit stay. The timing of this procedure remains a subject of debate. The decision for tracheostomy should take into consideration the risks and benefits of prolonged endotracheal intubation versus tracheostomy. Timing of tracheostomy is also influenced by the indications for the procedure, which include relief of upper airway obstruction, airway access in patients with cervical spine injury, management of r...

  17. Effects of Early Acute Care on Autonomic Outcomes in SCI: Bedside to Bench and Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Abdomen (S-CDE) AIS 6 Body Regions: Extremity (S-CDE) AIS 6 Body Regions: External (S-CDE) AIS 9 Body Regions: Head (S-CDE) AIS 9 Body Regions...Neck (S-CDE) AIS 9 Body Regions: Face (S-CDE) AIS 9 Body Regions: Chest/Thorax (S-CDE) AIS 9 Body Regions: Abdomen (S-CDE) AIS 9 Body Regions...Voxel Size (Axis 1) (S-CDE) Voxel Size (Axis 2) (S-CDE) Voxel Size (Axis 3) (S-CDE) NEX (S-CDE) Phase-encode direction (S-CDE) Was fat signal

  18. Fragmented QRS – A simple bedside non invasive predictor of early mortality and morbidity in STEMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Mateen Athar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Fragmented QRS encompasses different RSR’ patterns showing various morphologies of the QRS complexes with or without the Q wave on a resting 12-lead electrocardiogram. It has been shown possibly to cause adverse cardiac outcomes in patients with some heart diseases, including coronary artery disease. In view of the need for risk stratification of patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome in the most efficacious and cost-effective way, we conducted this study to clarify the value of fragmented QRS in patients presenting with STEMI in predicting complication during hospital stay. Methods: Fifty consecutive patients admitted to the coronary care unit with their first STEMI were enrolled in this prospective observational study. Demographic and electrocardiographic data on admission, in hospital complication and mortality were recorded. Results: 50 patients were divided into two groups, one consisting of patients who developed fQRS (fQRS +ve during hospital stay and the other group those who did not developed fQRS (fQRS –ve. Patients with fQRS on admission ECG had significantly higher incidence of arrhythmias (p=0.012, heart failure (p=0.008, hypotension (p=0.002 in comparison to patients with non fragmented QRS. In addition patients with more than one myocardial site involvement had higher incidence of fQRS (p=0.004. The mortality was significantly higher in fQRS positive (p= 0.029 group compared to fQRS negative group. Conclusion: This study strongly suggests that fragmented QRS on initial presentation with STEMI is predictive of subsequent events and provide very useful information in the risk stratification of acute STEMI patients.

  19. Relationship between Quality of Life and Nurse-led Bedside Symptom Evaluations in Patients with Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Sook Yoo, RN, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Collectively, our results indicate that nurse-led bedside evaluation is a noninvasive and useful method for detecting neurotoxicity and evaluating the patient’s QOL both during and after treatment.

  20. [Implementation of bedside training and advanced objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) trial to learn and confirm about pharmacy clinical skills].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Jin; Takamura, Norito; Ogata, Kenji; Setoguchi, Nao; Sato, Keizo

    2013-01-01

    Bedside training for fourth-year students, as well as seminars in hospital pharmacy (vital sign seminars) for fifth-year students at the Department of Pharmacy of Kyushu University of Health and Welfare have been implemented using patient training models and various patient simulators. The introduction of simulation-based pharmaceutical education, where no patients are present, promotes visually, aurally, and tactilely simulated learning regarding the evaluation of vital signs and implementation of physical assessment when disease symptoms are present or adverse effects occur. A patient simulator also promotes the creation of training programs for emergency and critical care, with which basic as well as advanced life support can be practiced. In addition, an advanced objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) trial has been implemented to evaluate skills regarding vital signs and physical assessments. Pharmacists are required to examine vital signs and conduct physical assessment from a pharmaceutical point of view. The introduction of these pharmacy clinical skills will improve the efficacy of drugs, work for the prevention or early detection of adverse effects, and promote the appropriate use of drugs. It is considered that simulation-based pharmaceutical education is essential to understand physical assessment, and such education will ideally be applied and developed according to on-site practices.

  1. Bedside Teaching in Undergraduate Medical Education: Issues, Strategies, and New Models for Better Preparation of New Generation Doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdus Salam

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBedside teaching is a vital component of medical education. It isapplicable to any situation where teaching is imparted in thepresence of patients. In teaching in the patients’ presence, learnershave the opportunities to use all of their senses and learn thehumanistic aspect of medicine such as role modeling, which isvital but difficult to communicate in words. Unfortunately, bedsideteaching has been on the decline. To investigate the reasonsfor the decline in bedside teaching, its importance and its revival,a review of literature was carried out using PubMed and otherdata bases. The review revealed that the major concerns of bedsideteaching were time constraint, false preceptors’ concernabout patients’ comfort, short stay of patients in hospitals, learnerdistraction by technology, lack of experience and unrealistic facultyexpectation. Whatsoever the reasons, bedside teaching cannotbe replaced with anything else. There are newer approachesof effective bedside teaching, and the core focus of all such approachesis educational process. A bedside teacher must learnhow to involve patients and learners in the educational processes.Moreover, bedside teaching is the process through which learnersacquire the skills of communication by asking patients’ permission,establishing ground rules, setting time limit, introducing theteam, diagnosing learner, diagnosing patient, conducting focusedteaching, using simple language, asking patient if there is anyquestion, closing with encouraging thanks, and giving feedbackprivately. It is most important to ensure a comfortable environmentfor all participants, the learner, the patient and the bedsideteacher. Ongoing faculty development programs on educationalprocesses and realistic faculty expectations may overcome theproblems.

  2. Technology-enhanced learning should be employed alongside – not instead of – bedside teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferguson Z

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Zachary FergusonSouth Thames Foundation School, London, UKI read with great interest the editorial by Al-jibury et al1 regarding the digitalization of medical education, particularly as I was part of the team that produced the YouTube video on heart murmurs which they reference in their paper.I agree wholeheartedly that digital resources cannot and must not replace bedside teaching. The video in question carries a disclaimer at the beginning, encouraging learners to use the resource as a companion to – not a substitute for – real-life patient contact. Convenient though YouTube might be, it cannot compare to the learning experience Al-jibury et al1 describes: listening to a live, beating heart. Bedside teaching has been around since the days of Hippocrates and it is not going anywhere anytime soon.Read the original article by Al-jibury et al.

  3. Bringing mini-chalk talks to the bedside to enhance clinical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Michael B; Orlander, Jay D

    2017-01-01

    Chalk talks - where the teacher is equipped solely with a writing utensil and a writing surface - have been used for centuries, yet little has been written about strategies for their use in medical education. Structured education proximal to patient encounters (during rounds, at the bedside, or in between patients in clinic) maximizes the opportunities for clinical learning. This paper presents a strategy to bring mini-chalk talks (MCTs) to the bedside as a practical way to provide relevant clinical teaching by visually framing teachable moments. Grounded in adult learning theory, MCTs leverage teaching scripts to facilitate discussion, involve learners at multiple levels, and embrace the increased retention associated with visual aids. These authors provide specific recommendations for the design and implementation of MCT sessions including what topics work well, how to prepare, and how to involve and engage the learners. ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder; MCT: Mini-chalk talks.

  4. Association of Attention Deficit Disorder With Bedside Anti-saccades in Survivors of Childhood Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Raja B; Hudson, Melissa M; Ness, Kirsten K; Liang, Zhu; Srivastava, Deokumar; Krull, Kevin R

    2016-02-01

    Impaired attention is well recognized in childhood cancer survivors. We prospectively evaluated 162 long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia to study an association between presence of neurologic soft signs as measured by Zurich Neuromotor Scale, bedside evaluation of anti-saccades, and attention deficit disorder. Attention deficit disorder was recognized in 10.5% of the study cohort. We did not find an association of attention deficit with presence of any soft sign. However, there was an association between presence of abnormal anti-saccades and attention deficit (P = .04). These results will require further validation and if confirmed may introduce a quick bedside method of assessing impaired attention in cancer survivors.

  5. Accuracy of ED Bedside Ultrasound for Identification of Gallstones: Retrospective Analysis of 575 Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scruggs, William

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Objective: To determine the ability of emergency department (ED physicians to diagnose cholelithiasis with bedside ultrasound. Methods: ED gallbladder ultrasounds recorded over 37 months were compared to radiology ultrasound interpretation. Results: Of 1,690 ED gallbladder ultrasound scans performed during this period, radiology ultrasound was performed in 575/1690 (34% cases. ED physician bedside interpretation was 88% sensitive [95% CI, 84-91] and 87% specific [95% CI, 82-91], while positive predictive value (PPV was 91% [88- 94%] and negative predictive value (NPV was 83% [78-87%], using radiology interpretation as the criterion reference. Conclusion: ED physician ultrasound of the gallbladder for cholelithiasis is both sensitive and specific.

  6. Is 'bench-to-bedside' realistic for autism? An integrative neuroscience approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Melissa D; Schumann, Cynthia M

    2013-04-01

    Given the prevalence and societal impact of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), there is an urgent need to develop innovative treatments that will improve core social deficits, for which there is currently no reliable pharmacological treatment, prevention or cure. Development of novel biological interventions will depend upon the successful translation of basic neuroscience research into safe and effective medicines. This article outlines steps to bring neuroscience research from 'the bench' to treatment at 'bedside', from phenotyping the disorder to animal models to patient treatment. Although these steps appear simplistic, this is a daunting challenge because of the inherent complexity of the human brain, our lack of understanding of disease neurobiology underlying ASD, and the incredible heterogeneity of the disorder. For ASD, perhaps more than any other neurological or psychiatric disorder, progress will depend on integrative multidisciplinary approaches between basic scientists from varying neuroscience disciplines and clinicians to make 'bench to bedside' treatment a reality.

  7. Rapid Bedside Inactivation of Ebola Virus for Safe Nucleic Acid Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstierne, Maiken Worsøe; Karlberg, Helen; Bragstad, Karoline

    2016-01-01

    Rapid bedside inactivation of Ebola virus would be a solution for the safety of medical and technical staff, risk containment, sample transport, and high-throughput or rapid diagnostic testing during an outbreak. We show that the commercially available Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer used...... for nucleic acid extraction inactivates Ebola virus. A rapid bedside inactivation method for nucleic acid tests is obtained by simply adding Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer directly into vacuum blood collection EDTA tubes using a thin needle and syringe prior to sampling. The ready-to-use inactivation vacuum...... tubes are stable for more than 4 months, and Ebola virus RNA is preserved in the Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer for at least 5 weeks independent of the storage temperature. We also show that Ebola virus RNA can be manually extracted from Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer-inactivated samples using...

  8. Ethnic diversity outpatient clinic in paediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahhan Nordin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The health status of chronic sick ethnic minority children in the Netherlands is unequal compared with indigenous Dutch children. In order to optimize the health care for these children a specific patient-oriented clinic in ethnic-cultural diversity: the Mosaic Outpatient Clinic (MOC was integrated in the general Paediatric Outpatient Departments (POPD of three hospitals in Amsterdam. Methods Feasibility of the MOC, factors influencing the health care process and encountered bottlenecks in health care were studied in ethnic minority children with asthma, diabetes type 1 or metabolic disease originating from Morocco, Turkey and Surinam. Feasibility was determined by the number of patients attended, support from the paediatric medical staff and willingness of the patients to participate. Influences on the health care process comprised parents' level of knowledge of disease, sense of disease severity, level of effort, linguistic skills, health literacy, adherence to treatment and encountered bottlenecks in the health care process. Moreover, the number of admissions and visits to the POPD in the years before, during and after the MOC were analysed. Results In 2006 a total of 189 ethnic minority children were seen. Integration of the MOC within the general POPD of the hospital is feasible. The ability of the parents to speak and understand Dutch was found to be 58%, functional health literacy was 88%; sufficient knowledge of disease and sense of disease severity were 59% and 67%, respectively. The main bottlenecks in the healthcare process: poor knowledge of disease, limited sense of disease severity and low health literacy in the parents proved to be the best predictors for decreased adherence. After attending the MOC there was a decrease in the number of admissions and visits to the POPD for asthma while the number of visits increased in patients with diabetes and the amount of no-shows decreased in patients with a metabolic

  9. Transfer from paediatric rheumatology to the adult rheumatology setting: experiences and expectations of young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilderson, Deborah; Eyckmans, Leen; Van der Elst, Kristien; Westhovens, Rene; Wouters, Carine; Moons, Philip

    2013-05-01

    Adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are transferred from paediatrics to adult-oriented healthcare when they reach early adulthood. Research on the extent to which patients' expectations about the adult healthcare setting match their actual experience after transfer, may promote successful transfer from paediatrics to adult care. As part of the 'Don't Retard' project ( http://www.kuleuven.be/switch2/rheuma.html ), experiences and expectations of young adults regarding their transfer from paediatric rheumatology to adult rheumatology were explored. A qualitative study was conducted using semi-structured, in-depth interviews of 11 patients with JIA, aged 18 to 30. Data were analysed using procedures inherent to the content analysis approach. For both concepts, experiences and expectations, three main themes emerged: 'preparation', 'parental involvement' and an 'adapted setting for the late-adolescent or early adult'. The need for a gradual process covered the themes 'preparation' and 'parental involvement'. Young people with JIA prefer to have a say in the moment of transfer and in the reduction of parental involvement. The majority of the participants like their parents' presence at the first consultation at the adult rheumatology department. They expect a healthcare setting adapted to their needs and the possibility to meet peers in this setting. Sudden confrontation with older patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis at adult rheumatology was an unsettling experience for some of the young patients and they declared that better preparation is needed. This study enabled us to define three main themes important in transfer. These themes can facilitate healthcare professionals in developing specific interventions to prepare the young people to transfer, to regulate parental involvement and to arrange an adapted setting for them. Since we included patients who were in follow-up at one tertiary care centre, in which both paediatric and adult

  10. Retrobulbar Hematoma from Warfarin Toxicity and the Limitations of Bedside Ocular Sonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    and progressive swelling. She had a complicated medical history, including the recent diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis with associated pulmonary...pseudoseizures, chronic lymphadenopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and fibromyalgia . The physical exam was remarkable for slight left eye proptosis, left...need for CT scan if the diagnosis can be made. In this case, the CT scan demonstrates a fairly significant RBH (Figure 2), yet the focused bedside

  11. Administrative gatekeeping - a third way between unrestricted patient advocacy and bedside rationing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Sigurd

    2009-01-01

    rationing. The former requires unrestricted advocacy of patients but prompts distrust, moral hazard and unfairness. The latter commits physicians to rationing at the bedside; but it is bound to introduce unfair inequalities among patients and lack of political accountability towards citizens. In this paper......, physicians are required to follow fair rules of rationing adopted at higher organizational levels within healthcare systems. At the same time, however, they are prohibited from including considerations of cost in their clinical decisions....

  12. Part 1: Evidence-based facility design using Transforming Care at the Bedside principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Deborah A; Wenger, Barb; Krugman, Mary; Zwink, Jennifer E; Shiskowsky, Kaycee; Hagman, Jan; Limon, Shelly; Sanders, Carolyn; Reeves, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    An academic hospital used Transforming Care at the Bedside (TCAB) principles as the framework for generating evidence-based recommendations for the design of an expansion of the current hospital. The interdisciplinary team used the table of evidence-based data to advocate for a patient- and family-centered, safe, and positive work environment. A nurse project manager acted as liaison between the TCAB design team, architects, and facilities and design consultants. Part 2 of this series describes project evaluation outcomes.

  13. Evaluation of a BED-SIDE Platelet Function Assay : Performance and Clinical Utility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Wei

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelets have a pivotal role in the initial defense against insult to the vasculature and are also recognized of critical importance in the acute care settings of percutaneous coronary intervention and cardiopulmonary bypass. In these environments both platelet count and function may be markedly compromised. Unfortunately, current assays to evaluate the parameters of platelet count and function are of limited utility for bed-side testing. Moreover, it is suggested that there may be significant inter patient variation in response to antiplatelet therapy that may be exacerbated by other agents (e.g. heparin that are routinely administered during cardiac intervention. Here we describe a practical, rapid and user-friendly whole blood platelet function assay that has been developed for use in bed-side settings. Platelet agonists were formulated with an anticoagulant and lyophilized in blood collection tubes standardised to receive a l mL fresh whole blood sample. In the presence of an agonist, platelets are activated and interact (aggregate. Using traditional cell counting principles, non-aggregated platelets are counted whereas aggregated platelets are not. The percentage (% of functional platelets in reference to a baseline tube may then be determined. Results are available within four minutes. Platelet aggregation in whole blood demonstrated good correlation with turbidometric aggregometry for both ADP (r=0.91 and collagen (r=0.88. Moreover, in clinical settings where antiplatelet agents were administered, this rapid, bed-side, platelet function assay demonstrated utility in monitoring patient response to these therapies. This novel bed-side assay of platelet function is extremely suitable for the clinical environment with a rapid turn-around time. In addition, it provides a full haematology profile, including platelet count, and should permit enhancement of transfusion and interventional decisions.

  14. Bedside Testing for Chronic Pelvic Pain: Discriminating Visceral from Somatic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    John Jarrell; Maria Adele Giamberardino; Magali Robert; Maryam Nasr-Esfahani

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. This study was done to evaluate three bedside tests in discriminating visceral pain from somatic pain among women with chronic pelvic pain. Study Design. The study was an exploratory cross-sectional evaluation of 81 women with chronic pelvic pain of 6 or more months' duration. Tests included abdominal cutaneous allodynia (aCA), perineal cutaneous allodynia (pCA), abdominal and perineal myofascial trigger points (aMFTP) and (pMFTP), and reduced pain thresholds (RPTs). Results. Eigh...

  15. Cost, staffing and quality impact of bedside electronic medical record (EMR) in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantz, Marilyn J; Hicks, Lanis; Petroski, Gregory F; Madsen, Richard W; Alexander, Greg; Galambos, Colleen; Conn, Vicki; Scott-Cawiezell, Jill; Zwygart-Stauffacher, Mary; Greenwald, Leslie

    2010-09-01

    There is growing political pressure for nursing homes to implement the electronic medical record (EMR) but there is little evidence of its impact on resident care. The purpose of this study was to test the unique and combined contributions of EMR at the bedside and on-site clinical consultation by gerontological expert nurses on cost, staffing, and quality of care in nursing homes. Eighteen nursing facilities in 3 states participated in a 4-group 24-month comparison: Group 1 implemented bedside EMR, used nurse consultation; Group 2 implemented bedside EMR only; Group 3 used nurse consultation only; Group 4 neither. Intervention sites (Groups 1 and 2) received substantial, partial financial support from CMS to implement EMR. Costs and staffing were measured from Medicaid cost reports, and staff retention from primary data collection; resident outcomes were measured by MDS-based quality indicators and quality measures. Total costs increased in both intervention groups that implemented technology; staffing and staff retention remained constant. Improvement trends were detected in resident outcomes of ADLs, range of motion, and high-risk pressure sores for both intervention groups but not in comparison groups. Implementation of bedside EMR is not cost neutral. There were increased total costs for all intervention facilities. These costs were not a result of increased direct care staffing or increased staff turnover. Nursing home leaders and policy makers need to be aware of on-going hardware and software costs as well as costs of continual technical support for the EMR and constant staff orientation to use the system. EMR can contribute to the quality of nursing home care and can be enhanced by on-site consultation by nurses with graduate education in nursing and expertise in gerontology. Copyright 2010 American Medical Directors Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dietary salt intake and time to relapse in paediatric multiple sclerosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nourbakhsh, Bardia; Graves, Jennifer; Casper, T Charles; Lulu, Sabeen; Waldman, Amy; Belman, Anita; Greenberg, Benjamin; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Aaen, Gregory; Tillema, Jan-Mendelt; Hart, Janace; Ness, Jayne; Rubin, Jennifer; Krupp, Lauren; Gorman, Mark; Benson, Leslie; Rodriguez, Moses; Chitnis, Tanuja; Rose, John; Barcellos, Lisa; Waubant, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    .... Methods Paediatric-onset MS and patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) within 4 years of disease onset were recruited from 15 paediatric MS centres in the USA as part of a case-control study...

  17. Emergency bedside cesarean delivery: lessons learned in teamwork and patient safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinney Michelle A O

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal cardiovascular and pulmonary events during labor and delivery may result in adverse maternal and fetal outcome. Potential etiologies include primary cardiac events, pulmonary embolism, eclampsia, maternal hemorrhage, and adverse medication events. Remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia is an alternative when conventional neuraxial analgesia for labor is contraindicated. Although remifentanil is a commonly used analgesic, its use for labor analgesia is not clearly defined. Case presentation We present an unexpected and unique case of remifentanil toxicity resulting in the need for an emergent bedside cesarean delivery. A 30-year-old G3P2 woman receiving subcutaneous heparin anticoagulation due to a recent deep vein thrombosis developed cardiopulmonary arrest during labor induction due to remifentanil toxicity. Conclusion A rapid discussion among the attending obstetric, anesthesia, and nursing teams resulted in consensus to perform an emergent bedside cesarean delivery resulting in an excellent fetal outcome. During maternal cardiopulmonary arrest, a prompt decision to perform a bedside cesarean delivery is essential to avoid significant maternal and fetal morbidity. Under these conditions, rapid collaboration among obstetric, anesthesia, and nursing personnel, and an extensive multi-layered safety process are integral components to optimize maternal and fetal outcomes.

  18. Point-of-care cardiac ultrasound techniques in the physical examination: better at the bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Bruce J

    2017-03-04

    The development of hand-carried, battery-powered ultrasound devices has created a new practice in ultrasound diagnostic imaging, called 'point-of-care' ultrasound (POCUS). Capitalising on device portability, POCUS is marked by brief and limited ultrasound imaging performed by the physician at the bedside to increase diagnostic accuracy and expediency. The natural evolution of POCUS techniques in general medicine, particularly with pocket-sized devices, may be in the development of a basic ultrasound examination similar to the use of the binaural stethoscope. This paper will specifically review how POCUS improves the limited sensitivity of the current practice of traditional cardiac physical examination by both cardiologists and non-cardiologists. Signs of left ventricular systolic dysfunction, left atrial enlargement, lung congestion and elevated central venous pressures are often missed by physical techniques but can be easily detected by POCUS and have prognostic and treatment implications. Creating a general set of repetitive imaging skills for these entities for application on all patients during routine examination will standardise and reduce heterogeneity in cardiac bedside ultrasound applications, simplify teaching curricula, enhance learning and recollection, and unify competency thresholds and practice. The addition of POCUS to standard physical examination techniques in cardiovascular medicine will result in an ultrasound-augmented cardiac physical examination that reaffirms the value of bedside diagnosis.

  19. Risks of Using Bedside Tests to Verify Nasogastric Tube Position in Adult Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody Ni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nasogastric (NG tubes are commonly used for enteral feeding. Complications of feeding tube misplacement include malnutrition, pulmonary aspiration, and even death. We built a Bayesian network (BN to analyse the risks associated with available bedside tests to verify tube position. Evidence on test validity (sensitivity and specificity was retrieved from a systematic review. Likelihood ratios were used to select the best tests for detecting tubes misplaced in the lung or oesophagus. Five bedside tests were analysed including magnetic guidance, aspirate pH, auscultation, aspirate appearance, and capnography/colourimetry. Among these, auscultation and appearance are non-diagnostic towards lung or oesophagus placements. Capnography/ colourimetry can confirm but cannot rule out lung placement. Magnetic guidance can rule out both lung and oesophageal placement. However, as a relatively new technology, further validation studies are needed. The pH test with a cut-off at 5.5 or lower can rule out lung intubation. Lowering the cut-off to 4 not only minimises oesophageal intubation but also provides extra safety as the sensitivity of pH measurement is reduced by feeding, antacid medication, or the use of less accurate pH paper. BN is an effective tool for representing and analysing multi-layered uncertainties in test validity and reliability for the verification of NG tube position. Aspirate pH with a cut-off of 4 is the safest bedside method to minimise lung and oesophageal misplacement.

  20. Back to the bedside: the 8-year evolution of a resident-as-teacher rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgen, Jonathan S; Takayesu, James K; Bhatia, Kriti; Marsh, Regan H; Shah, Sachita; Wilcox, Susan R; Krauss, William H; Nadel, Eric S

    2011-08-01

    Teaching our residents to teach is a vital responsibility of Emergency Medicine (EM) residency programs. As emergency department (ED) overcrowding may limit the ability of attending physicians to provide bedside instruction, senior residents are increasingly asked to assume this role for more junior trainees. Unfortunately, a recent survey suggests that only 55% of all residencies provide instruction in effective teaching methods. Without modeling from attending physicians, many residents struggle with this responsibility. We introduced a "Resident-as-Teacher" curriculum in 2002 as a means to address a decline in bedside instruction and provide our senior residents with a background in effective teaching methods. Here, we describe the evolution of this resident-as-teacher rotation, outline its current structure, cite potential pitfalls and solutions, and discuss the unique addition of a teach-the-teacher curriculum. A resident-as-teacher rotation has evolved into a meaningful addition to our senior residents' training, fostering their growth as educators and addressing our need for bedside instruction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cognitive profile and disorders affecting higher brain functions in paediatric patients with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaucheret Paz, E; López Ballent, A; Puga, C; García Basalo, M J; Baliarda, F; Ekonen, C; Ilari, R; Agosta, G

    2017-04-18

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common neurocutaneous syndrome often associated with specific cognitive deficits that are rarely monitored during follow-up of these patients. The purpose of our study is two-fold. First, we aimed to describe the cognitive profile of patients with NF1 and detect disorders in higher brain functions associated with the disease. Second, we identified the reasons for consultation associated with school performance in these patients. We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional study of 24 paediatric patients (ages 5 to 16) with NF1 who underwent neuropsychological assessment. The most frequent reasons for consultation were attention deficits (58.33%), learning disorders (25%), poor motor coordination (25%), and language impairment (0.8%). Although 96% of the patients displayed impairments in at least one of the assessed areas, only 83.34% of the parents had reported such impairments. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder was present in 58.33% of the patients, whereas 33.33% had nonverbal learning disabilities, 20.83% had expressive language disorder, 8.33% had borderline intellectual functioning, 4.16% had mental retardation, and only 4.16% showed no cognitive impairment. Higher brain functions are frequently impaired in paediatric patients with NF1. Although many parents report such disorders, they can go undetected in some cases. Neuropsychological assessment is recommended for all paediatric patients with NF1 to detect cognitive impairment and provide early, effective rehabilitation treatment. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Visceral leishmaniasis in Malta—an 18 year paediatric, population based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, V.; Mizzi, J.; Mangion, M.; Vella, C.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a chronic parasitic infection that infects approximately 400 000 individuals annually, with a predilection towards early childhood.
AIMS—To study the epidemiology of VL in childhood.
METHODS—VL is endemic in Malta, a small archipelago of islands in the centre of the Mediterranean with a total population approaching half a million. Notification of human cases of leishmaniasis is compulsory. Case records of all 81 paediatric patients with VL between 1980 and 1998 were analysed.
RESULTS—The annual incidence of VL declined for all cases of VL, and declined significantly for paediatric cases (p = 0.01). For 1994to 1998, the overall incidence of VL was 0.9 per 100 000 total population and the paediatric incidence was 2.5 per 100 000 population. Median age at presentation was 34 months. Common features at presentation were splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, fever, and pancytopenia with high lymphocyte and monocyte counts. The diagnostic sensitivity of isolated immunofluorescent antibody testing was equivalent to bone marrow aspiration (95%). Blood transfusions for anaemia were required in 93% of patients. Eleven per cent had intercurrent infections. All patients were cured, and were initially treated with intravenous sodium stibogluconate. Defervescence occurred after a median of six days of treatment, and patients continued to be treated on a day case basis. Nine relapsers were retreated with sodium stibogluconate, achieving a cure rate of 94%, but five patients required additional drug therapy. There were no permanent sequelae associated with VL or its treatment.
CONCLUSIONS—The decreased incidence is attributed to the eradication of stray dogs which are the disease reservoir.

 PMID:10799428

  3. An audit of paediatric mortality patterns in a Nigerian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Dafe Forae

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The 4 th millennium development goals (2002 reported that sub-Saharan Africa countries including Nigeria have a persistently high childhood mortality rates in-spite of all the preventive and interventional measures to reduce this ugly trend. Patients and Methods: Childhood mortality data was obtained from the medical records department and post-mortem records of the pathology departments over a 5-year period from January 2007 to December 2011. The selection criteria include all case notes with mortality records involving children admitted into the paediatrics department through the labour ward and the obstetrics theater, children emergency unit (CHER, paediatric out-patient clinic. Results : A total of 12,442 children were admitted during this period. Of this, 711 paediatric deaths were documented accounting for 17.5%. The male to female mortality ratio was 1.4:1. The age range was from birth to 17 years. Neonatal deaths accounted for the most common cause of death constituting 344 (48.4% of all deaths. Among the neonatal mortality patterns, severe birth asphyxia/perinatal asphyxia was the most common cause of early neonatal deaths accounting for 97 (28.2%. Septicaemia accounted for the most frequent cause of infant mortality accounting for 28 (21.8%. Among the under-5 age group, severe malaria constituted the most common cause of death accounting for 52 (36.6% cases while malignancy topped the list of 5-17 years mortality rate constituting 15 (15.4% cases. Conclusion: Perinatal and neonatal deaths constitute the vast majority of death in our environment with most of the deaths resulting from severe birth asphyxias, prematurity. Again in the post-neonatal period, infections and other preventable diseases constitute the most common cause of death in children of under age group of five years. Above 5 years childhood malignancies constitutes the highest mortality pattern.

  4. Gait and Lower Limb Observation of Paediatrics (GALLOP): development of a consensus based paediatric podiatry and physiotherapy standardised recording proforma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranage, Simone; Banwell, Helen; Williams, Cylie M

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric gait and lower limb assessments are frequently undertaken in podiatry and physiotherapy clinical practice and this is a growing area of expertise within Australia. No concise paediatric standardised recording proforma exists to assist clinicians in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to develop a gait and lower limb standardised recording proforma guided by the literature and consensus, for assessment of the paediatric foot and lower limb in children aged 0-18 years. Expert Australian podiatrists and physiotherapists were invited to participate in a three round Delphi survey panel using the online Qualtrics(©) survey platform. The first round of the survey consisted of open-ended questions on paediatric gait and lower limb assessment developed from existing templates and a literature search of standardised lower limb assessment methods. Rounds two and three consisted of statements developed from the first round responses. Questions and statements were included in the final proforma if 70 % or more of the participants indicated consensus or agreement with the assessment method and if there was support within the literature for paediatric age-specific normative data with acceptable reliability of outcome measures. There were 17 of the 21 (81 %) participants who completed three rounds of the survey. Consensus was achieved for 41 statements in Round one, 54 statements achieved agreement in two subsequent rounds. Participants agreed on 95 statements relating to birth history, developmental history, hip measurement, rotation of the lower limb, ankle range of motion, foot posture, balance and gait. Assessments with acceptable validity and reliability were included within the final Gait and Lower Limb Observation of Paediatrics (GALLOP) proforma. The GALLOP proforma is a consensus based, systematic and standardised way to collect information and outcome measures in paediatric lower limb assessment. This standardised recording proforma will assist

  5. Secondary surgery in paediatric facial paralysis reanimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Olivares, Fatima S

    2010-11-01

    Ninety-two children, the entire series of paediatric facial reanimation by a single surgeon over thirty years, are presented. The objective is to analyse the incidence and value of secondary revisions for functional and aesthetic refinements following the two main stages of reanimation. The reconstructive strategy varied according to the denervation time, the aetiology, and whether the paralysis was uni- or bilateral, complete or partial. Irrespective of these variables, 89% of the patients required secondary surgery. Post-operative videos were available in seventy-two cases. Four independent observers graded patients' videos using a scale from poor to excellent. The effect of diverse secondary procedures was measured computing a mean-percent-gain score. Statistical differences between treatment groups means were tested by the t-test and one-way ANOVA. Two-thirds of the corrective and ancillary techniques utilized granted significantly higher mean-scores post-secondary surgery. A comparison of pre- and post-operative data found valuable improvements in all three facial zones after secondary surgery. In conclusion, inherent to dynamic procedures is the need for secondary revisions. Secondary surgery builds in the potential of reanimation surgery, effectively augmenting functional faculties and aesthesis.

  6. Paediatric cardiac catheterization: an information sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Caroline; Greffier, Angelique

    2013-04-01

    The need to inform patients using validated scientific data is acknowledged internationally. The obligation to inform patients is based on a fundamental principle of French law: the principle of the unavailability of the human body. Before engaging in diagnostic or therapeutic strategies such as paediatric cardiac catheterization, the healthcare professional must explain the disease, the advantages and drawbacks of each treatment strategy and their foreseeable benefit/risk ratio in order to help older children and their parents come to a decision. To obtain this required consent and before the care is provided, the infant and their legal representative must have received clear, accurate and understandable information. An information sheet cannot substitute for verbal information. Guidelines for good practices on the delivery of information have been established by the Health Authorities and officially recognized in a decree from the Ministry of Health. These documents allow professionals to draft a written information document for patients and healthcare users. This document must help the patient to take part in decisions that concern them. The law of 4th March 2002 regarding the rights of patients and the quality of the healthcare system states that 'in cases of litigation, it is the responsibility of the professional or the healthcare establishment to provide proof that the information was given to the person concerned in the conditions set out in the present article. This proof can be brought by any means'.

  7. Whole-body MRI in paediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Littooij, Annemieke S

    2016-05-01

    Imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and follow-up of paediatric malignancies. Until recently, computed tomography (CT) has been the imaging technique of choice in children with cancer, but nowadays there is an increasing interest in the use of functional imaging techniques like positron emission tomography and single-photon emission tomography. These later techniques are often combined with CT allowing for simultaneous acquisition of image data on the biological behaviour of tumour, as well as the anatomical localisation and extent of tumour spread. Because of the small but not negligible risk of radiation induced secondary cancers and the significantly improved overall survival rates of children with cancer, there is an increasing interest in the use of alternative imaging techniques that do not use ionising radiation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a radiation-free imaging tool that allows for acquiring images with a high spatial resolution and excellent soft tissue contrast throughout the body. Moreover, recent technological advances have resulted in fast diagnostic sequences for whole-body MR imaging (WB-MRI), including functional techniques such as diffusion weighted imaging. In this review, the current status of the technique and major clinical applications of WB-MRI in children with cancer will be discussed.

  8. PAEDIATRIC OCULAR TRAUMA IN KUCHING, SARAWAK, MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    INTAN G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the demography, aetiology, type and outcome of paediatric ocular trauma in tertiary centre in Malaysia. Method: We retrospectively studied 118 eyes from 117 patients over a period of 36 months (January 2006 to December 2008. All ocular injuries in patients aged 12 and below seen in the Ophthalmology Department for the first time were included in thisstudy. Results: Mean age of patients was 6.1±3.0 years. 68 cases (58.2% occurred in pre-school children, whereas 49 (41.9% in school-aged children. Boys accounted for 65.8% of cases. There was no predilection for either right or the left eye. 47% of cases (56 patients occurred in Malay. Most of the injuries took place at home when the children were alone (p<0.05. Sharp objects were the commonest cause (45 cases, 38.1%. The majority of cases (103, 87.3% were considered preventable. The frequency of open and closed globe injury was similar. Hyphema was more common in closed globe injury compared to open globe injury (p<0.05. Other associated injuries such as cataract, vitreous hemorrhage and retinal hemorrhage are similar between the two groups. Visual outcome is generally poor with only 34 eyes (28.8% had no visual impairment. Conclusion: Ocular trauma in children is an important cause of visual loss. Most cases occurred at home and were preventable. Prevention through education is the best approach.

  9. Steam vaporizers: A danger for paediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonie, Sarah; Baker, Paul; Teixeira, Rodrigo

    2016-12-01

    Steam vaporizers are used to humidify air in dry environments. They are marketed to moisten children's airway secretions and thus to help relieve symptoms associated with upper respiratory tract infections. Unfortunately the steam emitted from the unit can also pose a significant risk of burns to children. Our study aimed to ascertain patterns of injury and treatment outcomes from steam burns resulting from these devices. Potential preventative measures are discussed. Children who had sustained vaporizer scald burns were identified at the outpatient burns clinic over a 10-month period (November 2014-August 2015). Medical records were reviewed retrospectively and data collected on pattern of injury, management and outcomes. Ten children were treated for vaporizer steam burns over the study period. The mean age was 1.6 years and 8 (80%) patients were male. Operative intervention was undergone in 5 (50%) cases; four acutely and one as a secondary reconstructive procedure. Hand burns accounted for 8 (80%) of cases. Steam vaporizers can cause significant burns in the paediatric population. Toddlers were most at risk, frequently sustaining hand burns that underwent skin grafting. Greater public awareness of the danger is indicated and measures to prevent such injuries should be addressed by appropriate authorities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  10. Paediatric analgesia in an Emergency Department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hawkes, C

    2012-02-03

    Timely management of pain in paediatric patients in the Emergency Department (ED) is a well-accepted performance indicator. We describe an audit of the provision of analgesia for children in an Irish ED and the introduction of a nurse-initiated analgesia protocol in an effort to improve performance. 95 children aged 1-16 presenting consecutively to the ED were included and time from triage to analgesia, and the rate of analgesia provision, were recorded. The results were circulated and a nurse initiated analgesia protocol was introduced. An audit including 145 patients followed this. 55.6% of patients with major fractures received analgesia after a median time of 54 minutes, which improved to 61.1% (p = 0.735) after 7 minutes (p = 0.004). Pain score documentation was very poor throughout, improving only slightly from 0% to 19.3%. No child had a documented pain score, which slightly improved to 19.3%. We recommend other Irish EDs to audit their provision of analgesia for children.

  11. Radionuclide studies in paediatric nephro-urology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepsz, Amy E-mail: amypiepsz@yahoo.com

    2002-08-01

    The main tool of radionuclide techniques applied to paediatric uro-nephrology is the quantitation of function, which is an information not easily obtained by other diagnostic modalities. The radiation burden is low. Drug sedation is only rarely needed, whatever the age of the patient. Accurate determination of glomerular filtration rate can be obtained by means of an intravenous injection of Cr-51 EDTA and one or two blood samples. Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy is an accurate method for evaluation of regional cortical impairment during acute pyelonephritis and later on, for detection of permanent scarring. Tc-99m MAG3 renography is nowadays a well-standardized method for accurate estimation of the split renal function and of renal drainage with or without furosemide challenge. This technique is particularly indicated in uni- or bilateral uropathies with or without renal and/or ureteral dilatation. Direct and indirect radionuclide cystography are two alternative modalities for X-ray MCUG. Their relative place in the strategy of management of vesicoureteral reflux is discussed.

  12. Diagnostic accuracy on the management of acute paediatric urinary tract infection in a general paediatric unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fahisham Taib; Bakht Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain diagnostic accuracy of paediatric urinary tract infection (UTI) in a general paediatric unit of a district hospital. Methods: Retrospective case note review and comparing to the final computerised database of Human in-Patient Enquiry (HIPE) at Portiuncula Hospital, Galway, Ireland. All children from 0-16 years of age with the diagnosis of UTI were enrolled within the 3 year study period. The information was first retrieved from HIPE system to capture list of patients. Case notes revision was followed to extract data under standardized pro-forma for demography, accuracy of diagnosis, treatment instituted and investigation ordered. Patients’ data was reviewed according to updated definition. Results: There were 85 cases treated for UTI during the 3 year period, and only 45 cases were considered as genuine UTI according to diagnostic criteria. Out of 45 cases, 16 cases were considered as suspected UTI cases. Escherichia coli was noted to be the commonest organism. Cephradine has been used as the first line treatment as per local guideline;however, different antibiotic regimes were based on physician’s preferences. The sensitivity of the current method of UTI diagnosis remained at 64%when comparing final diagnosis in the HIPE system. Conclusions: UTI can be difficult to accurately diagnosis in certain clinical cases. Decisions made should be individualized and tailored according to clinical suspicion and presentation of the patients. Improvement to ensure accurate diagnosis is vital to ensure correct data capture in the HIPE system thus giving valuable information and resource for future care.

  13. Patient Doses in Paediatric Fluoroscopic Examinations in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servomaa, A.; Komppa, T.; Heikkila, M.; Parviainen, T

    2000-07-01

    Dose-area products (DAP) in paediatric fluoroscopic examinations were measured at paediatric clinics in three university hospitals. The purpose was to provide supplementary data for development of reference doses, and for determination of relations between patient size and dose, in examinations involving both radiography and fluoroscopy for paediatric patients of various ages. The number of paediatric patients was 217. The most common fluoroscopic examinations were: micturating cystourethrography (MCU), 103 patients; barium enema (anography), 39 patients; barium meal and follow, 20 patients; and oesophagus, nine patients. Data on the patients and examination techniques, and the dose-area products are reported for various examinations and age groups. In the MCU examinations the mean DAP values were 560 mGy.cm{sup 2} for the age group of 0 years: 910 mGy.cm{sup 2} for the age group of 1-4 years; 880 mGy.cm{sup 2} for the age group of 5-9 years; and 4600 mGy.cm{sup 2} for the age group of 10-15 years. The radiation doses to which paediatric patients are exposed in fluoroscopic examinations vary over a large scale, even within narrow age bands, and comparisons between the doses are difficult because of wide ranges in patient size. This indicates the need for developing a method for taking account of the effects of patients size before deriving reference doses. (author)

  14. Smartphone applications in paediatric radiology: availability and authority

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelmerdine, Susan C. [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Specialist Registrar in Clinical Radiology, Department of Clinical Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Lynch, Jeremy O. [Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, Specialist Registrar in Clinical Radiology, Department of Clinical Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    With the widespread ownership of smartphones, many health care professionals question the degree to which medically related smartphone applications are reliable. To assess the variety of smartphone applications relating to paediatric radiology and the presence of health care professional involvement in their development. As a secondary objective, we explore whether there are gaps within the paediatric radiology app market. The most popular smartphone marketplaces (Apple iTunes App Store, Blackberry Mobile Market, Google Play Android Market, Nokia Ovi, Samsung and Microsoft Windows Marketplace) were searched for terms relating to paediatric radiology. Cost, review ratings, number of downloads, health care involvement and target audience were recorded. Nine paediatric radiology applications were found in the Apple iTunes App Store and nine in the Google Play Android Market. The target audiences for all applications were health care professionals. None were available for patients or their caregivers. All applications were reported to have medical expertise in their development. All paediatric radiology applications were developed with the aid of a health care professional. Due to the small number available online, there is a potential gap in the marketplace for further applications in this field, possibly aimed at patients and their families. (orig.)

  15. Smartphone applications in paediatric radiology: availability and authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelmerdine, Susan C; Lynch, Jeremy O

    2015-08-01

    With the widespread ownership of smartphones, many health care professionals question the degree to which medically related smartphone applications are reliable. To assess the variety of smartphone applications relating to paediatric radiology and the presence of health care professional involvement in their development. As a secondary objective, we explore whether there are gaps within the paediatric radiology app market. The most popular smartphone marketplaces (Apple iTunes App Store, Blackberry Mobile Market, Google Play Android Market, Nokia Ovi, Samsung and Microsoft Windows Marketplace) were searched for terms relating to paediatric radiology. Cost, review ratings, number of downloads, health care involvement and target audience were recorded. Nine paediatric radiology applications were found in the Apple iTunes App Store and nine in the Google Play Android Market. The target audiences for all applications were health care professionals. None were available for patients or their caregivers. All applications were reported to have medical expertise in their development. All paediatric radiology applications were developed with the aid of a health care professional. Due to the small number available online, there is a potential gap in the marketplace for further applications in this field, possibly aimed at patients and their families.

  16. [Immunisation schedule of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics: 2017 recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Pérez, David; Álvarez García, Francisco José; Arístegui Fernández, Javier; Cilleruelo Ortega, María José; Corretger Rauet, José María; García Sánchez, Nuria; Hernández Merino, Ángel; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, Teresa; Merino Moína, Manuel; Ortigosa Del Castillo, Luis; Ruiz-Contreras, Jesús

    2017-02-01

    The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (CAV- AEP) annually publishes the immunisation schedule which, in our opinion, is considered optimal for children resident in Spain, taking into account the evidence available on current vaccines. Pneumococcal and varicella immunisation in early childhood is already included in all funded vaccines present in the regional immunisation programmes. Furthermore, this committee establishes recommendations on vaccines not included in official calendars (non-funded immunisations), such as rotavirus, meningococcal B, and meningococcal ACWY. As regards funded immunisations, 2+1 strategy (2, 4, 11-12 months) with hexavalent (DTaP-IPV-Hib-HB) and 13-valent pneumococcal vaccines is recommended. Administration of the 6-year booster dose with DTaP is recommended, as well as a poliomyelitis dose for children who had received the 2+1 scheme, with the Tdap vaccine for adolescents and pregnant women between 27 and 32 weeks gestation. The two-dose scheme should be used for MMR (12 months and 2-4 years) and varicella (15 months and 2-4 years). Coverage of human papillomavirus vaccination in girls aged 12 with a two-dose scheme (0, 6 months) should be improved. Information and recommendations for male adolescents about potential beneficial effects of the tetravalent HPV vaccine should also be provided. ACWY meningococcal vaccine is the optimal choice in adolescents. For recommended unfunded immunisations, the CAV-AEP recommends the administration of meningococcal B vaccine, due to the current availability in Spanish community pharmacies, with a 3+1 scheme. CAV-AEP requests the incorporation of this vaccine in the funded unified schedule. Vaccination against rotavirus is recommended in all infants. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. [Nutritional assessment in hospitalized children in a Paediatric service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velandia, Silvia; Hodgson, Maria Isabel; Le Roy, Catalina

    Malnutrition in hospitalized children is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. To determine the nutritional status in children admitted to the Hospital Clínico de la Universidad Católica de Chile. A retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted on hospital patients less than 17 years old within the period from November 2010 to April 2011. A record was made of the demographic data, admission diagnosis, biochemistry results (albumin, haemoglobin, haematocrit), hospital stay, and anthropometry data. Nutritional diagnosis was expressed as standard deviation (SD) for weight-for-height (WFH) by WHO in children younger than 5 y, and body mass index (BMI) by CDC-NCHS in older children. Height-for-age (HFA) ≤-2SD indicated stunted growth. A total of 365 children, including 201 boys (55.1%), were evaluated. The median age was 3.35 years (IQR: 1.2-8.2). The most frequent reason for admission was heart disease (30.4%). The median hospital stay was 2 days (IQR: 2.0-4.0). Undernutrition was observed in 3.3% of the children, 8% were nutritionally at risk, 15% were overweight, and 10.9% were obese. As regards HFA, short stature was reported in 12.9%. There was a significant relationship between lower age and heart disease, and higher age with gastrointestinal and neurological diseases. By ordinal logistic regression for each year of age, the weight/height ratio (ZP/T) increases by 6.9% (OR=1.07). The biochemistry results (albumin, haemoglobin and haematocrit levels) were not associated with nutritional status. A high percentage of children at risk of undernutrition was found. The percentage overweight was similar to the general Chilean paediatric population. Early detection will allow an opportune intervention, and nutritional monitoring at discharge. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. [Immunisation schedule of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics: 2016 recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Álvarez García, F J; Arístegui Fernández, J; Cilleruelo Ortega, M J; Corretger Rauet, J M; García Sánchez, N; Hernández Merino, A; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T; Merino Moína, M; Ortigosa del Castillo, L; Ruiz-Contreras, J

    2016-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (CAV-AEP) annually publishes the immunisation schedule which, in our opinion, estimates optimal for children resident in Spain, considering available evidence on current vaccines. We acknowledge the effort of the Ministry of Health during the last year in order to optimize the funded unified Spanish vaccination schedule, with the recent inclusion of pneumococcal and varicella vaccination in early infancy. Regarding the funded vaccines included in the official unified immunization schedule, taking into account available data, CAV-AEP recommends 2+1 strategy (2, 4 and 12 months) with hexavalent (DTPa-IPV-Hib-HB) vaccines and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Administration of Tdap and poliomyelitis booster dose at the age of 6 is recommended, as well as Tdap vaccine for adolescents and pregnant women, between 27-36 weeks gestation. The two-dose scheme should be used for MMR (12 months and 2-4 years) and varicella (15 months and 2-4 years). Coverage of human papillomavirus vaccination in girls aged 11-12 with a two dose scheme (0, 6 months) should be improved. Information for male adolescents about potential beneficial effects of this immunisation should be provided as well. Regarding recommended unfunded immunisations, CAV-AEP recommends the administration of meningococcal B vaccine, due to the current availability in Spanish communitary pharmacies, with a 3+1 scheme (3, 5, 7 and 13-15 months). CAV-AEP requests the incorporation of this vaccine in the funded unified schedule. Vaccination against rotavirus is recommended in all infants. Annual influenza immunisation and vaccination against hepatitis A are indicated in population groups considered at risk.

  19. Paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training program in Latin-America: the RIBEPCI experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Herce, Jesús; Matamoros, Martha M; Moya, Luis; Almonte, Enma; Coronel, Diana; Urbano, Javier; Carrillo, Ángel; Del Castillo, Jimena; Mencía, Santiago; Moral, Ramón; Ordoñez, Flora; Sánchez, Carlos; Lagos, Lina; Johnson, María; Mendoza, Ovidio; Rodriguez, Sandra

    2017-09-12

    To describe the design and to present the results of a paediatric and neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training program adapted to Latin-America. A paediatric CPR coordinated training project was set up in several Latin-American countries with the instructional and scientific support of the Spanish Group for Paediatric and Neonatal CPR. The program was divided into four phases: CPR training and preparation of instructors; training for instructors; supervised teaching; and independent teaching. Instructors from each country participated in the development of the next group in the following country. Paediatric Basic Life Support (BLS), Paediatric Intermediate (ILS) and Paediatric Advanced (ALS) courses were organized in each country adapted to local characteristics. Five Paediatric Resuscitation groups were created sequentially in Honduras (2), Guatemala, Dominican Republican and Mexico. During 5 years, 6 instructors courses (94 students), 64 Paediatric BLS Courses (1409 students), 29 Paediatrics ILS courses (626 students) and 89 Paediatric ALS courses (1804 students) were given. At the end of the program all five groups are autonomous and organize their own instructor courses. Training of autonomous Paediatric CPR groups with the collaboration and scientific assessment of an expert group is a good model program to develop Paediatric CPR training in low- and middle income countries. Participation of groups of different countries in the educational activities is an important method to establish a cooperation network.

  20. The use of the Statscan digital X-ray unit in paediatric polytrauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitcher, Richard D. [University of Cape Town, Division of Paediatric Radiology, Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Cape Town (South Africa); Wilde, Jim C.H. [University of Cape Town, Division of Paediatric Surgery, Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Cape Town (South Africa); University of Amsterdam, Paediatric Surgical Centre of Amsterdam, Emma Children' s Hospital, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Douglas, Tania S. [University of Cape Town, MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, Department of Human Biology, Cape Town (South Africa); As, Arjan Bastiaan van [University of Cape Town, Division of Paediatric Surgery, Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2009-05-15

    We present a 3-year review of clinical paediatric experience with the statscan (Lodox Systems, Johannesburg, South Africa), a low-dose, digital, whole-body, slit-scanning X-ray machine. While focusing on the role of the unit in paediatric polytrauma, insight into its applications in other paediatric settings is provided. (orig.)

  1. The use of the Statscan digital X-ray unit in paediatric polytrauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Richard D; Wilde, Jim C H; Douglas, Tania S; van As, Arjan Bastiaan

    2009-05-01

    We present a 3-year review of clinical paediatric experience with the Statscan (Lodox Systems, Johannesburg, South Africa), a low-dose, digital, whole-body, slit-scanning X-ray machine. While focusing on the role of the unit in paediatric polytrauma, insight into its applications in other paediatric settings is provided.

  2. Preventing deaths from cryptococcal meningitis: from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Monika; Chiller, Tom

    2011-09-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis (CM), a fungal disease caused by Cryptococcus spp., is the most common form of meningitis and a leading cause of death among persons with HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. Detection of cryptococcal antigen, which is present several weeks before overt signs of meningitis develop, provides an opportunity to detect infection early. Screening persons with HIV for cryptococcal infection when they access healthcare can identify asymptomatic infected patients allowing for prompt treatment and prevention of death. A newly developed point-of-care assay for cryptococcal antigen, as well as growing evidence supporting the utility and cost-effectiveness of screening, are further reasons to consider broad implementation of cryptococcal screening in countries with a high burden of cryptococcal disease.

  3. Paediatric radiation oncology in the care of childhood cancer: A position paper by the International Paediatric Radiation Oncology Society (PROS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Freeman, Carolyn; Marcus, Karen; Claude, Line; Dieckmann, Karin; Halperin, Edward; Esiashvili, Natia; Paulino, Arnold; Mahajan, Anita; Seiersen, Klaus; Ahern, Verity; Ricardi, Umberto; Carrie, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Paediatric malignancies are a challenge for the radiation oncologist due to their rarity, the great variety of histological types, and the complexity of treatment concepts that evolve over time. The Paediatric Radiation Oncology Society (PROS) is the only internationally operating society for paediatric radiation oncology. The objectives of PROS are to set a world-wide standard of excellence with respect to radiation oncology aspects in curing children and adolescents with cancer, to provide a forum for communication between radiation oncologists, and to exchange information with all professionals involved in the management of paediatric and adolescent cancer. Challenges include the need to promote education and support practice in low and middle income countries (LMIC) as well as the cost and availability of modern treatment technologies for all but most especially these countries. Collaborations with other societies that include for example the education programmes provided jointly with ESTRO, and the upgraded technical platform of the PROS web site offer new possibilities to enhance the efficacy of PROS in education and support of paediatric radiation oncology practice world-wide. PROS has made an important contribution to the management of childhood malignancies over the past decade and new and developing collaborations between PROS and other societies or organizations will ultimately lead to a reduction in world-wide health care inequalities.

  4. Feasibility, appropriateness, meaningfulness and effectiveness of patient participation at bedside shift reporting: mixed-method research protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfait, Simon; Eeckloo, Kristof; Lust, Elisa; Van Biesen, Wim; Van Hecke, Ann

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, appropriateness, meaningfulness and effectiveness of bedside shift reporting in a minimum of five interventions and five control wards. Hospitals continually improve their quality of care. Next to improvements in clinical performance, more patient participation is stimulated through different methods. Methods to enhance patient participation such as bedside shift reporting lack rigorously performed research to determine their feasibility, appropriateness, meaningfulness and effectiveness. Small-scale research and a previous pilot study indicate that bedside shift reporting improves patient participation, nurse-nurse communication and nurse-patient communication. The development, implementation and evaluation of bedside shift report are based on the Medical Research Council framework for complex interventions in health care. A matched, controlled, mixed-method, longitudinal study design will be used. The Feasibility-Appropriateness-Meaningfulness-Effectiveness framework will be applied for the quantitative and qualitative evaluation of bedside shift report. A tailored intervention and implementation process for bedside shift report will be developed using diagnostic interviews, co-design and acceptability testing. The intervention will be evaluated before implementation and three times after implementation. Individual and focus group interviews will be performed. Questionnaires, observations and analysis of the medical records and administrative databases will be completed. This study was funded in October 2015. Research Ethics Committee approval was granted in March 2016. There is a pressing need for rigorous research into the effects of interventions for improving patient participation. This study addresses the significance of bedside shift report as an intervention to improve quality of care, communication and patient participation within a large-scale, matched, controlled research design. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Patient centric formulations for paediatrics and geriatrics: Similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanning, Sara M; Lopez, Felipe L; Wong, Ian C K; Ernest, Terry B; Tuleu, Catherine; Orlu Gul, Mine

    2016-10-30

    Paediatrics and geriatrics both represent highly heterogenous populations and require special consideration when developing appropriate dosage forms. This paper discusses similarities, differences and considerations with respect to the development of appropriate medicine formulations for paediatrics and geriatrics. Arguably the most significant compliance challenge in older people is polypharmacy, whereas for children the largest barrier is taste. Pharmaceutical technology has progressed rapidly and technologies including FDCs, multi-particulates and orodispersible dosage forms provide unprecedented opportunities to develop novel and appropriate formulations for both old and new drugs. However, it is important for the formulation scientists to work closely with patients, carers and clinicians to develop such formulations for both the paediatric and geriatric population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Review of simulation in paediatrics: The evolution of a revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul eOjha

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent changes in medical education have highlighted the importance of experiential learning. Simulation is one model that has gained significant attention in the last decade and has been widely adopted as a training and assessment tool in medical education. Paediatric simulation has been utilized to teach various skills including resuscitation and trauma management, procedural skills and team training. It is also a valuable tool for health care educators, as it allows learners to achieve competence without putting patients at risk. Recent literature demonstrates increased retention of knowledge and skills after simulation based training. Further research is required to improve current simulation curriculums, develop validated assessment tools and to demonstrate improved clinical outcomes after simulation based training. We conducted an online search of original and review articles related to simulation and paediatric medical education and provide an overview of the role and utility of simulation in paediatrics.

  7. A field guide to current advances in paediatric movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira-Moriyama, Laura; Lin, Jean-Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Recent advances in neurogenetics, neuroimmunology and nonpharmacological treatments have reshaped the field of paediatric movement disorders. In this review, we put recent findings into context providing a framework to enable navigation of the expanding literature in this field. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis has proven to be a significant cause of treatable movement disorder in children and to present a multifaceted link with herpes simplex encephalitis. The growing use of next-generation sequencing in both research and clinical practice has unravelled an expanding number of genes related to paediatric movement disorders as well as expanding spectrums of variable expressivity and phenotypic pleiotropy for various genes. Behavioural therapies have been proven efficacious in Tourette's syndrome and are likely to be helpful in complex motor stereotypies. Management of dystonia remains a clinical priority and challenge. The rapid advance of translational medicine has had major impacts on the field of paediatric movement disorders including diagnosis and treatment of these conditions.

  8. Paediatric ED BiPAP continuous quality improvement programme with patient analysis: 2005–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramo, Thomas; Williams, Abby; Mushtaq, Samaiya; Meredith, Mark; Sepaule, Rawle; Crossman, Kristen; Burney Jones, Cheryl; Godbold, Suzanne; Hu, Zhuopei; Nick, Todd

    2017-01-01

    hours. Conclusions BiPAP is a safe and effective therapeutic option for paediatric patients with asthma presenting to a PED or emergency department. This BiPAP CQIP showed significant patient compliance, no complications, improved therapeutics times, very low intubations and decreased PICU admissions. CQIP analysis demonstrated that using a higher IPAP, low EPAP with longer I:E optimises the patient's BiPAP settings and showed a significant improvement in PAS, RR and tidal volume. BiPAP should be considered as an early treatment in the PED severe or non-responsive moderate asthmatics. PMID:28093429

  9. Paediatric surgery: trends in UK surgical trainees' operative experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngson, G G; Adams, S; Winton, E

    2006-02-01

    This study assesses the effects of the reconfiguration of postgraduate surgical training and changes to work patterns through legislation within UK on the operative experience of trainees completing specialty training in paediatric surgery. Data were collected from the consolidation record of operative experience submitted by every candidate sitting the Intercollegiate Specialty Board Examination in Paediatric Surgery in UK from 1996 through 2004. A number of index procedures were chosen as surrogates of the overall operative experience and underwent detailed analysis. These comprised operations performed in the following categories: Neonatal Surgery, General Paediatric Surgery, Paediatric Urology, Paediatric Oncology, and Emergency Paediatric Surgery. Sixty-three sets of data comprising 12,866 operations were ultimately identified as being suitable for analysis. The average number of operations performed annually by trainees increased over the study period as did the number in each of the operative categories. The number of operations performed with senior assistance or supervision increased over this period by an average of 12.5%. This trend was also evident in emergency surgery where the average number of sample procedures performed by trainees increased by 28% over the study period. In 1995, reforms to the training grade within UK reduced the time spent in specialist training from a previously unregulated period to 72 months of higher surgical training. Subsequent directives in response to health and safety legislation have further abbreviated the length of time spent at the workplace, initially to 72 hours and more recently to 58 hours per week. This combination has been generally perceived throughout the surgical community as prejudicial to acquisition of clinical and operative competence. This study, however, fails to endorse this perception and suggests to the contrary that perhaps through increased delegation, the volume of training operations is being

  10. Collaboration between paediatric surgery and other medical specialties in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philemon E Okoro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The quality of service and success of patient care and research in most fields of medicine depend on effective collaboration between different specialties. Paediatric surgery is a relatively young specialty in Nigeria and such collaborations are desirable. This survey assesses the nature and extent of collaboration between paediatric surgery and other specialties in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This is a questionnaire survey carried out in November 2008 among paediatric surgeons and their trainees practising in Nigeria. Questionnaires were distributed and retrieved either by hand or e-mailing. The responses were then collated and analysed using the SPSS 17.0. Results: Forty-seven respondents were included in the survey. Forty-five (95.7% respondents thought that there was inadequate collaboration and that there was a need for an increased collaboration between paediatric surgery and other specialties. Anaesthesia, paediatrics and radiology are among the specialties where collaborations were most required but not adequately received. Collaboration had been required from these specialties in areas of patient care, training and research. Reasons for inadequate collaboration included the paucity of avenues for inter-specialty communication and exchange of ideas 33 (70.3%, lack of awareness of the need for collaboration 32 (68.1%, tendency to apportion blames for bad outcome 13 (27.7%, and mutual suspicion 8 (17%. Conclusion: There is presently inadequate collaboration between paediatric surgery and other specialties in Nigeria. There is a need for more inter-specialty support, communication, and exchange of ideas in order to achieve desirable outcomes.

  11. Neglected Foreign Body, the Cause of Navicular Osteomyelitis in A Paediatric Foot: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrashekara C.M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Foreign body injuries with date thorns, metal and wooden splinters are common in Middle East region, as most of it is desert. Some of the injuries lead to cellulitis or abscess formation, if neglected or improperly managed results in osteomyelitis or septic arthritis of foot structures. This is the first report of isolated navicular osteomyelitis following neglected foreign body in a paediatric foot. Case Report: A 10 year old male patient presented with discharging sinus in left mid-foot 3 years after penetrating injury with wooden splinter. The diagnosis of navicular osteomelitis is confirmed with plain radio-graphs. The ultrasound of foot was done to localize the foreign bodies. Patient was treated with complete removal of foreign body (wooden splinters, surgical debridement and combination of IV and oral cloxacillin for period of 6 weeks. At 18 months follow up, patient had painless foot with no recurrence or collapse of navicular bone. Conclusion: The neglected foreign body can result in osteomyelitis of small bones of foot in pediatric patient. The ultrasound is more useful tool in localizing foreign bodies; those are not radio-opaque. Early and prompt diagnosis with adequate treatment of established osteomyelitis by complete removal of foreign body, curettage and antibiotics can give good results. Keywords: Osteomyelitis; Navicular bone; Foreign body; Paediatric.

  12. Novel use of a supraclavicular transverse cervical artery customised perforator flap: a paediatric emergency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dolan, R T

    2013-08-01

    Perforation of the piriform fossa is a rare, potentially life-threatening paediatric emergency. Prompt diagnosis and early operative intervention is key to patient survival, yet restoring aerodigestive continuity can pose a significant reconstructive challenge. A seven-month old baby girl presented to an emergency department acutely unwell with a twenty-four-hour history of haemoptysis, cough and worsening respiratory distress. A contrast swallow demonstrated extension of contrast into the retropharyngeal region necessitating immediate surgical intervention. A 3.0 cm×1.0 cm perforation within the left posterolateral piriform fossa was identified. The defect was repaired with a supraclavicular transverse cervical artery customised perforator flap. This was inset into the piriform fossa luminal defect as a life-saving procedure. Following a stormy post-operative course, the child was discharged home on day 28 of admission and admitted electively 6 weeks later for division of flap pedicle. This case highlights the novel use of this fasciocutaneous island flap to reconstruct an extensive, potentially fatal, piriform fossa defect in an acute paediatric setting. This simple flap design offers timely mobilisation, reliable blood supply, adequate tenuity and surface area, to reconstruct this extensive defect as a life-saving intervention in a profoundly septic child.

  13. Dual bolus intravenous contrast injection technique for multiregion paediatric body CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Karen E.; Mann, E.H.; Padfield, N.; Greco, L.; BenDavid, G. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Alzahrani, A. [King Abdulaziz Medical City, PO Box 22490, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-04-01

    Optimal vascular and parenchymal enhancement for multi-region paediatric body computed tomography (CT) has many challenges. A variety of approaches are currently employed, associated with varying image quality and radiation dose implications. We present a dual bolus intravenous (DBI) contrast technique for single-acquisition imaging of the chest, abdomen and pelvis, with evaluation of multi-compartmental vascular enhancement. A DBI regime was designed for use with a programmable dual head pump injector. A larger initial bolus (two-thirds volume) is followed by a smaller bolus (one-third volume) before imaging the chest, abdomen and pelvis in a single acquisition, 45-65 seconds from the start of initial injection. Flow rates and second bolus timing were tailored to patient weight and contrast volume, using five weight categories. Multi-compartmental vascular opacification was graded and image quality was assessed in a cohort of 130 patients. The DBI technique resulted in concordant multi-compartmental (thoracic aortic, pulmonary arterial, abdominal aortic and portal venous) vascular enhancement. Early splenic parenchymal enhancement artefacts and alterations to renal enhancement were observed. We present a weight-stratified dual bolus intravenous contrast technique to improve image quality in paediatric multi-region body CT. (orig.)

  14. Imaging guided interventional procedures in paediatric uroradiology--a case based overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riccabona, M. E-mail: michael.riccabona@kfunigraz.ac.at; Sorantin, E.; Hausegger, K

    2002-08-01

    Objective: To describe the potential and application of interventional image guided procedures in the paediatric urinary tract. Patients and methods: The different techniques are illustrated using case reports. The examples comprise established indications such as percutaneous nephrostomy for compromised kidneys in obstructive uropathy and infection, sonographic guided renal biopsy including monitoring or treatment of complications after biopsy, and evaluation and balloon dilatation of childhood renal artery stenosis. There are new applications such as treatment of stenosis in cutaneous ureterostomy or sonographically guided catheterism for deployment of therapeutic agents. Results: Generally, the procedures are safe and successful. However, complications may occur, and peri-/post-interventional monitoring is mandatory to insure early detection and adequate management. Sometimes additional treatment such as percutaneous embolisation of a symptomatic post biopsy arterio-venous fistula, or a second biopsy for recurrent disease may become necessary. Conclusion: Imaging guided interventional procedures are performed successfully in a variety of diseases of the paediatric urinary tract. They can be considered a valuable additional modality throughout infancy and childhood.

  15. Paediatric dissecting posterior cerebral aneurysms: report of two cases and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilela, Pedro; Goulao, Augusto [Garcia de Orta Hospital, Neuroradiology Department, Almada (Portugal)

    2006-08-15

    Intracranial aneurysms in the paediatric population are uncommon, accounting for 2% to 6% of all aneurysms, and spontaneous arterial dissection is rarely reported as the cause of aneurysms in children, especially in the posterior cerebral artery. Two cases of paediatric spontaneous posterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysms are reported, one in a 33-month-old male child presenting with aneurysmal rupture and subarachnoid haemorrhage and the other in a 9-year-old boy with an unruptured aneurysm. The first child was successfully treated by endovascular parent vessel occlusion without neurological deficit and in the second a spontaneous thrombosis of the aneurysm and its parent artery occurred associated with hydrocephalus and a favourable outcome. Dissecting aneurysms are dynamic lesions with variable and unpredictable evolution and close follow-up and/or early treatment is warranted. Spontaneous arterial dissection is a rare, probably still under-recognized, cause of intracranial aneurysms that may be responsible for a significant number of aneurysms and spontaneous aneurysmal thromboses in children. (orig.)

  16. Assessment of paediatric hydronephrosis using output efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saundres, C.A.B.; Choong, K.K.L.; Gruenewald, S.M. [Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW (Australia). Dept of Nuclear Medicine

    1998-03-01

    Full text: Diuretic renography is an important tool in the evaluation of paediatric hydronephrosis. Recently a newly developed parameter, output efficiency (OE) has allowed normalisation of washout according to renal function. We retrospectively reviewed the diagnostic accuracy of OE in 56 children (70 hydronephrotic kidneys). There were 16 females and 41 males (mean age 1.4 years, range 3 weeks-12 years). Diuretic renography ({sup 99m}Tc-MAG3) was performed using i.v. volume expansion (15 mL/kg), frusemide diuresis (1mg/kg) and urethral catheterisation if VUR was present. Final diagnosis was made using surgery (n = 15) or clinical outcome (n = 42). Clinical follow up exceeded one year and included repeat MAG3 scan (n = 20), resolving hydronephrosis on ultrasound (n = 15) or percutaneous antegrade pyelogram (n = 1). Initial scans were classified as obstructed (n 13), indeterminate (n = 13) or non obstructed (n = 30) based on standard qualitative and quantitative criteria. Using a normal range of >84%, OE correctly predicted 12/13 (92%) obstructed kidneys and 44/44 non-obstructed kidneys (100%). In the indeterminate group, three kidneys developed obstruction at follow -up and 10 became non obstructed. Initial OE predicted outcome in two and four kidneys respectively. Overall, OE sensitivity and specificity were 88% and 89%. In the subgroup of patients (n = 19) with reduced differential function (<40%) the sensitivity of OE was 100% and specificity was 75%. This compares to 83% and 66% for Tl/2 in this subgroup. Therefore OE is a useful marker of renal outflow tract obstruction and maybe superior to other parameters such as Tl/2 particularly when renal function is reduced. 1 tab.

  17. Nasotracheal intubation depth in paediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, M; Dullenkopf, A; Schmidt, A R; Gerber, A; Weiss, M

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare intubation depth using the Microcuff paediatric endotracheal tube (PET) placed with the intubation depth mark between the vocal cords with that of different published formulae/recommendations for nasotracheal intubation depth in children. Children aged from birth to 10 yr undergoing elective surgery with nasotracheal intubation were included. Tracheal tubes were adjusted according to the intubation depth mark between the vocal cords using direct laryngoscopy. Nasal intubation depth was recorded and the distance 'tube tip to carina' was measured endoscopically. Based on the recorded nasal intubation depth and measured distance 'tube tip to carina', the position of tube tip and cuff was calculated according to six published formulae/recommendations. Seventy-six children were studied. For the Microcuff PET, the median tube tip advancement within the trachea was 52.9% (41.1-73.8%) of tracheal length. The shortest distance from the 'tube tip to carina' was 15 mm for a 3.5 mm internal diameter tube. If the six published formulae/recommendations had been used, this would have resulted in endobronchial tube placement in up to 9.1% of cases, and the tube tip would have been placed above the glottis in up to 2.6% of cases. The upper border of the cuff would have been placed in the subglottic area in up to 42.1% of cases and in a supraglottic position in up to 63.2% of cases. This study indicates that nasal intubation with the intubation depth mark placed between the vocal cords was superior to formula-based nasotracheal tube positioning. The latter would result in a high rate of endobronchial intubations, excessively high cuff positions and even tracheal extubations. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Portfolios for assessment of paediatric specialist registrars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, C; Rees, M; Brookfield, D; Anderson, J

    2004-10-01

    In 1997 the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health introduced portfolios to guide and monitor the learning of specialist registrars. We studied their value for assessment. Using Bigg's SOLO criteria we devised a marking scheme based on 6 domains of competence: clinical, communication, teaching and learning, ethics and attitudes, management and evaluation, and creation of evidence. We rated portfolios according to quality of evidence presented and expectations by year of training. We similarly assessed trainee performance in the annual record of in-training assessment (RITA) interview. Specific advice based on the results of the first portfolio assessments was circulated to all trainees, instructing them to increase the structure and decrease the bulk of portfolios. A second sample of portfolios was reviewed a year later, using similar evaluations, to determine the effects. A total of 76 portfolios were assessed in year 1 by a single rater; 30 portfolios were assessed in year 2 by 2 independent raters. The quality of documentation improved from year 1 to year 2 but there was no significant increase in portfolio scores. The inter-rater correlation coefficient of the portfolio assessment method was 0.52 (Cohen's kappa 0.35). The inter-rater correlation coefficient of the RITA interview was 0.71 (Cohen's kappa 0.38). There was moderate inter-assessment correlation between portfolios and RITA interviews (kappa 0.26 in year 1 and 0.29 in year 2). Generalisability analysis suggested that 5 successive ratings by a single observer or independent ratings by 4 observers on the same occasion would be needed to yield a generalisability coefficient > 0.8 for overall portfolio rating. This method of portfolio assessment is insufficiently reliable as a sole method for high stakes, single-instance assessment, but has a place as part of a triangulation process. Repeated portfolio assessment by paired observers would increase reliability. Longer term studies are required to

  19. Paediatric intraventricular meningiomas. A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Ramraje

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Meningiomas are rare in children comprising less than 3% of paediatric brain tumours and only 1.5-1.8% of all intracranial neoplasms. Intraventricular meningiomas (IVM account for 0.5-5% of all meningiomas. They arise in the ventricles from arachnoid cap cells contained within the choroid plexus, the tela choroidea, or the velum interpositum. Paediatric tumours also show an association with neurofibromatosis type 2 and previous radiation exposure.We present two cases of intraventricular meningiomas, both in children. The age and site of the lesion in the two cases are uncommon. Excision of the lesions caused a total subsidence of the symptoms with no reported recurrences.

  20. Demographics of paediatric renal replacement therapy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chesnaye, Nicholas; Bonthuis, Marjolein; Schaefer, Franz;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ESPN/ERA-EDTA Registry collects data on European children with end-stage renal disease receiving renal replacement therapy (RRT) who are listed on national and regional renal registries in Europe. In this paper we report on the analysis of demographic data collected from 2009...... to 2011. METHODS: Data on primary renal disease, incidence, prevalence, 4-year survival, transplantation rate and causes of death in paediatric patients receiving RRT were extracted from the ESPN/ERA-EDTA Registry for 37 European countries. RESULTS: The incidence of RRT in paediatric patients in Europe...

  1. Clinical competence in developmental-behavioural paediatrics: raising the bar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Mick

    2014-01-01

    For our specialist paediatric workforce to be suitably equipped to deal with current childhood morbidity, a high level of competence in developmental-behavioural paediatrics (DBP) is necessary. New models of training and assessment are required to meet this challenge. An evolution of training in DBP, built around the centrepiece of competency-based medical education, is proposed. Summative assessment based upon entrustable professional activities, and a menu of formative workplace-based assessments specific to the DBP context are key components. A pilot project to develop and implement these changes is recommended.

  2. Computational hybrid anthropometric paediatric phantom library for internal radiation dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Tianwu; Kuster, Niels; Zaidi, Habib

    2017-01-01

    covering statistical distributions of body morphometry in the paediatric population. The paediatric phantoms of the Virtual Population Series (IT'IS Foundation, Switzerland) were modified to match target anthropometric parameters, including body mass, body length, standing height and sitting height...... to create 1100 female and male phantoms with 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th body morphometries. Evaluation was performed qualitatively using 3D visualization and quantitatively by analysing internal organ masses. Overall, the newly generated phantoms appear very reasonable and representative of the main...

  3. Radiographic appearances of uncommon paediatric implants and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urquia, Arlen; Watson, Tom A.; Arthurs, Owen J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    As childhood survival of chronic illness improves, long-term implanted devices will be encountered more frequently in routine radiology. In our paediatric tertiary referral hospital, we have come across several types of implanted devices that were not confidently recognised or identified by front-line staff and were often only identified by discussion with the patient, family or clinical team. This pictorial review highlights the appearance of nonvascular devices on paediatric radiographs in order to help clinicians identify the most frequent complications and to improve awareness of these important devices. (orig.)

  4. Pseudoachondroplasia/COMP - translating from the bench to the bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey, Karen LaShea; Alcorn, Joseph L; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2014-07-01

    Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by disproportionate short stature, small hands and feet, abnormal joints and early onset osteoarthritis. PSACH is caused by mutations in thrombospondin-5 (TSP-5, also known as cartilage oligomeric matrix protein or COMP), a pentameric extracellular matrix protein primarily expressed in chondrocytes and musculoskeletal tissues. The thrombospondin gene family is composed of matricellular proteins that associate with the extracellular matrix (ECM) and regulate processes in the matrix. Mutations in COMP interfere with calcium-binding, protein conformation and export to the extracellular matrix, resulting in inappropriate intracellular COMP retention. This accumulation of misfolded protein is cytotoxic and triggers premature death of chondrocytes during linear bone growth, leading to shortened long bones. Both in vitro and in vivo models have been employed to study the molecular processes underlying development of the PSACH pathology. Here, we compare the strengths and weaknesses of current mouse models of PSACH and discuss how the resulting phenotypes may be translated to clinical therapies.

  5. The Virtual Liver Network: systems understanding from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henney, Adriano; Coaker, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Adriano Henney speaks to Hannah Coaker, Commissioning Editor. After achieving a PhD in medicine and spending many years in academic research in the field of cardiovascular disease, Adriano Henney was recruited by Zeneca Pharmaceuticals from a British Heart Foundation Senior Fellowship, where he led the exploration of new therapeutic approaches in atherosclerosis, specifically focusing on his research interests in vascular biology. Following the merger with Astra to form AstraZeneca, Henney became responsible for exploring strategic improvements to the company's approaches to pharmaceutical target identification and the reduction of attrition in early development, directing projects across research sites and across functional project teams in the USA, Sweden and the UK. This resulted in the creation of a new multidisciplinary department that focused on pathway mapping, modeling and simulation and supporting projects across research and development, which evolved into the establishment of the practice of systems biology within the company. Here, projects prototyped the application of mechanistic disease-modeling approaches in order to support the discovery of innovative new medicines, such as Iressa®. Since leaving AstraZeneca, Henney has continued his interest in systems biology, synthetic biology and systems medicine through his company, Obsidian Biomedical Consulting Ltd. He now directs a major €50 million German national flagship program – the Virtual Liver Network – which is currently the largest systems biology program in Europe.

  6. Metabotropic glutamate receptors: From the workbench to the bedside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, F.; Bockaert, J.; Collingridge, G.L.; Conn, P.J.; Ferraguti, F.; Schoepp, D.D.; Wroblewski, J.T.; Pin, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors were discovered in the mid 1980s and originally described as glutamate receptors coupled to polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis. Almost 6500 articles have been published since then, and subtype-selective mGlu receptor ligands are now under clinical development for the treatment of a variety of disorders such as Fragile-X syndrome, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias, generalized anxiety disorder, chronic pain, and gastroesophageal reflux disorder. Prof. Erminio Costa was linked to the early times of the mGlu receptor history, when a few research groups challenged the general belief that glutamate could only activate ionotropic receptors and all metabolic responses to glutamate were secondary to calcium entry. This review moves from those nostalgic times to the most recent advances in the physiology and pharmacology of mGlu receptors, and highlights the role of individual mGlu receptor subtypes in the pathophysiology of human disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Trends in Neuropharmacology: In Memory of Erminio Costa’. PMID:21036182

  7. Pannexin: from discovery to bedside in 11±4 years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Gerhard; Keane, Robert W

    2012-12-03

    Pannexin1 (Panx1) originally was discovered as a gap junction related protein. However, rather than forming the cell-to-cell channels of gap junctions, Panx1 forms a mechanosensitive and highly ATP permeable channel in the cell membrane allowing the exchange of molecules between the cytoplasm and the extracellular space. The list of arguments for Panx1 representing the major ATP release channel includes: (1) Panx1 is expressed in (all?) cells releasing ATP in a non-vesicular fashion, such as erythrocytes; (2) in cells with polar release of ATP, Panx1 is expressed at the ATP release site, such as the apical membrane in airway epithelial cells; (3) the pharmacology of Panx1 channels matches that of ATP release; (4) mutation of Panx1 in strategic positions in the protein modifies ATP release; and (5) knockdown or knockout of Panx1 attenuates or abolishes ATP release. Panx1, in association with the purinergic receptor P2X7, is involved in the innate immune response and in apoptotic/pyroptotic cell death. Inflammatory processes are responsible for amplification of the primary lesion in CNS trauma and stroke. Panx1, as an early signal event and as a signal amplifier in these processes, is an obvious target for the prevention of secondary cell death due to inflammasome activity. Since Panx1 inhibitors such as probenecid are already clinically tested in different settings they should be considered for therapy in stroke and CNS trauma.

  8. Bedside echocardiography in internal medicine: which are the key questions and answers for our decision-making?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Cogliati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The advent of portable equipment in the last years has brought ultrasound (US technology available at patient bedside, giving the opportunity to non-cardiologists to extend cardiac assessment based on physical examination. Bedside echocardiography is a question-driven examination, where simple and often dichotomous answers are searched. It is performed using phased-array probes and bi-dimensional images are visually evaluated to obtain information regarding cardiac size and function, presence of pericardial effusion, gross valvular diseases. Although this approach cannot in any case substitute a standard 2D color-Doppler echocardiography, bedside echocardiography has been demonstrated to maintain a good diagnostic accuracy when limited to basic questions, even in the hands of short-trained non cardiologist physicians. At present the bedside US approach is widely used in different settings and focused echocardiography takes part together with US explorations of lung, abdomen and deep veins in an integrated perspective that perfectly fits with the holistic approach of the internist. In this context we address two typical scenarios encountered in the internal medicine divisions - the patient presenting with dyspnea or nonpost- traumatic hypotension - showing the main questions we can ask to bedside echocardiography for a rapid identification of the determinants of symptoms and consequently for a therapeutic choice based on more objective evidence.

  9. Intercostal Artery Laceration: Rare Complication of Thoracentesis and Role of Ultrasound in Early Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissam Mansour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemothorax is a rare but potentially fatal postthoracentesis complication. Early clinical signs may be nonspecific resulting in diagnostic delay. A high index of suspicion is vital for early diagnosis and intervention to avoid further bleeding. Following procedure, early bedside ultrasound findings can be vital for early detection. We report a case of massive hemothorax in a 63-year-old male following therapeutic thoracentesis. Diagnosis was made following highly suggestive sonographic findings prompting thoracotomy and lacerated intercostal artery cauterization.

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of bedside tests for predicting difficult intubation in Indian population: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanger, Sangeeta; Gupta, Suman Lata; Vinayagam, Stalin; Bidkar, Prasanna Udupi; Elakkumanan, Lenin Babu; Badhe, Ashok Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Unanticipated difficult intubation can be challenging to anesthesiologists, and various bedside tests have been tried to predict difficult intubation. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of difficult intubation in the Indian population and also to determine the diagnostic accuracy of bedside tests in predicting difficult intubation. In this study, 200 patients belonging to age group 18-60 years of American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II, scheduled for surgery under general anesthesia requiring endotracheal intubation were enrolled. Patients with upper airway pathology, neck mass, and cervical spine injury were excluded from the study. An attending anesthesiologist conducted preoperative assessment and recorded parameters such as body mass index, modified Mallampati grading, inter-incisor distance, neck circumference, and thyromental distance (NC/TMD). After standard anesthetic induction, laryngoscopy was performed, and intubation difficulty assessed using intubation difficulty scale on the basis of seven variables. The Chi-square test or student t-test was performed when appropriate. The binary multivariate logistic regression (forward-Wald) model was used to determine the independent risk factors. Among the 200 patients, 26 patients had difficult intubation with an incidence of 13%. Among different variables, the Mallampati score and NC/TMD were independently associated with difficult intubation. Receiver operating characteristic curve showed a cut-off point of 3 or 4 for Mallampati score and 5.62 for NC/TMD to predict difficult intubation. The diagnostic accuracy of NC/TM ratio and Mallampatti score were better compared to other bedside tests to predict difficult intubation in Indian population.

  11. Bedside tomographic scintigraphy: a diagnostic tool in intensive care and the emergency room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone, Dianna; Persson, Mikael; Ribbe, Tommy; Dale, Susanne

    2001-09-01

    Scintigraphic tomography (SPECT) with a gamma camera is an established tool for the diagnosis of disturbances in perfusion of the myocardium. The technique has been shown to be useful in the management of patients with acute myocardial infarction. However, SPECT is not widely used for seriously ill patients due to the need to transport the patient to the gamma camera system. In order to make tomography available by the bedside, a form of limited view angle tomography, Ectomography, has been implemented on a mobile gamma camera system. Projection data are acquired by rotating a slant hole collimator in front of the stationary detector and therefore, the head gantry is simple and easily transported. The mobile system is completely self-contained providing acquisition, reconstruction and bedside display. System sensitivity can be increased by using a segmented collimator, making it possible to present reconstructed sections for diagnosis less than 10 min after the start of acquisition. At present, reconstruction is performed with 2D filtered back projection. A comparative study of patients with suspected coronary artery disease has shown that Ectomography and SPECT yield similar diagnostic information. In an experimental study, in which a coronary artery was occluded, it has been possible to use Ectomography to define myocardial area at risk and final infarct size. Myocardial imaging has been performed in the intensive care unit and a pilot study has demonstrated that brain scans can also be performed. Bedside tomographic scintigraphy has been shown to be feasible and studies can be performed without moving the patient. The method should provide, therefore, an alternative to SPECT in intensive care and the emergency room.

  12. From bench to bedside: use of human adipose-derived stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feisst V

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Vaughan Feisst,1 Sarah Meidinger,1 Michelle B Locke2 1Dunbar Laboratory, School of Biological Sciences, 2Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand Abstract: Since the discovery of adipose-derived stem cells (ASC in human adipose tissue nearly 15 years ago, significant advances have been made in progressing this promising cell therapy tool from the laboratory bench to bedside usage. Standardization of nomenclature around the different cell types used is finally being adopted, which facilitates comparison of results between research groups. In vitro studies have assessed the ability of ASC to undergo mesenchymal differentiation as well as differentiation along alternate lineages (transdifferentiation. Recently, focus has shifted to the immune modulatory and paracrine effects of transplanted ASC, with growing interest in the ASC secretome as a source of clinical effect. Bedside use of ASC is advancing alongside basic research. An increasing number of safety-focused Phase I and Phase IIb trials have been published without identifying any significant risks or adverse events in the short term. Phase III trials to assess efficacy are currently underway. In many countries, regulatory frameworks are being developed to monitor their use and assure their safety. As many trials rely on ASC injected at a distant site from the area of clinical need, strategies to improve the homing and efficacy of transplanted cells are also being explored. This review highlights each of these aspects of the bench-to-bedside use of ASC and summarizes their clinical utility across a variety of medical specialties. Keywords: standardization, bystander effect, stromal cells, mesenchymal stem cells, stromal vascular fraction

  13. Bedside tomographic scintigraphy: a diagnostic tool in intensive care and the emergency room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bone, Dianna E-mail: dianna.bone@ks.se; Persson, Mikael; Ribbe, Tommy; Dale, Susanne

    2001-09-21

    Scintigraphic tomography (SPECT) with a gamma camera is an established tool for the diagnosis of disturbances in perfusion of the myocardium. The technique has been shown to be useful in the management of patients with acute myocardial infarction. However, SPECT is not widely used for seriously ill patients due to the need to transport the patient to the gamma camera system. In order to make tomography available by the bedside, a form of limited view angle tomography, Ectomography, has been implemented on a mobile gamma camera system. Projection data are acquired by rotating a slant hole collimator in front of the stationary detector and therefore, the head gantry is simple and easily transported. The mobile system is completely self-contained providing acquisition, reconstruction and bedside display. System sensitivity can be increased by using a segmented collimator, making it possible to present reconstructed sections for diagnosis less than 10 min after the start of acquisition. At present, reconstruction is performed with 2D filtered back projection. A comparative study of patients with suspected coronary artery disease has shown that Ectomography and SPECT yield similar diagnostic information. In an experimental study, in which a coronary artery was occluded, it has been possible to use Ectomography to define myocardial area at risk and final infarct size. Myocardial imaging has been performed in the intensive care unit and a pilot study has demonstrated that brain scans can also be performed. Bedside tomographic scintigraphy has been shown to be feasible and studies can be performed without moving the patient. The method should provide, therefore, an alternative to SPECT in intensive care and the emergency room.

  14. An Evaluation of the Five Most Used Evidence Based Bedside Information Tools in Canadian Health Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Farrell

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – This project sought to identify the five most used evidence based bedside information tools used in Canadian health libraries, to examine librarians’ attitudes towards these tools, and to test the comprehensiveness of the tools. Methods – The author developed a definition of evidence based bedside information tools and a list of resources that fit this definition. Participants were respondents to a survey distributed via the CANMEDLIB electronic mail list. The survey sought to identify information from library staff regarding the most frequently used evidence based bedside information tools. Clinical questions were used to measure the comprehensiveness of each resource and the levels of evidence they provided to each question.Results – Survey respondents reported that the five most used evidence based bedside information tools in their libraries were UpToDate, BMJ Clinical Evidence, First Consult, Bandolier and ACP Pier. Librarians were generally satisfied with the ease of use, efficiency and informative nature of these resources. The resource assessment determined that not all of these tools are comprehensive in terms of their ability to answer clinical questions or with regard to the inclusion of levels of evidence. UpToDate was able to provide information for the greatest number of clinical questions, but it provided a level of evidence only seven percent of the time. ACP Pier was able to provide information on only 50% of the clinical questions, but it provided levels of evidence for all of these.Conclusion – UpToDate and BMJ Clinical Evidence were both rated as easy to use and informative. However, neither product generally includes levels of evidence, so it would be prudent for the practitioner to critically appraise information from these sources before using it in a patient care setting. ACP Pier eliminates the critical appraisal stage, thus reducing the time it takes to go from forming a clinical question to

  15. Moving theranostics trom bench to bedside in an interdisciplinary research team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swierczewska, Magdalena; Lee, Seulki; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-02-01

    The Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering at the National Institutes of Health has been led by Xiaoyuan Chen since 2009. The Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine contains three interdisciplinary, versatile groups: the Theranostic Nanomedicine; PET/Optical Imaging Probe; and Biological Molecular Imaging Sections, consisting of chemists, engineers, biologists and clinicians working together to transfer biomedical technology from bench to bedside. To find out more about our laboratory and meet our group, please visit us at www.nibib.nih.gov/Research/Intramural/xchen.

  16. Diagnosis of Mondor’s Disease in the Emergency Department with Bedside Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Michael O’Neal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mondor’s disease is a rare condition characterized by a superficial thrombophlebitis that can occur in the thoracoabdominal and genital areas. Findings with ultrasound in penile Mondor’s disease are readily measurable: a noncompressible penile vein without flow and absence of tears of the corpus cavernosum or tunica albuginea, hematoma, or evidence of fracture of the penis. We present a case of Mondor’s disease, diagnosed with bedside ultrasound, in the emergency department. Ultrasonography is readily available within the emergency department, and we suggest its use in aiding diagnosis of genitourinary disorders such as Mondor’s disease.

  17. Tinea capitis in a paediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, B C; O'Connell, K; Cafferkey, M; O'Donnell, B F; Keane, F M

    2006-01-01

    Tinea capitis is an increasing problem in Europe. The pattern of infection is changing with an increase in pathogenic anthropophilic dermatophytes particularly Trichophyton tonsurans. We aimed to determine the frequency of tinea capitis in a paediatric population attending dermatology outpatients and examine the clinical spectrum of disease. A retrospective analysis was performed of all laboratory proven tinea capitis cases presenting to the dermatology outpatient department at The Children's University Hospital, Temple Street over an 18-month period (1st January 2004 to 30th of June 2005 inclusive). Sixty-two children had tinea capitis of whom 53 (85.5%) were of African descent. Thirty-five (56%) were male and 27 female (44%). The average age at presentation was 4.02 years (age range 1-163 months) with five cases occurring in children less than one year of age. The most common pathogen was the anthropophilic dermatophyte Trichophyton tonsurans, accounting for 47 (75.8%) of all cases of tinea capitis. Eight (12.9%) were secondary to Microsporum ferrigineum, 2 (3.2%) secondary to Trichophyton violaceum, both Trichophyton soudanese and Trichophyton verruosum accounted for 1.6% each. The zoophilic organism Microsporum canis was diagnosed in 3 cases (4.8%). Presenting signs included scaling of the scalp (35.47%), scaling of the scalp and alopecia (53.24%), and alopecia and kerion (11.29%/o). The duration of symptoms was recorded in 52 patients with the average duration 8.38 months (range 0.5-72 months). In 20 cases an associated skin involvement on other areas of the body was recorded. All patients at diagnosis were either on no, suboptimal or inappropriate treatment. The prevalence of tinea capitis is increasing in this hospital based cohort. The main pathogen is now Trichophyton tonsurans. Children of African descent are at increased risk of infection. The diagnosis is poorly recognized and needs to be highlighted as a public health issue. There is a need for

  18. A practical approach to paediatric emergencies in the radiology department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turner, Nigel McBeth

    Acute life-threatening events involving children in the radiology department are rare. Nonetheless, radiologists should be competent in the relatively simple procedures required to maintain or restore vital functions in paediatric patients, particularly if their practice involves seriously ill or

  19. 3 T MRI in paediatrics: Challenges and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagia, Charuta [Department of Medical Imaging, Royal Children' s Hospital and Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Flemington Road, Parkville 3052 (Australia); Ditchfield, Michael [Department of Medical Imaging, Royal Children' s Hospital and Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Flemington Road, Parkville 3052 (Australia)], E-mail: michael.ditchfield@rch.org.au

    2008-11-15

    3 T MRI is being increasingly performed for clinical purposes in paediatrics, primarily because of the potential to improve spatial and temporal resolution - these can assist in overcoming the unique anatomic, physiologic and behavioural challenges of imaging children. The increased spatial resolution improves the capacity to image small patients; with particular reference to smaller structures such as the inner ear, brachial plexus, biliary system and the vascular system. The challenges inherent to imaging at high field strength remain pertinent especially, the altered T1 contrast, artefacts (susceptibility, chemical shift and B1 inhomogeneity) and safety issues, including specific absorption rate - several of these are circumvented due to software and hardware advances, or by trade off of some of the increased signal. The above mentioned challenges also create opportunities at 3 T, with improvement in MR angiography, arterial spin labelling, functional MRI, susceptibility weighted imaging, and MR spectroscopy - all of which have distinctive applications in paediatrics. Whole body imaging also becomes more practical because of the capacity for faster scans. 3 T MRI has the potential to image all the systems in paediatrics. However, neonatal brain and paediatric spine imaging have specific challenges at 3 T. Several factors also limit cardiac imaging at present. Further improvements in coil technology and newer sequences may help overcome the challenges that remain.

  20. Unmet needs in paediatric psychopharmacology : Present scenario and future perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persico, Antonio M.; Arango, Celso; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Correll, Christoph U.; Glennon, Jeffrey C.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Moreno, Carmen; Vitiello, Benedetto; Vorstman, Jacob; Zuddas, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Paediatric psychopharmacology holds great promise in two equally important areas of enormous biomedical and social impact, namely the treatment of behavioural abnormalities in children and adolescents, and the prevention of psychiatric disorders with adolescent- or adult-onset. Yet, in striking cont

  1. Paediatric endocrine disorders as seen at the University of Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: In this retrospective study, the case files of children seen in the paediatric endocrinemetabolic ... Information obtained included age at presentation, gender, principal complaints, and final diagnosis. ... of Child Health, UBTH during the ten-year period under review and 99 (0.72%) of these had endocrine disorders.

  2. Paediatric rheumatology clinic population in Southeast Asia: are we different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkachaisri, Thaschawee; Tang, Swee-Ping; Daengsuwan, Tassalapa; Phongsamart, Gun; Vilaiyuk, Soamarat; Charuvanij, Sirirat; Hoh, Sook Fun; Tan, Justin Hung Tiong; Das, Lena; Ang, Elizabeth; Lim, Wendy; Chan, Yiong Huak; Bernal, Christine B

    2017-03-01

    To examine the descriptive epidemiology of the patient population referred to paediatric rheumatology centres (PRCs) in Southeast Asia (SEA) and to compare the frequency of conditions encountered with other PRC populations. A web-based Registry for Childhood Onset Paediatric Rheumatic Diseases was established in 2009 and seven PRCs in four SEA countries, where paediatric rheumatologists are available, participated in a prospective 24 month data collection (43 months for Singapore). The number of patients analysed was 4038 (788 from Malaysia, 711 from the Philippines, 1943 from Singapore and 596 from Thailand). Over 70% of patients evaluated in PRCs in Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand had rheumatic diseases (RDs), as compared with one-half of the proportion seen in Singaporean PRCs, which was similar to the Western PRC experience. Among RDs diagnosed (n = 2602), JIA was the most common disease encountered in Malaysia (41%) and Thailand (61%) as compared with systemic vasculitides in the Philippines (37%) and Singapore (35%) among which Henoch-Schönlein purpura was the most prevalent. SLE and related diseases were more common, but idiopathic pain syndrome and abnormal immunological laboratory tests were rarer than those seen in the West. JIA subtype distributions were different among countries. Among non-RDs (n = 1436), orthopaedic and related conditions predominated (21.7-59.4%). The frequencies of RDs seen by SEA PRCs were different from those in the West. Systemic vasculitides and SLE were common in addition to JIA. Paediatric rheumatologist availability and healthcare accessibility partially explain these observed discrepancies.

  3. Movement disorders induced by gastrointestinal drugs: two paediatric cases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzinga-Huttenga, J.; Hekster, Y.A.; Bijl, A.; Rotteveel, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    A number of frequently prescribed gastrointestinal drugs can cause movement disorders in children, as well as in adults. In our centre for paediatric neurology, we saw a 3-year-old girl with abnormal movements mostly of the legs with an inner restlessness (akathisia) while using cisapride. Another

  4. Therapeutic upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy inPaediatric Gastroenterology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Imdadur Rahman; Praful Patel; Philip Boger; Shahnawaz Rasheed; Mike Thomson; Nadeem Ahmad Afzal

    2015-01-01

    Since the first report of use of endoscopy in childrenin the 1970s, there has seen an exponential growthin published experience and innovation in the field. Inthis review article we focus on modern age therapeuticendoscopy practice, explaining use of traditional aswell as new and innovative techniques, for diagnosisand treatment of diseases in the paediatric uppergastrointestinal tract.

  5. Therapeutic upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy in Paediatric Gastroenterology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Imdadur; Patel, Praful; Boger, Philip; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Thomson, Mike; Afzal, Nadeem Ahmad

    2015-03-16

    Since the first report of use of endoscopy in children in the 1970s, there has seen an exponential growth in published experience and innovation in the field. In this review article we focus on modern age therapeutic endoscopy practice, explaining use of traditional as well as new and innovative techniques, for diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the paediatric upper gastrointestinal tract.

  6. Typhoid fever in children presenting to paediatric medical wards of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Typhoid fever in children presenting to paediatric medical wards of Ahmadu ... and management outcomes of children admitted with typhoid fever during a ... All the children had pre-admission antibiotics, while 93.3% had abdominal pain, ... had laparotomy but there was no mortality, and all were discharged after recovery.

  7. Movement disorders induced by gastrointestinal drugs: two paediatric cases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzinga-Huttenga, J.; Hekster, Y.A.; Bijl, A.; Rotteveel, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    A number of frequently prescribed gastrointestinal drugs can cause movement disorders in children, as well as in adults. In our centre for paediatric neurology, we saw a 3-year-old girl with abnormal movements mostly of the legs with an inner restlessness (akathisia) while using cisapride. Another p

  8. The prevalence of intestinal parasites in paediatric diarrhoeal and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    1242, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; 3Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, P.O. Box 405, Addis ..... caregivers or parents may be different for boys compared ... with and result in severe consequences in HIV/AIDS .... Natural history of Giardia lamblia and cryptosporidium infections in a cohort of Israeli Bedouin infants: A.

  9. Reliability and validity of triage systems in paediatric emergency care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Veen (Mirjam); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Triage in paediatric emergency care is an important tool to prioritize seriously ill children. Triage can also be used to identify patients who do not need urgent care and who can safely wait. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the literature on reliability

  10. Paediatric Drug Development and Formulation Design-a European Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nales, D.A.; Kozarewicz, Piotr; Aylward, Brian; de Vries, Rutger; Egberts, Toine C G; Rademaker, Carin M A; Schobben, Alfred F A M

    2016-01-01

    The availability of licensed paediatric drugs is lagging behind those for adults, and there is a lack of safe formulations in suitable doses that children are able and willing to take. As a consequence, children are commonly treated with off-label or unlicensed drugs. As off-label and unlicensed dru

  11. Molecular mechanisms involved in chemoresistance in paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Tatjana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL is the most common paediatric cancer. Despite cure rates approaching 80%, resistance to treatment and disease relapse remain a significant clinical problem. Identification of the genes and biological pathways responsible for chemoresistance is therefore crucial for the design of novel therapeutic approaches aiming to improve patient survival. Mutations in the membrane transporter P-glycoprotein genes, genetic variations in drug-metabolising enzymes and defects in apoptotic pathways are mechanisms of chemoresistance common to a wide spectrum of cancers and also play a role in paediatric ALL. In addition, several recent microarray studies have identified transcriptional profiles specifically associated with chemoresistance and pointed to a number of potentially novel therapeutic targets. These microarray studies have shown that genes discriminating between clinically responsive and resistant leukaemias tend to be involved in cellular processes such as regulation of cell cycle, proliferation, and DNA repair. Here we review the outcomes of these microarray studies and also present our own investigations into apoptotic resistance to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in paediatric ALL. We present stratification of paediatric ALL by the profile of DNA damage response following ionising radiation (IR in vitro. This approach allows classification of ALL tumours at presentation into IR-apoptotic sensitive and IR-apoptotic resistant. Furthermore, apoptotic resistant leukaemias exhibit abnormal response of NFkB pathway following irradiation and inhibition of this pathway can sensitise leukaemic cells to IR-induced DSBs.

  12. An Audit of Anaesthesia for Paediatric Neurosurgical Procedures in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Office

    Paediatric patients may present with various cranio - spinal conditions which require .... severe head injury and in 6 infants with hydrocephalus. Eight patients that died .... This may be as a result of stimulation of the floor of the third ventricle by ...

  13. Gonad shielding in paediatric pelvic radiography: disadvantages prevail over benefit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frantzen, M.J.; Robben, S.; Postma, A.A.; Zoetelief, J.; Wildberger, J.E.; Kemerink, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To re-evaluate gonad shielding in paediatric pelvic radiography in terms of attainable radiation risk reduction and associated loss of diagnostic information. Methods A study on patient dose and the quality of gonad shielding was performed retrospectively using 500 pelvic radiographs of ch

  14. Paediatric intensive care is feasible in a neonatal department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne-Mette Bæk; Lundstrøm, Kaare E.; Reinholdt, Jes;

    2013-01-01

    Intensive care of infants below one year of age has been centralized in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) related to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Rigshospitalet, the University Hospital in Copenhagen in eastern Denmark (approximately 2.5 million inhabitants) since 2002. The aim...

  15. [The emotions of caregivers in neonatal and paediatric intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birsan, Sandrine; Guichoux, Julie; Rodriguez, Marie-Pierre; Brissaud, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    When treating a child hospitalised in a neonatal or paediatric unit, the emotions of the child's parents are of particular concern for the caregivers. The emotional experience of the nursing teams, however, is rarely taken into account, despite it having an impact on the quality of the support. Group discussion and individual reflection around professionals' emotions is essential.

  16. Measuring adherence to treatment of paediatric HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naar-King, S; Frey, M; Harris, M; Arfken, C

    2005-04-01

    Parent, child, physician report and pill counts were used to measure adherence in paediatric HIV. Relationships to viral load were assessed. Pill counts were considered invalid. Adherence measures did not correlate with one another. Physicians reported lower adherence than parents, but parent and physician report correlated with viral load. The clinical and research utility of the various measures are discussed.

  17. Paediatric primary care in Europe: variation between countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Esso, Diego; del Torso, Stefano; Hadjipanayis, Adamos;

    2010-01-01

    Although it is known that differences in paediatric primary care (PPC) are found throughout Europe, little information exists as to where, how and who delivers this care. The aim of this study was to collect information on the current existing situation of PPC in Europe....

  18. Pattern and outcome of admissions as seen in the paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2013-01-10

    Jan 10, 2013 ... lighting the disease pattern among the Paediatric popula- tion in Bayelsa State, the ... children's ward when they are stable to continue management. ... Febrile seizures. 17. 40. 21. 1. 79 (4.5). Protein Energy Mal- nutrition. 18. 12. 0. 1. 31(1.8) ... ous group included acute renal failure, Guillien barre syndrome ...

  19. Unusual case of paediatric septic arthritis of the lumbar facet joints due to Kingella kingae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hanneur, M; Vidal, C; Mallet, C; Mazda, K; Ilharreborde, B

    2016-11-01

    A 32-month-old boy presented with febrile limping that had developed over 6days, associated with right lumbosacral inflammatory swelling. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed joint effusion of the right L5-S1 zygapophyseal joint, complicated by destructive osteomyelitis of the L5 articular process and paraspinal abscess. Surgery was decided to evacuate the fluid accumulation and rule out differential diagnoses. The diagnosis of septic arthritis of the facet joint was confirmed intraoperatively; real-time quantitative PCR analysis identified Kingella kingae. This is the first substantiated paediatric case of zygapophyseal joint septic arthritis due to K. kingae. K. kingae is the most common pathogen responsible for invasive osteoarticular infection in children under 4years of age. Since empiric antibiotics are effective in early stages, physicians should consider the possibility of spinal infections due to K. kingae when a limping child under 4years of age presents with a fever.

  20. Indications for admission, treatment and improved outcome of paediatric haematology/oncology patients admitted to a tertiary paediatric ICU.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Owens, C

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Overall survival in paediatric cancer has improved significantly over the past 20 years. Treatment strategies have been intensified, and supportive care has made substantial advances. Historically, paediatric oncology patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) have had extremely poor outcomes. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study over a 3-year period in a single centre to evaluate the outcomes for this particularly vulnerable group of patients admitted to a paediatric ICU. RESULTS: Fifty-five patients were admitted a total of 66 times to the ICU during the study period. The mortality rate of this group was 23% compared with an overall ICU mortality rate of 5%. 11\\/15 patients who died had an underlying haematological malignancy. Twenty-eight percent of children with organism-identified sepsis died. CONCLUSIONS: While mortality rates for paediatric oncology patients admitted to a ICU have improved, they are still substantial. Those with a haematological malignancy or admitted with sepsis are most at risk.

  1. The Reliability and Validity of a Paediatric Script Concordance Test with Medical Students, Paediatric Residents and Experienced Paediatricians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Francois Lemay

    2010-07-01

    Conclusions:  These results support other findings indicating the SC test format can be used to differentiate between the clinical reasoning skills of novices, intermediates and experts in paediatrics.  An alternative scoring method that includes one best answer and partial marks was also supported for grading SC test items.

  2. Care of the trauma patient beyond the emergency department: a patient care standard to guide bedside nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaekel, Camilla; Paar, Cheryl; Schiltz, Jenifer; Peterson, Rose

    2009-01-01

    Injuries sustained from illicit drug use or alcohol intoxication are common in emergency departments. Ongoing assessments of psychosocial issues in trauma patients are imperative, even after the patient leaves the specialized area of the emergency department. Oftentimes, bedside nurses are ill prepared to identify the subtle clues of deeper psychosocial issues in complex patients such as trauma patients. This article focuses on the rationale for the development of a patient care standard to guide the bedside staff nurse in the care of the trauma patient. An example of a multiple trauma diagnosis-related patient care standard is presented.

  3. Detection of Acute Pulmonary Embolism by Bedside Ultrasound in a Patient Presenting in PEA Arrest: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangyul Chung-Esaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimal management of the critically ill patient in shock requires rapid identification of its etiology. We describe a successful application of an emergency physician performed bedside ultrasound in a patient presenting with shock and subsequent cardiac arrest. Pulmonary embolus was diagnosed using bedside echocardiogram and confirmed with CTA of the thorax. Further validation and real-time implementation of this low-cost modality could facilitate the decision to implement thrombolytics for unstable patients with massive pulmonary embolism who cannot undergo formal radiographic evaluation.

  4. Choosing a career in paediatrics: do trainees' views change over the first year of specialty training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, Helen M; Lakshminarayana, Indumathy; Wall, David; Bindal, Taruna

    2014-09-01

    To look at why a regional cohort of UK doctors chose a paediatric career and to ascertain views on their career near the end of training year one. A 20-item questionnaire was sent to all new regional paediatric specialty trainees. Three focus groups were held with trainees near the end of year one to elicit key themes. West Midlands Deanery, UK. Twenty-nine new regional paediatric specialty trainees in year one completed the questionnaire. A total of 15 trainees participated in the focus groups near the end of year one training. Reasons for choosing a paediatric career and factors which further influence career choice for trainees during their first specialty training year. Key influencing factors for choosing paediatrics were enjoying working with children and positive undergraduate experience of the specialty. All trainees had paediatrics as their first choice specialty and undertook a paediatric Foundation post. Near the end of year one, doubts were cast on career aspirations due to seeing middle grade colleagues struggling with work-life balance and a growing feeling that family came first. Senior trainees need to be aware that they act as powerful role models for their more junior colleagues and therefore have an influential role on how juniors perceive a paediatric career. Family friendly flexible working patterns in paediatrics are vital to retain junior trainees. All paediatric staff are role models and need to be enthusiastic, keen to teach and to promote a positive working environment.

  5. Why some health policies don't make sense at the bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, D A; Hershey, J C

    1995-06-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis and other forms of decision analysis are becoming more common in the medical literature and are increasingly influential in the development of health policy. Nevertheless, many clinicians find it difficult to apply policies developed from these analyses to individual encounters with patients. We examine the assumptions behind these analyses and argue that the perspective they embody can make clinical strategies appear to be less risky in theory than they are at the bedside. We believe that this problem underlies the intuitive concern many physicians have about policy analyses and calls into question the value of these analyses in shaping clinical practice. These analyses aggregate the benefits and burdens of alternative interventions across different individual persons. Thus, overall population risk appears blunted, as it would in a diversified portfolio of stocks that react differently to financial forces or in a herd of cattle that react differently to veterinary interventions. The assumptions behind these analyses make sense if aggregate outcome is what matters, but not if one cares about each individual investment or animal. Because such aggregation tends to understate individual risk, when applied to human health policy, it may misrepresent the interests of patients and cannot be assumed to provide useful guidelines for decision making at the bedside.

  6. A portable near infrared spectroscopy system for bedside monitoring of newborn brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosen Harel

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Newborns with critical health conditions are monitored in neonatal intensive care units (NICU. In NICU, one of the most important problems that they face is the risk of brain injury. There is a need for continuous monitoring of newborn's brain function to prevent any potential brain injury. This type of monitoring should not interfere with intensive care of the newborn. Therefore, it should be non-invasive and portable. Methods In this paper, a low-cost, battery operated, dual wavelength, continuous wave near infrared spectroscopy system for continuous bedside hemodynamic monitoring of neonatal brain is presented. The system has been designed to optimize SNR by optimizing the wavelength-multiplexing parameters with special emphasis on safety issues concerning burn injuries. SNR improvement by utilizing the entire dynamic range has been satisfied with modifications in analog circuitry. Results and Conclusion As a result, a shot-limited SNR of 67 dB has been achieved for 10 Hz temporal resolution. The system can operate more than 30 hours without recharging when an off-the-shelf 1850 mAh-7.2 V battery is used. Laboratory tests with optical phantoms and preliminary data recorded in NICU demonstrate the potential of the system as a reliable clinical tool to be employed in the bedside regional monitoring of newborn brain metabolism under intensive care.

  7. Innovative integrative bedside teaching model improves tutors’ self-assessments of teaching skills and attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itai Gat

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient bedside is the ideal setting for teaching physical examination, medical interviewing, and interpersonal skills. Herein we describe a novel model for bedside teaching (BST practiced during tutor training workshop and its resulting effect on practitioners’ self assessment of teaching skills and perceptions. Methods: One-day tutor training workshop included theoretical knowledge supplementation regarding tutors’ roles as well as implementing practical tools for clinical education, mainly BST model. The model, which emphasizes simultaneous clinical and communication teaching in a stepwise approach, was practiced by consecutive simulations with a gradual escalation of difficulty and adjusted instruction approaches. Pre- and post-workshop-adjusted questionnaires using a Likert scale of 1 to 4 were completed by participants and compared. Results: Analysis was based on 25 out of 48 participants who completed both questionnaires. Significantly improved teaching skills were demonstrated upon workshop completion (mean 3.3, SD 0.5 compared with pre-training (mean 2.6, SD 0.6; p<0.001 with significant increase in most examined parameters. Significantly improved tutor's roles internalization was demonstrated after training completion (mean 3.7, SD 0.3 compared with pre-workshop (mean 3.5 SD 0.5; p=0.002. Discussion: Successful BST involves combination of clinical and communication skills. BST model practiced during the workshop may contribute to improved teaching skills in this challenging environment.

  8. Testing a bedside personal computer Clinical Care Classification System for nursing students using Microsoft Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeg, Veronica D; Saba, Virginia K; Feeg, Alan N

    2008-01-01

    This study tested a personal computer-based version of the Sabacare Clinical Care Classification System on students' performance of charting patient care plans. The application was designed as an inexpensive alternative to teach electronic charting for use on any laptop or personal computer with Windows and Microsoft Access. The data-based system was tested in a randomized trial with the control group using a type-in text-based-only system also mounted on a laptop at the bedside in the laboratory. Student care plans were more complete using the data-based system over the type-in text version. Students were more positive but not necessarily more efficient with the data-based system. The results demonstrate that the application is effective for improving student nursing care charting using the nursing process and capturing patient care information with a language that is standardized and ready for integration with other patient electronic health record data. It can be implemented on a bedside stand in the clinical laboratory or used to aggregate care planning over a student's clinical experience.

  9. The Staff Nurse Clinical Leader at the Bedside: Swedish Registered Nurses’ Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga E. Larsson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Registered nurses at the bedside are accountable for and oversee completion of patient care as well as directly leading and managing the provision of safe patient care. These nurses have an informal leadership role that is not associated with any given position. Leadership is a complex and multifaceted concept and its meaning is unclear, especially in the staff nurse context. The aim was to describe registered nurses’ perceptions of what it entails to be the leader at the bedside in inpatient physical care. A phenomenographic approach was employed. Interviews were performed with Swedish registered nurses (n=15. Five descriptive categories were identified: demonstrating clinical knowledge, establishing a good atmosphere of collaboration, consciously structuring the work in order to ensure patients’ best possible nursing care, customized presence in the practical work with patients according to predetermined prerequisites, and monitoring coworkers’ professional practice. Registered nurses informal role as leader necessitates a social process of deliberate effort to attain and maintain leader status and authority. Participants used deliberate communicative approaches and interactive procedures. Leader principles grounded in the core values of the nursing profession that ensure nursing values and person-centered attributes were a key aspect.

  10. The role of bedside ultrasound in the diagnosis and outcome of patients with acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bellone

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between a bedside ultrasound evaluation during an episode of acute respiratory failure and the patient’s outcome. A retrospective observational study was conducted in the emergency departments (EDs of two hospitals in Como (Sant’Anna Hospital and Valduce Hospital over two years. Two hundred and twenty eight adult patients with acute respiratory failure were recruited for the study. One hundred and eight patients (group A received immediately a bedside ultrasound diagnostic test by expert investigastors at the time of ED admission, while 120 patients (group B were evaluated and managed without a preliminary ultrasound diagnostic approach. The concordance between initial and final diagnosis was statistically significant in group A vs group B (P<0.01. In-hospital mortality was significantly lower in group A as compared with group B [3 (2.7% vs 6 (5%, respectively; P<0.01]; in group A only nine patients (8.3% compared with seventeen patients (14.1% in group B (P<0.01 were transferred to the intensive care unit for monitoring and treatment. The study proposed is not able to recommend the procedure because it is a retrospective design. In spite of this, our study supports the routine use of ultrasonography for the evaluation of patients having acute respiratory failure.

  11. Provision of alcohol hand rub at the hospital bedside: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, S

    2004-04-01

    A pilot study was performed on a 28-bed acute hospital ward, promoting hand disinfection by providing Sterillium alcohol hand rub at the bedside. Bottles of Sterillium with pump dispensers were attached to the end of each patient's bed, next to the observation charts. Posters promoting the use of the product were prominently displayed and several ward staff attended a presentation on the effectiveness of Sterillium. Although this was a small study, Alert Organism rates during the three-month trial indicated a reduction in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) incidence and an increased Clostridium difficile incidence. Several other factors that may have influenced the study outcomes will be discussed. There were no health and safety problems during the trial, but other issues were identified which have implications for introducing the bedside rub on a hospital wide basis, including the type of holder used, logistical arrangements and the staff and patient information requirements. The strategies adopted to address these issues will be discussed.

  12. A Novel Bedside Technique for Differentiation of Exudative From Transudative Pleural Effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Ashraf Askari

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Background:At present, differentiation between exudative and transudative pleural  effusion is based solely on laboratory measures and is time-consuming. Asimple  bedside method would be of great help to differentiate between these two types of effusions.We present a new method for this purpose assessed in 46 patients.Methods: Standard laboratory tests and our method were tested using the same fluid  samples in 46 patients with pleural effusion. Aprincipal in physics called the capillary Tube law (h=2a/rpg was used to compare the samples. The imbibition of the fluid  level less than 15mm signified exudate and greater than 15mm signified transudate.Results: Our data shows that this method is 74% sensitive and 89.4% specific compared to the standard method when analyzed statistically by the chi-square and Kappa  agreement (Cronbach’s K tests. Conclusion: The capillary tube test has an acceptable validity for bedside diagnosis  of exudative or transudative effusions.  

  13. The Staff Nurse Clinical Leader at the Bedside: Swedish Registered Nurses' Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Inga E; Sahlsten, Monika J M

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses at the bedside are accountable for and oversee completion of patient care as well as directly leading and managing the provision of safe patient care. These nurses have an informal leadership role that is not associated with any given position. Leadership is a complex and multifaceted concept and its meaning is unclear, especially in the staff nurse context. The aim was to describe registered nurses' perceptions of what it entails to be the leader at the bedside in inpatient physical care. A phenomenographic approach was employed. Interviews were performed with Swedish registered nurses (n = 15). Five descriptive categories were identified: demonstrating clinical knowledge, establishing a good atmosphere of collaboration, consciously structuring the work in order to ensure patients' best possible nursing care, customized presence in the practical work with patients according to predetermined prerequisites, and monitoring coworkers' professional practice. Registered nurses informal role as leader necessitates a social process of deliberate effort to attain and maintain leader status and authority. Participants used deliberate communicative approaches and interactive procedures. Leader principles grounded in the core values of the nursing profession that ensure nursing values and person-centered attributes were a key aspect.

  14. Hair Dye Poisoning in a Paediatric Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolly Chandran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hair dye ingestion with suicidal intention has increased among rural Indian population and is associated with significant mortality. We report a teenager who presented with cervicofacial edema, respiratory distress, rhabdomyolysis, and myocarditis after ingesting the hair dye Super Vasmol 33. Early and supportive treatment can prevent morbidity and mortality.

  15. Sikker brug af bedside_UL-vejledt pleuracentese og ascitesdrændge hos patienter med maligne sygdomme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damstrup, Camilla Vantore

    2014-01-01

    and investigated the patients' medical files with regard to complications. In 29 pleuracentesises and 43 laparocentesises only one pneumothorax was registered (3.4%). This is comparable to previous studies and may suggest that it is safe to perform these procedures bedside in cancer patients with no complications....

  16. Bedside ultrasound training at Muhimbili National Hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania and Hospital San Carlos in Chiapas, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teri A. Reynolds

    2016-09-01

    Discussion: Introducing bedside ultrasound training in two distinct resource-limited settings was feasible and well-received. After a brief intensive period of training, participants successfully passed a comprehensive examination, including demonstration of standardised image acquisition and accurate interpretation of normal and abnormal studies.

  17. The Role of Bedside Troponin T Test for Identification of High Risk Patients With Acute Chest Pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo xiaobi; Feng Jianzhan; Guo Hengshan

    2005-01-01

    Objectives Evaluation of patients with acute chest pain when they admitted is time-consuming. We prospectively investigated the role of bedside troponin T test for predicting the risk of death and acute heart failure of patients with acute chest pain. Methods and Results 502 consecutive patients with chest pain for less than 24 hours were determined by troponin T test at bedside and quantitative troponin I test in lab. For bedside troponin T tests, there were 160 patients in positive and 323 in negative. During 30 days of followed-up. Myocardial infarction evolved in 139 patients among 160 patients in positive troponin T test, only 7 patients in negative one. Acute heart failure occurred in 51 patients among the positive group, but 37 occurred it at negative group.The odds ratio of acute heart failure of positive group vs.negative group was 3.6. Patients died 39 in positive group, 15 in negative group, the all-cause death odds ratio of positive group vs. negative group was 6.7; 31patients died with cardiac event in positive group, 5 in negative group only. Conclusions Bedside Troponin T test is a powerful and independent predictor of death and acute heart failure for patients with acute chest pain.

  18. Impaired vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3): bedside and search coil evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Carlos R; Zivotofsky, Ari Z; Caspi, Avi

    2014-01-01

    Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR) abnormalities in cerebellar ataxias are a matter of renewed interest. We have previously reported vestibular areflexia in a group of Yemenite-Jews with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3 (SCA3) who had clear bilateral pathological horizontal Head Impulse Test (HIT). The objective of this study was to evaluate the VOR of ten SCA3 patients who have variable bedside HIT responses by recording their eye movements using magnetic search coils and to correlate these results with their clinical and genetic data. Eight out of the ten patients have abnormal horizontal HIT detected by both clinical bedside examination and laboratory tests. Results of bedside HIT testing were significantly correlated with the VOR gain recorded using magnetic search coils. No significant correlations were found between VOR gain and other clinical or genetic data. Our study confirms the presence of defective VOR in SCA3 patients and corroborates the useful of the HIT as a reliable bedside test for diagnosis of VOR deficits.

  19. Paediatric pancreatic problems: A five-year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahoti B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To analyse a tertiary care experience with various pancreatic problems in the paediatric age group and clarify the frequency of various pancreatic diseases in the same patient population as well as the role of surgical or conservative management in their treatment. Patients and Methods: All patients with clinical suspicion of disease pertaining to the pancreas, substantiated by laboratory investigations or imaging modalities over a period of five years are included in our study. Results: Of the total 228 patients with various pancreatic problems, who presented to us, mostly with acute pancreatitis and pancreatic trauma, 64 needed surgical interventions. The total mortality rate encountered was a meagre 3.5%. Conclusion: Paediatric pancreatic disorders are not so infrequent; and a high index of suspicion aided by the newer modalities of investigation greatly helps in the appropriate and timely management.

  20. Radiation dose measurement of paediatric patients in Estonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kepler, K. [Training Centre of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University of Tartu (Estonia); Lintrop, M. [Department of Radiology, Tartu University Hospital, Tartu (Estonia); Servomaa, A.; Parviainen, T. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Eek, V.; Filippova, I. [Estonian Radiation Protection Centre, Tallinn (Estonia)

    2003-06-01

    According to the Medical Exposure Directive (97/43/Euratom) the radiation doses to patients should be measured in every hospital and doses should be compared to the reference doses established by the competent authorities. Special attention should be paid to the paediatric x-ray examinations, because the paediatric patients are more radiosensitive than adult patients. The requirement of measurements of radiation dose to patients is not yet included in the Estonian radiation act, but the purpose to join the European Communities makes the quality control in radiology very actual in Estonia. The necessity exists to introduce suitable measurement methods in the Xray departments of Estonian hospitals for establishing feedback system for radiologists, radiographers and medical physicists in optimising the radiation burden of patients and image quality. (orig.)

  1. Sedation versus general anaesthesia in paediatric patients undergoing chest CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, W.W.M.; So, N.M.C.; Metreweli, C. [Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong, Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging (China); Chen, P.P. [Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care (China)

    1998-05-01

    Objective: CT of the chest in paediatric patients often requires sedation or general anaesthesia to minimize motion artefacts. Both sedation and general anaesthesia are associated with atelectasis which obscures the underlying pulmonary pathology. We conducted a prospective study to compare these two methods with respect to degree of motion artefacts and extent of atelectasis. Material and Methods: Nineteen patients undergoing 22 chest CT examinations were randomly selected for either sedation or general anaesthesia. The total area of atelectasis and the degree of motion artefacts were measured. Results: The mean percentage of atelectasis was 6.67% for general anaesthesia and 0.01% for sedation (p=0.01). There was no significant difference in the quality of the images between the sedation patients and the general anaesthesia patients. Conclusion: Whenever the clinical condition permits it, sedation rather than general anaesthesia should be given to paediatric patients undergoing chest CT. (orig.).

  2. Sentinel lymph node biopsy in paediatric melanoma. A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Aguilar, M; Álvarez Pérez, R M; García Gómez, F J; Fernández Ortega, P; Borrego Dorado, I

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma in children is uncommon, being particularly rare in children under 10 years-old. However, this disease is increasing by a mean of 2% per year. As in adults, the lymph node status is the most important prognostic factor, crucial to performing the selective sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). We report 3 cases of paediatric patients of 3, 4 and 8 years-old, in which SLNB was performed for malignant melanoma. Paediatric age implies greater technical difficulty to the scintigraphy scan due to poor patient cooperation, with mild sedation required in some cases, and only being able to acquire planar images in other cases. SPECT/CT was only performed in the oldest patient. In our cases, SLNB was useful for selecting the least invasive surgery in order to reduce morbidity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  3. Acceptable nationwide outcome after paediatric inguinal hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thue; Kehlet, H; Oehlenschlager, J;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The primary objective was to describe 30-day outcomes after primary inguinal paediatric hernia repair. METHODS: Prospectively collected data from the National Patient Registry covering a 2-year study period 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2006 were collected. Unexpected outcomes were defined...... was not associated with the inguinal hernia repair. The usual technique was a simple sutured plasty (96.5 %). Emergency repair was performed in 54 patients (2.2 %) mainly in children between 0 and 2 years (79.6 %). During the 1 year follow-up, reoperation for recurrent inguinal hernia was performed in 8 children...... after elective repair (recurrence rate 0.3 %). Paediatric repairs were for most parts performed in surgical public hospitals, and most departments performed less than 10 inguinal hernia repairs within the 2 years study period. CONCLUSION: These nationwide results are acceptable with low numbers...

  4. Incidence of severe critical events in paediatric anaesthesia (APRICOT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habre, Walid; Disma, Nicola; Virag, Katalin

    2017-01-01

    immediate intervention and that led (or could have led) to major disability or death. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01878760. FINDINGS: Between April 1, 2014, and Jan 31, 2015, 31 127 anaesthetic procedures in 30 874 children with a mean age of 6·35 years (SD 4·50) were...... a relatively high rate of severe critical events during the anaesthesia management of children for surgical or diagnostic procedures in Europe, and a large variability in the practice of paediatric anaesthesia. These findings are substantial enough to warrant attention from national, regional, and specialist...... societies to target education of anaesthesiologists and their teams and implement strategies for quality improvement in paediatric anaesthesia. FUNDING: European Society of Anaesthesiology....

  5. Learning preference and personality type: their association in paediatric residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, L W; Goldberg, R M; Foley, R P

    1996-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if there is a relationship between the learning preferences and personality types of residents in paediatrics. As part of a study to teach residents in paediatrics how to teach, the authors administered the Learning Preference Inventory (LPI) and Fundamental Interpersonal Relationship Orientation (FIRO-B) instruments to 55 residents in paediatrics at all three levels of training. The instruments provided data that were used to provide feedback to residents on their learning preferences and interaction styles, as well as how these factors might affect teaching and learning in the clinical setting. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to determine relationships between the LPI and the FIRO-B. Fifty-two of the 55 residents (95%) completed the instruments. The results revealed that residents' learning preferences were significantly related to their personality types. For example, residents with high inclusion and affection scores on the FIRO-B preferred learning with others, which was significantly related to their high interpersonal scores on the LPI. Residents with low inclusion and affection scores were more likely to prefer independent learning (high individual and student-structured scores on the LPI) and abstract learning at statistically significant levels. The scores obtained by residents in paediatrics on the LPI were strongly correlated with those obtained on the FIRO-B. These data may have important implications for the way in which staff recruit, counsel and teach residents. The fact that the LPI is easy to administer and does not purport to measure personality styles makes it an acceptable educational tool that can be used in many areas of training.

  6. Insufficient serum caspofungin levels in a paediatric patient on ECMO

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Birgit C. P.; Wildschut, Enno D; Goede, Anna L. de; Hoog, Matthijs; Brüggemann, Roger J M

    2012-01-01

    Caspofungin, aechinocandin, is a relatively new lipophilic antifungal drug. Little is known concerning the pharmacokinetics of caspofungin in children. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) allows prolonged cardiopulmonary support in patients with life-threatening respiratory or cardiac failure. Pharmacokinetics may be altered by ECMO. We describe the case of a paediatric patient on ECMO with severe pneumonia and sepsis, who had subtherapeutic exposure of caspofungin despite normal to hi...

  7. The role of computed tomography in modern paediatric uroradiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maudgil, D.D.; McHugh, K. E-mail: kmchugh@gosh.nhs.uk

    2002-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has developed a well-recognised role within paediatric uroradiology, especially in imaging of trauma, malignancy (in particular Wilms' tumour), atypical infection, and congenital urogenital abnormalities. CT can also be used for problem solving in nephrolithiasis and renal transplant assessment. These applications are illustrated and discussed, with an emphasis on particular information that can be gained from the CT study.

  8. Computational hybrid anthropometric paediatric phantom library for internal radiation dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tianwu; Kuster, Niels; Zaidi, Habib

    2017-04-01

    Hybrid computational phantoms combine voxel-based and simplified equation-based modelling approaches to provide unique advantages and more realism for the construction of anthropomorphic models. In this work, a methodology and C++ code are developed to generate hybrid computational phantoms covering statistical distributions of body morphometry in the paediatric population. The paediatric phantoms of the Virtual Population Series (IT’IS Foundation, Switzerland) were modified to match target anthropometric parameters, including body mass, body length, standing height and sitting height/stature ratio, determined from reference databases of the National Centre for Health Statistics and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The phantoms were selected as representative anchor phantoms for the newborn, 1, 2, 5, 10 and 15 years-old children, and were subsequently remodelled to create 1100 female and male phantoms with 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th body morphometries. Evaluation was performed qualitatively using 3D visualization and quantitatively by analysing internal organ masses. Overall, the newly generated phantoms appear very reasonable and representative of the main characteristics of the paediatric population at various ages and for different genders, body sizes and sitting stature ratios. The mass of internal organs increases with height and body mass. The comparison of organ masses of the heart, kidney, liver, lung and spleen with published autopsy and ICRP reference data for children demonstrated that they follow the same trend when correlated with age. The constructed hybrid computational phantom library opens up the prospect of comprehensive radiation dosimetry calculations and risk assessment for the paediatric population of different age groups and diverse anthropometric parameters.

  9. [Efficacy of treatment with I(131) in paediatric Graves disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enes Romero, P; Martín-Frías, M; de Jesús, M; Caballero Loscos, C; Alonso Blanco, M; Barrio Castellanos, R

    2014-01-01

    Radioiodine is an important therapeutic option in young patients with Grave's disease (GD). In the United States it is a widespread therapy, but in Europe its use in paediatrics is still controversial. To report our experience in radioiodine therapy of paediatric GD patients and analyse its effectiveness and safety. We retrospectively studied our paediatric population (<18 years of age) with GD, diagnosed from 1982 to 2012. A curative option was offered to patients who did not respond to anti-thyroid drug (AT) at puberty. We analysed, the patient characteristics, TSH, T4, T3 and thyroid antibodies levels, AT response, remission post I(131), side effects, and hypothyroidism rates. A total of 50 patients were diagnosed with GD from 1982 to 2012. All patients received AT as initial treatment (mean duration: 35.3±25.9 months). Permanent remission was achieved in 46%. Thyroidectomy was performed in 5 patients, and 14 patients received I(131) (mean dose: 10.9±1.09 mCi). Remission with I(131) was obtained in 100%. The rate of permanent hypothyroidism was 90%. There was no progression of ophthalmopathy or side effects in any patients treated with I(131.) Radioiodine treatment of paediatric GD patients is safe, leads to complete remission at the expense of hypothyroidism, and does not exacerbate ophthalmopathy. It can be considered in patients older than 5 years, who do no not respond to AT or with significant side effects with this medication. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Trichilemmal Cyst of the Penis in a Paediatric Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Madan; Rashi Joshi

    2015-01-01

    Paediatric penile cysts are uncommon. We report a five-year-old child with an asymptomatic progressively growing cyst on the ventral aspect of the penis after a hypospadias repair. The patient presented to the Cooper Health Clinic, Dubai, United Arab Emirates, in March 2012. A complete excision of the cyst was performed. Histology results delineated a capsulated benign trichilemmal cyst. No recurrence or complications were reported in the 26 months following the excision. We recommend an earl...

  11. A retrospective study of oral lichen planus in paediatric population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabita Chatterjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Well documented cases of oral lichen planus, a cell mediated immune condition is infrequently reported in paediatric population. This study was undertaken to obtain epidemiological data retrospectively and also to explore the possibility of any association that might exist among the clinical and histopathological features in paediatric patients suffering from oral lichen planus. Subjects and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out on 22 patients, younger than 18 years with clinical and histopathological diagnosis of oral lichen planus over a period of 14 years. The clinical characteristics and histopathological features were observed. The statistical analysis of the data was performed using Statistical Analysis Software (SAS, Version 9.1. Results: Analysis of data of 22 patients revealed that the average age of patient is 15.18 years with equal male and female predilection. The most common site is buccal mucosa (50% and most frequent clinical form is erosive (63.64%. Focusing on the histopathological findings, parakeratosis was found in 86.36% of the cases, acanthosis in 63.64% of cases, moderate basal cell degeneration was identified in 63.64% of cases and dense lymphocytic infiltration at juxtaepithelial connective tissue region was found in 59.09% of cases. Conclusions: Oral lichen planus in paediatric population is rare and appeared between 8 to 18 years of age. There is no significant gender predominance. The most common clinical form is erosive, manifesting mainly in buccal mucosa. Histopathological findings characteristic of oral lichen planus in paediatric patients include parakeratosis, acanthosis, liquefaction degeneration of basal cells and lymphocytic infiltration in the subepithelial layer.

  12. [Knowledge of health care ethics in paediatric residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández González, A; Rodríguez Núñez, A; Cambra Lasaosa, F J; Quintero Otero, S; Ramil Fraga, C; García Palacios, M V; Hernández Rastrollo, R; Ruiz Extremera, M A

    2014-02-01

    Bioethics has been recently incorporated in to the educational programs of both medical students and medical residents as part of their curriculum. However, its training based on clinical practice is not well structured. To evaluate the knowledge of bioethics in Spanish paediatric residents, and to analyse how this relates to the medical education during graduate and post-graduate training. A questionnaire with 20 multiple choice questions was designed to evaluate the knowledge in basic ethics with potential implications in clinical practice. We evaluated the education received during graduate and post-graduate training, and the main ethical conflicts faced. A total of 210 completed questionnaires were received from medical residents in paediatrics from 20 different Spanish hospitals, of whom 47 of these were first year residents (R1), 49 were second year residents (R2), 57 were third year residents (R3), and the remaining 57 were final year residents (R4). The mean number of correct answers was 16.8 out of 20. No differences were found between residents in different years of training, nor were there any differences between the group that had received specific training in bioethics versus those who had not. Residents were more likely to give wrong answers related with informed consent, the law on the freedom of the patient, principles of quality of life, the case analysis system, and the dimension of distributive justice. Limitation of therapeutic efforts was identified as the main ethical problem faced in clinical practice by Spanish residents in paediatrics. Most of the knowledge of bioethics is acquired during graduate training, and improved very little throughout the period of medical residence. Our results suggest that efforts are required in organising and structuring the education in bioethics during the training of residents in paediatrics. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. The paediatric surgeon and his working conditions in Francophone sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gnassingbé

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study described the current conditions of work of paediatric surgeons in Francophone sub-Saharan Africa (FSSA and set the debate at the level of the humanist thinking in medicine. Patients and Methods: This was a multicentre study from 1 st May to 30 th October 2008. The African Society of paediatric surgeons′ directory was used to identify paediatric surgeons in the Francophone′s countries in Sub Saharan Africa. The parameters studied were number of surgeons per country, means of training, working conditions, remunerations, needs for continuous training and the research. Results: A total of 41 paediatric surgeons (68.33% responded. The average number of paediatric surgeons per country was 5. The means of training included government scholarships among 7 paediatric surgeons (17.07%, scholarship from a non-governmental organisations in 14 (34.15% and self-sponsorships in 20 (48.78%. The average salary was 450 Euros (€ (range: 120-1 400 Euros. Most of the paediatric surgeons (68.29% had internet services for continuous update courses and research. Thirty six paediatric surgeons (87.80% had no subscription to specialised scientific journals. Conclusion: The paediatric surgeon in FSSA faces many problems related to his working and living conditions that may have a negative impact on their competences.

  14. review article paediatric malaria: a ten-year retrospective study at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    Medical Microbiology & Parasitology Laboratories, National Hospital, Abuja, Nigeria ... Keywords: Malaria, paediatric patients, parasite density, prevalence, laboratory diagnosis, treatment. .... or the plus sign scheme is used to report parasite.

  15. Advanced practice physiotherapy in paediatric orthopaedics: innovation and collaboration to improve service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ó Mír, M; O'Sullivan, C

    2017-05-06

    One in eight paediatric primary care presentations is for a musculoskeletal (MSK) disorder. These patients are frequently referred to paediatric orthopaedic surgeons; however, up to 50% of referrals are for normal variants. This results in excessive wait-times and impedes access for urgent surgical cases. Adult MSK medicine has successfully utilised advanced practice physiotherapists (APP) managing non-surgical candidates, with documented benefits both to patients and services. There is a gap in the literature with regard to APP in paediatric orthopaedics. In this review, we investigate demands on paediatric orthopaedic services, examine the literature regarding APP in paediatric orthopaedics and explore the value the role has to offer current outpatient services. Paediatric orthopaedic services are under-resourced with concurrent long wait times. Approximately 50% of referrals are for normal variants, which do not require specialist intervention. Poor musculoskeletal examination skills and low diagnostic confidence amongst primary care physicians have been identified as a cause of inappropriate referrals. APP clinics for normal variants have reported independent management rate and discharge rates of 95% and marked reduction in patient wait times. There is limited evidence to support the APP in paediatric orthopaedics. Further studies are needed investigating diagnostic agreement, patient/stakeholder satisfaction, patient outcomes and economic evaluation. Paediatric orthopaedics is in crisis as to how to effectively manage the overwhelming volume of referrals. Innovative multidisciplinary solutions are required so that the onus is not solely on physicians to provide all services. The APP in paediatric orthopaedics may be part of the solution.

  16. Burn epidemiology and cost of medication in paediatric burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Zeliha; Sağlam, Zeynep

    2012-09-01

    Burns are common injuries that cause problems to societies throughout the world. In order to reduce the cost of burn treatment in children, it is extremely important to determine the burn epidemiology and the cost of medicines used in burn treatment. The present study used a retrospective design, with data collected from medical records of 140 paediatric patients admitted to a burn centre between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2009. Medical records were examined to determine burn epidemiology, medication administered, dosage, and duration of use. Descriptive statistical analysis was completed for all variables; chi-square was used to examine the relationship between certain variables. It was found that 62.7% of paediatric burns occur in the kitchen, with 70.7% involving boiling water; 55.7% of cases resulted in third-degree burns, 19.3% required grafting, and mean duration of hospital stay was 27.5 ± 1.2 days. Medication costs varied between $1.38 US dollars (USD) and $14,159.09, total drug cost was $46,148.03 and average cost per patient was $329.63. In this study, the medication cost for burn patients was found to be relatively high, with antibiotics comprising the vast majority of medication expenditure. Most paediatric burns are preventable, so it is vital to educate families about potential household hazards that can be addressed to reduce the risk of a burn. Programmes are also recommended to reduce costs and the inappropriate prescribing of medication.

  17. EULAR recommendations for vaccination in paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijstek, M W; Ott de Bruin, L M; Bijl, M; Borrow, R; van der Klis, F; Koné-Paut, I; Fasth, A; Minden, K; Ravelli, A; Abinun, M; Pileggi, G S; Borte, M; Wulffraat, N M

    2011-10-01

    Evidence-based recommendations for vaccination of paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases (PaedRD) were developed by following the EULAR standardised procedures for guideline development. The EULAR task force consisted of (paediatric) rheumatologists/immunologists, one expert in vaccine evaluation, one expert in public health and infectious disease control, and one epidemiologist. A systematic literature review was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and abstracts of the EULAR and American College of Rheumatology meetings of 2008/9. The level of evidence and strength of recommendation were based on customary scoring systems. Delphi voting was applied to assess the level of agreement between task force members. 107 papers and eight abstracts were used. The majority of papers considered seasonal influenza (41) or pneumococcal (23) vaccination. 26 studies were performed specifically in paediatric patients, and the majority in adult rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Fifteen recommendations were developed with an overall agreement of 91.7%. More research is needed on the safety and immunogenicity of (live-attenuated) vaccination in PaedRD, particularly in those using biologicals, and the effect of vaccination on prevention of infections.

  18. Forecasting paediatric malaria admissions on the Kenya Coast using rainfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuri, Stella Wanjugu; Snow, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a vector-borne disease which, despite recent scaled-up efforts to achieve control in Africa, continues to pose a major threat to child survival. The disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Plasmodium and requires mosquitoes and humans for transmission. Rainfall is a major factor in seasonal and secular patterns of malaria transmission along the East African coast. The goal of the study was to develop a model to reliably forecast incidences of paediatric malaria admissions to Kilifi District Hospital (KDH). In this article, we apply several statistical models to look at the temporal association between monthly paediatric malaria hospital admissions, rainfall, and Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures. Trend and seasonally adjusted, marginal and multivariate, time-series models for hospital admissions were applied to a unique data set to examine the role of climate, seasonality, and long-term anomalies in predicting malaria hospital admission rates and whether these might become more or less predictable with increasing vector control. The proportion of paediatric admissions to KDH that have malaria as a cause of admission can be forecast by a model which depends on the proportion of malaria admissions in the previous 2 months. This model is improved by incorporating either the previous month's Indian Ocean Dipole information or the previous 2 months' rainfall. Surveillance data can help build time-series prediction models which can be used to anticipate seasonal variations in clinical burdens of malaria in stable transmission areas and aid the timing of malaria vector control.

  19. Conflict escalation in paediatric services: findings from a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbat, Liz; Teuten, Bea; Barclay, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    To explore clinician and family experiences of conflict in paediatric services, in order to map the trajectory of conflict escalation. Qualitative interview study, employing extreme-case sampling. Interviews were analysed using an iterative thematic approach to identify common themes regarding the experience and escalation of conflict. Thirty-eight health professionals and eight parents. All participants had direct experience of conflict, including physical assault and court proceedings, at the interface of acute and palliative care. Two teaching hospitals, one district general hospital and two paediatric hospices in England, in 2011. Conflicts escalate in a predictable manner. Clearly identifiable behaviours by both clinicians and parents are defined as mild, moderate and severe. Mild describes features like the insensitive use of language and a history of unresolved conflict. Moderate involves a deterioration of trust, and a breakdown of communication and relationships. Severe marks disintegration of working relationships, characterised by behavioural changes including aggression, and a shift in focus from the child's best interests to the conflict itself. Though conflicts may remain at one level, those which escalated tended to move sequentially from one level to the next. Understanding how conflicts escalate provides clinicians with a practical, evidence-based framework to identify the warning signs of conflict in paediatrics. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. An observational study of hand hygiene compliance in paediatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randle, Jacqueline; Firth, Joseph; Vaughan, Natalie

    2013-09-01

    To measure healthcare workers', children's and visitors' hand hygiene compliance in a paediatric oncology ward and a paediatric respiratory ward in an English hospital. Children are especially vulnerable to healthcare-associated infections, yet few studies have reported on hand hygiene compliance in paediatric clinical areas. This was an observational study. We measured hand hygiene compliance over an eight-hour period in two hospital wards using the 'five moments of hand hygiene' observation tool. We monitored a total of 407 hand hygiene opportunities. Overall opportunities for compliance were 74% for healthcare workers (n = 315) and children and visitors 23% (n = 92). Compliance was 84% for allied health professionals, 81% for doctors, 75% for nurses and 73% for ancillary and other staff. Hand hygiene compliance varied depending on which of the five moments of hygiene healthcare workers were undertaking (p hygiene compliance, and for visitors to the oncology ward, hand hygiene compliance was higher (p hygiene compliance; however, visitors' compliance was low. Among healthcare workers, levels of compliance were higher compared with previous reported estimates. Visitors had the lowest level of compliance yet owing to the nature of the clinical environments, nearly a quarter of care is delivered by them rather than healthcare workers, and so, this offers opportunities for specific future interventions aimed at families and carers. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. An interprofessional approach to improving paediatric medication safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Neil

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Safe drug prescribing and administration are essential elements within undergraduate healthcare curricula, but medication errors, especially in paediatric practice, continue to compromise patient safety. In this area of clinical care, collective responsibility, team working and communication between health professionals have been identified as key elements in safe clinical practice. To date, there is limited research evidence as to how best to deliver teaching and learning of these competencies to practitioners of the future. Methods An interprofessional workshop to facilitate learning of knowledge, core competencies, communication and team working skills in paediatric drug prescribing and administration at undergraduate level was developed and evaluated. The practical, ward-based workshop was delivered to 4th year medical and 3rd year nursing students and evaluated using a pre and post workshop questionnaire with open-ended response questions. Results Following the workshop, students reported an increase in their knowledge and awareness of paediatric medication safety and the causes of medication errors (p Conclusion This study has helped bridge the knowledge-skills gap, demonstrating how an interprofessional approach to drug prescribing and administration has the potential to improve quality and safety within healthcare.

  2. Paediatric intraocular lens implants: accuracy of lens power calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gallagher, M K; Lagan, M A; Mulholland, C P; Parker, M; McGinnity, G; McLoone, E M

    2016-09-01

    PurposeThis study aims to evaluate the accuracy of lens prediction formulae on a paediatric population.MethodsA retrospective case-note review was undertaken of patients under 8 years old who underwent cataract surgery with primary lens implantation in a regional referral centre for paediatric ophthalmology, excluding those whose procedure was secondary to trauma. Biometric and refractive data were analysed for 43 eyes, including prediction errors (PE). Statistical measures used included mean absolute error (MAE), median absolute error (MedAE), Student's t-test and Lin's correlation coefficient.ResultsThe mean PE using the SRK-II formula was +0.96 D (range -2.47D to +2.41 D, SD 1.33 D, MAE 1.38 D, MedAE 1.55, n=15). The mean PE was smaller using SRK/T (-0.18 D, range -3.25 D to +3.95 D, SD 1.70 D, MAE 1.30 D, MedAE 1.24, n=27). We performed an analysis of the biometry data using four different formula (Hoffer Q, Holladay 1, SRK-II and SRK/T). Hoffer Q showed a smaller MedAE than other formulae but also a myopic bias.ConclusionOur clinical data suggest SRK/T was more accurate in predicting post-operative refraction in this cohort of paediatric patients undergoing cataract surgery. Hoffer Q may have improved accuracy further.

  3. Antibiotic resistance and irrational prescribing in paediatric clinics in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toska, Aikaterini; Geitona, Mary

    Greece is among the countries with the highest rates of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and simultaneous antibiotic consumption. The aim of this study was to assess the perceptions and knowledge of AMR and irrational antibiotic prescribing of nurses working in paediatric hospitals in Greece. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to nurses in paediatric hospitals and paediatric clinics in Greece. Descriptive and multivariate statistical analyses were performed. Levels of significance were two-tailed and statistical significance was p=0.05. A total of 87% of participants reported irrational prescribing to be an important cause of AMR. Diagnostic uncertainty was stated by 55.5% as the main cause of irrational antibiotic prescribing and 94% suggested the use of protocols and guidelines as the main measure to control overprescribing. Parental demand for antibiotics in hospitals has increased according to 51.8% of respondents. Strong correlation was observed between social-demographic characteristics and antibiotic resistance, as well as irrational prescribing. Assessing nurses' knowledge and perceptions of antimicrobial resistance and irrational prescribing is vital as nurses actively participate in the antibiotics administration process and antimicrobial management in Greece. Their involvement could contribute to educate patients and parents on the public-health implications of overprescribing and antimicrobial resistance.

  4. Common tasks and problems in paediatric trauma radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paertan, Gerald E-mail: gerald.paertan@smz.magwien.gv.at; Pamberger, Petra; Blab, Edmund; Hruby, Walter

    2003-10-01

    Scope of this article is to give practical hints for the most common, typical and important topics of trauma radiology in children to those radiologists who are not exclusively occupied with paediatric imaging. Due to the increased radiation sensitivity of children compared with adults balancing radiation protection and necessary image quality is of utmost importance. Outlines for this optimisation process are given. Especially in imaging of the extremities perhaps the greatest difficulties are posed by the dynamically changing face of the immature, growing, only partially ossified skeleton. Lack of experience must be compensated by meticulous comparison with the normal skeletal development as shown in standard textbooks, and by knowledge of the radiological image of the developmental variants. Besides general remarks about paediatric trauma radiology, some important topics are discussed into more detail. Especially the elbow joint poses a challenge for those less experienced with its radiological appearance in children. More than in adults, ultrasound should remain the primary imaging modality of choice especially in the assessment of abdominal trauma, and CT be tailored to radiological and clinical findings. Imaging and diagnosis of non-accidental injury (NAI) may be a less common task for the general radiologist, however, the severe social implications of physical child abuse mandate a basic knowledge about the radiological symptoms and the imaging management of this problem for all physicians occupied with paediatric radiology.

  5. Communication skills of healthcare professionals in paediatric diabetes services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambly, H; Robling, M; Crowne, E; Hood, K; Gregory, J W

    2009-05-01

    To identify training needs in communication skills and to assess training preferences of staff working in paediatric diabetes services, which will inform the development of a learning programme in behaviour change counselling for healthcare professionals. Three hundred and eighty-five staff in 67 UK paediatric diabetes services were sent questionnaires to determine their previous communication skills training, to measure their self-reported view of the importance of and confidence in addressing common clinical problems and to assess the perceived feasibility of training methods to improve skillfulness. Two hundred and sixty-six questionnaires (69%) were returned from 65 services. Sixteen per cent of doctors, nurses and dietitians reported no previous training in communication skills and 47% had received no training since graduating. Respondents rated psychosocial issues as more important to address than medical issues within consultations (t = 8.93, P important component of consultations involving young people with diabetes, but healthcare professionals find it easier to address medical issues. This represents a key training need in communication skills for diabetes professionals. The survey will inform the development of a tailored learning programme for health professionals in UK paediatric diabetes clinics.

  6. Donor-Recipient Size Mismatch in Paediatric Renal Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Donati-Bourne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. End stage renal failure in children is a rare but devastating condition, and kidney transplantation remains the only permanent treatment option. The aim of this review was to elucidate the broad surgical issues surrounding the mismatch in size of adult kidney donors to their paediatric recipients. Methods. A comprehensive literature search was undertaken on PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar for all relevant scientific articles published to date in English language. Manual search of the bibliographies was also performed to supplement the original search. Results. Size-matching kidneys for transplantation into children is not feasible due to limited organ availability from paediatric donors, resulting in prolonged waiting list times. Transplanting a comparatively large adult kidney into a child may lead to potential challenges related to the surgical incision and approach, vessel anastomoses, wound closure, postoperative cardiovascular stability, and age-correlated maturation of the graft. Conclusion. The transplantation of an adult kidney into a size mismatched paediatric recipient significantly reduces waiting times for surgery; however, it presents further challenges in terms of both the surgical procedure and the post-operative management of the patient’s physiological parameters.

  7. Economics and ethics of paediatric respiratory extra corporeal life support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, M; Doyle, Y; O'Hare, B; Healy, M; Nölke, L

    2013-09-01

    Extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a form of life support, which facilitates gas exchange outside the body via an oxygenator and a centrifugal pumping system. A paediatric cardiac ECMO programme was established in 2005 at Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Crumlin (OLCHC) and to date 75 patients have received ECMO, the majority being post operative cardiac patients. The outcome data compares favourably with international figures. ECMO has been most successful in the treatment of newborn infants with life threatening respiratory failure from conditions such as meconium aspiration, respiratory distress syndrome and respiratory infections. There is no formal paediatric respiratory ECMO programme at OLCHC, or anywhere else in Ireland. Currently, neonates requiring respiratory ECMO are transferred to centres in Sweden or the UK at an average cost of 133,000 Euros/infant, funded by the Health Service Executive E112 treatment abroad scheme. There is considerable morbidity associated with the transfer of critically ill infants, as well as significant psycho-social impact on families. OLCHC is not funded to provide respiratory ECMO, although the equipment and expertise required are similar to cardiac ECMO and are currently in place. The average cost of an ECMO run at OLCHC is 65,000 Euros. There is now a strong argument for a fully funded single national cardiac and respiratory paediatric ECMO centre, similar to that for adult patients.

  8. Foreskin-isolated keratinocytes provide successful extemporaneous autologous paediatric skin grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcheik, Jiad N; Barrault, Christine; Pedretti, Nathalie; Garnier, Julien; Juchaux, Franck; Levard, Guillaume; Morel, Franck; Lecron, Jean-Claude; Bernard, François-Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Severe burns in children are conventionally treated with split-thickness skin autografts or epidermal sheets. However, neither early complete healing nor quality of epithelialization is satisfactory. An alternative approach is to graft isolated keratinocytes. We evaluated paediatric foreskin and auricular skin as donor sources, autologous keratinocyte transplantation, and compared the graft efficiency to the in vitro capacities of isolated keratinocytes to divide and reconstitute epidermal tissue. Keratinocytes were isolated from surgical samples by enzymatic digestion. Living cell recovery, in vitro proliferation and epidermal reconstruction capacities were evaluated. Differentiation status was analysed, using qRT-PCR and immunolabelling. Eleven children were grafted with foreskin-derived (boys) or auricular (girls) keratinocyte suspensions dripped onto deep severe burns. The aesthetic and functional quality of epithelialization was monitored in a standardized way. Foreskin keratinocyte graft in male children provides for the re-epithelialization of partial deep severe burns and accelerates wound healing, thus allowing successful wound closure, and improves the quality of scars. In accordance, in vitro studies have revealed a high yield of living keratinocyte recovery from foreskin and their potential in terms of regeneration and differentiation. We report a successful method for grafting paediatric males presenting large severe burns through direct spreading of autologous foreskin keratinocytes. This alternative method is easy to implement, improves the quality of skin and minimizes associated donor site morbidity. In vitro studies have highlighted the potential of foreskin tissue for graft applications and could help in tissue selection with the prospect of grafting burns for girls. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice among Dental Practitioners Pertaining to Preventive Measures in Paediatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Amitkumar; Kambalimath, Halaswamy V; Panchakshari, Bharath Kashetty; Jain, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Prevention at primary level is of great value in Paediatric Dentistry. Since use of preventive measures can prevent future complications, dental professionals share an important responsibility toward early screening, prompt referral and treatment and this knowledge must transfer into the practice of dentistry. Aim To evaluate Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) among dental practitioners in Bhopal city (central part of India) pertaining to sealants, topical fluorides usage and orthodontic consideration in paediatric patients. Materials and Methods A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted using a 20-item self-administered, closed ended, structured questionnaire. A total of 200 available private dental practitioners of Bhopal city made up the sampling frame of study. Results Out of 200 practicing dentists, 147 participated with response rate of 73.5% in which 69.4% were males and 30.6% were females. A total of 83% dentists were less than 35 years of age, while 17% were equal to or more than 35 years of age. Qualification distribution revealed 67.3% dental graduate and 32.6% dental specialist. A highly significant difference in knowledge in relation to age was observed. The mean±SD were found for Knowledge as 8.46±1.82, Attitude as 2.65±0.780, and Practice as 1.66±1.57. Statistically significant correlations were found between attitude and practice (r=0.58, p<0.001). Conclusion Dentists in Bhopal city have vast knowledge towards preventive dentistry. The attitude is highly commendable but underutilized in practice, which needs to be improved. PMID:28209009

  10. Bedside rationing by general practitioners: a postal survey in the Danish public healthcare system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Sigurd; Norup, Michael; Rossel, Peter

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: It is ethically controversial whether medical doctors are morally permitted to ration the care of their patients at the bedside. To explore whether general practitioners in fact do ration in this manner we conducted a study within primary care in the Danish public healthcare...... of the study were twofold: an assessment of the proportion of GPs who, in a mainly hypothetical setting, would consider cost-quality trade-offs relevant to their clinical decision-making given their economic impact on the healthcare system; and a measure of the extent to which they would disclose...... this information to patients. RESULTS: In the hypothetical setting 95% of GPs considered cost-quality trade-offs relevant to their clinical decision-making given the economic impact of such trade-offs on the healthcare system. In all 90% stated that this consideration had been relevant in clinical decision...

  11. Bedside resource stewardship in disasters: a provider's dilemma practicing in an ethical gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    During disasters, clinicians may be forced to play dual roles, as both a provider and an allocator of scarce resources. At present, a clear framework to govern resource stewardship at the bedside is lacking. Clinicians who find themselves practicing in this ethical gap between clinical and public health ethics can experience significant moral distress. One provider describes her experience allocating an oxygen tank in the intensive care unit at a hospital in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, immediately following the 2010 earthquake. Using a clinical vignette and reflective narrative she attempts to identify the factors that influenced her allocation decision, opening up the factors for commentary and debate by an ethicist. A better paradigm for the ethical care of patients during disasters is needed to better guide provider choices in the future.

  12. Bedside patient data viewer using RFID and e-Ink technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikodijevic, Aleksandar; Pichler, Patrick; Forjan, Mathias; Sauermann, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    In the daily routine of hospitals, which work with paper based medical records, the staff has to find the appropriate patient file if it needs information about the patient. With the introduction of ELGA the Austrian hospitals have to use specific standards for their clinical documentation. These structured documents can be used to feed an e-Ink reader with information about every patient in a hospital. Combined with RFID and security measures, the clinical staff is supported during the patient file searching process. The developed experimental setup of the Bedside Patient Data Viewer demonstrates a prototype of such a system. An Amazon Kindle Paperwhite is used to display processed data, supplied by a Raspberry Pi with an attached RFID module for identification purposes. Results show that such a system can be implemented, however a lot of organizational and technical issues remain to be solved.

  13. NeuroDebian Virtual Machine Deployment Facilitates Trainee-Driven Bedside Neuroimaging Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Alexander; Kenney-Jung, Daniel; Botha, Hugo; Tillema, Jan-Mendelt

    2016-09-21

    Freely available software, derived from the past 2 decades of neuroimaging research, is significantly more flexible for research purposes than presently available clinical tools. Here, we describe and demonstrate the utility of rapidly deployable analysis software to facilitate trainee-driven translational neuroimaging research. A recipe and video tutorial were created to guide the creation of a NeuroDebian-based virtual computer that conforms to current neuroimaging research standards and can exist within a HIPAA-compliant system. This allows for retrieval of clinical imaging data, conversion to standard file formats, and rapid visualization and quantification of individual patients' cortical and subcortical anatomy. As an example, we apply this pipeline to a pediatric patient's data to illustrate the advantages of research-derived neuroimaging tools in asking quantitative questions "at the bedside." Our goal is to provide a path of entry for trainees to become familiar with common neuroimaging tools and foster an increased interest in translational research.

  14. Televisitation: virtual transportation of family to the bedside in an acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    Televisitation is the virtual transportation of a patient's family to the bedside, regardless of the patient's location within an acute care setting. This innovation in the Telemedicine Program at Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre (TBRHSC) in Ontario, Canada, embraces the concept of patient- and family-centered care and has been identified as a leading practice by Accreditation Canada. The need to find creative ways to link patients to their family and friend supports hundreds of miles away was identified more than ten years ago. The important relationship between health outcomes and the psychosocial needs of patients and families has been recognized more recently. TBRHSC's patient- and family-centered model of care focuses on connecting patients with their families. First Nations renal patients with family in remote communities were some of the earliest users of videoconferencing technology for this purpose.

  15. SU-E-I-11: A New Cone-Beam CT System for Bedside Head Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, H; Zeng, W; Xu, P; Wang, Z; Xing, X; Sun, M [Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Jiangsu (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To design and develop a new mobile cone-beam CT (CBCT) system for head imaging with good soft-tissue visibility, to be used bedside in ICU and neurosurgery department to monitor treatment and operation outcome in brain patients. Methods: The imaging chain consists of a 30cmx25cm amorphous silicon flat panel detector and a pulsed, stationary anode monoblock x-ray source of 100kVp at a maximal tube current of 10mA. The detector and source are supported on motorized mechanisms to provide detector lateral shift and source angular tilt, enabling a centered digital radiographic imaging mode and half-fan CBCT, while maximizing the use of the x-ray field and keep the source to detector distance short. A focused linear anti-scatter grid is mounted on the detector, and commercial software with scatter and other corrective algorithms is used for data processing and image reconstruction. The gantry rotates around a horizontal axis, and is able to adjust its height for different patient table positions. Cables are routed through a custom protective sleeve over a large bore with an in-plane twister band, facilitating single 360-degree rotation without a slip-ring at a speed up to 5 seconds per rotation. A UPS provides about 10 minutes of operation off the battery when unplugged. The gantry is on locked casters, whose brake is control by two push handles on both sides for easy reposition. The entire system is designed to have a light weight and a compact size for excellent maneuverability. Results: System design is complete and main imaging components are tested. Initial results will be presented and discussed later in the presentation. Conclusion: A new mobile CBCT system for head imaging is being developed. With its compact size, a large bore, and quality design, it is expected to be a useful imaging tool for bedside uses. The work is supported by a grant from Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  16. Comparison of visual analogue and Likert scales in evaluation of an emergency department bedside teaching programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celenza, Antonio; Rogers, Ian R

    2011-02-01

    The present study compares visual analogue scale (VAS) to Likert-type scale (LTS) instruments in evaluating perceptions of an ED bedside clinical teaching programme. A prospective study was conducted in the ED of an urban, adult tertiary hospital. Prospective pairing occurred of a teaching consultant and registrar who were relatively quarantined from normal clinical duties. Registrars received 3 months of the teaching intervention, and 3 months without the intervention in a cross-over fashion. Evaluation questionnaires were completed using both the LTS and 100 mm horizontal VAS for each question. Correlation between VAS and LTS gave a measure of validity, and test-retest stability and internal consistency gave measures of reliability. Registrar perceptions of the teaching programme were positive, but no differences were found between the pre- and post-intervention groups. The test-retest reliabilities (intraclass correlation coefficient) for the questionnaires were 0.51 and 0.54 for the VAS, and 0.58 and 0.58 for the LTS. Cronbach's alpha varied between 0.79 and 0.91 for the VAS, and 0.79 and 0.81 for the LTS. Correlations between the two methods varied from 0.35 to 0.94 for each question. A linear regression equation describing the relationship approximated VAS = 19.5 × LTS-9 with overall r= 0.89. An ED bedside teaching programme is perceived to be a beneficial educational intervention. The VAS is a reliable and valid alternative to the LTS for educational evaluation and might provide advantages in educational measurement. Further research into the significance of extreme values and educationally important changes in scores is required. © 2011 The Authors. EMA © 2011 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  17. Exploration of exposure conditions with a novel wireless detector for bedside digital radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, Hilde; Nens, Joris; Delzenne, Louis; Marshall, Nicholas; Pauwels, Herman; De Wever, Walter; Oyen, Raymond

    2012-03-01

    We propose, apply and validate an optimization scheme for a new wireless CsI based DR detector in combination with a regular mobile X-ray system for bedside imaging applications. Three different grids were tested in this combination. Signal-difference-to-noise was investigated in two ways, using a 1mm Cu piece in combination with different thicknesses of PMMA and by means of the CDRAD phantom using 10 images per condition and an automated evaluation method. A Figure of Merit (FOM), namely SDNR2/Imparted Energy, was calculated for a large range of exposure conditions, without and with grid in place. Misalignment of the grids was evaluated via the same FOMs. This optimization study was validated with comparative X-ray acquisitions performed on dead bodies. An experienced radiologist scored the quality of several specific aspects for all these exposures. Signal difference to noise ratios measured with the Cu method correlated well with the threshold contrasts from the CDRAD analysis (R2 > 0.9). The analysis showed optimal FOM with detector air kerma rates as typically used in clinical practice. Lower tube voltages provide higher FOM than the higher values but their practical use depends on the limitations of X-ray tubes, linked to patient motion artefacts. The use of high resolution grids should be encouraged, as the FOM increases with 47% at 75kV. These scores from the Visual grading study confirmed the results obtained with the FOM. The switch to (wireless) DR technology for bedside imaging could benefit from devices to improve grid positioning or any scatter reduction technique.

  18. PREVALENCE OF OVERWEIGHT, OBESITY, PAEDIATRIC METABOLIC SYNDROME AND ASSOCIATED RISK FACTORS AMONG CHILDREN IN THE AGE GROUP OF 10-16 YEARS IN PRIVATE SCHOOLS OF SHIMLA CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anmol Gupta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Paediatric obesity is a complex and growing global problem which is escalating much more rapidly in developing countries like India and considered an important predecessor to NCD multi-morbidity due to changing life style as a result of rapid urbanisation and mechanisation. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of overweight, obesity, paediatric metabolic syndrome and associated risk factors among children in the age group of 10-16 years in private schools of Shimla city. MATERIALS AND METHODS At total of 2100 adolescents attending school (aged 10-16 years participated in this cross-sectional study. All the anthropometric, clinical and biochemical assessment was done after proper consent. Prevalence of overweight and obesity was assessed by using IOTF guidelines and the metabolic syndrome was determined by the Paediatric International Diabetic Federation definition modified for age group. RESULTS The prevalence of overweight, obesity and paediatric metabolic syndrome was 14.5%, 4.1% & 4.3% respectively. In the groups with PMS, hypertension, waist circumference, and TG were significantly higher, and HDL-C was significantly lower. Significant difference was observed in gender, physical activity level, metabolic equivalent, consumption of junk food & time spent on TV in the distribution of overweight, obesity and metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSION Our study highlights the possible role of change in the dietary pattern and physical activity pattern in the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome in early stage of life. Collective efforts of parents and schools are required to institute early preventive measures to reduce progression towards obesity and its future complications.

  19. Malaria paediatric hospitalization between 1999 and 2008 across Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okiro, Emelda A; Alegana, Victor A; Noor, Abdisalan M; Mutheu, Juliette J; Juma, Elizabeth; Snow, Robert W

    2009-12-09

    Intervention coverage and funding for the control of malaria in Africa has increased in recent years, however, there are few descriptions of changing disease burden and the few reports available are from isolated, single site observations or are of reports at country-level. Here we present a nationwide assessment of changes over 10 years in paediatric malaria hospitalization across Kenya. Paediatric admission data on malaria and non-malaria diagnoses were assembled for the period 1999 to 2008 from in-patient registers at 17 district hospitals in Kenya and represented the diverse malaria ecology of the country. These data were then analysed using autoregressive moving average time series models with malaria and all-cause admissions as the main outcomes adjusted for rainfall, changes in service use and populations-at-risk within each hospital's catchment to establish whether there has been a statistically significant decline in paediatric malaria hospitalization during the observation period. Among the 17 hospital sites, adjusted paediatric malaria admissions had significantly declined at 10 hospitals over 10 years since 1999; had significantly increased at four hospitals, and remained unchanged in three hospitals. The overall estimated average reduction in malaria admission rates was 0.0063 cases per 1,000 children aged 0 to 14 years per month representing an average percentage reduction of 49% across the 10 hospitals registering a significant decline by the end of 2008. Paediatric admissions for all-causes had declined significantly with a reduction in admission rates of greater than 0.0050 cases per 1,000 children aged 0 to 14 years per month at 6 of 17 hospitals. Where malaria admissions had increased three of the four sites were located in Western Kenya close to Lake Victoria. Conversely there was an indication that areas with the largest declines in malaria admission rates were areas located along the Kenyan coast and some sites in the highlands of Kenya. A

  20. Long- term outcome of paediatric patients with ANCA vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pusey Charles D

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary systemic vasculitis presenting in childhood is an uncommon but serious condition. As these patients transfer to adult clinics for continuing care, defining long term outcomes with emphasis on disease and treatment- related morbidity and mortality is important. The aim of this study is to describe the long- term clinical course of paediatric patients with ANCA vasculitis. Methods The adult patients in our vasculitis clinics who had presented in childhood, with a follow up time of greater than 10 years were included. We also reviewed the literature for articles describing the clinical outcome of paediatric patients with ANCA vasculitis. Results We describe the clinical course of 8 adults who presented in childhood with ANCA vasculitis. 7 patients had Wegener's granulomatosis and 1 had microscopic polyangiitis. The median age at presentation was 11.5 years, and follow up time ranged form 11 to 30 years. Induction therapy for all patients was steroids and/or cyclophosphamide. Maintenance therapy was with azathioprine or mycophenolate mofetil. Biological agents were used in 3 patients for relapsed disease in adulthood only. Seven patients achieved complete remission. All patients experienced disease relapse, with a median of 4 episodes. Kidney function was generally well preserved, with median eGFR 76 ml/min. Only one patient developed end-stage renal failure and one patient died after 25 years of disease. Treatment-related morbidity rates were high; 7 suffered from infections, 4 were infertile, 2 had skeletal complications, and 1 developed malignancy. Conclusion Close long- term follow up of paediatric patients with ANCA vasculitis is imperative, as this patient cohort is likely to live long enough to develop significant treatment and disease- related morbidities. Prospective cohort studies with novel therapies including paediatric patients are crucial to help us determine the best approach to managing this complex group

  1. Application of the 2012 revised diagnostic definitions for paediatric multiple sclerosis and immune-mediated central nervous system demyelination disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pelt, E. Danielle; Neuteboom, Rinze F.; Ketelslegers, Immy A.; Boon, Maartje; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E.; Hintzen, Rogier Q.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, the International Paediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group (IPMSSG) definitions for the diagnosis of immune-mediated acquired demyelinating syndromes (ADS) of the central nervous system, including paediatric multiple sclerosis (MS), have been revised. Objective To evaluate the

  2. The influence of the European paediatric regulation on marketing authorisation of orphan drugs for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreeftmeijer-Vegter, Annemarie Rosan; de Boer, Anthonius; van der Vlugt-Meijer, Roselinda H; de Vries, Peter J

    2014-08-05

    Drug development for rare diseases is challenging, especially when these orphan drugs (OD) are intended for children. In 2007 the EU Paediatric Drug Regulation was enacted to improve the development of high quality and ethically researched medicines for children through the establishment of Paediatric Investigation Plans (PIPs). The effect of the EU Paediatric Drug Regulation on the marketing authorisation (MA) of drugs for children with rare diseases was studied. Data on all designated orphan drugs, their indication, MA, PIPs and indication group (adult or child) were obtained from the European Medicines Agency (EMA). The outcome and duration of the process from orphan drug designation (ODD) to MA, was compared, per indication, by age group. The effect of the Paediatric Drug Regulation, implemented in 2007, on the application process was assessed with survival analysis. Eighty-one orphan drugs obtained MA since 2000 and half are authorised for (a subgroup of) children; another 34 are currently undergoing further investigations in children through agreed PIPs. The Paediatric Drug Regulation did not significantly increase the number of ODDs with potential paediatric indications (58% before vs 64% after 2007 of ODDs, p = 0.1) and did not lead to more MAs for ODs with paediatric indications (60% vs 43%, p = 0.22). ODs authorised after 2007 had a longer time to MA than those authorised before 2007 (Hazard ratio (95% CI) 2.80 (1.84-4.28), p < 0.001); potential paediatric use did not influence the time to MA (Hazard ratio (95% CI) 1.14 (0.77-1.70), p = 0.52). The EU Paediatric Drug Regulation had a minor impact on development and availability of ODs for children, was associated with a longer time to MA, but ensured the further paediatric development of drugs still off-label to children. The impact of the Paediatric Drug Regulation on research quantity and quality in children through PIPs is not yet clear.

  3. Paediatric Blood-Injection-Injury Phobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Johnson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood-Injection-Injury phobia is a major health issue throughout the life span. It usually starts in early childhood. Avoidance of health care is seen in such individuals. Children with blood injection injury phobia have uncontrollable fear of blood, injury, injections and needles. Because of the intense fear, these children will do everything possible to avoid it. Various physical symptoms including increased heart rate, chest discomfort, trembling movements, feeling of choking and syncope may occur in these children on mentioning about blood, needles or any injury. Vasovagal fainting with diphasic response pattern occurs in about twenty percent of children on exposure to the phobic stimulus. Other anxiety disorders, depressive disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder also occur co-morbidly in children with blood-injection-injury phobia which makes the prognosis poor. Avoidance of health care due to phobia causes significant negative impact on health outcomes. Hence early diagnosis and urgent management of blood-injection-injury phobia in children is essential.

  4. Scaling up paediatric HIV care with an integrated, family-centred approach: an observational case study from Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyirika, Emmanuel; Towle, Megan S; Achan, Joyce; Muhangi, Justus; Senyimba, Catherine; Lule, Frank; Muhe, Lulu

    2013-01-01

    Family-centred HIV care models have emerged as an approach to better target children and their caregivers for HIV testing and care, and further provide integrated health services for the family unit's range of care needs. While there is significant international interest in family-centred approaches, there is a dearth of research on operational experiences in implementation and scale-up. Our retrospective case study examined best practices and enabling factors during scale-up of family-centred care in ten health facilities and ten community clinics supported by a non-governmental organization, Mildmay, in Central Uganda. Methods included key informant interviews with programme management and families, and a desk review of hospital management information systems (HMIS) uptake data. In the 84 months following the scale-up of the family-centred approach in HIV care, Mildmay experienced a 50-fold increase of family units registered in HIV care, a 40-fold increase of children enrolled in HIV care, and nearly universal coverage of paediatric cotrimoxazole prophylaxis. The Mildmay experience emphasizes the importance of streamlining care to maximize paediatric capture. This includes integrated service provision, incentivizing care-seeking as a family, creating child-friendly service environments, and minimizing missed paediatric testing opportunities by institutionalizing early infant diagnosis and provider-initiated testing and counselling. Task-shifting towards nurse-led clinics with community outreach support enabled rapid scale-up, as did an active management structure that allowed for real-time review and corrective action. The Mildmay experience suggests that family-centred approaches are operationally feasible, produce strong coverage outcomes, and can be well-managed during rapid scale-up.

  5. Paediatric cardiology: the last 50 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Malcolm E

    2015-01-01

    In the last half-century, the outlook for children with heart disease has changed dramatically. Morphologists have transformed our understanding of heart defects. Improved imaging methods, such as echocardiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have made diagnostic cardiac catheterisation almost redundant. However, interventional catheterisation has flourished as transcatheter procedures have replaced surgery for many lesions. The ability to pharmacologically manipulate the duct has revolutionised the management of the sick neonate with major heart disease. Better surgical techniques, such as deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest, allow repair of lesions in early infancy before irreversible complications develop. Advances in anaesthesia and intensive care have been integral. New sub-disciplines, such as fetal cardiology and electrophysiology, have emerged. The sum of these numerous developments is enormous. Lesions that were previously considered lethal are now routinely treated. Consequently, the great majority of children with major heart disease now reach adulthood in good health.

  6. [Addison's disease: forms of presentation in paediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royo Gómez, M; Olmos Jiménez, M J; Rodríguez Arnao, M D; Roldán Martín, M B

    2013-06-01

    Addison's disease or primary adrenal insufficiency is a rare disease in children. The signs and symptoms at diagnosis are frequently non-specific and insidious. Since adrenal crisis represents an emergency, it is important to be aware and to have a high degree of suspicion of the disorder in order to achieve an early diagnosis and treatment. We present a retrospective study describing the epidemiological, clinical and etiological data at diagnosis of five patients with Addison's disease followed up in our hospital. Dehydration, hyponatremia and skin hyperpigmentation were the most prevalent signs and symptoms at onset of the disease. The patients had low serum cortisol levels and positive adrenal antibodies. One patient with negative antibodies presented with a polyglandular syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical Profile of Children and Adolescents Attending the Behavioural Paediatrics Unit OPD in a Tertiary Care Set up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: There are limited studies on the clinical profile of children attending child guidance clinic under Paediatric background. Aims: To study clinical profile of Children & adolescents attending the Behavioural Paediatrics Unit (BPU) OPD under department of Paediatrics in a tertiary care set up. Methods: Monthly average turnover in the…

  8. Electromagnetic-Guided Bedside Placement of Nasoenteral Feeding Tubes by Nurses Is Non-Inferior to Endoscopic Placement by Gastroenterologists: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, A.; Rooij, T. de; Dijkgraaf, M.G.; Busch, O.R.; Bergman, J.J.; Ubbink, D.T.; Duijvendijk, P. van; Erkelens, G.W.; Klos, M.; Kruyt, P.M.; Bac, D.J.; Rosman, C.; Tan, A.C.; Molenaar, I.Q.; Monkelbaan, J.F.; Mathus-Vliegent, E.M.; Besselink, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Electromagnetic (EM)-guided bedside placement of nasoenteral feeding tubes by nurses may improve efficiency and reduce patient discomfort and costs compared with endoscopic placement by gastroenterologists. However, evidence supporting this task shift from gastroenterologists to nurses i

  9. Differences in treatment approach between Dutch paediatric dentists and general practitioners, a case control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuin, D.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.

    2012-01-01

    AIM: This case control study was to assess whether paediatric dentists perform significantly more diagnostic, preventive and curative care in a clinical setting then do general dental practitioners. METHODS: 16 paediatric dentists were approached and a matching control group of 16 general dental pra

  10. Guidelines for 18F-FDG PET and PET-CT imaging in paediatric oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stauss, J.; Franzius, C.; Pfluger, T.

    2008-01-01

    by the EANM Paediatric Committee, do not intend to compete with the existing guidelines, but rather aim at providing additional information on issues particularly relevant to PET imaging of children with cancer. CONCLUSION: The guidelines summarize the views of the Paediatric Committee of the European...

  11. The duration of effect of infliximab maintenance treatment in paediatric Crohn's disease is limited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bie, C. I.; Kindermann, A.; Kokke, F. T. M.; Damen, G. M.; Kneepkens, C. M. F.; van Rheenen, P. F.; Schweizer, J. J.; Hoekstra, J. H.; Norbruis, O. F.; Ten, W. E. Tjon A.; Vreugdenhil, A. C.; Deckers-Kocken, J. M.; Gijsbers, C. F. M.; Escher, J. C.; de Ridder, L.; Hummel, T.

    2011-01-01

    P>Background Infliximab is effective for induction and maintenance of remission in children with moderately to severely active Crohn's disease (CD). Aim To evaluate the long-term efficacy of infliximab treatment in paediatric CD. Methods In this observational, multicentre study, all paediatric CD pa

  12. The duration of effect of infliximab maintenance treatment in paediatric Crohn's disease is limited.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bie, C.I. De; Hummel, T.Z.; Kindermann, A.; Kokke, F.T.; Damen, G.M.; Kneepkens, C.M.; Rheenen, P.F. van; Schweizer, J.J.; Hoekstra, J.H.; Norbruis, O.F.; Tjon a Ren, W.E.; Vreugdenhil, A.C.; Deckers-Kocken, J.M.; Gijsbers, C.F.; Escher, J.C.; Ridder, L. de

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infliximab is effective for induction and maintenance of remission in children with moderately to severely active Crohn's disease (CD). AIM: To evaluate the long-term efficacy of infliximab treatment in paediatric CD. METHODS: In this observational, multicentre study, all paediatric CD

  13. Drug utilization and off-label drug use among Spanish emergency room paediatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    Morales-Carpi, Cristina; Estañ, Luis; Rubio, Elena; Lurbe, Empar; Morales-Olivas, Francisco J.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe the use of medicines and to determine the frequency of off-label use in emergency room paediatric patients. Patients and methods A prospective, observational and descriptive study was carried out in the setting of the paediatric emergency room of a Spanish general hospital. Medicines used by children

  14. Vaccination of paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases. Navigating through turbulent waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijstek, M.W.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we focus on the safety and efficacy of vaccinations in paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases. With the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR), we constructed recommendations for vaccination of paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases based on available evidence. Evidence

  15. Beyond counting cases: Public health impacts of national Paediatric Surveillance Units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grenier, D.; Elliott, E.J.; Zurynski, Y.; Rodrigues Pereira, R.; Preece, M.; Lynn, R.; Kries, R. von; Zimmermann, H.; Dickson, N.P.; Virella, D.

    2007-01-01

    Paediatric Surveillance Units (PSUs) have been established in 14 countries and facilitate national, prospective, active surveillance for a range of conditions, with monthly reporting by child health specialists. The International Network of Paediatric Surveillance Units (INoPSU) was established in 1

  16. Plate fixation of paediatric fractures of the distal tibia and fibula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bingshu; Wang, Jun

    2012-10-01

    The role of surgery in the management of paediatric long-bone shaft fractures remains a matter of debate. We present a series of paediatric patients with unstable fractures of the distal tibia and fibula, treated with titanium plate fixation. Excellent results were obtained after plate fixation.

  17. A Clinical Study of Phenomenology and Comorbidity of Paediatric Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pavan Kumar; T., Sivakumar; Agarwal, Vivek; Sitholey, Prabhat

    2012-01-01

    Background: Considerable controversy exists regarding clinical presentation, diagnosis, and comorbidities especially with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), in paediatric Bipolar Disorder (BPD). Aims and objectives: To describe phenomenology and comorbidities of paediatric BPD. Method: 78 Subjects (6-16 years) attending child and…

  18. Foreword: all things considered about probiotics, prebiotics and ıntestinal microbiota in children - from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozen, Metehan; Dinleyici, Ener Cagri

    2015-01-01

    There are numerorus published and ongoing experimental/clinical studies about probiotics and prebiotics, intestinal microbiota and nutrition. Three years ago, at the first International Symposium of Probiotics Prebiotics in Paediatrics in Istanbul (2012) we highlighted the 'paediatric perspective' on these issues and brought together more than 40 global key opinion leaders and 400 attendants to have a chance to extensively discuss the past, present and the future. In 2014, the second state of art congress, held in Antalya, aimed to discuss the gut microbiota and microbiotics and their impact through lifespan. Selected papers of this conference are presented in this special issue 'prebiotics and probiotics in paediatrics' of Beneficial Microbes. A summary of the conference results is provided below.

  19. Paediatric heart failure research: role of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kristin M

    2015-08-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, of the National Institutes of Health, is committed to supporting research in paediatric heart failure. The Institute's support of paediatric heart failure research includes both investigator-initiated grants and Institute initiatives. There were 107 funded grants in paediatric heart failure over the past 20 years in basic, translational and clinical research, technology development, and support of registries. Such research includes a broad diversity of scientific topics and approaches. The Institute also supports several initiatives for paediatric heart failure, including the Pediatric Circulatory Support Program, the Pumps for Kids, Infants, and Neonates (PumpKIN) Program, PediMACS, and the Pediatric Heart Network. This review article describes the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's past, present, and future efforts to promote a better understanding of paediatric heart failure, with the ultimate goal of improving outcomes.

  20. Paediatric screening for hypercholesterolaemia in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusters, D M; de Beaufort, C; Widhalm, K; Guardamagna, O; Bratina, N; Ose, L; Wiegman, A

    2012-03-01

    Different screening strategies are currently recommended to identify children with (familial) hypercholesterolaemia in order to initiate early lipid management. However, these strategies are characterised to date by low adherence by the medical community and limited compliance by parents and children. In a literature review, the authors assess which children should undergo screening and which children are in effect identified through the currently recommended strategies. Furthermore, the authors discuss the different screening tools and strategies currently used in Europe and what is known about the negative aspects of screening. The authors conclude that currently recommended selective screening strategies, which are mainly based on family history, lack precision and that a large percentage of affected children who are at increased risk of future coronary artery disease are not being identified. The authors propose universal screening of children between 1 and 9 years of age, a strategy likely to be most effective in terms of sensitivity and specificity for the identification of children with familial hypercholesterolaemia. However, this concept has yet to be proven in clinical practice.