WorldWideScience

Sample records for bedouin material culture

  1. Science and education across cultures: another look at the Negev Bedouins and their environmental management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Carlos Hiroo

    2014-12-01

    This is a rejoinder to the original article written by Wisam Sedawi, Orit Ben Zvi Assaraf, and Julie Cwikel about waste-related implication on the welfare of children living in the Negev's Bedouin Arab community. More specifically, the authors discuss the role of environmental education in the improvement of participants' life conditions. They do so by analyzing the impact of current precarious waste management practices on children's health and proposing the implementation of a science study unit in school that could assist them in dealing with the problem. My argument here is divided in three parts: first, based on the original article's information, I comment on some important characteristics of those unrecognized settlements and their waste production practices; second, I try to determine what kind of environmental education—if any—is necessary in that context to promote the desired changes put forward by the authors; and third, I adopt a cross-cultural approach to science and environmental literacy as means to provoke readers to consider the scientific value (often neglected) of traditional knowledge in attempting to solve the issues described in the original paper. In addition, both the Tbilisi Intergovernmental Conference on Environmental Education (1977) and the Treaty on Environmental Education for Sustainable Societies and Global Responsibility (1992) are used to support my argument, which also encompasses the concept of empowerment. Ultimately, bridging the Bedouin's traditional knowledge and Western modern science can help to improve science education at the school level in the unrecognized township under study by linking present and past in search of a more sustainable and peaceful future.

  2. Science and Education across Cultures: Another Look at the Negev Bedouins and Their Environmental Management Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Carlos Hiroo

    2014-01-01

    This is a rejoinder to the original article written by Wisam Sedawi, Orit Ben Zvi Assaraf, and Julie Cwikel about waste-related implication on the welfare of children living in the Negev's Bedouin Arab community. More specifically, the authors discuss the role of environmental education in the improvement of participants' life conditions. They do…

  3. A cross-cultural perspective of medical clowning: comparison of its effectiveness in reducing pain and anxiety among hospitalized Bedouin and Jewish Israeli children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilboa-Negari Z

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Zehavit Gilboa-Negari,1 Sarah Abu-Kaf,2 Ephrat Huss,1 Gavriel Hain,3 Asher Moser4 1Spitzer Department of Social Work, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel; 2Conflict Management and Resolution Program, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel; 3Department of Pediatrics, Soroka University Medical Center, Beer-Sheva, Israel; 4Department of Pediatric Oncology, Soroka University Medical Center, Beer-Sheva, Israel Purpose: Medical clowning has proven effective for reducing pain, anxiety, and stress, however, its differential effects on children from different cultures have not yet been researched. This study evaluated the effects of medical-clowning intervention on anxiety and pain among Jewish and Bedouin children, and anxiety among their parents, in southern Israel. Patients and methods: The study was conducted in hospital pediatric departments and employed a pre–post design involving quantitative and qualitative methods. The study included 89 children whose ages ranged from 7.5 to 12 years (39 Jewish and 50 Bedouin and 69 parents (19 Jewish and 50 Bedouin. Questionnaires assessing pain, anxiety, and demographics were used at the pre-intervention stage and pain, anxiety, and enjoyment of different aspects of the intervention were evaluated following the intervention. The intervention stage lasted for 8–10 minutes and included the use of word play, body language, and making faces, as well as the use of props brought by the clown. Semi-structured interviews were also conducted at the post-intervention stage. Results: The intervention reduced pain and anxiety among both groups of children and reduced anxiety among both groups of parents. However, anxiety levels were reduced more significantly among Bedouin children. The nonverbal components of the clowns’ humor were most central, but it was the verbal components that mediated the reduction in anxiety among the Bedouin children. Conclusion: This study underscored

  4. Caring for a Bedouin Female Patient with Breast Cancer: An Application of Leininger’s Theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality

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    Abdul Qadir J. Nashwan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Leininger’s theory is to provide care measures that are in harmony with an individual or group’s cultural beliefs, practices, and values. In the 1960’s she coined the term culturally congruent care, which is the primary goal of Transcultural nursing practice. Recently, there is a noticeable increase in the usage of the advanced hospitals’ health services by the Bedouin; as their awareness developed in term of health issues, and this put the health care providers (especially nurses in a great chance to face this Bedouin’s culture in clinical areas. So we have to enrich our understanding of the Bedouin’s culture to deliver a culturally congruent and satisfying care. A personal experience of two oncology nurses in working with a female patient with breast cancer and her Bedouin family described, with application of Madeleine Leininger’s theory of culture care diversity and universality. Concluding that understanding, considering and valuing cultural differences when delivering nursing care are vital to ensure providing a culturally congruent nursing care as well as avoid conflicts.

  5. Cultural Differences and Students' Spontaneous Models of the Water Cycle: A Case Study of Jewish and Bedouin Children in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi Assaraf, Orit; Eshach, Haim; Orion, Nir; Alamour, Yousif

    2012-01-01

    The present research aims at pinpointing differences in spontaneous and non-spontaneous mental models of water cycle conceptions of two 4th grade student groups: the Jewish residents of a small provincial town and a group of students from an indigenous Bedouin community. Students' conceptions were elicited using the Repertory Grid technique as…

  6. Listening to Bedouin Mothers of Children with Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor-Binyamini, Iris; Shoshana, Avihu

    2018-02-10

    This article examines how Bedouin mothers in Israel describe, perceive, and interpret their experiences raising a child with autism. Data were collected using semi-structured ethnographic interviews with 18 Bedouin mothers of children with autism, aged 6-16, living in recognized and unrecognized settlements in the Negev. Analysis of the study findings shows how the subaltern status of Bedouin women, which includes their husbands' constant threats of divorce or taking a second wife, makes it difficult for them to be mobile and interact in the public sphere without the presence of a man and creates an experience unique to these mothers, which we call "Exclusion within Exclusion". The Bedouin mothers report not only stigmatization, a lack of social support and loneliness but also structural-cultural characteristics that prevent them from obtaining information and participating in decision-making about the child with autism and that restrict their agency in dealing with and coping with their child's autism. In light of this situation, the discussion highlights the unique connection between local cultural scripts and the phenomenology of autism.

  7. Navigating care for Bedouin patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunton, Shauna; Higgins, Alison; Amkraut, Jonathan; Abu-Rabia, Yones

    2016-03-04

    The Bedouin Arab population in the southern Negev region of Israel has faced health problems as a result of transitioning rapidly from a nomadic agricultural lifestyle to a more modern urban lifestyle. Like many populations around the world, the Bedouins have changed their diets and become more sedentary and this has led to a high rate of diabetes. In this case report, we examine how diabetes has affected the life of an influential man in the Bedouin community and the significance this case has in the greater context of a global rise in chronic disease. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. RLG's Cultural Materials Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Smith-Yoshimura

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available

    頁次:5-12

    RLG members have formed a "Cultural Materials Alliance" to develop a pool of digitized research materials and a coherent, integrated discovery service. Alliance members are identifying best practices to create and describe digital surrogates and a rights-management framework addressing institutional intellectual-property mandates. The paper outlines the issues addressed in developing this new research resource that will promote "cultural heritage" in an unprecedented way. Examples from the RLG Cultural Materials service to be released later in 2001 will illustrate the work done so far.

  9. The Use of Developmental Rehabilitation Services. Comparison between Bedouins and Jews in the South of Israel

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    Hasia Lubetzky

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Some communities have peripheral zones inhabited by persons with a different culture than the majority of the general population, such as the Aboriginals in Australia, the Native Americans in the U.S. and Canada, the Eskimos in Lapland, and the Bedouins in Israel. These citizens are not receiving the same medical or rehabilitation services as the citizens of the metropolitan areas due to the fact that health and welfare programs are not adapted to their unique needs. At the Soroka University Medical Center in Beer-Sheva, Israel, the health and rehabilitation services have a very large and heterogeneous catch-up population serving most of the south of Israel. The purpose of this study was to look at the utilization and the number of appointments for child rehabilitation services by the Bedouin population compared to the general population in the south of Israel at the Zusman Child Development Center (CDC.The records of appointments to the CDC between the years 1995–1999 inclusive were studied and we randomly chose to limit the study to January, April, July, and October of each year, and randomly chose the daily records of nine therapists, three from each discipline (occuptional therapy [OT], physical therapy [PT], and speech and language therapy [SLT]. There were 8,504 appointments during these 4 months of the years 1995–1999, 2,255 of which were for Bedouin and 6,249 for Jewish children. Noncompliance with therapy appointments (NCTA for the same period for both the Bedouins (31% and Jewish children (26%, with a significant difference between the two populations, was noted. Of all the Jewish childrens’ appointments, the percentage of all three services was similar: 33% to PT, 38% to OT, and 29% to SLT, but for the Bedouin children, the percentage between the three services was significantly different: 62% to PT, 34% to OT, and 3% to SLT. These results seem to indicate that the Bedouin families prefer the PT and OT over the SLT. Our results

  10. Researching Creations: Applying Arts-Based Research to Bedouin Women's Drawings Ephrat Huss and Julie Cwikel

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    Ephrat Huss

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the author examines the combination of arts-based research and art therapy within Bedouin women's empowerment groups. The art fulfills a double role within the group of both helping to illuminate the women's self-defined concerns and goals, and simultaneously enriching and moving these goals forward. This creates a research tool that adheres to the feminist principles of finding new ways to learn from lower income women from a different culture, together with creating a research context that is of direct potential benefit and enrichment for the women. The author, through examples of the use of art within lower income Bedouin women's groups, examines the theoretical connection between arts-based research and art therapy, two areas that often overlap but whose connection has not been addressed theoretically.

  11. Teaching Religion and Material Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carp, Richard M.

    2007-01-01

    Because religions discipline and interpret bodies; create and define sacred spaces; generate, adore and study images in all media; regulate the intake of food; structure temporal experience; and in general interpenetrate and are permeated by the cultural landscapes in which they exist, religious studies must engage material religion and religious…

  12. Pediatricians' communication styles as correlates of global trust among Jewish and Bedouin parents of disabled children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Talma; Bachner, Yaacov G; Carmel, Sara; Flusser, Hagit; Galil, Aharon

    2008-02-01

    There is a paucity of empirical studies of trust among parents of children with developmental disabilities. Trust is an important element in the patient-physician relationship, especially in medical rehabilitation, where continuous cooperation is essential for positive therapeutic outcomes. Trust is dependent on a variety of psychosocial factors, one of which is the physician's communication style. The current study had three goals: (1) to compare two groups of Israeli parents, Jews and Bedouins, in terms of the levels of global trust in the pediatricians in a regional child development center; (2) to compare their perceptions of the pediatricians' communication styles; and (3) to assess the association between three communication styles (caring, interest, and collaboration) and the parents' trust in the pediatricians. The sample included 193 parents of disabled children ranging from 6 months to 6 years of age. Global trust and parents' perceptions concerning their communication with the center's pediatricians were measured by scales developed for this research. Despite the large cultural differences that exist between the Jewish and Bedouin groups, the only significant difference between them was that Jewish parents' reported a significantly higher level of collaboration compared with the Bedouins. Global trust in the pediatrician was significantly predicted by the interest and collaboration communication styles, but ethnicity was not a significant predictor. These findings underscore the importance of physicians' interpersonal competence and skills in the therapeutic relationship and support the increasing trend of including doctor-patient communication training in undergraduate and continuing medical education.

  13. Pediatric Burns in the Bedouin Population in Southern Israel

    OpenAIRE

    Arnon D. Cohen; R. Gurfinkel; R. Glezinger; Y. Kriger; N. Yancolevich; L. Rosenberg

    2007-01-01

    Burn trauma is an important public health concern, with increased risk for burns in children. A cross-sectional study was performed to describe the epidemiological characteristics and risk factors for burns in hospitalized Bedouin children in Soroka University Medical Center during the years 2001–2002. In a population of 558 hospitalized burn-injured patients, 282 Bedouin children were identified. Two hundred and sixty five patients (94.0%) had burns involving less than 20% of the body surfac...

  14. Prevalence of consanguineous marriages and associated factors among Israeli Bedouins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na'amnih, Wasef; Romano-Zelekha, Orly; Kabaha, Ahmed; Rubin, Liza Pollack; Bilenko, Natalya; Jaber, Lutfi; Honovich, Mira; Shohat, Tamy

    2014-10-01

    The Bedouin population in Israel is a semi-nomadic traditional patriarchal society. Consanguineous marriages are very common, contributing to high rates of congenital malformations and genetic diseases, resulting in high infant mortality. Data on consanguineous marriages among Bedouins in Israel are limited. This study examined the current prevalence of consanguineous marriages and their determinants among Israeli Bedouins. One thousand two hundred ninety Bedouin women who delivered in the maternity wards of the only hospital serving the Bedouin population were interviewed between November 2009 and January 2010. The prevalence of consanguineous marriages was 44.8 %. The most common type of spousal relationship was first cousins (65.7 % of all consanguineous marriages). The mean inbreeding coefficient was 0.0238. Factors significantly associated with consanguinity were less years of schooling (OR 0.94, 95 % CI (0.88-0.99), p = 0.02) and younger age at marriage of the wife (OR 0.90, 95 % CI (0.80-0.96), p = 0.0002). In conclusion, the rate of consanguineous marriages among Bedouins is very high, making this population at risk for congenital malformations and genetic diseases. Efforts should be directed at better education and provision of premarital and prenatal counseling on the health consequences of consanguineous marriages and the possibilities to lower those risks.

  15. Poetry as women’s resistance to the consequences of Bedouin displacement in Jordan

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    Maira Seeley

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the significant displacement that Jordanian Bedouin familieshave undergone in recent generations, Bedouin women are able tomitigate some of the consequences of that displacement through theopportunities and influence they have gained as Nabati poets.

  16. Therapists' communication styles and parents' global trust in the therapists: a comparison between Jewish and Bedouin parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachner, Yaacov G; Carmel, Sara; Lubetzky, Hassy; Heiman, Nurit; Galil, Aharon

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the level of global trust in therapists for two groups of Israeli parents, Jews and Bedouin, and to assess which of three interpersonal communication styles significantly explain global trust in the therapists. A total of 193 parents of children ranging from six months to six years of age participated in this study. Parents' perceptions regarding their communication with the center's therapists were measured by 15 items clustered into three dimensions of communication: caring, collaboration, and interest. Parents of both cultural groups expressed high levels of global trust in the center's therapists. Jewish parents trusted their children's therapists significantly more than their Bedouin counterparts and ranked the therapists' caring and collaboration more highly. The communication style of caring was found to be the sole contributor to the variability in global trust. Effort should be undertaken to develop effective communication styles for the dimension of caring to increase therapists' ability to promote global trust in their patients' parents.

  17. Diabetes in the Bedouin population in the Israeli Negev - An update 2017.

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    Amkraut, Jonathan; Zaina, Adnan; Abu-Rabia, Yones

    2018-03-26

    The Bedouins are an Arab population living in Israel severely impacted by diabetes and obesity. The aim of this research was to update the prevalence of diabetes among Bedouins in the Negev and to observe differences in this population in comparison with non-Bedouins in Israel. A cross-sectional study was performed using the Clalit Health Services database. Diabetes prevalence among Bedouins was compared with non-Arabs and non-Bedouin Arabs in Israel. Differences in sexes and among Bedouins living in planned cities and unrecognized villages were observed. The age-adjusted prevalence of diabetes was 12.3% in the Bedouin population versus 8.2% in the non-Arab population in southern Israel (p < 0.0001). Diabetes prevalence among Bedouins and all Arabs in Israel was similar (12.0%). In all of Israel, age-adjusted diabetes prevalence was 8.8% for men and 7.5% in women (p < 0.0001) compared to 12.0% for men and 12.5% for women in the Bedouin population (p = 0.0008). In the Bedouin population in planned cities, age-adjusted diabetes prevalence was 12.5% versus 10.5% in the Bedouin population in unrecognized villages (p < 0.0001). This study shows that the prevalence of diabetes among Bedouins is higher than non-Bedouins in Israel. Increasing urbanization of the Bedouin population with their higher diabetes prevalence indicates the need for increased medical intervention as well as continuing investigation into the causes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Learning Things: Material Culture in Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandy, Doug; Bolin, Paul E.

    2018-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive book to connect art education to material culture--an evolving pedagogy about the meaning of "things" in the lives of children, youth, and adults. Written by luminaries in the field, this resource explores a range of objects exemplifying material culture, defined as "the human-formed objects, spaces,…

  19. Ecological studies of some insects associated with Bedouin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ecological studies of some insects associated with Bedouin settlements in St Katherine Protectorate, South Sinai, Egypt. ... Cockroaches were very abundant in houses, peaking in August, and reaching a minimum in winter. The abundance of Vespa orientalis has important implications for wild bees, and the huge numbers ...

  20. Embodied drawings as expressions of distress among impoverished single Bedouin mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, Ephrat; Cwikel, Julie

    2008-06-01

    This paper demonstrates how marginalized, Bedouin, single mothers define pain through different depictions of their bodies and their embodied experience. Using visual data generated through an empowerment group with single Bedouin women living in the Negev, illustrative pictures were selected. The potential of drawing as an indirect, but deeply communicative symbolic vehicle with which to express the women's pain and struggle as marginalized and impoverished women is demonstrated through themes that emerged from a content analysis of the women's art and their verbal comments about what they had drawn. A central theme identified pain due to painful life circumstances, rather than due to inherent sickness or weakness. Other themes identified included the body as a site for cultural transition, power negations with men, intellectual development, and the struggles of motherhood. This shows how the visual depiction of pain on the page offers a socially critical, yet potentially mental health promoting medium that locates women's distress, not as the result of personal and physical weakness, but as the result of social oppression. The implications for the use of art with socially marginalized women are discussed.

  1. Portable Material Culture and Death Factory Auschwitz

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    Adrian T. Myers

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Like any other factory, the death factory of Auschwitz consumed primary materials and produced secondary products. Unique to Auschwitz, though, is that the primary material consumed was human life; not just the life of the breathing human body, but also the material possessions associated with that life. The detritus of this most efficient genocide – clothing, jewellery, food, corpses – was appropriated and put to new uses by the SS and the prisoners. Others have recognised the various postwar material cultural outcomes of the camp: the writing, the film, the theatre, the art, the tourism. This article, however, demonstrates that the material culture of Auschwitz is not a phenomenon exclusive to the postwar era. It focuses on the fact that inside the camp during the war, despite the landscape of death and deprivation, intimate interaction between humans and material culture continued.

  2. Material culture of multilingualism and affectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Larissa Aronin

    2012-01-01

    Affectivity is an important dimension in humans’ social and individual lives. It is either a stimulating or hindering aspect of language learning. This article aims to draw attention to material culture as a powerful, but mostly neglected source of data on the use and acquisition of languages, and demonstrates the close and intricate links between affectivity and material culture. It is hoped that revealing these interrelationships will assist in understanding and managing l...

  3. Deafness among the Negev Bedouin: an interdisciplinary dialogue on deafness, marginality and context

    OpenAIRE

    Kisch, S.

    2012-01-01

    Shifra Kisch analyses the social consequences of deafness and the sociolinguistic context of signing among the Negev Bedouin, the native Arab inhabitants of the southern arid region of present-day Israel. The consequences of deafness vary considerably between different Bedouin groups as well as along gender lines. The emergence of a local sign language, in several Bedouin groups with exceptionally high rates of deafness, account for significant differences in the experience of deafness by bot...

  4. The ecology of primate material culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koops, Kathelijne; Visalberghi, Elisabetta; van Schaik, Carel P

    2014-11-01

    Tool use in extant primates may inform our understanding of the conditions that favoured the expansion of hominin technology and material culture. The 'method of exclusion' has, arguably, confirmed the presence of culture in wild animal populations by excluding ecological and genetic explanations for geographical variation in behaviour. However, this method neglects ecological influences on culture, which, ironically, may be critical for understanding technology and thus material culture. We review all the current evidence for the role of ecology in shaping material culture in three habitual tool-using non-human primates: chimpanzees, orangutans and capuchin monkeys. We show that environmental opportunity, rather than necessity, is the main driver. We argue that a better understanding of primate technology requires explicit investigation of the role of ecological conditions. We propose a model in which three sets of factors, namely environment, sociality and cognition, influence invention, transmission and retention of material culture. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Back to the Future? History, Material Culture and New Materialism

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    Hans Schouwenburg

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of history currently witnesses two markedly different material turns. Some historians are using material artefacts as alternatives to textual sources. Others draw on ‘new materialism’, a new tradition in thought that originated in the field of gender studies. Both groups are trying to move beyond the cultural turn, which has dominated the study of history since the 1980s. However, the first group merely extends the programme of the cultural turn into new domains without rejecting its methods or epistemological foundations. The latter group, on the other hand, provides a new cultural theory. This article demonstrates that the ‘new’ in new materialism is not so much an increased engagement with the material world, but rather a new conceptualization of developing theory and reading texts, which cuts through established dichotomies between matter and meaning or culture and the social. In doing so, a new materialist history can solve some of the problems associated with the cultural turn and the turn to material artefacts.

  6. Material culture of multilingualism and affectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Aronin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Affectivity is an important dimension in humans’ social and individual lives. It is either a stimulating or hindering aspect of language learning. This article aims to draw attention to material culture as a powerful, but mostly neglected source of data on the use and acquisition of languages, and demonstrates the close and intricate links between affectivity and material culture. It is hoped that revealing these interrelationships will assist in understanding and managing language diversity. It will allow practitioners and teachers to carry out social and private encounters, events and language teaching with more care, understanding and expertise. Researchers will be encouraged to join the investigation of yet one more important facet of multilingualism – material culture.

  7. [Differences in clinical characteristics and outcomes of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in Jewish and Bedouin patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabaev, Elena; Sagy, Iftach; Zaid, Eed Abu; Nevzorov, Roman; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Zeller, Lior; Barski, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare clinical characteristics and outcomes of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in the Jewish and Bedouin populations. A retrospective analysis was conducted of hospital admissions for diabetic ketoacidosis in adult patients between 2003 and 2010. The clinical and biochemical characteristics and outcomes of diabetic ketoacidosis patients of Jewish origin were compared with those of Bedouin origin. The primary outcome was in-hospital all-cause mortality. The study cohort included 220 consecutive patients for whom the admission diagnosis was diabetic ketoacidosis. The cohort was categorized according to Jewish and Bedouin origin as follows: 177 (80.5%) Jewish and 43 (19.5%) Bedouin patients. The Jewish patients were significantly older than the Bedouin patients (45.8 +/- 18.9 vs. 32.9 +/- 15.3, p diabetic ketoacidosis in both the Jewish and Bedouin groups had type 1 diabetes mellitus. No differences were found for in-hospital mortality, 30 days mortality or complication rates in groups of Jewish and Bedouin patients. The Length of hospital stay was significantly Longer in the Jewish compared to the Bedouin groups of patients (median 4 days (IQR 2; 6 days) vs. median 3 days (IQR 2; 4 days) respectively, p = 0.05). We did not find significant differences in the outcomes between Bedouin and Jewish patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. The Bedouin patients in the present study were younger compared to Jewish patients and the Length of the hospital stay was shorter in the Bedouin compared to the Jewish group. Advanced age, mechanical ventilation and bed-ridden state were independent predictors of 30-day mortality in both ethnic groups.

  8. Pediatric Burns in the Bedouin Population in Southern Israel

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    Arnon D. Cohen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Burn trauma is an important public health concern, with increased risk for burns in children. A cross-sectional study was performed to describe the epidemiological characteristics and risk factors for burns in hospitalized Bedouin children in Soroka University Medical Center during the years 2001–2002. In a population of 558 hospitalized burn-injured patients, 282 Bedouin children were identified. Two hundred and sixty five patients (94.0% had burns involving less than 20% of the body surface area. Cause of the burns was scald in 190 patients (67.4%, fire in 80 patients (28.4%, chemical in 8 patients (2.8%, and explosion in 2 patients (0.7%. Two female patients (0.7% aged 11 and 17 years died of their burns that were caused by fire. The mean length of hospitalization was 9.8 days. Pediatric burn injury has become a significant public health problem in the Bedouin population of the Negev. To reduce the burden of burn injury, it is necessary to increase current efforts in prevention of burns.

  9. Deafness among the Negev Bedouin: an interdisciplinary dialogue on deafness, marginality and context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kisch, S.

    2012-01-01

    Shifra Kisch analyses the social consequences of deafness and the sociolinguistic context of signing among the Negev Bedouin, the native Arab inhabitants of the southern arid region of present-day Israel. The consequences of deafness vary considerably between different Bedouin groups as well as

  10. Material Culture of Multilingualism and Affectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronin, Larissa

    2012-01-01

    Affectivity is an important dimension in humans' social and individual lives. It is either a stimulating or hindering aspect of language learning. This article aims to draw attention to material culture as a powerful, but mostly neglected source of data on the use and acquisition of languages, and demonstrates the close and intricate links between…

  11. The provision of accessible, acceptable health care in rural remote areas and the right to health: Bedouin in the North East region of Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewando Hundt, Gillian; Alzaroo, Salah; Hasna, Fadia; Alsmeiran, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Provision of accessible acceptable health care in remote rural areas poses a challenge to health care providers. This case study of formal and informal health care provision for Bedouin in North East Jordan is based on interviews conducted in 2007-2008 involving clinic providers, policymakers and Bedouin as part of an EC funded study from 2006 to 2010. The paper explores to what extent the right to health as set out in UN General Comment 14 (on Article 12 and 12.2 of the International Covenant on Social Economic and Cultural Rights on the right to health) can provide a framework for considering the availability, accessibility and acceptability of current provision in a rural setting in Jordan. Health care is provided in the public sector by the Ministry of Health and the Royal Medical Services to a dispersed population living in encampments and villages over a large rural area. There are issues of accessibility in terms of distance, and of acceptability in relation to the lack of local and female staff, lack of cultural competencies and poor communication. We found that these providers of health care have a developing partnership that could potentially address the challenge of provision to this rural area. The policymakers have an overview that is in line with applying the concept of health care justice for a more equitable distribution of resources and adjustment of differential access and availability. The health providers are less aware of the right to accessible acceptable health care in their day to day provision whilst the Bedouin population are quite aware of this. This case study of Bedouin in North East Jordan has particular relevance to the needs of populations - both pastoralists and non pastoralists living in remote and rural areas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of lunar materials on plant tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkinshaw, C. H.; Venketeswaran, S.; Baur, P. S.; Croley, T. E.; Scholes, V. E.; Weete, J. D.; Halliwell, R. S.; Hall, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Lunar material collected during the Apollo 11, 12, 14, and 15 missions has been used to treat 12 species of higher plant tissue cultures. Biochemical and morphological studies have been conducted on several of these species. Tobacco tissue cultures treated with 0.22 g of lunar material exhibited increased greening more complex chloroplasts, less cytoplasmic vacuolation and greater vesiculation. Pine tissue cultures reacted to treatment by an increased deposition of tannin-like materials. The percentage of dry weight and soluble protein was increased in cultures treated with either lunar or terrestrial rock materials.

  13. Security Culture in Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susyanta-Widyatmaka; Koraag, Venuesiana-Dewi; Taswanda-Taryo

    2005-01-01

    In nuclear related field, there are three different cultures: safety, safeguards and security culture. Safety culture has established mostly in nuclear industries, meanwhile safeguards and security culture are relatively new and still developing. The latter is intended to improve the physical protection of material and nuclear facility. This paper describes concept, properties and factors affecting security culture and interactions among these cultures. The analysis indicates that anybody involving in nuclear material and facility should have strong commitment and awareness of such culture to establish it. It is concluded that the assessment of security culture outlined in this paper is still preliminary for developing and conduction rigorous security culture implemented in a much more complex facility such as nuclear power plant

  14. Quality of primary nursing care for Bedouin in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasna, Fadia; Hundt, Gillian L; Al-Smairan, Mohamed; Alzaroo, Salah

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents a critique of the use of the Maximizing Access to Quality (MAQ) instrument supplemented by non-participant observation as a way of assessing the quality of nursing care in primary care clinics in the north-eastern Badia of Jordan, where populated by Bedouin. The MAQ checklist with non-participant observation of clinic care was used to assess the quality of care in four comprehensive health centres. In the four comprehensive health centres, more than half of the indicators for measuring the quality of the physical conditions were adequate. In relation to personnel, general practitioners were available, but in-service training was needed and no social workers were available. Provision of health services was optimal in three of the clinics but was less than optimal in the remotest clinic. Health education was done sporadically and continuity of care was the main challenge in provision in the four clinics. The MAQ checklist for assessing the quality of health provision in maternal and child health and reproductive services is a useful instrument to capture a snapshot of health-care provision; however, it is not suited to a rural setting. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. The Influence of Israel Health Insurance Law on the Negev Bedouin Population — A Survey Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Morad

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The extension of universal health service insurance to national populations is a relatively new phenomenon. Since 1995, the Israeli National Health Insurance Law (NHIL has provided universal health services to every resident, but the effect of this law on health and health services among minorities has not been examined sufficiently. The goals of this study were to track some of the first changes engendered by the NHIL among the Negev Bedouin Arabs to examine the effects of universal health care services. Methods included analysis of historical and health policy documents, three field appraisals of health care services (1994, 1995, 1999, a region-wide interview survey of Negev Bedouins (1997, and key informant interviews. For the interview survey, a sample of 515 households was chosen from different Bedouin localities representing major sedentarization stages. Results showed that prior to the NHIL, a substantial proportion of the Negev Bedouins were uninsured with limited, locally available health service. Since 1995, health services, particularly primary care clinics and health manpower, have dramatically expanded. The initial expansion appears to have been a marketing ploy, but real improvements have occurred. There was a high level of health service utilization among the Bedouins in the Negev, especially private medical services, hospitals, and night ambulatory medical services. The NHIL brought change to the structure of health services in Israel, namely the institution of a national health system based on proportional allocation of resources (based on size and age and open competition in the provision of quality health care. The expansion of the pool of potential members engendered by the new universal coverage had profound effects on the Health Funds' attitudes towards Negev Bedouins. In addition, real consumer choice was introduced for the first time. Although all the health care needs of this rapidly growing population have yet to be met

  16. Analyzing the Heterogeneous Hierarchy of Cultural Heritage Materials: Analytical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentelman, Karen

    2017-06-12

    Objects of cultural heritage significance are created using a wide variety of materials, or mixtures of materials, and often exhibit heterogeneity on multiple length scales. The effective study of these complex constructions thus requires the use of a suite of complementary analytical technologies. Moreover, because of the importance and irreplaceability of most cultural heritage objects, researchers favor analytical techniques that can be employed noninvasively, i.e., without having to remove any material for analysis. As such, analytical imaging has emerged as an important approach for the study of cultural heritage. Imaging technologies commonly employed, from the macroscale through the micro- to nanoscale, are discussed with respect to how the information obtained helps us understand artists' materials and methods, the cultures in which the objects were created, how the objects may have changed over time, and importantly, how we may develop strategies for their preservation.

  17. Enhancing Access to Primary Cultural Heritage Materials of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Peter M.; Hyman, Malcolm

    This chapter is about enhancing access to primary cultural heritage materials of India housed in academic libraries by integrating them with machine-readable texts, lexical resources, and linguistic software in a digital library. Integrating primary cultural materials with a digital library can enable broad use of Indic collections for research and education. For the purposes of illustrating this procedure, we outline here the development of a prototype using the collections of Sanskrit manuscripts in the libraries at Brown University and the University of Pennsylvania and integrating them with The Sanskrit Library. The result is extendable to collections of Indic materials throughout the world and can serve as a model for digitization projects of cultural materials in other major culture-bearing languages such as Greek, Latin, Arabic, Persian, and Chinese.

  18. Global China:Material culture and connections in world history

    OpenAIRE

    Gerritsen, Anne; McDowall, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The multidisciplinary articles in this special issue were developed in conjunction with a research project on the cultures of porcelain in global history, hosted by the Global History and Culture Centre at the University of Warwick. These articles all situate porcelain within wider contexts of material and visual culture. This approach reveals the complexities of the processes involved in the appropriation of Chinese ceramics in England and Iran and in the diffusion of Chinese-style ceramics ...

  19. School Violence in Bedouin Schools in Israel: A Re-Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbedour, Salman; ElBassiouny, Amanda; Bart, William M.; Elbedour, Hammad

    2013-01-01

    Students in Bedouin schools in Israel completed a survey in which they indicated how frequent abusive teacher behaviors occurred in their classrooms; responses indicated that abusive teacher behaviors occur often. Female students tended to register higher levels of punitive teacher behaviors than male students and secondary school students tended…

  20. "Deaf discourse": the social construction of deafness in a Bedouin community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kisch, S.

    2008-01-01

    Among the Al-Sayyid Arab-Bedouin, the use of an indigenous sign language is widespread and provides the foundation of a signing community shared by hearing and deaf people. Cases with comparable high incidences of deafness have in recent years stimulated debates in diverse academic disciplines.

  1. Disappearance of female genital mutilation from the Bedouin population of Southern Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halila, Suhil; Belmaker, R H; Abu Rabia, Yunis; Froimovici, Miron; Applebaum, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Recently, clinicians in Southern Israel perceived that the practice of female genital mutilation had disappeared entirely in the Bedouin population. We previously studied the prevalence of this practice in 1995. We decided to survey again the Bedouin population focusing on those tribes previously reported to perform this practice. Eighty percent of the interviews were done by an Arabic-speaking psychiatrist and 20% were done by an Arabic speaking nurse in the gynecologic clinic of a large Bedouin township or the gynecologic clinic of a smaller Bedouin township. Women were asked if they would be willing to answer a few questions about their past and if they were willing to have the gynecologist, with no additional procedure, note whether any operation had been performed on their genitalia. Physical examination by gynecologist and an oral questionnaire. One hundred and thirty two women were examined. No cases of any scarring of the kind reported in the previous study were found on physical examination. FGM has apparently disappeared over 15 years in a population in which it was once prevalent.

  2. Impact of multiple micronutrient supplementation ("sprinkles") on iron deficiency anemia in Bedouin Arab and Jewish infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilenko, Natalya; Fraser, Drora; Vardy, Hillel; Belmaker, Ilana

    2014-07-01

    A high prevalence of iron deficiency anemia persists in Bedouin Arab and Jewish pediatric populations in southern Israel. To compare the effect of daily use of the micronutrient supplementation (MMS), "Sprinkles," a powdered formulation of iron, vitamins A and C, folic acid and zinc, with liquid iron and vitamins A and D on iron deficiency at 12 months of age. The 621 eligible Bedouin and Jewish infants in the study were assigned to the MMS and control arms and received supplementations from age 6 to 12 months. We examined the change in hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean cell volume, red blood cell distribution, serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. In addition, we used the high Iron Deficiency Index (IDI) if two or more of the above six parameters showed abnormal levels. Rates of anemia decreased significantly over the 6 month period, from 58.8% to 40.6% among Bedouin infants (P = 0.037) and from 40.6 to 15.8% among Jewish infants (P = 0.017). In Bedouin infants the prevalence of high IDI decreased significantly from 79.2% to 67.4% (P = 0.010) in the MMS group, but there was no change in the controls. Among Jewish infants, the high IDI prevalence decreased from 67% to 55.6% with no statistically significant difference in the two study arms. In the multivariate analysis in Bedouin infants MMS use was associated with a reduced risk of 67% in high IDI at age 12 months as compared to controls (P = 0.001). Fewer side effects in the intervention groups in both ethnic populations were reported. MMS fortification of home food can be recommended as an effective and safe method for preventing iron deficiency anemia at 12 months of age.

  3. Cultural and Ideological Roots of Materialism in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Song; Stening, Bruce W.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the role of cultural values and political ideologies in the development of materialism, and the impact of materialism on subjective well-being, in the Chinese context. A survey was conducted of 487 persons in two cities in China and the results analyzed using structural equation modeling. The findings show that China's…

  4. Identification of collagen-based materials in cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Daniel P; Buckley, Michael; Promise, Ellen; Trauger, Sunia A; Holdcraft, T Rose

    2013-09-07

    All stakeholders in cultural heritage share an interest in fabrication methods and material technology. Until now methods for analysis of organic materials, particularly proteins, have not been widely available to researchers at cultural institutions. This paper will describe an analytical method for the identification of collagen-based materials from soft tissue sources and show examples of its application to diverse museum objects. The method, peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF), uses enzymatic digestion of extracted proteins to produce a mixture of peptides. The mass spectrum of the mixture contains characteristic marker ions-a peptide mass fingerprint-which are compared to species-specific markers from references as the basis of identification. Preliminary results indicate that analysis of materials from aged samples, several different tissue types, and tanned or untanned materials yields comparable PMF results. Significantly, PMF is simple, rapid, sensitive and specific, has been implemented in a museum laboratory, and is being practiced successfully by non-specialists.

  5. Importance of integrating a cultural module in the community nursing curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shdayfat, Noha; Hasna, Fadia; Al-Smairan, Mohammad; Lewando-Hundt, Gillian; Shudayfat, Tamador

    2016-01-01

    The Bedouin Health module was one of the proposed interventions funded by the European Union in 2007-2008, with a focus on health services and utilisation of these services for the Bedouin people in the north of Jordan. This study aimed to evaluate the sustainability of integrating this module into the community health nursing courses at Al al-Bayt University, Jordan. Two focus group discussions were carried out with five faculty members and five students involved in the implementation of the Bedouin Health module. Leading questions were prepared for both groups. Four main themes emerged across both focus groups: self-expression, sustainability, acceptance, and motivation. The findings of this study identify how crucial it is for nursing students and faculty members to be culturally competent when practising community health care in the Bedouin community.

  6. Scaling up: Material culture as scaffold for the social brain

    OpenAIRE

    Coward, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Many other species besides Homo sapiens are tool-users and even tool-makers, but one aspect of material culture still sets modern humans apart: our emotional and social engagement with objects. Here I argue that this engagement acted as a crucial scaffold for the scaling-up of human social networks beyond those of our closest relatives the chimpanzees to the global ‘small world’ of modern humans. Material culture plays a crucial role in conveying social information about relationships between...

  7. On Tea Bowl from Jianzhan to Tenmoku: Material Culture and Intangible Culture in Cultural Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Guan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available According to precise and scientific literature that recorded, Chinese tea culture has a documented history of more than 1700 years. During which period, Yuan Dynasty was considered a crucial turning-point with great changes. The current tea culture in China is an adoption and innovation of Ming and Qing dynasty, especially in the form of processing technology. For those elements inherited from Tang and Song dynasties, however, they were more directly adopted systematically by Japan. Ever since powdered tea culture from Song dynasty was accepted in Japan, Jianzhan, the tea bowl that gained renowned reputation in the Song tea culture was also introduced and became tenmoku (tianmu after localization. As the transformation of Chinese tea culture ended in Japan, Japanese tea culture of wabi-cha was shaped after the tenmoku’s obvious decline in value. Jianzhan’s prosper, and tenmoku’s emergence and transition, all proved a definitive impact from intangible culture.

  8. Out of the Desert: My Journey from Nomadic Bedouin to the Heart of Global Oil

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Naimi, Ali Ibrahim

    2017-01-08

    His Excellency Ali Ibrahim Al-Naimi, former Ministry of Oil in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, will comment on his forthcoming autobiography "Out of the Desert: My Journey from Nomadic Bedouin to the Heart of Global Oil". Ali Ibrahim Al-Naimi is the former Saudi oil minister - and OPEC kingpin - a position he held for the two decades between August 1995 and May 2016. He was born into extreme poverty as a nomadic Bedouin in the 1930s, just as US companies were discovering vast quantities of oil under Arabian deserts. From his first job as a shepherd boy to his appointment to one of the most powerful political and economic jobs in the world, Out of the Desert charts Al-Naimi\\'s extraordinary rise to power.

  9. Assessing environmental effects on organic materials in cultural heritage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyatzis, Stamatis; Ioakimoglou, Eleni; Facorellis, Yorgos

    2015-01-01

    Under the auspices of INVENVORG (Thales Research Funding Program – NRSF), and within a holistic approach for assessing environmental effects on organic materials in cultural heritage (CH) artefacts, the effect of artificial ageing on elemental and molecular damage and their effects...

  10. Cultural Materialism and Behavior Analysis: Common Problems and Radical Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Marvin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a transcribed audio recording of the invited address the author gave to Sigrid Glenn on the relations between cultural materialism and radical behaviorism at the 12th annual conference of the Association for Behavior Analysis in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on May 23rd, 1986. In his address, the author emphasizes that the necessity…

  11. Inflammatory bowel disease among Bedouin Arabs in southern Israel: urbanization and increasing prevalence rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Freha, Naim; Schwartz, Doron; Elkrinawi, Jaber; Ben Yakov, Gil; Abu Tailakh, Muhammad; Munteanu, Daniela; Abu Ganim, Abdelrhman; Fich, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been associated with genetic and environmental factors, including urban living. IBD was rare in the Israeli Bedouin community 30 years ago. Over recent decades, a large proportion of this community has undergone a transition from a nomadic to a western lifestyle. Our aim was to carry out an updated evaluation of the clinical and epidemiological features of IBD in the Bedouin sector of southern Israel. All Bedouin patients with a known diagnosis of Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) were included in the retrospective study. The cohort included 31 CD patients and 31 UC patients. The mean age of the patients at diagnosis was 29±10.9 and 35±17.5 years for CD and UC, respectively. The prevalence rate for CD was 15.5/100,000 and the incidence rate was 0.8-3.55/100,000. Fourteen of the CD patients (45%) had ileal disease and 64.5% had inflammatory disease behavior according to the Montreal classification. Eleven of the CD patients (35%) were treated with anti-TNF-α and 26% had undergone surgery. Over the previous decade, the prevalence of UC was 14/100,000 and the incidence was 0.5-2.39/100,000. Eighteen UC patients (58%) had left-sided colitis. Three (9.7%) had undergone total colectomy for severe disease. We found an increased prevalence of IBD in the Bedouin population, associated with their change in lifestyle over previous decades. However, the prevalence is still markedly lower than that in other population groups. A high percentage of patients were treated with anti-TNF-α and/or surgery.

  12. [Prevalence and risk factors for diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetes patients in Jewish and Bedouin populations in southern Israel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorny, Alexander; Lifshits, Tova; Kratz, Assaf; Levy, Jaime; Golfarb, Daniel; Zlotnik, Alexander; Knyazer, Boris

    2011-12-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the most common microvascular complication of diabetes. In recent years, there is a dramatic increase in the number of diabetic patients in the Bedouin population in the Negev region. To analyze the clinical features and find out the incidence and risk factors of diabetic retinopathy of type 2 diabetes patients in the Jewish and Bedouin populations. Data was collected from the files of 523 patients, who were examined by ophthalmologists at different clinics in southern Israel, and who were not previously diagnosed with diabetic retinopathy until that examination. All the data was analyzed by univariate analysis, and a multivariate model was built to predict the risk to develop diabetic retinopathy, separately for the Jewish and Bedouin population in the Negev. The average age was 64 +/- 10.3 years in the Jewish population and 58.6 +/- 12 years in the Bedouin population (P diabetic retinopathy and/or maculopathy) were found in 13.4% of Jews, compared to 22% of Bedouins (P predicting factors for the development of diabetic retinopathy in the Jewish population: long duration of diabetes, older age, high HbA1c, insulin treatment, high levels of LDL and creatinine; and 4 predicting factors in the Bedouin population: long duration of diabetes, high HbA1c, insulin treatment and smoking. The Bedouin population in southern Israel suffers more from retinal diabetic complications compared to Jewish patients. Common risk factors for both populations are long duration of diabetes, high HbA1c and insulin treatment.

  13. Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency and Lynch syndrome among consecutive Arab Bedouins with colorectal cancer in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Freha, Naim; Leibovici Weissman, Yaara; Fich, Alexander; Barnes Kedar, Inbal; Halpern, Marisa; Sztarkier, Ignacio; Behar, Doron M; Arbib Sneh, Orly; Vilkin, Alex; Baris, Hagit N; Gingold, Rachel; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Niv, Yaron; Goldberg, Yael; Levi, Zohar

    2018-01-01

    We assessed the molecular characteristics and the frequency of mutations in mismatch-repair genes among Bedouin patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) in Israel. Bedouin patients with a diagnosis of CRC at a major hospital in the southern part of Israel were deemed eligible for this study. The primary screening method was immunohistochemical staining for mismatch-repair proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2). For subjects with abnormal immunohistochemical staining, we performed microsatellite instability (MSI) analyses, and for tumors with a loss of MLH1 expression we also performed BRAF testing. In MSI high cases we searched further for germline mutations. Of the 24 patients enrolled, four subjects (16.7%) had MSI high tumors: one subject was found to harbor a biallelic PMS2 mutation, one subject had Lynch syndrome (LS) with MSH6 mutation and two subjects had a loss of MLH1/PMS2 proteins/BRAF wild type /normal MLH1 sequence. Ten patients (41.7%) were younger than 50 at the time of diagnosis and none had first degree relatives with CRC. In conclusion, in this cohort of 24 consecutive Arab Bedouins with CRC, one patient was found to harbor a constitutional mismatch repair deficiency, one patient had LS with MSH6 mutation, and two patients had unresolved loss of MLH1/PMS2 proteins/BRAF wild type phenotype.

  14. Characteristics of fibromyalgia in Muslim Bedouin women in a primary care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Roni; Ablin, Jacob N; Peleg, Aya; Neumann, Lily; Rabia, Rasmia Abu; Buskila, Dan

    2008-06-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) has been described and studied in various sociocultural settings in both developed and developing countries. To study the clinical manifestations of FM and to describe its effect on quality of life in the unique setting of Muslim Bedouin women in the southern Israel Negev desert area. One hundred two Bedouin women were recruited from a primary health care clinic in the Negev area. All patients fulfilled American College of Rheumatology criteria for the diagnosis of FM. Tenderness was assessed by manual dolorimetry and the fibromyalgia impact questionnaire was utilized to estimate the severity of FM symptoms. Anxiety and depression were assessed by the Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales subscales and quality of life was evaluated by the SF-36 questionnaire. The study population was characterized by a low educational level, a high rate of consanguinity, a high number of children per mother, and a high rate of polygamy. There was a high frequency of classic FM symptoms such as pain and fatigue, as well as anxiety and depression. The overall impact of FM on quality of life was exceedingly high (8.9 on a scale of 0 to 10). FM is relatively common in the unique setting of Muslim Bedouin women and has a very significant impact on their quality of life as well as on their dependents. Physicians involved in the primary care of this population should be attentive to the manifestations of FM and related disorders.

  15. Synthesis of polymer materials for use as cell culture substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakard, Sophie [Laboratoire de Chimie des Materiaux et Interfaces, University of Franche-Comte, IUT, 30 Avenue de l' Observatoire, 25009 Besancon (France)], E-mail: sophie.lakard@univ-fcomte.fr; Morrand-Villeneuve, Nadege [Laboratoire de Neurosciences, University of Franche-Comte, Place Leclerc, 25030 Besancon (France); Lesniewska, Eric [Laboratoire de Physique de l' Universite de Bourgogne, University of Bourgogne, 9 Avenue Savary, 21078 Dijon (France); Lakard, Boris [Laboratoire de Chimie des Materiaux et Interfaces, University of Franche-Comte, 16 Route de Gray, 25030 Besancon (France); Michel, Germaine [Laboratoire de Neurosciences, University of Franche-Comte, Place Leclerc, 25030 Besancon (France); Herlem, Guillaume [Laboratoire de Chimie des Materiaux et Interfaces, University of Franche-Comte, 16 Route de Gray, 25030 Besancon (France); Gharbi, Tijani [Laboratoire d' Optique P.M. Duffieux, University of Franche-Comte, 16 Route de Gray, 25030 Besancon (France); Fahys, Bernard [Laboratoire de Chimie des Materiaux et Interfaces, University of Franche-Comte, 16 Route de Gray, 25030 Besancon (France)

    2007-12-20

    Up to today, several techniques have been used to maintain cells in culture for studying many aspects of cell biology and physiology. More often, cell culture is dependent on proper anchorage of cells to the growth surface. Thus, poly-L-lysine, fibronectin or laminin are the most commonly used substrates. In this study, electrosynthesized biocompatible polymer films are proposed as an alternative to these standard substrates. The electrosynthesized polymers tested were polyethylenimine, polypropylenimine and polypyrrole. Then, the adhesion, proliferation and morphology of rat neuronal cell lines were investigated on these polymer substrates in an attempt to develop new and efficient polymer materials for cell culture. During their growth on the polymers, the evolution of the cell morphology was monitored using both confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry, leading to the conclusion of a normal development. An estimation of the adhesion and proliferation rates of rat neuronal cell cultures indicated that polyethylenimine and polypropylenimine were the best substrates for culturing olfactory neuronal cells. A method to favour the differentiation of the neuronal cells was also developed since the final aim of this work is to develop a biosensor for odour detection using differentiated neuronal cells as transducers. Consequently, a biosensor was microfabricated using silicon technology. This microsystem allowed us to culture the cells on a silicon wafer and to position the cells on certain parts of the silicon wafer.

  16. Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After Ritual Female Genital Surgery Among Bedouin in Israel: Myth or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applebaum, Julia; Cohen, Hagit; Matar, Michael; Abu Rabia, Yones; Kaplan, Zeev

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Ritual female genital surgery (RFGS), or female circumcision, is common among certain ethnic groups in Asia and Africa and describes a range of practices involving complete or partial removal of the female external genitalia for nonmedical reasons. Several studies in African populations, in which more severe forms of RFGS are performed, reported an increased prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder and other psychiatric syndromes among circumcised women than among uncircumcised controls. Among the Bedouin population in southern Israel, RFGS has become a symbolic operation without major mutilation. However, in a study performed in 1999, Bedouin women after RFGS reported difficulties in mother-daughter relationships and trust. This pilot study assessed the mental health of Bedouin women from southern Israel after RFGS compared to age-matched controls without RFGS. Method: The psychological impact of RFGS was assessed in 19 circumcised Bedouin women compared to 18 age-matched controls. The Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Scale, Symptom Checklist, Impact of Event Scale, and a demographics and background questionnaire were used to assess traumatization and psychiatric illnesses. The study was conducted from March to July 2007. Results: No statistically significant differences were found between the 2 groups. Conclusions: The prevailing procedure of RFGS among the Bedouin population of southern Israel had no apparent effect on mental health. PMID:19287554

  17. Teaching Material Culture and Chinese Gardens at American Colleges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Han

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper reflects on the experience of designing and teaching a course on material culture and Chinese gardens. Involving traditional philosophy, ethics, religion, painting, calligraphy, craft, literature, architecture and horticulture, a classical Chinese garden can be considered a microcosm of Chinese culture. This essay discusses the textbooks and general organization of the course, particularly focusing on how students study the key elements (rocks, water, plants and architecture in building a Chinese garden. Some Chinese literature with representations of gardens that can be used for this class is also introduced. In addition, this essay uses two classical Chinese gardens built in the United States (the Astor Court and the Garden of Flowing Fragrance to discuss the appropriation of “Chinese-ness” in different geographical, physical and cultural environments. Finally, some available online resources and technologies that have enhanced student understanding of the subject matter are introduced.

  18. Human epithelial tissue culture study on restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, András; Ungvári, Krisztina; Györgyey, Ágnes; Kukovecz, Ákos; Turzó, Kinga; Nagy, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    Health condition of the gingival tissues contacting the surfaces of fixed prostheses is a result of multiple etiologic factors. The aim of the investigation discussed here was to evaluate the attachment and proliferation rate of cultured human epithelial cells on three commonly used restorative materials under in vitro conditions. Morphological and chemical structure of polished lithium-disilicate (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Germany), yttrium modified zirconium dioxide (5-TEC ICE Zirkon Translucent, Zirkonzahn GmbH Srl, Germany) and cobalt chromium alloy (Remanium star, Dentaurum GmbH & Co. KG, Germany) discs were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Human epithelial cells harvested and cultured from one donor, were applied to investigate cell attachment (24h observation) and proliferation (72h observation) via dimethylthiazol-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and AlamarBlue(®) (AB) assays on control surface (cell-culture plate) and on the restorative materials (n=3×20 specimens/material). SEM and AFM revealed typical morphology and roughness features for the materials. Zirconia presented significantly higher Ra value. EDS confirmed typical elements on the investigated restorative materials: lithium-disilicate (Si, O); Zirconia (Zi, Y, O); CoCr (Co, Cr, W). All surfaces except CoCr exhibited significant cell proliferation according to MTT and AB assays after 72h compared to 24h. Among the restorative materials, CoCr samples showed the highest cell attachment as indicated by MTT assay. AB results showed that attachment and proliferation of human epithelial cells is supported more on lithium-disilicate. Both assays indicated the lowest value for zirconia. The results indicate that the restorative materials examined are equally suitable for subgingival restorations. Lithium-disilicate exhibited the best biocompatibility. The examined materials are indicated for use

  19. Materializing Mind: The Role of Objects in Cognition and Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tylén, Kristian; McGraw, John J.

    2014-01-01

    , and distributed cognition, we review and classify a set of cognitive processes mediated by material representations. Specifically, we ask how—in a range of everyday cognitive and cultural practices—we employ objects (1) to scaffold memory, (2) to alter cognitive complexity, (3) to facilitate epistemic......If mind is investigated as the set of interactions that accomplish a cognitive task, that is, if mind is more than that which occurs inside the head, then how does the interplay of biological and environmental resources produce human cognition? Informed by active externalism, joint action...... experimentation, (4) to enable the division of cognitive labor, (5) to promote confidence and trust, (6) to consolidate social structure, and (7) to support dialogical coupling. We conclude that through cultural practices the stable, “manipulable”, and public properties of objects have come to afford...

  20. A Republican Egalitarian Approach to Bioethics: The Case of the Unrecognized Bedouin Villages in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filc, Dani; Davidovich, Nadav; Gottlieb, Nora

    2016-10-01

    This article argues that current, mainstream, liberal approaches to the right to health and to bioethics are not adequately aware of the structural and political character of health and illness. We propose a radical egalitarian definition of the right to health as the basis for the discussion of a republican egalitarian perspective on bioethics that redefines autonomy and stresses the importance of equality, political participation, and the common good. The violations of the right to health in unrecognized Bedouin villages in Israel are analyzed to exemplify the possibilities opened by the republican egalitarian approach. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. General principles of researching the lexicon of traditional material culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedeljkov Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses a linguistic research of terminological systems connected with basic fields of human life and work which, in modern conditions, are either transformed into contemporary modern forms or gradually disappear due to changes in the way of life and work. The lexicon of material culture of native inhabitants of Vojvodina is examined, resulting in monographs on the terminologies of fishing, cartwrighting, shepherding and houses and furniture, all of which have in common the fact that the starting point was the research of the lexicon in question by semantic fields. The paper shows the lexicological and lexicographical procedures used while researching these terminological systems.

  2. Beyond Cultural History? The Material Turn, Praxiography, and Body History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Clever

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The body came to be taken seriously as a topic of cultural history during the “corporeal” or “bodily” turn in the 1980s and 1990s. Soon, however, critique was raised against these studies’ conceptualization of the body as discursively shaped and socially disciplined: individual bodily agency and feeling were felt to be absent in the idea of the material body. This article critically analyzes new approaches in the field of body history, particularly the so-called “material turn”. It argues that the material turn, especially in the guise of praxiography, has a lot to offer historians of the body, such as more attention to material practices, to different kinds of actors and a more open eye to encounters. Potential problems of praxiographical analyses of the body in history include the complicated relationship between discourses and practices and the neglect of the political and feminist potential of deconstructive discourse analyses. However, a focus on the relationship between practices of knowledge production and the representation of the body may also provide new ways of opening up historical power relations.

  3. Gender and ethnic disparities in outcome following acute myocardial infarction among Bedouins and Jews in southern Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakht, Ygal; Gilutz, Harel; Shiyovich, Arthur; Zahger, Doron; Weitzman, Shimon

    2011-02-01

    Previous studies have documented gender-ethnic disparities in outcomes following acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This study evaluates such disparities in the Negev, Israel, and reviews potentially responsible mechanisms. Patients discharged with AMI were classified into young (controlling for (i) the Ontario Acute Myocardial Infarction Mortality Prediction Rules (OAMIMPRs) and (ii) the OAMIMPR and additional potential confounders. Of 2669 subjects, 45.8% were elders, 66.2% male and 10.9% Bedouin. The mortality rate was 12.3% (young 4.6%, elders 22%). Survival was significantly lower in FB compared with MB in the elderly stratum (P = 0.025). Multivariate analyses demonstrated similar risks for dying among the young. In the elders, the first multivariate analysis showed greater risk for mortality in FB. Using FB as the reference group, the HRs were as follows: HR((MB)) = 0.36 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.14-0.9]; HR((FJ)) = 0.5 (95% CI: 0.27-0.9) and HR((MJ)) = 0.5 (95% CI: 0.28-0.91). In the second analysis, the HRs were as follows: HR((MB)) = 0.37 (95% CI: 0.14-0.93); HR((FJ)) = 0.58 (95% CI: 0.32-1.07) and HR((MJ)) = 0.56 (95% CI: 0.31-1.03). Elderly FB have poor 1-year prognosis following AMI compared with MB, MJ and FJ when controlling for the OAMIMPR model, yet when controlling for other potential confounders the differences are of borderline significance in relation to Jewish subjects. A culturally and economically sensitive programme focusing on tertiary prevention in these patients is warranted.

  4. Role of School Administration in Solving Students' Problems among Bedouin Schools within the Green Line in Palestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badarna, Laila Khaled; abu Ashour, Muhammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the role of the school administration in solving the students' problems and differences according to gender, scientific qualification, years of experience and job title. The sample consisted of (300) staff from those who are working in the Bedouin schools within the Green Line of Palestine. The author used a…

  5. Elderly Bedouins and Jews in Israel: the effects of visual impairment on perceived functional and health status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iecovich, Esther; Isralowitz, Richard E

    2003-01-01

    Age-related vision impairment is a major cause of functional limitations in mobility and independent living. Research findings suggest that vision impairment in later life affects social, emotional, mental as well as physical well-being, and daily functioning. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between ethnicity and visual problems, i.e., whether Bedouin and Jewish elderly persons differed in terms of visual impairment prevalence and the extent to which visual impairment affected their ability to perform activities of everyday life. This study sampled 88 Bedouin and 111 Jewish elderly persons aged 60 and older in the southern region of Israel. The findings show that the majority of the respondents reported visual problems. Bedouin elderly tended to have more problems with distance sight as a result of living conditions than Jewish elderly. In terms of ability to perform ADL and IADL functions, elderly Bedouins reported more problems. The study findings are discussed in terms of policy and service provision. In addition, recommendations for additional research are presented. Copyright 2003 The Haworth Press, Inc.

  6. The association between inadequate prenatal care and future healthcare use among offspring in the Bedouin population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estis-Deaton, Asia; Sheiner, Eyal; Wainstock, Tamar; Landau, Daniella; Walfisch, Asnat

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the impact of inadequate prenatal care on long-term morbidity among the offspring of an ethnic minority population. A retrospective population-based cohort analysis was performed among all Bedouin women with singleton pregnancies who delivered in a tertiary medical center in Israel between January 1, 1991, and January 1, 2014. Morbidity was defined as pediatric hospitalization across six distinct disease categories before 18 years of age. The cumulative morbidity rates were compared for offspring born following pregnancies with either inadequate (prenatal care facility) or adequate prenatal care. Overall, 127 396 neonates were included; 19 173 (15.0%) were born following inadequate prenatal care. Pediatric hospitalizations for all morbidities other than cardiovascular ones were less frequent among the inadequate prenatal care group than the adequate prenatal care group (Pprenatal care group, with the exception of cardiovascular disease. Inadequate prenatal care correlated with reduced pediatric hospitalization rates among offspring, possibly owing to a lack of child healthcare service utilization within the Bedouin population. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  7. Anemia among Muslim Bedouin and Jewish women of childbearing age in Southern Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treister-Goltzman, Yulia; Peleg, Roni; Biderman, Aya

    2015-11-01

    There are inequalities in health indicators among different ethnic groups living in the same region and receiving the same medical services. Anemia is a global problem. Although the prevalence of anemia is not high in Israel, differences among ethnic groups have not been studied. Our objective was to assess anemia among Bedouin and Jewish women of childbearing age in southern Israel. A retrospective observational study was conducted based on data from computerized medical records. Seven thousand eight hundred seventy-one women in the study clinics underwent complete blood counts and had blood hemoglobin levels of 11 g/dl or below. The Jewish patients were older (31.7 vs. 29.7 years, P types of anemia were iron deficiency and anemia of chronic disease. Two types of anemia were proportionally higher among Jewish women, anemia of chronic disease (18.1 vs. 9.7 %, P  0.001). The adherence rates for treatment were very low. Three factors associated with severe anemia (hemoglobin below 8 g/dl) were being Bedouin (odds ratio (OR) = 1.295, P anemia, and adherence to treatment for anemia is very low in both groups. These findings should be addressed in a national program to reduce health inequalities.

  8. American Material Culture: Investigating a World War II Trash Dump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julie Braun

    2005-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory: An Historical Trash Trove Historians and archaeologists love trash, the older the better. Sometimes these researchers find their passion in unexpected places. In this presentation, the treasures found in a large historic dump that lies relatively untouched in the middle of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will be described. The U.S. military used the central portion of the INL as one of only six naval proving grounds during World War II. They dumped trash in dry irrigation canals during and after their wartime activities and shortly before the federal government designated this arid and desolate place as the nation’s nuclear reactor testing station in 1949. When read critically and combined with memories and photographs, the 60-year old trash provides a glimpse into 1940s’ culture and the everyday lives of ordinary people who lived and worked during this time on Idaho’s desert. Thanks to priceless stories, hours of research, and the ability to read the language of historic artifacts, the dump was turned from just another trash heap into a treasure trove of 1940s memorabilia. Such studies of American material culture serve to fire our imaginations, enrich our understanding of past practices, and humanize history. Historical archaeology provides opportunities to integrate inanimate objects with animated narrative and, the more recent the artifacts, the more human the stories they can tell.

  9. Recalling community: Using material culture and digital archives in Salford

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Cassidy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This article explores strategies for engaging geographically fragmented urban communities as active participants in conceptually re-mapping their former localities. It looks in detail at the ongoing Retracing Salford project in Salford, UK, which employs the use of everyday objects and oral histories to engage and enable former residents to reconnect with their recently demolished neighbourhoods and each other. The project also seeks to document an urban working class history largely overlooked by the large-scale institutions. The project is based on a PhD study undertaken by the author at The District Six Museum in Cape Town, South Africa, which examined the use of material artefacts in exhibitions and memory workshops at that museum (Cassidy 2009. Like District Six, Salford has undergone wide-scale demolition and population dispersal over the past 40 years. What began as relatively simple installations in museums, libraries and the like, has now grown to include digitised versions of the family snaps, street signs and oral histories, as a developing online Streets Museum archive (www.streetsmuseum.co.uk. This article reflects on how the methodology employed in the Retracing Salford project has helped rejuvenate and reconnect these dispersed communities. The article argues that the approach used is succeeding in widening the circle of participation and debate in relation to heritage issues, in particular the absence of commemoration of working-class community culture in the city. It has also increased awareness of urban land clearance issues. Its continued success depends on numerous factors, such as developing new strategies of engagement with the community, regularly gaining publicity and organising new exhibitions and workshops. Keywords: Material culture, community participation, urban working class history

  10. [Investigation of fibrous cultural materials by infrared spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xi-yun; Du, Yi-ping; Shen, Mei-hua; Zhang, Wen-qing; Zhou, Xin-guang; Fang, Shu-ying; Zhang, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Cultural fibrous material includes both important categories, i. e. textile and paper, consisting of precious cultural materials in museum, such as costume, painting, and manuscript. In recent years more and more connoisseur and conservator's concerns are, through nondestructive method, the authenticity and the ageing identification of these cultural relics especially made from fragile materials. In this research, we used attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy to identify five traditional textile fibers, alongside cotton, linen, wool, mulberry silk and tussah silk, and another five paper fibers alongside straw, wheat straw, long qisong, Chinese alpine rush and mulberry bar, which are commonly used for making Chinese traditional xuan paper. The research result showed that the animal fiber (wool, mulberry silk and tussah silk) and plant fiber (cotton and linen) were easier to be distinguished by comparing the peaks at 3 280 cm-1 belonging to NH stretching vibration and a serious peaks related to amide I to amide III. In the spectrum of wool, the peak at 1 076 cm-1 was assigned to the S-O stretching vibration absorption of cystine in wool structure and can be used to tell wool from silk. The spectrum of mulberry silk and tussah silk seems somewhat difficult to be identified, as well as the spectrum of cotton and linen. Five rural paper fibers all have obvious characteristic peaks at 3 330, 2 900 cm-1 which are related to OH and CH stretching vibration. In the fingerprint wavenumber range of 1 600 - 800 cm, the similar peaks also appeared at 1 370, 1 320 cm-1 and 1 162, 1 050 cm-1, both group peaks respectively are related to CH and CO vibration in the structure of cellulose and hemicellulose in paper fibers. Although there is more similarity of the infrared spectroscopy of these 5 paper fibers, some tiny difference in absorbance also can be found at 3 300 cm-1 and in the fingerprint range at 1 332, 1 203, and 1 050 cm-1 which are related to C-O-C vibration

  11. Elemental images of Spain in 18th Century French culture: from material culture to public opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel-Henri PAGEAUX

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to illustrate certain possibilities of adaptation of literary studies to the field of «material history» as defined in the work of Fernand Braudel («material civilization» and particularly Jean-Marie Pesez in the collective work coordinated by J. Le Goff, La nouvelle histoire (1998. It thus traces, with commentary, certain elemental images of Spain (plants, fruit, wool, horses, wine, not to mention the symbolic product, gold that may have gone through a process of literaturization, but above all, of «socialization», in «literary» works and texts (ranging from the article in the Encyclopedie to the descriptive poetry so much in vogue during the Enlightenment. In spite of the fragmentation of the inquiry, a gradual reformulation of the essential bases of a «social imagery» is being made that should serve a broader study of (French «public opinion» when faced with a foreign culture (Spanish culture.

  12. Exposure to metals and congenital anomalies: A biomonitoring study of pregnant Bedouin-Arab women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakis, Isabella [Environmental Epidemiology Department, Ministry of Health, Jerusalem (Israel); Faculty of Health Science, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Department of Public Health, The Ashkelon Academic College, Ashkelon (Israel); Landau, Daniella [Faculty of Health Science, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Department of Neonatology, Soroka University Medical Center, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Yitshak-Sade, Maayan [Faculty of Health Science, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Clinical Research Center, Soroka University Medical Center, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Hershkovitz, Reli [Faculty of Health Science, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Ultrasound Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Soroka University Medical Center, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Rotenberg, Michal [Laboratory of Clinical Toxicology and Pharmacology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Sarov, Batia [Faculty of Health Science, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Grotto, Itamar [Environmental Epidemiology Department, Ministry of Health, Jerusalem (Israel); Faculty of Health Science, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Public Health Services, Ministry of Health, Jerusalem (Israel); Novack, Lena, E-mail: novack@bgu.ac.il [Faculty of Health Science, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel)

    2015-06-01

    Background: The Bedouin-Arab population in Israel comprises a low socio-economic society in transition. Smoking among males and consanguineous marriages are frequent. A previous study showed elevated rates of major malformations within groups from this population residing near an industrial park, where high ambient values of arsenic (As) and nickel (Ni) were detected, compared to groups living in remote localities. Objectives: We estimated the extent of exposure to metals in pregnant Bedouin-Arab women in relation to congenital malformations. Methods: We collected maternal urine samples from 140 Bedouin women who gave birth in a local hospital. Patient medical history, type of marriage (consanguineous or non-consanguineous), and parental exposure history were collected by interview and medical records. Results: Aluminum (Al) was detected in 37 women (26.4%), cadmium (Cd) in 2 (1.4%), As in 10 (7.1%), and Ni in 1 woman (0.7%). The detected rate of Cd exposure was low, though more than 92% of the fathers reported smoking. Concentrations of Al were higher for women residing within 10 km of the local industrial park (Prevalence Ratio (PR) = 1.12, p-value = 0.012) or who reported using a wood burning stove (PR = 1.37, p-value = 0.011) and cooking over an open fire (PR = 1.16, p-value = 0.076). Exposure to Al was adversely associated with minor anomalies (OR = 3.8, p-value = 0.046) after adjusting for history of abortions (OR = 6.1, p-value = 0.007). Fetuses prenatally exposed to As were born prematurely (p-value = 0.001) and at lower weights (pv = 0.023). Conclusions: The study population of pregnant women is exposed to high levels of metals mainly of household origin. Our findings may be generalized to similar populations in developing countries. - Highlights: • Almost a third of the pregnant women had a detectable metal in their urine. • Aluminum and Arsenic were the most prevalent metals in urine. • The study investigates pregnant women exposed to a hazardous

  13. Exposure to metals and congenital anomalies: A biomonitoring study of pregnant Bedouin-Arab women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The Bedouin-Arab population in Israel comprises a low socio-economic society in transition. Smoking among males and consanguineous marriages are frequent. A previous study showed elevated rates of major malformations within groups from this population residing near an industrial park, where high ambient values of arsenic (As) and nickel (Ni) were detected, compared to groups living in remote localities. Objectives: We estimated the extent of exposure to metals in pregnant Bedouin-Arab women in relation to congenital malformations. Methods: We collected maternal urine samples from 140 Bedouin women who gave birth in a local hospital. Patient medical history, type of marriage (consanguineous or non-consanguineous), and parental exposure history were collected by interview and medical records. Results: Aluminum (Al) was detected in 37 women (26.4%), cadmium (Cd) in 2 (1.4%), As in 10 (7.1%), and Ni in 1 woman (0.7%). The detected rate of Cd exposure was low, though more than 92% of the fathers reported smoking. Concentrations of Al were higher for women residing within 10 km of the local industrial park (Prevalence Ratio (PR) = 1.12, p-value = 0.012) or who reported using a wood burning stove (PR = 1.37, p-value = 0.011) and cooking over an open fire (PR = 1.16, p-value = 0.076). Exposure to Al was adversely associated with minor anomalies (OR = 3.8, p-value = 0.046) after adjusting for history of abortions (OR = 6.1, p-value = 0.007). Fetuses prenatally exposed to As were born prematurely (p-value = 0.001) and at lower weights (pv = 0.023). Conclusions: The study population of pregnant women is exposed to high levels of metals mainly of household origin. Our findings may be generalized to similar populations in developing countries. - Highlights: • Almost a third of the pregnant women had a detectable metal in their urine. • Aluminum and Arsenic were the most prevalent metals in urine. • The study investigates pregnant women exposed to a hazardous

  14. Milk composition and yield of the black Bedouin goat during dehydration and rehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltz, E; Shkolnik, A

    1984-02-01

    Milk composition and yield were measured in the black Bedouin goat during 4 d of dehydration followed by 2 d of rehydration. During this time the goats were exposed to strong solar radiation with no access to shade; all of these conditions occur commonly in the desert. Milk yield, initially similar to that found in the desert, was maintained during the first 2 d of dehydration, fell to 35% of the initial value over the third and fourth days and recovered fully during 2 d of rehydration. As yield fell, milk osmolality, and milk fat and protein concentrations rose. During rehydration all 3 fell once more, but whereas osmolality finished below initial values the concentrations of fat and protein remained higher than before dehydration. The milk remained isosmolar with plasma throughout. Total yields of milk solids and milk water during the whole experimental period were 70 and 67% of normal respectively and normal growth of the young was not disturbed.

  15. Bread type intake is associated with lifestyle and diet quality transition among Bedouin Arab adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Saad, Kathleen; Shai, Iris; Kaufman-Shriqui, Vered; German, Larissa; Vardi, Hillel; Fraser, Drora

    2009-11-01

    The traditionally semi-nomadic Bedouin Arabs in Israel are undergoing urbanisation with concurrent lifestyle changes, including a shift to using unfortified white-flour bread instead of wholewheat bread as the main dietary staple. We explored associations between the transition from wholewheat to white-flour bread and (1) lifestyle factors, (2) overall diet quality, and (3) health status. We conducted a nutrition survey among 451 Bedouin adults, using a modified 24 h recall questionnaire. Bread intake accounted for 32.7 % of the total energy intake. Those consuming predominantly white bread (PWB) (n 327) were more likely to be urban (OR 2.79; 95 % CI 1.70, 4.58), eating store-bought rather than homemade bread (OR 8.18; 95 % CI 4.34, 15.41) and currently dieting (OR 4.67; 95 % CI 1.28, 17.11) than those consuming predominantly wholewheat bread (PWWB) (n 124). PWB consumption was associated with a lower intake of dietary fibre (23.3 (se 0.6) v. 41.8 (se 1.0) g/d; P consumption (P or = 40 years, PWB consumption was associated with a 9.85-fold risk (95 % CI 2.64, 36.71; P = 0.001) of having one or more chronic conditions, as compared with PWWB consumption, after controlling for other risk factors. White bread intake was associated with a less traditional lifestyle and poorer diet quality, and may constitute a useful marker for at-risk subgroups to target for nutritional interventions.

  16. Rethinking Historical and Cultural Source of Spontaneous Mental Models of Water Cycle: In the Perspective of South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Younkyeong

    2012-01-01

    This review explores Ben-Zvi Assaraf, Eshach, Orion, and Alamour's paper titled "Cultural Differences and Students' Spontaneous Models of the Water Cycle: A Case Study of Jewish and Bedouin Children in Israel" by examining how the authors use the concept of spontaneous mental models to explain cultural knowledge source of Bedouin…

  17. Assessing the cultural in culturally sensitive printed patient-education materials for Chinese Americans with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Evelyn Y; Tran, Henrietta; Chesla, Catherine A

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes affects Chinese Americans at an alarming rate. To address this health disparity, research in the area of cultural sensitivity and health literacy provides useful guidelines for creating culturally appropriate health education. In this article, we use discourse analysis to examine a group of locally available, Chinese- and English-language diabetes print documents from a surface level and deep structure level of culture. First, we compared these documents to research findings about printed health information to determine whether and how these documents apply current best practices for health literacy and culturally appropriate health communication. Second, we examined how diabetes as a disease and diabetes management is being constructed. The printed materials addressed surface level culture through the use of Chinese language, pictures, foods, and exercises. From a deeper cultural level, the materials constructed diabetes management as a matter of measurement and control that contrasted with previous research suggesting an alternative construction of balance. A nuanced assessment of both surface and deeper levels of culture is essential for creating health education materials that are more culturally appropriate and can lead to increased health literacy and improved health outcomes.

  18. 19 CFR 10.121 - Visual or auditory materials of an educational, scientific, or cultural character.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Visual or auditory materials of an educational... RATE, ETC. General Provisions Visual Or Auditory Materials § 10.121 Visual or auditory materials of an... the articles are visual or auditory materials of an educational, scientific, or cultural character...

  19. Rethinking historical and cultural source of spontaneous mental models of water cycle: in the perspective of South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Younkyeong

    2012-06-01

    This review explores Ben-Zvi Assaraf, Eshach, Orion, and Alamour's paper titled "Cultural Differences and Students' Spontaneous Models of the Water Cycle: A Case Study of Jewish and Bedouin Children in Israel" by examining how the authors use the concept of spontaneous mental models to explain cultural knowledge source of Bedouin children's mental model of water compared to Jewish children's mental model of water in nature. My response to Ben-Zvi Assaraf et al.'s work expands upon their explanations of the Bedouin children's cultural knowledge source. Bedouin children's mental model is based on their culture, religion, place of living and everyday life practices related to water. I suggest a different knowledge source for spontaneous mental model of water in nature based on unique history and traditions of South Korea where people think of water in nature in different ways. This forum also addresses how western science dominates South Korean science curriculum and ways of assessing students' conceptual understanding of scientific concepts. Additionally I argue that western science curriculum models could diminish Korean students' understanding of natural world which are based on Korean cultural ways of thinking about the natural world. Finally, I also suggest two different ways of considering this unique knowledge source for a more culturally relevant teaching Earth system education.

  20. Mycotoxins profiling of the culture material of Fusarium verticillioides ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nirenberg culture isolated from rice in Niger State, Nigeria, previously found to be acutely toxic to mice and chicks was established to contain 8.233 ppm of total fumonisins (FBs). The present work was undertaken to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxic effect to human lymphocytes of the same 4-year old extract via flow cytometry ...

  1. Mycotoxins profiling of the culture material of Fusarium verticillioides ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-26

    Sep 26, 2011 ... An extract of Fusarium verticillioides (Sacc.) Nirenberg culture isolated from rice in Niger State, Nigeria, previously found to be acutely toxic to mice and chicks was established to contain 8.233 ppm of total fumonisins (FBs). The present work was undertaken to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxic effect to human.

  2. IMPLEMENTING A STUDENT-CENTERED PEDAGOGY THROUGH THE USE OF INTERESTING AND CULTURALLY CONTEXTUALIZED AUTHENTIC MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabitha Kidwell

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The selection and use of appropriate materials is one of the most critical challenges facing English teachers today. In this article, we tell the stories (vignettes of some of the major challenges we have faced as educators in this regard, and we offer a research base and practical suggestions related to each vignette. Selection of interesting and culturally contextualized authentic materials can go a long way towards creating a student-centered peddagogy. This will help to increase student motivation, achievemnt, and retention. Our first recommendation is to cultivate interst in the classroom. Interest can be elicited by selecting materials that lead to individual interest, students‘ personal interests, situational interest, the inherant interest in a specific situation like amystery or a puzzle, or topic interest, interest in the subject of the activity. An excellent way to elicit student interest is through the use of authentic materials. Teachers should endeavor to create interst in their classrooms by choosing interesting topics and texts, editing those texts, and using suspense and surprise. Our second suggestion is to use culturally contextualized authentic materials. These can come from two directions: either they can be situated in the culture of the students (the ―home‖ culture, or they can be situated in the culture of native speakers (the ―target‖ culture. Use of both types of cultural materials is important, and both can be termed ―authentic.‖ The most important point is that the materials are authentic, and therefore more meaningful to students.

  3. Culture through Comparison: Creating Audio-Visual Listening Materials for a CLIL Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhyrun, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    Authentic listening has become a part of CLIL materials, but it can be difficult to find listening materials that perfectly match the language level, length requirements, content, and cultural context of a course. The difficulty of finding appropriate materials online, financial limitations posed by copyright fees, and necessity to produce…

  4. Material Culture and Diasporic Experiences: A Case of Medieval Hanse Merchantsin the Baltic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naum, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    and material practices of these communities. It theorizes about the role and meaning of everyday material culture for Hanseatic merchants and their families, and investigates how material objects figured in the experience of relocation. It discusses the centrality of everyday things in rebuilding the migrants...

  5. Cryptosporidium infection in Bedouin infants assessed by prospective evaluation of anticryptosporidial antibodies and stool examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, G; Fraser, D; Orr, N; Sela, T; Slepon, R; Ambar, R; Dagan, R; Le Blancq, S; Deckelbaum, R J; Cohen, D

    2001-01-15

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system using oocyst lysate as antigen was used to detect serum- specific antibody responses to Cryptosporidium parvum between 1989 and 1994 in consecutive sera obtained at birth, and at the age of 6, 12, and 23 months, from 52 infants living in a Bedouin town located in the south of Israel. The serologic tests revealed high levels of immunoglobulin G anti-Cryptosporidium at birth that dropped significantly by the age of 6 months and then rose continuously to a geometric mean titer of 481 at age 23 months. The serum immunoglobulin M Cryptosporidium antibodies rose continuously from nearly undetectable levels at birth to a geometric mean titer of 471 (157-fold increase) at age 23 months. All the subjects already showed at 6 months a significant rise in immunoglobulin M. A significant rise in immunoglobulin A titers was detected in 48% and 91% of subjects at 6 and 23 months, respectively. By monthly surveillance, microscopy using the modified Ziehl-Neelsen method and confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence assay detected Cryptosporidium antigens in only 11% at age 6 months and 48% at age 23 months. The extent of exposure to Cryptosporidium immediately after birth as detected by serology is much higher than that predicted by frequent prospective assessment of stool samples.

  6. Effects of dehydration and rehydration on body temperatures in the black bedouin goat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, C; Dmi'el, R; Choshniak, I; Ezra, D; Kuhnen, G

    1998-10-01

    The temperatures of the arterial blood and the brain in black Bedouin goats were measured continuously by miniature data loggers. The animals were either euhydrated or dehydrated to 75-80% of the initial body mass by withholding water for 3-4 days during exposure to intense solar radiation. The daily blood temperature means and maxima of were significantly higher in dehydration than in euhydration, but 40 degreesC was rarely exceeded even during the hot hours of the day. Selective brain cooling occurred in euhydration, but its extent was small when blood temperature was below 39.5 degreesC. In dehydration, however, selective brain cooling was frequent and the standard response when blood temperature exceeded 39 degreesC. We believe that selective brain cooling contributes to the inhibition of evaporative heat loss, which is the primary cause of the higher blood temperature in dehydration. Rapid rehydration with cold water induced long-lasting depression of blood temperature. No evidence was found for mechanisms attenuating the subsequent decrease of brain temperature which occurred a few minutes after the uptake of cold water.

  7. Developing Culturally Targeted Diabetes Educational Materials for Older Russian-Speaking Immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Son, Catherine R

    2014-07-01

    Older adults who immigrate late in life face many challenges adapting to a new country. Immigrants bring their cultural beliefs and behaviors with them, which can influence their ability to make dietary changes required when they have type 2 diabetes. Culturally targeted patient education materials are needed to improve immigrants' health literacy and abilities to self-manage diabetes. Currently, there is a scarcity of diabetes patient education materials to meet the educational needs of the Russian-speaking immigrant group. The purpose of this article is to describe a project in which culturally targeted diabetes education materials for older Russian-speaking immigrants were designed and developed. Culturally targeted patient education materials are essential if they are to be accepted and used by clients from different ethnic minority populations. The creation of culturally relevant materials requires a team effort and community stakeholder input. The availability of materials on the internet facilitates access and use by health care providers. Culturally targeted education materials are an important component in addressing health literacy in ethnic minority populations. Next steps require that these materials be evaluated to test their impact on diabetes self-management behaviors and clinical outcomes such as adherence, amount of physical activity, and blood glucose levels. © 2014 The Author(s).

  8. Analytical techniques for characterization of raw materials in cell culture media

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Chandana; Drew, Barry; Head, Kevin; Pusuluri, Rani; Caple, Matthew V

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Raw materials are a critical part of any cell culture medium; therefore, it is of utmost importance to understand and characterize them for high-quality product. The raw material characterization (RMC) program at SAFC focuses on individual screening of raw materials both analytically and biologically. The goal of the program is to develop the best-in-class knowledge base of the raw materials used in SAFC’s media formulations and their impact on performance of products.

  9. Cultural Adaptation and Translation of Outreach Materials on Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinker, Roy R.; Kang-Yi, Christina D.; Ahmann, Chloe; Beidas, Rinad S.; Lagman, Adrienne; Mandell, David S.

    2015-01-01

    In order to connect with families and influence treatment trajectories, outreach materials should address cultural perceptions of the condition, its causes, and post-diagnostic care. This paper describes the cultural adaptation and translation of the Autism Speaks First 100 Days Kit into Korean for the purpose of improving autism spectrum disorder…

  10. Developing Instructional Materials To Improve and Test Competency in Japanese Business Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Shohei

    This discussion focuses on examples of materials used at Eastern Michigan University (EMU) to help convey cultural values in the Japanese component in the Language and International Trade and the Language and World Business Programs at EMU. Ways that the culture is incorporated into the Japanese curriculum are described, and an explanation is…

  11. When African teenagers become fathers: culture, materiality and masculinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhana, Deevia; Nkani, Nomvuyo

    2014-01-01

    Between 1996 and 2010, the percentage of African children living with their fathers in South Africa dropped from 44% to 31%, with only a third of preschool children living with their parents. Concern about the spate of father absence and its effects on children's well-being has led to a growing focus on fathers in family interventions, although there is relative silence on teenage fathers. In this paper, we draw on an interview-based study with teenage fathers living under conditions of poverty to show how their understandings of fatherhood and constructions of provider masculinity intersect with cultural demands that express both weakness and power. In expressing the desire to care and be involved with their children, and aligning with patterns of masculinity that sought enhanced options for contraceptive use based on gender-equitable relationships, we show a new direction in the making of teenage fatherhood, diverging from hierarchical gender relations where men make the decisions. These changes, however, are limited by constructions of masculinity that contradictorily reinforce provider status, gender inequalities and male patterns of sexual entitlements within a context where teenage fathers are unable to achieve the cultural status of provider masculinity. Implications are discussed in the conclusion.

  12. Improving Elementary School Students’ English Vocabulary Through Local Cultural Content Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Frans Manurung; Ignatius Harjanto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Elementary students of a certain public school in Indonesia had difficulties in learning English. One of the crucial problems was learning English vocabulary. In an attempt to help the students learn and improve English vocabulary, the researchers decided to use CAR to teach English vocabulary with local cultural content materials. The aim of this study was to investigate how the teaching of English vocabulary with local cultural content materials contributed to the improvement ...

  13. Big brains, small worlds: material culture and the evolution of the mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, Fiona; Gamble, Clive

    2008-06-12

    New developments in neuroimaging have demonstrated that the basic capacities underpinning human social skills are shared by our closest extant primate relatives. The challenge for archaeologists is to explain how complex human societies evolved from this shared pattern of face-to-face social interaction. We argue that a key process was the gradual incorporation of material culture into social networks over the course of hominin evolution. Here we use three long-term processes in hominin evolution-encephalization, the global human diaspora and sedentism/agriculture-to illustrate how the cultural transmission of material culture allowed the 'scaling up' of face-to-face social interactions to the global societies known today. We conclude that future research by neuroimagers and archaeologists will need to investigate the cognitive mechanisms behind human engagement with material culture as well as other persons.

  14. "Their Little Wooden Bricks": A History of the Material Culture of Kindergarten in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochner, Larry

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the material culture of kindergarten in the United States in relation to the production and consumption of materials and kindergarten theory and pedagogy. The focus is on Friedrich Froebel's building gifts as they were manufactured and sold by the Milton Bradley Company from 1869 to 1939. A review of trade catalogues over the…

  15. Fixed, Fluid, and Transient: Negotiating Layers of Art Classroom Material Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woywod, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Objects of material culture have meaning. American flags, worktables, bulletin boards, interactive whiteboards, and large white-faced clocks signify "classroom" while color wheels, cupboards, cabinets, sinks, drawing supplies, and that particular scent that lingers after years of exposure to painting materials even more specifically…

  16. Japanese Language and Culture: 9-Year Program Classroom Assessment Materials, Grade 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This document is designed to provide assessment materials for specific Grade 4 outcomes in the Japanese Language and Culture Nine-year Program, Grades 4-5-6. The assessment materials are designed for the beginner level in the context of teaching for communicative competence. Grade 4 learning outcomes from the Japanese Language and Culture…

  17. The Power of Femininity: Exploring the Gender and Ethnic Experiences of Muslim Women Who Accessed Supervisory Roles in a Bedouin Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quader, Sarab Abu-Rabia; Oplatka, Izhar

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The current paper aims to tell the stories of six female supervisors who have successfully managed to access this high-level position in the Bedouin educational system, putting forward some implications for understanding and exploring the lives and career of women in patriarchal, minority groups. Design/methodology/approach: Six female…

  18. A burn prevention program as a long-term investment: trends in burn injuries among Jews and Bedouin children in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shani, E; Bahar-Fuchs, S A; Abu-Hammad, I; Friger, M; Rosenberg, L

    2000-03-01

    In order to broaden our long-term intervention efforts in elementary schools in Israel (underway since 1988) and to set priorities for further population-specific actions, we compared the pattern of burn injuries among two age groups (0-4; 5-14) of two ethnic groups of Jews and Bedouins admitted to a regional hospital between 1986 and 1995 (n = 1050). The findings indicated a significant downward trend, though somewhat nonlinear, in burn admissions among the older age groups. A relatively less favorable trend was observed for the younger age groups. Consistently across years, burn rates in the younger group of Bedouin children were the highest. For the 10-year period, a significant season by ethnic group variation in burn admissions was observed, with a peak in the spring and in the wintertime for the Jews and Bedouins, respectively. A significant trend of decrease, mostly among older children, in average lengths of hospital stay, was also evident. Yet, regardless of age group and across years, Bedouin children stayed longer in the hospital than Jewish children. The overall leading causes of injury (for 1992-1995) were hot liquids (69%), fire (17%), chemicals (9.5%) and contact (2%). In our view, there is a need to address at-risk populations through environmental, community and family-oriented interventions and to venture beyond the pathogenic factors to the investigation of the salutary factors of health under diverse life conditions.

  19. Teachers' Autonomy Support, Autonomy Suppression and Conditional Negative Regard as Predictors of Optimal Learning Experience among High-Achieving Bedouin Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Haya

    2018-01-01

    The study is based on self-determination theory and focuses on the motivation of high-achieving Bedouin students who belong to a hierarchical-collectivist society. The study focuses on the question: What are the relations between teachers' autonomy support and control and an optimal learning experience among students? The study is unique in its…

  20. Contingencies and metacontingencies: Toward a synthesis of behavior analysis and cultural materialism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Sigrid S.

    1988-01-01

    A synthesis of cultural materialism and behavior analysis might increase the scientific and technological value of both fields. Conceptual and substantive relations between the two fields show important similarities, particularly with regard to the causal role of the environment in behavioral and cultural evolution. Key concepts in Marvin Harris's cultural materialist theories are outlined. A distinction is made between contingencies at the behavioral level of analysis (contingencies of reinforcement) and contingencies at the cultural level of analysis (metacontingencies). Relations between the two kinds of contingencies are explored in cultural practices from paleolithic to industrial sociocultural systems. A synthesis of these two fields may offer the opportunity to resolve serious problems currently facing modern cultures. PMID:22478011

  1. Material Culture and Cultural Meanings: Current Studies of Archaeological Ceramics and in Ce­ramic Ethnoarchaeology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles C. Kolb

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Pottery and People: A Dynamic Interaction. James M. Skibo and Gary M. Feinman (editors. Founda­tions of Archaeological Inquiry. Salt Lake City. University of Utah Press. 1999. 260 pp. 91 figures. 30 tables. ISBN 0-87480-576-7. $55.00 (cloth; 0-87489-577-5. $25.00 (paperback. Material Meanings: Critical Approaches to the Interpretation of Material Culture. Elizabeth S. Chilton (editor. Foundations of Archaeological Inquiry. Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press. 1999.179pp. 35 figures. 11 tables. ISBN 0-87480-632-1. $55.00 (cloth; 087480-633-X. $35.00 (paperback. The description and interpretation of material culture may be regarded as the essence of archaeology, a discipline that seeks to recover, describe, document, and interpret past human culture. More recently, understanding that actions occur in a material world that is constituted symbolically, archaeological explanations are often framed in sociocultural meanings, the analysis of agencies, practices and behaviors. I shall subsequently return to this issue. Because of their longevity in the archaeological record, lithic and ceramic artifacts are crucial to the endeavor to interpret human culture. Objects fashioned from clay and subjected to intentional artificial sources of heat made their initial appearance in the archaeological record more than 26.000 years ago. Ceramic objects have been created in a seemingly endless variety of shapes and forms, varying from fertility figurines. to cooking and food storage vessels. lamps, smoking pipes, medicinal pastilles, tokens, beehives, and coffins to modern whitewares and pyroceramics.

  2. Improving Elementary School Students’ English Vocabulary Through Local Cultural Content Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Manurung

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Elementary students of a certain public school in Indonesia had difficulties in learning English. One of the crucial problems was learning English vocabulary. In an attempt to help the students learn and improve English vocabulary, the researchers decided to use CAR to teach English vocabulary with local cultural content materials. The aim of this study was to investigate how the teaching of English vocabulary with local cultural content materials contributed to the improvement of the students’ English vocabulary mastery. The topics covered in the materials were selected based on schemata theory. Vocabulary learning process was done through several activities provided in the materials: classroom and outside vocabulary learning. The results showed that the teaching of local cultural content materials have contributed to the improvement of the Elementary students’ vocabulary mastery. The schematic knowledge found in the familiar topics has aroused the students’ interest and motivation in learning English vocabulary. Students who were more familiar with the topics could respond to the vocabulary learning better than those who were not familiar with. The vocabulary mastery was more successful only if the students participated in both classroom and outside vocabulary learning process. Keywords: Vocabulary Mastery, Vocabulary Improvement, Local Cultural Content Materials, Vocabulary Learning, Schemata

  3. Fluorometric detection and estimation of fungal biomass on cultural heritage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkol, Nick; McNamara, Christopher J; Mitchell, Ralph

    2010-02-01

    A wide variety of cultural heritage materials are susceptible to fungal deterioration. The paper, canvas, and stone constituents of our cultural heritage are subjected to harmful physical and chemical processes as they are slowly consumed by fungi. Remediation of fungal contamination can be costly and risk further damage to cultural artifacts. Early detection of fungal growth would permit the use of relatively noninvasive treatments to remediate fungal contamination before visible or lasting damage to the object has occurred. Current methods used for the detection and measurement of microbial biomass, such as colony counts, microscopic biovolume estimation, and ergosterol analysis are expensive and time consuming, or are inappropriate for use with fungi. Beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase (3.2.1.52) activity provides a reliable estimation of fungal biomass in soil and on building materials. Adapted for use on cultural heritage materials' fluorogenic 4-methylumbelliferyl (MUF) labeled substrate N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminide (NAG) was used to detect beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase activity in the fungus Aspergillus niger. Fluorescence increased linearly with fungal biomass and the sensitivity of the assay was comparable to other biochemical techniques. The fluorometric assay was used to monitor fungal biomass on a variety of cultural heritage materials non-destructively, and without the introduction of chemicals or solvents to the surfaces. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy applied to natural and artificial materials from cultural heritages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brai, Maria; Gennaro, Gaetano; Schillaci, Tiziano; Tranchina, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an applied physical technique that has shown in recent years its great potential for rapid qualitative analysis of materials. Thanks to the possibility to implement a portable instrument that perform LIBS analysis, this technique is revealed to be particularly useful for in situ analysis in the field of cultural heritages. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the potentiality of LIBS technique in the field of cultural heritages, with respect to the chemical characterization of complex matrix as calcareous and refractory materials for further quantitative analyses on cultural heritages. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyses were used as reference. Calibration curves of certified materials used as standards were obtained by XRF analyses. The LIBS measurements were performed with a new mobile instrument called Modi (Mobile Double pulse Instrument for LIBS Analysis). The XRF analyses were performed with a portable instrument ArtTAX. LIBS and XRF measurement were performed on both reference materials and samples (bricks and mortars) sampled in the ancient Greek-Roman Theatre of Taormina. Although LIBS measurements performed on reference materials have shown non linear response to concentrations, and so we were not able to obtain quantitative results, an integrated study of XRF and LIBS signals permitted us to distinguish among chemical features and degradation state of measured building materials.

  5. Materializing Culture - Culturizing Material. On the Status, Responsibilities and Function of Cultural Property Repositories within the Framework of a "Transformative Scholarship"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Hilgert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Certain theoretical streams in the cultural and social sciences that are occasionally subsumed under the term “New Materialism” 2 (see Witzgall, as well as recent social, political, cultural and media technology developments require a theoretical and research-political repositioning of academic object repositories. For it is obvious that under the influence of these multi-layered, partly interwoven processes, the status, responsibilities, as well as the function and spheres of activity of these object or cultural property repositories with research commitment (on the term see section 2 below are currently undergoing long-lasting change. For the respective institutions, these changes not only result in complex challenges regarding contents and structure, but also present extraordinary opportunities for the fulfillment of their academic, social and political responsibilities. The appropriate handling of these challenges and opportunities can substantially contribute to the sharpening of the academic and social profile of these institutions and increase their visibility on both a national and international level.

  6. Cellulosic ethanol fermentation using Saccharomyces cerevisiae seeds cultured by pretreated corn stover material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Abdul Sattar; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Utilization of lignocellulose materials to replace the pure glucose for preparation of the fermenting yeast seeds could reduce the cost of ethanol fermentation, because a large quantity of glucose is saved in the large-scale seed fermentor series. In this study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae DQ1 was cultured using the freshly pretreated corn stover material as the carbon source, and then the culture broth was used as the inoculation seeds after a series of seed transfer and inoculated into the ethanol production fermentor. The results show that the yeast cell growth and ethanol fermentation performance have essentially no difference when the yeast seeds were cultured by glucose, the corn stover hydrolysate liquid, and the pretreated corn stover solids as carbon sources, respectively. Approximately 22% of the yeast cell culture cost was saved, and the process flow sheet in industrial scale plants was simplified by using the pretreated corn stover for seed culture. The results provided a practical method for materials and operational cost reduction for cellulosic ethanol production.

  7. Pages of the phytomorphology history in the monuments of material culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Yu. Barshteyn

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available It was reviewed Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome sources of plants morphology, plant morphology knowledge in Renaissance age – scientific works of Andrea Cesalpino, Joachim Jungius, Marcello Malpighi and plant morphology formation as the separate branch of science due to Johann Wolfgang von Goethe scientific works and its reflection in the monuments of material culture.

  8. An Approach to Teaching the Analysis of Popular Culture Materials in History Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartshorne, Thomas L.

    1987-01-01

    Demonstrates specific exercises designed to show students how popular cultural materials can be used as historical documents and the potential pitfalls inherent in this process. Examines Warner Brothers cartoons, relating the plot to the socio-historical roots of the cartoons. Concludes that this technique helps students better understand…

  9. 'Real relationships': sociable interaction, material culture and imprisonment in a secure psychiatric unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parrott, F.

    2010-01-01

    Research into the character of social relationships in psychiatric inpatient facilities has focused on face-to-face interaction between individuals and within groups in the communal areas of wards. Using theories developed in material culture and media studies, this article argues that patients'

  10. Investigating longitudinal and cross cultural measurement Invariance of Inglehart’s short post-materialism scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ippel, L.; Gelissen, J.P.T.M.; Moors, G.B.D.

    2014-01-01

    Inglehart applies a four item ranking scale to measure post-materialism which is used for cross-cultural and cross-temporal comparative purposes. The aim of this research is to test measurement invariance of the scale to establish to what extent the scale produces comparable results in time and

  11. Popular Culture as Emotional Provocation: The Material Enactment of Queer Pedagogies in a High School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlivan, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on the notion of popular culture as a form of queer emotional provocation, in this paper I suggest that attending to the material enactment of queer pedagogies in context enables an understanding of the importance of attending more fully to the emotional ramifications of queer pedagogies. Working within the context of a research project…

  12. Towards cultural materialism in the medical humanities: the case of blood rejuvenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This paper argues for an approach within the medical humanities that draws on the theoretical legacy of cultural materialism as a framework for reading cultural practices and their relationship to the social and economic order. It revisits the origins and development of cultural materialism in cultural studies and literary studies between the 1970s and 1990s and considers how, with adaptation, this methodology might facilitate ideological criticism focused on material formations of health, disease and the human body. I outline three key characteristics of a medicocultural materialist approach along these lines: (a) interdisciplinary work on a broad range of medical and cultural sources, including those drawn from ‘popular’ forms of culture; (b) the combination of historicist analysis with scrutiny of present-day contexts; (c) analyses that engage with political economy perspectives and/or the work of medical sociology in this area. The subsequent sections of the paper employ a medicocultural materialist approach to examine conjectural understandings of, and empirical investigations into, the capacity of transfused human blood to rejuvenate the ageing body. I trace textual faultlines that expose the structures of power which inform the movement of blood between bodies in ‘medical gothic’ fictions from the 19th-century fin de siècle, including Mary Elizabeth Braddon's ‘Good Lady Ducayne’ (1896) and Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897). I conclude with a critique of biomedical innovations in blood rejuvenation in the era of medical neoliberalism, before considering the potential applications of medicocultural materialism to other topics within the field of the medical humanities. PMID:28495908

  13. Towards cultural materialism in the medical humanities: the case of blood rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Catherine

    2018-03-01

    This paper argues for an approach within the medical humanities that draws on the theoretical legacy of cultural materialism as a framework for reading cultural practices and their relationship to the social and economic order. It revisits the origins and development of cultural materialism in cultural studies and literary studies between the 1970s and 1990s and considers how, with adaptation, this methodology might facilitate ideological criticism focused on material formations of health, disease and the human body. I outline three key characteristics of a medicocultural materialist approach along these lines: (a) interdisciplinary work on a broad range of medical and cultural sources, including those drawn from 'popular' forms of culture; (b) the combination of historicist analysis with scrutiny of present-day contexts; (c) analyses that engage with political economy perspectives and/or the work of medical sociology in this area. The subsequent sections of the paper employ a medicocultural materialist approach to examine conjectural understandings of, and empirical investigations into, the capacity of transfused human blood to rejuvenate the ageing body. I trace textual faultlines that expose the structures of power which inform the movement of blood between bodies in 'medical gothic' fictions from the 19th-century fin de siècle, including Mary Elizabeth Braddon's 'Good Lady Ducayne' (1896) and Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897). I conclude with a critique of biomedical innovations in blood rejuvenation in the era of medical neoliberalism, before considering the potential applications of medicocultural materialism to other topics within the field of the medical humanities. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. [On the Way to Culture-Sensitive Patient Information Materials: Results of a Focus Group Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Zivile; Frank, Fabian; Bermejo, Isaac; Kalaitsidou, Chariklia; Zill, Jördis; Dirmaier, Jörg; Härter, Martin; Bengel, Jürgen; Hölzel, Lars

    2017-09-28

    Aim This study was part of a double-blind randomised controlled trial aimed to evaluate the effects of culture-sensitive patient information materials (PIM) compared with standard translated material. The study aimed to obtain the data for the development of culture sensitive PIM about unipolar depression for the 4 largest migrant groups in Germany (Turkish, Polish, Russian and Italian migration background). Method A qualitative study using 4 manual-based focus groups (FG), one for each migrant group, with 29 participants (9 with a Turkish (TüG), 8 with a Polish (PoG), 5 with a Russian (RuG) and 7 with an Italian (ItG) migration background) was conducted. The discussions were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results 7 categories were identified. For the (1.) development of a good culture-sensitive PIM an easy language, a clear structure, an assessable extent of information and the avoidance of stereotypes were highlighted cross-culturally in all four FG. RuG and PoG had the largest (2.) lack of information about the German health care system. Concerning the (3.) illness perception RuG named problems with recognizing and understanding depression. PoG, RuG and TüG thematized (4.) feared consequences of the illness and of professional helpseeking. ItG, PoG, RuG had fears concerning (5.) psychotropic drugs as a result from insufficient knowledge about medication. For (6.) doctor-patient relationship cultural specifics were identified in RuG and TüG and for (7.) migration or culture specific reasons for depression in RuG, ItG and TüG. Conclusion Although the identified categories were relevant for all or for the majority of migrant groups, for most categories specific cultural aspects were discovered. These findings show the importance of a culture sensitive adaptation of PIM. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Infrared thermographic assessment of materials and techniques for the protection of cultural heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moropoulou, Antonia; Avdelidis, Nicolas P.; Koui, Maria; Delegou, Ekaterini T.; Tsiourva, Theodora

    2001-09-01

    In this work, infrared thermography was applied and investigated as a non-destructive tool in the assessment of materials and techniques for the protection of cultural heritage. Diagnostic studies on monuments and historic buildings, situated in Greece, were performed. Long wave infrared thermography was used on restoration and traditional - historic materials concerning architectural surfaces and historic structures for research purposes such as: the assessment of moisture impact to porous stone masonries and the evaluation of conservation interventions (materials and techniques) regarding, consolidation interventions on porous stone masonries, restoration of masonries by repair mortars, and cleaning of facades. The results of this work indicate that thermography can be considered as a powerful diagnostic nondestructive tool for the preservation and protection of cultural heritage.

  16. Influence of Support Materials on Phosphate Removal by the Pure Culture of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanife Büyükgüngör

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the influence and performance of the addition of support material on the phosphate uptake in a pure culture of phosphate-accumulating bacteria Acinetobacter calcoaceticus (DSM, 1532. Materials (natural zeolite and clay from Hrvatsko zagorje, Croatia of different physical, chemical and mineral characteristics as well as different particle size were tested. In anaerobic/aerobic sequencing batch reactors with the pure culture of A. calcoaceticus, the addition of natural zeolite or clay in the aerobic phase resulted in a significantly higher final efficiency of phosphate removal. The amount of phosphate removed depended on particle size and type of material used. The number of A. calcoaceticus cells was significantly higher in reactors with support materials than in control reactors. After 24 h of incubation with support materials, the cells were present in colonies on the outer layer, strongly adsorbed and adhering to one another by extracellular substances. The main contribution of the support material to the phosphate removal was the increase of biomass, and in a lesser extent the adsorption of phosphate on the material particles.

  17. Journeys of our ancestors: Conservation science approaches to the analysis of cultural material

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Caitlin Rose

    The application and use of non-destructive portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is a critical tool in the preservation and interpretation of cultural material. Portable XRF instrumentation produce elemental compositional data that is used to reconstruct current artifact composition, which can be related to materials and methods of manufacture, technological practice, as well as object condition and presence of corrosion surfaces. Portable XRF analysis is used to assess a variety of material classes utilized in artifact manufacture. The dissertation research is based on a series of three case studies that represent typical groups of material culture commonly encountered in conservation and conservation science research. Conservators and conservation scientists frequently undertake analysis and interpretation of disparate groups of materials. Often, these objects are tied together by research questions or themes directed by outside influences including preservation issues requiring action; curatorial research interests; museum exhibition programs; as well as many other cultural heritage stakeholders. To this end, both non-destructive and destructive tools that provide measurements of interest play critical roles in analysis. The case studies have been designed to answer common compositional questions relating to (a) bulk analysis of Chinese coins, (b) characterization of Southwestern ceramic colorants, and, (c) chemical examination of post-depositional manganese dioxide accretions occurring on archaeological ceramic materials. They evaluate the value of data produced using effectiveness of non-destructive portable XRF analysis for the interpretation of archaeological materials. The case studies provide a template for the development of conservation science research, predicated on object preservation, which produce meaningful data for the interpretation and conservation of the analyzed archaeological artifacts. Portable XRF provides useful data that is used to

  18. Material, behavioural, cultural and psychosocial factors in the explanation of socioeconomic inequalities in oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijster, Denise; Oude Groeniger, Joost; van der Heijden, Geert J M G; van Lenthe, Frank J

    2017-12-19

    This study aimed to assess the contribution of material, behavioural, cultural and psychosocial factors in the explanation of socioeconomic inequalities (education and income) in oral health of Dutch adults. Cross-sectional data from participants (25-75 years of age) of the fifth wave of the GLOBE cohort were used (n = 2812). Questionnaires were used to obtain data on material factors (e.g. financial difficulties), behavioural factors (e.g. smoking), cultural factors (e.g. cultural activities) and psychosocial factors (e.g. psychological distress). Oral health outcomes were self-reported number of teeth and self-rated oral health (SROH). Mediation analysis, using multivariable negative binomial regression and logistic regression, was performed. Education level and income showed a graded positive relationship with both oral health outcomes. Adding material, behavioural, cultural and psychosocial factors substantially reduced the rate ratio for the number of teeth of the lowest education group from 0.79 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.75-0.83) to 0.92 (95% CI: 0.87-0.97) and of the lowest income group from 0.80 (95% CI: 0.73-0.88) to 1.04 (95% CI: 0.96-1.14). Inclusion of all factors also substantially reduced the odds ratio for poor SROH of the lowest education group from 1.61 (95% CI: 1.28-2.03) to 1.12 (95% CI: 0.85-1.48) and of the lowest income groups from 3.18 (95% CI: 2.13-4.74) to 1.48 (95% CI: 0.90-2.45). In general, behavioural factors contributed most to the explanation of socioeconomic inequalities in adult oral health, followed by material factors. The contribution of cultural and psychosocial factors was relatively moderate. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association.

  19. Emerging Approaches in Synchrotron Studies of Materials from Cultural and Natural History Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Loïc; Bernard, Sylvain; Marone, Federica; Thoury, Mathieu; Reiche, Ina; Gourrier, Aurélien; Sciau, Philippe; Bergmann, Uwe

    2016-02-01

    Synchrotrons have provided significant methods and instruments to study ancient materials from cultural and natural heritages. New ways to visualise (surfacic or volumic) morphologies are developed on the basis of elemental, density and refraction contrasts. They now apply to a wide range of materials, from historic artefacts to paleontological specimens. The tunability of synchrotron beams owing to the high flux and high spectral resolution of photon sources is at the origin of the main chemical speciation capabilities of synchrotron-based techniques. Although, until recently, photon-based speciation was mainly applicable to inorganic materials, novel developments based, for instance, on STXM and deep UV photoluminescence bring new opportunities to study speciation in organic and hybrid materials, such as soaps and organometallics, at a submicrometric spatial resolution over large fields of view. Structural methods are also continuously improved and increasingly applied to hierarchically structured materials for which organisation results either from biological or manufacturing processes. High-definition (spectral) imaging appears as the main driving force of the current trend for new synchrotron techniques for research on cultural and natural heritage materials.

  20. Effects of Pop Culture as Authentic Materials toward Students’ Writing Skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratnawati Ratnawati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Writing, one of the four skills which has to be taught by educators in language learning. Starting from classroom observation implied that students confronted the difficulties in writing involving generating ideas, organizing words, and making compositions. This study supposes to explore some effects of pop culture as authentic materials for English language teaching in improving students‘ writing skill. Due to pop culture relates to students‘ life and experience, it is considered to be a stimulus for gaining students‘ ideas, information, motivation, and interest in teaching writing. The students of secondary school were involved in this study and descriptive case study was employed to observe the importance of pop culture in writing class. Also, questionnaires and students‘ works are the instruments to measure its effects. Both students‘ works and result of the questionnaires pointed out that significantly improvement obtained after applying pop culture. In line with findings, it can be said that pop cultures have significant effects toward students‘ writing skill. So, educators need to apply pop culture as their choices in future planning lesson.

  1. Ramón Reichert and Annika Richterich, eds., Digital Material/ism Vol. 1, Issue 1 – Digital Culture and Society

    OpenAIRE

    Pournara, Lizzy

    2017-01-01

    Ramón Reichert and Annika Richterich, eds., Digital Material/ism Vol. 1, Issue 1 – Digital Culture and Society Bielefeld: [transcript] Verlag, 2015. ISBN 978-3-8376-3153-1. Lizzy Pournara Aristotle University of Thessaloniki The issue Digital Material/ism edited by Ramón Reichert and Annika Richterich inaugurates the first volume of the journal Digital Culture & Society. The significance of this volume’s work lies in its attempt to redress the concept of materiality in digital environments an...

  2. Plant Materials are Sustainable Substrates Supporting New Technologies of Plant-Only-Based Culture Media for in vitro Culturing of the Plant Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, Elhussein F; Sarhan, Mohamed S; Daanaa, Hassan-Sibroe A; Abdou, Mennatullah; Morsi, Ahmed T; Abdelfadeel, Mohamed R; Elsawey, Hend; Nemr, Rahma; El-Tahan, Mahmoud; Hamza, Mervat A; Abbas, Mohamed; Youssef, Hanan H; Abdelhadi, Abdelhadi A; Amer, Wafaa M; Fayez, Mohamed; Ruppel, Silke; Hegazi, Nabil A

    2018-03-29

    In order to improve the culturability and biomass production of rhizobacteria, we previously introduced plant-only-based culture media. We herein attempted to widen the scope of plant materials suitable for the preparation of plant-only-based culture media. We chemically analyzed the refuse of turfgrass, cactus, and clover. They were sufficiently rich to support good in vitro growth by rhizobacteria isolates representing Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. They were also adequate and efficient to produce a cell biomass in liquid batch cultures. These culture media were as sufficient as artificial culture media for the cultivation and recovery of the in situ rhizobacteria of barley (Hordeum murinum L.). Based on culture-dependent (CFU plate counting) and culture-independent analyses (qPCR), mowed turfgrass, in particular, supported the highest culturable population of barley endophytes, representing >16% of the total bacterial number quantified with qPCR. This accurately reflected the endophytic community composition, in terms of diversity indices (S', H', and D') based on PCR-DGGE, and clustered the plant culture media together with the qPCR root populations away from the artificial culture media. Despite the promiscuous nature of the plant materials tested to culture the plant microbiome, our results indicated that plant materials of a homologous nature to the tested host plant, at least at the family level, and/or of the same environment were more likely to be selected. Plant-only-based culture media require further refinements in order to provide selectivity for the in vitro growth of members of the plant microbiome, particularly difficult-to-culture bacteria. This will provide insights into their hidden roles in the environment and support future culturomic studies.

  3. Do Authors of Online Electronic Materials for Teaching Mathematics Use Their Potential to Use Non-Stereotypical Cultural Settings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraová, Hana

    2017-01-01

    The paper focuses on the cultural content of online electronic materials developed primarily by Czech in-service teachers of mathematics for smartboards. The author presents an analysis of these materials with a focus on the cultural settings of word problems they contain. The paper builds on a poster presented on ECEL 2015 conference and a paper…

  4. Cultura material da escola: entram em cena as carteiras Material culture of the school: the portfolio comes into play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Xavier de Souza Castro

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Carteiras escolares: objeto de pesquisa sobre a história da cultura material da escola catarinense. A intenção deste artigo é apresentar alguns resultados referentes a essa pesquisa. Com o trabalho, busca-se identificar aspectos que caracterizem este mobiliário no início da organização das escolas primárias em Santa Catarina. Fontes da pesquisa: legislação, pareceres de professores, relatórios de inspetores, receitas de compras da então Província, além de ícones da época. O advento do ensino da escrita como tarefa escolar é um divisor de águas na configuração material do espaço escolar. A reflexão é balizada por referências a métodos de ensino, considerados articuladores da presença ou alteração de determinado mobiliário no interior das salas de aula. Em termos teóricos, tem se mobilizado um repertório que incide particularmente na história da educação, na cultura material da escola e em referências aos inícios da escolarização, principalmente na Europa e nos Estados Unidos.The School Desks: the research's object about the history of material culture of Santa Catarina's schools. The aim of this article is to present some results related to this research and to identify some aspects that characterize this furniture at the begining of the organization of the primary schools in the state of Santa Catarina. The Research Sources: legislation, teachers' opinions, reports of inspectors, incomes, besides icons of this period. The advent of teaching writing in the schools is a watershed in the schools setting material and furniture. The reflection is based in references of methods of teaching considered articulators of presence or alteration of certain determinate furniture inside the classrooms. In theoretical terms, it has been mobilized a repertory that happens particularly in the history of education, schools' material culture and in references to beginnings of schooling, especially in Europe and the United

  5. The Islamic Orient and the Development of Material Culture of Muscovy: Evaluation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belyaev Leonid A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The author discusses approaches to archaeological analysis of the Muslim contribution to the development of Muscovy, as well as the mere possibility of such analysis. So far, the studies focused on identifi cation of some interpenetrating elements of the material and artistic culture, which is necessary, but not quite suffi cient. New tasks must be formulated: to outline and characterize areas of intersection of various cultural streams; to identify forms and stages of such contacts; to understand ways for primary perception of impulses, which gave birth to distinctive national cultures in the Middle Ages and in the Modern era; to trace processing of such impulses further on; to try and understand whether there was a monocultural archaeological environment that existed in the past and belonged to the coexisting groups speaking different languages and belonging to different confessions.

  6. Considering Material Culture in Assessing Assistive Devices: “Breaking up the Rhythm”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Anderson

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a project that looked at the meaning stroke survivors assigned to assistive devices. Material culture theory served as a framework to help stroke survivors explicitly consider [dis]ability as a discursive object with a socially constructed meaning that influenced how they thought about themselves with impairment. Material culture theory informed the design (taking and talking to their peers about photos of anything that assisted and analysis of the meaning of the assistive devices project. In our analysis of the narratives, survivors assigned three types of meanings to the assistive devices: markers of progress, symbolic objects of disability, and the possibility of independent participation. Notably, the meaning of assistive devices as progress, [dis]ability, and [poss]ability was equally evident as participants talked about mobility, everyday activities, and services. We discuss how considering [dis]ability as a discursive object in the situation might have enabled stroke survivors to participate.

  7. Diamond-like carbon as biological compatible material for cell culture and medical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, L; Jones, M W; Wu, R L

    1993-01-01

    Ion beam assisted diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been used for growing the human hematopoietic myeloblastic ML-1 cells and human embryo kidney 293 cells in the control environment. DLC films were directly deposited onto the P-35 plastic dishes by impacting the high kinetic energy (1000 eV) of methane ions at room temperature. The present results showed that both ML-1 and HEK 293 cells continuously grow with and without DLC films. It has demonstrated that human cells proliferated on DLC film with very high viability and DLC material had no toxicity to cultured human ML-1 and HEK 293 cells. We conclude that DLC film is a biological compatible material for potential cell culture matrix and bio-medical applications.

  8. Trepanation and Roman medicine: a comparison of osteoarchaeological remains, material culture and written texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullo, E

    2010-06-01

    Evidence for prehistoric trepanation is limited to preserved osteoarchaeological material, namely human skulls, and the occasional discovery of surgical instruments. However, the Roman empire gave rise to an abundant and diverse range of source types, including skeletal remains, material culture and detailed medical texts, each of which harbours the potential to contribute to our understanding of trepanation during this historical period. This paper highlights the advantages and inherent biases of each of these source types, and proposes that the simultaneous analysis and integration of different types of historical evidence is essential for the study of trepanation as a surgical procedure.

  9. The transfilter transmission of [3H]-proline labelled material in cultured rat tooth germs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woltiers, J.M.L.

    1978-01-01

    Mesenchyme and epithelium from 20-day old embryonic rat tooth germs were cultured for 2 days with Millipore filter separating the two tissues. Either the mesenchyme or the epithelium was labelled with [ 3 H]-proline. Differentiation of the tissues proceeded as in unseparated controls. Collagenase-digestible tritiated material produced by the mesenchyme passed through the filter and accumulated at the interface between filter and epithelium. Findings show that collagen could have a stabilizing influence on the differentiation of the ameloblasts. (author)

  10. Identification of blue staining vaccine-derived material in inflammatory lesions using cultured canine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruggs, Jennifer L; LeBlanc, Casey J

    2015-03-01

    Vaccine reactions are described in cytology textbooks as having eosinophilic to magenta colored globules within and admixed with inflammatory cells. Recently, we have seen increased numbers of inflammatory lesions containing blue to blue-gray globular material, with historical information suggesting an association with rabies vaccination. The purpose of the study was to confirm the blue-gray and the eosinophilic material observed microscopically in some inflammatory lesions as being vaccine-derived. Three different vaccines were cytocentrifuged and Wright stained. Vaccine aliquots were also added to the culture media of canine-derived macrophages for 24 hours and the cells subsequently harvested, cytocentrifuged, and Wright stained. The globular material present in both preparations was compared to that observed in vaccine-induced inflammatory lesions. Morin staining was used to identify metal within vaccine material in both in vitro- and in vivo-derived cytology samples. Vaccine-derived material has a characteristic color and appearance. Appearance of the material was consistent in cytologic samples, in cells incubated with the vaccine, and in cytocentrifuged preparations of the vaccine vial contents. The blue-gray globules stained positively for Morin stain, while the eosinophilic material did not stain. Vaccine-induced inflammatory lesions may contain blue to blue-gray or magenta stained globular material. Blue-gray material was associated with administration of rabies vaccine Imrab 3 TF and the observed material may be metal-containing adjuvant. Magenta material was associated with other vaccines and negative for Morin stain, suggesting a metal-free adjuvant. © 2014 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  11. Terahertz pulse imaging of stratified architectural materials for cultural heritage studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, J. Bianca; Labaune, Julien; Mourou, Gérard; Duling, Irl N.; Walker, Gillian; Bowen, John; Menu, Michel

    2011-06-01

    Terahertz pulse imaging (TPI) is a novel noncontact, nondestructive technique for the examination of cultural heritage artifacts. It has the advantage of broadband spectral range, time-of-flight depth resolution, and penetration through optically opaque materials. Fiber-coupled, portable, time-domain terahertz systems have enabled this technique to move out of the laboratory and into the field. Much like the rings of a tree, stratified architectural materials give the chronology of their environmental and aesthetic history. This work concentrates on laboratory models of stratified mosaics and fresco paintings, specimens extracted from a neolithic excavation site in Catalhoyuk, Turkey, and specimens measured at the medieval Eglise de Saint Jean-Baptiste in Vif, France. Preparatory spectroscopic studies of various composite materials, including lime, gypsum and clay plasters are presented to enhance the interpretation of results and with the intent to aid future computer simulations of the TPI of stratified architectural material. The breadth of the sample range is a demonstration of the cultural demand and public interest in the life history of buildings. The results are an illustration of the potential role of TPI in providing both a chronological history of buildings and in the visualization of obscured wall paintings and mosaics.

  12. Colloid and materials science for the conservation of cultural heritage: cleaning, consolidation, and deacidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglioni, Piero; Chelazzi, David; Giorgi, Rodorico; Poggi, Giovanna

    2013-04-30

    Serendipity and experiment have been a frequent approach for the development of materials and methodologies used for a long time for either cleaning or consolidation of works of art. Recently, new perspectives have been opened by the application of materials science, colloid science, and interface science frameworks to conservation, generating a breakthrough in the development of innovative tools for the conservation and preservation of cultural heritage. This Article is an overview of the most recent contributions of colloid and materials science to the art conservation field, mainly focusing on the use of amphiphile-based fluids, gels, and alkaline earth metal hydroxide nanoparticles dispersions for the cleaning of pictorial surfaces, the consolidation of artistic substrates, and the deacidification of paper, canvas, and wood. Future possible directions for solving several conservation issues that still need to be faced are also highlighted.

  13. Acting and Collecting: Imagining Asia through material culture and musical theatre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Thorley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the link between Asian-inspired material culture and musical theatre through the collections of Anglo-Australian performer Herbert Browne (1895-1975. Brown played lead roles in 1920s Australian musical theatre productions of The Mikado and Chu Chin Chow and re-lived his connection with oriental theatre by collecting and responding to objects performatively in the Chinoiserie room of his Melbourne home. Oriental musical theatre blended exotic cultures and locales in visually spectacular productions which bore little resemblance to reality. The taste for escapist fiction in the theatre took place against a backdrop of museum collecting which aimed to reproduce authentic Asian and Other cultures. In this paper, I draw on French philosopher Merleau-Ponty’s observations on the relationship between thought and the body’s interaction with space to interpret the influence of Browne’s theatricality on collecting choices. From this perspective, objects materialize particular understandings of the world which originate in the body and the body’s performative engagement with space.

  14. Cultural repertoires and food-related household technology within colonia households under conditions of material hardship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean Wesley R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Mexican-origin women in the U.S. living in colonias (new-destination Mexican-immigrant communities along the Texas-Mexico border suffer from a high incidence of food insecurity and diet-related chronic disease. Understanding environmental factors that influence food-related behaviors among this population will be important to improving the well-being of colonia households. This article focuses on cultural repertoires that enable food choice and the everyday uses of technology in food-related practice by Mexican-immigrant women in colonia households under conditions of material hardship. Findings are presented within a conceptual framework informed by concepts drawn from sociological accounts of technology, food choice, culture, and material hardship. Methods Field notes were provided by teams of promotora-researchers (indigenous community health workers and public-health professionals trained as participant observers. They conducted observations on three separate occasions (two half-days during the week and one weekend day within eight family residences located in colonias near the towns of Alton and San Carlos, Texas. English observations were coded inductively and early observations stressed the importance of technology and material hardship in food-related behavior. These observations were further explored and coded using the qualitative data package Atlas.ti. Results Technology included kitchen implements used in standard and adapted configurations and household infrastructure. Residents employed tools across a range of food-related activities identified as forms of food acquisition, storage, preparation, serving, feeding and eating, cleaning, and waste processing. Material hardships included the quality, quantity, acceptability, and uncertainty dimensions of food insecurity, and insufficient consumption of housing, clothing and medical care. Cultural repertoires for coping with material hardship included reliance on

  15. Cultural repertoires and food-related household technology within colonia households under conditions of material hardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Wesley R; Sharkey, Joseph R; Johnson, Cassandra M; St John, Julie

    2012-05-15

    BSTRACT: Mexican-origin women in the U.S. living in colonias (new-destination Mexican-immigrant communities) along the Texas-Mexico border suffer from a high incidence of food insecurity and diet-related chronic disease. Understanding environmental factors that influence food-related behaviors among this population will be important to improving the well-being of colonia households. This article focuses on cultural repertoires that enable food choice and the everyday uses of technology in food-related practice by Mexican-immigrant women in colonia households under conditions of material hardship. Findings are presented within a conceptual framework informed by concepts drawn from sociological accounts of technology, food choice, culture, and material hardship. Field notes were provided by teams of promotora-researchers (indigenous community health workers) and public-health professionals trained as participant observers. They conducted observations on three separate occasions (two half-days during the week and one weekend day) within eight family residences located in colonias near the towns of Alton and San Carlos, Texas. English observations were coded inductively and early observations stressed the importance of technology and material hardship in food-related behavior. These observations were further explored and coded using the qualitative data package Atlas.ti. Technology included kitchen implements used in standard and adapted configurations and household infrastructure. Residents employed tools across a range of food-related activities identified as forms of food acquisition, storage, preparation, serving, feeding and eating, cleaning, and waste processing. Material hardships included the quality, quantity, acceptability, and uncertainty dimensions of food insecurity, and insufficient consumption of housing, clothing and medical care. Cultural repertoires for coping with material hardship included reliance on inexpensive staple foods and dishes, and

  16. Novel approach of signal normalization for depth profile of cultural heritage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvilay, D.; Detalle, V.; Wilkie-Chancellier, N.; Texier, A.; Martinez, L.; Serfaty, S.

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of cultural heritage materials is always complex and specific because unique. Materials are most often heterogeneous and organized in several layers such as mural paintings or corrosion products. The characterization of a complete artwork's stratigraphy is actually one of the questions of science conservation. Indeed, the knowledge of these layers allows completing the history of the work of art and a better understanding of alteration processes in order to set up an appropriate conservation action. The LIBS technique has been employed to study the stratigraphy of an artwork thanks to the ablation laser. However, as we know, atomic information could be insufficient to characterize two materials composed by the same based elements. Therefore, an additional molecular analysis, like Raman spectroscopy; is sometimes necessary for a better identification of the material in particular for organic coatings in cultural heritage. We suggest in this study to use Standard Normal Variate (SNV) as a common normalization for different kinds of spectra (LIBS and Raman spectroscopy) combined with a 3D colour representation for stratigraphic identification of the different layers composing the complex material from artwork. So in this investigation, the SNV method will be applied on LIBS and Raman spectra but also on baseline Raman spectra often considering as nuisance. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the versatility of SNV applied on varied spectra like LIBS, Raman spectra as well as the luminescence background. This original work considers the SNV with a 3D colour representation as a probable new perspective for an easy recognition of a structure layered with a direct overview of the depth profile of the artwork.

  17. Characterization of mammalian cell culture raw materials by combining spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunfio, Nicholas; Lee, Haewoo; Starkey, Jason; Agarabi, Cyrus; Liu, Jay; Yoon, Seongkyu

    2017-07-01

    Two of the primary issues with characterizing the variability of raw materials used in mammalian cell culture, such as wheat hydrolysate, is that the analyses of these materials can be time consuming, and the results of the analyses are not straightforward to interpret. To solve these issues, spectroscopy can be combined with chemometrics to provide a quick, robust and easy to understand methodology for the characterization of raw materials; which will improve cell culture performance by providing an assessment of the impact that a given raw material will have on final product quality. In this study, four spectroscopic technologies: near infrared spectroscopy, middle infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy were used in conjunction with principal component analysis to characterize the variability of wheat hydrolysates, and to provide evidence that the classification of good and bad lots of raw material is possible. Then, the same spectroscopic platforms are combined with partial least squares regressions to quantitatively predict two cell culture critical quality attributes (CQA): integrated viable cell density and IgG titer. The results showed that near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy are capable of characterizing the wheat hydrolysate's chemical structure, with NIR performing slightly better; and that they can be used to estimate the raw materials' impact on the CQAs. These results were justified by demonstrating that of all the components present in the wheat hydrolysates, six amino acids: arginine, glycine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, isoleucine and threonine; and five trace elements: copper, phosphorus, molybdenum, arsenic and aluminum, had a large, statistically significant effect on the CQAs, and that NIR and fluorescence spectroscopy performed the best for characterizing the important amino acids. It was also found that the trace elements of interest were not characterized well by any of the spectral

  18. From basic raw material goods to cultural and environmental services: the Chinese bamboo sophistication path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ruiz Pérez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bamboo has deep cultural and economic roots in China, the country with the largest bamboo resources in the world. Over the last three decades bamboo has evolved from a supply of raw material for basic goods into the material base of an increasingly diversified array of products and, more recently, into a potentially important source of cultural and environmental services. Based on a general literature review and the lessons learned from detailed case studies in different regions of China, we explored the changing roles of bamboo, and its effects on local economies and farmers' livelihood strategies. As the country develops and new economic activities continue to appear, bamboo production has shifted from a superior income-generating opportunity that largely benefited the better-off to a less attractive option left for those who have no other choice. The nature of the work has also changed, from families working directly on their bamboo plots to an emphasis on hired labor, with prosperous bamboo owners devoting most of their time to more lucrative activities. A similar process can be observed in bamboo processing in counties where previous industrial structures hinged around raw material harvests, but which have now entered into other secondary and tertiary industry activities. At the same time, bamboo has attracted new opportunities as a source of cultural, aesthetic, and leisure-related activities, as well as some potentially important climatic, watershed, and biodiversity functions. We analyze the complementarity between goods and services provided by bamboo and discuss some research issues and future trends that may help in overcoming these conflicts.

  19. Sweden in the Delaware Valley: Everyday Life and Material Culture in New Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naum, Magdalena; Ekengren, Fredrik; Zagal Mach Wolfe, Ulla Isabel

    2013-01-01

    In 1637 the Swedish Crown, encouraged by Dutch merchants, developed a plan to establish a colonial outpost in America to tap into profitable tobacco and beaver pelt trade. The same year the first cargo ships left Sweden and sailed westwards to claim their piece of America along the Delaware River......, their perception and interactions with the neighbouring Native American groups. It discusses the ways material culture was used, exchanged and appropriated by the colonists and the local Lenape and Susquehannock in the processes of meeting, negotiations and daily coexistence....

  20. Charlotte Charke’s Gun: Queering Material Culture and Gender Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade Higa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay juxtaposes readings of material culture and gender performance in Charlotte Charke’s Narrative of the Life of Mrs. Charlotte Charke (1755. It argues that the transient relationship Charke has to the objects in her life mirrors the fluidity of her gender. The essay ultimately uses Charke’s narrative as a case study in a questioning of a binarized gender matrix. The thesis suggest that, though we lack language to fully describe it, characters and historical figures like Charke move beyond and explode gender binaries.

  1. Conceptualizations of waste-related implications on health and welfare among elementary school students in the Negev's Bedouin Arab community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedawi, Wisam; Ben Zvi Assaraf, Orit; Cwikel, Julie

    2014-12-01

    This study addresses the manner in which 4th-5th grade children from unrecognized Bedouin settlements in Israel's Negev desert perceive waste and its effects on health and the environment, with an eye towards building a future model for their environmental education. These children participate in local practices with environmental repercussions, such as incinerating waste or collecting it for reuse and sale. These lead to injury, exposure to toxic chemicals and chronic disease. Understanding such dangers would not only help these children avoid future environmental and personal harm, but potentially allow them to influence the knowledge, affect and behavior of adults in their household as well. Data was collected by a combination of interviews and observations, with results divided into three main categories: knowledge, affect and behavior. We found that though waste is an integral part of the children's domestic environment, their knowledge of it was only superficial, based in social and personal experience. In terms of affect, children's reactions were ambiguous—demonstrating environmental responsibility whilst simultaneously describing a lack of interest towards environmental preservation. The children described several waste-related everyday behaviors: going to the valley to dump waste, burning or playing with it, making toys from discarded objects, and gathering metals, batteries, and bottles for sale. Together, the three aspects of this study reveal the extent and pervasiveness of waste's impact on these children's lives. They also highlight the areas that should be targeted in future environmental education if positive change is to be achieved.

  2. Production of bio-based materials using photobioreactors with binary cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beliaev, Alex S; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E; Hill, Eric A; Fredrickson, Jim K

    2013-08-27

    A method, device and system for producing preselected products, (either finished products or preselected intermediary products) from biobased precursors or CO.sub.2 and/or bicarbonate. The principal features of the present invention include a method wherein a binary culture is incubated with a biobased precursor in a closed system to transform at least a portion of the biobased precursor to a preselected product. The present invention provides a method of cultivation that does not need sparging of a closed bioreactor to remove or add a gaseous byproduct or nutrient from a liquid medium. This improvement leads to significant savings in energy consumption and allows for the design of photobioreactors of any desired shape. The present invention also allows for the use of a variety of types of waste materials to be used as the organic starting material.

  3. Production of bio-based materials using photobioreactors with binary cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beliaev, Alex S.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Hill, Eric A.

    2017-01-31

    A method, device and system for producing preselected products, (either finished products or preselected intermediary products) from biobased precursors or CO.sub.2 and/or bicarbonate. The principal features of the present invention include a method wherein a binary culture is incubated with a biobased precursor in a closed system to transform at least a portion of the biobased precursor to a preselected product. The present invention provides a method of cultivation that does not need sparging of a closed bioreactor to remove or add a gaseous byproduct or nutrient from a liquid medium. This improvement leads to significant savings in energy consumption and allows for the design of photobioreactors of any desired shape. The present invention also allows for the use of a variety of types of waste materials to be used as the organic starting material.

  4. Raman Spectroscopy of cultural heritage Materials: Overview of Applications and New Frontiers in Instrumentation, Sampling Modalities, and Data Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadio, Francesca; Daher, Céline; Bellot-Gurlet, Ludovic

    2016-10-01

    Rooted in the long tradition of Raman spectroscopy of cultural heritage materials, in this work we provide a personal perspective on recent applications and new frontiers in sampling modalities, data processing, and instrumentation.

  5. Scientific methods and cultural heritage an introduction to the application of materials science to archaeometry and conservation science

    CERN Document Server

    Artioli, Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    Artioli provides an introduction to the methods and rationales of the scientific investigation of cultural heritage materials, with an emphasis placed on the analytical strategies, modes of operation and resulting information rather than on technicalities.

  6. Characterization of mammalian cell culture raw materials by combining spectroscopy and chemometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunfio, Nicholas; Lee, Haewoo; Starkey, Jason; Agarabi, Cyrus; Liu, Jay

    2017-01-01

    Two of the primary issues with characterizing the variability of raw materials used in mammalian cell culture, such as wheat hydrolysate, is that the analyses of these materials can be time consuming, and the results of the analyses are not straightforward to interpret. To solve these issues, spectroscopy can be combined with chemometrics to provide a quick, robust and easy to understand methodology for the characterization of raw materials; which will improve cell culture performance by providing an assessment of the impact that a given raw material will have on final product quality. In this study, four spectroscopic technologies: near infrared spectroscopy, middle infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy were used in conjunction with principal component analysis to characterize the variability of wheat hydrolysates, and to provide evidence that the classification of good and bad lots of raw material is possible. Then, the same spectroscopic platforms are combined with partial least squares regressions to quantitatively predict two cell culture critical quality attributes (CQA): integrated viable cell density and IgG titer. The results showed that near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy are capable of characterizing the wheat hydrolysate's chemical structure, with NIR performing slightly better; and that they can be used to estimate the raw materials’ impact on the CQAs. These results were justified by demonstrating that of all the components present in the wheat hydrolysates, six amino acids: arginine, glycine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, isoleucine and threonine; and five trace elements: copper, phosphorus, molybdenum, arsenic and aluminum, had a large, statistically significant effect on the CQAs, and that NIR and fluorescence spectroscopy performed the best for characterizing the important amino acids. It was also found that the trace elements of interest were not characterized well by any of the spectral

  7. Impact of carrier material on fermentative activity of encapsulated yoghurt culture in whey based substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krunić Tanja Ž.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this paper were to study the influence of the carrier material used for encapsulation and of bead size to fermentative activity and viability of the dairy starter culture ‘Lactoferm ABY 6’. Encapsulation of yoghurt culture in beads with diameter of 1mm provides better results than encapsulation in beads with larger diameter. Alginate beads and chitosan coated beads have proved to be a strong barrier for nutrients from substrate, so samples with those beads have lower viable cell count, lower titratable acidity and higher pH value after 5h of fermentation at 42°C, than samples with WPC-alginate beads. Also those beads have significantly (P < 0.05 lower cell leaking, than WPC-alginate beads and lower antioxidant capacity. Encapsulation of yoghurt culture in WPC-alginate carrier with diameter of approximately 1mm provided the best characteristics for fermented product. Samples with these beads have significantly (P < 0.05 higher increase of viable cell number after fermentation, despite of major cell leaking (19.7 %. Moreover, sample with these beads have the highest titratable acidity, the lowest pH value after fermentation (the best fermentative activity and the best antioxidant characteristics. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31017 i br. III 46010

  8. Who is reducing their material consumption and why? A cross-cultural analysis of dematerialization behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmarsh, Lorraine; Capstick, Stuart; Nash, Nicholas

    2017-06-13

    The environmental and economic imperatives to dematerialize economies, or 'do more with less', have been established for some years. Yet, to date, little is known about the personal drivers associated with dematerializing. This paper explores the prevalence and profile of those who are taking action to reduce consumption in different cultural contexts (UK and Brazil) and considers influences on dematerialization behaviours. We find that exemplar behaviours (avoiding buying new things and avoiding packaging) are far less common than archetypal environmental behaviours (e.g. recycling), but also that cultural context is important (Brazilians are more likely to reduce their material consumption than people in the UK). We also find that the two dematerialization behaviours are associated with different pro-environmental actions (more radical action versus green consumption, respectively); and have distinct, but overlapping, psychological (e.g. identity) and socio-demographic (e.g. education) predictors. Comparing a more traditional value-identity model of pro-environmental behaviour with a motivation-based (self-determination) model, we find that the latter explains somewhat more variance than the former. However, overall, little variance is explained, suggesting that additional factors at the personal and structural levels are important for determining these consumption behaviours. We conclude by outlining policy implications and avenues for further research.This article is part of the themed issue 'Material demand reduction'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  9. Hyperspectral analysis of cultural heritage artifacts: pigment material diversity in the Gough Map of Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Di; Messinger, David W.; Howell, David

    2017-08-01

    The Gough Map, one of the earliest surviving maps of Britain, was created and extensively revised over the 15th century. In 2015, the map was imaged using a hyperspectral imaging system while in the collection at the Bodleian Library, Oxford University. The goal of the collection of the hyperspectral image (HSI) of the Gough Map was to address questions such as enhancement of faded text for reading and analysis of the pigments used during its creation and revision. In particular, pigment analysis of the Gough Map will help historians understand the material diversity of its composition and potentially the timeline of, and methods used in, the creation and revision of the map. Multiple analysis methods are presented to analyze a particular pigment in the Gough Map with an emphasis on understanding the within-material diversity, i.e., the number and spatial layout of distinct red pigments. One approach for understanding the number of distinct materials in a scene (i.e., endmember selection and dimensionality estimation) is the Gram matrix approach. Here, this method is used to study the within-material differences of pigments in the map with common visual color. The application is a pigment analysis tool that extracts visually common pixels (here, the red pigments) from the Gough Map and estimates the material diversity of the pixels. Results show that the Gough Map is composed of at least five kinds of dominant red pigments with a particular spatial pattern. This research provides a useful tool for historical geographers and cartographic historians to analyze the material diversity of HSI of cultural heritage artifacts.

  10. Quasi-Appropriation of Dialectical Materialism: A Critical Reading of Marxism in Vygotskian Approaches to Cultural Studies in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, André; Camillo, Juliano; Mattos, Cristiano

    2014-01-01

    In this review essay we examine five categories of dialectical materialism proposed by Paulo Lima Junior, Fernanda Ostermann, and Flavia Rezende in their study of the extent to which the articles published in "Cultural Studies of Science Education," that use a Vygotskian approach, are committed to Marxism/dialectical materialism. By…

  11. Experimental ultrasonic characterization of polyester-based materials for cultural heritage applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniegas, Andres; Martinez, Loic; Briand, Arnaud; Prieto, Sophie; Serfaty, Stéphane; Wilkie-Chancellier, Nicolas

    2017-11-01

    For several years, the Réunion des musées nationaux - Grand-Palais has produced polyester resin reproductions in order to replace marble sculptures that have weakened by outdoor exposure. These objects are made of a complex multilayered polyester composite material including reinforcements to ensure the mechanical strength of the final structure and mineral fillers that allow to imitate the original aesthetics. However, the final structure also weakens because of constant outdoor exposure and ageing. This observation leads today to conduct research related to the structural health monitoring of reproductions for preventive conservation of cultural heritage. This paper presents a nondestructive technique to study the properties of the composite material used to produce reproductions of marble sculptures. Firstly, classical ultrasonic contact measurements were performed to estimate bulk properties and Rayleigh wave velocity. Secondly, experimental Rayleigh wave was measured using contact and laser vibrometry methods. The results show the potential of using ultrasonic surface wave propagation and laser vibrometry method to develop a minimum contact technique to study these polyester-based materials. The maximum relative uncertainty with respect to the expected theoretical Rayleigh wave velocity was close to 12%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Fabricating the "Southern Belle": Assessing the Role of Imported Material Culture in the Confederacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, Emily A.

    2017-10-01

    Confederate society was dependent on a rigidly defined hierarchy that assigned roles and appropriate behavior based on race, gender, and wealth. White, wealthy, southern women were dependent on material culture as a socially acceptable means of self-fashioning and making their status public. The Union naval blockade threatened this practice by preventing Confederate markets from accessing imported, status-affirming goods. The industry of blockade running rose to fill this need, often controversially prioritizing cargo space for civilian, luxury products over necessities for the military. This article examines the artifact assemblages of blockade runner sites off the coasts of Wilmington, North Carolina and Charleston, South Carolina through a theoretical framework of agency and costly signaling to make assessments about Confederate identity during the Civil War.

  13. The Wauja snake-basket: myth and the conceptual imagination of material culture in Amazonia

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    Aristoteles Barcelos Neto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature on Amazonian ethnology is plenty of mythical serpents whose deeds are relatedto the origin of humanity, the invention and teaching of shamanic knowledge, artefacts, graphicmotifs and songs. If the mythological themes on Amazonian serpents have already been widelydescribed and analysed, the same cannot be said about the visual forms related to these themes.Many studies on Amazonian mythology left aside the very plastic aspects of material culture.These studies did not take into account that several features of the mythological themes areprecisely merged with the qualities of the visual styles. This article discusses some aspects ofthe conceptual imagination of Wauja (an Arawak speaking people of the Upper Xingu materialculture through the analysis of a mythical character that explicitly exposes the intrinsic andsimultaneous musical and iconographic nature of weaving art.

  14. A compact μ-XRF spectrometer for (in situ) analyses of cultural heritage and forensic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vittiglio, G.; Bichlmeier, S.; Klinger, P.; Heckel, J.; Fuzhong, W.; Vincze, L.; Janssens, K.; Engstroem, P.; Rindby, A.; Dietrich, K.; Jembrih-Simbuerger, D.; Schreiner, M.; Denis, D.; Lakdar, A.; Lamotte, A.

    2004-01-01

    A compact, light weight and relatively inexpensive μ-XRF instrument that allows for non-destructive and local analysis of sub-mm samples with minor/trace level sensitivity was developed. Two versions of this prototype instrument exist: a table-top version that can be used in a laboratory environment while for in situ measurements a readily transportable version was constructed. Polycapillary lenses are used to focus the primary X-ray beam down to the level of 70-100 μm in diameter. Relative detection limits of transition elements in biological and glass matrices are situated at the 10-100 ppm level. These instruments are useful for characterization of various materials from the cultural heritage and forensic sector

  15. Applied microbiology and biotechnology in the conservation of stone cultural heritage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, P

    2006-11-01

    The contribution of applied microbiology and biotechnology for the preservation and restoration of culturally relevant stoneworks has been used only to a minor extent. Until recently it only involved the identification of the living organisms accountable for the deterioration of those materials by classic phenotypic identification methods. This seems to be changing, given the amount of work recently published that focuses in the introduction of molecular-based techniques for the detection of microorganisms in historic stone. Such techniques complement and expand the information up till now gathered by conventional identification methods. Along with this, efforts are being made to develop and implement bio-based methodologies that may actively contribute to the bioremediation of weathered historic stoneworks. The present mini-review aims to provide an overview of recent findings on these matters.

  16. Emotions, Development and Materiality at School: a Cultural-Historical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller Mirza, Nathalie

    2016-12-01

    In the school context, feelings and emotions are generally perceived as obstacles to learning. Today, however, the introduction of complex real-world issues in lessons of Geography, History or civic education, such as international migration or cultural diversity, blurs the classic boundaries between emotions and cognition when they prompt students' personal opinions and experiences. In the frame of a research on teaching and learning practices in education for cultural diversity, this paper examines how students' personal emotions were elicited in the lessons, and how they were semiotized, transformed in the course of social interactions. We analyze empirical data gathered in 12 Primary and Junior school classrooms in Switzerland. 12 teachers and 232 students (from 11 to 16 years old) participated. We adopt a cultural-historical perspective inspired by Vygotsky and his followers and show the interactional processes by which the emotions undergo semiotization and influence the unfolding of the students' psychological processes. In the sequences we analyze, using the Valsiner's schema (Human Development, 44, 84-97, 2001), we identify three different modalities of semiotization: 1) the students' feelings are simply verbalized and linked to the speaker's affective world; 2) the verbalized emotions are reframed and interwoven with factual information; 3) the verbalized emotions are linked to information and reframed with collective emotional experiences. These processes are described, illustrated and discussed. We shed light on the central role of the verbal interventions of the teacher (who supports but also hinders the processes sometimes) and of materiality, here photographs, which mediated the teacher-student interactions.

  17. IBA techniques: Examples of useful combinations for the characterisation of cultural heritage materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, L.; Pichon, L.; Moignard, B.; Guillou, T.; Walter, P.

    2011-01-01

    For many years, ion beam analysis techniques have successfully been used to the study of cultural heritage objects. The chemical composition of work art is usually determined by PIXE, but in many cases, RBS and/or PIGE can provide useful complementary information. RBS gives information about the depth distribution and concentration in light elements, such as carbon and oxygen. In the past years, the experimental facilities at the AGLAE (Accélérateur Grand Louvre d’Analyse Élémentaire) accelerator has been progressively developed in order to apply simultaneously PIXE, PIGE and RBS under optimal conditions using an external beam. This combination is now routinely used for point analyses or mappings. In this contribution, we present several examples of applications: manufacturing technology of lustre-decorated ceramics and silver plating, control of altered or restored surfaces, and quantification of organic phase in painting and bone. The final conclusion is that the association of PIXE with RBS is very attractive for the investigation of cultural heritage objects, in particular of materials containing both mineral and organic components or possessing a multilayered structure. The first results of the production of monochromatic X-rays for radiography purposes by PIXE are also presented.

  18. 238 ISBN 978-602-19638-5-2 DEVELOPING CULTURAL READING LEARNING MATERIALS OF LITERATURE FOR JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiky Soraya, S.Pd.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Culture is embodied by the language. Studying language is studying the culture itself. It means that culture cannot be separated with the target language. In learning English, literature is believed to have much influence on the English language. This is because literature can keep the students’ sensitivity to the use of English. This study presents the Research and Development (R&D type. The research allowed some stages. The stages were conducting needs analysis, planning, designing the materials, experts judgements, revising, evaluating or trying the materials, and writing the final draft of the materials. The research involves 30 participants in a Junior High School of Wonosari, Gunungkidul. The data of this research were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. The data from the research findings show that the appropriate English learning materials for the students consist of three units. The materials was then developed from the three most preferable themes, the love,virtue, and honesty. Then, there were three litterary works for each theme namely poetry, story, and play. From the results of the materials evaluation, the mean values ( of the statements were 3.78 to 4.50. Those ranges were categorized as good and very good. The data were supported by the interview, and observation. It can be concluded that cultural reading learning materials of literature were appropriate for the junior high school students in Wonosari, Gunungkidul.

  19. Picking up the Pieces: Catholic Material Culture and Iconoclasm in the Low Countries

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    David de Boer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1566 the Catholic majority in the Low Countries witnessed the large-scale destruction of their religious habitat during the Beeldenstorm. Afterwards, Catholics treated the objects that had fallen to (or survived iconoclasm in different ways. This article analyses how Netherlandish Catholics interacted with and renegotiated their material religious culture after its violent dislocation. I will argue that church objects had multiple layers of meaning and were tied to individuals, groups and local communities in various ways. Moreover, iconoclasm could fundamentallychange the meaning that was ascribed to these objects. By evaluating the diverse qualities of the objects that had come under attack, Catholics simultaneously found strategies to condemn the Beeldenstorm in secular terms.  In 1566 moest de katholieke meerderheid in de Nederlanden toezien hoe een groot deel van haar religieuze habitat werd vernietigd tijdens de Beeldenstorm. Katholieken behandelden de objecten die wel (of juist niet aan iconoclasme ten prooi waren gevallen op verschillende manieren. Dit artikel analyseert hoe Nederlandse katholieken opnieuw duiding gaven aan hun religieuze materiële cultuur na haar gewelddadige ontwrichting. De rol van kerkobjecten in de vroegmoderne samenleving was complex en ambigu, omdat ze op verschillende manieren verbonden waren met individuen, groepen en lokale gemeenschappen. Iconoclasme kon er bovendien voor zorgen dat de betekenis van een kerkobject fundamenteel veranderde. Door de verschillende kwaliteiten van de aangevallenkerkobjecten nader te beschouwen vonden katholieken strategieën om deBeeldenstorm ook op seculiere gronden te veroordelen.

  20. Bodies Folded in Migrant Crypts: Dis/Ability and the Material Culture of Border-Crossing

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    Vasilis Galis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article considers media narratives that suggest that hiding in trucks, buses, and other vehicles to cross borders has, in fact, been a common practice in the context of migration to, and within, Europe. We aim to problematize how the tension between the materiality of bordering practices and human migrants generates a dis/abled subject. In this context, dis/ability may be a cause or consequence of migration, both in physical/material (the folding of bodies in the crypt and cultural/semiotic terms, and may become a barrier to accessing protection, to entering and/or crossing a country, and to performing mobility in general. Dis/ability and migration have not been associated in the literature. We adopt an analytical symmetry between humans and non-humans, in this case between bodies and crypts. By suggesting an infected, ambivalent, and hybrid approach to the human subject, the body-crypt traveling border challenges the essentialist dichotomies between technology and biology, disability and impairment. The articles and reports upon which we rely were collected through extensive searches of databases/archives of online newspapers and news websites.

  1. [Influence of promotional material on hand hygiene in the safety culture of a tertiary hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Cabrillana, J; Dorta-Hung, M E; Otero Sanz, L; Henández Vera, J R; Martín-Rodríguez, M M; García de Carlos, P

    2016-06-01

    In order to increase safety culture about hand hygiene by means of messages and reminders about its importance in preventing nosocomial infections, we developed a new set of materials in the Complejo Hospitalario Universitario Insular Materno-Infantil of Las Palmas, Gran Canaria, constitued by two centres with 450 beds each and acredited for medical internal residents training. We hired a well-known caricaturist, who adapted the messages to the local way of speaking, by using characters that used to appear in his artwork in the local newspaper. Also, we continued to work with other graphic design professionals. We monitored adherence and consumption of products for hand rubbing. We noted an increase in both indicators in the following months after the implementation of this strategy. Moreover, we revised the infrastructures for hand hygiene, and were able to demonstrate improvements in most of the patient care areas. The material was well accepted by professionals, patients and visitors. No other interventions were made, so we think improvements can be attributable to this strategy in our setting. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Dehomed: the impacts of house demolitions on the well-being of women from the unrecognized Bedouin-Arab villages in the Negev/Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Nora; Feder-Bubis, Paula

    2014-09-01

    Thirty-five Bedouin-Arab villages in South Israel are regarded illegal settlements by the state. Consequently, the residents׳ homes are subject to demolition. Based on 12 semi-structured multiple-participant interviews, this paper examines the house demolitions׳ impacts on women, in the context of gendered constructions of social roles and space. It highlights that the marginalized position of Arab-Bedouin women - as women in a patriarchal community, as members of a minority within Israeli society, and as residents of an "invisible" settlement - contributes to the devastating effects of the house demolitions. In particular, the study׳s results show that the house demolitions inflict severe personal and collective trauma, amplified by women׳s primary role as mothers. Paradoxically, the very same role also becomes a source of resilience and political resistance, as women act to defend a sense of home and restore family life in the face of state violence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cultural alternatives. A material reading of the mourning of 11th-M / Alternativas de la cultura. Una lectura material del duelo del 11-M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Jimeno Salvatierra

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the human ecology approach occurs a break in the forms of studying culture or its accomplishments. The novelty has to do with the need to examine it not in itself or in their performances, but as an element of the ecological system is interconnected with the rest of their material elements. This material functional analysis model is described as a substantive by its main theoretical. Thus the cultural behaviours are responses to disturbances belonging to the system environment. One of the most interesting for the study of social and cultural are rituals, as part of retroactive mechanisms within any human ecological system. The aims of this paper is to theorize about the observation of the material aspects of collective behaviours, such as rituals, ceremonies, or others collective manifestations, that highlight the social importance and interpretative of these aspects. The article manifests both the creation and the orientation of “enactment of meanings” through the analysis of collective behaviours. It also shows an important part of social truth in material performances. Methodological applications such as Rappaport’s reference to material signs in his ritual theory, placing emphasize on the communication role of these are used to interpret the mourning ritual.

  4. Optimization of Cell Adhesion on Mg Based Implant Materials by Pre-Incubation under Cell Culture Conditions

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    Regine Willumeit

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium based implants could revolutionize applications where orthopedic implants such as nails, screws or bone plates are used because they are load bearing and degrade over time. This prevents a second surgery to remove conventional implants. To improve the biocompatibility we studied here if and for how long a pre-incubation of the material under cell culture conditions is favorable for cell attachment and proliferation. For two materials, Mg and Mg10Gd1Nd, we could show that 6 h pre-incubation are already enough to form a natural protective layer suitable for cell culture.

  5. Early evidence of San material culture represented by organic artifacts from Border Cave, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Errico, Francesco; Backwell, Lucinda; Villa, Paola; Degano, Ilaria; Lucejko, Jeannette J; Bamford, Marion K; Higham, Thomas F G; Colombini, Maria Perla; Beaumont, Peter B

    2012-08-14

    Recent archaeological discoveries have revealed that pigment use, beads, engravings, and sophisticated stone and bone tools were already present in southern Africa 75,000 y ago. Many of these artifacts disappeared by 60,000 y ago, suggesting that modern behavior appeared in the past and was subsequently lost before becoming firmly established. Most archaeologists think that San hunter-gatherer cultural adaptation emerged 20,000 y ago. However, reanalysis of organic artifacts from Border Cave, South Africa, shows that the Early Later Stone Age inhabitants of this cave used notched bones for notational purposes, wooden digging sticks, bone awls, and bone points similar to those used by San as arrowheads. A point is decorated with a spiral groove filled with red ochre, which closely parallels similar marks that San make to identify their arrowheads when hunting. A mixture of beeswax, Euphorbia resin, and possibly egg, wrapped in vegetal fibers, dated to ∼40,000 BP, may have been used for hafting. Ornaments include marine shell beads and ostrich eggshell beads, directly dated to ∼42,000 BP. A digging stick, dated to ∼39,000 BP, is made of Flueggea virosa. A wooden poison applicator, dated to ∼24,000 BP, retains residues with ricinoleic acid, derived from poisonous castor beans. Reappraisal of radiocarbon age estimates through bayesian modeling, and the identification of key elements of San material culture at Border Cave, places the emergence of modern hunter-gatherer adaptation, as we know it, to ∼44,000 y ago.

  6. The effect of labor migration on relations of exchange and subordination among the Rashaayda Bedouin of Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, W C

    1987-01-01

    away, and 4) they invested in jewelry, businesses, and 2nd wives. Thus, the Rashaayda developed mutual trust with some of the other pastoral peoples of the region. Exchanges between rural Rashaayda and urban Sudanese emerged (through business and marriage). The infusion of cash into the Rashaayda's economy has also enabled them to respond productively to worsening ecological conditions in Sudan. Finally, economic and political inequalities among still-pastoral Bedouin are today much less pronounced than earlier.

  7. Toxicity of Fusarium moniliforme culture material containing known levels of fumonisin B1 in ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, J D; Benard, G; Jouglar, J Y; Durand, S; Guerre, P

    2001-05-28

    Fusarium moniliforme culture material toxicity containing fumonisin B1 (FB1) was investigated into four groups of five growing ducks, each receiving 0,5,15 or 45 mg/kg FB1 by daily oral administration over 12 days. Treatments did not lead to lethality, but the average body weight gain was slightly retarded in treated versus control animals, without apparent dose relation. A dose-dependent increase of the liver weight with a disorganization of the span and implementation of a microglandular structure in both periportal and centrolobular areas was obtained. In the plasma, together protein, cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, gammaglutamyl transferase and sphinganine to sphingosine ratio (SA/SO) were increased. No sign of apoptosis was present neither in the liver nor in peripheral blood lymphocytes and only moderate oxidative damages were obtained. These results are of interest, because although FB1 increases SA/SO and is hepatotoxic in all investigated species, liver hyperplasia with increased liver weight were obtained in ducks, whereas decreased liver weight and apoptosis are observed in rats. Finally, although ducks appeared resistant to FB1 toxicity in terms of mortality, liver alterations were obtained with only 5 mg/kg per day of FB1 for 12 days. Considering the fact that high levels of FB1 may occur in corn (100-300 mg/kg), liver pathology could have an impact in farming conditions.

  8. Becoming at home in residential care for older people: a material culture perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovatt, Melanie

    2018-02-01

    Residential homes encourage new residents to bring belongings with them, so that they can personalise their room and 'feel at home'. Existing literature on material culture in residential homes views objects as symbols and repositories of home and identity, which can facilitate a sense of belonging in residents through their display in residents' rooms. I suggest that this both misunderstands the processual and fluid nature of home and identity, and conceptualises objects as essentially passive. This article uses ethnographic data and theories of practice and relationality to argue that rather than the meaning of home being inherent in objects, or felt subjectively by residents, meaning is generated through ongoing, everyday interactions between the two. I show that residents became at home by acquiring new things -as well as displaying existing possessions - and also through interacting with mundane objects in everyday social and relational practices such as cleaning and hosting. I conclude that being at home in older people's residential homes need not be so different from being at home at other stages of the life course and in other settings. This challenges conceptualisations of older people's homes - and older age itself - as somehow unknowable and unfamiliar. © 2018 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  9. 'Real relationships': sociable interaction, material culture and imprisonment in a secure psychiatric unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Fiona R

    2010-12-01

    Research into the character of social relationships in psychiatric inpatient facilities has focused on face-to-face interaction between individuals and within groups in the communal areas of wards. Using theories developed in material culture and media studies, this article argues that patients' relationships to goods, namely, photographs, cards and gifts from family or friends, televisions and radios, are important mediators and constituents of sociability. In an ethnographic study of a medium-secure psychiatric unit, I show how these goods are put to use in private space in ways that reflect and mitigate the constraints of incarceration and stigmatization. The data were derived from 3 months of participant observation on a male and a female ward at a unit in the south of England, including a series of anthropological interviews with 19 patients. This article highlights two important findings. First, potentially isolating activities are perceived by patients as sociable, in that watching television and looking at photographs in their room helps to counter feelings of loneliness and isolation. Second, potentially sociable activities, exchanging goods or watching the communal television, are often practiced in such a way as to maintain distance between patients in acknowledgment of the constrained and volatile nature of these relationships. This suggests that patients aspire to retain a sense of the artificiality of their situation, preferring to confine their notion of 'real' relationships to those that exist outside the institution.

  10. Microaggressions as New Political Material for Feminist Scholars and Activists : Perspectives from Continental Philosophy, the New Materialisms, and Popular Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Tuin, I.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses microaggressions as new political material for feminist scholars and activists. The article asks how the new materialisms may contribute to the conceptualisation and operationalisation of microaggressions. After all, and taking them at face value, the ontological status of

  11. Spousal violence against pregnant women from a Bedouin community in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okour, Abdelhakeem M; Badarneh, Raja

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of spousal violence against pregnant women during their current pregnancy and investigate factors related to violence. A cross-sectional survey was performed with 303 pregnant women who attended antenatal clinics in Al-Mafraq, northern desert of Jordan. The prevalence of violence (any type) during pregnancy was 40.9%. Physical violence was the highest (34.7 %), followed by psychologic violence (28.1%) and sexual violence (15.5%). Women who resided in the city (odds ratio [OR] 1.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-2.79), had six or more pregnancies including the current one (OR 5.4, 95% CI 1.45-20.0), had four or more female children (OR 4.03, 95% CI 1.3- 11.9) and were under pressure to have a male child (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.07- 3.08) were more likely to be exposed to violence during pregnancy. This study attempted to shed light on some of the cultural dimensions behind spousal violence, especially preference for male children. This study is important to the Jordanian and Arab communities in their efforts to protect women's rights and in designing interventions against domestic and spousal violence.

  12. Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann and Michael North (eds., Mediating Netherlandish Art and Material Culture in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claartje Rasterhoff

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Book notice of: Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann and Michael North (eds., Mediating Netherlandish Art and Material Culture in Asia (Amsterdam Studies in the Dutch Golden Age Amsterdam, Amsterdam University Press, 2014. 348 pp. ISBN 978-90-8964-569-2. € 99,00.

  13. Cultural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur F. LaPage

    1971-01-01

    A critical look at outdoor recreation research and some underlying premises. The author focuses on the concept of culture as communication and how it influences our perception of problems and our search for solutions. Both outdoor recreation and science are viewed as subcultures that have their own bodies of mythology, making recreation problems more difficult to...

  14. Supercritical CO2 foaming of thermoplastic materials derived from maize: proof-of-concept use in mammalian cell culture applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grissel Trujillo-de Santiago

    Full Text Available Foams are high porosity and low density materials. In nature, they are a common architecture. Some of their relevant technological applications include heat and sound insulation, lightweight materials, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Foams derived from natural polymers are particularly attractive for tissue culture due to their biodegradability and bio-compatibility. Here, the foaming potential of an extensive list of materials was assayed, including slabs elaborated from whole flour, the starch component only, or the protein fraction only of maize seeds.We used supercritical CO2 to produce foams from thermoplasticized maize derived materials. Polyethylene-glycol, sorbitol/glycerol, or urea/formamide were used as plasticizers. We report expansion ratios, porosities, average pore sizes, pore morphologies, and pore size distributions for these materials. High porosity foams were obtained from zein thermoplasticized with polyethylene glycol, and from starch thermoplasticized with urea/formamide. Zein foams had a higher porosity than starch foams (88% and 85%, respectively and a narrower and more evenly distributed pore size. Starch foams exhibited a wider span of pore sizes and a larger average pore size than zein (208.84 vs. 55.43 μm2, respectively. Proof-of-concept cell culture experiments confirmed that mouse fibroblasts (NIH 3T3 and two different prostate cancer cell lines (22RV1, DU145 attached to and proliferated on zein foams.We conducted screening and proof-of-concept experiments on the fabrication of foams from cereal-based bioplastics. We propose that a key indicator of foamability is the strain at break of the materials to be foamed (as calculated from stress vs. strain rate curves. Zein foams exhibit attractive properties (average pore size, pore size distribution, and porosity for cell culture applications; we were able to establish and sustain mammalian cell cultures on zein foams for extended time periods.

  15. USE OF SPONGE, Callyspongia basilana EXTRACT AS ADDITIVE MATERIAL ON TIGER SHRIMP CULTURE

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    Rosmiati Rosmiati

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Blue shrimp disease is one of the main problems in tiger shrimp culture. It reduces shrimp quality which eventually will decrease its market price. Blue shrimp is caused by deficiency of nutrition and additive materials such as carotene and other nutrient which function as vitamin source for important metabolic processes and formation of color profile in shrimp and fish. The aims of this study were to study the application effect of carotenoid extract of sponge Callyspongia basilana, as an additive material on the ability of shrimp to get back to normal state after suffering blue shrimp disease and survival rate of shrimp and to find out the optimal concentration of sponge carotenoid extract to cure the diseased shrimp. This study was consisted of two steps namely; (1. Extraction of sponge carotenoid by maseration and fractionation using acetone and petroleum ether solvents and (2, the application of carotenoid extract on the diseased shrimp. The research was arranged in a complete randomized design with four experiments consisted of (A. Control (without carotenoid extract; (B,(C, and (D carotetoid extract addition of 3 mg/L, 6 mg/L, and 9 mg/L respectively with three replication each. The test animal used were blue diseased tiger shrimp with the density of 15 ind./container having 7.5–9.5 cm in size and the average weight of 5.5–10.0 g. The study showed that Callyspongia basilana carotenoid extract was able to change blue diseased shrimp to be normal within six days at the concentration of 9 mg/L. The highest survival rate was found in the experiment D (93.3%. Meanwhile, the lowest was obtained by the control population (13.3% and the other two treatments were 80.0%(C and 73.3% (B. The average of water quality parameters such as temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, salinity, nitrite, and ammonia were in the suitable range for the growth and survival rate of tiger shrimp.

  16. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  17. Inheritance of quantitative dermatoglyphic traits with asymmetry and diversity in Muzeina Bedouin tribe: a small isolated and consanguineous population from South Sinai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Bibha; Malkin, Ida; Kobyliansky, Eugene

    2014-06-01

    The genetic factors contribute significantly to the determination of dermatoglyphic traits is well established. However, the controversies in views and findings of this issue are still inconclusive. The present study is an attempt to evaluate the inheritance of quantitative dermatoglyphic traits with asymmetry (DA and FA) and diversity (Div) through sibling correlations. Data include 218 individuals from (88 families) in a small isolate, the nomadic tribe Muzeina with a high degree of consanguinity (0.09) from South Sinai. Statistical analyses include sibling correlations, cross-correlations and genetic correlation (GC)--a ratio of sibling cross-correlation between traits divided on square root of the both traits sibling correlation product. The familial correlation coefficients for quantitative dermatoglyphic traits are perhaps expected lower in such a small isolated and consanguineous population than our previous studied in Indian populations and Chuvashian populations from Russia. These results indicate a simpler genetic basis due to high degree (0.09 inbreeding coefficient) of consanguinity in Muzeina Bedouin tribe. There is no evidence of major gene involvement, although a little genetic effect obtained from familial correlations on asymmetry (DA and FA) and diversity (Div) traits through sibling correlations. The significant interaction between sexes was found, which contradicts with the other populations perhaps due to high level of consanguinity. Lower correlation coefficients than in other non-consanguineous populations for quantitative dermatoglyphic traits indicate a simpler genetic basis due to high degree of inbreeding coefficient (0.09) in Muzeina. Dermatoglyphic asymmetry and diversity traits may be due to environmental factors rather than dominance in Bedouins, although a little genetic effect was found suggests a measure of developmental instability in human (FA).

  18. Laser-induced emission, fluorescence and Raman hybrid setup: A versatile instrument to analyze materials from cultural heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvilay, D.; Bai, X. S.; Wilkie-Chancellier, N.; Texier, A.; Martinez, L.; Serfaty, S.; Detalle, V.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this research project was the development of a hybrid system in laboratory coupling together three analytical techniques, namely laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and Raman spectroscopy in a single instrument. The rationale for combining these three spectroscopies was to identify a material (molecular and elemental analysis) without any preliminary preparation, regardless of its organic or inorganic nature, on the surface and in depth, without any surrounding light interference thanks to time resolution. Such instrumentation would allow characterizing different materials from cultural heritage. A complete study on LIBS-LIF-Raman hybrid was carried out, from its conception to instrumental achievement, in order to elaborate a strategy of analysis according to the material and to be able to address conservation issues. From an instrumental point of view, condensing the three spectroscopies was achieved by using a single laser for excitation and two spectrometers (time-integrated and not time-integrated) for light collection. A parabolic mirror was used as collecting system, while three excitation sources directed through this optical system ensured the examination of a similar probe area. Two categories of materials were chosen to test the hybrid instrumentation on cultural heritage applications (copper corrosion products and wall paintings). Some examples are reported to illustrate the wealth of information provided by the hybrid, thus demonstrating its great potential to be used for cultural heritage issues. Finally, several considerations are outlined aimed at further improving the hybrid.

  19. A common basis for facilitated legitimate exchange of biological materials proposed by the European Culture Collections' Organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Fritze

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Being charged with the task of accessioning and supplying of living microbiological material, microbial culture collections are institutions that play a central role between the interests of a variety of user communities. On the one side are the providers of living microbiological material, such as individual scientists, institutions and countries of origin and on the other side are the various kinds of recipients/users of cultures of microorganisms from academia and industry. Thus, providing access to high quality biological material and scientific services while at the same time observing donor countries' rights, intellectual property rights, biosafety and biosecurity aspects poses demanding challenges. E.g. donor countries rights relate to Article 15 of the Convention on Biological Diversity: "Contracting parties …. recognize the sovereign rights of states over their natural resources …. shall facilitate access to resources … and not impose restrictions that run counter to the aims of the Convention. Access to natural resources shall be by mutually agreed terms and subject to prior informed consent ..." The use of a proposed standard contract by culture collections is discussed as a way of contractually safeguarding the existing research commons, while observing the new rights established in the Convention on Biological Diversity as well as other existing and new legislation impacting on the accessibility of living microbial material.

  20. Detection of chlamydial antigenic material in ovarian, prostatic, ectopic pregnancy and semen samples of culture-negative subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, M; Patton, D L; Campbell, L A; Carretta, E I; Mouradian, J; Toth, A; Shevchuk, M; Baergen, R; Ledger, W

    2000-04-01

    The pathogenesis of long-term sequelae in Chlamydia trachomatis infection is poorly understood. While serology indicates previous chlamydial infection, culture studies are frequently negative. We wanted to know whether in chronic cases the bacterium is absent or persists in a dormant state where it evades detection. Using immunoperoxidase (IP) staining and in situ hybridization (ISH), we examined tissues of culture-negative subjects. Ovarian biopsy specimens from 19 culture-negative women with pelvic adhesions and/or tubal infertility were analyzed by both methods. Samples of prostates from 10 culture-negative men undergoing prostatectomy for benign hypertrophy, two sets of semen samples from culture-negative sexual partners of 28 women with PID and/or bacterial vaginosis (BV), and ten endometrium-tube sample-pairs from ectopic pregnancies (EPs) were examined by IP only. Seven of the nineteen ovarian specimens tested positive for Chlamydia antigen or deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (36%). Of the 10 hypertrophic prostates examined, 4 (40%) were positive. Of the 28 semen samples examined, 10 (35%) tested positive. Tissue samples of 3 cases of EP were positive by IP. 1. C. trachomatis antigen and nucleic acid can be frequently demonstrated in asymptomatic, culture-negative men and women with chronic infection. 2. Chlamydia antigens may have an etiologic role in benign prostate hypertrophy and EP. 3. Antigenic material may be sexually transmissible. 4. IP and ISH identify temporarily inactive bacteria that may continue to act as immunostimulants and potentially reactivate as Chlamydia infection.

  1. Effects of culture-sensitive adaptation of patient information material on usefulness in migrants: a multicentre, blinded randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzel, Lars P; Ries, Zivile; Kriston, Levente; Dirmaier, Jörg; Zill, Jördis M; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Niebling, Wilhelm; Bermejo, Isaac; Härter, Martin

    2016-11-23

    To evaluate the usefulness of culture-sensitive patient information material compared with standard translated material. Multicentre, double-blind randomised controlled trial. 37 primary care practices. 435 adult primary care patients with a migration background with unipolar depressive disorder or non-specific chronic low back pain were randomised. Patients who were unable to read in the language of their respective migration background were excluded. Sufficient data were obtained from 203 women and 106 men. The largest group was of Russian origin (202 patients), followed by those of Turkish (52), Polish (30) and Italian (25) origin. Intervention group: provision of culture-sensitive adapted material. provision of standard translated material. Primary outcome: patient-rated usefulness (USE) assessed immediately after patients received the material. patient-rated usefulness after 8 weeks and 6 months, symptoms of depression (PHQ-9), back pain (Back Pain Core Set) and quality of life (WHO-5) assessed at all time points. Usefulness was found to be significantly higher (t=1.708, one-sided p=0.04) in the intervention group (USE-score=65.08, SE=1.43), compared with the control group (61.43, SE=1.63), immediately after patients received the material, in the intention-to-treat analysis, with a mean difference of 3.65 (one-sided 95% lower confidence limit=0.13). No significant differences were found for usefulness at follow-up (p=0.16, p=0.71). No significant effect was found for symptom severity in depression (p=0.95, p=0.66, p=0.58), back pain (p=0.40, p=0.45, p=0.32) or quality of life (p=0.76, p=0.86, p=0.21), either immediately after receiving the material, or at follow-up (8 weeks; 6 months). Patients with a lower level of dominant society immersion benefited substantially and significantly more from the intervention than patients with a high level of immersion (p=0.005). Cultural adaptation of patient information material provides benefits over high quality

  2. From Nano to Macro: Multiscale Materials for Improved Stem Cell Culturing and Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Khademhosseini, A.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells respond to nanoscale, microscale, and macroscale cues, such as matrix, growth factors, and niche organization, which are difficult to physiologically recapitulate in culture. We discuss how utilizing bioengineering approaches to manipulate and integrate spatiotemporal cues across these

  3. History, modernity, material and spiritual culture of Lemko, Boyko and Transcarpathian Rusyns in the problem field of interdisciplinary researches

    OpenAIRE

    Пронь, Тетяна Михайлівна

    2016-01-01

    The publication represents the interdisciplinary research professionals of social science and literature of Poland, Ukraine, Slovakia, the United States and Canada in history, modernity, material and spiritual culture Lemko, Boyko and Transcarpathian Rusyns disclose at the IV International scientific conference (23-24 September 2011 , Slupsk, Poland) and in the new collective proceedings of the Institute of Political Science Zelenogorsk University and the Institute of History Pomeranian Acade...

  4. Oral exposure to culture material extract containing fumonisins predisposes swine to the development of pneumonitis caused by Pasteurella multocida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halloy, David J.; Gustin, Pascal G.; Bouhet, Sandrine; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2005-01-01

    Fumonisin B 1 (FB 1 ) is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium verticillioides and F. proliferatum that commonly occurs in maize. In swine, consumption of contaminated feed induces liver damage and pulmonary edema. Pasteurella multocida is a secondary pathogen, which can generate a respiratory disorder in predisposed pigs. In this study, we examined the effect of oral exposure to fumonisin-containing culture material on lung inflammation caused by P. multocida. Piglets received by gavage a crude extract of fumonisin, 0.5 mg FB 1 /kg body weight/day, for 7 days. One day later, the animals were instilled intratracheally with a non toxin producing type A strain of P. multocida and followed up for 13 additional days. Pig weight and cough frequency were measured throughout the experiment. Lung lesions, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cell composition and the expression of inflammatory cytokines were evaluated at the autopsy. Ingestion of fumonisin culture material or infection with P. multocida did not affect weight gain, induced no clinical sign or lung lesion, and only had minimal effect on BALF cell composition. Ingestion of mycotoxin extract increased the expression of IL-8, IL-18 and IFN-γ mRNA compared with P. multocida infection that increased the expression of TNF-α. The combined treatment with fumonisin culture material and P. multocida delayed growth, induced cough, and increased BALF total cells, macrophages and lymphocytes. Lung lesions were significantly enhanced in these animals and consisted of subacute interstitial pneumonia. TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-18 mRNA expression was also increased. Taken together, our data showed that fumonisin culture material is a predisposing factor to lung inflammation. These results may have implications for humans and animals consuming FB 1 contaminated food or feed

  5. Toxicity of functional nano-micro zinc oxide tetrapods: impact of cell culture conditions, cellular age and material properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papavlassopoulos, Heike; Mishra, Yogendra K; Kaps, Sören; Paulowicz, Ingo; Abdelaziz, Ramzy; Elbahri, Mady; Maser, Edmund; Adelung, Rainer; Röhl, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    With increasing production and applications of nanostructured zinc oxide, e.g., for biomedical and consumer products, the question of safety is getting more and more important. Different morphologies of zinc oxide structures have been synthesized and accordingly investigated. In this study, we have particularly focused on nano-micro ZnO tetrapods (ZnO-T), because their large scale fabrication has been made possible by a newly introduced flame transport synthesis approach which will probably lead to several new applications. Moreover, ZnO-T provide a completely different morphology then classical spherical ZnO nanoparticles. To get a better understanding of parameters that affect the interactions between ZnO-T and mammalian cells, and thus their biocompatibility, we have examined the impact of cell culture conditions as well as of material properties on cytotoxicity. Our results demonstrate that the cell density of fibroblasts in culture along with their age, i.e., the number of preceding cell divisions, strongly affect the cytotoxic potency of ZnO-T. Concerning the material properties, the toxic potency of ZnO-T is found to be significantly lower than that of spherical ZnO nanoparticles. Furthermore, the morphology of the ZnO-T influenced cellular toxicity in contrast to surface charges modified by UV illumination or O2 treatment and to the material age. Finally, we have observed that direct contact between tetrapods and cells increases their toxicity compared to transwell culture models which allow only an indirect effect via released zinc ions. The results reveal several parameters that can be of importance for the assessment of ZnO-T toxicity in cell cultures and for particle development.

  6. 'It's All Done With Mirrors': V.S. Ramachandran and the Material Culture of Phantom Limb Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Katja

    2016-07-01

    This article examines the material culture of neuroscientist Vilayanur S. Ramachandran's research into phantom limbs. In the 1990s Ramachandran used a 'mirror box' to 'resurrect' phantom limbs and thus to treat the pain that often accompanied them. The experimental success of his mirror therapy led Ramachandran to see mirrors as a useful model of brain function, a tendency that explains his attraction to work on 'mirror neurons'. I argue that Ramachandran's fascination with and repeated appeal to the mirror can be explained by the way it allowed him to confront a perennial problem in the mind and brain sciences, that of the relationship between a supposedly immaterial mind and a material brain. By producing what Ramachandran called a 'virtual reality', relating in varied and complex ways to the material world, the mirror reproduced a form of psycho-physical parallelism and dualistic ontology, while conforming to the materialist norms of neuroscience today.

  7. Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene Rock Art from the Mongolian Altai: The Material and its Cultural Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Jacobson-Tepfer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Rock-pecked images from the northern Mongolian Altai attest to the presence of human communities within the high valleys of that region during the Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene. The material provides evidence that is hitherto largely missing from the archaeological record of that region. This paper reviews the rock art, its find sites and larger physical contexts and uses evidence from paleoenvironmental studies to propose dating and cultural significance. The material is compared with other sites said to have Paleolithic imagery from Mongolia and the adjoining Russian Altai. The body of presented material offers a major resource for the study of early hunter-gatherer communities at the interface of Central and North Asia.

  8. The Cost of Materialism in a Collectivistic Culture: Predicting Risky Behavior Engagement in Chinese Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Randy P.; McWhinnie, Chad M.; Goldfinger, Marc; Abela, John R. Z.; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Yao, Shuqiao

    2010-01-01

    The goals of the current study were to examine whether (a) negative events mediate the relationship between materialism and risky behavior engagement and (b) materialism moderates the relationship between stress and engagement in risky behaviors in Chinese youth. At Time 1, 406 adolescents (ages 14-19) from Yue Yang, China, completed measures…

  9. Consumed by consumer culture? Advertising’s impact on children’s materialism and life satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opree, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    Do children get consumed by consumer culture? This question occupies the thoughts of many parents, caretakers, and policymakers. Dutch children are annually exposed to approximately 9,500 television advertisements. These advertisements suggest that the good life can be obtained through the goods

  10. Ticking the box? Material cultures of migration in Museum Rotterdam and the Netherlands Open Air Museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dibbits, Hester; Karrouche, N.F.F.

    2017-01-01

    For a few years now, Rotterdam’s policy makers and cultural actors have been debat- ing the possibility of establishing a new museum in the southern, demographically di- verse part of the city that would both focus on the history of migration to Rotterdam and support research on Rotterdam as a site

  11. Taxi texts as reading material and a source of cultural schemata for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines issues surrounding the teaching of culture and reading comprehension in Zulu as a second language in Gauteng primary schools. Given the limited time available for the teaching of Zulu and the lack of availability of comprehensible, authentic texts for learners with limited competence, one solution to ...

  12. Iranian Parents' Resistance to Incompatible Aspects of Western Culture: Implications for ELT Material Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasaian, Seyed Ahmad; Subbakrishna, Rangaswamy

    2011-01-01

    The British and US varieties of English have now come under suspicion of promoting American and British ways of life and marginalizing the local identities of their learners. Prompted by these suspicions, many scholars and policy makers have voiced doubts about the cultural adequacy of the native speaker-controlled ELT programs. In a recent survey…

  13. National Agendas and Local Realities: Festive Material and Ritual Culture, Nationalism, and Modernity in the Chita Region of Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean McPherson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The reworking of religious space in modern Japan encompassed the reinvention of the spatial, material, and ritual culture of matsuri 祭り(festivals. After a period of relative official disfavor, festivals in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were reinvigorated by changes in ritual process and spatial scope, as well as by shifts in the architecture and sculpture of dashi 山車 (wheeled festival floats. The incorporation of matsuri into broader discourses of national cultural identity was driven by the affective potential of their supposed cultural authenticity. This reinvention of festivity is evident in the Tokoname Matsuri of Tokoname City, Aichi Prefecture, where after the 1905 Russo-Japanese conflict several Edo-period shrine festivals were merged into a shōkonsai 招魂祭 (festival for the war dead. The spatial scope and ritual process, as well as the architecture and sculptural iconography, of the six dashi built for the new Tokoname Matsuri tied this regional city into national discourses of cultural authenticity, racial purity, and martial valor. The ideological resonance in prewar Japan of the Tokoname Matsuri and other festivals with nationalist imagery sprang from their indelibly local origins; matsuri were not controlled entirely from the top down, but rather were mediated at multiple levels.

  14. Melding the Old with the New: Trends in Methods Used to Identify, Monitor, and Control Microorganisms on Cultural Heritage Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmartín, Patricia; DeAraujo, Alice; Vasanthakumar, Archana

    2016-04-27

    Microbial activity has an important impact on the maintenance of cultural heritage materials, owing to the key role of microorganisms in many deterioration processes. In order to minimize such deleterious effects, there is a need to fine-tune methods that detect and characterize microorganisms. Trends in microbiology indicate that this need can be met by incorporating modern techniques. All of the methods considered in this review paper are employed in the identification, surveillance, and control of microorganisms, and they have two points in common: They are currently used in microbial ecology (only literature from 2009 to 2015 is included), and they are often applied in the cultural heritage sector. More than 75 peer-reviewed journal articles addressing three different approaches were considered: molecular, sensory and morphological, and biocontrol methods. The goal of this review is to highlight the usefulness of the traditional as well as the modern methods. The general theme in the literature cited suggests using an integrated approach.

  15. Characterization of pigments applied on archaeological material from Chincha's Culture by x-rays fluorescence and transmission electronic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez M, Alcides; Olivera, Paula

    2007-01-01

    The elementary characterization of some pigments applied in the decoration of recipients used by our ancestors of the Chincha Culture by Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF)method was allowed. Additionally, the morphological and crystalline characterization by Transmission Electronic Microscopy (TEM) method has been possible. The results have allowed identifying the presence of mercury sulphur (HgS) (cinnabar) in the red pigment on the 'mate'; the black and white pigments are constituted by materials of organic aspect; in the case the dark brown one they are constituted by organic matter and ferric oxide. This work also demonstrates that a portable EDXRF spectrometer is the most suitable for the study of pieces of our cultural patrimony, mainly of those that are difficult to transport from an archaeological place or museum to an analytic laboratory by reason of its dimensions and conservation conditions. (author)

  16. Cultural Resource Investigation for the Materials and Fuels Complex Wastewater System Upgrade at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R. Pace; Julie B raun Williams; Hollie Gilbert; Dino Lowrey; Julie Brizzee

    2010-05-01

    The Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) located in Bingham County at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho is considering several alternatives to upgrade wastewater systems to meet future needs at the facility. In April and May of 2010, the INL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, archaeological field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify cultural resources that may be adversely affected by the proposed construction and to provide recommendations to protect any resources listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that one National Register-eligible archaeological site is located on the boundary of the area of potential effects for the wastewater upgrade. This report outlines protective measures to help ensure that this resource is not adversely affected by construction.

  17. Characterisation of CIME, an experimental chamber for simulating interactions between materials of the cultural heritage and the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabas, A; Fouqueau, A; Attoui, M; Alfaro, S C; Petitmangin, A; Bouilloux, A; Saheb, M; Coman, A; Lombardo, T; Grand, N; Zapf, P; Berardo, R; Duranton, M; Durand-Jolibois, R; Jerome, M; Pangui, E; Correia, J J; Guillot, I; Nowak, S

    2015-12-01

    An approach consisting in combining in situ and laboratory experiments is often favoured for investigating the mechanisms involved in the weathering of the materials of the cultural heritage. However, the realistic simulation in the laboratory of the environmental conditions ruling the interactions of atmospheric compounds with materials is a very complex task. The aim of this work is to characterise CIME, a new chamber specially built to simulate the interactions between materials of the cultural heritage and the environment. The originality of this instrument is that beside the usual climatic parameters (temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation) and gaseous pollutants, it also allows the controlled injection of different types of particulate matter such as terrigenous, marine and anthropogenic. Therefore, varied realistic atmospheric environments (marine or urban) can be easily simulated within CIME. In addition to the technical description of CIME, this paper shows the first results obtained by the impact of gaseous pollutants on non-durable glass, bronze and limestone. The first experiments for the deposition of different particles (calcite, clays, soot and halite) are also presented.

  18. Introgression of genetic material from Zea mays ssp. Mexicana into cultivated maize was facilitated by tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.; Gu, X.; Qu, M.; Luan, J.; Zhang, J.

    2012-01-01

    Zea mays ssp. mexicana, a wild relative of cultivated maize (Z. mays ssp. mays), is a useful gene resource for maize breeding. In this study, two populations were generated by conventional breeding scheme (population I) or tissue culture regime (population II), respectively, to introgress genetic material of Z. mays ssp. mexicana into maize. Karyotype analysis showed that the arm ratios of 10 pairs of chromosomes in parent maize Ye515 and derivative lines from 2 different populations with 26% and 38% chromosome variation frequencies, respectively. Alien chromatin was detected in the root tip cells of progeny plants through genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). There were 3.3 chromosomes carrying alien chromatin on average in population I and 6.5 in population II. The hybridization signals were located mainly at the terminal or sub terminal regions of the chromosomes and the sizes were notably variant among lines. Based on those results, it is concluded that the introgression of genetic material from Z. mays ssp. mexicana into cultivated maize was facilitated by tissue culture, and subsequently some excellent materials for maize breeding were created. (author)

  19. Improved enrichment culture technique for methane-oxidizing bacteria from marine ecosystems: the effect of adhesion material and gas composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekeman, Bram; Dumolin, Charles; De Vos, Paul; Heylen, Kim

    2017-02-01

    Cultivation of microbial representatives of specific functional guilds from environmental samples depends largely on the suitability of the applied growth conditions. Especially the cultivation of marine methanotrophs has received little attention, resulting in only a limited number of ex situ cultures available. In this study we investigated the effect of adhesion material and headspace composition on the methane oxidation activity in methanotrophic enrichments obtained from marine sediment. Addition of sterilized natural sediment or alternatively the addition of acid-washed silicon dioxide significantly increased methane oxidation. This positive effect was attributed to bacterial adhesion on the particles via extracellular compounds, with a minimum amount of particles required for effect. As a result, the particles were immobilized, thus creating a stratified environment in which a limited diffusive gas gradients could build up and various microniches were formed. Such diffusive gas gradient might necessitate high headspace concentrations of CH 4 and CO 2 for sufficient concentrations to reach the methane-oxidizing bacteria in the enrichment culture technique. Therefore, high concentrations of methane and carbon dioxide, in addition to the addition of adhesion material, were tested and indeed further stimulated methane oxidation. Use of adhesion material in combination with high concentrations of methane and carbon dioxide might thus facilitate the cultivation and subsequent enrichment of environmentally important members of this functional guild. The exact mechanism of the observed positive effects on methane oxidation and the differential effect on methanotrophic diversity still needs to be explored.

  20. Dark fermentative hydrogen production by defined mixed microbial cultures immobilized on ligno-cellulosic waste materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Sanjay K.S. [Microbial Biotechnology and Genomics, Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology (IGIB), CSIR, Delhi University Campus, Mall Road, Delhi 110007 (India); Department of Biotechnology, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Purohit, Hemant J. [Environmental Genomics Unit, National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (NEERI), CSIR, Nehru Marg, Nagpur 440020 (India); Kalia, Vipin C. [Microbial Biotechnology and Genomics, Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology (IGIB), CSIR, Delhi University Campus, Mall Road, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2010-10-15

    Mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) based on 11 isolates belonging to Bacillus spp. (Firmicutes), Bordetella avium, Enterobacter aerogenes and Proteus mirabilis (Proteobacteria) were employed to produce hydrogen (H{sub 2}) under dark fermentative conditions. Under daily fed culture conditions (hydraulic retention time of 2 days), MMC6 and MMC4, immobilized on ligno-cellulosic wastes - banana leaves and coconut coir evolved 300-330 mL H{sub 2}/day. Here, H{sub 2} constituted 58-62% of the total biogas evolved. It amounted to a H{sub 2} yield of 1.54-1.65 mol/mol glucose utilized over a period of 60 days of fermentation. The involvement of various Bacillus spp. -Bacillus sp., Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus thuringiensis as components of the defined MMCs for H{sub 2} production has been reported here for the first time. (author)

  1. Cultural Resource Investigations for the Resumption of Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Material at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, Brenda R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Williams, Julie B. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a need to test nuclear fuels under conditions that subject them to short bursts of intense, high-power radiation called ‘transient testing’ in order to gain important information necessary for licensing new nuclear fuels for use in U.S. nuclear power plants, for developing information to help improve current nuclear power plant performance and sustainability, for improving the affordability of new generation reactors, for developing recyclable nuclear fuels, and for developing fuels that inhibit any repurposing into nuclear weapons. To meet this mission need, DOE is considering alternatives for re-use and modification of existing nuclear reactor facilities to support a renewed transient testing program. One alternative under consideration involves restarting the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) reactor located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site in southeastern Idaho. This report summarizes cultural resource investigations conducted by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office in 2013 to support environmental review of activities associated with restarting the TREAT reactor at the INL. These investigations were completed in order to identify and assess the significance of cultural resources within areas of potential effect associated with the proposed action and determine if the TREAT alternative would affect significant cultural resources or historic properties that are eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. No archaeological resources were identified in the direct area of potential effects for the project, but four of the buildings proposed for modifications are evaluated as historic properties, potentially eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. This includes the TREAT reactor (building #), control building (building #), guardhouse (building #), and warehouse (building #). The proposed re-use of these historic

  2. Materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available community. The construction industry is a significantly consumer of materials, using 50 per cent of all products produced globally. Building materials is any material which is used for a construction purpose. Many of these materials are sources from natural...

  3. Perceived availability of culturally and demographically diverse photographs for health education materials, Colorado, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, Mary K; Bettinghaus, Erwin; Buller, David B; Liu, Xia; Fluharty, Lyndsay

    2015-02-26

    An online survey was conducted with health educators in Colorado to ascertain their needs and ability to access relevant stock art photographs for their print and electronic educational media. Health educators were dissatisfied with the cultural and demographic diversity of photographs available from their own sources or from commercial stock art websites. There was a perceived need for more photographs that would better represent their target populations. The health educators believed, furthermore, that representative visual images can help improve their message effectiveness.

  4. After the I-Hotel : Material, Cultural, and Affective Geographies of Filipino San Francisco

    OpenAIRE

    Tagle, Thea Quiray

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation traces the cultural and economic trajectories of Filipino migration to, settlement in, and displacement from the San Francisco Bay Area from the 1960s through the present moment as represented in the work of local poets, visual artists, and performers. After the I-Hotel argues that the shifting representations of urban and suburban space over this time period not only reveal the structural forces behind the displacement of old and new Filipino migrants in the Bay Area, but a...

  5. The Study about the Influence of the Pop Culture for the Japanese Fashion : The Historical Materials Collection about the Connection of Japanese Fashion and Pop Cultures after World War II

    OpenAIRE

    田中, 里尚; 中村, 仁; 梅原, 宏司; 齋木, 吉隆; 古賀, 令子

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research collect and arrange documents and historical materials to determine how pop culture influenced the fashion in Japan after World War II. In 2010, we firstly collected previous fashion and popular culture studies done in foreign countries. We found many intriguing studies, but we came upon one which was particularly noteworthy. As a means of clarifying the relationship between fashion and pop culture, we collected books written by Angela McRobbie. Second, we collect...

  6. Localized Induced Current Stimulation to Neuronal Culture Using Soft Magnetic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Atsushi; Saito, Aki; Moriguchi, Hiroyuki; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    To establish precisely focused magnetic stimulation, we developed a Mu-meal based low-frequency localized induced current (LIC) stimulation system with micro-fabricated dual cell-culture chamber. The dual cell-culture chamber was arranged in a concentric circle manner. Between the inner and outer chambers, 4 or 8 connecting micro-channels were fabricated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Rat cortical neurons were separately cultured in outer and inner chambers. Through the micro-channels, functional synaptic connections were formed. Mu-metal that has very high magnetic permeability was aligned along the outer circle, which allowed us of LIC stimulation to the cells in the outer chamber. Applying low-frequency magnetic fields to the Mu-metal, induced currents were generated and the electrical activity of the cells in the outer chamber was modified depending on the stimulation intensity. Following the modified activity in the outer circles, the cells in the inner chamber also showed slightly depressed activity patterns. These results suggested that our system would be promising for localized stimulation of neuronal networks and highly regulation of network activities.

  7. To Encounter, to Build the World and to Become a Human Being. Advocating for a Material-Cultural Turn in Developmental Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Christiane

    2016-12-01

    Why have material world of daily life and material objects in their conventional features or to say it in other words, why have the mundane world and mundane objects, in which the human beings live and children come to, encounter, experience and develop through, received so little attention from psychologists thus remaining a blind spot in mainstream developmental psychology? Certainly the object has not been totally forgotten (e.g. Piaget's constructivist paradigm) but it has been considered as theoretically determined by the categories of understanding (cf. Kant), and considered as a key to understanding the world in its physical properties by the infant. But the material world and the material objects that are used for everyday purposes (i.e. pragmatically) belonging to material culture, have been totally neglected by developmental psychologists. Reacting to the Kantian agenda of developmental psychology but also to heterodox non developmentalist thinkers such as Gibson who is a growing source of inspiration for developmental psychologists today, we challenge the taken-for-granted mundane world, arguing for the importance of material objects related to material culture in psychological development during the prelinguistic period. On the basis of recent research in early development grounded in the Vygotskian paradigm, we discuss this issue through Marxist Anthropology, Material Culture Studies and Phenomenology. As a consequence we advocate for a material-cultural turn in psychological development in order to place the issue of material world and material objects in their pragmatic and semiotic features on the agenda of developmental psychology.

  8. Gas chromatographic study of degradation phenomena concerning building and cultural heritage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metaxa, E; Agelakopoulou, T; Bassiotis, I; Karagianni, Ch; Roubani-Kalantzopoulou, F

    2009-05-30

    Air pollution influences all aspects of social and economical life nowadays. In order to investigate the impact of air pollution on materials of works of art, the method of Reversed Flow-Inverse Gas Chromatography has been selected. The presence of various atmospheric pollutants is studied on marbles, oxides--building materials and samples of authentic statues from the Greek Archaeological Museums of Kavala and of Philippi. The method leads to the determination of several physicochemical quantities and the characterization of the heterogeneous surfaces of these solids. Moreover, the influence of a second pollutant (synergistic effect) is examined. The structure, the properties and the behavior of the materials are examined by X-Ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Raman Spectroscopy. Therefore, the precise measurement of the above mentioned quantities form the scientific basis for elucidation of the mechanism of the whole phenomenon of the degradation, thus providing a scientific platform to conservation procedures.

  9. Gas chromatographic study of degradation phenomena concerning building and cultural heritage materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metaxa, E.; Agelakopoulou, T.; Bassiotis, I.; Karagianni, Ch.; Roubani-Kalantzopoulou, F.

    2009-01-01

    Air pollution influences all aspects of social and economical life nowadays. In order to investigate the impact of air pollution on materials of works of art, the method of Reversed Flow-Inverse Gas Chromatography has been selected. The presence of various atmospheric pollutants is studied on marbles, oxides-building materials and samples of authentic statues from the Greek Archaeological Museums of Kavala and of Philippi. The method leads to the determination of several physicochemical quantities and the characterization of the heterogeneous surfaces of these solids. Moreover, the influence of a second pollutant (synergistic effect) is examined. The structure, the properties and the behavior of the materials are examined by X-Ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Raman Spectroscopy. Therefore, the precise measurement of the above mentioned quantities form the scientific basis for elucidation of the mechanism of the whole phenomenon of the degradation, thus providing a scientific platform to conservation procedures.

  10. Novel Aspects of Materials Processing by Ultrafast Lasers: From Electronic to Biological and Cultural Heritage Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotakis, C; Zorba, V; Stratakis, E; Athanassiou, A; Tzanetakis, P; Zergioti, I; Papagoglou, D G; Sambani, K; Filippidis, G; Farsari, M; Pouli, V; Bounos, G; Georgiou, S

    2007-01-01

    Materials processing by ultrafast lasers offers several distinct possibilities for micro/nano scale applications. This is due to the unique characteristics of the laser-matter interactions involved, when sub-picosecond pulses are employed. Prospects arising will be discussed in the context of surface and in bulk laser induced modifications. In particular, examples of diverse applications including the development and functionalization of laser engineered surfaces, the laser transfer of biomolecules and the functionalization of 3D structures constructed by three-photon stereolithography will be presented. Furthermore, the removal of molecular substrates by ultrafast laser ablation will be discussed with emphasis placed on assessing the photochemical changes induced in the remaining bulk material. The results indicate that in femtosecond laser processing of organic materials, besides the well acknowledged morphological advantages, a second fundamental factor responsible for its success pertains to the selective chemical effects. This is crucial for the laser cleaning of sensitive painted artworks

  11. Bioengineering of cultured epidermis from adult epidermal stem cells using Mebio gel sutable as autologous graft material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmana K Yerneni

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Closure of burn wound is the primary requirement in order to reduce morbidity and mortality that are otherwise very high due to non-availability of permanent wound covering materials. Sheets of cultured epidermis grown from autologous epidermal keratinocyte stem cells are accepted world over as one of the best wound covering materials. In a largely populated country like ours where burn casualties occur more frequently due to inadequate safety practices, there is a need for indigenous research inputs to develop such methodologies. The technique to culturing epidermal sheets in vitro involves the basic Reheinwald-Green method with our own beneficial inputs. The technique employs attenuated 3T3 cells as feeders for propagating keratinocyte stem cells that are isolated from the epidermis of an initial skin biopsy of about 5 cm2 from the patient. The cultures are then maintained in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium strengthened with Ham's F12 formula, bovine fetal serum and various specific growth-promoting agents and factors in culture flasks under standard culture conditions. The primary cultures thus established would be serially passaged to achieve the required expansion. Our major inputs are into the establishment of (1 an efficient differential trypsinization protocol to isolate large number epidermal keratinocytes from the skin biopsy, (2 a highly specific, unique and foolproof attenuation protocol for 3T3 cells and (3 a specialized and significant decontamination protocol. The fully formed epidermal sheet as verified by immuno-histochemical and light & electron microscopic studies, is lifted on to paraffin gauze by incubating in a neutral protease. The graft is then ready to be transported to the operating theatre for autologous application. We have a capability of growing cultured epidermal sheets sufficient enough to cover 40 per cent burn wound in 28 days. The preliminary small area clinical applications undertaken so far revealed

  12. Researching Interplay between 3D-Materials and Young Children in Socio-Cultural Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana C. Fredriksen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This text presents empirical and interpretative methodological inquiry in a study of young children’s interplay with three-dimensional (3D materials in early childhood educational settings. Recent acknowledgement of young children as competent individuals challenges forms of research with them. Respecting their views and competence demands that they are treated as actors and not objects of research. At the same time, young children are vulnerable and need to be protected from harm, for example when they use tools. This combination of children’s competence and vulnerability challenges research ethics and methods. This article discusses the following question: How to conduct ethical and valid research in sloyd education with young children?The study was carried out in a Norwegian Early Childhood Education Centre, ECEC, using a multiple case study approach. To be able to understand young children’s experiences, the researcher positioned herself inside the educational contexts taking the role of an A/R/T-ographer. Ten case contexts were conducted, in which pairs of different children played with 3D-materials. The cases were filmed and the video-material was analyzed both contextually and in a cross-case manner.Keywords: method, sloyd, early childhood education, video observation, three-dimensional materialsURN:NBN:no-29956

  13. Humic Acid-Like Material from Sewage Sludge Stimulates Culture Growth of Ectomycorrhizal Fungi in Vitro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hršelová, Hana; Soukupová, Lucie; Gryndler, Milan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 6 (2007), s. 627-630 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/06/0540 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes * sewage sludge * humic-acid-like materials Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.989, year: 2007

  14. Formation of nano iridium oxide: material properties and neural cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In-Seop; Whang, Chung-Nam; Lee, Young-Hee; Hwan Lee, Gun; Park, Bong-Joo; Park, Jong-Chul; Seo, Won-Seon; Cui Fuzhai

    2005-01-01

    Iridium film with the thickness of 30 and 60 nm were formed on both Si wafer and commercially pure (CP) Ti by electron beam evaporation. The thin iridium film showed the identical charge injection capability with the bulk Ir. However, the charge injection value of iridium film was decreased with continuous potential cycling when the deposited iridium became depleted due to the formation of oxide. The number of cycles at which the charge injection value decreased was 800 and 1600 cycles for the 30- and 60-nm-thick Ir film, respectively. FE-SEM observations on the cross section of Ir film clearly showed the thicker iridium oxide was formed with the more potential cycling. Ar ion beam etching to substrates before deposition certainly improved the adhesion strength of Ir film enough to resist to the strain induced by the larger volume occupation of iridium oxide. Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts culture on Ir and Ir oxide showed no cytotoxicity. Also, embryonic cortical neural cell culture on electrode indicated neurons adhered and survived by the formation of neurofilament

  15. Using the health belief model to develop culturally appropriate weight-management materials for African-American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Delores C S; Pobee, Joseph W; Oxidine, D'lauren; Brown, Latonya; Joshi, Gungeet

    2012-05-01

    African-American women have the highest prevalence of adult obesity in the United States. They are less likely to participate in weight-loss programs and tend to have a low success rate when they do so. The goal of this project was to explore the use of the Health Belief Model in developing culturally appropriate weight-management programs for African-American women. Seven focus groups were conducted with 50 African-American women. The Health Belief Model was used as the study's theoretical framework. Participants made a clear delineation between the terms healthy weight, overweight, and obese. Sexy, flirtatious words, such as thick, stacked, and curvy were often used to describe their extra weight. Participants accurately described the health risks of obesity. Most believed that culture and genetics made them more susceptible to obesity. The perceived benefits of losing weight included reduced risk for health problems, improved physical appearance, and living life to the fullest. Perceived barriers included a lack of motivation, reliable dieting information, and social support. Motivators to lose weight included being diagnosed with a health problem, physical appearance, and saving money on clothes. Self-efficacy was primarily affected by a frustrated history of dieting. The data themes suggest areas that should be addressed when developing culturally appropriate weight-loss messages, programs, and materials for African-American women. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Quasi-appropriation of dialectical materialism: a critical reading of Marxism in Vygotskian approaches to cultural studies in science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, André; Camillo, Juliano; Mattos, Cristiano

    2014-09-01

    In this review essay we examine five categories of dialectical materialism proposed by Paulo Lima Junior, Fernanda Ostermann, and Flavia Rezende in their study of the extent to which the articles published in Cultural Studies of Science Education, that use a Vygotskian approach, are committed to Marxism/dialectical materialism. By closely examining these categories ("thesis, antithesis and synthesis," "unity of analysis," "History," "revolution," "materialism") we expect to enrich the general discussion about the possible contributions of Marxism to science education. We perceive part of science education practice as orientating toward positivism, which reduces human beings—teachers, learners and researchers—to isolated individuals who construct knowledge by themselves. The very same approach aggravates the inner contradiction of the capitalist society demanding commitments from researchers to continually build innovative science education from human praxis. Nevertheless, it is necessary to situate ourselves beyond a formal commitment with dialectical materialism and hence reach the heart of this method. Besides understanding the researchers' commitments, we question the extent to which the respective research helps to radically refresh the current view on science, science education practice, and research in science education.

  17. Atmospheric corrosion effects of air pollution on materials and cultural property in Asia and Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Foax, LJ

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available .3 Bangkok 0.6 161 7.6 26.3 25.4 Phrapradaeng 1.7 417 11.3 28.6 47.9 Hanoi 1.4 279 11.6 11.4 27.6 Ho Chi Minh 0.8 214 11.3 15.1 20.0 Mytho 2.3 298 8.5 20.1 9.9 Chongqing 8.2 1201 19.9 46.0 75.6 Tie Shan Ping 6.7 769 24.8 36.5 55.6 Hong Kong 0.7 201 11... Science 23 July 2002 Vietnam Ho Chi Minh Ho Chi Minh Branch of the Institute of Materials Science 26 July 2002 Vietnam Mytho Ho Chi Minh Branch of the Institute of Materials Science 27 July 2002 China Chongqing Chongqing Institute of Environmental...

  18. Biomimetic poly(amidoamine hydrogels as synthetic materials for cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenardi Cristina

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poly(amidoamines (PAAs are synthetic polymers endowed with many biologically interesting properties, being highly biocompatible, non toxic and biodegradable. Hydrogels based on PAAs can be easily modified during the synthesis by the introduction of functional co-monomers. Aim of this work is the development and testing of novel amphoteric nanosized poly(amidoamine hydrogel film incorporating 4-aminobutylguanidine (agmatine moieties to create RGD-mimicking repeating units for promoting cell adhesion. Results A systematic comparative study of the response of an epithelial cell line was performed on hydrogels with agmatine and on non-functionalized amphoteric poly(amidoamine hydrogels and tissue culture plastic substrates. The cell adhesion on the agmatine containing substrates was comparable to that on plastic substrates and significantly enhanced with respect to the non-functionalized controls. Interestingly, spreading and proliferation on the functionalized supports are slower than on plastic exhibiting the possibility of an easier control of the cell growth kinetics. In order to favor the handling of the samples, a procedure for the production of bi-layered constructs was also developed by means the deposition via spin coating of a thin layer of hydrogel on a pre-treated cover slip. Conclusion The obtained results reveal that PAAs hydrogels can be profitably functionalized and, in general, undergo physical and chemical modifications to meet specific requirements. In particular the incorporation of agmatine warrants good potential in the field of cell culturing and the development of supported functionalized hydrogels on cover glass are very promising substrates for applications in cell screening devices.

  19. A plant culture system for producing food and recycling materials with sweetpotato in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaya, Yoshiaki; Yano, Sachiko; Hirai, Hiroaki

    2016-07-01

    The long term human life support in space is greatly dependent on the amounts of food, atmospheric O2 and clean water produced by plants. Therefore, the bio-regenerative life support system such as space farming with scheduling of crop production, obtaining high yields with a rapid turnover rate, converting atmospheric CO2 to O2 and purifying water should be established with employing suitable plant species and varieties and precisely controlling environmental variables around plants grown at a high density in a limited space. We are developing a sweetpotato culture system for producing tuberous roots as a high-calorie food and fresh edible leaves and stems as a nutritive functional vegetable food in space. In this study, we investigated the ability of food production, CO2 to O2 conversion through photosynthesis, and clean water production through transpiration in the sweetpotato production system. The biomass of edible parts in the whole plant was almost 100%. The proportion of the top (leaves and stems) and tuberous roots was strongly affected by environmental variables even when the total biomass production was mostly the same. The production of biomass and clean water was controllable especially by light, atmospheric CO2 and moisture and gas regimes in the root zone. It was confirmed that sweetpotato can be utilized for the vegetable crop as well as the root crop allowing a little waste and is a promising functional crop for supporting long-duration human activity in space.

  20. ‘It’s All Done With Mirrors’: V.S. Ramachandran and the Material Culture of Phantom Limb Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Katja

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the material culture of neuroscientist Vilayanur S. Ramachandran’s research into phantom limbs. In the 1990s Ramachandran used a ‘mirror box’ to ‘resurrect’ phantom limbs and thus to treat the pain that often accompanied them. The experimental success of his mirror therapy led Ramachandran to see mirrors as a useful model of brain function, a tendency that explains his attraction to work on ‘mirror neurons’. I argue that Ramachandran’s fascination with and repeated appeal to the mirror can be explained by the way it allowed him to confront a perennial problem in the mind and brain sciences, that of the relationship between a supposedly immaterial mind and a material brain. By producing what Ramachandran called a ‘virtual reality’, relating in varied and complex ways to the material world, the mirror reproduced a form of psycho-physical parallelism and dualistic ontology, while conforming to the materialist norms of neuroscience today. PMID:27292324

  1. Hydroxide nanoparticles for cultural heritage: consolidation and protection of wall paintings and carbonate materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelazzi, David; Poggi, Giovanna; Jaidar, Yareli; Toccafondi, Nicola; Giorgi, Rodorico; Baglioni, Piero

    2013-02-15

    Colloids and Material Science are nowadays providing innovative and effective technological solutions in a wide range of applicative fields. In the last decade, nanomaterials have been specifically designed to ensure the long-term restoration and preservation of movable and immovable artworks. The main tasks to address by conservation scientists concern the cleaning, the deacidification and the consolidation of different kinds of artistic substrates. The aim of the present contribution is to provide an up-to-date overview on the synthesis and preparation of colloidal systems tailored to the consolidation and protection of wall paintings, plasters and stones, highlighting the most recent improvements. Two case studies, widely representative of typical consolidation problems, are presented, i.e. the preservation of wall paintings belonging to a Mesoamerican archeological site and the consolidation of two Italian Renaissance buildings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Time resolved XANES illustrates a substrate-mediated redox process in Prussian blue cultural heritage materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervais, Claire; Moretti, Giulia; Lanquille, Marie-Angélique; Réguer, Solenn

    2016-01-01

    The pigment Prussian blue is studied in heritage science because of its capricious fading behavior under light exposure. We show here that XANES can be used to study the photosensitivity of Prussian blue heritage materials despite X-ray radiation damage. We used an original approach based on X-ray photochemistry to investigate in depth the redox process of Prussian blue when it is associated with a cellulosic substrate, as in cyanotypes and watercolors. By modifying cation and proton contents of the paper substrate, we could tune both rate and extent of Prussian blue reduction. These results demonstrate that the photoreduction and fading of Prussian blue is principally mediated by the substrate and its interaction with the oxygen of the environment. (paper)

  3. Material and Literary Cultures in Iberian Middle Ages: Sefaradic Identity Features among Persia, Palestine and Hispania

    OpenAIRE

    Rozental Sancovsky, Renata; Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro

    2011-01-01

    Na interface dos campos da história da cultura material e da literatura medieval propõe-se analisar os níveis de interacionismos judaicos Ocidente-Oriente, evidenciados nos universos de práticas, comportamentos e organizações das aljamas ibéricas, os bairros judeus, dos séculos V a VIII. Tais intercâmbios estavam presentes no cotidiano judaico ibérico mesmo durante os processos de conversões obrigatórias ao Cristianismo no século VII, e a consolidação do Califado de Al-Andaluz, no século VIII...

  4. Materialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Advanced spectral imaging for noninvasive microanalysis of cultural heritage materials: review of application to documents in the U.S. Library of Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Fenella G

    2011-06-01

    Hyperspectral imaging was originally developed for remote sensing and astronomical applications, but adaptations of this technology have been of great benefit to the preservation of cultural heritage. Developments in noninvasive analytical techniques have advanced the preservation of cultural heritage materials by enabling the identification and analysis of a range of materials, utilizing their unique spectral response to nondestructively determine chemical composition, and determining states of deterioration and change due to environmental conditions. When used as a tool for noninvasive characterization of cultural heritage, these spectral imaging systems allow the collection of chemical identification information about materials without sampling, which is a critical factor for cultural heritage materials. The United States Library of Congress has been developing the application of hyperspectral imaging to the preservation and analysis of cultural heritage materials as a powerful noncontact technique. It allows noninvasive characterization of materials, by identifying and characterizing colorants, inks, and substrates with narrow-band illumination to protect the object while also monitoring deterioration or changes due to exhibit and other environmental conditions. Contiguous illumination from the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectral regions allows the capture of lost, obscured, and deteriorated information. The resulting image cube allows greater capabilities for mapping and coordinating a range of complementary chemical and spectral analyses. The capabilities of this technique are illustrated by a review of results from analysis of the Waldseemüller World Map, the L'Enfant plan for Washington, D.C., and the first draft of the U.S. Declaration of Independence.

  6. The in vitro viability and growth of fibroblasts cultured in the presence of different bone grafting materials (NanoBone and Straumann Bone Ceramic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauschke, E; Rumpel, E; Fanghänel, J; Bayerlein, T; Gedrange, T; Proff, P

    2006-02-01

    Different clinical applications, including dentistry, are making increasing demands on bone grafting material. In the present study we have analysed the viability, proliferation and growth characteristics of fibroblasts cultured in vitro together with two different bone grafting materials, NanoBone and Straumann Bone Ceramic, over a period of 24 and 28 days respectively. Viability was measured at least every 72 hours by using the alamarBlue assay, a test that measures quantitatively cell proliferation and viability but does not require cell fixation or extraction. After one week of culture fibroblast viability was as high as in controls for both grafting materials and remained high (> 90%) for the duration of the experiment. Cell growth was evaluated microscopically. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a dense fibroblast growth at the surface of both bone grafting materials after three weeks of in vitro culture. Generally, our in vitro analyses contribute to further insights into cell - scaffold interactions.

  7. Toxicokinetics and toxicological effects of single oral dose of fumonisin B1 containing Fusarium verticillioides culture material in weaned piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilkin, P; Direito, G; Simas, M M S; Mallmann, C A; Corrêa, B

    2010-05-14

    Toxicokinetics and the toxicological effects of culture material containing fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)) were studied in male weaned piglets by clinical, pathological, biochemical and sphingolipid analyses. The animals received a single oral dose of 5 mg FB(1)/kg of body weight, obtained from Fusarium verticillioides culture material. FB(1) was detected by HPLC in plasma collected at 1-h intervals up to 6h and at 12-h intervals up to 96 h. FB(1) eliminated in feces and urine was quantified over a 96-h period and in liver samples collected 96 h post-intoxication. Blood samples were obtained at the beginning and end of the experiment to determine serum enzyme activity, total bilirubin, cholesterol, sphinganine (Sa), sphingosine (So) and the Sa/So ratio. FB(1) was detected in plasma between 30 min and 36 h after administration. The highest concentration of FB(1) was observed after 2 h, with a mean concentration of 282 microg/ml. Only 0.93% of the total FB(1) was detected in urine between 75 min and 41 h after administration, the highest mean concentration (561 microg/ml) was observed during the interval after 8 at 24 h. Approximately 76.5% of FB(1) was detected in feces eliminated between 8 and 84 h after administration, with the highest levels observed between 8 and 24 h. Considering the biochemical parameters, a significant increase only occurred in cholesterol, alkaline phosphatase and aspartate aminotransferase activities. In plasma and urine, the highest Sa and Sa/So ratios were obtained at 12 and 48 h, respectively. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Environmental controls on the boron and strontium isotopic composition of aragonite shell material of cultured Arctica islandica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-W. Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification, the decrease in ocean pH associated with increasing atmospheric CO2, is likely to impact marine organisms, particularly those that produce carbonate skeletons or shells. Therefore, it is important to investigate how environmental factors (seawater pH, temperature and salinity influence the chemical compositions in biogenic carbonates. In this study we report the first high-resolution strontium (87Sr / 86Sr and δ88 / 86Sr and boron (δ11B isotopic values in the aragonite shell of cultured Arctica islandica (A. islandica. The 87Sr / 86Sr ratios from both tank water and shell samples show ratios nearly identical to the open ocean, which suggests that the shell material reflects ambient ocean chemistry without terrestrial influence. The 84Sr–87Sr double-spike-resolved shell δ88 / 86Sr and Sr concentration data show no resolvable change throughout the culture period and reflect no theoretical kinetic mass fractionation throughout the experiment despite a temperature change of more than 15 °C. The δ11B records from the experiment show at least a 5‰ increase through the 29-week culture season (January 2010–August 2010, with low values from the beginning to week 19 and higher values thereafter. The larger range in δ11B in this experiment compared to predictions based on other carbonate organisms (2–3‰ suggests that a species-specific fractionation factor may be required. A significant correlation between the ΔpH (pHshell − pHsw and seawater pH (pHsw was observed (R2 = 0.35, where the pHshell is the calcification pH of the shell calculated from boron isotopic composition. This negative correlation suggests that A. islandica partly regulates the pH of the extrapallial fluid. However, this proposed mechanism only explains approximately 35% of the variance in the δ11B data. Instead, a rapid rise in δ11B of the shell material after week 19, during the summer, suggests that the boron uptake changes when a thermal

  9. Assessment of cellular materials generated by co-cultured ‘inflamed’ and healthy periodontal ligament stem cells from patient-matched groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Hao-Ning [State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Department of Stomatology, The First Affiliated Hospital of the Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100048 (China); Xia, Yu [State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Department of Stomatology, The 309th Hospital of Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Beijing 100091 (China); Xu, Jie; Tian, Bei-Min; Zhang, Xi-Yu [State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Chen, Fa-Ming, E-mail: cfmsunhh@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)

    2016-08-01

    Recently, stem cells derived from the'inflamed’ periodontal ligament (PDL) tissue of periodontally diseased teeth (I-PDLSCs) have been increasingly suggested as a more readily accessible source of cells for regenerative therapies than those derived from healthy PDL tissue (H-PDLSCs). However, substantial evidence indicates that I-PDLSCs exhibit impaired functionalities compared with H-PDLSCs. In this study, patient-matched I-PDLSCs and H-PDLSCs were co-cultured at various ratios. Cellular materials derived from these cultures were investigated regarding their osteogenic potential in vitro and capacity to form new bone following in vivo transplantation. While patient-matched I-PDLSCs and H-PDLSCs could co-exist in co-culture systems, the proportion of I-PDLSCs tended to increase during in vitro incubation. Compared with H-PDLSC monoculture, the presence of I-PDLSCs in the co-cultures appeared to enhance the overall cell proliferation. Although not completely rescued, the osteogenic and regenerative potentials of the cellular materials generated by co-cultured I-PDLSCs and H-PDLSCs were significantly improved compared with those derived from I-PDLSC monocultures. Notably, cells in co-cultures containing either 50% I-PDLSCs plus 50% H-PDLSCs or 25% I-PDLSCs plus 75% H-PDLSCs expressed osteogenesis-related proteins and genes at levels similar to those expressed in H-PDLSC monocultures (P>0.05). Irrespective of the percentage of I-PDLSCs, robust cellular materials were obtained from co-cultures with 50% or more H-PDLSCs, which exhibited equivalent potential to form new bone in vivo compared with sheets generated by H-PDLSC monocultures. These data suggest that the co-culture of I-PDLSCs with patient-matched H-PDLSCs is a practical and effective method for increasing the overall osteogenic and regenerative potentials of resultant cellular materials. - Highlights: • Co-culturing H-PDLSCs with I-PDLSCs led to rapid cell expansion. • H-PDLSCs and I-PDLSCs co-cultured

  10. Patrimônio cultural material e imaterial - dicotomia e reflexos na aplicação do tombamento e do registro

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira de Pragmácio Telles, Mário; Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro

    2011-01-01

    O artigo pretende analisar os reflexos da invocação da dicotomia entre patrimônio cultural material e imaterial na efetiva tutela dos bens culturais alçados à categoria oficial de patrimônio cultural brasileiro, tomando-se como exemplo a aplicação dos dois principais instrumentos de proteção existentes em nível federal - tombamento e registro - sobre os bens integrantes da categoria lugares. PALAVRAS CHAVE: Patrimônio cultural. Dicotomia. Instrumentos de proteção. Tangible and intang...

  11. Adolescent Students' Intercultural Awareness When Using Culture-Based Materials in the English Class (La conciencia intercultural de estudiantes adolescentes al usar materiales con contenido cultural en la clase de inglés)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda Usaquén, Mireya Esther

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative and interpretative case study conducted at a high school located in the southeast of Bogotá. The case is comprised of a group of fifty-one eighth graders who had had little contact with English. It aimed at exploring how these adolescents made sense of the culture-based materials implemented in the English…

  12. Science Education and the Material Culture of the Nineteenth-Century Classroom: Physics and Chemistry in Spanish Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Josep; Cuenca-Lorente, Mar

    2010-04-01

    Although a large number of Spanish secondary schools have preserved an important scientific heritage, including large scientific instrument collections, this heritage has never been officially protected. Their current state is very diverse, and although several research projects have attempted to initiate their recovery and use, their lack of coordination and wide range of methodological approaches has limited their impact. This paper presents a case-study integrated in a new project supported by the Catalan Scientific Instrument Commission (COMIC) whose final aim is the establishment of a research hub for the preservation, study and use of Spanish scientific instrument collections. Major aims in this project are promoting a better coordination of Spanish projects in this field, and furthering international research on science pedagogy and the material culture of science. The major focus of COMIC is currently the recovery of secondary school collections. This paper provides first, a historical account of the development of secondary education in Spain, and the contemporary establishment of physics and chemistry school collections. Second, we focus on a case-study of three Spanish schools (Valencia, Castellón, and Alicante). Finally, we provide a brief overview of current projects to preserve Spanish school collections, and discuss how COMIC can contribute to help to coordinate them, and to take a step forward interdisciplinary research in this context.

  13. Fumonisin concentrations and in vivo toxicity of nixtamalized Fusarium verticillioides culture material: evidence for fumonisin-matrix interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, T D; Snook, M E; Riley, R T; Voss, K A

    2008-08-01

    The toxic potential of nixtamalized foods can be underestimated if, during cooking, reversible fumonisin-food matrix interactions reduce the amount of mycotoxin that is detected but not the amount that is bioavailable. Fusarium verticillioides culture material (CM) was nixtamalized as is (NCM) or after mixing with ground corn (NCMC). Additional portions were sham nixtamalized without (SCM) or with corn (SCMC). Nixtamalization and sham nixtamalization reduced FB(1); CM, NCM, and SCM diets contained 9.08, 2.08, and 1.19 ppm, respectively. FB(1) was further reduced in the NCMC (0.49 ppm) but not the SCMC (1.01 ppm) diets compared to their NCM and SCM counterparts. Equivalent weights of the cooked products, uncooked CM, corn (UC) or nixtamalized UC (NUC) were fed to rats for up to three weeks. Kidney lesions in the NCM-fed group were less severe than in the CM-fed, positive control group and no lesions were found in the NCMC and other groups. Group kidney sphinganine (biomarker of fumonisin exposure) concentrations decreased in the order: CM (absolute concentration (nmol/g)=600-800)>NCM (400-600)>SCM and SCMC (30-90)>NCMC, UC and NUC (<8). Together, these results suggest that mycotoxin-corn matrix interactions during nixtamalization reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of FB(1).

  14. Science Education and the Material Culture of the Nineteenth-Century Classroom: Physics and Chemistry in Spanish Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Josep; Cuenca-Lorente, Mar

    2012-02-01

    Although a large number of Spanish secondary schools have preserved an important scientific heritage, including large scientific instrument collections, this heritage has never been officially protected. Their current state is very diverse, and although several research projects have attempted to initiate their recovery and use, their lack of coordination and wide range of methodological approaches has limited their impact. This paper presents a case-study integrated in a new project supported by the Catalan Scientific Instrument Commission (COMIC) whose final aim is the establishment of a research hub for the preservation, study and use of Spanish scientific instrument collections. Major aims in this project are promoting a better coordination of Spanish projects in this field, and furthering international research on science pedagogy and the material culture of science. The major focus of COMIC is currently the recovery of secondary school collections. This paper provides first, a historical account of the development of secondary education in Spain, and the contemporary establishment of physics and chemistry school collections. Second, we focus on a case-study of three Spanish schools (Valencia, Castellón, and Alicante). Finally, we provide a brief overview of current projects to preserve Spanish school collections, and discuss how COMIC can contribute to help to coordinate them, and to take a step forward interdisciplinary research in this context.

  15. Soft material-based microculture system having air permeable cover sheet for the protoplast culture of Nicotiana tabacum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jong Il; Ko, Jung-Moon; Kim, So Hyeon; Baek, Ju Yeoul; Cha, Hyeon-Cheol; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2006-08-01

    In plant cell culture, the delivery of nutrition and gas (mainly oxygen) to the cells is the most important factor for viability. In this paper, we propose a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microculture system that is designed to have good aeration. PDMS is known to have excellent air permeability, and through the experimental method, we investigated the relation between the degree of air delivery and the thickness of the PDMS sheet covering the culture chamber. We determined the proper thickness of the cover sheet, and cultured protoplasts of Nicotiana tabacum in a culture chamber covered with a PDMS sheet having thickness of 400 microm. The cells were successfully divided, and lived well inside the culture chamber for 10 days. In addition, protoplasts were cultured inside the culture chambers covered with the cover glass and the PDMS sheet, respectively, and the microcolonies were formed well inside the PDMS covered chamber after 10 days.

  16. The Impact of a Cultural Lifestyle Intervention on Metabolic Parameters After Gestational Diabetes Mellitus A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman-Kravits, Dana; Meyerstein, Naomi; Abu-Rabia, Yones; Wiznitzer, Arnon; Harman-Boehm, Ilana

    2018-06-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes in Israel is increasing in all ethnic groups but most markedly in the Bedouin population. We aimed to assess the effects of a lifestyle change intervention on risk markers for type 2 diabetes after gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). One hundred eighty Jewish and Bedouin post-GDM women were randomly assigned to a lifestyle intervention group (IG) or a control group (CG) starting 3-4 months after delivery. The IG participated in healthy lifestyle sessions led by a dietician and a sports instructor for 24 months after delivery. The IG participants had three individual 45-min counseling sessions and four 90-min group meetings (10 women each). The dietary and exercise recommendations were culturally adapted. The primary outcome of the study was HOMA-IR. We monitored clinical and chemical biomarkers 1 and 2 years after delivery. After 1 and 2 years of intervention, the metabolic measures improved substantially. The intervention reduced the insulin, glucose and HOMA-IR levels in the IG compared with those in the CG (p < 0.001). This novel culturally tailored lifestyle intervention program significantly improved the metabolic and morphometric indices measured 1 and 2 years after delivery. These results highlight and underscore the importance of effective lifestyle change education following GDM.

  17. Materializing ideas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandvad, Sara Malou

    2011-01-01

    Based on a qualitative study of development processes in the Danish film industry, this article sketches a socio-material perspective for analysing the production of culture. Whereas previous studies of cultural production have identified social factors in cultural production, this article sets out...... it is becoming materialized....

  18. Parent-Adolescent Conflict and Its Resolution in Monogamous and Polygamous Bedouin Arab Families in Southern Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Elbedour

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was twofold: (1 to compare whether children from polygamous family structures significantly differ from children from monogamous family structures with regard to the frequency of parent-child conflict, and (2 whether children from these two structures employ different patterns of family conflict resolution.To address these questions, a random sample of 212 high school students (60.8% monogamous completed a self-administered survey. The results of MANOVA show no significant differences (p > 0.05 between these two structures with regard to the frequency of parent-child conflict. The results also show similar conflict management styles between these two family structures within each of the following five domains (privacy, school and career, money spending, going out and leisure, and physical appearance.This study is unique in that it is the first empirical research to be conducted in the field of conflict resolution among youth and adolescents in polygamous marital structures and therefore, further investigation is needed to replicate these results utilizing different cross-cultural populations practicing polygamy.

  19. Parent-adolescent conflict and its resolution in monogamous and polygamous Bedouin Arab families in southern Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbedour, Salman; Hektner, Joel M; Morad, Mohammed; Abu-Bader, Soleman H

    2003-12-05

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to compare whether children from polygamous family structures significantly differ from children from monogamous family structures with regard to the frequency of parent-child conflict, and (2) whether children from these two structures employ different patterns of family conflict resolution. To address these questions, a random sample of 212 high school students (60.8% monogamous) completed a self-administered survey. The results of MANOVA show no significant differences (p > 0.05) between these two structures with regard to the frequency of parent-child conflict. The results also show similar conflict management styles between these two family structures within each of the following five domains (privacy, school and career, money spending, going out and leisure, and physical appearance). This study is unique in that it is the first empirical research to be conducted in the field of conflict resolution among youth and adolescents in polygamous marital structures and therefore, further investigation is needed to replicate these results utilizing different cross-cultural populations practicing polygamy.

  20. Seleccionando materiales adecuados cultural y linguisticamente: Sugerencias para los proveedores de servicios (Selecting Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Materials: Suggestions for Service Providers). ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rosa Milagros; Reese, Debbie

    The population of the United States is growing more culturally diverse each year, and this diversity is clearly evident among families with young children; however, individuals who work in early childhood programs are not as diverse as those they serve. Moreover, many early childhood professionals have little preparation for working with families…

  1. Spanish-Hispanic Culture from A to V (Actualidades to Venezuela): 72 Spanish-Language Interdisciplinary Cultural Themes with Suggested Resource Materials and Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Merriam M.

    This guidebook is intended for use by teachers of Spanish (FLES through college level) and by teachers in Spanish bilingual programs. It lists all of the Spanish-speaking countries and 72 Spanish-language cultural themes, such as "Actualidades" (Current Events), "Carreras y espanol comercial" (Careers and Commercial Spanish), "Deportes" (Sports),…

  2. Radiation Safety and Culture of Prevention in the Use of Radioactive Materials in Industry. Criteria and Trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truppa, W.A.

    2011-01-01

    As time goes by and experience is gained, modernization and technological development show the need to implement more complex programs and procedures to ensure a high level of compliance with radiation safety, particularly in those activities in which radioactive material is used in industry. A relevant aspect of present technology is the concern to introduce mechanisms to prevent radiological accidents or incidents, to ensure early detection of failures. This includes systems that either individually or as a whole, increase the level of responsibility of the different disciplines involved, so as to avoid a situation that could lead to loss of control of the facility or part of it. The prevention of an abnormal situation, overexposure of workers or unwanted risks, should be considered in the level of vulnerability of the facility, a concept drawn from international protection systems and which is applied directly in radiation safety. Preventive management, risk communication and proposals for change or improvement along with the detection of risks and training, constitute all the factors contained within prevention policies. Dose limitation, optimization and justification, old tools used for decades, could not be replaced by other modern concepts and criteria. ALARA culture (including performance indicators) should be considered. The atmosphere at work, working under pressure as well as other factors such as quality issues, ethics of prevention, etc. align with this idea of prevention and safety, besides changes in attitude, towards risk prevention (methods, reports, intervention guides, working instructions, and any other helpful tool), are followed by preventive, as well as predictive and corrective maintenance, applied to minimize the dose absorbed by workers. A clear policy of prevention is needed as well as an appropriate level of radiation safety which should be taken into account since the very beginning of the development of a given practice. All these

  3. Radiation safety and culture of prevention in the use of radioactive materials in industry : criteria and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truppa, Walter Adrian

    2008-01-01

    As time goes by and experience is gained, modernization and technological development show the need to implement more complex programs and procedures to ensure a high level of compliance with radiation safety, particularly in those activities in which radioactive material is used in industry. A relevant aspect of present technology is the concern to introduce mechanisms to prevent radiological accidents or incidents, to ensure early detection of failures. This includes systems that either individually or as a whole, increase the level of responsibility of the different disciplines involved, so as to avoid a situation that could lead to loss of control of the facility or part of it. The prevention of an abnormal situation, overexposure of workers or unwanted risks, should be considered in the level of vulnerability of the facility, a concept drawn from international protection systems and which is applied directly in radiation safety. Preventive management, risk communication and proposals for change or improvement along with the detection of risks and training, constitute all the factors contained within prevention policies. Dose limitation, optimization and justification, old tools used for decades, could not be replaced by other modern concepts and criteria. ALARA culture (including performance indicators) should be considered. The atmosphere at work, working under pressure as well as other factors such as quality issues, ethics of prevention, etc. align with this idea of prevention and safety, besides changes in attitude, towards risk prevention (methods, reports, intervention guides, working instructions, and any other helpful tool), are followed by preventive, as well as predictive and corrective maintenance, applied to minimize the dose absorbed by workers. A clear policy of prevention is needed as well as an appropriate level of radiation safety which should be taken into account since the very beginning of the development of a given practice. All these

  4. IAEA/USDOE senior management workshop on promotion of safety culture for the NPPS with RBMK reactors. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The current workshop, co-sponsored by the IAEA and USDOE, was a continuation of the previous effort for further promotion of safety culture at RBMK NPPs. The objective of the workshop was to provide a forum for senior managers from governmental organizations and operating organizations to further exchange experience in understanding the factors influencing safety culture, in assessing safety culture at their own organizations and developing safety culture at RBMK NPPs. The workshop consisted of a broad scope of presentations to review the basic concepts and major elements of safety culture (ownership, accountability, pride, job satisfaction, trust, openness, etc.), to identify and discuss the various approaches used in different countries in attaining a strong safety culture, and to explain, through the use of practical examples, what the benefits of a strong safety culture are; how to improve the behavior of people, how to gain trust and openness, how to overcome difficulties in changing staff's attitudes, and how to manage safety culture. 2 figs

  5. Diversidade cultural, patrimônio cultural material e cultura popular: a Unesco e a construção de um universalismo global

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elder Patrick Maia Alves

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo procura situar o advento e a operacionalização de uma formação discursiva responsável pela emergência de um novo universalismo global. Tal universalismo traz como imperativo ético-moral a defesa e a promoção de valores como a diversidade cultural. Para compreender as implicações políticas e culturais desse universalismo, este trabalho elege como eixo empírico a atuação da Organização das Nações Unidas Para Educação, a Ciência e a Cultura (UNESCO, destacando as ações dessa organização na coordenação e dinamização de um trânsito simbólico e discursivo transnacional envolvendo governos, organizações não-governamentais e grupos políticos.This article attempts to situate the emergence and development of a discursive formation responsible for the appearance of a new global universalism. The ethical and moral imperative of this universalism is the defense and promotion of values such as cultural diversity. To understand the political and cultural implications of this universalism, this article elects as its empirical axis the performance of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO, highlighting the actions of the organization in coordinating and facilitating a symbolic and discursive transnational transit involving governments, nongovernmental organizations and political groups.

  6. The use of material culture to establish the ethnic identity of victims in genocide investigations: a validation study from the American Southwest*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, Debra A; Lathrop, Sarah

    2008-09-01

    Successful prosecution of genocide requires that the victims constitute one of four protected groups: national, religious, ethnic, or racial. Establishing victim identity in prior trials has relied on positive identification of decedents, been largely presumptive, or was based on untested methodology. This report details a validation study of one untested method: the use of material culture in establishing ethnic identity. Classes of clothing and personal effects were scored on 3,430 individuals of known Hispanic or White ancestry from autopsy records in New Mexico. Significant differences were seen in evidence of language, nationality, and religious affiliation between the two groups, as well as clothing types and currency. Predictive models used to estimate ethnic identity in random, blind subsets produced an overall accuracy of 81.5% and estimates of 61-98% in specific subsets. Results suggest material culture, when present, can provide reliable evidence of ethnic affinity in genocide investigations.

  7. Analysis of teaching materials of civic education is characterized by the value of character in building an anti-corruption culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmini; Suyanto, Totok; Nadiroh, Ulin

    2018-01-01

    In general, corruption is very harmful to society. One of the efforts in preventing corruption is by the culture of Anti-Corruption Education in the young generation through teaching materials in schools. The research method used is qualitative description. The sample in this research is 60 junior high school teachers of Citizenship Education in Surabaya. Data analysis technique used in this research is descriptive statistic with percentage technique. The result of this research is that it is very important that the value of the character of anti-corruption education in teaching materials to grow in the young generation.

  8. Power and Socio˗cultural Conflict in the 1920-ies in Russia (on Materials of the South of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna D. Bagdasaryan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The twentieth century went down in world history as the time of the Genesis of socio-cultural picture of the global world. A special role in the formation of new paradigms technetronic society played the October revolution and post-revolution syndrome that destroyed the outlook of traditional society. In terms of public socio-cultural policy in Soviet Russia, aimed at the creation of a secular culture, but in the context of the ideology of building a Communist society implemented the formation of Soviet man impersonal state propaganda. In the article the problems of interaction between government and peasant society in the 1920-ies in the South of Russia on the basis of the facts of the collision policy of the Soviet state and traditional festive peasant culture are considered.

  9. Ineffable Cultures or Material Devices: What Valuation Studies can Learn from the Disappearance of Ensured Solidarity in a Health Care Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teun Zuiderent-Jerak

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Valuation studies addresses how values are made in valuation practices. A next - or rather previous - question becomes: what then makes valuation practices? Two oppositional replies are starting to dominate how that question can be answered: a more materially oriented focus on devices of valuation and a more sociologically inclined focus on ineffable valuation cultures. The debate between proponents of both approaches may easily turn into the kind of leapfrog debates that have dominated many previous discussions on whether culture or materiality would play a decisive role in driving history. This paper explores a less repetitive reply. It does so by analyzing the puzzling case of the demise of solidarity as a core value within the recent Dutch health care system of regulated competition. While "solidarity among the insured" was both a strong cultural value within the Dutch welfare-based health system, and a value that was built into market devices by health economists, within a fairly short time "fairness" became of lesser importance than "competition". This makes us call for a more historical, relational, and dynamic understanding of the role of economists, market devices, and of culture in valuation studies.

  10. Comparison of the Osteogenic Potential of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Endosequence Root Repair Material in a 3-dimensional Culture System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifaey, Hisham S; Villa, Max; Zhu, Qiang; Wang, Yu-Hsiung; Safavi, Kamran; Chen, I-Ping

    2016-05-01

    The ability to promote osteoblast differentiation is a desirable property of root-end filling materials. Several in vitro studies compare the cytotoxicity and physical properties between mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Endosequence root repair material (ERRM), but not their osteogenic potential. Three-dimensional cultures allow cells to better maintain their physiological morphology and better resemble in vivo cellular response than 2-dimensional cultures. Here we examined the osteogenic potential of MTA and ERRM by using a commercially available 3-dimensional Alvetex scaffold. Mandibular osteoblasts were derived from 3-week-old male transgenic reporter mice where mature osteoblasts express green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by a 2.3-kilobase type I collagen promoter (Col(I)-2.3). Mandibular osteoblasts were grown on Alvetex in direct contact with MTA, ERRM, or no material (negative control) for 14 days. Osteoblast differentiation was evaluated by expression levels of osteogenic genes by using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and by the spatial dynamics of Col(I)-2.3 GFP-positive mature osteoblasts within the Alvetex scaffolds by using 2-photon microscopy. ERRM significantly increased alkaline phosphatase (Alp) and bone sialoprotein (Bsp) expression compared with MTA and negative control groups. Both MTA and ERRM increased osterix (Osx) mRNA significantly compared with the negative control group. The percentage of Col(I)-2.3 GFP-positive cells over total cells within Alvetex was the highest in the ERRM group, followed by MTA and by negative controls. ERRM promotes osteoblast differentiation better than MTA and controls with no material in a 3-dimensional culture system. Alvetex scaffolds can be used to test endodontic materials. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. In vitro testing of dental materials by means of macrophage cultures: II. Effects of particulate dental amalgams and their constituent phases on cultured macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrjänen, S; Hensten-Pettersen, A; Nilner, K

    1986-10-01

    It is known that macrophages play an important role in the removal of foreign particulate matter from tissue. When powdered dental amalgam is introduced into the soft tissues an amalgam tattoo is formed due to the intracellular degradation of amalgam by macrophages and their polykaryons. It was therefore feasible to study the effects of particulate amalgams as well as their individual phases on macrophages in vitro. The parameters compared were rate of the phagocytosis, changes of cellular morphology, and release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) to demonstrate plasma membrane permeability. It was shown that all the alloys except the Sn8Hg particles (gamma 2-phase) and gamma 2-containing Revalloy were effectively phagocytized by macrophages, and the alterations in cellular morphology were slight during the first day. Prominent cellular damage was seen in cultures treated with particulate Ag2Hg3 (gamma 1-phase) and Revalloy for 1 week. A slight increase in LDH activity in the medium was seen one hour after the alloy treatment. The LDH activities due to the amalgam treatment increased in the order Dispersalloy less than Revalloy less than Sybraloy. Intraperitoneal phagocytosis did not cause any morphological changes in macrophages, but the per cent of phagocytosis was diminished.

  12. A NATIONAL DEMONSTRATION PROJECT UTILIZING TELEVISED MATERIALS FOR THE FORMAL EDUCATION OF CULTURALLY DISADVANTAGED PRESCHOOL CHILDREN. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MUKERJI, ROSE; AND OTHERS

    TO SUPPLY DISADVANTAGED PRESCHOOL CHILDREN WITH CULTURALLY STIMULATING EXPERIENCES, A TV SERIES, "ROUNDABOUT," WAS DESIGNED TO BE USED IN WASHINGTON, D.C. INNER-CITY PRESCHOOL AND DAY CARE CENTERS. THE 15-MINUTE PROGRAMS WERE TO INTRODUCE NEW EXPERIENCES AND SUPPLEMENT REGULAR ACTIVITIES. IT WAS HOPED THAT THE CHILDREN WOULD IDENTIFY…

  13. Materializing Multiculturalism: Deconstruction and Cumulation in Teaching Language, Culture, and (Non) Identity Reflections on Roth and Kellogg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Katherine Richardson

    2009-01-01

    As a multicultural teacher educator, the author spends a lot of time talking about cultural and linguistic "difference." Doing this work in Iowa means that many of the students she talks with come from communities that, they say, have not prepared them to have this conversation. "Everyone was just like me," they claim.…

  14. Evaluation of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real-Time PCR in Oil Palm Elite Planting Materials Propagated by Tissue Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Pek-Lan; Rose, Ray J.; Abdul Murad, Abdul Munir; Zainal, Zamri; Leslie Low, Eng-Ti; Ooi, Leslie Cheng-Li; Ooi, Siew-Eng; Yahya, Suzaini; Singh, Rajinder

    2014-01-01

    Background The somatic embryogenesis tissue culture process has been utilized to propagate high yielding oil palm. Due to the low callogenesis and embryogenesis rates, molecular studies were initiated to identify genes regulating the process, and their expression levels are usually quantified using reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). With the recent release of oil palm genome sequences, it is crucial to establish a proper strategy for gene analysis using RT-qPCR. Selection of the most suitable reference genes should be performed for accurate quantification of gene expression levels. Results In this study, eight candidate reference genes selected from cDNA microarray study and literature review were evaluated comprehensively across 26 tissue culture samples using RT-qPCR. These samples were collected from two tissue culture lines and media treatments, which consisted of leaf explants cultures, callus and embryoids from consecutive developmental stages. Three statistical algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper) confirmed that the expression stability of novel reference genes (pOP-EA01332, PD00380 and PD00569) outperformed classical housekeeping genes (GAPDH, NAD5, TUBULIN, UBIQUITIN and ACTIN). PD00380 and PD00569 were identified as the most stably expressed genes in total samples, MA2 and MA8 tissue culture lines. Their applicability to validate the expression profiles of a putative ethylene-responsive transcription factor 3-like gene demonstrated the importance of using the geometric mean of two genes for normalization. Conclusions Systematic selection of the most stably expressed reference genes for RT-qPCR was established in oil palm tissue culture samples. PD00380 and PD00569 were selected for accurate and reliable normalization of gene expression data from RT-qPCR. These data will be valuable to the research associated with the tissue culture process. Also, the method described here will facilitate the selection of appropriate

  15. Evaluation of reference genes for quantitative real-time PCR in oil palm elite planting materials propagated by tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Pek-Lan; Rose, Ray J; Abdul Murad, Abdul Munir; Zainal, Zamri; Low, Eng-Ti Leslie; Ooi, Leslie Cheng-Li; Ooi, Siew-Eng; Yahya, Suzaini; Singh, Rajinder

    2014-01-01

    The somatic embryogenesis tissue culture process has been utilized to propagate high yielding oil palm. Due to the low callogenesis and embryogenesis rates, molecular studies were initiated to identify genes regulating the process, and their expression levels are usually quantified using reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). With the recent release of oil palm genome sequences, it is crucial to establish a proper strategy for gene analysis using RT-qPCR. Selection of the most suitable reference genes should be performed for accurate quantification of gene expression levels. In this study, eight candidate reference genes selected from cDNA microarray study and literature review were evaluated comprehensively across 26 tissue culture samples using RT-qPCR. These samples were collected from two tissue culture lines and media treatments, which consisted of leaf explants cultures, callus and embryoids from consecutive developmental stages. Three statistical algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper) confirmed that the expression stability of novel reference genes (pOP-EA01332, PD00380 and PD00569) outperformed classical housekeeping genes (GAPDH, NAD5, TUBULIN, UBIQUITIN and ACTIN). PD00380 and PD00569 were identified as the most stably expressed genes in total samples, MA2 and MA8 tissue culture lines. Their applicability to validate the expression profiles of a putative ethylene-responsive transcription factor 3-like gene demonstrated the importance of using the geometric mean of two genes for normalization. Systematic selection of the most stably expressed reference genes for RT-qPCR was established in oil palm tissue culture samples. PD00380 and PD00569 were selected for accurate and reliable normalization of gene expression data from RT-qPCR. These data will be valuable to the research associated with the tissue culture process. Also, the method described here will facilitate the selection of appropriate reference genes in other oil palm

  16. Evaluation of reference genes for quantitative real-time PCR in oil palm elite planting materials propagated by tissue culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pek-Lan Chan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The somatic embryogenesis tissue culture process has been utilized to propagate high yielding oil palm. Due to the low callogenesis and embryogenesis rates, molecular studies were initiated to identify genes regulating the process, and their expression levels are usually quantified using reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR. With the recent release of oil palm genome sequences, it is crucial to establish a proper strategy for gene analysis using RT-qPCR. Selection of the most suitable reference genes should be performed for accurate quantification of gene expression levels. RESULTS: In this study, eight candidate reference genes selected from cDNA microarray study and literature review were evaluated comprehensively across 26 tissue culture samples using RT-qPCR. These samples were collected from two tissue culture lines and media treatments, which consisted of leaf explants cultures, callus and embryoids from consecutive developmental stages. Three statistical algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper confirmed that the expression stability of novel reference genes (pOP-EA01332, PD00380 and PD00569 outperformed classical housekeeping genes (GAPDH, NAD5, TUBULIN, UBIQUITIN and ACTIN. PD00380 and PD00569 were identified as the most stably expressed genes in total samples, MA2 and MA8 tissue culture lines. Their applicability to validate the expression profiles of a putative ethylene-responsive transcription factor 3-like gene demonstrated the importance of using the geometric mean of two genes for normalization. CONCLUSIONS: Systematic selection of the most stably expressed reference genes for RT-qPCR was established in oil palm tissue culture samples. PD00380 and PD00569 were selected for accurate and reliable normalization of gene expression data from RT-qPCR. These data will be valuable to the research associated with the tissue culture process. Also, the method described here will facilitate the selection

  17. Do material e do simbólico : capitalismo, imagem e a intermediação cultural pós-modernista

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Valente Aguiar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have a main goal to give relevant clues on the framing of images in the cultural logic of post-modernism. At the same time, we will give space to a brief description on the relation between post-modernism and flexible accumulation, primary support from where our object comes from. Along with this, we conceptualize central dimensions such as the imagetic transmutation, the primacy of image and the effect of dematerialization induced by the image in the perception of social relations. In this way, a conceptual chain is constituted with the purpose of connecting phenomena and social processes only apparently fragmented such as the productive basis of contemporary capitalism, its cultural reality and the place of image in all that wide framing. From an epistemological point of view, one must highlight that all the theoretical work developed here points out to a parallel relation between material and symbolical domains

  18. Cytotoxic Evaluation of Elastomeric Dental Impression Materials on a Permanent Mouse Cell Line and on a Primary Human Gingival Fibroblast Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Tiozzo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The need for clinically relevant in vitro tests of dental materials is widely recognized. Nearly all dental impression materials are introduced into the mouth just after mixing and allowed to set in contact with the oral tissues. Under these conditions, the materials may be toxic to cells or may sensitize the tissues. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the potential cytotoxicity of new preparations of elastomeric dental impression materials: A four vinylpolysiloxanes: Elite H-D Putty and Elite H-D Light Body (Zhermack, Badia Polesine, Rovigo, Italy; Express Putty and Express Light Body (3M ESPE AG Seefeld, Germany and B two polyethers: Impregum Penta and Permadyne Penta L (3M ESPE AG Seefeld, Germany. The cytotoxicity of these impression materials were examined using two different cell lines: Balb/c 3T3 (permanent cell line and human gingival fibroblasts (primary cell line and their effects were studied by indirect and direct tests. The direct tests are performed by placing one sample of the impression materials in the centre of the Petri dishes at the time of the seeding of cells. The cell growth was evaluated at the 12th and 24th hours by cell number. The indirect tests were performed by incubating a square of 1 cm diameter impression material in 5 mL of medium at 37 °C for 24 hours (“eluates”. Subconfluent cultures are incubated with “eluates” for 24 hours. The MTT-formazan production is the method used for measuring the cell viability. The results indicate that: a polyether materials are cytotoxic under both experimental conditions; b among vinylpolysiloxanes, only Express Light Body (3M ESPE AG Seefeld, Germany induces clear inhibition of cellular viability of Balb/c 3T3 evaluated by direct and indirect tests and c the primary cell line is less sensitive to the toxic effect than the permanent cell line.

  19. MICRO ALGAE CULTURE FROM RAWA GAMBUT: INTRODUCTION STUDY OF MICRO ALGAE POTENTIAL AS BIO DIESEL RAW MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Jumiarni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable production of renewable energy is being a crucial problem, since fuel demand in Indonesia rises annually while the production decreases. Microalgae have been suggested as a potential feedstock for biofuel production. This research was a preliminary study to identified microalgal culture from water of peat swamp, and probe its potential as biodiesel feedstock.  Microalgal identification was conducted by morphological observation using microscope, while potential as biodiesel was probed by detection using Nile Red staining and supported by literature study. This research has identified 19 species of microalgae from culture, which were consisting of 16 species were Chlorophyceae and 3 species were Bacillariophyceae. Microalgae that  potentially to be developed biodiesel feedstock were Cyclotella atomus, Cyclotella sp, Nitzschia sp, Chlorella sp, Desmodesmus sp, Chlorella ellipsoida and Chlorella vulgaris.

  20. Manuscript Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    What do Mesoamerica, Greece, Byzantium, Island, Chad, Ethiopia, India, Tibet, China and Japan have in common? Like many other cultures of the world, they share a particular form of cultural heritage: ancient handwritten documents. In 2007, scholars from some20 countries around the world gathered...... at the University of Copenhagen for a workshop on manuscripts to compare notes. This event led to the publication of this volume, which brings together16 articles on philological, cultural, and material aspects of manuscripts in search for a common ground across disciplines and cultures....

  1. The effect of perfusion culture on proliferation and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on biocorrodible bone replacement material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farack, J.; Wolf-Brandstetter, C.; Glorius, S.; Nies, B.; Standke, G.; Quadbeck, P.; Worch, H.; Scharnweber, D.

    2011-01-01

    Biocorrodible iron foams were coated with different calcium phosphate phases (CPP) to obtain a bioactive surface and controlled degradation. Further adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of SaOs-2 and human mesenchymal stem cells were investigated under both static and dynamic culture conditions. Hydroxyapatite (HA; [Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 OH 2 ]) coated foams released 500 μg/g iron per day for Dulbecco's modified eagle medium (DMEM) and 250 μg/g iron per day for McCoys, the unmodified reference 1000 μg/g iron per day for DMEM and 500 μg/g iron per day for McCoys, while no corrosion could be detected on brushite (CaHPO 4 ) coated foams. Using a perfusion culture system with conditions closer to the in vivo situation, cells proliferated and differentiated on iron foams coated with either brushite or HA while in static cell culture cells could proliferate only on Fe-brushite. We conclude that the degradation behaviour of biocorrodible iron foams can be varied by different calcium phosphate coatings, offering opportunities for design of novel bone implants. Further studies will focus on the influence of different modifications of iron foams on the expression of oxidative stress enzymes. Additional information about in vivo reactions and remodelling behaviour are expected from testing in implantation studies.

  2. Effectiveness of a Lactobacillus sakei starter culture in the reduction of biogenic amine accumulation as a function of the raw material quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bover-Cid, S; Izquierdo-Pulido, M; Vidal-Carou, M C

    2001-03-01

    The effectiveness of an amine-negative starter culture (Lactobacillus sakei CTC494) in the reduction of biogenic amine production during the ripening of fermented sausages was examined. Four batches were manufactured in parallel: spontaneously fermented and starter-mediated sausages were manufactured from two lots of raw materials of different hygienic quality. Besides the biogenic amine contents, changes in the microbial counts, nitrogenous fractions, pH, and water content were measured at several sampling points during the ripening process. In sausages manufactured from good quality meat, the starter strain of L. sakei reduced and even inhibited biogenic amine accumulation during sausage fermentation, the end products showing extremely low biogenic amine contents (tyramine levels less than 15 mg/kg of dry matter and putrescine and cadaverine levels less than 5 mg/kg of dry matter). Nevertheless, starter-mediated sausages made from poorer-quality raw materials showed much higher amine contents (308, 223, and 36 mg/kg of dry matter of cadaverine, tyramine, and putrescine, respectively), which were only slightly lower than those of the spontaneously fermented sausages made from the same raw materials. The relatively high bacterial numbers of raw materials of poorer-hygienic quality diminished the beneficial effect of the starter strain. Therefore, the effectiveness of the starter was strongly dependent on the hygienic quality of the raw materials used.

  3. Scope insensitivity in helping decisions: Is it a matter of culture and values?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Tehila; Slovic, Paul; Västfjäll, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    The singularity effect of identifiable victims refers to people's greater willingness to help a single concrete victim compared with a group of victims experiencing the same need. We present 3 studies exploring values and cultural sources of this effect. In the first study, the singularity effect was found only among Western Israelis and not among Bedouin participants (a more collectivist group). In Study 2, individuals with higher collectivist values were more likely to contribute to a group of victims. Finally, the third study demonstrates a more causal relationship between collectivist values and the singularity effect by showing that enhancing people's collectivist values using a priming manipulation produces similar donations to single victims and groups. Moreover, participants' collectivist preferences mediated the interaction between the priming conditions and singularity of the recipient. Implications for several areas of psychology and ways to enhance caring for groups in need are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Hydration of Biodentine, Theracal LC, and a prototype tricalcium silicate-based dentin replacement material after pulp capping in entire tooth cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Josette; Laurent, Patrick; About, Imad

    2014-11-01

    The calcium-releasing ability of pulp-capping materials induces pulp tissue regeneration. Tricalcium silicate-based materials produce calcium hydroxide as a by-product of hydration. Assessment of hydration and calcium ion leaching is usually performed on samples that have been aged in physiological solution for a predetermined period of time. The hydration and activity of the materials in vivo may not be similar to those displayed in vitro because of insufficient fluid available in contact with dentin. The aim of this research was the assessment of hydration of Biodentine, Theracal LC, and a prototype radiopacified tricalcium silicate-based material after pulp capping and to compare it with direct hydration in an aqueous solution. The extent of hydration of Biodentine, Theracal LC, and a prototype radiopacified tricalcium silicate-based material with a similar composition to Biodentine but not incorporating the additives was assessed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy of polished specimens after being allowed to hydrate in Hank's balanced salt solution for 14 days. The extent of hydration was compared with material hydration when used as direct pulp capping materials by using a tooth culture model. Material activity was also assessed by x-ray diffraction analysis to investigate the deposition of calcium hydroxide by the materials, and calcium ion leaching in Hank's balanced salt solution was assessed by ion chromatography. Biodentine and the prototype tricalcium silicate cement hydrated and reaction by-products were deposited in the cement matrix both after pulp capping and when incubated in an aqueous solution. Calcium hydroxide was formed, and calcium ions were leached in solution. Theracal LC hydration was incomplete because of the limited moisture diffusion within the material. Thus, no calcium hydroxide was produced, and a lower calcium ion leaching was recorded. Theracal LC had a heterogeneous structure with large unhydrated

  5. Dr. Hans Chang, Director, Physics Research Committee, Stichting voor Fundamenteel Onderzoek der Materie (FOM), Dr. Joris Van Enst, Head of Science Policy Division, Ministry of Education, Culture and S cience, Dr. Jan Bezemer, NL Delegate CERN, Netherlands

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Hans Chang, Director, Physics Research Committee, Stichting voor Fundamenteel Onderzoek der Materie (FOM), Dr. Joris Van Enst, Head of Science Policy Division, Ministry of Education, Culture and S cience, Dr. Jan Bezemer, NL Delegate CERN, Netherlands

  6. Osteoblast integration of dental implant materials after challenge by sub-gingival pathogens : a co-culture study in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Bingran; van der Mei, Henny C; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Busscher, Henk J; Ren, Yijin

    2015-01-01

    Sub-gingival anaerobic pathogens can colonize an implant surface to compromise osseointegration of dental implants once the soft tissue seal around the neck of an implant is broken. In vitro evaluations of implant materials are usually done in monoculture studies involving either tissue integration

  7. LOCAL CULTURE STORIES AS ALTERNATIVE READING MATERIALS FOR STUDENTS (A CONTEXTUAL TEACHING AND LEARNING FOR HIGH AND LOW INTEREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Fitri Al Amin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the effectiveness of contextual learning using local culture based stories to improve the skill in reading comprehension especially for narrative texts for students with higher and lower interest in MTs Nahdlatul Muslimin Kudus. The study was conducted using factorial design with two research groups and two control groups. The participants of this study were two classes. The number of subjects was 30 in a class. The data were collected by using a pretest and a posttest. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS was used for analyzing the tabulated data. The result shows that there was a significance improvement between pretest and posttest in both control and experimental group with the level of significance 0.000. This means both methods are effective in improving the students’ reading skills both for the students with higher and lower interest. The analysis of covariance shows that there was no significant interaction between the contextual learning using local and non-local culture based stories, students’ interest, and reading comprehension skills with the level of significance 0.380.

  8. A novel co-culture model of murine K12 osteosarcoma cells and S. aureus on common orthopedic implant materials: 'the race to the surface' studied in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConda, David B; Karnes, Jonathan M; Hamza, Therwa; Lindsey, Brock A

    2016-07-01

    Infection is a major cause of orthopedic implant failure. There are few studies assessing both tissue cell and bacterial adherence on common orthopedic implant materials in a co-culture environment. An in vitro co-culture model was created using K12 osteosarcoma cells and Staphylococcus aureus in a medium incubated over metal disks for 48 h. The results showed that, in the presence of S. aureus, there were fewer osteosarcoma cells attached to the disks for all substrata tested. There were significantly more osteosarcoma cells adhering to the cobalt chrome than the stainless steel and titanium disks. Overall, in the presence of osteosarcoma cells, there were more bacteria adhering to the disks for all the substrata tested, with significantly more bacteria adhering to the stainless steel disks compared to cobalt chrome and titanium disks. Scanning electron microscopy verified that osteosarcoma cells and bacteria were adherent to the metal disks after incubation for 48 h. Furthermore, the observation that more bacteria were in the co-culture than in the control sample suggests that the osteosarcoma cells serve as a nutrient source for the bacteria. Future models assessing the interaction of osteogenic cells with bacteria on a substratum would be improved if the model accounted for the role of the immune system in secondary bone healing.

  9. Development and testing of culturally sensitive patient information material for Turkish, Polish, Russian and Italian migrants with depression or chronic low back pain (KULTINFO): study protocol for a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzel, Lars P; Ries, Zivile; Zill, Jördis M; Kriston, Levente; Dirmaier, Jörg; Härter, Martin; Bermejo, Isaac

    2014-07-04

    Many of the approximately 15 million people with a migration background living in Germany (19% of the population) are inadequately reached by existing healthcare provision. In the literature, the necessity for cultural adaptation of information material for patients with a migration background is often cited as a measure for improving healthcare.In this study, culturally sensitive information material will be developed and evaluated for patients with a migration background and depression or chronic low back pain. In this respect, it will be examined whether culturally sensitive information material is judged as more useful by the patients than standard translated patient information without cultural adaptation. The implementation and evaluation of culturally sensitive patient information material will occur in the framework of a double-blind randomized controlled parallel-group study in four study centres in Germany. Primary care patients with a Turkish, Polish, Russian or Italian migration background with a diagnosis of depressive disorder or chronic low back pain will be included and randomly allocated to the intervention group or the control group. In the intervention group, culturally sensitive patient information will be handed to the patient at the end of the physician consultation, while in the control group, standard translated patient information material will be provided. The patients will be surveyed by means of questionnaires following the consultation as well as after 8 weeks and 6 months. In addition to the primary outcome (subjective usefulness), several patient- and physician-rated secondary outcomes will be considered. The study will provide an empirical answer to the question of whether persons with a migration background perceive culturally sensitive patient information material as more useful than translated information material without cultural adaptation. Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien (DRKS-ID) DRKS00004241 and Universal Trial Number

  10. Conservation study of the stone material used in the Culture House of Almirante Oquendo, in San Sebastian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Maribona, L.

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The historical heritage of our country is mainly made up of masonry, playing the sandstones an important role. However, because of the effect of environmental conditions and pollution, these materials can loose their cement, and eventually disintegrate. Chemical consolidants can be applied in order to prevent and stop these decay process, which, when there is a lack of cement, fix the stone grains, enhancing the strength and durability of the In order to ensure the success of the application of these products in restoration works, preliminary studies should he carried out, so as to define the suitability of their use, and select the most appropriate consolidant for each specific case, as the reliability of these products is mainly determined by the microstructure of the stone material under study. This paper describes a study which was carried out on Igueldo sandstone from the main façade of the Casa de Cultura del Almirante Oquendo, in San Sebastian, which aimed at establishing the most suitable consolidation technique for the stone degradation processes observed. Firstly, the study dealt with the diagnosis of the pathologies which affected the stone from this building. Furthermore, 6 commercial consolidants were tested on quarry stone. Finally, the results were validated applying these products in real work conditions, what enabled us to select the most appropriate treatment for the restoration of the main façade of the building.

    El Patrimonio Histórico-Artístico de nuestro país, está constituido, principalmente, por edificios de piedra de sillería, en los que las areniscas juegan un papel muy importante. Sin embargo, debido, fundamentalmente, a las condiciones medioambientales y a la contaminación, estos materiales pueden perder su matriz cementante y sufrir una desintegración. Para prevenir y frenar estos fenómenos de deterioro, se pueden emplear productos consolidantes que, en ausencia de matriz cementante, fijan los

  11. Prendas-Ngangas-Enquisos: turbulence and the influence of the dead in Cuban-Kongo material culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Todd Ramón

    2010-01-01

    Cuban-Kongo praise of the dead in Havana turns insistently around complex agglomerations of materials called "prendas,"ngangas," and "enquisos." This article addresses the ontological status of "prendas-ngangas-enquisos," which practitioners of Cuban-Kongo affliction practices care for as entities that determine the very possibility of their healing and harming craft. Cuban-Kongo societies of affliction, in Havana collectively referred to as "Palo," stake their claim to influence others in and through these entities. In this essay I seek to position the influence generated in prendas-ngangas-enquisos as a problem for Euro-American materialism, to be addressed not through symbolic or representational solutions but, rather, by refocusing the problem itself via alternate distributions of its epistemological, historical, and ethnographic elements. Contextualized within ethnographic description, I first propose that prendas-ngangas-enquisos do not conform to dialectical logic, and should thus be positioned conceptually as something other than "objects" or "fetishes." From there, I consider Creole turns on the term prenda and explore scholarly accounts of 19th-century Cuban slavery and manumission, which I place alongside what is known about pawn slavery among BaKongo people prior to and during the Atlantic slave trade. Having established a basic series of conceptual and historiographic coordinates, I then suggest ethnographically how prendas-ngangas-enquisos come to command others, thereby guaranteeing Cuban-Kongo healing and harming sovereignty in Cuba today.

  12. Deacetylation of Chitosan: Material Characterization and in vitro Evaluation via Albumin Adsorption and Pre-Osteoblastic Cell Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel D. Bumgardner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Degree of deacetylation (DDA and molecular weight (MW of chitosans are important to their physical and biological properties. In this study, two chitosans, HS (DDA = 73.3% and AT (DDA = 76.8%, were deacetylated with 45% sodium hydroxide under nitrogen atmosphere at 80 °C or 90 °C for up to 120 min, to obtain two series of chitosans. The polymers produced were characterized for MW by gel permeation chromatography, DDA by titration and UV-vis methods, and crystallinity, hydrophilicity and thermal stability by X-ray diffraction, water contact angle and differential scanning calorimetry respectively. Films, made by solution casting in dilute acetic acid at ambient conditions, were evaluated for biological activity by albumin adsorption and the attachment and growth of a pre-osteoblast cell line. Chitosans with between 80–93% DDA’s (based on titration were reproducibly obtained. Even though deacetylation under nitrogen was supposed to limit chain degradation during decetylation, MW decreased (by maximum of 37.4% of HS and 63.0% for AT with increasing deacetylation reaction time and temperature. Crystallinity and decomposition temperature increased and water contact angles decreased with processing to increase DDA. Significantly less albumin was absorbed on films made with 93% DDA chitosans as compared with the original materials and the AT chitosans absorbed less than the HS chitosans. The cells on higher DDA chitosan films grew faster than those on lower DDA films. In conclusion, processing conditions increased DDA and influenced physicochemical and biological properties. However, additional studies are needed to unambiguously determine the influence of DDA or MW on in vitro and in vivo performance of chitosan materials for bone/implant applications.

  13. Ecstatic things

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    This article addresses the orchestration of domestic lighting as an object of anthropological study. It takes Bedouin domestic architecture in southern Jordan as a starting point in an analysis of how light is used as means of safeguarding spaces as part of hospitality practices central to Bedouin...... is analyzed through the notion of “atmosphere” as a contemporaneity of subjective emotions, cultural ideals, and material phenomena. Thus, while boundaries between interior and exterior may be upheld by tangible material strategies, such as walls, these boundaries may also simultaneously be permeated...

  14. Development of X-ray Fluorescence Quantitative Methodologies To Analyze Aqueous and Acid Extracts from Building Materials Belonging to Cultural Heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Florentino, Cristina; Maguregui, Maite; Marguí, Eva; Queralt, Ignasi; Carrero, Jose Antonio; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2017-04-04

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (ED-XRF) is widely used in art and cultural heritage for direct measurements and elemental quantification of solid samples. However, in the literature there are not works dealing with the quantitative application of ED-XRF to liquid extracts coming from samples belonging to cultural heritage. In this work, a novel methodology based on the use of ED-XRF spectrometry after thin film deposition on special sample retainers and a subsequent evaporation was developed to quantify light elements (Z ≤ 20) in aqueous extracts and heavy elements (Z > 20) in acid extracts, coming from materials and degradation products belonging to built heritage (mortars, black crusts, and calcium carbonate formations). For this purpose, special sample retainers were used instead of more common adsorbent filter papers. Three different ED-XRF calibration methodologies were designed as elemental quantification tools and "green chemistry" alternatives to conventional techniques. On the one hand, the developed external ED-XRF calibration methodology for elements with Z ≤ 20 was proposed as an alternative to ion chromatography to obtain information about the degradation processes that the building materials suffered. On the other hand, the external ED-XRF calibration for elements with Z > 20 in acid extracts was optimized as a faster and cleaner quantification alternative to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Finally, with the aim to reduce the matrix effect and to improve the quantitative results for elements with Z > 20 in acid extracts, a novel ED-XRF calibration methodology based on standard additions was successfully designed and applied to real samples belonging to built heritage.

  15. Elemental images of Spain in 18th Century French culture: from material culture to public opinion Imagenes elementales de España en la cultura francesa del siglo XVIII: de la cultura material a la opinión pública Images elementaires de l’Espagne dans la culture française du XVIIIème siècle: de la culture materielle à l’opinion publique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel-Henri PAGEAUX

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to illustrate certain possibilities of adaptation of literary studies to the field of «material history» as defined in the work of Fernand Braudel («material civilization» and particularly Jean-Marie Pesez in the collective work coordinated by J. Le Goff, La nouvelle histoire (1998. It thus traces, with commentary, certain elemental images of Spain (plants, fruit, wool, horses, wine, not to mention the symbolic product, gold that may have gone through a process of literaturization, but above all, of «socialization», in «literary» works and texts (ranging from the article in the Encyclopedie to the descriptive poetry so much in vogue during the Enlightenment. In spite of the fragmentation of the inquiry, a gradual reformulation of the essential bases of a «social imagery» is being made that should serve a broader study of (French «public opinion» when faced with a foreign culture (Spanish culture.Este trabajo pretende ejemplificar unas posibilidades de adaptación del estudio literario al campo de la «historia material» tal como lo han definido los trabajos de Fernand Braudel («civilización material» y sobre todo Jean-Marie Pesez en la obra colectiva coordinada por J. Le Goff, La nouvelle histoire (1988. Se trata pues de rastrear comentándolas unas pocas imágenes elementales de España (plantas, fruta, lana, caballo, vino, sin olvidar el producto símbolo el oro que han podido pasar por un proceso de literaturización pero ante todo de «socialización» en obras y textos «literarios» (desde el artículo de la Encyclopedie a la poesía descriptiva que tanto fue de moda durante la Ilustración. A pesar de lo fragmentario de las encuestas, se van reformulando las bases esenciales de un «imaginario social» que ha de servir a un estudio más amplio de la «opinión pública» (francesa frente a una cultura extranjera (la española.Cet article vise à illustrer certaines possibilités d'adaptation des

  16. Ethno-cultural origins, health beliefs and mothers' behavior regarding infant vaccinations in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarid, O; Shraga, Y; Cwikel, J; Reuveni, H

    2018-03-26

    To compare the health beliefs and infant vaccination behavior of mothers of four different ethno-cultural backgrounds: Israeli-born Jewish and Arab-Bedouin and immigrants from the Former Soviet Union and Ethiopia; to examine the associations between initial and subsequent infant vaccination behaviors of mothers and to identify predictors of vaccination behaviors. A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted in selected community neighborhoods. A quota sample included 100 mothers with infants aged 18-24 months (N = 400) from each of the four ethno-cultural groups. Data were collected through questionnaires and examination of the infant vaccination cards. Both groups of immigrant mothers had the lowest adherence to the recommended vaccination regime. Our findings indicate that maternal behaviors regarding infant vaccinations were determined mainly by the behavior at the previous recommended vaccination stage. Different ethno-cultural groups presented different sociodemographic predictors of vaccination behaviors. These predictors only affected the vaccinations at the early stage of 2 months. Policy makers should be aware that mother's vaccination behaviors vary according to ethno-cultural groups to establish culturally tailored intervention programs.

  17. Symbolic Communication: Reading Material Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayre, Shay

    1993-01-01

    Presents a multipart exercise developed to facilitate a semiotic approach for teachers of journalism courses concerned with feature writing and photography, in advertising copywriting classes, and for public relations projects involved with image development. Notes that the lessons for each sequence are based upon a process of discovery through a…

  18. Are osseous artefacts a window to perishable material culture? Implications of an unusually complex bone tool from the Late Pleistocene of East Timor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, S; Robertson, G; Aplin, K P

    2014-02-01

    We report the discovery of an unusually complex and regionally unique bone artefact in a Late Pleistocene archaeological assemblage (c. 35 ka [thousands of years ago]) from the site of Matja Kuru 2 on the island of Timor, in Wallacea. The artefact is interpreted as the broken butt of a formerly hafted projectile point, and it preserves evidence of a complex hafting mechanism including insertion into a shaped or split shaft, a complex pattern of binding including lateral stabilization of the cordage within a bilateral series of notches, and the application of mastic at several stages in the hafting process. The artefact provides the earliest direct evidence for the use of this combination of hafting technologies in the wider region of Southeast Asia, Wallacea, Melanesia and Australasia, and is morphologically unparallelled in deposits of any age. By contrast, it bears a close morphological resemblance to certain bone artefacts from the Middle Stone Age of Africa and South Asia. Examination of ethnographic projectile technology from the region of Melanesia and Australasia shows that all of the technological elements observed in the Matja Kuru 2 artefact were in use historically in the region, including the unusual feature of bilateral notching to stabilize a hafted point. This artefact challenges the notion that complex bone-working and hafting technologies were a relatively late innovation in this part of the world. Moreover, its regional uniqueness encourages us to abandon the perception of bone artefacts as a discrete class of material culture, and to adopt a new interpretative framework in which they are treated as manifestations of a more general class of artefacts that more typically were produced on perishable raw materials including wood. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. DESCRIPTION OF TWO NEW MONOECIOUS SPECIES OF VOLVOX SECT. VOLVOX (VOLVOCACEAE, CHLOROPHYCEAE), BASED ON COMPARATIVE MORPHOLOGY AND MOLECULAR PHYLOGENY OF CULTURED MATERIAL(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaka, Nanako; Kawai-Toyooka, Hiroko; Matsuzaki, Ryo; Nakada, Takashi; Nozaki, Hisayoshi

    2012-06-01

    Species of Volvox sect. Volvox (Volvocaceae, Chlorophyceae) are unique because they have thick cytoplasmic bridges between somatic cells and spiny-walled zygotes. This section is taxonomically important because the genus Volvox is polyphyletic. However, taxonomic studies of species in Volvox sect. Volvox have not been carried out on cultured material. Here, we performed a taxonomic study of monoecious species of Volvox sect. Volvox based on the comparative morphology and molecular phylogeny of chloroplast genes and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nuclear rDNA using various strains originating from Japan and two preserved strains from the USA. The strains were clearly divided into four species, V. globator L., V. barberi W. Shaw, V. kirkiorum sp. nov., and V. ferrisii sp. nov., on the basis of differences in numbers of zygotes (eggs) in the sexual spheroids, form of zygote wall, and somatic cell shape. Sequences for ITS of nuclear rDNA resolved that the two new species have phylogenetic positions separated from V. globator, V. barberi, V. capensis F. Rich et Pocock, and V. rousseletii G. S. West UTEX 1862 within Volvox sect. Volvox. © 2012 Phycological Society of America.

  20. Using in situ nanocellulose-coating technology based on dynamic bacterial cultures for upgrading conventional biomedical materials and reinforcing nanocellulose hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Qingsong; Jönsson, Leif J; Hong, Feng F

    2016-07-08

    Bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) is a microbial nanofibrillar hydrogel with many potential applications. Its use is largely restricted by insufficient strength when in a highly swollen state and by inefficient production using static cultivation. In this study, an in situ nanocellulose-coating technology created a fabric-frame reinforced nanocomposite of BNC hydrogel with superior strength but retained BNC native attributes. By using the proposed technology, production time could be reduced from 10 to 3 days to obtain a desirable hydrogel sheet with approximately the same thickness. This novel technology is easier to scale up and is more suitable for industrial-scale manufacture. The mechanical properties (tensile strength, suture retention strength) and gel characteristics (water holding, absorption and wicking ability) of the fabric-reinforced BNC hydrogel were investigated and compared with those of ordinary BNC hydrogel sheets. The results reveal that the fabric-reinforced BNC hydrogel was equivalent with regard to gel characteristics, and exhibited a qualitative improvement with regard to its mechanical properties. For more advanced applications, coating technology via dynamic bacterial cultures could be used to upgrade conventional biomedical fabrics, i.e. medical cotton gauze or other mesh materials, with nanocellulose. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1077-1084, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  1. Extending Cultural Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riecken, Ted J.; Court, Deborah

    1992-01-01

    Advocates defining cultural literacy to recognize the mass media's role in transmitting and maintaining cultural stereotypes and shaping values and beliefs. Distinguishes between ideational and material aspects of culture. Advocates teaching critical thinking and respect for persons in light of questionable moral perspectives in certain media…

  2. Joseph E. Suzanne, Fertile Bonds. Bedouin class, kinship and gender in the Bekaa Valley, University Press of Florida, 2013, 233 p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Van Aken

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The importance of kinship ties and their idiom in marginalized communities in the Middle East and elsewhere is a focal theme in anthropological literature. Reinventing bonds and their symbolical and material meaning in everyday life has been historically one of the main neglected issues in understanding poverty, local coping strategies, class formation and policy making. This is even more true of pastoral communities, which tend to be relegated in social studies to the “traditional” conservat...

  3. Transformation of Manor of the Nobility in Russian Culture-Historical space of 18th –19th Centuries (Materials of Chernozem Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjyana V. Kovaleva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a manor of the nobility phenomenon as part of the Chernozem region cultural space in XVIII–XIX centuries, its forming and development factors and the country estate landscape components. The household, economic and cultural characteristics of the manors in the Central Black Soil region are examined as well as their importance for the region development. The manor landscape is described as the wholeness of natural and cultural origins. The paper generalizes it as the best achievements of Russian and Western European cultures and a synthesis of urban and rural lifestyles.

  4. IAEA/SiP senior managers workshop on international promotion of safety culture for the NPPs with RBMK reactors. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The IAEA/SiP Senior Managers Workshop on International Promotion of Safety Culture for the NPPs with RMBK reactors was organized in the frame of the IAEA Technical Cooperation Regional Project RER/9/035 and the IAEA Extrabudgetary Project on WWER and RBMK Safety in co-operation with Swedish International Project Nuclear Safety (SiP). It took place at the Forsmark NPP, Sweden, from 1 to 4 October 1996. The objectives of the workshop were to provide a forum for senior managers to exchange national and international experience on factors influencing safety culture, to better understand these factors and to further enhance promotion of safety culture. Twenty-three specialists participated in the workshop from six countries (Canada, Lithuania, Russian Federation, Sweden, Ukraine and USA) and from two international organizations (WANO, EC-G24 coordination). Participants were from regulatory bodies, ministries and operational organizations of respective countries. The INSAG-4 definition of safety culture was taken as a starting point for the discussions, but at the start of the workshop participants did not seem to have the same understanding of what is contained in the safety culture context. Specifically the difference between measures taken to improve safety and establishing a proper safety culture level was discussed with useful results. Some participants proposed quantitative safety culture indicators, but there was no agreement at this stage about how to define them. Refs

  5. MATERIAL CULTURE OBJECTS IN THE EPICS OF DEDE KORKUT AND ÂŞIK GARIP FOLK ROMANCE / DEDE KORKUT HİKÂYELERİ VE ÂŞIK GARİP HİKÂYESİ’NDE YER ALAN MADDİ KÜLTÜR ÜRÜNLERİ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Süheyla SARITAŞ

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt that the epic of Dede Korkut is one of the most popular Turkish folklore topics studied by Turkish folklorists. The book itself, which consists of twelve narratives, is considered as a bridge between the epic and the folk romance tradition, one of the most important cultural heritages of the Turks. Moreover, it contains spiritual and material cultural objects, important for the social and cultural life of the Turks. Similarly, a scholar comes across material cultural objects belonging to the Turkish culture in folk romances, created after the epic of Dede Korkut. In this article, in order to emphasize the changes in the social and cultural Turkish lives, I will be investigating the material cultural objects comparatively in the Book of Dede Korkut and Âşık Garip, a well-known folk romance which has an important place in the Turkish folk romance tradition.

  6. Geomorphological Insights on Human-Volcano Interactions and Use of Volcanic Materials in Pre-Hispanic Cultures of Costa Rica through the Holocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Ruiz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Critical Zones (CZ in tropical environments, especially near active volcanoes, are rich in resources such as water, food, and construction materials. In Central America, people have lived near volcanic centers for thousands of years and learned to take advantage of these resources. Understanding how pre-Hispanic societies lived in this type of CZs and interacted with volcanoes, provides us with insights on how to reduce the negative impact derived from volcanic activity in modern cities. In this multidisciplinary approach we focus on two case studies in Costa Rica near Poás and Turrialba volcanoes, which are currently active, in order to obtain a comprehensive view of human-volcano interactions through time. We use a methodology based on historical accounts, geological and archeological fieldwork, geomorphological characterization based on remote sensing techniques and past (pre-Hispanic, and present land use analysis. The northern Poás region represents a case of a poorly developed pre-Hispanic society, which subsisted mainly on hunting and gathering activities, had no permanent settlements and was probably affected by the activity of the Hule and Río Cuarto maars. In spite of their vulnerability and lack of infrastructure, they used geomorphology to their advantage, achieving natural protection. Conversely, the Guayabo National Monument (GNM near Turrialba Volcano represents a cultural peak in pre-Hispanic societies in Costa Rica. Archeological remains and structures at this site indicate that this society had a good understanding of physical and geological processes and was therefore able to take advantage of natural resources for water and food supply, construction, and protection as well as hazard prevention and mitigation. The use of new technologies, some accessible and low-cost such as Google Earth and others with restricted access and higher costs such as LiDAR, allowed us to complete a rapid and efficient characterization of land

  7. Negotiating Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel

    of architecture, the social use of luminosity, prophylactic items, saint veneration, Qur'anic items, and heritage production. The thesis challenges the preoccupation with "meaning" in material culture studies, by focusing on conceptualizations of "presence" and "absence" as equally important to protective...... strategies are confirming their efficacy, and act as material anchors for negotiating Bedouin identities in response to a rapid transformation from nomadic pastoralists to sedentary wageworkers. The tensions surrounding the materiality of protection, along with the role of the past in the present is further...... investigated through the contested public representations of Ammarin culture, along with a detailed study of the process leading to the protection of Bedouin culture by UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage. The overall conclusion of this research is that negotiating efficacious protection against perceived...

  8. Fecal culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... parasites exam Alternative Names Stool culture; Culture - stool; Gastroenteritis fecal culture Images Salmonella typhi organism Yersinia enterocolitica organism Campylobacter jejuni organism Clostridium difficile organism References Beavis, KG, ...

  9. Culture and social class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yuri

    2017-12-01

    A large body of research in Western cultures has demonstrated the psychological and health effects of social class. This review outlines a cultural psychological approach to social stratification by comparing psychological and health manifestations of social class across Western and East Asian cultures. These comparisons suggest that cultural meaning systems shape how people make meaning and respond to material/structural conditions associated with social class, thereby leading to culturally divergent manifestations of social class. Specifically, unlike their counterparts in Western cultures, individuals of high social class in East Asian cultures tend to show high conformity and other-orientated psychological attributes. In addition, cultures differ in how social class impacts health (i.e. on which bases, through which pathways, and to what extent). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Present and future role of ion beam analysis in the study of cultural heritage materials: The example of the AGLAE facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomon, J.; Dran, J.-C.; Guillou, T.; Moignard, B.; Pichon, L.; Walter, P.; Mathis, F.

    2008-01-01

    The application of IBA to cultural heritage mostly relies on the use of PIXE because of its high sensitivity and its ease of implementation at atmospheric pressure. The need for depth information not easily available with this technique has conducted to associate RBS also in external beam mode. We have progressively developed a set-up that permits such a combination of techniques either simultaneously or sequentially. The set-up is currently further improved to permit NRA measurement (depth profiles of light elements) in addition to PIXE and RBS. The coupling of all these techniques provides a wealth of information on cultural heritage objects, not easily attainable with any other single method

  11. Bacterial cell culture

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    ### Materials 1. Glass culture tubes with metal caps and labels - Growth medium, from media room or customized - Glass pipette tubes - Parafilm ### Equipment 1. Vortexer - Fireboy or Bunsen burner - Motorized pipette - Micropipettes and sterile tips ### Procedure For a typical liquid culture, use 5 ml of appropriate medium. The amount in each tube does not have to be exact if you are just trying to culture cells for their precious DNA. 1. Streak an a...

  12. Some aspects of financing physical culture and sport organizations in the USSR at the regional level in the early fifties (on materials of the Penza region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koroleva Larisa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the funding mechanism of the Soviet organizations of mass physical culture and sports in the early 1950s on the example of the Penza area: the defects in estimating of expensesin of sports events, incorrect registration of financial documents – acts, business trip certificates, etc., wrong payment of work of judges and coaches, etc.

  13. Comparison of ex vivo harvested and in vitro cultured materials from Echinococcus granulosus by measuring expression levels of five genes putatively involved in the development and maturation of adult worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezaki, Ebrahim Saedi; Yaghoubi, Mohammad Mehdi; Spiliotis, Markus; Boubaker, Ghalia; Taheri, Elham; Almani, Pooya Ghaseminejad; Tohidi, Farideh; Harandi, Majid Fasihi; Gottstein, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    Parts of the natural life cycle of Echinococcus granulosus can be retraced in vitro such as the development of protoscoleces into semiadult worms with three or more proglottids, or the redifferentiation of in vitro cultured protoscoleces into metacestode-like cystic structures. Most in vitro generated samples share-at the microscopical level-high similarities with those naturally grown, but developmental differences have also been documented, such as missing egg production in in vitro grown adults or unusual bladder/vesicle formation in protoscoleces cultured into the metacestode direction. The aim of the present study was to explore how far different in vitro generated stage-specific materials/structures match the natural situation on the transcriptome level, based on testing five exemplarily chosen different genes: the frizzled receptor eg-fz4 (posterior marker), the FGF receptor-like factor eg-fgfrl (anterior association), the cell differentiation protein eg-rcd1 (part of the CCR4-NOT complex, a key regulator of eukaryotic gene expression), the rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma serin/threonin kinase eg-braf (part of the MAPK pathway involved, e.g., in EGF signaling) and the co-smad eg-smadD (downstream factor of TGFβ/BMP2/activin signaling). These genes-tested via qPCR-were selected such as to allow a discussion on their potential role in the development of E. granulosus into the adult stage. Thus, testing took place with three ex vivo isolated samples, namely (i) egg-containing adult worms, (ii) invaginated protoscoleces, and (iii) protoscolex-free germinal layer tissue. Respective data were compared (a) with in vitro generated metacestode-like microcysts developed from protoscolices, and (b) different development stages of protoscoleces in vitro cultured toward adult maturation. As a finding, only eg-smadD and partially eg-fz4 showed high expression similarities between ex vivo harvested and in vitro cultured E. granulosus, thus suggesting a putative role in

  14. Perfusion based cell culture chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Arto; Emnéus, Jenny; Dufva, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Performing cell culture in miniaturized perfusion chambers gives possibilities to experiment with cells under near in vivo like conditions. In contrast to traditional batch cultures, miniaturized perfusion systems provide precise control of medium composition, long term unattended cultures...... and tissue like structuring of the cultures. However, as this chapter illustrates, many issues remain to be identified regarding perfusion cell culture such as design, material choice and how to use these systems before they will be widespread amongst biomedical researchers....

  15. Material Imagination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    2018-01-01

    As a mass medium of modern culture, design sets the frame for human imaginative interaction with the world. In its many appearances, design can be seen as kind of material imagination where concepts and sensual appearances meet in different constellations. In this process something is made present...... as the product of a series of constructive factors related to schematization. Second, I discuss in two examples of design, how these factors operate and how the process of imagination is conditioned by the specific materiality of the design....

  16. The impact of Cu treatment on phenolic and polyamine levels in plant material regenerated from embryos obtained in anther culture of carrot

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Górecka, K.; Cvikrová, Milena; Kowalska, U.; Eder, Josef; Szafrańska, K.; Górecki, R.; Janas, K. M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2007), s. 54-61 ISSN 0981-9428 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P05OC052 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : carrot culture * copper ions * embryo regeneration Subject RIV: GE - Plant Breeding Impact factor: 1.669, year: 2007

  17. In vitro evaluation of long-term cytotoxic response of injection-molded polyamide and polymethyle metacrylate denture base materials on primary fibroblast cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Ismail Hakki; Tatar, Abdulgani; Hacimuftuoglu, Ahmet; Saruhan, Fatih; Bayindir, Funda

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the long-term cytotoxic response of thermoplastic polyamide and conventional polymethyle metacrylate (PMMA) denture base materials. Twenty discs were prepared for each polyamide, heat and cold cured PMMA denture base resins (totally 60) and divided into four sub-groups (n = 5). Cytotoxicity was assessed with the direct cell contact method using cell viability and neutral red (NR) uptake assay. Each sub-group was tested at initial and after being aged for 24 h, 1 week and 8 weeks with artificial saliva according to ISO 10993 standards. There were no significantly difference among the materials and control groups after initial, 24 h and 1 week testing. In 24 h testing, only Deflex was more toxic according to the Control group (p denture base materials increased significantly after the long-term aging. Therefore, long-term aging may be useful to determine a dental material's toxicity. Polyamide denture base material had a similar toxicity profile with conventional heat- and cold-cured PMMA.

  18. Doing Cultural Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    du Gay, Paul; Hall, Stuart; Janes, Linda

    What does the Walkman have to do with the 21st century? The long-awaited second edition of this classic textbook takes students on a journey between past and present, giving them the skills do to cultural analysis along the way. Through the notion of the 'circuit of culture', this book teaches...... to the past - unpack the key concepts of contemporary culture, such as mobility and materiality - look with fresh eyes at today's media world and the cultural practices it gives rise to - practice their critical skills with up-to-date exercises and activities This book remains the perfect 'how to...

  19. Philosophy in Dialogue with Culture through Hermeneutics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Man as a product of the society is a bye-product of culture; and man also uses culture as material in the quest to live well and understand the environment and the world around him. This interplay accentuates the correlation between man and culture. Due to the critical role culture plays for man, culture as a dynamic scheme ...

  20. Urine culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture and sensitivity - urine ... when urinating. You also may have a urine culture after you have been treated for an infection. ... when bacteria or yeast are found in the culture. This likely means that you have a urinary ...

  1. Safeguards Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2012-07-01

    The concepts of nuclear safety and security culture are well established; however, a common understanding of safeguards culture is not internationally recognized. Supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, the authors prepared this report, an analysis of the concept of safeguards culture, and gauged its value to the safeguards community. The authors explored distinctions between safeguards culture, safeguards compliance, and safeguards performance, and evaluated synergies and differences between safeguards culture and safety/security culture. The report concludes with suggested next steps.

  2. On the role of the nomads in development of material culture of the Volga Bulgaria and the bulgarian ulus of the Golden Horde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin A. Rudenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Archaeological findings of the last decades (from 1970s till recently are used to examine ethnic and cultural interaction between the settled and the nomadic population, on the one hand, and different groups of nomads between themselves, on the other hand, in Volga Bulgaria and the Bulgarian Ulus of the Golden Horde. The study showed that the Turk- and Ugrian-speaking nomads were an important ethnic component of these state formations. At the same time, presence of nomads in the region and their influence on the culture of the settled Bulgarian population was different at different stages in history of the Volga Bulgaria. In pre-Mongol time, the nomads would use peripheries of the Bulgarian state, while the settled Bulgarians and their nomadic neighbors would build their relations as “us – them”. During the Golden Horde time, the nomads started exploring central areas (the Turkic groups and eastern territories (the Ugrian groups, and thus the nomadic element, either autonomous or integrated, became a permanent element in the Bulgarian Ulus in the 13th – 14th centuries.

  3. Organizational Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian HUDREA

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Cultural orientations of an organization can be its greatest strength, providing the basis for problem solving, cooperation, and communication. Culture, however, can also inhibit needed changes. Cultural changes typically happen slowly – but without cultural change, many other organizational changes are doomed to fail. The dominant culture of an organization is a major contributor to its success. But, of course, no organizational culture is purely one type or another. And the existence of secondary cultures can provide the basis for change. Therefore, organizations need to understand the cultural environments and values.

  4. Sound as Popular Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    , physical, perceptual, and sensory processes that integrate a multitude of cultural traditions and forms of knowledge. The chapters discuss conceptual issues as well as terminologies and research methods; analyze historical and contemporary case studies of listening in various sound cultures; and consider......The wide-ranging texts in this book take as their premise the idea that sound is a subject through which popular culture can be analyzed in an innovative way. From an infant’s gurgles over a baby monitor to the roar of the crowd in a stadium to the sub-bass frequencies produced by sound systems...... in the disco era, sound—not necessarily aestheticized as music—is inextricably part of the many domains of popular culture. Expanding the view taken by many scholars of cultural studies, the contributors consider cultural practices concerning sound not merely as semiotic or signifying processes but as material...

  5. Sound as Popular Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The wide-ranging texts in this book take as their premise the idea that sound is a subject through which popular culture can be analyzed in an innovative way. From an infant’s gurgles over a baby monitor to the roar of the crowd in a stadium to the sub-bass frequencies produced by sound systems...... in the disco era, sound—not necessarily aestheticized as music—is inextricably part of the many domains of popular culture. Expanding the view taken by many scholars of cultural studies, the contributors consider cultural practices concerning sound not merely as semiotic or signifying processes but as material......, physical, perceptual, and sensory processes that integrate a multitude of cultural traditions and forms of knowledge. The chapters discuss conceptual issues as well as terminologies and research methods; analyze historical and contemporary case studies of listening in various sound cultures; and consider...

  6. Towards quantification of toxicity of lithium ion battery electrolytes - development and validation of a liquid-liquid extraction GC-MS method for the determination of organic carbonates in cell culture materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehlau, Jenny; Weber, Till; Lürenbaum, Constantin; Bornhorst, Julia; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Winter, Martin; Nowak, Sascha

    2017-10-01

    A novel method based on liquid-liquid extraction with subsequent gas chromatography separation and mass spectrometric detection (GC-MS) for the quantification of organic carbonates in cell culture materials is presented. Method parameters including the choice of extraction solvent, of extraction method and of extraction time were optimised and the method was validated. The setup allowed for determination within a linear range of more than two orders of magnitude. The limits of detection (LODs) were between 0.0002 and 0.002 mmol/L and the repeatability precisions were in the range of 1.5-12.9%. It could be shown that no matrix effects were present and recovery rates between 98 and 104% were achieved. The methodology was applied to cell culture models incubated with commercial lithium ion battery (LIB) electrolytes to gain more insight into the potential toxic effects of these compounds. The stability of the organic carbonates in cell culture medium after incubation was studied. In a porcine model of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier, it could be shown that a transfer of organic carbonates into the brain facing compartment took place. Graphical abstract Schematic setup for the investigation of toxicity of lithium ion battery electrolytes.

  7. Geomorphological Insights on Human-Volcano Interactions and Use of Volcanic Materials in Pre-Hispanic Cultures of Costa Rica through the Holocene

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Ruiz; Sara Mana; Amalia Gutiérrez; Gerardo Alarcón; José Garro; Gerardo J. Soto

    2018-01-01

    Critical Zones (CZ) in tropical environments, especially near active volcanoes, are rich in resources such as water, food, and construction materials. In Central America, people have lived near volcanic centers for thousands of years and learned to take advantage of these resources. Understanding how pre-Hispanic societies lived in this type of CZs and interacted with volcanoes, provides us with insights on how to reduce the negative impact derived from volcanic activity in modern cities. In ...

  8. Overview of security culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matulanya, M. A.

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear Security culture concept has been aggressively promoted over the past several years as a tool to improve the physical protection of the nuclear and radioactive materials due to growing threats of catastrophic terrorism and other new security challenges. It is obvious that, the scope of nuclear security and the associated cultures need to be extended beyond the traditional task of protecting weapons-usable materials. The role of IAEA is to strengthen the nuclear security framework globally and in leading the coordination of international activities in this field. Therefore all governments should work closely with the IAEA to take stronger measures to ensure the physical protection, the safety and security of the nuclear and radioactive materials. In the effort to reflect this new realities and concerns, the IAEA in 2008 came up with the document, the Nuclear Security Culture, Nuclear Security Series No. 7, Implementing Guide to the member states which urged every member state to take appropriate measures to promote security culture with respect to nuclear and radioactive materials. The document depicted this cultural approach as the way to protect individual, society and the environment. Among other things, the document defined nuclear security culture as characteristics and attitudes in organizations and of individuals which establishes that, nuclear security issues receives attention warranted by their significance. (au)

  9. Culture and psychiatric diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2013-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, neurobiologists and anthropologists have criticized the rigidity of its diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations, as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopathology. Experts in culture and mental health have responded to these criticisms by revising the very process of diagnosis for DSM-5. Specifically, the DSM-5 Cultural Issues Subgroup has recommended that concepts of culture be included more prominently in several areas: an introductory chapter on Cultural Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis - composed of a conceptual introduction, a revised Outline for Cultural Formulation, a Cultural Formulation Interview that operationalizes this Outline, and a glossary on cultural concepts of distress - as well as material directly related to culture that is incorporated into the description of each disorder. This chapter surveys these recommendations to demonstrate how culture and context interact with psychiatric diagnosis at multiple levels. A greater appreciation of the interplay between culture, context, and biology can help clinicians improve diagnostic and treatment planning. Copyright © 2013 APA*

  10. Culture matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Zeba

    Zebaa Arif reflects on changes during her career as a mental health nurse in relation to cultural care issues: Cultural awareness is becoming embedded in patient care. All aspects of care are influenced by cultural beliefs and should form part of assessment. Leadership is essential in influencing cultural care, as is organisational commitment.

  11. Cultural entrepreneurship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Klamer (Arjo)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCultural entrepreneurship is a new character in the cultural sector. This paper characterizes the cultural entrepreneur paying homage to the hermeneutic approach of Don Lavoie and others. The challenge is to render the "cultural" meaningful. An invention is the highlighting of the

  12. TECHNICAL CULTURE AND HUMAN AXJOSPHERE

    OpenAIRE

    ­Krystyna Chałas

    2014-01-01

    Technical culture is the value of each historical period. It is the subject of the ongoing development. While it is a value which is associated with different categories of values, mainly material, cognitive, social. Between culture and these three categories of values ​ there is a cognitive effect. Technical culture determines the quality of human axjosphere. The aim of this study is to show the relationships and dependencies between technical culture and the structures in which a person liv...

  13. Cultural Neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Daniel L.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2013-01-01

    Cultural neuroscience issues from the apparently incompatible combination of neuroscience and cultural psychology. A brief literature sampling suggests, instead, several preliminary topics that demonstrate proof of possibilities: cultural differences in both lower-level processes (e.g. perception, number representation) and higher-order processes (e.g. inferring others’ emotions, contemplating the self) are beginning to shed new light on both culture and cognition. Candidates for future cultural neuroscience research include cultural variations in the default (resting) network, which may be social; regulation and inhibition of feelings, thoughts, and actions; prejudice and dehumanization; and neural signatures of fundamental warmth and competence judgments. PMID:23874143

  14. Cultural management and government role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edalat Nemati

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Culture plays an important role on human lives and it has been in four ancient civilizations of China, Iran, Egypt and Greece. The civilization achievements are normally categorized in two different groups of material and immaterial. Practical experience of the material, social objective is called as a civilization and the mental aspect of spiritual experiences, spiritual and personal is called culture. The purpose of this research is to find a framework for cross-cultural management. First, we define the cultural planning and we review the existing cultural examples in Iranian society and try to provide an overall analysis. The paper also investigates the role of government on creating adaptive culture within the society and explains that government must act as leadership in creating value added culture.

  15. Culturing Protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Compares various nutrient media, growth conditions, and stock solutions used in culturing protozoa. A hay infusion in Chalkey's solution maintained at a stable temperature is recommended for producing the most dense and diverse cultures. (WB)

  16. Bile culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - bile ... is placed in a special dish called a culture medium to see if bacteria, viruses, or fungi ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Body fluid - anaerobic culture. In: ... . 6th ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:225-226. Kim AY, ...

  17. The use of paleo-imaging and microbiological testing in the analysis of antique cultural material: multislice tomography, and microbial analysis of the Trogir Cathedral cope hood depicting St. Martin and a beggar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavka, Mislav; Petaros, Anja; Kavur, Lovro; Skrlin, Jasenka; Mlinaric Missoni, Emilija; Jankovic, Ivor; Brkljacic, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Paleoradiology is the study of biological and other materials from archeological settings through the use of various medical imaging techniques. Although it is most often used in the scientific study of ancient human remains, it can also be used to study metals, ceramics, paper, and clothes. The aim of this study was to test two paleoimaging techniques (MSCT and mammography) in the analysis of an important Croatian liturgical vestment: the hood of a bishop's cope from St. Lawrence's Treasury in Trogir depicting St. Martin and a beggar. To ensure a safe environment for scientists participating in the analysis, a preliminary microbiological analysis was performed, which contributed to the database of microbiological flora found on Croatian archeological remains and relics studied to date. Due to a great amount of metal filaments, the paleoradiological analysis did not produce satisfactory results. However, a digitally enhanced image clearly showed fine metal embroidery of the hood that was not so easily perceived by naked eye. This article argues in favor of expanding paleoradiological studies on materials other than human remains and also of publishing unsatisfactory results, as important lessons for future development of techniques and methods to analyze ancient remains and seek answers about human historical and cultural heritage.

  18. The influence of materialism and ideal body internalization on body-dissatisfaction and body-shaping behaviors of young men and women: support for the Consumer Culture Impact Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guðnadóttir, Unnur; Garðarsdóttir, Ragna B

    2014-04-01

    Exposure to media images of the 'body-perfect' ideal has been partly blamed for the pursuit of thinness among women and muscularity among men. Research has largely overlooked the materialistic messages frequently associated with these images. We present findings from two studies with Icelandic students aged 18-21, one focusing on young women (n = 303) and one on young men (n = 226), which test associations of materialistic and body-perfect ideals with body dissatisfaction and excessive body shaping behaviors. In both studies, the internalization of materialistic values is strongly linked to the internalization of body-perfect ideals: the thin-ideal for young women, and the muscular-ideal for young men. A materialist value orientation also predicted body dissatisfaction in both studies, and was linked to body shaping behaviors, albeit differently for young women and men. Thus, the research identifies materialism as a further correlate of both body dissatisfaction and excessive body-shaping behaviors. The findings support Dittmar's (2008) Consumer Culture Impact Model, which proposes that the body-perfect and 'material good life' ideals jointly impact well-being. © 2014 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Cultural tourism and tourism cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    Presenting a comprehensive and dynamic understanding of cultural tourism, this volume examines cultural mediators and how they help tourists appreciate foreign cultures. It also shows how tourism experiences are strategically crafted by mediators, the complexity of the mediation process, and how...... various products are mediated differently. A number of different products are investigated, including destination brand identities, "living" cultures and everyday life, art and history. The author illustrates his arguments by comparing the tourism strategies of Copenhagen and Singapore, and demonstrates...

  20. Pop Culture Peeps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszewski, Julie; Fontes, Kris

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a classroom activity called Pop Culture Peep. In this particular activity, students are required to first research famous artists and/or famous artworks to have an image to use as a reference. Students then plan out how they would decorate the Peep, deciding what materials they would use to create the Peep in…

  1. Creating organizational cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouton, Nicolaas T.O.; Just, Sine Nørholm; Gabrielsen, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    insights. The authors propose an integrated perspective in which material practices and rhetorical strategies are seen as two analytical sides of the same ontological coin. This enables a fuller and more detailed explanation of how organizational cultures are created or changed. A brief illustration......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to re-conceptualize the relations between rhetorical strategies and material practices in the processes whereby leaders create or change organizational cultures. Design/methodology/approach – The authors compare and contrast two broad perspectives on cultural...... is provided of the merits of this approach by revisiting the case of Enron. Originality/value – The paper constitutes an initial exploration of how social scientific and rhetorical perspectives on organizational change may be brought closer together. It may provide the first step towards the development...

  2. Culture evolves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiten, Andrew; Hinde, Robert A.; Laland, Kevin N.; Stringer, Christopher B.

    2011-01-01

    Culture pervades human lives and has allowed our species to create niches all around the world and its oceans, in ways quite unlike any other primate. Indeed, our cultural nature appears so distinctive that it is often thought to separate humanity from the rest of nature and the Darwinian forces that shape it. A contrary view arises through the recent discoveries of a diverse range of disciplines, here brought together to illustrate the scope of a burgeoning field of cultural evolution and to facilitate cross-disciplinary fertilization. Each approach emphasizes important linkages between culture and evolutionary biology rather than quarantining one from the other. Recent studies reveal that processes important in cultural transmission are more widespread and significant across the animal kingdom than earlier recognized, with important implications for evolutionary theory. Recent archaeological discoveries have pushed back the origins of human culture to much more ancient times than traditionally thought. These developments suggest previously unidentified continuities between animal and human culture. A third new array of discoveries concerns the later diversification of human cultures, where the operations of Darwinian-like processes are identified, in part, through scientific methods borrowed from biology. Finally, surprising discoveries have been made about the imprint of cultural evolution in the predispositions of human minds for cultural transmission. PMID:21357216

  3. Culture evolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiten, Andrew; Hinde, Robert A; Laland, Kevin N; Stringer, Christopher B

    2011-04-12

    Culture pervades human lives and has allowed our species to create niches all around the world and its oceans, in ways quite unlike any other primate. Indeed, our cultural nature appears so distinctive that it is often thought to separate humanity from the rest of nature and the Darwinian forces that shape it. A contrary view arises through the recent discoveries of a diverse range of disciplines, here brought together to illustrate the scope of a burgeoning field of cultural evolution and to facilitate cross-disciplinary fertilization. Each approach emphasizes important linkages between culture and evolutionary biology rather than quarantining one from the other. Recent studies reveal that processes important in cultural transmission are more widespread and significant across the animal kingdom than earlier recognized, with important implications for evolutionary theory. Recent archaeological discoveries have pushed back the origins of human culture to much more ancient times than traditionally thought. These developments suggest previously unidentified continuities between animal and human culture. A third new array of discoveries concerns the later diversification of human cultures, where the operations of Darwinian-like processes are identified, in part, through scientific methods borrowed from biology. Finally, surprising discoveries have been made about the imprint of cultural evolution in the predispositions of human minds for cultural transmission.

  4. Holograms a cultural history

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, Sean F

    2016-01-01

    Holograms have been in the public eye for over a half-century, but their influences have deeper cultural roots. No other visual experience is quite like interacting with holograms; no other cultural product melds the technological sublime with magic and optimism in quite the same way. As holograms have evolved, they have left their audiences alternately fascinated, bemused, inspired or indifferent. From expressions of high science to countercultural art to consumer security, holograms have represented modernity, magic and materialism. Their most pervasive impact has been to galvanize hopeful technological dreams. This book explores how holograms found a place in distinct cultural settings. Engineers, artists, hippies and hobbyists have played with, and dreamed about, holograms. This book explores the technical attractions and cultural uses of the hologram, how they were shaped by what came before them, and how they have matured to shape our notional futures. Today, holograms are in our pockets (as identity do...

  5. Spatial Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Spatial Culture – A Humanities Perspective Abstract of introductory essay by Henrik Reeh Secured by alliances between socio-political development and cultural practices, a new field of humanistic studies in spatial culture has developed since the 1990s. To focus on links between urban culture...... and modern society is, however, an intellectual practice which has a much longer history. Already in the 1980s, the debate on the modern and the postmodern cited Paris and Los Angeles as spatio-cultural illustrations of these major philosophical concepts. Earlier, in the history of critical studies, the work...... Foucault considered a constitutive feature of 20th-century thinking and one that continues to occupy intellectual and cultural debates in the third millennium. A conceptual framework is, nevertheless, necessary, if the humanities are to adequa-tely address city and space – themes that have long been...

  6. Features and current status of Pu'er food culture : Challenges toward cultural environment preservation

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Xiaomin; Kisihomoto, sayaka; Yu, Ganqian

    2015-01-01

    Pu'er food culture is characterized by distinct uniqueness and diversity on three aspects: culture, material and skill under various influences of regional, ecological and border culture, which is based on tea culture in particular. However, food culture in Pu'er has been facing several problems and risks of gradual assimilation, lack of specific transmission carrier, and the urgent need of building sustainable support system for the preservation of Pu'er food culture. This paper aims to intr...

  7. Japan: Geography, Cuisine, and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Karen

    These materials are designed as four modules: geography, foods, the kitchen, and culture and are to be used singly or jointly as a unit on Japanese food and culture. Common ingredients of Japanese food, nutritional information, methods of preparation, and illustrations of utensils and eating implements are given in conjunction with cultural…

  8. Cultural Concepts for Spanish Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertora, Luis H.

    This report integrates instructional materials and concepts on the teaching of culture in foreign language classes in three major areas. Part 1 deals with the description of sociocultural concepts of Spanish peoples with emphasis on the basic features of Latin American Culture including: (1) the family, (2) family events, (3) social peculiarities,…

  9. Cultural Understanding: Spanish Level 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Reid

    The teacher's attention is focused on selected elements of Spanish culture which may be taught integrally with instructional materials found in the first-year Spanish texts "Entender y Hablar", "La Familia Fernandez", and "A-LM Spanish, Level One". Items are cross-referenced for 42 cultural concepts ranging from nicknames to streets, roads, and…

  10. Center for Ukrainian Cultural Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laarse, R.

    2017-01-01

    The Amsterdam-based Center for Ukrainian Cultural Studies (UCS) unites Dutch scholars in Ukrainian art, cinema, media, memory, language, and literature. Launched by the Amsterdam School for Heritage, Memory and Material Culture (AHM) and the University of Amsterdam’s Department of Slavic Languages

  11. The Changing Materiality of Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Henrik

    . Against the backdrop of recent discussions of popular music as material culture it is argued that emergent usages must be seen in relation to accumulations of different materialities and that such a perspective highlights issues related to both aesthetic reflexivity and agency. Keywords: cultural......A great deal of effort has gone into discussing issues of copyright in relation to the new materialities of the digital distribution of popular music; there has, however, been less focus on the changes that these new developments may invoke with respect to the cultural and social usages of music...... commodity, materiality, reflexivity, music, MP3...

  12. Skin or nail culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucosal culture; Culture - skin; Culture - mucosal; Nail culture; Culture - fingernail; Fingernail culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria, ...

  13. Cultural Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Jose

    It is too often taken for granted that the communication process with culturally different children takes place as readily as it might with children from Anglo cultures. Most teachers receive training in verbal and formal communication skills; children come to school with nonverbal and informal communication skills. This initially can create…

  14. Connecting Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugegaard, Rikke; Mynster Christensen, Maya

    2017-01-01

    The understanding of cultural dynamics in the area of operations is essential in to the accomplishment of military missions in international operations. The aim of this handbook is to introduce a tool enabling the use of culture as part of the military operational planning process....

  15. Culture Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2007-01-01

    by certain representations and embedded in certain norms and values. The analytical framework is applied on a case of cultural urban branding. The case is the harbour front in Aalborg, Denmark where a number of flagship architecture projects and cultural institutions are being planned. It is shown how...

  16. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  17. Culture Clash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Sheila; Olson, Hope

    1996-01-01

    Discusses two basic cultures within the library science field, one that emphasizes "soft-edged" traditional service and the other newer culture which has evolved around information technology and entrepreneurial drive. Topics include historical background; university pressures on library schools to be "tech-oriented";…

  18. From History of Serbian-Russian Historical and Cultural Relations: Dušan I. Semiz (1884–1955 and His Family. Commentaries to Archival Materials from St. Petersburg and Moscow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena V. Rozhdestvenskaia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The fate of a Serbian political emigrant in Russia, the journalist, politician, and historian Dušan Ivanović Semiz (1884–1955 and his family, is studied for the first time on the basis of archival materials from St. Petersburg: the Institute of Russian Literature of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Pushkin House and the Russian State Historical Archive. Dušan Semiz was a journalist and press correspondent at the frontlines of WWI and the author of historical and political pamphlets and books, and translations of Serbian epics into Russian. He was first arrested in Leningrad in 1929 for being a former active participant in the Serbian nationalist revolutionary organisation Crna ruka (The Black Hand and sentenced to five years in the GULAG. His first spell in the labor camps was followed by several others. Semiz did hard labor as a lumberjack in the Archangel region and at the construction of the White Sea–Baltic Canal; he was exiled to Kazakhstan in Berlik, where Alexander Solzhenitsyn was also later exiled. Semiz was not released from the GULAG until 1953, not long before his death. Here I present some fragments of the works by Semiz on historical and current relationships between Serbia and Russia, the causes of WWII, and also a short story he wrote in 1933, as well as his letters from the GULAG and exile to his family and letters from his family to him. These documents show hist strong personality, which was maintained even through his period in the  GULAG. The archive materials presented in the paper are another historical document of Stalinist terror and are of interest for the study of Serbo-Russian historical and cultural links in the mid 20th century.

  19. Avatar Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koda, Tomoko; Ishida, Toru; Rehm, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Avatars are increasingly used to express our emotions in our online communications. Such avatars are used based on the assumption that avatar expressions are interpreted universally among all cultures. This paper investigated cross-cultural evaluations of avatar expressions designed by Japanese...... and Western designers. The goals of the study were: (1) to investigate cultural differences in avatar expression evaluation and apply findings from psychological studies of human facial expression recognition, (2) to identify expressions and design features that cause cultural differences in avatar facial...... expression interpretation. The results of our study confirmed that (1) there are cultural differences in interpreting avatars’ facial expressions, and the psychological theory that suggests physical proximity affects facial expression recognition accuracy is also applicable to avatar facial expressions, (2...

  20. CULTURAL TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana POP

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will try to analyse the cultural tourism. We will start by referring to the complex concepts of tourism and culture and to the synergies existing between them. We will define cultural tourism and present its appearance and evolution as well as its importance as a modern form of tourism. We will present the various types of cultural tourism with their characteristics and the specific features of cultural tourists according to their interests. We will also mention that there are advantages and disadvantages for any kind of tourism depending on the position – local communities, companies or tourists. For the future we will refer to the new partnership between UNWTO and UNESCO.

  1. Aromatherapy Oils: Commodities, Materials, Essences

    OpenAIRE

    Barcan, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the essential oils that are the central tools of aromatherapy and uses them as a case study for different approaches to material culture. It considers the conceptual and political implications of thinking of essential oils as, in turn, commodities, materials and essences. I argue that both cultural studies and aromatherapy have something to learn from each other. Classic materialist approaches might do well to focus more attention on the material properties and effects o...

  2. Culture Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Warner-Søderholm

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Whether managers are concerned with financial issues, marketing, or human resource management (HRM, cultural values and practices do matter. The purpose of this article is to understand Norwegian managers’ cultural values within the cross-cultural landscape of her neighbors in the “Scandinavian cluster.” Clearly, subtle but disturbing differences may surface even when representatives from similar cultures work together. As a follow on from the GLOBE project, data based on the GLOBE instrument were collected on culture and communication values in Norway from 710 Norwegian middle managers for this present study. Although the Scandinavian cultures appear ostensibly similar, the results illustrate that research can reveal subtle but important cultural differences in nations that are similar yet dissimilar. All three Scandinavian societies appear intrinsically egalitarian; they appear to value low Power Distance, directness, and consensus in decision making and to promote Gender Egalitarianism. Nevertheless, there are significant differences in the degrees of commitment to these values by each individual Scandinavian partner. These differences need to be understood and appreciated to avoid misunderstandings.

  3. Digging culture and doing culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andries van den Broek; Jos de Haan; Frank Huysmans

    2009-01-01

    Original title: Cultuurbewonderaars en cultuurbeoefenaars. There are people who love art and culture and there are people who practise it; people who enjoy it and people who are themselves creative in their leisure time. Who are these culture-lovers and practitioners? How has participation in

  4. The Development of Man and His Culture: Old World Prehistory. Grade 5. Teacher Guide [And] Pupil Text [And] Pupil Guide [And] Teacher Background Material [And] A Sequential Curriculum in Anthropology. Test Form 5, Composite Form for Pre- and Post-Test. Revised, January 1968. Publications No. 25, 31, 23, 24 and 43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potterfield, James E.; And Others

    This social studies unit includes a teaching guide, student text, study guide, teacher background material, and composite pretest/posttest covering archaeological methods, evolution, fossils and man, and development of culture during the prehistoric periods in the Old World. It is part of the Anthropology Curriculum Project and is designed for…

  5. Dictionary materials engineering, materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This dictionary contains about 9,500 entries in each part of the following fields: 1) Materials using and selection; 2) Mechanical engineering materials -Metallic materials - Non-metallic inorganic materials - Plastics - Composites -Materials damage and protection; 3) Electrical and electronics materials -Conductor materials - Semiconductors - magnetic materials - Dielectric materials - non-conducting materials; 4) Materials testing - Mechanical methods - Analytical methods - Structure investigation - Complex methods - Measurement of physical properties - Non-destructive testing. (orig.) [de

  6. Safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drukraroff, C.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of Safety Culture was defined after Chernobyl's nuclear accident in 1986. It has not been exempt from discussion interpretations, adding riders, etc..., over the last 24 years because it has to do with human behavior and performance in the organizations. Safety Culture is not an easy task to define, assess and monitor. The proof of it is that today we still discussing and writing about it. How has been the evolution of Safety Culture at the Juzbado Factory since 1985 to today?. What is the strategy that we will be following in the future. (Author)

  7. Blood culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - blood ... A blood sample is needed . The site where blood will be drawn is first cleaned with an antiseptic such ... organism from the skin getting into (contaminating) the blood sample and causing a false-positive result (see ...

  8. Rectal culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have an infection of the rectum, such as gonorrhea . It may also be done instead of a ... infection. This may be: Bacterial infection Parasitic enterocolitis Gonorrhea Sometimes a culture shows that you are a ...

  9. Stool Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... illness by producing toxins . These bacteria may be cultured , but many of the tests used to detect ... been contaminated with pathogenic bacteria, such as undercooked meat or raw eggs, or the same food that ...

  10. Materials development for TESOL

    CERN Document Server

    Mishan, Freda

    2015-01-01

    Materials development has become much more important in the field of TESOL in the last twenty years: modules on materials development are now commonplace on MA TESOL courses around the world. The overall aim of the book is to introduce readers to a wide range of theoretical and practical issues in materials development to enable them to make informed and principled choices in the selection, evaluation, adaptation and production of materials. The book aims to show how these choices need to be informed by an awareness of culture, context and purpose.

  11. Urban sharing culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjalland, Emmy Laura Perez

    In urban areas sharing cultures, services and economies are rising. People share, rent and recycle their homes, cars, bikes, rides, tools, cloths, working space, knowhow and so on. The sharing culture can be understood as mobilities (Kesselring and Vogl 2013) of goods, values and ideas reshaping...... our cities. The sharing economy has the power to democratise access the urban space, resources and raw materials (Steen Nielsen 2008; Harvey 2000); it holds the ability to change the current dominant understandings and structures of economy and growth (Steen Nielsen 2008); solve emerging environmental...... and trust. (Thomsen 2013; Bauman 2000; Beck 1992; Giddens 1991). The sharing economy is currently hyper trendy but before claiming capitalism as dead we need to understand the basics of the sharing economies and cultures asking who can share and what will we share. Furthermore it is crucial to study what...

  12. Embodied Cultures of Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2010-01-01

    contemporary theorists understanding bodily movement, material sites of mobility, and social interactions must be consulted along the road (e.g. Latour’s work on objects and ANT, Thrift’s work on the body and ‘non-representational theory, and Massumi’s notions of affects and emotions related to bodily mobility......The paper explores the relationship between the body and mobility by looking into a number of modes of transportation and their ways of constructing particular engagements with mobility. The ‘mobile embodiments’ are significant to a material and symbolic set of relations between human agents...... and material artifacts. The paper target the complex relationship between the moving, sensing body and the material and built environment of infrastructures and mobility modes in order to explore what norms, and meanings, and everyday life mobility cultures are being produced and re-produced in this process...

  13. 7 CFR 58.433 - Cheese cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cheese cultures. 58.433 Section 58.433 Agriculture... Material § 58.433 Cheese cultures. Harmless microbial cultures used in the development of acid and flavor components in cheese shall have a pleasing and desirable taste and odor and shall have the ability to...

  14. Cell Culturing of Cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Cell culturing, such as this bone cell culture, is an important part of biomedical research. The BioDyn payload includes a tissue engineering investigation. The commercial affiliate, Millenium Biologix, Inc., has been conducting bone implant experiments to better understand how synthetic bone can be used to treat bone-related illnesses and bone damaged in accidents. On STS-95, the BioDyn payload will include a bone cell culture aimed to help develop this commercial synthetic bone product. Millenium Biologix, Inc., is exploring the potential for making human bone implantable materials by seeding its proprietary artificial scaffold material with human bone cells. The product of this tissue engineering experiment using the Bioprocessing Modules (BPMs) on STS-95 is space-grown bone implants, which could have potential for dental implants, long bone grafts, and coating for orthopedic implants such as hip replacements.

  15. Nigerian cultural heritage: preservation, challenges and prospects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian is a country endowed with a lot of cultural heritages sourced from its multicultural communities. Contemporary status of most Nigerian cultural heritages (both material and non-material) is best described as endangered. This paper derives from a functionalist perspective which descriptively presents a historical, ...

  16. World Literature - World Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offering their own twenty-first-century perspectives - across generations, nationalities and disciplines -, the contributors to this anthology explore the idea of world literature for what it may add of new connections and itineraries to the study of literature and culture today. Covering a vast...... historical material these essays, by a diverse group of scholars, examine the pioneers of world literature and the roles played by translation, migration and literary institutions in the circulation and reception of both national and cosmopolitan literatures....

  17. Cultural tourism and tourism cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    Presenting a comprehensive and dynamic understanding of cultural tourism, this volume examines cultural mediators and how they help tourists appreciate foreign cultures. It also shows how tourism experiences are strategically crafted by mediators, the complexity of the mediation process, and how...... various products are mediated differently. A number of different products are investigated, including destination brand identities, "living" cultures and everyday life, art and history. The author illustrates his arguments by comparing the tourism strategies of Copenhagen and Singapore, and demonstrates...... how tourism is an agent for social change. The author also offers an original and refreshing way of understanding tourist behaviour through the concept of the "versatile tourist". The book's empirical cases and dialogic framework provide new and deep insights into tourism activities. In his...

  18. A Cultural Sexuality or a Sexual Culture?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandermeersch, Patrick

    1990-01-01

    P. Vandermeersch, A Cultural Sexuality or a Sexual Culture? In: F. VAN DE VIJVER & G. HUTSCHEMAEKERS (ed.), The Investigation of Culture. Current Issues in Cultural Psychology, Tilburg, Tilburg University Press, 1990, 43-58.

  19. Advertising cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malefyt, Timothy de Waal; Moeran, Brian

    to the relationship between advertizing and anthropology. The link between them may come as a surprise to those who consider advertizing to be firmly rooted in commerce and anthropology in culture. Through the lens of anthropologists, this book not only shows how anthropology and advertizing are connected...... and how anthropology can be used to give an informed cultural understanding of the consumer. From constructing a "Japaneseness" that appeals to two very different Western audiences, to tracking the changes, in the post World War II period, in advertizing, and considering how people can be influenced...... by language and symbols, this book is an innovative mix of business strategy and cultural theory. Its pioneering work should provide a valuable guide to consumer behaviour for practitioners and students alike, and should pave the way for a new and exciting area of research....

  20. Spatial Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    , the notion of aesthetics (taken in the original signification of aisthesis: sensory perception) helped to map the relations between city, human experience, and various forms of art and culture. Delving into our simultaneously optical and tactical reception of space (a dialectics pointed out by Walter...... Benjamin), studies in urbanity and aesthetics may highlight mul-tisensory everyday practices that pass unnoticed in the current era of visual domination. A humanistic approach to urban and spatial cultures should also learn from German sociologist and philosopher Georg Simmel’s hypothesis of a modern need......: Memory”, and ”Staging and Interpretation: Places”....

  1. Mayan Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter Bent

    1992-01-01

    The social categories « Maya » and « mestizo » habe been applied to denote the Yucatec Mayan people in Mexico. The A. examines the cluster of perceived attributes (schemata) evoked by the terms and how they relate to each other. He shows that there is an incongruency between them along the lines ...... of local and academic categorization, which is an implication of the different social spaces in which they arise. In spite of the incongruency and the cultural plurality evoked by their usage, the A. argues that the people of Yucatec share a single culture....

  2. Information cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skouvig, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to suggest a genealogy of the concept of information beyond the 20th century. The article discusses how the concept of information culture might provide a way of formulating such a genealogic strategy. The article approaches this purpose by providing a general...... narrative of premodern information cultures, examining works on early-modern scholars and 18th century savants and discussion of what seems to be a Foucauldian rupture in the conceptualization of information in 19th century England. The findings of the article are situated in the thinking that a genealogy...

  3. Cultural Usability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Qingxin

    2007-01-01

    Culture has already played an important role in the global market. It not only affects products, but also impacts on usability evaluation methods. This project aims to examine in the established thinking aloud usability evaluation method (TA UEM), how does the evaluator build a supportive...... relationship and communicate effectively with the user in order to find relevant usability problems in culturally localized applications. It includes three parts, pilot study, field study and experiments, to get both qualitative data and quantitative data. From this project, we hope to find an effective way...

  4. Safety culture of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Beixin

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a summary on the basis of DNMC safety culture training material for managerial personnel. It intends to explain the basic contents of safety, design, management, enterprise culture, safety culture of nuclear power plant and the relationship among them. It explains especially the constituent elements of safety culture system, the basic requirements for the three levels of commitments: policy level, management level and employee level. It also makes some analyses and judgments for some typical safety culture cases, for example, transparent culture and habitual violation of procedure. (authors)

  5. New Materialism: Interviews & Cartographies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Tuin, I.; Dolphijn, R.

    2012-01-01

    This book is the first monograph on the theme of “new materialism,” an emerging trend in 21st century thought that has already left its mark in such fields as philosophy, cultural theory, feminism, science studies, and the arts. The first part of the book contains elaborate interviews with some of

  6. Cultural Politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotsky, Sandra

    1991-01-01

    Multicultural education has at least two faces--an academic one and an ideological one. Encouraging the balkanization of U.S. culture threatens to undermine the academic integrity of the social studies curriculum. Offers suggestions to make sure that schools are offering an academically rigorous multicultural curriculum, not political…

  7. Grindr Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shield, Andrew DJ

    2018-01-01

    intersections of sexuality with other socio-cultural categories such as race and migration background, but also gender and ability. I find that user experiences with exclusion and discrimination can be related to Grindr’s interface, such as its drop-down menus, the discourses circulated by Grindr users...

  8. Black Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angela Khristin

    2013-01-01

    The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united. The population of blacks passed down a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape…

  9. Culture Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angela Khristin

    2013-01-01

    The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united. The population of blacks past downs a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape…

  10. callus culture

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    steve

    capacity in comparison to those of grown on 75%. NH4NO3 depleted media under the same light regime. Light dependent secondary metabolite production. Initially, we have cultured wounded grape leaf explants in the dark for callus induction and monitoring possible pigmentation and phenolics accumulation. Supplemen-.

  11. Cultural Usability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Qingxin

    2007-01-01

    Culture has already played an important role in the global market. It not only affects products, but also impacts on usability evaluation methods. This project aims to examine in the established thinking aloud usability evaluation method (TA UEM), how does the evaluator build a supportive...

  12. Hydroponic Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steucek, G. L.; Yurkiewicz, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Describes a hydroponic culture technique suitable for student exercises in biology. This technique of growing plants in nutrient solutions enhances plant growth, and is an excellent way to obtain intact plants with root systems free of soil or other particulate matter. (JR)

  13. Starter cultures for kimchi fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mo-Eun; Jang, Ja-Young; Lee, Jong-Hee; Park, Hae-Woong; Choi, Hak-Jong; Kim, Tae-Woon

    2015-05-01

    Kimchi is a traditional Korean vegetable product that is naturally fermented by various microorganisms present in the raw materials. Among these microorganisms, lactic acid bacteria dominate the fermentation process. Natural fermentation with unsterilized raw materials leads to the growth of various lactic acid bacteria, resulting in variations in the taste and quality of kimchi, which may make it difficult to produce industrial-scale kimchi with consistent quality. The use of starter cultures has been considered as an alternative for the industrial production of standardized kimchi, and recent trends suggest that the demand for starter cultures is on the rise. However, several factors should be carefully considered for the successful application of starter cultures for kimchi fermentation. In this review, we summarize recent studies on kimchi starter cultures, describe practical problems in the application of industrial-scale kimchi production, and discuss the directions for further studies.

  14. Cultured Trash, Not Trash Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Taufiqurrohman, Taufiqurrohman; Utomo, Setyo; Wibowo, Purwo Adi

    2017-01-01

    As civilized creature, human actually can manage trash as well as possible although it is often stereotyped as a vain thing. This article gives the proof that trash can be cultured as well so that a society can take benefits from the existence of it. This article parses ways of orderly managing it at schools, in this case two schools in Jepara. The results say that trash can be cultured by having an organization to manage the Trash Bank at schools and to train students to classify and recycle...

  15. Castilian Appearance as perceived in Spain and in Rome. Image, Material Culture and Comparative Life Percepciones de la apariencia castellana dentro de España y en Roma. Imagen, cultura material y estilos de vida comparados a finales del Antiguo Régimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Máximo GARCÍA FERNÁNDEZ

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The values of Enlightenment gave way to a different «culture of appearances» clearly expressed in dressing trends; thus the social and economic exteriorization of garments came to be the scenario for ideological struggle. Was the mental, socioeconomic and political development of the Castilian bourgeoisie adapted to the European pace or were these transformations in material culture, image and demand taken on belatedly, limited in their sociological scope and with fluctuations, showing more attachment to tradition than a step into modernity? Was the Spanish model of such changes similar to the increase in consumerism of the English nobility, did it follow the Romer or Parisian trends, or should we compare it with the bourgeoisie of Lisbon? The conclusion: changes and continuations: very different if we analyse the belongings of the privileged class along with those of the majority of the population. The slow growth of the urban middle class in the inland peninsula was slowing down the appearance of a new materialist civilization with more consumer habits, a fact that would hinder the relationship between the growth of demand and the origins of individualism. Its peculiarity lay in the slow speed of this transformation, which only became established around 1830.Alentada por los nuevos valores ilustrados, se alimentaba otra «cultura de las apariencias», expresada claramente en el vestido. Así, la exteriorización económica y social del atuendo llegó a ser, finalmente, escenario de lucha ideológica. ¿La evolución mental, socioeconómica y política urbana castellana durante el XVIII se adecuaba al devenir europeo o se produjeron todas esas transformaciones en la demanda y la cultura material con retraso, limitadas sociológicamente y con numerosas fluctuaciones que mostraban más permanencias tradicionales que modernidad? ¿El modelo español de aquellos cambios se ajustaba al incremento del consumo nobiliario inglés, seguía el romano o

  16. Culturing larvae of marine invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strathmann, Richard R

    2014-01-01

    Larvae of marine invertebrates cultured in the laboratory experience conditions that they do not encounter in nature, but development and survival to metamorphic competence can be obtained in such cultures. This protocol emphasizes simple methods suitable for a wide variety of larvae. Culturing larvae requires seawater of adequate quality and temperature within the tolerated range. Beyond that, feeding larvae require appropriate food, but a few kinds of algae and animals are sufficient as food for diverse larvae. Nontoxic materials include glass, many plastics, hot-melt glue, and some solvents, once evaporated. Cleaners that do not leave toxic residues after rinsing include dilute hydrochloric or acetic acid, sodium hypochlorite (commercial bleach), and ethanol. Materials that can leave toxic residues, such as formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde, detergents, and hand lotions, should be avoided, especially with batch cultures that lack continuously renewed water. Reverse filtration can be used to change water gently at varying frequencies, depending on temperature and the kinds of food that are provided. Bacterial growth can be limited by antibiotics, but antibiotics are often unnecessary. Survival and growth are increased by low concentrations of larvae and stirring of large or dense cultures. One method of stirring large numbers of containers is a rack of motor-driven paddles. Most of the methods and materials are inexpensive and portable. If necessary, a room within a few hours of the sea could be temporarily equipped for larval culture.

  17. Talking Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgreen, Lise-Lotte

    When Danish businesses move production abroad, ‘culture’ is often seen as a huge challenge to the successful outcome of cross-border collaboration. Therefore, business leaders often seek information and guidelines of how to cope in the vast amount of literature on culture and intercultural...... communication. Much of this literature is based on functionalist approaches providing the dos and don’ts of intercultural encounters. This involves inter alia conceptualising ‘culture’ as a relatively fixed, homogeneous entity of values, attitudes and norms shared by members of a group, often leading readers...... to adopt dichotomised understandings and discourses about other cultures (see e.g. Hofstede 2001; Jandt 1998; Trompenaars & Hampden-Turner 1997). However, experience shows that the world in which intercultural encounters take place is not as simple and easy to categorise as these approaches may suggest...

  18. MARKETING CULTURAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gómez Ramírez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo analiza la definición de "Marketing" Cultural y la adaptación y beneficios del "marketing" tradicional respecto al conjunto de manifestaciones artísticas de las diversas industrias involucradas en el sector cultural o artístico; asimismo, se desagregan los conceptos básicos que lo componen como factor de éxito en dichas empresas. Se hace uso de la exposición de casos específicos para ilustrar la articulación de estos dos conceptos aparentemente contrapuestos, cultura y "marketing", y registra algunas reflexiones para que el lector se involucre en la construcción del concepto aquí presentado.

  19. CHRISTIANITY AND AWKA SOCIO-RELIGIO-CULTURAL IDENTITY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dean SPGS NAU

    sports, and social organizations. In Taylor's view, culture includes all aspects of human activity from the fine arts ... Material culture comprises the physical products of human society. (ranging from jewelry, houses, weapons, clothing styles, to temples or churches), while non-material culture refers to the intangible products of ...

  20. Cultural neurolinguistics

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chuansheng; Xue, Gui; Mei, Leilei; Chen, Chunhui; Dong, Qi

    2009-01-01

    As the only species that evolved to possess a language faculty, humans have been surprisingly generative in creating a diverse array of language systems. These systems vary in phonology, morphology, syntax, and written forms. Before the advent of modern brain-imaging techniques, little was known about how differences across languages are reflected in the brain. This chapter aims to provide an overview of an emerging area of research - cultural neurolinguistics - that examines systematic cross...

  1. Cultural neurolinguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuansheng; Xue, Gui; Mei, Leilei; Chen, Chunhui; Dong, Qi

    2009-01-01

    As the only species that evolved to possess a language faculty, humans have been surprisingly generative in creating a diverse array of language systems. These systems vary in phonology, morphology, syntax, and written forms. Before the advent of modern brain-imaging techniques, little was known about how differences across languages are reflected in the brain. This chapter aims to provide an overview of an emerging area of research - cultural neurolinguistics - that examines systematic cross-cultural/crosslinguistic variations in the neural networks of languages. We first briefly describe general brain networks for written and spoken languages. We then discuss language-specific brain regions by highlighting differences in neural bases of different scripts (logographic vs. alphabetic scripts), orthographies (transparent vs. nontransparent orthographies), and tonality (tonal vs. atonal languages). We also discuss neural basis of second language and the role of native language experience in second-language acquisition. In the last section, we outline a general model that integrates culture and neural bases of language and discuss future directions of research in this area.

  2. Of 'other' materialities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2016-01-01

    within the ‘new materiality’ literature in philosophy as well as in cultural theory. Important lessons are drawn in from across different positions such as non-representational theory, the nonhuman turn, Object-Oriented-Ontology to mention a few. It is argued that to create the necessary materially......In this article, the notion of materialities is rearticulated as an important field for the future of mobilities research. We focus on the intersection between situational mobilities research and design/architecture. The vocabulary and material imaginary developed within the latter are an important...... sensitive imaginary, mobilities research should be looking to architecture and design, as well as it may profit from engaging with these new materially sensitive thinkers. The article ends with some concrete themes for future research inspired by these intersections and identifies ‘material pragmatism...

  3. Cultural Robotics: The Culture of Robotics and Robotics in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Samani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have investigated the concept of “Cultural Robotics” with regard to the evolution of social into cultural robots in the 21st Century. By defining the concept of culture, the potential development of a culture between humans and robots is explored. Based on the cultural values of the robotics developers, and the learning ability of current robots, cultural attributes in this regard are in the process of being formed, which would define the new concept of cultural robotics. According to the importance of the embodiment of robots in the sense of presence, the influence of robots in communication culture is anticipated. The sustainability of robotics culture based on diversity for cultural communities for various acceptance modalities is explored in order to anticipate the creation of different attributes of culture between robots and humans in the future.

  4. Strategic Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buhler, Carl; Burke, Adrian; Davis, Kirk; Gerhard, Michelle; Heil, Valerie; Hulse, Richard; Kwong, Ralph; Mahoney, Michael; Moran, Scott; Peek, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Some materials possess greater value than others. Materials that provide essential support for the nation's economic viability or enable critical military capabilities warrant special attention in security studies...

  5. Altai Empathy Culture: Ontological Design of Altai Cognitive Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, Maksim; Belousova, Valeria; Khalina, Natalya

    2016-01-01

    This study considers the features of Altai cultural semantics through the cognitive materialism of culture basing on the assumption that the linguistic structures are part of culture, and the metaphorical linguistic use is the basis for cultural cognitive structures forming. Altai text is considered as a structural unit of Altai cognitive…

  6. High efficiency protoplast isolation from in vitro cultures and hairy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro cultures of the medicinal plant Maesa lanceolata were established to enable the cultivation of plant material for the production of protoplasts. Callus cultures were initiated using leaves collected from shoot cultures and the root tips from hairy root cultures obtained upon Agrobacterium rhizogenes transformation.

  7. La arquitectura cultural. / Cultural architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobos, Jorge

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo releva la Arquitectura Cultural, que es plural y diversa en términos estéticos y conceptuales. Sugiere la apertura a otras dinámicas de comprensión de lo arquitectónico, a otras lógicas de construcción de las ciudades. Para aclarar el concepto se expone un breve ejemplo práctico./This article points out the "cultural architecture", which is plural and diverse in concept and aesthetic terms. It suggests the opening to other dinamics of comprehention of the architectural issue and the building of cities. The article presents a brief empirical example that clarifies the conceptual approach.

  8. Tribological comparison of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bing

    Approximately 600,000 total joint replacement surgeries are performed each year in the United States. Current artificial joint implants are mainly metal-on-plastic. The synthetic biomaterials undergo degradation through fatigue and corrosive wear from load-bearing and the aqueous ionic environment of the human body. Deposits of inorganic salts can scratch weight-bearing surfaces, making artificial joints stiff and awkward. The excessive wear debris from polyethylene leads to osteolysis and potential loosening of the prosthesis. The lifetime for well-designed artificial joints is at most 10 to 15 years. A patient can usually have two total joint replacements during her/his lifetime. Durability is limited by the body's reaction to wear debris of the artificial joints. Wear of the artificial joints should be reduced. A focus of this thesis is the tribological performance of bearing materials for Total Replacement Artificial Joints (TRAJ). An additional focus is the scaffolds for cell growth from both a tissue engineering and tribological perspective. The tribological properties of materials including Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) coated materials were tested for TRAJ implants. The DLC coatings are chemically inert, impervious to acid and saline media, and are mechanically hard. Carbon-based materials are highly biocompatible. A new alternative to total joints implantation is tissue engineering. Tissue engineering is the replacement of living tissue with tissue that is designed and constructed to meet the needs of the individual patient. Cells were cultured onto the artificial materials, including metals, ceramics, and polymers, and the frictional properties of these materials were investigated to develop a synthetic alternative to orthopedic transplants. Results showed that DLC coated materials had low friction and wear, which are desirable tribological properties for artificial joint material. Cells grew on some of the artificial matrix materials, depending on the

  9. Digital Materialities: Design and Anthropology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saramifar, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The very phrase ‘digital materiality’ provokes a multitude of opinions and interpreta-tions. Scholars of design studies, architects, and cultural critics have provided definitions of digital materiality while separating the digital and the material from each other. In the 11 chapters of this book,

  10. Black Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Khristin Brown

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united.  The population of blacks past downs a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape from poverty of enslavement and to establish a way of life through tradition. A way of personal freedoms was through getting a good education that lead to a better foundation and a better way of life.

  11. Culture Jamming Versus Popular Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardia Acynthia Putri

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This literature study researched Adbusters, the anti-commercial organization, and described the organization’s activities and media usage, mainly in the period of 2007-2010, which critized the populer culture. Adbusters is an organization which performs “Culture Jamming”; a rebellious act reacting towards commercialism domination in many aspects including popular culture. Compared to other similar organizations, Adbusters has been executing more various activisms using several media which other organizations do not use. This study used the Adbusters’ official website and blogs as main data sources. The data of Adbusters’ activities and media usage were categorized and analyzed, thus the tendency of its development can be described. This study also analyzed Adbusters’ activity using Media Hegemony Theory and Political Economy Media Theory. The media has been dominated by a certain group that owns politic and economic power, so the information flow has been dominated by them. Media and its contents have been commercialized, thus capitalism and commercialism have been considered as a common system that should run the world. Adbusters has been trying to stop the domination and change the society’s way of thinking into a more critical way of thinking.   Abstrak: Studi literatur ini meneliti tentang Adbusters, sebuah organisasi anti komersial, dengan mendeskripsikan aktivitas serta penggunaan media organisasi tersebut dari tahun 2007-2010 dalam mengkritisi budaya populer. Adbusters adalah organisasi yang melakukan Culture Jamming, aksi perlawanan terhadap dominasi komersialisme di segala aspek termasuk popular culture. Dibandingkan dengan organisasi lain yang serupa, aktivitas Adbusters lebih bervariasi dan menggunakan media-media yang tidak biasa digunakan organisasi lain. Penelitian ini menggunakan situs online resmi Adbusters sebagai sumber data utama. Data mengenai aktivitas dan

  12. Cultural Robotics: The Culture of Robotics and Robotics in Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Samani, Hooman; Saadatian, Elham; Pang, Natalie; Polydorou, Doros; Fernando, Owen Noel Newton; Nakatsu, Ryohei; Koh, Jeffrey Tzu Kwan Valino

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the concept of “Cultural Robotics” with regard to the evolution of social into cultural robots in the 21st Century. By defining the concept of culture, the potential development of a culture between humans and robots is explored. Based on the cultural values of the robotics developers, and the learning ability of current robots, cultural attributes in this regard are in the process of being formed, which would define the new concept of cultural robotics. Ac...

  13. Integrating cultural competency throughout a first-year physician assistant curriculum steadily improves cultural awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Barbra; Scheel, Matthew H; De Oliveira, Kathleen; Hopp, Jane

    2013-01-01

    This study tracked student self-assessments of cultural awareness at regular intervals during the first year of a master's of science physician assistant (PA) program to test effectiveness of a cultural competency component in the curriculum. Students completed a cultural awareness survey at the beginning of the program and retook the survey at approximately 4-month intervals throughout the first year. Regression analyses confirmed positive linear relationships between survey number and score on 31 of 31 items. Cultural awareness among PA students benefits from repeated exposures to lessons on cultural competency. Schools attempting to develop or expand cultural awareness among students should consider presenting material in multiple courses across terms.

  14. Regulatory and Safety Requirements for Food Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulund, Svend; Wind, Anette; Derkx, Patrick M F; Zuliani, Véronique

    2017-05-23

    The increased use of food cultures to ferment perishable raw materials has potentiated the need for regulations to assess and assure the safety of food cultures and their uses. These regulations differ from country to country, all aimed at assuring the safe use of food cultures which has to be guaranteed by the food culture supplier. Here we highlight national differences in regulations and review a list of methods and methodologies to assess the safety of food cultures at strain level, at production, and in the final product.

  15. Regulatory and Safety Requirements for Food Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svend Laulund

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The increased use of food cultures to ferment perishable raw materials has potentiated the need for regulations to assess and assure the safety of food cultures and their uses. These regulations differ from country to country, all aimed at assuring the safe use of food cultures which has to be guaranteed by the food culture supplier. Here we highlight national differences in regulations and review a list of methods and methodologies to assess the safety of food cultures at strain level, at production, and in the final product.

  16. Culture collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David

    2012-01-01

    Culture collections no matter their size, form, or institutional objectives play a role in underpinning microbiology, supplying the resources for study, innovation, and discovery. Their basic roles include providing a mechanism for ex situ conservation of organisms; they are repositories for strains subject to publication, taking in safe, confidential, and patent deposits from researchers. They supply strains for use; therefore, the microorganisms provided must be authentic and preserved well, and any associated information must be valid and sufficient to facilitate the confirmation of their identity and to facilitate their use. The organisms must be collected in compliance with international conventions, international and national legislation and distributed to users indicating clearly the terms and conditions under which they are received and can be used. Collections are harmonizing approaches and characterizing strains to meet user needs. No one single collection can carry out this task alone, and therefore, it is important that output and strategy are coordinated to ensure culture collections deliver the basic resources and services microbiological innovation requires. This chapter describes the types of collection and how they can implement quality management systems and operate to deliver their basic functions. The links to information sources given not only provide support for the practitioners within collections but also provide guidance to users on accessing the huge resource available and how they can help ensure microbiology has the resources and a solid platform for future development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Developing Culturally Relevant Literacy Assessments for Bahamian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Gertrude Tinker; Jackson, Annmarie P.; Sullivan, Tarika; Wynter-Hoyte, Kamania

    2018-01-01

    The strong presence of culturally relevant materials in classrooms is seen as an indicator of good teaching but the development and use of these materials is under-investigated. Similarly, the actual construction and use of culturally relevant materials for literacy assessment purposes is under-reported. This paper examines the development and…

  18. Culture of health of a person as a part of physical culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Khalajtsan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determine the general concepts of the theory and methods of physical education. On the basis of their form defining the components of physical culture and personality reflect the place of culture health of individuals among these components. Material: processed more than 40 references. Results: a definition of generalizing concepts of "culture", "health", "physical culture", "culture of health" formulated defining components of physical culture personality: health culture personality, culture motivational values and beliefs, culture of educational excellence, physical culture perfection, excellence and culture of the motor provides a definition of each. Given a reflection of culture of health in the physical culture of the individual. Considered separately culture a person's health as a component of physical culture. Conclusions: it has a logical and hierarchical unity of the principal terms of the theory and methods of physical education, including culture of health of the person is a body of knowledge and skills of a healthy lifestyle, self psychological, social, spiritual and physical development.

  19. Materials Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Fahlman, Bradley D

    2011-01-01

    The 2nd edition of Materials Chemistry builds on the strengths that were recognized by a 2008 Textbook Excellence Award from the Text and Academic Authors Association (TAA). Materials Chemistry addresses inorganic-, organic-, and nano-based materials from a structure vs. property treatment, providing a suitable breadth and depth coverage of the rapidly evolving materials field. The 2nd edition continues to offer innovative coverage and practical perspective throughout. After briefly defining materials chemistry and its history, seven chapters discuss solid-state chemistry, metals, semiconducting materials, organic "soft" materials, nanomaterials, and materials characterization. All chapters have been thoroughly updated and expanded with, for example, new sections on ‘soft lithographic’ patterning, ‘click chemistry’ polymerization, nanotoxicity, graphene, as well as many biomaterials applications. The polymer and ‘soft’ materials chapter represents the largest expansion for the 2nd edition. Each ch...

  20. Understanding Jerusalem and its Cross-Cultural Dilemmas in Guy Delisle’s Jerusalem: Chronicles From the Holy City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrilă Ana-Maria

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Guy Delisle’s Jerusalem: Chronicles from the Holy City (2011 is a nonfictional graphic novel which narrates the experiences during a year that the Canadian artist and his family spent living far from home, in the occasionally dangerous and perilous city of the ancient Middle East. Part humorous memoir filled with “the logistics of everyday life,” part an inquisitive and sharp-eyed travelogue, Jerusalem is interspersed with enthralling lessons on the history of the region, together with vignettes of brief strips of Delisle’s encounters with expatriates and locals, with Jewish, Muslim, and Christian communities in and around the city, with Bedouins, Israeli and Palestinians. Since the comic strip is considered amongst the privileged genres able to disseminate stereotypes, Jerusalem tackles cultural as well as physical barriers, delimiting between domestic and foreign space, while revealing the historical context of the Israeli-Palestinian present conflict. Using this idea as a point of departure, I employ an imagological method of interpretation to address cross-cultural confusions in analysing the cartoonist’s travelogue as discourse of representation and ways of understanding cultural transmission, paying attention to the genre’s convention, where Delisle’s drawing style fits nicely the narrative techniques employed. Through an imagological perspective, I will also pay attention to the interaction between cultures and the dynamics between the images which characterise the Other (the nationalities represented or the spected and those which characterise - not without a sense of irony - his own identity (self-portraits or auto-images. I shall take into account throughout my analysis that the source of this graphic memoir is inevitably a subjective one: even though Delisle professes an unbiased mind-set from the very beginning, the comic is at times coloured by his secular views. Delisle’s book is a dark, yet gentle comedy, and his

  1. Objects, materiality and meaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Lindegaard, Hanne

    2008-01-01

    The present research work investigates the relation between physical objects, their materiality, understood as the physical substances they are made from, and the communication from the objects. In product design of physical objects the communicative aspects are just as important as the function...... of the object, and the designers aim is therefore to tune both in order to achieve a desired goal. To do so the designer basically has 2 options: Alteration of the physical shape of the object and the selection of materials. Through the manipulation of shape and materials can symbolic and sensory information...... be written into the object. The materials are therefore carriers of communication, even though this is dependent of the cultural context and the environment which the object will be part of. However the designer has only minor influence on those....

  2. Materials research at CMAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchiatti, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The Centro de Micro Analisis de Materiales (CMAM) is a research centre of the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid dedicated to the modification and analysis of materials using ion beam techniques. The infrastructure, based on a HVEE 5MV tandem accelerator, provided with a coaxial Cockcroft Walton charging system, is fully open to research groups of the UAM, to other public research institutions and to private enterprises. The CMAM research covers a few important lines such as advanced materials, surface science, biomedical materials, cultural heritage, materials for energy production. The Centre gives as well support to university teaching and technical training. A detail description of the research infrastructures and their use statistics will be given. Some of the main research results will be presented to show the progress of research in the Centre in the past few years and to motivate the strategic plans for the forthcoming

  3. Materials research at CMAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucchiatti, Alessandro [Centro de Micro Analisis de Materiales CMAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, c/ Faraday 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-18

    The Centro de Micro Analisis de Materiales (CMAM) is a research centre of the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid dedicated to the modification and analysis of materials using ion beam techniques. The infrastructure, based on a HVEE 5MV tandem accelerator, provided with a coaxial Cockcroft Walton charging system, is fully open to research groups of the UAM, to other public research institutions and to private enterprises. The CMAM research covers a few important lines such as advanced materials, surface science, biomedical materials, cultural heritage, materials for energy production. The Centre gives as well support to university teaching and technical training. A detail description of the research infrastructures and their use statistics will be given. Some of the main research results will be presented to show the progress of research in the Centre in the past few years and to motivate the strategic plans for the forthcoming.

  4. Materials research at CMAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchiatti, Alessandro

    2013-07-01

    The Centro de Micro Analisis de Materiales (CMAM) is a research centre of the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid dedicated to the modification and analysis of materials using ion beam techniques. The infrastructure, based on a HVEE 5MV tandem accelerator, provided with a coaxial Cockcroft Walton charging system, is fully open to research groups of the UAM, to other public research institutions and to private enterprises. The CMAM research covers a few important lines such as advanced materials, surface science, biomedical materials, cultural heritage, materials for energy production. The Centre gives as well support to university teaching and technical training. A detail description of the research infrastructures and their use statistics will be given. Some of the main research results will be presented to show the progress of research in the Centre in the past few years and to motivate the strategic plans for the forthcoming.

  5. Cultures of choice: towards a sociology of choice as a cultural phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Ori

    2017-09-07

    The article explores different ways to conceptualize the relationship between choice and culture. These two notions are often constructed as opposites: while sociologies of modernization (such as Giddens') portray a shift from cultural traditions to culturally disembedded choice, dispositional sociologies (such as Bourdieu's) uncover cultural determination as the hidden truth behind apparent choice. However, choice may be real and cultural simultaneously. Culture moulds choice not only by inculcating dispositions or shaping repertoires of alternatives, but also by offering culturally specific choice practices, ways of choosing embedded in meaning, normativity, and materiality; and by shaping attributions of choice in everyday life. By bringing together insights from rival schools, I portray an outline for a comparative cultural sociology of choice, and demonstrate its purchase while discussing the digitalization of choice; and cultural logics that shape choice attribution in ways opposing neoliberal trends. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  6. Folklore, creativity, and cultural memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    in a creative exercise of building a cultural identity and (re)constructing the connection to a shared past. Illustrations are offered here of the ways in which cultural memory has a productive function in relation to the life of individuals and collectives and, at the same time, creativity is part and parcel......This paper addresses the question of how folk art can be, simultaneously, a vehicle for cultural memory and cultural creativity. It takes the case of Romanian Easter egg decoration as a practice situated at the intersection between art, folklore, religion and a growing market, it order to unpack...... the role of tradition and creativity in the life of a rural community. Egg decoration is an old custom, with pre-Christian roots, practiced extensively in the historical region of Bucovina, and relying on a complex system of material artefacts and symbolic elements acquired and enacted by artisans usually...

  7. Cultural Landscape and Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Haaland

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper focus on the way Nepalese migrants in Myanmar use features of the natural environment in their homeland in metaphoric constructions of a cultural landscape expressing ethnic identity. It is through such "symbolic work" that perceptions of "ethnoscapes" are shaped and indoctrinated. Although the appeal is to symbols that can serve to foster the importance of Nepaliness as a basis for belonging to an imagined community, this does not mean that the caste/ethnicity interaction boundaries are broken down. It does mean however that sectors of activities where such boundaries are made relevant have been changed and so has the cultural content organized through such interaction boundaries. Ethnoscapes do not exist by themselves from a 'primordial' past; they require ongoing expression and confirmation. Features of a natural environment most migrants have never seen is used as sources for spinning compelling webs of significance extolling the values of belonging to a group that shares a common past in that environment. I shall here present material of an ethnoscape very different from what is experienced in Nepal, namely Nepalese multi-caste/ethnic communities among Kachins, Shans, Burmese, Indian and Chinese traders in the Kachin state of Northern Myanmar. Keywords: Nepali migrants; Myanmar; ethnic identity; cultural landscape DOI: 10.3126/dsaj.v4i0.4515 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol.4 2010 pp.99-110

  8. Culture-lovers and Culture-leavers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank Huysmans; Andries van den Broek; Jos de Haan

    2005-01-01

    Who are the people in the Netherlands with an active interest in cultural heritage and the performing arts, and who prefer to leave these forms of culture alone? Have the size and composition of the groups of 'culture-lovers' and 'culture-leavers' changed since the end of the 1970s? These are the

  9. Academic Culture and Campus Culture of Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xi; Tian, Xianghong

    2012-01-01

    Academic culture of universities mainly consists of academic outlooks, academic spirits, academic ethics and academic environments. Campus culture in a university is characterized by individuality, academic feature, opening, leading, variety and creativity. The academic culture enhances the construction of campus culture. The campus culture…

  10. STUDYING THE FEATURES OF CULTIVATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF COMPOSITION CULTURE MEDIA FOR LACTOBACILLUS SP.

    OpenAIRE

    Aniskina M. V.; Volobueva E. S.; Petenko A. I.; Volkova S. A.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the materials of the study of the features of cultivation of Lactobacillus sp. on different culture medium. We have made a comparison of standard culture medium for cultivation Lactobacillus sp. and determined the most optimal culture medium

  11. Coastal Culture Area. Native American Curriculum Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Cathy; Fernandes, Roger

    Background information, legends, games, illustrations, and art projects are provided in this booklet introducing elementary students to the history and culture of Indian tribes of the North Pacific Coast and Pacific Northwest. One in a series of Native American instructional materials, the booklet provides an overview of the coastal culture area,…

  12. Plant Tissue Culture in a Bag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Describes the use of an oven bag as a sterile chamber for culture initiation and tissue transfer. Plant tissue culture is an ideal tool for introducing students to plants, cloning, and experimental design. Includes materials, methods, discussion, and conclusion sections. (SAH)

  13. The impact of indigenous cultural identity and cultural engagement on violent offending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Stephane M; Delgado, Rosa Hazel; Sherwood, Juanita; Paradies, Yin

    2017-07-24

    Possessing a strong cultural identity has been shown to protect against mental health symptoms and buffer distress prompted by discrimination. However, no research to date has explored the protective influences of cultural identity and cultural engagement on violent offending. This paper investigates the relationships between cultural identity/engagement and violent recidivism for a cohort of Australian Indigenous people in custody. A total of 122 adults from 11 prisons in the state of Victoria completed a semi-structured interview comprising cultural identification and cultural engagement material in custody. All official police charges for violent offences were obtained for participants who were released from custody into the community over a period of 2 years. No meaningful relationship between cultural identity and violent recidivism was identified. However a significant association between cultural engagement and violent recidivism was obtained. Further analyses demonstrated that this relationship was significant only for participants with a strong Indigenous cultural identity. Participants with higher levels of cultural engagement took longer to violently re-offend although this association did not reach significance. For Australian Indigenous people in custody, 'cultural engagement' was significantly associated with non-recidivism. The observed protective impact of cultural engagement is a novel finding in a correctional context. Whereas identity alone did not buffer recidivism directly, it may have had an indirect influence given its relationship with cultural engagement. The findings of the study emphasize the importance of culture for Indigenous people in custody and a greater need for correctional institutions to accommodate Indigenous cultural considerations.

  14. Mechanical Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gap Yong; Jang, Gun Ik; Kim, Dung Jung; Kim, Ui Do

    1999-02-01

    This book introduces characteristics of metal with crystal structure and plastic deformation of metal, equilibrium diagram of alloy, steel such as constitutional diagram and structure of carbon steel, and heat treatment of steel, structural alloy steel, tool material, corrosion and anticorrosion of steel and stainless steel, heat resisting material and properties of steel against high temperature, strengthening of surface of steel, cast iron, nonferrous metal material and materials test.

  15. Magnetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaldin, Nicola A.

    2003-04-01

    Magnetic materials are the foundation of multi-billion dollar industries and the focus of intensive research across many disciplines. This book covers the fundamentals, basic theories and applications of magnetism and conventional magnetic materials. Based on a lecture course given by Nicola Spaldin in the Materials Department at University of California, Santa Barbara, the book is ideal for a one- semester course in magnetic materials. It contains numerous homework problems and solutions.

  16. Was there ever a Single Grave culture in East Denmark?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Rune

    2016-01-01

    coexisted for at least a couple of hundred years: the late Funnel Beaker culture (TRB), the forager-oriented Pitted Ware culture and the Single Grave and Battle Axe cultures, the last two belonging to the overall Corded Ware complex. As the Funnel Beaker culture ceased, East Denmark entered an insignificant...... material elements were obtained and fitted into existing Funnel Beaker traditions forming a heterogeneous cultural expression....

  17. Material Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Anna; Boer, Laurens; Tsaknaki, Vasiliki

    2017-01-01

    In the near future every other smart material will have computational power embedded in the form of graphene transistors or nanotubes. These will be the ultimate computational composites: materials that hold classic material qualities, such as structural durability, flexibility, texture, weight, ...

  18. 21 CFR 866.2320 - Differential culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2320 Differential culture... biological materials intended for medical purposes to cultivate and identify different types of pathogenic...

  19. 21 CFR 866.2300 - Multipurpose culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2300 Multipurpose culture... or solid biological materials intended for medical purposes for the cultivation and identification of...

  20. 21 CFR 866.2360 - Selective culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2360 Selective culture... solid biological materials intended for medical purposes to cultivate and identify certain pathogenic...

  1. 21 CFR 866.2330 - Enriched culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2330 Enriched culture... solid biological materials intended for medical purposes to cultivate and identify fastidious...

  2. Certain Aspects of the Samara Culture Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korolev Arkadiy I.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The problems of the Samara culture origin in the context of the Eneolithic cultures development in the whole steppe and forest-steppe Volga river region territory are discussed in the article. The view of the Samara culture formation that had resulted from the interaction of a variety of southern (the Caspian area and northern (forest and forest-steppe area groups of the Neolithic Volga-Ural population prevails. Based on the analysis of ceramics and anthropological materials of the S’yezzhee burial ground, the author concludes that the Samara culture had been formed as a result of a western cultural and racial impulse from the Mariupol cultural community, being subsequently influenced by the Khvalynsk culture bearers

  3. Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    This book deals with the mechanical and physical behavior of composites as influenced by composite geometry. "Composite Materials" provides a comprehensive introduction for researchers and students to modern composite materials research with a special emphasis on the significance of phase geometry....... The book enables the reader to a better understanding of the behavior of natural composites, improvement of such materials, and design of new materials with prescribed properties. A number of examples are presented: Special composite properties considered are stiffness, shrinkage, hygro-thermal behavior...... materials. Numerical procedures are outlined which facilitate the practical analysis of any feature considered in this book. Examples are presented which illustrate the analysis of well-known materials such as concrete, hardening cement paste, ceramics, tile, wood, impregnated and reinforced materials...

  4. Aerospace materials and material technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Wanhill, R

    2017-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive compilation of chapters on materials (both established and evolving) and material technologies that are important for aerospace systems. It considers aerospace materials in three Parts. Part I covers Metallic Materials (Mg, Al, Al-Li, Ti, aero steels, Ni, intermetallics, bronzes and Nb alloys); Part II deals with Composites (GLARE, PMCs, CMCs and Carbon based CMCs); and Part III considers Special Materials. This compilation has ensured that no important aerospace material system is ignored. Emphasis is laid in each chapter on the underlying scientific principles as well as basic and fundamental mechanisms leading to processing, characterization, property evaluation and applications. A considerable amount of materials data is compiled and presented in appendices at the end of the book. This book will be useful to students, researchers and professionals working in the domain of aerospace materials.

  5. Words in a Cultural Context?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Kavanagh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract: Successful communication is dependent upon an adequate level of cultural as well as linguistic understanding. Language is itself part of culture and reflects social structures and attitudes. lbis paper examines the case for dictionaries to carry cultural as well as lexical information. It reviews the American tradition and purpose of including cultural material in dictionaries, and considers the nature and scope of cultural information contained in a number of modem American and European dictionaries. Various means of presenting cultural information are also examined. The paper concludes by considering the implications for lexicographers developing dictionaries in multicultural South Africa.

    Keywords: COMMUNICATION, CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION, CULTURAL INFORMATION, CULTURE, CURRICULUM, DICTIONARIES FOR SPECIAL PURPOSES, DICTIONARY, DICTIONARY DESIGN, ENCYCLOPEDIA, ENCYCLOPEDIC DICTIONARIES, LANGUAGE, LEXICOGRAPHY, MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY, SOUTH AFRICA

    Opsomming: W oorde binne In kulturele konteks. Suksesvolle kommunikasie berusop 'n voldoende vlak van kulturele sowel as taalkundige begrip. Taal self is deeJ van kuJtuur enweerspieiH sosiale strukture en houdings. Hierdie artikel ondersoek die insluiting van sowel kultureleas leksikale inIigting in woordeboeke. Dit beoordeel die Amerikaanse tradisie en doel daarmeeom kulturele materiaal in woordeboeke in te sluit, en oorweeg die aard en omvang van kultureleinIigting vervat in 'n aantal moderne Amerikaanse en Europese woordeboeke. Verskillendemaniere om kulturele inIigting aan te bied, word ook ondersoek. Die artikel sluit af deur die implikasiesvir leksikograwe te oorweeg wat woordeboeke saamstel in multikulturele Suid-Afrika.

    Sleutelwoorde: KOMMUNIKASIE, INTERKULTURELE KOMMUNIKASIE, KULTURELEINLIGTlNG, KULTUUR, KURRIKULUM, WOORDEBOEKE MET SPESIALE OOGMERKE,WOORDEBOEK, WOORDEBOEKONTWERP, ENSIKLOPEDIE, ENSIKLOPEDIESE WOORDEBOEKE,TAAL, LEKSIKOGRAFIE, MULTIKULTURELE

  6. Cultural Humility and Hospital Safety Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Joshua N; Boan, David; Davis, Don E; Aten, Jamie D; Ruiz, John M; Maryon, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Hospital safety culture is an integral part of providing high quality care for patients, as well as promoting a safe and healthy environment for healthcare workers. In this article, we explore the extent to which cultural humility, which involves openness to cultural diverse individuals and groups, is related to hospital safety culture. A sample of 2011 hospital employees from four hospitals completed measures of organizational cultural humility and hospital safety culture. Higher perceptions of organizational cultural humility were associated with higher levels of general perceptions of hospital safety, as well as more positive ratings on non-punitive response to error (i.e., mistakes of staff are not held against them), handoffs and transitions, and organizational learning. The cultural humility of one's organization may be an important factor to help improve hospital safety culture. We conclude by discussing potential directions for future research.

  7. CONNECTION BETWEEN ECONOMICS, CULTURE AND CULTURAL DIPLOMACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agil Valiyev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, culture is one of the main feeble factors of economic development.  The leading role of culture in economic development should be argued as multiplied: so, on firstly, as domestic value, on secondly, as a main factor of regional economic development advanced to raised gravity of different regions for residents, tourists and investors, on thirdly, as major parameters of social development based on tolerance, creativity and knowledge. To the different international experiences, culture is main part of economic development in our life. Cultural diversities are combined into a main reason economic development model. The article consist of explainations about the understanding of culture, cultural diplomacy and economics, approach on conflicts between culture and economics, to find how affecting of culture to economic development, the role of culture in economic development of Azerbaijan. The article can be considered as a useful resource  for experts and researchers conducting research in this field.

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY AND ECOLOGICAL CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalimat M. Alilova

    2017-01-01

    satisfying his material needs to meeting the needs of the soul thus implementing a sustainable development strategy. Therefore the links between environmental philosophy and environmental culture deserve further study.

  9. Culture collections and the biotechnology deal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievers, Martin; Dasen, Gottfried; Wermelinger, Tobias; Landert, Silvano; Frasson, David

    2010-01-01

    Culture collections provide starting material for life science research, development and production. Especially in biotechnology, well characterised and pure microbial strains are essential for reproducible and safe bioprocesses. Culture collections also play a role as repositories of biological material for future applications and help to preserve biological diversity. In addition, they also maintain the know-how needed for more complex identification methods and help to develop new techniques. To enable culture collections to achieve higher quality standards, new certification guidelines for biological resource centres are currently being developed.

  10. El contexto cultural como medio y material educativo para la enseñanza aprendizaje de la historia y geografía en el nivel secundario del distrito de Ayacucho - 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Taipe Carbajal, Marcelino Efraín

    2014-01-01

    El propósito del trabajo de investigación fue identificar, seleccionar y utilizar Medios y Materiales Educativos del contexto Cultural que pueden influir en el proceso de Enseñanza Aprendizaje de la Historia y Geografía; optimizar la calidad del Procecso de Enseñanza Aprendizaje de la Historia y Geografía utilizando Medios y Materiales Educativos del Contexto, a fin de desarrollar la conciencia crítica, la identidad y el civismo de los estudiantes del nivel secundario. El tipo de investigació...

  11. Nano Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, In Ju; Lee, Ik Mo; Kwon, Yeung Gu; and others

    2006-02-15

    This book introduces background of nano science such as summary, plenty room at the bottom, access way to nano technique, nanoparticles using bottom-up method which are a marvel of nature, and modern alchemy : chemical synthesis of artificial nano structure, understanding of quantum mechanics, STM/AFM, nano metal powder, ceramic nanoparticles, nano structure film, manufacture of nanoparticles using reverse micelle method, carbon nano tube, sol-gel material, nano energy material, nano catalyst nano bio material technology and spintronics.

  12. Nano Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, In Ju; Lee, Ik Mo; Kwon, Yeung Gu

    2006-02-01

    This book introduces background of nano science such as summary, plenty room at the bottom, access way to nano technique, nanoparticles using bottom-up method which are a marvel of nature, and modern alchemy : chemical synthesis of artificial nano structure, understanding of quantum mechanics, STM/AFM, nano metal powder, ceramic nanoparticles, nano structure film, manufacture of nanoparticles using reverse micelle method, carbon nano tube, sol-gel material, nano energy material, nano catalyst nano bio material technology and spintronics.

  13. Material Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Brath; Mortensen, Henrik Rubæk; Mullins, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes and reflects upon the results of an investigative project which explores the setting up of a material system - a parametric and generative assembly consisting of and taking into consideration material properties, manufacturing constraints and geometric behavior. The project...... approaches the subject through the construction of a logic-driven system aiming to explore the possibilities of a material system that fulfills spatial, structural and performative requirements concurrently and how these are negotiated in situations where they might be conflicting....

  14. Material focus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokoler, Tomas; Vallgårda, Anna K. A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we build on the notion of computational composites, which hold a material perspective on computational technology. We argue that a focus on the material aspects of the technology could be a fruitful approach to achieve new expressions and to gain a new view on the technology's role...... in design. We study two of the computer's material properties: computed causality and connectability and through developing two computational composites that utilize these properties we begin to explore their potential expressions....

  15. Teamwork in Israeli Arab-Bedouin School-Based Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizel, Omar

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the western world a leading example of the educational reforms that have been implemented in the late twentieth and twenty-first century is School-Based Management (SBM), a system designed to improve educational outcome through staff teamwork and self-governance. This research set out to examine the efficacy of teamwork in ten…

  16. DEMONSTRATIVES IN A BEDOUIN ARABIC DIALECT OF WESTERN SUDAN

    OpenAIRE

    Manfredi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    International audience; This article aims at describing the forms, the distribution and the functions of demonstratives in Kordofanian Baggara Arabic, an Arabic dialect spoken by semi-nomadic cattle herders living in the Southern Kordofan State of the Republic of Sudan. Based on an oral corpus gathered on field, the study analyses in typological perspective the morphosyntactic and the pragmatic features of demonstrative pronouns and determiners as well as of sentential and locational demonstr...

  17. Materials characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azali Muhammad

    2005-01-01

    Various nuclear techniques have been developed and employed by technologies and scientists worldwide to physically and chemically characterise the material particularly those that have applications in industry. These include small angle neutron scattering (SANS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) for the internal structural study of material, whereas, the x-ray fluorescence (XRF) for the chemical analysis, while the Moessbauer spectroscopy for the study on the magnetic properties and structural identity of material. Basic principle and instrumentations of the techniques are discussed in this chapter. Example of their applications in various disciplines particularly in characterisation of industrial materials also described

  18. Cultural Archetype Contents for the Traditional Wedding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Hee Ahn

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to perform a contextual study of the wedding customs, wedding procedures, and wedding costumes included in Korean traditional wedding culture, making use of cultural contents which form cultural archetypes. The range of wedding customs studied are set limits from the Joseon dynasty to ancient times, and, for wedding procedures and costumes, to the Chosun dynasty, when a wedding ceremony became the norm. Only wedding ceremonies performed among ordinary classes are included as subjects for this research; wedding ceremonies and costumes for court are excluded. The cultural archetypes developed within these boundaries suggest prior cultural content, developed beforehand. The research methods are focused on document records inquiry and genre paintings during the Joseon era, using museum resources as visual materials. The following is the outcome of this research: Firstly, wedding customs and procedures observed among folk materials are presented in chronological order. Secondly, the brides' and grooms' wedding costumes are also presented chronologically, differentiated by class-characteristics.

  19. Cultural Analysis - towards cross-cultural understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullestrup, Hans

    The book considers intercultural understanding and co-action, partly by means of general insight into concept of culture and the dimensions which bring about cultural differences, and partly as a methodology to analyse a certain culture - whether one's own or others'. This leads towards...... an understanding of cultural complexity and cultural differences among people. Furthermore, the book provides a discussion of a number of ethical issues, which almost invariably will arise when people meet and co-act across cultural boundaries. Cultural Analysis consists of four parts. The first part offers...... a theoretical/abstract proposal for cultural understanding. The second part presents a theoretical/abstract proposal for under-standing intercultural plurality and complexity. The third part provides an empirical model for the analysis of intercultural co-action. Finally, the fourth part present and discusses...

  20. Exploring Culture : Exercises, Stories and Synthetic Cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    A unique training book containing over 100 culture awareness exercises, dialogues, stories incidents and simulations that bring to life Geert Hofstede's five dimensions of culture. These dimensions are: power distance, collectivism versus individualism, femininity versus masculinity, uncertainly

  1. Revisiting cultural awareness and cultural relevancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Hashem, Naji

    2015-10-01

    Comments on the original article by Christopher et al. (see record 2014-20055-001) regarding critical cultural awareness. The more insights and exploration of the meaning and influence of culture we receive, the better. There is no single treatment of any personal or collective culture(s) that can be inherently complete or totally exhaustive. New hermeneutics and skills are always needed, appreciated, and refreshing. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. 19 CFR 12.104h - Exempt materials and articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exempt materials and articles. 12.104h Section 12... THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Cultural Property § 12.104h Exempt materials and articles... material or any article of cultural property which is imported into the U.S. for temporary exhibition or...

  3. Safety, Security and Safeguards (3S) Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mladineo, S.V.; Frazar, S.

    2013-01-01

    A meaningful discussion of Safety, Security, and Safeguards (3S) Culture requires a review of the concepts related to the culture of the three components. The concept of culture can be confusing, and so careful use of terminology is needed to enable a focused and constructive dialogue. To this end, this paper will use the concept of organizational culture as a backdrop for a broader discussion about how the three subcultures of safety, security and safeguards come together to enhance the mission of an organization. Since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, the nuclear industry has embraced the concept of safety culture. The work on safety culture has been used to develop programs and concepts in the culture of Material Protection, Control, and Accounting and Nuclear Security Culture. More recently, some work has been done on defining an International Safeguards Culture. Others have spoken about a 3S Culture, but there has been little rigorous consideration of the concept. This paper attempts to address 3S Culture, to begin to evaluate the merit of the concept, and to propose a definition. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (authors)

  4. The symbolic power of corporate culture organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Kubko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to outline the nature of the symbolic block of the corporate culture and its role in the formation and development of the modern organization. In this paper the symbolic part of the corporate culture of the modern organizations has been analyzed. The role of symbols in the development and formation of corporate culture organizations and their values is determined. Corporate culture is characterized as a set of behavioral norms, artifacts, values, ideas and concepts, which are created by the organization. The corporate culture has to help us overcome obstacles, internal and external, on the way to success and prosperity. Corporate culture is a socially created reality which helps us to solve certain problems. The corporate culture serves as the level of formation of knowledge, skills, technology activities to achieve the objectives of a certain organization. The space of corporate culture, in turn, consists of meanings, symbols, myths, ideological directives, behavioral practices, communication links and a set of material objects. Thus, the characters are a common feature of the concept of corporate culture and thanks to them the values of the orientation «are being transmitted» to all members of the organization. The symbolic block of the culture has rituals, symbols, myths, legends, heroic peculiarities of organizations that reflect the most concise strong forms of the company culture, its major landmarks in the laconic and figurative shape.

  5. Dehistoricized Cultural Identity and Cultural Othering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiguo, Qu

    2013-01-01

    The assumption that each culture has its own distinctive identity has been generally accepted in the discussion of cultural identities. Quite often identity formation is not perceived as a dynamic and interactive ongoing process that engages other cultures and involves change in its responses to different challenges at different times. I will…

  6. Cultural Understanding Through Cross-Cultural Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briere, Jean-Francois

    1986-01-01

    A college course used an explicit intercultural approach and collective research activities to compare French and American cultures and to examine the reasons for cultural attitudes and culture conflict. Class assignments dealt with contrastive analyses of American and French institutions like advertising, cinema, feminism, etc. (MSE)

  7. Microalgal Culture Collection Transfers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Milford Microalgal culture Collection holds over 200 live cultures representing 13 classes of of algae. The cultures are maintained in three different growing...

  8. Urethral discharge culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genital exudate culture; Culture - genital discharge or exudate; Urethritis - culture ... Augenbraun MH, McCormack WM. Urethritis. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases . 8th ed. ...

  9. Urine culture - catheterized specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - urine - catheterized specimen; Urine culture - catheterization; Catheterized urine specimen culture ... Normal values depend on the test being performed. Normal results are reported as "no growth" and are a sign ...

  10. Organizations, projects and culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van Cleeff; Pieter van Nispen tot Pannerden

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: to explore and demonstrate the effects of organizational culture on projects, in particular project culture and project management style. Methodology/approach: descriptive and explorative; through students’ groups. Findings: the cultural relationship between organizations, their projects

  11. Lymph node culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - lymph node ... or viruses grow. This process is called a culture. Sometimes, special stains are also used to identify specific cells or microorganisms before culture results are available. If needle aspiration does not ...

  12. Routine sputum culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sputum culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Culture, routine. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, ... . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:409- ...

  13. Cross-cultural awareness

    OpenAIRE

    БУРЯК Н.Ю.

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the importance of cultural awareness for businesspeople when they go abroad. It also gives some cultural advice and factors which are thought to be the most important in creating a culture.

  14. New materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, S.K.; Rao, C.N.R.; Tsuruta, T.

    1992-01-01

    The book contains the state-of-the art lectures delivered at the discussion meeting on new materials, a field in which rapid advances are taking place. The main objective of the meeting was to bring active scientists in this area from Japan and India together. The topics covered diverse aspects of modern materials including high temperature superconducting compounds. (M.G.B.)

  15. Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    . The book enables the reader to a better understanding of the behavior of natural composites, improvement of such materials, and design of new materials with prescribed properties. A number of examples are presented: Special composite properties considered are stiffness, shrinkage, hygro-thermal behavior......, viscoelastic behavior, and internal stress states. Other physical properties considered are thermal and electrical conductivities, diffusion coefficients, dielectric constants and magnetic permeability. Special attention is given to the effect of pore shape on the mechanical and physical behavior of porous...... materials. Numerical procedures are outlined which facilitate the practical analysis of any feature considered in this book. Examples are presented which illustrate the analysis of well-known materials such as concrete, hardening cement paste, ceramics, tile, wood, impregnated and reinforced materials...

  16. Touching Materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lisa Rosén

    2012-01-01

    Dripping ink pens, colourful paint on skin, vegetables pots on a school roof. In interviews with three generations of former school pupils, memories of material objects bore a relation to everyday school life in the past. Interwoven, these objects entered the memorising processes, taking...... the interviewer and interviewee beyond an exclusively linguistic understanding of memory. This article analyses how the shifting objects of materiality in personal and generational school memories connects to material as well as sensuous experiences of everyday school life and its complex processes of learning....... Drawing on anthropological writings, the article argues that the objects of materiality are part of important but non-verbalised memories of schooling. The Dutch philosopher Eelco Runia’s notions of presence and metonymy are incorporated as tools for approaching objects of materiality in memory studies....

  17. Composite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchens, Stacy A [Knoxville, TN; Woodward, Jonathan [Solihull, GB; Evans, Barbara R [Oak Ridge, TN; O' Neill, Hugh M [Knoxville, TN

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  18. Composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Stacy A [Knoxville, TN; Woodward, Jonathan [Solihull, GB; Evans, Barbara R [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M [Knoxville, TN

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  19. Cell Culture on MEMS Platforms: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Ming; Tong, Wen Hao; Choudhury, Deepak; Rahim, Nur Aida Abdul; Iliescu, Ciprian; Yu, Hanry

    2009-01-01

    Microfabricated systems provide an excellent platform for the culture of cells, and are an extremely useful tool for the investigation of cellular responses to various stimuli. Advantages offered over traditional methods include cost-effectiveness, controllability, low volume, high resolution, and sensitivity. Both biocompatible and bio-incompatible materials have been developed for use in these applications. Biocompatible materials such as PMMA or PLGA can be used directly for cell culture. However, for bio-incompatible materials such as silicon or PDMS, additional steps need to be taken to render these materials more suitable for cell adhesion and maintenance. This review describes multiple surface modification strategies to improve the biocompatibility of MEMS materials. Basic concepts of cell-biomaterial interactions, such as protein adsorption and cell adhesion are covered. Finally, the applications of these MEMS materials in Tissue Engineering are presented. PMID:20054478

  20. Wpływ detergentów, humianu i ściółek na plonowanie goździków w uprawie hydroponicznej [Influence of detergents humate and seedbed materials on yield of carnations in hydroponic culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Gumińska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Addition of the detergent (DBSS + ASS either .single or every eight weeks to the nutrient solution stimulates carnation development. Detergent addition every fourth week caused decreasing of flower diameter. The addition of humates to the nutrient solution did not interact significantly with detergents. Among three material combinations used in the seedbed: peat with coke-slag, peat with brown coal and sponge with coke-slag – the first proved the best.

  1. The Shaping Of Cultural Knowledge In South African Translation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KATEVG

    theory of contrastive analysis the constant is referred to traditionally as the tertium comparationis. In respect of culture, the source text may be compared to the target text in terms of the cultural dimensions, as set out in Newmark (1988:103):. (3)(a) Ecology: animals, plants, local winds, etc. (b) Material culture (artefacts): food, ...

  2. EFFECTS OF CULTURE TANK SECTIONS ON GROWTH OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. (Mrs) Jenyo-Oni

    EFFECTS OF THE SHAPE OF CULTURE TANKS ON PRODUCTION OF THE. AFRICAN CATFISH Clarias ... Three culture tank shapes (circular, rectangular and square) made of plastic material, having the ..... and space for fish culture. Since total costs incurred remains one of the most important factor in the evaluation of.

  3. 7 CFR 58.330 - Butter starter cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Butter starter cultures. 58.330 Section 58.330... Material § 58.330 Butter starter cultures. Harmless bacterial cultures when used in the development of flavor components in butter and related products shall have a pleasing and desirable flavor and shall...

  4. Developing cultural sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruddock, Heidi; Turner, deSalle

    2007-01-01

    Title. Developing cultural sensitivity: nursing students’ experiences of a study abroad programme Aim. This paper is a report of a study to explore whether having an international learning experience as part of a nursing education programme promoted cultural sensitivity in nursing students....... Background. Many countries are becoming culturally diverse, but healthcare systems and nursing education often remain mono-cultural and focused on the norms and needs of the majority culture. To meet the needs of all members of multicultural societies, nurses need to develop cultural sensitivity...... on the deliver of culturally sensitive care. Keywords: cultural sensitivity, nursing students, empirical research, report, interviews, study abroad programmes, phenomenology...

  5. Safeguards Culture: Analogies from Safety Culture and Security Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, K.

    2013-01-01

    The terminology of 'safeguards culture' has been used loosely by safeguards experts as an essential element for establishing an organizational environment of stakeholders for the effective and efficient implementation of international safeguards. However, unlike the other two triplet brothers/ sisters of 3S's (Safety, Security, Safeguards), there is no formally established definition of safeguards culture. In the case of safety culture, INSAG (the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group) has extensively dealt with its concept, elaborating its definition and key characteristics, and published its report, INSAG-4, as the IAEA Safety Series 75. On the other hand, security culture has also been defined by AdSec (the Advisory Group on Nuclear Security). In this paper, a provisional definition of safeguards culture is made on the analogies of safety culture and security culture, and an effort is made to describe essential elements of safeguards culture. It is proposed for SAGSI (the Standing Advisory Group on Safeguards Implementation) to formally consider the definition of safeguards culture and its characteristics. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (author)

  6. FROM CULTURAL IMPOTENCE TO CULTURAL AMPUTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Вячеслав Владимирович Суханов

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cultural space of any state is formed by a population that is within its borders. In this article, the author introduces a new cultural definitions «cultural impotence» and «cultural amputation», justifying their use, both in terms of population of the Russian Federation and the European Union and America. The article analyzes the state of society and the cultural factors that influence the development of society in Russia, there are options to bring the country out of a deep cultural crisis. Also established a close relationship between the domestic policy of the state and development of culture.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-2-1

  7. Attitude towards materialism in sport and materialism tendencies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modern media has commoditised professional athletes, turning them into role models with significant celebrity status and making them a central force driving today's materialistic consumer culture. This study investigates the relationship between black Generation Y students' level of acceptance of materialism in sport and ...

  8. Utopian Materialities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elgaard-Jensen, Torben

    2004-01-01

    a detachment from the known world.Second, the utopianism of a new economy firm is examined. It is argued that the physical set-up of the firm -in particular the distribution of tables and chairs - evoke a number of alternatives to ordinary work practice.In this way the materialities of the firm are crucial...... to its persuasive image of being the office of the future.The notion that utopia is achieved through material arrangements is finally related to the analysis of facts andfictions in ANT. It is argued, that even though Utopias are neither fact nor fiction, they are both material andeffective......In various ways, this paper makes the counter-intuitive claim that the utopian and the material are thoroughlyinterdependent, rather than worlds apart. First, through a reading of Thomas More's Utopia, it is argued thatUtopia is the product of particular kinds of relations, rather than merely...

  9. Hazardous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DO NOT put the material in the normal trash. DO NOT let it get into the air. ... Accessed February 21, 2018. Occupational Safety and Health Administration website. Healthcare. www.osha.gov/SLTC/healthcarefacilities/index. ...

  10. CURRICULUM MATERIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Jersey State Dept. of Education, Trenton.

    MATERIALS ARE LISTED BY 36 TOPICS ARRANGED IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER. TOPICS INCLUDE APPRENTICE TRAINING, BAKING, DRAFTING, ENGLISH, GLASSBLOWING, HOME ECONOMICS, INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY, MACHINE SHOP, NEEDLE TRADES, REFRIGERATION, AND UPHOLSTERY. PRICES ARE GIVEN FOR EACH ITEM. (EL)

  11. Utopian Materialities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elgaard-Jensen, Torben

    2004-01-01

    In various ways, this paper makes the counter-intuitive claim that the utopian and the material are thoroughlyinterdependent, rather than worlds apart. First, through a reading of Thomas More's Utopia, it is argued thatUtopia is the product of particular kinds of relations, rather than merely...... a detachment from the known world.Second, the utopianism of a new economy firm is examined. It is argued that the physical set-up of the firm -in particular the distribution of tables and chairs - evoke a number of alternatives to ordinary work practice.In this way the materialities of the firm are crucial...... to its persuasive image of being the office of the future.The notion that utopia is achieved through material arrangements is finally related to the analysis of facts andfictions in ANT. It is argued, that even though Utopias are neither fact nor fiction, they are both material andeffective...

  12. Propulsion materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Edward J. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States); Sullivan, Rogelio A. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States); Gibbs, Jerry L. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Vehicle Technologies (OVT) is pleased to introduce the FY 2007 Annual Progress Report for the Propulsion Materials Research and Development Program. Together with DOE national laboratories and in partnership with private industry and universities across the United States, the program continues to engage in research and development (R&D) that provides enabling materials technology for fuel-efficient and environmentally friendly commercial and passenger vehicles.

  13. Encountering Materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2016-01-01

    DHT researcher Connie Svabo and artist Charlotte Grum did a joint performance presentation titled Becoming Sheep, Becoming Animal at the international conference Encountering Materiality – Transdisciplinary Conversations, held in Geneve, Schwitzerland, June 23-25 2016.......DHT researcher Connie Svabo and artist Charlotte Grum did a joint performance presentation titled Becoming Sheep, Becoming Animal at the international conference Encountering Materiality – Transdisciplinary Conversations, held in Geneve, Schwitzerland, June 23-25 2016....

  14. Nano Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    AlOOH Argonide www.argonide.com Perovskite Fuel Cell Materials www.fuelcellmaterials.com Metal rubber Nanosonic www.nanosonic.com ZnO , optical layer... perovskites are being discussed as electrode materials for use as cathodes. Specifically the high surface area and the high ionic conductivity of the...Nanoparticles • Perovskites • Metal rubber • Nanoclays • Nanoshells & quatum dots • Nanopores • Molecular nanotechnology • Software • Conclusion 3

  15. Background Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandersen, Marianne; Hyytiäinen, Kari; Saraiva, Sofia

    This document serves as a background material to the BONUS Pilot Scenario Workshop, which aims to develop harmonised regional storylines of socio-ecological futures in the Baltic Sea region in a collaborative effort together with other BONUS projects and stakeholders.......This document serves as a background material to the BONUS Pilot Scenario Workshop, which aims to develop harmonised regional storylines of socio-ecological futures in the Baltic Sea region in a collaborative effort together with other BONUS projects and stakeholders....

  16. Culture Unbound Volume 6, Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Fornäs

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available With this volume, Culture Unbound celebrates its five-year anniversary. This makes a good opportunity both to look back at what we have achieved and to gaze ahead to what we have planned for the future. This new volume, which will be more extensive and ambitious than ever, thus marks a readiness and willingness to engage with some of the most acute problems and complex transformation that society faces. We hope and believe that this not only expresses the ambitions of Culture Unbound but also reflects a more general tendency within contemporary cultural research. In order to better accommodate the most recent developments within the field of cultural research, and facilitate intellectual discussion and critical analysis of contemporary issues we also plan to expand our repertoire of published material. In the coming year Culture Unbound will therefore introduce a section of texts we have chosen to call ‘Unbound Ideas’. Here we welcome academic essays and texts of a somewhat shorter format and freer approach to scholarly convention than our usual full-length research articles. These essays will take different – perhaps speculative or conjectural – positions, or give a new perspective on pressing topics or recently emerged.

  17. Many Forms of Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Adam B.

    2009-01-01

    Psychologists interested in culture have focused primarily on East-West differences in individualism-collectivism, or independent-interdependent self-construal. As important as this dimension is, there are many other forms of culture with many dimensions of cultural variability. Selecting from among the many understudied cultures in psychology,…

  18. HPT: The Culture Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Roger M.; Wittkuhn, Klaus D.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the challenges in managing performance across national cultures and within changing corporate cultures. Describes two human performance technology tools that can help performance consultants understand different cultures and provide the basis for successful management action: the culture audit and the systems model that can be adapted…

  19. Journal of Cultural Studies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of Cultural Studies was established in 1999 as an independent tool for research development in Africa. It is published by the Nigerian Group for the Study of African Cultures (NIGSAC), a non-profit organisation which focuses on cultural and development issues in Africa. The journal aims to explore the varied socio-cultural ...

  20. Reflections on Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Lisette

    1999-01-01

    Examines aspects of cross-cultural studies, delineates a concept of culture, explores the interplay of culture and ethics, and analyzes the shifting cultural and economic values as issues that either the economists or the humanists will deal with under the banner of the future global village. (Author/VWL)

  1. Ontological foundations of human culture as the highest values being

    OpenAIRE

    Воропаєва, В. Г.

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the ontological foundations of culture as the highest value of life, observed that culture - is historically certain level of society and man, expressed in the types and forms of life and activity of people and they create material and spiritual values, reveals the essence of global cultural transformations that are at the service of subjective economic globalization. The purpose of the article: the paradigm of culture as a form of general civilization and t...

  2. Cultural Tourism in the Italian Opera Houses' Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Morelli Giovanna; Fisichella Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, culture and tourism are two keywords of growing importance, more than ever, for the Italian recovery from the present global economic crisis. Therefore, policy makers and tourism operators view cultural tourism as a strategic potential source of growth. On the other hand, in everyone's imaginary, Italy is strongly linked to culture, both material and immaterial, on which it founds expected significant tourist flows. Moreover, music is "per se" an immaterial cultural resource without...

  3. Corporate culture and its role in human resource management

    OpenAIRE

    PERTLÍKOVÁ, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    This thesis deals with the corporate culture in a chosen company Podzimek a synové s. r. o. The aim is to analyze the corporate culture and its role in human resource management. There is explained the basic terminology which comes to this field. Various types of corporate culture and interconnection between human resource management and a company culture are described there.The research is carried out in several steps. Based on the observation, studying corporate materials, the thesis for th...

  4. Aging in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Helene H

    2013-06-01

    This article reviews the empirical studies that test socioemotional aging across cultures. The review focuses on comparisons between Western (mostly North Americans and Germans) and Eastern cultures (mostly Chinese) in areas including age-related personality, social relationships, and cognition. Based on the review, I argue that aging is a meaning-making process. Individuals from each cultural context internalize cultural values with age. These internalized cultural values become goals that guide adult development. When individuals from different cultures each pursue their own goals with age, cultural differences in socioemotional aging occur.

  5. Conceptualizing cultures of violence and cultural change

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, J. Carter

    2007-01-01

    The historiography of violence has undergone a distinct cultural turn as attention has shifted from examining violence as a clearly defined (and countable) social problem to analysing its historically defined 'social meaning'. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the relationship between 'violence' and 'culture' is still being established. How are 'cultures of violence' formed? What impact do they have on violent behaviour? How do they change? This essay examines some of the conceptual aspects...

  6. Materiality for Musical Expressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindell, Rikard; Tahiroğlu, Koray; Riis, Morten S.

    2016-01-01

    Nordic universities. Electronic music instrument makers participated in providing the course. In eleven days the students designed and built interfaces for musical expressions , composed a piece, and performed at the Norberg electronic music festival. The students explored the relationship between......We organised an elven day intense course in materiality for musical expressions to explore underlying principles of New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME) in higher education. We grounded the course in different aspects of ma-teriality and gathered interdisciplinary student teams from three...... technology and possible musical expression with a strong connection to culture and place. The emphasis on performance provided closure and motivated teams to move forward in their design and artistic processes. On the basis of the course we discuss an interdisciplinary NIME course syllabus, and we infer...

  7. Athletes’ careers across cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryba, Tatiana; Stambulova, Natalia

    in this symposium continue the initiated dialogue of the relevance of culture and cultural issues in their analyses of how social and cultural discourses shape career development and career transitions of athletes in different countries. Opening the foundations of sport psychological knowledge to culturally diverse...... and, perhaps, unfamiliar intellectual traditions, perspectives and concerns, the symposium will demonstrate how local knowledge of problems enables researchers and practitioners to better understand the dynamics of cultural diversity within the topic of athlete career development and assistance....

  8. Organizational Culture and Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth A. Martinez; Nancy Beaulieu; Robert Gibbons; Peter Pronovost; Thomas Wang

    2015-01-01

    Organizations are all around us. Culture is trickier—to analyze and even to see. We consider both the effect of management on culture and the effect of culture on performance. We begin by describing an intervention that dramatically improved outcomes and conspicuously included a culture-change component. We then use details from this intervention to describe potential empirical analyses of the association between organizational culture and performance in this and similar settings. Finally, we...

  9. Atmospheric materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    A disjunction between the material and the immaterial has been at the heart of the architectural debate for decades. In this dialectic tension, the notion of atmosphere which increasingly claims attention in architectural discourse seems to be parallactic, leading to the re-evaluation of perceptual...... experience and, consequently, to the conceptual and methodological shifts in the production of space, and hence in the way we think about materiality. In this context, architectural space is understood as a contingent construction – a space of engagement that appears to us as a result of continuous...... and complex interferences revealed through our perception; ‘the atmospheric’ is explored as a spatial and affective quality as well as a sensory background, and materiality as a powerful and almost magical agency in shaping of atmosphere. Challenging existing dichotomies and unraveling intrinsic...

  10. Electronic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Kwok, H L

    2010-01-01

    The electronic properties of solids have become of increasing importance in the age of information technology. The study of solids and materials, while having originated from the disciplines of physics and chemistry, has evolved independently over the past few decades. The classical treatment of solid-state physics, which emphasized classifications, theories and fundamental physical principles, is no longer able to bridge the gap between materials advances and applications. In particular, the more recent developments in device physics and technology have not necessarily been driven by new conc

  11. Telling materials.

    OpenAIRE

    Crang, M.

    2003-01-01

    This chapter asks us to think carefully about what we do with material we have created out in the field. The way it is going to approach this is by thinking about the actions involved in analysis making sense out of the material you have so painstakingly gathered. However, I am not going to present a discussion of the criteria of a ‘good’ or ‘valid’ analysis, since there are many types of epistemological theories that underlie different sorts of analysis. That is, there are theories about how...

  12. The knowns and unknowns of chimpanzee culture

    OpenAIRE

    Gruber, Thibaud; Reynolds, Vernon; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Claims of culture in chimpanzees appeared soon after the launch of the first field studies in africa.1 The notion of chimpanzee ‘material cultures’ was coined,2 and this was followed by a first formal comparison, which revealed an astonishing degree of behavioural diversity between the different study communities, mainly in terms of tool use.3 Although this behavioural diversity is still undisputed, the question of chimpanzee cultures has remained controversial.4–6 The debate has less to do w...

  13. Reconsidering Cultural Heritage in East Asia

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The concept of ‘cultural heritage’ has acquired increasing currency in culture, politics and societies in East Asia. However, in spite of a number of research projects in this field, our understanding of how the past and its material expressions have been perceived, conceptualised and experienced in this part of the world, and how these views affect contemporary local practices and notions of identity, particularly in a period of rapid economic development and increasing globalisation, is sti...

  14. Advancing Climate Literacy through Investment in Science Education Faculty, and Future and Current Science Teachers: Providing Professional Learning, Instructional Materials, and a Model for Locally-Relevant and Culturally-Responsive Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halversen, C.; Apple, J. K.; McDonnell, J. D.; Weiss, E.

    2014-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) call for 5th grade students to "obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect Earth's resources and environment". Achieving this, and other objectives in NGSS, will require changes in the educational system for both students and teachers. Teachers need access to high quality instructional materials and continuous professional learning opportunities starting in pre-service education. Students need highly engaging and authentic learning experiences focused on content that is strategically interwoven with science practices. Pre-service and early career teachers, even at the secondary level, often have relatively weak understandings of the complex Earth systems science required for understanding climate change and hold alternative ideas and naïve beliefs about the nature of science. These naïve understandings cause difficulties in portraying and teaching science, especially considering what is being called for in NGSS. The ACLIPSE program focuses on middle school pre-service science teachers and education faculty because: (1) the concepts that underlie climate change align well with the disciplinary core ideas and practices in NGSS for middle grades; and (2) middle school is a critical time for capturing students interest in science as student engagement by eighth grade is the most effective predictor of student pursuit of science in high school and college. Capturing student attention at this age is critical for recruitment to STEM careers and lifelong climate literacy. THE ACLIPSE program uses cutting edge research and technology in ocean observing systems to provide educators with new tools to engage students that will lead to deeper understanding of the interactions between the ocean and climate systems. Establishing authentic, meaningful connections between indigenous and place-based, and technological climate observations will help generate a more holistic perspective

  15. Family, alcohol, and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, L A

    1989-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s a small but rich tradition of anthropological and sociological studies of family culture, cultural context, and alcohol has developed. Ideally, ethnographic analysis of a cultural group and in-depth holistic examination of family process are incorporated in such research. In conducting family, culture, and alcohol investigations, researchers are encouraged to reexamine some conceptual assumptions: (1) their working definition of culture; (2) their relative emphasis on family culture or cultural context; (3) their attention to socialization as an active process in the transmission of culture within and across generations; and (4) their adoption of a holistic and cross-generational perspective. To apply this line of research to preventive and intervention strategies, two questions are especially relevant: Why are particular alcohol traditions established and maintained within families? What incentives and constraints from the family's cultural context help create, preserve, and/or terminate particular drinking practices?

  16. Cultural Literacy: Negotiating Language, Culture, and Thought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ellen Riojas; Flores, Belinda Bustos

    2007-01-01

    Our schools see increasing numbers of students who reflect the wide diversity of this country's population, but too often these differences--culture, language, socioeconomic backgrounds, ethnicity are viewed from negative or deficit perspectives when they are, in fact, the cultural capital that enriches discussion, broadens viewpoints, and…

  17. What Is so "Cultural" About Cultural Entrepreneurship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staffan Albinsson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The term “cultural entrepreneurship” has been increasingly used during the new millennium, mirroring the rapidly growing importance of the “quaternary sector of the economy,” i.e. knowledge-based industries, including culture. Exploration of the literature in which the term “cultural entrepreneurship” is used does not bring a solid, clear-cut, and unambiguous understanding of its definition or meaning. The aim of this paper is to present various uses of the concept and to bring about some clarity in how the concept can be understood. Two overarching uses of the cultural entrepreneurship concept have been found: 1. the anthropologist’s and institutional economist’s use, which indicates the dynamic development of intangible cultural features such as symbols, myths, languages, beliefs, values, norms, rituals, and attitudes in and between societies, and 2. the arts development use, which indicates the dynamic development of cultural services, tangible goods, and individual or collective career promotion. Most authors use a cultural entrepreneurship concept without defining it. Authors could apply more precise definitions by using a quadruple bottom-line framework to position themselves in the nexus of financial, social, artistic, and cultural perspectives.

  18. Ferroic Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For many ferro- electrics, this response function becomes particularly large when the material is at or near the temperature of the ferroelectric phase transition. An analogy from sociology may help explain why this should be so. When things are in a state of flux (say, when there a revolution under way, or a war is going on), ...

  19. Emerging Materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Olav Wedege; Breinbjerg, Morten; Pold, Søren

    2009-01-01

    The authors examine how materiality emerges from complex chains of mediation in creative software use. The primarily theoretical argument is inspired and illustrated by interviews with two composers of electronic music. The authors argue that computer mediated activity should not primarily...

  20. Materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, H.E.

    1976-01-01

    The main thrust of the materials program is the development of a structural material for the MSBR primary circuit which has adequate resistance to embrittlement by neutron irradiation and to shallow intergranular attack by fission product penetration. A modified Hastelloy N containing 2 percent Ti has good resistance to irradiation embrittlement; however, it remains to be shown that the alloy has sufficient resistance to shallow intergranular cracking. Numerous laboratory tests are in progress to answer this important question. Laboratory programs to study Hastelloy N--salt--tellurium interactions are being established, including the development of methods for exposing test materials under simulated reactor operating conditions. The procurement of products from two commercial heats (8000 and 10,000 lb) of 2 percent Ti--modified Hastelloy N continued. All products except seamless tubing were received, and much experience was gained in the fabrication of the new alloy. The work on chemical processing materials is concentrated on graphite. Capsule tests are in progress to study possible chemical interactions between graphite and bismuth-lithium solutions and to evaluate the mechanical intrusion of these solutions into the graphite