WorldWideScience

Sample records for bed waste heat

  1. Preliminary market assessment of fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, F.T.; Fey, C.L.; Grogan, P.J.; Klein, N.P.

    1980-06-01

    A preliminary assessment of fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery (FBWHR) system market potential is presented with emphasis on the factors influencing industrial acceptability. Preliminary market potential areas are identified based on the availability of waste heat. Trends in energy use are examined to see the effect they might have on these market potential areas in the future. Focus groups interviews are used to explore important factors in the industrial decision-making process. These important factors are explored quantitatively in a survey of industrial plant engineers. The survey deals with the waste-heat boiler configuration of the FBWHR system. Results indicate market acceptance of the fluidized-bed waste-heat boiler could be quite low.

  2. Fluidized-bed incineration plant equipped with waste heat boilers. Developed for mid-size municipalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handa, Hitoshi

    1988-01-20

    A fluidized bed incineration plant with a waste heat boiler was installed to dispose wastes in Sakura City on March, 1987 and has waste disposing capacity of 120tons/d. Sands are fluidized in the furnace at 700-800/sup 0/C and wastes are burned completely for a short time. The waste heat boiler is used to utilize waste heat to send steam to aquiculturing farms and hot water to the community plaza and further supplies steam to two 90kW back pressure turbines for driving forced draft fan used for the incineration plant. Harmful gases in waste gas are removed by the harmful gas eliminator to lower HCl to 120ppm or less and K value of SOx to 9.0 or less and then cleaned gas is exhausted through the electostatic precipitator and the chimney. Dust and fly ash are transferred to a reservior through a superior seal tight air transportation system, pelletized and disposed for land fill. Bulk waste disposing capacity is 50 tons/d and harmful wastes, magnetic materials, unburnable and burnable wastes are classified and separated. Separated iron purity is 95% or more. (4 figs, 2 photos)

  3. Hydrous mineral dehydration around heat-generating nuclear waste in bedded salt formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Amy B; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Caporuscio, Florie A; Robinson, Bruce A; Stauffer, Philip H

    2015-06-02

    Heat-generating nuclear waste disposal in bedded salt during the first two years after waste emplacement is explored using numerical simulations tied to experiments of hydrous mineral dehydration. Heating impure salt samples to temperatures of 265 °C can release over 20% by mass of hydrous minerals as water. Three steps in a series of dehydration reactions are measured (65, 110, and 265 °C), and water loss associated with each step is averaged from experimental data into a water source model. Simulations using this dehydration model are used to predict temperature, moisture, and porosity after heating by 750-W waste canisters, assuming hydrous mineral mass fractions from 0 to 10%. The formation of a three-phase heat pipe (with counter-circulation of vapor and brine) occurs as water vapor is driven away from the heat source, condenses, and flows back toward the heat source, leading to changes in porosity, permeability, temperature, saturation, and thermal conductivity of the backfill salt surrounding the waste canisters. Heat pipe formation depends on temperature, moisture availability, and mobility. In certain cases, dehydration of hydrous minerals provides sufficient extra moisture to push the system into a sustained heat pipe, where simulations neglecting this process do not.

  4. Fluidised bed heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, D.E.; Healey, E.M.; Roberts, A.G.

    1974-01-01

    Problems that have arisen during the initial stages of development of fluidised bed boilers in which heat transfer surfaces are immersed in fluidised solids are discussed. The very high heat transfer coefficients that are obtained under these conditions can be exploited to reduce the total heat transfer surface to a fraction of that in normal boilers. However, with the high heat flux levels involved, tube stressing becomes more important and it is advantageous to use smaller diameter tubes. One of the initial problems was that the pumping power absorbed by the fluidised bed appeared to be high. The relative influence of the fluidising velocity (and the corresponding bed area), tube diameter, tube spacing, heat transfer coefficient and bed temperature on pumping power and overall cost was determined. This showed the importance of close tube packing and research was undertaken to see if this would adversely affect the heat transfer coefficient. Pressure operation also reduces the pumping power. Fouling and corrosion tests in beds burning coal suggest that higher temperatures could be reached reliably and cost studies show that, provided the better refractory metals are used, the cost of achieving higher temperatures is not unduly high. It now remains to demonstrate at large scale that the proposed systems are viable and that the methods incorporated to overcome start up and part lead running problems are satisfactory. The promising role of these heat transfer techniques in other applications is briefly discussed

  5. Comparison of ANN (MLP), ANFIS, SVM, and RF models for the online classification of heating value of burning municipal solid waste in circulating fluidized bed incinerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Haihui; Ma, Zengyi; Tang, Yijun; Wang, Yuelan; Yan, Jianhua; Ni, Mingjiang; Cen, Kefa; Huang, Qunxing

    2017-10-01

    The heating values, particularly lower heating values of burning municipal solid waste are critically important parameters in operating circulating fluidized bed incineration systems. However, the heating values change widely and frequently, while there is no reliable real-time instrument to measure heating values in the process of incinerating municipal solid waste. A rapid, cost-effective, and comparative methodology was proposed to evaluate the heating values of burning MSW online based on prior knowledge, expert experience, and data-mining techniques. First, selecting the input variables of the model by analyzing the operational mechanism of circulating fluidized bed incinerators, and the corresponding heating value was classified into one of nine fuzzy expressions according to expert advice. Development of prediction models by employing four different nonlinear models was undertaken, including a multilayer perceptron neural network, a support vector machine, an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system, and a random forest; a series of optimization schemes were implemented simultaneously in order to improve the performance of each model. Finally, a comprehensive comparison study was carried out to evaluate the performance of the models. Results indicate that the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system model outperforms the other three models, with the random forest model performing second-best, and the multilayer perceptron model performing at the worst level. A model with sufficient accuracy would contribute adequately to the control of circulating fluidized bed incinerator operation and provide reliable heating value signals for an automatic combustion control system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Considerations of the Differences between Bedded and Domal Salt Pertaining to Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Francis D.; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Sobolik, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Salt formations hold promise for eternal removal of nuclear waste from our biosphere. Germany and the United States have ample salt formations for this purpose, ranging from flat-bedded formations to geologically mature dome structures. As both nations revisit nuclear waste disposal options, the choice between bedded, domal, or intermediate pillow formations is once again a contemporary issue. For decades, favorable attributes of salt as a disposal medium have been extoled and evaluated, carefully and thoroughly. Yet, a sense of discovery continues as science and engineering interrogate naturally heterogeneous systems. Salt formations are impermeable to fluids. Excavation-induced fractures heal as seal systems are placed or natural closure progresses toward equilibrium. Engineering required for nuclear waste disposal gains from mining and storage industries, as humans have been mining salt for millennia. This great intellectual warehouse has been honed and distilled, but not perfected, for all nuances of nuclear waste disposal. Nonetheless, nations are able and have already produced suitable license applications for radioactive waste disposal in salt. A remaining conundrum is site location. Salt formations provide isolation, and geotechnical barriers reestablish impermeability after waste is placed in the geology. Between excavation and closure, physical, mechanical, thermal, chemical, and hydrological processes ensue. Positive attributes for isolation in salt have many commonalities independent of the geologic setting. In some cases, specific details of the environment will affect the disposal concept and thereby define interaction of features, events and processes, while simultaneously influencing scenario development. Here we identify and discuss high-level differences and similarities of bedded and domal salt formations. Positive geologic and engineering attributes for disposal purposes are more common among salt formations than are significant differences

  7. Considerations of the Differences between Bedded and Domal Salt Pertaining to Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Francis D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kuhlman, Kristopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sobolik, Steven R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-07-07

    Salt formations hold promise for eternal removal of nuclear waste from our biosphere. Germany and the United States have ample salt formations for this purpose, ranging from flat-bedded formations to geologically mature dome structures. As both nations revisit nuclear waste disposal options, the choice between bedded, domal, or intermediate pillow formations is once again a contemporary issue. For decades, favorable attributes of salt as a disposal medium have been extoled and evaluated, carefully and thoroughly. Yet, a sense of discovery continues as science and engineering interrogate naturally heterogeneous systems. Salt formations are impermeable to fluids. Excavation-induced fractures heal as seal systems are placed or natural closure progresses toward equilibrium. Engineering required for nuclear waste disposal gains from mining and storage industries, as humans have been mining salt for millennia. This great intellectual warehouse has been honed and distilled, but not perfected, for all nuances of nuclear waste disposal. Nonetheless, nations are able and have already produced suitable license applications for radioactive waste disposal in salt. A remaining conundrum is site location. Salt formations provide isolation and geotechnical barriers reestablish impermeability after waste is placed in the geology. Between excavation and closure, physical, mechanical, thermal, chemical, and hydrological processes ensue. Positive attributes for isolation in salt have many commonalities independent of the geologic setting. In some cases, specific details of the environment will affect the disposal concept and thereby define interaction of features, events and processes, while simultaneously influencing scenario development. Here we identify and discuss high-level differences and similarities of bedded and domal salt formations. Positive geologic and engineering attributes for disposal purposes are more common among salt formations than are significant differences

  8. Considerations of the Differences between Bedded and Domal Salt Pertaining to Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Francis D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kuhlman, Kristopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sobolik, Steven R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-07-07

    Salt formations hold promise for eternal removal of nuclear waste from our biosphere. Germany and the United States have ample salt formations for this purpose, ranging from flat-bedded formations to geologically mature dome structures. As both nations revisit nuclear waste disposal options, the choice between bedded, domal, or intermediate pillow formations is once again a contemporary issue. For decades, favorable attributes of salt as a disposal medium have been extoled and evaluated, carefully and thoroughly. Yet, a sense of discovery continues as science and engineering interrogate naturally heterogeneous systems. Salt formations are impermeable to fluids. Excavation-induced fractures heal as seal systems are placed or natural closure progresses toward equilibrium. Engineering required for nuclear waste disposal gains from mining and storage industries, as humans have been mining salt for millennia. This great intellectual warehouse has been honed and distilled, but not perfected, for all nuances of nuclear waste disposal. Nonetheless, nations are able and have already produced suitable license applications for radioactive waste disposal in salt. A remaining conundrum is site location. Salt formations provide isolation, and geotechnical barriers reestablish impermeability after waste is placed in the geology. Between excavation and closure, physical, mechanical, thermal, chemical, and hydrological processes ensue. Positive attributes for isolation in salt have many commonalities independent of the geologic setting. In some cases, specific details of the environment will affect the disposal concept and thereby define interaction of features, events and processes, while simultaneously influencing scenario development. Here we identify and discuss high-level differences and similarities of bedded and domal salt formations. Positive geologic and engineering attributes for disposal purposes are more common among salt formations than are significant differences

  9. Performance investigation of a waste heat-driven 3-bed 2-evaporator adsorption cycle for cooling and desalination

    KAUST Repository

    Thu, Kyaw

    2016-06-13

    Environment-friendly adsorption (AD) cycles have gained much attention in cooling industry and its applicability has been extended to desalination recently. AD cycles are operational by low-temperature heat sources such as exhaust gas from processes or renewable energy with temperatures ranging from 55 °C to 85 °C. The cycle is capable of producing two useful effects, namely cooling power and high-grade potable water, simultaneously. This article discusses a low temperature, waste heat-powered adsorption (AD) cycle that produces cooling power at two temperature-levels for both dehumidification and sensible cooling while providing high-grade potable water. The cycle exploits faster kinetics for desorption process with one adsorber bed under regeneration mode while full utilization of the uptake capacity by adsorbent material is achieved employing two-stage adsorption via low-pressure and high-pressure evaporators. Type A++ silica gel with surface area of 863.6 m2/g and pore volume of 0.446 cm3/g is employed as adsorbent material. A comprehensive numerical model for such AD cycle is developed and the performance results are presented using assorted hot water and cooling water inlet temperatures for various cycle time arrangements. The cycle is analyzed in terms of key performance indicators i.e.; the specific cooling power (SCP), the coefficient of performance (COP) for both evaporators and the overall system, the specific daily water production (SDWP) and the performance ratio (PR). Further insights into the cycle performance are scrutinized using a Dühring diagram to depict the thermodynamic states of the processes as well as the vapor uptake behavior of adsorbent. In the proposed cycle, the adsorbent materials undergo near saturation conditions due to the pressurization effect from the high pressure evaporator while faster kinetics for desorption process is exploited, subsequently providing higher system COP, notably up to 0.82 at longer cycle time while the

  10. Fluidized-bed firing of washery wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Yu M; Gavrik, M V

    1978-01-01

    Tailings containing SiO2 (56.76%), A12O3 (25.63%), Fe2O3 (10.22%) plus CaO, MgO and SOat3 were fluidized at 1.7-2.0 m/s. This gives a uniform pressure of 6 kg-f/m2 at bed heights of 100 mm, though this is higher in the upper layers where the fine material tends to concentrate. The resistance of the bed is directly proportional to its height. Minimum oxygen, maximum carbon dioxide and maximum temperature are found in the section 250-300 mm above the grid (bed height 500 mm); in the upper zone of the bed, some decrease in temperature and carbon dioxide, and increase in oxygen are associated with the ingress of air through the discharge chute. Waste heat should be utilised to help to cover costs of desulphurising stack gases.

  11. A fluidized bed furnace fired with biomass waste to supply heat for a spray dryer in a plant producing floortiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulyurtlu, I.; Andre, R.; Mendes, J.; Monteiro, A.; Cabrita, I. [Instituto Nacional de Engenharia e Tecnologia Industrial, Lisboa (Portugal)

    1993-12-31

    This project has been implemented at a factory producing floortiles for domestic use. The project consists of a fluidized bed combustion system burning coal or wood or a mixture of both to produce hot combustion gases to provide heat for spray drying process. The system was designed by INETI for a maximum output of 8 MW thermal energy and all the engineering calculations were carried out to dimension the furnace to provide this amount of heat. Shallow bed concept was used for complete burning of the biomass particles which contained volatiles up to 75% by weight. The sand bed was used as a flame stabilizer for the combustion of volatiles. The combustion of volatiles in the freeboard was mainly controlled by mixing ashes and other impurities. The combustion temperature had to be maintained in the range 700--800{degrees}C to achieve combustion efficiencies of 85% or more. The combustion efficiency (1) did not increase substantially above 90% of excess air although levels of up to 120% were used during combustion and (2) was found to increase through air staging in the order of 20 to 25%, by simply adding 45 to 55% of the air required to the freeboard zone. No SO{sub 2} was observed in flue gases when burning only biomass but there was some NO{sub x} formed and the level of conversion of fuel-N to NO{sub x} was found to be about 25--30%.

  12. Performance investigation of a waste heat-driven 3-bed 2-evaporator adsorption cycle for cooling and desalination

    KAUST Repository

    Thu, Kyaw; Saha, Bidyut Baran; Chua, Kian Jon; Ng, Kim Choon

    2016-01-01

    Environment-friendly adsorption (AD) cycles have gained much attention in cooling industry and its applicability has been extended to desalination recently. AD cycles are operational by low-temperature heat sources such as exhaust gas from processes

  13. Fluidized bed heat exchanger utilizing angularly extending heat exchange tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmud, Fred M.; Garcia-Mallol, Juan-Antonio

    1980-01-01

    A fluidized bed heat exchanger in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel disposed in a housing. A steam/water natural circulation system is provided and includes a steam drum disposed adjacent the fluidized bed and a series of tubes connected at one end to the steam drum. A portion of the tubes are connected to a water drum and in the path of the air and the gaseous products of combustion exiting from the bed. Another portion of the tubes pass through the bed and extend at an angle to the upper surface of the bed.

  14. Rock bed heat accumulators. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riaz, M.

    1977-12-01

    The principal objectives of the research program on rock bed heat accumulators (or RBHA) are: (1) to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of storing large amounts of thermal energy (in the tens of MWt range) at high temperature (up to 500/sup 0/C) over extended periods of time (up to 6 months) using native earth or rock materials; (2) to conduct studies to establish the performance characteristics of large rock bed heat accumulators at various power and temperature levels compatible with thermal conversion systems; and (3) to assess the materials and environmental problems associated with the operation of such large heat accumulators. Results of the study indicate that rock bed heat accumulators for seasonal storage are both technically and economically feasible, and hence could be exploited in various applications in which storage plays an essential role such as solar power and total energy systems, district and cogeneration heating systems.

  15. Method of Heating a Foam-Based Catalyst Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortini, Arthur J.; Williams, Brian E.; McNeal, Shawn R.

    2009-01-01

    A method of heating a foam-based catalyst bed has been developed using silicon carbide as the catalyst support due to its readily accessible, high surface area that is oxidation-resistant and is electrically conductive. The foam support may be resistively heated by passing an electric current through it. This allows the catalyst bed to be heated directly, requiring less power to reach the desired temperature more quickly. Designed for heterogeneous catalysis, the method can be used by the petrochemical, chemical processing, and power-generating industries, as well as automotive catalytic converters. Catalyst beds must be heated to a light-off temperature before they catalyze the desired reactions. This typically is done by heating the assembly that contains the catalyst bed, which results in much of the power being wasted and/or lost to the surrounding environment. The catalyst bed is heated indirectly, thus requiring excessive power. With the electrically heated catalyst bed, virtually all of the power is used to heat the support, and only a small fraction is lost to the surroundings. Although the light-off temperature of most catalysts is only a few hundred degrees Celsius, the electrically heated foam is able to achieve temperatures of 1,200 C. Lower temperatures are achievable by supplying less electrical power to the foam. Furthermore, because of the foam s open-cell structure, the catalyst can be applied either directly to the foam ligaments or in the form of a catalyst- containing washcoat. This innovation would be very useful for heterogeneous catalysis where elevated temperatures are needed to drive the reaction.

  16. Carbon Bed Mercury Emissions Control For Mixed Waste Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soelberg, Nick; Enneking, Joe

    2010-01-01

    Mercury has had various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so is often present in radioactive and mixed (both radioactive and hazardous according to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) wastes. Depending on regulatory requirements, the mercury in the off-gas must be controlled with sometimes very high efficiencies. Compliance to the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards can require off-gas mercury removal efficiencies up to 99.999% for thermally treating some mixed waste streams. Several test programs have demonstrated this level of off-gas mercury control using fixed beds of granular sulfur-impregnated activated carbon. Other results of these tests include: (a) The depth of the mercury control mass transfer zone was less than 15-30 cm for the operating conditions of these tests, (b) MERSORB(reg s ign) carbon can sorb Hg up to 19 wt% of the carbon mass, and (c) the spent carbon retained almost all (98-99.99%) of the Hg; but when even a small fraction of the total Hg dissolves, the spent carbon can fail the TCLP test when the spent carbon contains high Hg concentrations. Localized areas in a carbon bed that become heated through heat of adsorption, to temperatures where oxidation occurs, are referred to as 'bed hot spots.' Carbon bed hot spots must be avoided in processes that treat radioactive and mixed waste. Key to carbon bed hot spot mitigation are (a) designing for sufficient gas velocity, for avoiding gas flow maldistribution, and for sufficient but not excessive bed depth, (b) monitoring and control of inlet gas flowrate, temperature, and composition, (c) monitoring and control of in-bed and bed outlet gas temperatures, and (d) most important, monitoring of bed outlet CO concentrations. An increase of CO levels in the off-gas downstream of the carbon bed to levels about 50-100 ppm higher than the inlet CO concentration indicate CO formation in the bed, caused by carbon bed

  17. Coolability of volumetrically heated particle beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Muhammad

    2017-03-22

    In case of a severe nuclear reactor accident, with loss of coolant, a particle bed may be formed from the fragmentation of the molten core in the residual water at different stages of the accident. To avoid further propagation of the accident and maintain the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel, the decay heat of the particle bed must be removed. To better understand the various thermo-hydraulic processes within such heat-generating particle beds, the existing DEBRIS test facility at IKE has been modified to be able to perform novel boiling, dryout and quenching experiments. The essential experimental data includes the pressure gradients measured by 8 differential pressure transducers along the bed height as a function of liquid and vapour superficial velocities, the determination of local dryout heat fluxes for different system pressures as well as the local temperature distribution measured by a set of 51 thermocouples installed inside the particle bed. The experiments were carried out for two different particle beds: a polydispersed particle bed which consisted of stainless steel balls (2 mm, 3 mm and 6 mm diameters) and an irregular particle bed which consisted of a mixture of steel balls (3 mm and 6 mm) and irregularly shaped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. Additionally, all experiments were carried out for different flow conditions, such as the reference case of passive 1D top-flooding, 1D bottom flooding (driven by external pumps and different downcomer configurations) and 2D top-/bottom-/lateral flooding with a perforated downcomer. In this work, it has been observed that for both particle beds with downcomer configurations an open downcomer leads to the best coolability (dryout heat flux = 1560 kW/m{sup 2}, polydispersed particle bed, psys = 1 bar) of the particle bed, mainly due to bottom-flow with enhanced natural convection. It has also been shown that a potential lateral flow via a perforation of the downcomer does not bring any further improvements

  18. Coolability of volumetrically heated particle beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    In case of a severe nuclear reactor accident, with loss of coolant, a particle bed may be formed from the fragmentation of the molten core in the residual water at different stages of the accident. To avoid further propagation of the accident and maintain the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel, the decay heat of the particle bed must be removed. To better understand the various thermo-hydraulic processes within such heat-generating particle beds, the existing DEBRIS test facility at IKE has been modified to be able to perform novel boiling, dryout and quenching experiments. The essential experimental data includes the pressure gradients measured by 8 differential pressure transducers along the bed height as a function of liquid and vapour superficial velocities, the determination of local dryout heat fluxes for different system pressures as well as the local temperature distribution measured by a set of 51 thermocouples installed inside the particle bed. The experiments were carried out for two different particle beds: a polydispersed particle bed which consisted of stainless steel balls (2 mm, 3 mm and 6 mm diameters) and an irregular particle bed which consisted of a mixture of steel balls (3 mm and 6 mm) and irregularly shaped Al 2 O 3 particles. Additionally, all experiments were carried out for different flow conditions, such as the reference case of passive 1D top-flooding, 1D bottom flooding (driven by external pumps and different downcomer configurations) and 2D top-/bottom-/lateral flooding with a perforated downcomer. In this work, it has been observed that for both particle beds with downcomer configurations an open downcomer leads to the best coolability (dryout heat flux = 1560 kW/m 2 , polydispersed particle bed, psys = 1 bar) of the particle bed, mainly due to bottom-flow with enhanced natural convection. It has also been shown that a potential lateral flow via a perforation of the downcomer does not bring any further improvements in

  19. Industrial waste heat for district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitner, K.L.; Brooks, P.P.

    1982-01-01

    Presents 2 bounding evaluations of industrial waste heat availability. Surveys waste heat from 29 major industry groups at the 2-digit level in Standard Industrial Codes (SIC). Explains that waste heat availability in each industry was related to regional product sales, in order to estimate regional waste heat availability. Evaluates 4 selected industries at the 4-digit SIC level. Finds that industrial waste heat represents a significant energy resource in several urban areas, including Chicago and Los Angeles, where it could supply all of these areas residential heating and cooling load. Points out that there is a strong need to evaluate the available waste heat for more industries at the 4-digit level. Urges further studies to identify other useful industrial waste heat sources as well as potential waste heat users

  20. Fluidized bed incineration of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    A fluidized-bed incineration facility is being designed for installation at the Rocky Flats Plant to demonstrate a process for the combustion of transuranic waste. The unit capacity will be about 82 kg/hr of combustible waste. The combustion process will utilize in situ neutralization of acid gases generated in the process. The equipment design is based on data generated on a pilot unit and represents a scale-up of nine. Title I engineering is at least 70 percent complete

  1. Waste isolation facility description: bedded salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-09-01

    The waste isolation facility is designed to receive and store three basic types of solidified wastes: high-level wastes, intermediate level high-gamma transuranic waste, and low-gamma transuranic wastes. The facility under consideration in this report is designed for bedded salt at a depth of approximately 1800 ft. The present design for the facility includes an area which would be used initially as a pilot facility to test the viability of the concept, and a larger facility which would constitute the final storage area. The total storage area in the pilot facility is planned to be 77 acres and in the fuel facility 1601 acres. Other areas for shaft operations and access would raise the overall size of the total facility to slightly less than 2,000 acres. The following subjects are discussed in detail: surface facilities, shaft design and characteristics, design and construction of the underground waste isolation facility, ventilation systems, and design requirements and criteria. (LK)

  2. Waste isolation facility description: bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    The waste isolation facility is designed to receive and store three basic types of solidified wastes: high-level wastes, intermediate level high-gamma transuranic waste, and low-gamma transuranic wastes. The facility under consideration in this report is designed for bedded salt at a depth of approximately 1800 ft. The present design for the facility includes an area which would be used initially as a pilot facility to test the viability of the concept, and a larger facility which would constitute the final storage area. The total storage area in the pilot facility is planned to be 77 acres and in the fuel facility 1601 acres. Other areas for shaft operations and access would raise the overall size of the total facility to slightly less than 2,000 acres. The following subjects are discussed in detail: surface facilities, shaft design and characteristics, design and construction of the underground waste isolation facility, ventilation systems, and design requirements and criteria

  3. The experimental investigation on the performance of a low temperature waste heat-driven multi-bed desiccant dehumidifier (MBDD) and minimization of entropy generation

    KAUST Repository

    Myat, Aung; Thu, Kyaw; Ng, K. C.

    2012-01-01

    We present the experimental investigation on the performance of multi-bed desiccant dehumidification system (MBDD) using a thermodynamic framework with an entropy generation analysis. The cyclic steady state performance of adsorption-desorption processes at the assorted heat source temperatures, and typical ambient humidity conditions was carried out. MBDD unit uses type-RD silica gel pore surface area with of 720 m 2/g. It has a nominal diameter range of 0.4 to 0. 7 mm. The key advantages of MBDD are: (i) it has no moving parts rendering less maintenance, (ii) energy-efficient means of dehumidification by adsorption process with low temperature heat source as compared to the conventional methods, (iii) although it is a pecked bed desiccant, a laminar chamber is employed by arranging the V-shaped configuration of heat exchangers and (iv) it is environmental friendly with the low-carbon footprint. Entropy generation analysis was performed at the assorted heat source temperatures to investigate the performance of MBDD. By conducting the entropy minimization, it is now able to locate the optimal operating conditions of the system while the specific entropy generation is found to be minimal. This analysis shows that the minimization of entropy generation in the dehumidification cycle leads to the maximization of COP in the MBDD and thus, higher delivery of useful effects at the same input resources. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The experimental investigation on the performance of a low temperature waste heat-driven multi-bed desiccant dehumidifier (MBDD) and minimization of entropy generation

    KAUST Repository

    Myat, Aung

    2012-06-01

    We present the experimental investigation on the performance of multi-bed desiccant dehumidification system (MBDD) using a thermodynamic framework with an entropy generation analysis. The cyclic steady state performance of adsorption-desorption processes at the assorted heat source temperatures, and typical ambient humidity conditions was carried out. MBDD unit uses type-RD silica gel pore surface area with of 720 m 2/g. It has a nominal diameter range of 0.4 to 0. 7 mm. The key advantages of MBDD are: (i) it has no moving parts rendering less maintenance, (ii) energy-efficient means of dehumidification by adsorption process with low temperature heat source as compared to the conventional methods, (iii) although it is a pecked bed desiccant, a laminar chamber is employed by arranging the V-shaped configuration of heat exchangers and (iv) it is environmental friendly with the low-carbon footprint. Entropy generation analysis was performed at the assorted heat source temperatures to investigate the performance of MBDD. By conducting the entropy minimization, it is now able to locate the optimal operating conditions of the system while the specific entropy generation is found to be minimal. This analysis shows that the minimization of entropy generation in the dehumidification cycle leads to the maximization of COP in the MBDD and thus, higher delivery of useful effects at the same input resources. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fluidized bed incineration of transuranic contaminated waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, D.L.; Johnson, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    A 9 kg/hr pilot scale fluidized bed incinerator is now being used for burning various types of radioactive waste at Rocky Flats Plant. General solid combustible waste containing halogenated materials is burned in a fluidized bed of sodium carbonate for in situ neutralization of thermally generated acidic gases. A variety of other production related materials has been burned in the incinerator, including ion exchange resin, tributyl phosphate solutions, and air filters. Successful operation of the pilot plant incinerator has led to the design and construction of a production site unit to burn 82 kg/hr of plant generated waste. Residues from incinerator operations will be processed into glass buttons utilizing a vitrification plant now under development

  6. Refrigeration waste heat recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-03-01

    UK Super A Stores was built in 1972 and is part of a small indoor shopping complex linked together by a heated mall. The store has a public floor area of approximately 1,232 m{sup 2} (13,261 ft.{sup 2}) and sells the usual variety of food produce including a large selection of frozen foods. There are five lengths of refrigerated display cabinets with a total area of approximately 78 m{sup 2}. There are also some frozen food storage rooms at the back of the store. This report provides a description of a waste heat recovery system within a medium sized food store. It details how the waste heat that is produced by the conventional frozen food display cabinets, can be reused by the store's space heating system. Recommended uses for this waste heat include: diverting to the loading bays which would make the reheat coil unnecessary, diverting to the front of the shop, and heating the adjacent shopping mall. The CREDA (Conservation and Renewable Energy Demonstration Assistance) program contributed $17,444 towards the total project cost of $30,444. The project was initiated by the store owner, who is now realizing a lower annual fuel consumption, with the resulting financial savings. 11 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Waste heat recovery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phi Wah Tooi

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The Konzen in-house designed anaerobic digester system for the POME (Palm Oil Mill Effluent) treatment process is one of the registered Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) projects in Malaysia. It is an organic wastewater treatment process which achieves excellent co-benefits objectives through the prevention of water pollution and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, which is estimated to be 40,000 to 50,000 t-CO 2 per year. The anaerobic digester was designed in mesophile mode with temperature ranging from 37 degree Celsius to 45 degree Celsius. A microorganisms growth is optimum under moderately warm temperature conditions. The operating temperature of the anaerobic digester needs to be maintained constantly. There are two waste heat recovery systems designed to make the treatment process self-sustaining. The heat recovered will be utilised as a clean energy source to heat up the anaerobic digester indirectly. The first design for the waste heat recovery system utilises heat generated from the flue gas of the biogas flaring system. A stainless steel water tank with an internal water layer is installed at the top level of the flare stack. The circulating water is heated by the methane enriched biogas combustion process. The second design utilizes heat generated during the compression process for the biogas compressor operation. The compressed biogas needs to be cooled before being recycled back into the digester tank for mixing purposes. Both the waste heat recovery systems use a design which applies a common water circulation loop and hot water tank to effectively become a closed loop. The hot water tank will perform both storage and temperature buffer functions. The hot water is then used to heat up recycled sludge from 30 degree Celsius to 45 degree Celsius with the maximum temperature setting at 50 degree Celsius. The recycled sludge line temperature will be measured and monitored by a temperature sensor and transmitter, which will activate the

  8. On the heat transfer in packed beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sordon, G.

    1988-09-01

    The design of a fusion reactor blanket concept based on a bed of lithium containing ceramic pebbles or a mixture of ceramic and beryllium pebbles demands the knowledge of the effective thermal conductivity of pebble beds, including beds formed by a binary mixture of high conducting metallic pebbles and poorly conducting pebbles. In this work, binary mixtures of spheres of same diameter and different conductivities as well as beds formed by one type of spheres were investigated. The experimental apparatus consists of a stainless steel cylinder with a heating rod along the symmetry axis. Experiments with stagnant and flowing gas were performed. The pebbles were of Al 2 O 3 (diameter = 1, 2, 4 mm), of Li 4 SO 4 (diameter = 0.5 mm) of Al (diameter = 2 mm) and of steel (diameter = 2, 4 mm). Experimental values of the thermal conductivity and of the wall heat transfer coefficient are compared with the predicted ones. Modifications of already existing models were suggested. (orig.) [de

  9. Heat exchanger support apparatus in a fluidized bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Carl W.

    1982-01-01

    A heat exchanger is mounted in the upper portion of a fluidized combusting bed for the control of the temperature of the bed. A support, made up of tubes, is extended from the perforated plate of the fluidized bed up to the heat exchanger. The tubular support framework for the heat exchanger has liquid circulated therethrough to prevent deterioration of the support.

  10. Combustion of palm oil solid waste in fluidized bed combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, I.; Shamsuddin, A.H.; Sopian, K.

    2000-01-01

    Results of experimental investigations of fluidized bed combustion of palm oil wastes consisting of shell, fibre and empty fruit bunches high heating value of 17450 kJ/kg and low heating value of 14500 kJ/kg. The fluidized bed combuster used has a vessel size of 486 x 10 6 mm 3 , surface area of evaporation tubes and distribution air pipes of 500 mm 2 and 320 mm 2 respectively. It was found that a fuel feeding rate 160 kg/h is required to achieve a steam flow rate of 600 kg/h, with the combustion efficiency 96% and boiler efficiency of 72%, emission level of flue gas NO x at less than 180 ppm, SO 2 at less than 20 ppm are measured in the flue gas. (Author)

  11. Electricity from waste heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larjola, Jaakko; Lindgren, Olli; Vakkilainen, Esa

    In industry and in ships, large amounts of waste heat with quite a high release temperature are produced: examples are combustion gases and the exhaust gases of ceramic kilns. Very often they cannot be used for heating purposes because of long transport distances or because there is no local district heating network. Thus, a practical solution would be to convert this waste heat into electric power. This conversion may be carried out using an ORC-plant (Organic Rankine Cycle). There are probably some twenty ORC-plants in commercial use in the world. They are, however, usually based on conventional power plant technology, and are rather expensive, complicated and may have significant maintenance expenses. In order to obviate these problems, a project was started at Lappeenranta University of Technology at the beginning of 1981 to develop a high-speed, hermetic turbogenerator as the prime mover of the ORC. With this new technology the whole ORC-plant is quite simple, with only one moving part in the power system. It is expected to require very little maintenance, and the calculations made give for it significantly lower specific price than for the conventional technology ORC-plant. Two complete prototypes of the new technology ORC-plant have been built, one to the laboratory, other to industrial use. The nominal output of both is 100 kW electricity. Calculated amortization times for the new ORC-plant range from 2.1 to 6.

  12. Waste form dissolution in bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufman, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    A model was devised for waste dissolution in bedded salt, a hydrologically tight medium. For a typical Spent UnReprocessed Fuel (SURF) emplacement, the dissolution rate wll be diffusion limited and will rise to a steady state value after t/sub eq/ approx. = 250 (1+(1-epsilon 0 ) K/sub D//epsilon 0 ) (years) epsilon 0 is the overpack porosity and K/sub d/ is the overpack sorption coefficient. The steady state dissolution rate itself is dominated by the solubility of UO 2 . Steady state rates between 5 x 10 -5 and .5 (g/year) are achievable by SURF emplacements in bedded salt without overpack, and rates between 5 x 10 -7 and 5 x 10 -3 (g/year) with an overpack having porosity of 10 -2

  13. Internal dust recirculation system for a fluidized bed heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Robert L.; Garcia-Mallol, Juan A.

    1981-01-01

    A fluidized bed heat exchanger in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel disposed in a housing. A steam/water natural circulation system is provided in a heat exchange relation to the bed and includes a steam drum disposed adjacent the bed and a tube bank extending between the steam drum and a water drum. The tube bank is located in the path of the effluent gases exiting from the bed and a baffle system is provided to separate the solid particulate matter from the effluent gases. The particulate matter is collected and injected back into the fluidized bed.

  14. Graphite waste incineration in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiroy, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    French gas-cooled reactors belonging to the Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Electricite de France (EDF), Hifrensa (Spain), etc., commissioned between the 1950s and 1970s, have generated large quantities of graphite wastes, mainly in the form of spent fuel sleeves. Furthermore, some of these reactors scheduled for dismantling in the near future (such as the G2 and G3 reactors at Marcoule) have cores consisting of graphite blocks. Consequently, a fraction of the contaminated graphite, amounting to 6000 t in France for example, must be processed in the coming years. For this processing, incineration using a circulating fluidized bed combustor has been selected as a possible solution and validated. However, the first operation to be performed involves recovering this graphite waste, and particularly, first of all, the spent fuel sleeves that were stored in silos during the years of reactor operation. Subsequent to the final shutdown of the Spanish gas-cooled reactor unit, Vandellos 1, the operating utility Hifrensa awarded contracts to a Framatome Iberica SA/ENSA consortium for removing, sorting, and prepackaging of the waste stored in three silos on the Vandellos site, essentially graphite sleeves. On the other hand, a program to validate the Framatome fluidized bed incineration process was carried out using a prototype incinerator installed at Le Creusot, France. The validation program included 22 twelve-hour tests and one 120-hour test. Particular attention was paid to the safety aspects of this project. During the performance of the validation program, a preliminary safety assessment was carried out. An impact assessment was performed with the help of the French Institute for Protection and Nuclear Safety, taking into account the preliminary spectra supplied by the CEA and EDF, and the activities of the radionuclides susceptible of being released into the atmosphere during the incineration. (author). 4 refs, 11 figs, 1 tab

  15. The use of dielectric heating in particulate bed dryout experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, G.F.; Willshire, S.J.

    1984-09-01

    Decay-heated, liquid-saturated debris beds arise in hypothetical severe accidents with LMFBR and PWR, and a large international effort is currently engaged in experimental studies of the cooling limitations of such beds. Dryout is one of the important cooling limitations. Dielectric heating offers a means of closely simulating decay heating in beds of irregular particles, and is under development at AEE Winfrith for application to experimental studies of dryout. This report describes progress to date. (author)

  16. Study of thermal energy storage using fluidized bed heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weast, T. E.; Shannon, L. J.; Ananth, K. P.

    1980-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of fluid bed heat exchangers (FBHX) for thermal energy storage (TES) in waste heat recovery applications is assessed by analysis of two selected conceptual systems, the rotary cement kiln and the electric arc furnace. It is shown that the inclusion of TES in the energy recovery system requires that the difference in off-peak and on-peak energy rates be large enough so that the value of the recovered energy exceeds the value of the stored energy by a wide enough margin to offset parasitic power and thermal losses. Escalation of on-peak energy rates due to fuel shortages could make the FBHX/TES applications economically attractive in the future.

  17. Fluidised bed combustion: a new route to power and heat from coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling, H D [Bergbau-Forschung G.m.b.H., Essen (Germany, F.R.)

    1978-02-01

    The functioning of fluidized-bed firings and their advantages with regard to SO/sub 2/ emissions are described. The principle of design of a fluidized-bed boiler and a gas/steam turbine power plant with fluidized-bed firing under pressure is outlined. The application and their economics in heat and power generation and marketing potential of fluidized-bed firings and their economics in heat and power generation is pointed out. The construction of waste-fired incinerators has already become possible, but there is still a lot of development work to be done until fluidized-bed firings can be used in central heatings, combined-cycle power plants, and large power plants.

  18. Waste heat recovery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Zigan, James A.

    2017-12-19

    A waste heat recovery system includes a Rankine cycle (RC) circuit having a pump, a boiler, an energy converter, and a condenser fluidly coupled via conduits in that order, to provide additional work. The additional work is fed to an input of a gearbox assembly including a capacity for oil by mechanically coupling to the energy converter to a gear assembly. An interface is positioned between the RC circuit and the gearbox assembly to partially restrict movement of oil present in the gear assembly into the RC circuit and partially restrict movement of working fluid present in the RC circuit into the gear assembly. An oil return line is fluidly connected to at least one of the conduits fluidly coupling the RC components to one another and is operable to return to the gear assembly oil that has moved across the interface from the gear assembly to the RC circuit.

  19. Calculation of local bed to wall heat transfer in a fluidized-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilkis, B.I.

    1987-01-01

    Surface to bed heat transfer in a fluidized-bed largely depends upon its local and global hydrodynamical behavior including particle velocity, particle trajectory, gas velocity, and void fraction. In this study, a computer program was developed in order to calculate the local bed to wall heat transfer, by accounting for the local and global instantaneous hydrodynamics of the bed. This is accomplished by utilizing the CHEMFLUB computer program. This information at a given location is interpreted so that the most appropriate heat transfer model is utilized for each time increment. These instantaneous heat transfer coefficient for the given location. Repeating the procedure for different locations, a space average heat transfer coefficient is also calculated. This report briefly summarizes the various heat transfer models employed and gives sample computer results reporting the case study for Mickley - Trilling's experimental set-up. Comparisons with available experimental data and correlations are also provided in order to compare and evaluate the computer results

  20. Dryout heat flux experiments with deep heterogeneous particle bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholm, I.; Holmstroem, S.; Miettinen, J.; Lestinen, V.; Hyvaerinen, J.; Pankakoski, P.; Sjoevall, H.

    2006-01-01

    A test facility has been constructed at Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) to simulate as accurately as possible the ex-vessel core particle bed in the conditions of Olkiluoto nuclear power plant. The STYX particle bed reproduces the anticipated depth of the bed and the size range of particles having irregular shape. The bed is immersed in water, creating top flooding conditions, and internally heated by an array of electrical resistance heating elements. Dryout tests have been successfully conducted at 0.1-0.7 MPa pressure for both uniformly mixed and stratified bed geometries. In all tests, including the stratified ones, the dry zone first formed near the bottom of the bed. The measured dryout heat fluxes increased with increasing pressure, from 232 kW/m 2 at near atmospheric pressure to 451 kW/m 2 at 0.7 MPa pressure. The data show some scatter even for the uniform bed. The tests with the stratified bed indicate a clear reduction of critical power due to the presence of a layer of small particles on top of the uniform bed. Comparison of data with various critical power (dryout heat flux) correlations for porous media shows that the most important parameter in the models is the effective particle diameter. Adiabatic debris bed flow resistance measurements were conducted to determine the most representative particle diameter. This diameter is close, but not equal, to the particle number-weighted average diameter of the bed material. With it, uniform bed data can be calculated to within an accuracy of 3-28% using Lipinski's 0-D model. In the stratified bed experiments, it appears that the top layer was partially fluidized, hence the measured critical power was significantly higher than calculated. Future experiments are being planned with denser top layer material to eliminate non-prototypic fluidization

  1. Dust removal from waste gas arising from fluidized beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltys, L.

    1992-01-01

    Two types dust removal equipment mostly useful for dust removal from waste gas from fluidized beds, i.e. electrofilters and pulsatory bag filters were presented. Their features and functional properties were compared. (author). 7 refs, 4 figs

  2. Continuous cleaning of heat exchanger with recirculating fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St Kollbach, J.; Dahm, W.; Rautenbach, R.

    1987-01-01

    Fluidized bed heat exchangers for liquids have been studied in the United States, the Netherlands, and the Federal Republic of Germany. Between 1965 and 1970, fluidized bed heat exchangers were developed in the United States as brine heaters in seawater desalination. Furthermore, their potential in the utilization of geothermal energy was tested between 1975 and 1980. In the Netherlands, fluidized bed heat exchangers have been developed since 1973 for brine heating and heat recovery in multistage flash evaporators for seawater desalination and, since about 1980, for applications in the process industry. The authors became interested in fluidized bed heat exchangers first in 1978 in connection with wastewater evaporation. The authors emphasize that the results of all these groups were in basic agreement. They can be summarized as follows: 1. The fluidized bed will in many cases maintain totally clean surfaces and neither scaling nor fouling will occur. In cases where even a fluidized bed cannot completely prevent scaling or fouling, the thickness of the layer is controlled. In these cases stable operation maintaining acceptable overall heat transfer coefficients is possible without cleaning. 2. There are always excellent heat transfer coefficients as low superficial velocities of less than ν < 0.5 m/s. 3. The pressure losses are comparable with those in normal heat exchangers since fluidized bed heat exchangers are mostly operated at low superficial velocities. 4. Feed flow may be varied between 50 and 150% or more of the design feed flow. 5. Erosion is negligible. 6. Fluidized bed particles can be manufactured from all sorts of chemically and mechanically resistant materials, such as sand, glass, ceramics, and metals

  3. Fluid flow with heat transfer in a fix-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparetto, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Tests with two different fluids, water and air, flowing in a bed with irregular particles of silica were done. The bed was confined inside a tube, which was heated by an external jacket. The bed is characterized by permeability and porosity. The tests showed a wall effect face to the relation between the tube diameter and the medium dimension of the particles. The results are presented as a relation between Nusselt number / Peclet number. (E.G.) [pt

  4. Numerical calculation of wall-to-bed heat transfer coefficients in gas-fluidized beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, J.A.M.; Prins, W.; van Swaaij, W.P.M.

    1992-01-01

    A computer model for a hot gas-fluidized bed has been developed. The theoretical description is based on a two-fluid model (TFM) approach in which both phases are considered to be continuous and fully interpenetrating. Local wall-to-bed heat-transfer coefficients have been calculated by the

  5. Feasibility study - Lowered bed temperature in Fluidised Bed boilers for waste; Foerstudie - Saenkt baeddtemperatur i FB-pannor foer avfallsfoerbraenning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niklasson, Fredrik

    2009-01-15

    Waste incineration generally serves two purposes; 1) dispose of waste and 2) generation of heat and power. In the process of power production from waste fuels, the steam temperatures in super heaters are generally limited by the severe fouling and corrosion that occurs at elevated material temperatures, caused by high concentrations of alkali metals and chloride in the flue gas and fly ash. The overall aim of a continuation of present project is to determine if a reduced temperature of the bed zone in a fluidized bed waste incinerator reduces the amount of alkali chlorides in the flue gas. If so, a reduced bed temperature might enable increased steam temperature in super heaters, or, at unchanged steam temperature, improve the lifespan of the super heaters. The results from the project are of interest for plant owners wishing to improve performance of existing plants. The results may also be used to modify the design of future plants by boiler manufacturers. The aim of present pre-study was to determine how far the bed temperature can be reduced in a waste fired fluidized bed boiler in Boraas while maintaining a stable operation with sufficient combustion temperature in the freeboard to fulfil the directives of waste incineration. A continuation of the project will be based on the results from present study. The work is based on experiments at the test boiler. During the present study, no other measurements were performed apart from some sampling of bed material and ashes at different modes of operation. The experiments show that it is possible to alter the air and recycled flue gas in such a manner that the bed temperature is reduced from about 870 deg C to 700 deg C at 100% load and normal fuel mixture, while fulfilling the directive of 850 deg C at 2 seconds. Within normal variations of the fuel properties, however, the bed temperature increases to somewhat above 700 deg C if the fuel turns dry, while it falls below 650 deg C when the fuel turns wet. With

  6. The heat transfer mechanisms in fluidized beds; Laemmoensiirtomekanismit leijukerroksessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogelholm, C.J.; Blomster, A.M.; Kojola, H. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    The goal of the research project is to improve the accuracy of the heat transfer correlation in circulating fluidized beds and to define how the heat transfer is distributed in radiation and convection in the different parts of the fluidized bed. This will be carried out by studying the behaviour and heat transfer of the fluidized bed in the boundary layer near the wall. The total and radiative heat transfer as well as the particle concentration will be measured. Based on the data a correlation will be created. Two different measurement systems are used. The particle concentration is measured by a image-analysis system. A video camera and a Super VHS recorder are used to capture live images from the bed. The images are digitized and stored on a PC. The system has been used in previous research projects at our laboratory. In earlier projects all measurements have been carried out in cold environments. In this project the system will be modified for hot environments. The radiative heat transfer is measured by a radiative heat transfer probe connected to a PC via an A/D converter. The probe consists of a heat flow detector which is isolated from the bed by a sapphire window so that only the radiative part of the heat transfer is detected. The probe will be calibrated in a black body oven so that the effect of the conduction and the sapphire window can be separated. (author)

  7. Thermal Analysis of Fluidized Bed and Fixed Bed Latent Heat Thermal Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beemkumar, N.; Karthikeyan, A.; Shiva Keshava Reddy, Kota; Rajesh, Kona; Anderson, A.

    2017-05-01

    Thermal energy storage technology is essential because its stores available energy at low cost. Objective of the work is to store the thermal energy in a most efficient method. This work is deal with thermal analysis of fluidized bed and fixed bed latent heat thermal storage (LHTS) system with different encapsulation materials (aluminium, brass and copper). D-Mannitol has been used as phase change material (PCM). Encapsulation material which is in orbicular shape with 4 inch diameter and 2 mm thickness orbicular shaped product is used. Therminol-66 is used as a heat transfer fluid (HTF). Arrangement of encapsulation material is done in two ways namely fluidized bed and fixed bed thermal storage system. Comparison was made between the performance of fixed bed and fluidized bed with different encapsulation material. It is observed that from the economical point of view aluminium in fluidized bed LHTS System has highest efficiency than copper and brass. The thermal energy storage system can be analyzed with fixed bed by varying mass flow rate of oil paves a way to find effective heat energy transfer.

  8. Thermal valorization of post-consumer film waste in a bubbling bed gasifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-Lera, S.; Torrico, J.; Pallarés, J.; Gil, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Film waste from packaging is a common waste, a fraction of which is not recyclable. • Gasification can make use of the high energy value of the non-recyclable fraction. • This waste and two reference polymers were gasified in a bubbling bed reactor. • This experimental research proves technical feasibility of the process. • It also analyzes impact of composition and ER on the performance of the plant. - Abstract: The use of plastic bags and film packaging is very frequent in manifold sectors and film waste is usually present in different sources of municipal and industrial wastes. A significant part of it is not suitable for mechanical recycling but could be safely transformed into a valuable gas by means of thermal valorization. In this research, the gasification of film wastes has been experimentally investigated through experiments in a fluidized bed reactor of two reference polymers, polyethylene and polypropylene, and actual post-consumer film waste. After a complete experimental characterization of the three materials, several gasification experiments have been performed to analyze the influence of the fuel and of equivalence ratio on gas production and composition, on tar generation and on efficiency. The experiments prove that film waste and analogue polymer derived wastes can be successfully gasified in a fluidized bed reactor, yielding a gas with a higher heating value in a range from 3.6 to 5.6 MJ/m 3 and cold gas efficiencies up to 60%

  9. Alternatives for metal hydride storage bed heating and cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, I.A.; Ramirez, F.B.; Koonce, J.E.; Ward, D.E.; Heung, L.K.; Weimer, M.; Berkebile, W.; French, S.T.

    1991-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen isotopes with the storage bed hydride material is exothermic during absorption and endothermic during desorption. Therefore, storage bed operation requires a cooling system to remove heat during absorption, and a heating system to add the heat needed for desorption. Three storage bed designs and their associated methods of heating and cooling and accountability are presented within. The first design is the current RTF (Replacement Tritium Facility) nitrogen heating and cooling system. The second design uses natural convection cooling with ambient glove box nitrogen and electrical resistance for heating. This design is referred to as the Naturally Cooled/Electrically Heated (NCEH) design. The third design uses forced convection cooling with ambient glove box nitrogen and electrical resistance for heating. The design is referred to as the Forced Convection Cooled/Electrically Heated (FCCEH) design. In this report the operation, storage bed design, and equipment required for heating, cooling, and accountability of each design are described. The advantages and disadvantages of each design are listed and discussed. Based on the information presented within, it is recommended that the NCEH design be selected for further development

  10. Some performance characteristics of a fluidized bed heat recovery unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Militzer, J.; Basu, P.; Adaikkappan, N.

    1985-01-01

    The advantages of using fluidized bed heat recovery units with diesel engines are well documented. Two of those are: significantly less tube fouling and heat transfer coefficient four to five time higher than that of conventional shell and tube heat exchangers. The high concentration of soot in the exhaust gases of diesel engines make fouling a major concern in design of any kind of heat recovery unit. In the experiment a conventional fluidized bed heat exchanger was connected to the exhaust of a diesel engine mounted on a dynamometer. With this arrangement it was possible to test the heat recovery unit under a wide range of operating conditions. The main objective of this experiment was the determination of the performance characteristics of the heat recovery unit, especially with reference to its heat transfer and fouling characteristics. (author)

  11. Temperature distribution in spouted bed and heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Yutaka

    1976-01-01

    Temperature distribution in spouted bed was measured by using brass and graphite spouted beds so as to investigate heat transfer characteristic of spouted bed applied to an apparatus of PyC coating. These spouted beds are batch type and are spouted by air or nitrogen gas of room temperature, and the outer wall of beds are heated by nichrome or graphite heater. Particles used for experiments are alumina spherical particles and the diameter is 0.80 -- 1.12 mm. Temperature condition is in the range of 400 -- 1,400 0 C. In the neighborhood of 400 0 C, the spouting condition is stable, while the spouting condition becomes unstable in the case of above 1,000 0 C. This is caused by abrupt temperature increase of spouting gas. It was found that heat transfer coefficient h sub(w) of our low temperature experiments was closer to the calculated from Malek et al.'s equation, h sub(p) of our experiments was several times greater than the calculated from Uemaki et al.'s equation. On the other hand, h sub(p) of high temperature experiments was compared with an experimental relation for convective heat transfer of fluidized bed, it was found that Nu sub(p) of our experiments was nearly equal to or greater than the calculated from the relation, this would be caused by radiant heat transfer. (auth.)

  12. Waste heat utilization in agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horacek, P.

    1983-01-01

    The Proceedings contain 17 papers presented at meetings of the Working Group for Waste Heat Utilization of the Committee of the European Society of Nuclear Methods in Agriculture of which 7 fall under the INIS scope. The working group met in May 1980 in Brno, Czechoslovakia, in October 1981 in Aberdeen, Scotland and in September 1982 in Brno. (Z.M.)

  13. Bed-To-Wall Heat Transfer in a Supercritical Circulating Fluidised Bed Boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błaszczuk Artur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to find a correlation for heat transfer to walls in a 1296 t/h supercritical circulating fluidised bed (CFB boiler. The effect of bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient in a long active heat transfer surface was discussed, excluding the radiation component. Experiments for four different unit loads (i.e. 100% MCR, 80% MCR, 60% MCR and 40% MCR were conducted at a constant excess air ratio and high level of bed pressure (ca. 6 kPa in each test run. The empirical correlation of the heat transfer coefficient in a large-scale CFB boiler was mainly determined by two key operating parameters, suspension density and bed temperature. Furthermore, data processing was used in order to develop empirical correlation ranges between 3.05 to 5.35 m·s-1 for gas superficial velocity, 0.25 to 0.51 for the ratio of the secondary to the primary air, 1028 to 1137K for bed temperature inside the furnace chamber of a commercial CFB boiler, and 1.20 to 553 kg·m-3 for suspension density. The suspension density was specified on the base of pressure measurements inside the boiler’s combustion chamber using pressure sensors. Pressure measurements were collected at the measuring ports situated on the front wall of the combustion chamber. The obtained correlation of the heat transfer coefficient is in agreement with the data obtained from typical industrial CFB boilers.

  14. Future heat supply of our cities. Heating by waste heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brachetti, H E [Stadtwerke Hannover A.G. (Germany, F.R.); Technische Univ. Hannover (Germany, F.R.))

    1976-08-01

    The energy-price crisis resulted in structural changes of the complete energy supply and reactivated the question of energy management with respect to the optimum solution of meeting the energy requirements for space heating. Condensation power plants are increasingly replaced by thermal stations, the waste heat of which is used as so-called district heat. Thermal power stations must be situated close to urban areas. The problem of emission of harmful materials can partly be overcome by high-level emission. The main subject of the article, however, is the problem of conducting and distributing the heat. The building costs of heat pipeline systems and the requirements to be met by heat pipelines such as strength, heat insulation and protection against humidity and ground water are investigated.

  15. Heat Transfer in a Fixed Bed of Straw Char

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Jensen, Anker

    2003-01-01

    A model for the thermal conductivity of a straw char bed has been developed. The model extends the work of Yagi and Kunii to describe heat transfer in a bed of cylinders, using a relationship between the interparticle distance and the external porosity. To verify the model, thermal conductivity...... the experimental uncertainty over the range of conditions investigated. The heat transfer model was used in a parametric study to evaluate the effect of gas flow rate, particle diameter, porosity, and temperature on the thermal conductivity in a straw char bed....... experiments were performed on shredded and un-shredded straw char samples, varying particle size, bed packing (loose or dense), and temperature. Predictions with the model, using the measured external porosity and particle diameter as input parameters, are in agreement with measurements within...

  16. DURABILITY TESTING OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER (FBSR) WASTE FORMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C

    2006-01-01

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium aqueous radioactive wastes. The addition of clay and a catalyst as co-reactants converts high sodium aqueous low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford and Idaho DOE sites to a granular ''mineralized'' waste form that may be made into a monolith form if necessary. Simulant Hanford and Idaho high sodium wastes were processed in a pilot scale FBSR at Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low-activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The durability of the FBSR waste form products was tested in order to compare the measured durability to previous FBSR waste form testing on Hanford Envelope C waste forms that were made by THOR Treatment Technologies (TTT) and to compare the FBSR durability to vitreous LAW waste forms, specifically the Hanford low activity waste (LAW) glass known as the Low-activity Reference Material (LRM). The durability of the FBSR waste form is comparable to that of the LRM glass for the test responses studied

  17. Investigation of heat transfer in bed and freeboard of fluidized bed combustors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitor, V.V.; Matsnev, V.V.; Sorokin, A.P.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results for heat transfer between immersed bundles of bare tubes and fluidized beds are reported. The experimental results are obtained on industrial boilers with a bed area from 2,5 to 4 m/sup 2/ under conditions of long term operation. The bed temperature range has been 1073 0 K-1233 0 K, gas velocity between 1,8-4,5 m/s, mean particle size from 1,5 mm to 6,0 mm, freeboard furnace height of 2,3 and 5 m. The obtained data are compared with experimental results from literature

  18. Recovering heat from waste air from stables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    A milk cow gives off 35.7 kW h/d via its body, excreta and urine. 68.4% of this is body heat. Part of this waste heat escapes with the waste air from the cowsheds. The heat can be recovered from the waste air by an air/air heat exchanger. The air is collected and taken to a heat exchanger. In the heat exchanger, fresh air is heated by the waste air, and is distributed over the cowshed by a system of ducts. The heated waste air escapes through a central chimney at the end of the heat exchanger. It is sensible to fit the heat exchanger above the cowshed roof, if there is sufficient space available and the chimney should run upwards from the cowshed. A double heat exchanger makes it possible to allocate each half of the cowshed to half of the heat exchanger.

  19. Characterization of industrial process waste heat and input heat streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilfert, G.L.; Huber, H.B.; Dodge, R.E.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Griffin, E.A.; Brown, D.R.; Moore, N.L.

    1984-05-01

    The nature and extent of industrial waste heat associated with the manufacturing sector of the US economy are identified. Industry energy information is reviewed and the energy content in waste heat streams emanating from 108 energy-intensive industrial processes is estimated. Generic types of process equipment are identified and the energy content in gaseous, liquid, and steam waste streams emanating from this equipment is evaluated. Matchups between the energy content of waste heat streams and candidate uses are identified. The resultant matrix identifies 256 source/sink (waste heat/candidate input heat) temperature combinations. (MHR)

  20. Modeling of waste/near field interactions for a waste repository in bedded salt: the Dynamic Network (DNET) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranwell, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    The Fuel Cycle Risk Analysis Division of Sandia National Laboratories has been funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to develop a methodology for use in assessing the long-term risk from the disposal of radioactive wastes in deep geologic formations. As part of this program, the Dynamic Network (DNET) model was developed to investigate waste/near field interactions associated with the disposal of radioactive wastes in bedded salt formations. The model is a quasi-multi-dimensional network model with capabilities for simulating processes such as fluid flow, heat transport, salt dissolution, salt creep, and the effects of thermal expansion and subsedence on the rock units surrounding the repository. The use of DNET has been demonstrated in the analysis of a hypothetical disposal site containing a bedded salt formation as the host medium for the repository. An example of this demonstration analysis is discussed. Furthermore, the outcome of sensitivity analyses performed on the DNET model are presented

  1. Modes of heat removal from a heat-generating debris bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squarer, D.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Piecznski, A.T.

    1984-01-01

    In the worst hypothetical accident in a light water reactor, when all protection systems fail, the core could be converted into a deep particulate bed either in-vessel or ex-vessel. The containment of such an accident depends on the coolability of a heat-generating debris bed. Some recent experimental and analytical studies that are concerned with heat removal from such a particulate bed are reviewed. Studies have indicated that bed dryout flux and, therefore, the heat removal rate from the particulate bed increases with the particle diameter (i.e., the permeability) for pool boiling conditions and can exceed the critical heat flux of a flat plate. Bed dryout in a large particle bed (i.e., a few millimetres) was found to be closely related to the ''flooding'' limit of the bed. Dryout under forced flow conditions was found to be affected by both forced and natural convection for mass flow rate smaller than m /SUB cr/ , whereas above this mass flow rate, bed dryout is proportional to the mass flow rate. Recent analyses were found to be in agreement with experimental data; however, additional research is needed to assess factors not accounted for in previous studies (e.g., effect of pressure, multidimensionality, stratification, etc.). Based on the expected pressure and particle sizes in a postulated severe accident sequence, a debris bed should be coolable, given a sufficient water supply

  2. Local heat transfer coefficient in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Busoul, A. M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study for the local heat transfer coefficient. The experiments was conducted inside a reactor with inner diameter (I D = 142mm) at atmospheric conditions (temperature mean value = 29 deg.) The bed was heated by means of a parochial electric heater with a diameter of (d h = 29 mm) and a constant power of 5W. The following factors varied: particles type and diameter, fluid velocity, bed height and heater position inside the reactor. The results were presented and discussed. (author). 15 refs., 7 figs

  3. Fluidized bed combustion of low-grade coal and wastes: Research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodulya, V.A.; Dikalenko, V.I.; Palchonok, G.I.; Vinogradov, L.M. [Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus). A.V. Luikov Heat and Mass Transfer Inst.; Dobkin, S.M.; Telegin, E.M. [Special Design Office, Brest (Belarus)

    1994-12-31

    Experimental studies were carried out to investigate devolatilization of fuel as single spherical particles of wood, hydrolytic lignin, leather sewage sludge and Belarussian brown coals in a fluidized bed of sand. It is found that the devolatilization process depends on moisture and ash contents in fuel and on the external heat and mass transfer rate. The char combustion occurs largely in the intermediate region. Kinetic parameters of the devolatilization and char combustion are obtained. A low-capacity fluidized bed boiler suitable for combustion of coal and different wastes is described.

  4. Bedding material affects mechanical thresholds, heat thresholds and texture preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehring, Francie; O’Hara, Crystal L.; Stucky, Cheryl L.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that the bedding type animals are housed on can affect breeding behavior and cage environment. Yet little is known about its effects on evoked behavior responses or non-reflexive behaviors. C57BL/6 mice were housed for two weeks on one of five bedding types: Aspen Sani Chips® (standard bedding for our institute), ALPHA-Dri®, Cellu-Dri™, Pure-o’Cel™ or TEK-Fresh. Mice housed on Aspen exhibited the lowest (most sensitive) mechanical thresholds while those on TEK-Fresh exhibited 3-fold higher thresholds. While bedding type had no effect on responses to punctate or dynamic light touch stimuli, TEK-Fresh housed animals exhibited greater responsiveness in a noxious needle assay, than those housed on the other bedding types. Heat sensitivity was also affected by bedding as animals housed on Aspen exhibited the shortest (most sensitive) latencies to withdrawal whereas those housed on TEK-Fresh had the longest (least sensitive) latencies to response. Slight differences between bedding types were also seen in a moderate cold temperature preference assay. A modified tactile conditioned place preference chamber assay revealed that animals preferred TEK-Fresh to Aspen bedding. Bedding type had no effect in a non-reflexive wheel running assay. In both acute (two day) and chronic (5 week) inflammation induced by injection of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant in the hindpaw, mechanical thresholds were reduced in all groups regardless of bedding type, but TEK-Fresh and Pure-o’Cel™ groups exhibited a greater dynamic range between controls and inflamed cohorts than Aspen housed mice. PMID:26456764

  5. Single-phase convection heat transfer characteristics of pebble-bed channels with internal heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Xianke; Sun Zhongning; Xu Guangzhan

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The core of the water-cooled pebble bed reactor is the porous channels which stacked with spherical fuel elements. The gaps between the adjacent fuel elements are complex because they are stochastic and often shift. We adopt electromagnetic induction heating method to overall heat the pebble bed. By comparing and analyzing the experimental data, we get the rule of power distribution and the rule of heat transfer coefficient with particle diameter, heat flux density, inlet temperature and working fluid's Re number. Highlights: ► We adopt electromagnetic induction heating method to overall heat the pebble bed to be the internal heat source. ► The ball diameter is smaller, the effect of the heat transfer is better. ► With Re number increasing, heat transfer coefficient is also increasing and eventually tends to stabilize. ► The changing of heat power makes little effect on the heat transfer coefficient of pebble bed channels. - Abstract: The reactor core of a water-cooled pebble bed reactor includes porous channels that are formed by spherical fuel elements. This structure has notably improved heat transfer. Due to the variability and randomness of the interstices in pebble bed channels, heat transfer is complex, and there are few studies regarding this topic. To study the heat transfer characters of pebble bed channels with internal heat sources, oxidized stainless steel spheres with diameters of 3 and 8 mm and carbon steel spheres with 8 mm diameters are used in a stacked pebble bed. Distilled water is used as a refrigerant for the experiments, and the electromagnetic induction heating method is used to heat the pebble bed. By comparing and analyzing the experimental results, we obtain the governing rules for the power distribution and the heat transfer coefficient with respect to particle diameter, heat flux density, inlet temperature and working fluid Re number. From fitting of the experimental data, we obtain the dimensionless average

  6. Forced Convection Heat Transfer of a sphere in Packed Bed Arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong-Young; Chung, Bum-Jin

    2016-01-01

    This paper analysis and discuss the forced convective heat transfer from heated single sphere, which is buried in unheated packed bed, depending on Re d with porosity. The present work determines the test matrix for the packed bed experiment. And this study discuss difference of heat transfer according to the location of heated sphere and compared heated bed with heated sphere in packed bed and compared FCC (Face Centered Cubic), HCP (Hexagonal Closed Packed) structured packed bed with random packed. This paper is to discuss and make the plan to experiment the heat transfer for depending on location of heated single sphere in unheated packed bed, to compare single sphere in packed bed with heated packed bed and to compare the structured packed bed with random packed bed. The Nu d increase as heated single sphere is close to the wall and bottom because of increasing porosity and enhancing eddy motion respectively. The existing experiment of heated sphere in packed bed do not consider the preheating effect which decrease heat transfer on downstream. The heat transfer rate of structured packed bed is different from random packed bed because of unsteady flow in random packed bed. In this study, mass transfer experiments will replace heat transfer experiments based on analogy concept. An electroplating system is adopted using limiting current technique

  7. Forced Convection Heat Transfer of a sphere in Packed Bed Arrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong-Young; Chung, Bum-Jin [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This paper analysis and discuss the forced convective heat transfer from heated single sphere, which is buried in unheated packed bed, depending on Re{sub d} with porosity. The present work determines the test matrix for the packed bed experiment. And this study discuss difference of heat transfer according to the location of heated sphere and compared heated bed with heated sphere in packed bed and compared FCC (Face Centered Cubic), HCP (Hexagonal Closed Packed) structured packed bed with random packed. This paper is to discuss and make the plan to experiment the heat transfer for depending on location of heated single sphere in unheated packed bed, to compare single sphere in packed bed with heated packed bed and to compare the structured packed bed with random packed bed. The Nu{sub d} increase as heated single sphere is close to the wall and bottom because of increasing porosity and enhancing eddy motion respectively. The existing experiment of heated sphere in packed bed do not consider the preheating effect which decrease heat transfer on downstream. The heat transfer rate of structured packed bed is different from random packed bed because of unsteady flow in random packed bed. In this study, mass transfer experiments will replace heat transfer experiments based on analogy concept. An electroplating system is adopted using limiting current technique.

  8. Automotive Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Gregory P.

    2015-03-01

    Considerable fuel energy, as much as 70%, is not converted to useful work by internal combustion engines but is instead rejected as waste heat, and more than half of the waste heat, nearly 40% of fuel energy, is contained in vehicle exhaust gas. This provides an opportunity to recover some of the wasted fuel energy and convert it from heat into useful work, subject to the laws of thermodynamics, and thereby improve vehicle energy efficiency. Thermoelectric (TE) materials have been extensively researched and TE devices are now being developed for operation at high temperatures corresponding to automotive exhaust gases for direct solid-state conversion of heat into electricity. This has stimulated substantial progress in the development of practical TE generator (TEG) systems for large-scale commercialization. A significant enabler of this progress has been the US Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program through funding for low cost solutions for automotive TE waste heat recovery to improve fuel economy. Our current project at General Motors has culminated in the identification of the potential supply chain for all components and assembly of an automotive TEG. A significant focus has been to develop integrated and iterative modeling tools for a fully optimized TEG design that includes all components and subsystems (TE modules, heat exchangers, thermal interfaces, electrical interconnects, power conditioning, and vehicle integration for maximal use of TEG power). We have built and tested a new, low-cost Initial TEG prototype based on state-of-the-art production-scale skutterudite TE modules, novel heat exchanger designs, and practical solutions to the many technical challenges for optimum TEG performance. We will use the results for our Initial TEG prototype to refine our modeling and design tools for a Final automotive TEG system prototype. Our recent results will be presented. Thanks to: J.R. Salvador, E.R. Gundlach, D. Thompson, N.K. Bucknor, M

  9. Study of dryout heat fluxes in beds of inductively heated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhir, V.K.; Catton, I.

    1977-02-01

    Experimental observations of the dryout heat fluxes for inductively heated particulate beds have been made. The data were obtained when steel and lead particles in the size distribution 295-787 microns were placed in a 4.7 cm diameter pyrex glass jar and inductively heated by passing radio frequency current through a 13.3 cm diameter multi-turn work coil encircling the jar. Distilled water, methanol and acetone were used as coolants in the experiments, while the bed height was varied from 1.0 to 8.9 cm. Different mechanisms for the dryout in deep and shallow beds have been identified. Dryout in shallow beds is believed to occur when the vapor velocity in the gas jets exceeds a certain critical velocity at which choking of the vapor occurs, leading to obstruction in the flow of the liquid toward the bed. However, deep beds dry out when gravitational force can no longer maintain a downward coolant flow rate necessary to dissipate the heat generated in the bed. The heat flux data of the investigation and that from two previous investigations made at Argonne Laboratory and at UCLA have been correlated with semi-theoretical correlations based on the proposed hydrodynamic models. The deep and shallow bed correlations are used to predict the bed height at which transition from deep to shallow bed would occur. An application of the study has been made to determine the maximum coolable depths of the core debris as a function of the particle size, bed porosity and decay heat

  10. Waste Heat to Power Market Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elson, Amelia [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Tidball, Rick [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Hampson, Anne [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Waste heat to power (WHP) is the process of capturing heat discarded by an existing process and using that heat to generate electricity. In the industrial sector, waste heat streams are generated by kilns, furnaces, ovens, turbines, engines, and other equipment. In addition to processes at industrial plants, waste heat streams suitable for WHP are generated at field locations, including landfills, compressor stations, and mining sites. Waste heat streams are also produced in the residential and commercial sectors, but compared to industrial sites these waste heat streams typically have lower temperatures and much lower volumetric flow rates. The economic feasibility for WHP declines as the temperature and flow rate decline, and most WHP technologies are therefore applied in industrial markets where waste heat stream characteristics are more favorable. This report provides an assessment of the potential market for WHP in the industrial sector in the United States.

  11. Rock bed storage with heat pump. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remmers, H.E.; Mills, G.L.

    1979-05-01

    The study, Rock Bed Storage with Heat Pump, established the feasibility of mating a heat pump to a rock bed storage to effect optimal performance at the lowest cost in single family residences. The operating characteristics of off-the-shelf components of heat pump/rock bed storage systems were studied, and the results were used to formulate configurations of representative systems. These systems were modeled and subsequently analyzed using the TRNSYS computer program and a life cycle cost analysis program called LCCA. A detailed load model of a baseline house was formulated as part of the TRNSYS analysis. Results of the analysis involved the development of a technique to confine the range of heat pump/rock bed storage systems to those systems which are economical for a specific location and set of economic conditions. Additionally, the results included a comparison of the detailed load model with simple UA models such as the ASHRAE bin method. Several modifications and additions were made to the TRNSYS and LCCA computer programs during the course of the study.

  12. Potential health impacts of burning coal beds and waste banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelman, R.B.

    2004-01-01

    Uncontrolled release of pollutants from burning coal beds and waste banks presents potential environmental and human health hazards. On a global scale, the emissions of large volumes of greenhouse gases from burning coal beds may contribute to climate change that alters ecosystems and patterns of disease occurrence. On regional and local scales, the emissions from burning coal beds and waste banks of acidic gases, particulates, organic compounds, and trace elements can contribute to a range of respiratory and other human health problems. Although there are few published reports of health problems caused by these emissions, the potential for problems can be significant. In India, large numbers of people have been displaced from their homes because of health problems caused by emissions from burning coal beds. Volatile elements such as arsenic, fluorine, mercury, and selenium are commonly enriched in coal deposits. Burning coal beds can volatilize these elements, which then can be inhaled, or adsorbed on crops and foods, taken up by livestock or bioaccumulated in birds and fish. Some of these elements can condense on dust particles that can be inhaled or ingested. In addition, selenium, arsenic, lead, tin, bismuth, fluorine, and other elements condense where the hot gaseous emissions come in contact with ambient air, forming mats of concentrated efflorescent minerals on the surface of the ground. These mats can be leached by rainwater and washed into local water bodies providing other potential routes of exposure. Although there are little data linking burning coal beds and waste banks to known health problems, a possibly analogous situation exists in rural China where mineralized coal burned in a residential environment has caused widespread and severe health problems such as fluorosis and arseniasis. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Fouling reduction characteristics of a no-distributor-fluidized-bed heat exchanger for flue gas heat recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Y.D.; Lee, K.B.; Islam, S.Z.; Ko, S.B. [Kongju National University, Kong Ju (Republic of Korea). Dept. for Mechanical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    In conventional flue gas heat recovery systems, the fouling by fly ashes and the related problems such as corrosion and cleaning are known to be major drawbacks. To overcome these problems, a single-riser no-distributor-fluidized-bed heat exchanger is devised and studied. Fouling and cleaning tests are performed for a uniquely designed fluidized bed-type heat exchanger to demonstrate the effect of particles on the fouling reduction and heat transfer enhancement. The tested heat exchanger model (1 m high and 54 mm internal diameter) is a gas-to-water type and composed of a main vertical tube and four auxiliary tubes through which particles circulate and transfer heat. Through the present study, the fouling on the heat transfer surface could successfully be simulated by controlling air-to-fuel ratios rather than introducing particles through an external feeder, which produced soft deposit layers with 1 to 1.5 mm thickness on the inside pipe wall. Flue gas temperature at the inlet of heat exchanger was maintained at 450{sup o}C at the gas volume rate of 0.738 to 0.768 CMM (0.0123 to 0.0128 m{sup 3}/sec). From the analyses of the measured data, heat transfer performances of the heat exchanger before and after fouling and with and without particles were evaluated. Results showed that soft deposits were easily removed by introducing glass bead particles, and also heat transfer performance increased two times by the particle circulation. In addition, it was found that this type of heat exchanger had high potential to recover heat of waste gases from furnaces, boilers, and incinerators effectively and to reduce fouling related problems.

  14. INTENSIFICATION OF HEAT TRANSFER IN A HIGH-TEMPERATURED FLUIDIZED BED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. O. Redko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This paper highlights experimental research of heat exchange in coarse particles to ensure the performance of ecological characteristics of Heat supply system. Methodology. The test stand has been developed to solve the defined task. It helps to do the research at the temperature of fluidizing bed and pulsating fluidizing bed at the range 800–1000°С. The temperature of the fluidized bed was provided by burning natural gas and wood waste. Sand and chamotte with a particle size of 1.0 to 5.0 mm were used as the layer material. The heat-transfer coefficient from the layer to the surface, immersed in the layer, and the density of the heat flux were measured by a calorimetric method under steady-state conditions. Smooth tubes and transversely finned with different height and rib spacing were investigated. Experiments in a high-temperature pulsating fluidized bed were carried out with pulsating combustion of natural gas in a layer or in a sublattice chamber into which natural gas and air were separately supplied. The frequency of combustion pulsations was provided by the automation system. The flash frequency was regulated in the range from 0.14 to 5 Hz. Findings. It is presented the results of physical modeling to find out the heat-transfer coefficients of smooth and finned tubes in fluidizing bed of coarse particles in the process of wood waste and gaseous fuel combusting. It is proved that the coefficient of heat transfer increases with increasing temperature by 2–2,5 times in the bed which contains particles diameter of 2.5–5 mm is 300–350Vt/(m2 К that is much higher than for layer furnaces. The results of the experiments are presented in the form of a generalized relationship that takes into account the diameter of the particles and the value of the finning coefficient. Heat transfer of finned tubes is 15–20% less then smooth tubes but the density of heat flow referred to the area of a finned tube is 0,12–0,20 МVt/m2 that

  15. The heat transfer mechanisms in fluidized beds; Laemmoensiirtomekanismit leijukerroksessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogelholm, C.J.; Blomster, A.M.; Kojola, H. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Energy Technology and Environmental Protection

    1997-10-01

    The goal of the research project is to improve the accuracy of the heat transfer correlation in circulating fluidized beds and to define how the heat transfer is distributed in radiation and convection in the different parts of the fluidized bed. This will be carried out by studying the behaviour and the heat transfer of the fluidized bed in the boundary layer near the wall. During the project the concentration and the velocity of the sand particles are measured. The particle concentration and the particle velocity are measured by an image analysis system. A video camera and a Super VHS recorder are used to capture live images from the bed. The images are digitized and stored on a PC. The measured particle concentration was at highest slightly over 20 % on the straight wall. As expected, the velocity of the fluidizing gas had the most important role on the particle concentration. The experimental studies of the particle velocity were started last autumn 1996. The velocities of the particles were measured by using a multiple exposure technique. Afterwards the images captured were analyzed by performing a Fourier transform analysis. So far the results have been encouraging and the analyzing work will be ended this spring. (orig.)

  16. Biodenitrification of gaseous diffusion plant aqueous wastes: stirred bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    Approximately 30 kilograms of nitrates per day are discarded in the raffinates (acid wastes) of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant's X-705 Uranium Recovery and Decontamination Facility. A biodenitrification process employing continuous-flow, stirred-bed reactors has been successfully used to remove nitrates from similar acid wastes at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Laboratory studies have been made at Portsmouth to characterize the X-705 raffinates and to test the stirred-bed biodenitrification process on such raffinates. Raffinates which had been previously characterized were pumped through continuous-flow, stirred-bed, laboratory-scale reactors. Tests were conducted over a period of 146 days and involved variations in composition, mixing requirements, and the fate of several metal ions in the raffinates. Tests results show that 20 weight percent nitrates were reduced to a target nitrate effluent concentration of 100 μg/ml with a 99.64 percent efficiency. However, the average denitrification rate achieved was only 33% of that demonstrated with the Y-12 stirred-bed system. These low rates were probably due to the toxic effects of heavy metal ions on the denitrifying bacteria. Also, most of the uranium in the raffinate feed remained in the biomass and calcite, which collected in the reactor. This could cause criticality problems. For these reasons, it was decided not to make use of the stirred-bed bioreactor at Portsmouth. Instead, the biodenitrification installation now planned will use fluidized bed columns whose performance will be the subject of a subsequent report

  17. Comparison of correlations for heat transfer in sphere-pac beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fundamenski, W.R.; Gierszewski, P.J.

    1991-08-01

    The design of a tritium breeding blanket for a fusion reactor requires the knowledge of heat transfer within the blanket. In this paper three models for effective bed heat transfer are compared against the experimental database in order to choose a reference correlation to be used in blanket design. Two parameters are used to describe heat transfer in a packed bed: effective thermal conductivity of the bed, and a heat transfer coefficient at the bed-solid interface

  18. Air gasification of rice husk in bubbling fluidized bed reactor with bed heating by conventional charcoal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makwana, J P; Joshi, Asim Kumar; Athawale, Gaurav; Singh, Dharminder; Mohanty, Pravakar

    2015-02-01

    An experimental study of air gasification of rice husk was conducted in a bench-scale fluidized bed gasifier (FBG) having 210 mm diameter and 1600 mm height. Heating of sand bed material was performed using conventional charcoal fuel. Different operating conditions like bed temperature, feeding rate and equivalence ratio (ER) varied in the range of 750-850 °C, 25-31.3 kg/h, and 0.3-0.38, respectively. Flow rate of air was kept constant (37 m(3)/h) during FBG experiments. The carbon conversion efficiencies (CCE), cold gas efficiency, and thermal efficiency were evaluated, where maximum CCE was found as 91%. By increasing ER, the carbon conversion efficiency was decreased. Drastic reduction in electric consumption for initial heating of gasifier bed with charcoal compared to ceramic heater was ∼45%. Hence rice husk is found as a potential candidate to use directly (without any processing) in FBG as an alternative renewable energy source from agricultural field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Heat transfer and flow characteristics around a finned-tube bank heat exchanger in fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Ryosuke; Umekawa, Hisashi; Ozawa, Mamoru

    2009-01-01

    Principal heat transfer mechanisms in a fluidized bed have been classified into three categories, i.e. solid convection, gas convection and radiation. Among these mechanisms, the solid convection is a dominant mechanism in the bubbling fluidized bed. This solid convection is substantially caused by the bubble movement, thus the visualization of the void fraction distribution becomes a very useful method to understand the characteristics of the fluidized-bed heat exchanger. In this study, the heat transfer coefficient and the void fraction around the heat transfer tube with annuler fin were measured. For the quantitative measurement of the void fraction, neutron radiography and image processing technique were employed. Owing to the existence of the annuler fin, the restriction of the particle movements was put. This restriction suppressed the disturbance caused by tubes, and the influence of the tube arrangement on the flow and heat transfer characteristics could be clearly expressed.

  20. Heat transfer and flow characteristics around a finned-tube bank heat exchanger in fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, Ryosuke [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Umekawa, Hisashi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan)], E-mail: umekawa@kansai-uac.jp; Ozawa, Mamoru [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan)

    2009-06-21

    Principal heat transfer mechanisms in a fluidized bed have been classified into three categories, i.e. solid convection, gas convection and radiation. Among these mechanisms, the solid convection is a dominant mechanism in the bubbling fluidized bed. This solid convection is substantially caused by the bubble movement, thus the visualization of the void fraction distribution becomes a very useful method to understand the characteristics of the fluidized-bed heat exchanger. In this study, the heat transfer coefficient and the void fraction around the heat transfer tube with annuler fin were measured. For the quantitative measurement of the void fraction, neutron radiography and image processing technique were employed. Owing to the existence of the annuler fin, the restriction of the particle movements was put. This restriction suppressed the disturbance caused by tubes, and the influence of the tube arrangement on the flow and heat transfer characteristics could be clearly expressed.

  1. Thermal valorization of post-consumer film waste in a bubbling bed gasifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Lera, S; Torrico, J; Pallarés, J; Gil, A

    2013-07-01

    The use of plastic bags and film packaging is very frequent in manifold sectors and film waste is usually present in different sources of municipal and industrial wastes. A significant part of it is not suitable for mechanical recycling but could be safely transformed into a valuable gas by means of thermal valorization. In this research, the gasification of film wastes has been experimentally investigated through experiments in a fluidized bed reactor of two reference polymers, polyethylene and polypropylene, and actual post-consumer film waste. After a complete experimental characterization of the three materials, several gasification experiments have been performed to analyze the influence of the fuel and of equivalence ratio on gas production and composition, on tar generation and on efficiency. The experiments prove that film waste and analogue polymer derived wastes can be successfully gasified in a fluidized bed reactor, yielding a gas with a higher heating value in a range from 3.6 to 5.6 MJ/m3 and cold gas efficiencies up to 60%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Industrial waste heat utilization for low temperature district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Hao; Xia, Jianjun; Zhu, Kan; Su, Yingbo; Jiang, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Large quantities of low grade waste heat are discharged into the environment, mostly via water evaporation, during industrial processes. Putting this industrial waste heat to productive use can reduce fossil fuel usage as well as CO 2 emissions and water dissipation. The purpose of this paper is to propose a holistic approach to the integrated and efficient utilization of low-grade industrial waste heat. Recovering industrial waste heat for use in district heating (DH) can increase the efficiency of the industrial sector and the DH system, in a cost-efficient way defined by the index of investment vs. carbon reduction (ICR). Furthermore, low temperature DH network greatly benefits the recovery rate of industrial waste heat. Based on data analysis and in-situ investigations, this paper discusses the potential for the implementation of such an approach in northern China, where conventional heat sources for DH are insufficient. The universal design approach to industrial-waste-heat based DH is proposed. Through a demonstration project, this approach is introduced in detail. This study finds three advantages to this approach: (1) improvement of the thermal energy efficiency of industrial factories; (2) more cost-efficient than the traditional heating mode; and (3) CO 2 and pollutant emission reduction as well as water conservation. -- Highlights: •We review situation of industrial waste heat recovery with a global perspective. •We present a way to analyze the potential to utilize industrial waste heat for DH. •Northern China has huge potential for using low-grade industrial waste heat for DH. •A demonstration project is introduced using the universal approach we propose. •It proves huge benefits for factories, heat-supply companies and the society

  3. Fluidized bed system for calcination of high level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pande, D P; Prasad, T L; Yadgiri, N K; Theyyunni, T K [Process Engineering and Systems Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    During the operation of nuclear facilities significant quantities of radiochemical liquid effluents of different concentrations and varying chemical compositions are generated. These effluents contain activated radionuclides, corrosion products and fission products. The advantage of feeding the waste in solid form into the vitrifying equipment are multifold. Efforts are therefore made in many countries to calcine the high level waste, and obtain waste in the oxide form before the same is mixed with glass forming additives and fed into the melter unit. An experimental rig for fluidized bed calcination is constructed for carrying out the detailed investigation of this process, in order to adopt the same for plant scale application. To achieve better gas-solid contact and avoid raining down of solids, a distributor of bubble cap type was designed. A review of existing experience at various laboratories and design of new experimental facility for development of calciners are given. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Co-combustion of coal and non-recyclable paper & plastic waste in a fluidised bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boavida, D.; Abelha, P.; Gulyurtlu, I.; Cabrita, I. [DEECA-INETI, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2002-07-01

    Co-combustion of waste with coal was carried out using a fluidised bed combustor with the aim of achieving a fuel mixture with little variations in its heating value and simultaneously reducing the accumulation of non-toxic waste material by upgrading them for energy purposes. Results obtained indicate that the feeding of waste materials could present serious problems which could render conditions for a stable combustion difficult to achieve. The waste was fed mixed with coal and there was some difference observed in results regarding the combustion efficiency and emissions. Part of the combustion of waste material, contrary to that of coal, was observed to take place in the freeboard where the temperature was as much as 150{degree}C above that of the bed. 6 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Co-combustion of coal and non-recyclable paper and plastic waste in a fluidised bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Boavida; P. Abelha; I. Gulyurtlu; I. Cabrita [DEECA-INETI, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2003-10-01

    Co-combustion of waste with coal was carried out using a fluidised bed combustor with the aim of achieving a fuel mixture with little variations in its heating value and simultaneously reducing the accumulation of non-toxic waste material by upgrading them for energy purposes. Results obtained indicate that the feeding of waste materials plays an important role to achieve conditions for a stable combustion. The form in which the fuel is fed to the combustor makes a significant contribution to achieve desirable combustion performance and differences were observed in results regarding the combustion efficiency and emissions when waste was fed densified or in a fluffy state when it was burned mixed with coal. Part of the combustion of waste material, contrary to that of coal, was observed to take place in the freeboard where the temperature was as much as 150{sup o}C above that of the bed. 15 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Thermal valorization of footwear leather wastes in bubbling fluidized bed combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahillo, A; Armesto, L; Cabanillas, A; Otero, J

    2004-01-01

    Transformation of hide (animal skins) into leather is a complicated process during which significant amounts of wastes are generated. Footwear is the sector that consumes the major part of leather (60%). Logically, this industry is producing the largest quantity of leather wastes. The objective of this work was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of fluidized bed technology to recover the energy from burning footwear leather wastes. Considering the characteristics of leather waste, especially the heating value (12.5-21 MJ/kg), it can be considered a fairly good fuel. Moreover, leather waste has suitable characteristics for combustion, e.g., high volatile matter (76.5%) and low ash content (5.2%). Two factors deserve special attention: N3O and NOx emissions as a consequence of its unusual high nitrogen content (14.1%) and the chromium speciation because chromium is the main element of ash (3.2%) due to its use in leather tanning. A series of experiments has been carried out in a 0.1 MWt bubbling fluidized bed pilot plant. The combustion efficiency, flue gas composition and chromium speciation were investigated. Despite having high nitrogen content, a low conversion rate of fuel-N to NOx and N2O was attained. Chromium was concentrated in the solid streams and it was consistently found as Cr(III+); no presence of Cr(VI+) was detected.

  7. Waste heat recovery for offshore applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierobon, Leonardo; Kandepu, Rambabu; Haglind, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    vary in the range 20-30%. There are several technologies available for onshore gas turbines (and low/medium heat sources) to convert the waste heat into electricity. For offshore applications it is not economical and practical to have a steam bottoming cycle to increase the efficiency of electricity...... production, due to low gas turbine outlet temperature, space and weight restrictions and the need for make-up water. A more promising option for use offshore is organic Rankine cycles (ORC). Moreover, several oil and gas platforms are equipped with waste heat recovery units to recover a part of the thermal...... energy in the gas turbine off-gas using heat exchangers, and the recovered thermal energy acts as heat source for some of the heat loads on the platform. The amount of the recovered thermal energy depends on the heat loads and thus the full potential of waste heat recovery units may not be utilized...

  8. Field study of wastes from fluidized-bed combustion technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, A.; Holcombe, L.; Butler, R.

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has undertaken a research project to monitor advanced coal process wastes placed in natural geologic settings. The overall objective of the study is to gather field data on the engineering and environmental performance of disposed solid waste from various advanced coal processes. The coal ash from a fluidized-bed combustion unit is being studied as part of the DOE program. The unit is a 110-MW circulating fluidized bed (CFB) at Colorado Ute Electric Association's Nucla Steam Electric Station, which is being demonstrated with the support of the DOE Clean Coal Technology Program. The Electric Power Research Institute is cofunding the study. In June of 1989, a test cell approximately 100 feet square and 8 feet deep was constructed and filled with ash from the Colorado Ute CFB unit. The cell was instrumented with lysimeters and neutron probe access tubes to monitor water flow and leachate chemistry in the ash; groundwater wells and runoff collection devices were installed to determine the effects on groundwater and surface water quality, and a meteorological station was installed to determine the water balance. Additionally, tests are being performed to evaluate the chemical, physical, and mineralogical properties of the solid waste and geologic materials. Results from the first year of monitoring are presented

  9. Co-combustion of waste materials using fluidized bed technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Lopes; I. Gulyurtlu; P. Abelha; T. Crujeira; D. Boavida; I. Cabrita [INETI-DEECA, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2004-07-01

    There is growing interest in using renewable fuels in order to sustain the CO{sub 2} accumulation. Several waste materials can be used as coal substitutes as long as they contain significant combustible matter, as for example MSW and sewage sludge. Besides the outcome of the energetic valorization of such materials, combustion must be regarded as a pre-treatment process, contributing to the safe management of wastes. Landfilling is an expensive management option and requires a previous destruction of the organic matter present in residues, since its degradation generates greenhouse gases and produces acidic organic leachates. Fluidized bed combustion is a promising technology for the use of mixtures of coal and combustible wastes. This paper presents INETI's experience in the co-combustion of coal with this kind of residues performed in a pilot fluidized bed. Both the RDF (from MSW and sewage sludge) and sewage sludge combustion problems were addressed, relating the gaseous emissions, the behaviour of metals and the leachability of ashes and a comparison was made between co-combustion and mono-combustion in order to verify the influence of the utilization of coal. 9 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  10. Process and technological wastes compaction through a fluidized bed incineration process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiroy, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    The various fluidized bed systems (dense or circulating) are reviewed and the advantages of the circulation fluidized bed are highlighted (excellent combustion performance, clean combustion, large operating range, poly-functionality with regards to waste type, ...). Applications to contaminated graphite (with the problem of ash management) and to plant process wastes (ion exchangers, technological wastes, aqueous effluents); study of the neutralization and chlorine emission

  11. Combustion of cork waste in a circulating fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulyurtlu, I.; Boavida, D.; Miranda, M.; Cabrita, I. [Dept. de Tecnologias de Combustao, ITE-INETI, Lisboa (Portugal); Abelha, P. [Coaltec e Ambiente, Lisboa (Portugal)

    1999-07-01

    There is currently an ongoing joint project between Portugal and Spain, which is being funded by the FAIR programme. The principal objective of the FAIR project is to investigate the application of the fluidised bed combustion (FBC) technology to burn cork wastes with the aim of overcoming the difficulties currently experienced in the cork processing industries. The combustion studies at INETI were carried out using the 300 kW{sub th} circulating fluidised bed facility. The combustor is square in cross section with each side being 0.3 m long. The combustor height is 5 m. The temperatures in the bed, the riser and that of the flue gases leaving the reactor were continuously monitored. The combustion gases leaving the reactor passed through the recycling cyclone first to capture most of particulates elutriated out of the combustor. The solid particles were intermittently collected for analysis to determine the amount of carbon present, which helped the combustion efficiency to be calculated. Instantaneous measurements of O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, N{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} present levels in the flue gases were also carried out. The combustion tests were done with both the cork waste dust and granular virgin cork. The difference is that cork dust gets contaminated during the process due to the use of various additives. Most of the combustion took place in the riser where the temperature was at times up to 523 K above that of the bed. The unburned carbon level was low ranging from about 1.5 to 2.% suggesting that most of the particles burned to completion in the riser. (orig.)

  12. Development of Moving Bed Technology for Heat Treatment and Grinding of Dismantled Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yong

    2009-04-01

    The factors such as gas or fluid velocity, length, width and depth of each stage, number of Zig-Zag stage, angle of each stage, position of feed stage, size and amount of feed material, amount of treated concrete waste, method of fluid distribution, surface area of heat transfer, position of heater, method of heating, temperature difference between the heater and the material, amount of heat have been found to be important factors in the system. The capability of the system has been analyzed and evaluated by means of total efficiency and grade separation efficiency the experiments by using the simulated Zig-Zag type moving bed flow process with bench scale(3.2m high, Ifi-stage) have shown that the total efficiency has been in the range of 92% - 95% and the grade efficiency of 93% - 95%, respectively, elucidating that the system is quite good

  13. Optimization of a packed bed reactor for liquid waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, C.A.; Brower, M.J.; Coogan, J.J.; Tennant, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe an optimization study of a packed bed reactor (PBR), developed for the treatment of hazardous liquid wastes. The focus is on the destruction of trichloroethylene (TCE). The PBR technology offers many distinct advantages over other processes: simple design, high destruction rates (99.99%), low costs, ambient pressure operation, easy maintenance and scaleability. The cost effectiveness, optimal operating parameters and scaleability were determined. As a second stage of treatment, a silent discharge plasma (SDP) reactor was installed to further treat offgases from the PBR. A primary advantage of this system is closed loop operation, where exhaust gases are continuously recycled and not released into the atmosphere

  14. Governing equations for heat and mass transfer in heat-generating porous beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, T.C.; Pedersen, D.R.; Minkowycz, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Upon dryout of the bed, the dominant modes of heat transfer are conduction and radiation. Radiation is modeled through the Rosseland approximation. The melting of stainless-steel particulate imbedded in the fuel is modeled by assuming the bed to be a continuum with conduction and radiation as the dominant modes of heat transfer. The molten steel, after it drains to the bottom of the bed, is assumed to disappear into cracks and mortar joints of the MgO bricks. The melting of fuel in the interior of the bed is modeled identically to the steel particulate, except for the bed settling which is more pronounced in the case of fuel melting and is assumed to be instantaneous owing to the significant weight of overlying bed and sodium pool. The molten layer of fuel, as it collects at the bottom of the bed, causes the heatup of the MgO lining to the eutectic temperature (2280 0 C), and the MgO lining begins to dissolve. The density gradient caused by the dissolution of MgO leads to natural convection and mixing in the molten layer. The submerged fuel particulate also begins to dissolve in the molten solution and ultimately leads to the conversion of debris to a molten pool of fuel and MgO. The process of penetration of the MgO lining continues until the mixing process lowers the concentration of fuel in the volume of the pool to the level where the internal heat rate per unit volume is not enough to keep the body of the pool molten and leads to freezing in the cooler part of the pool. As the molten pool reaches a frozen or a quiescent state, the MgO brick lining thickness provided is deemed 'safe' for a given bed loading and the external rate of cooling. (author)

  15. Production of renewable energy from biomass and waste materials using fluidized bed technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozainee, M.; Rashid, M.; Looi, S.

    2000-01-01

    Malaysian industries generate substantial amount of biomass and waste materials such as wastes from agricultural and wood based industries, sludge waste from waste-water treatment plants and solid waste from municipals. Incinerating these waste materials not only produces renewable energy, but also solving their disposal problems. Fluidized bed combustors are widely used for incinerating these biomass materials. The significant advantages of fluidized bed incineration include simple design, efficient, and ability to reduce air pollution emissions. This paper discusses the opportunities and challenges of producing the green energy from biomass materials using the fluidized bed technologies. (Author)

  16. Hydrodynamic Modelling of Municipal Solid Waste Residues in a Pilot Scale Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Cardoso

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the hydrodynamics and heat transfer behavior of municipal solid waste (MSW gasification in a pilot scale bubbling fluidized bed reactor. A multiphase 2-D numerical model following an Eulerian-Eulerian approach within the FLUENT framework was implemented. User defined functions (UDFs were coupled to improve hydrodynamics and heat transfer phenomena, and to minimize deviations between the experimental and numerical results. A grid independence study was accomplished through comparison of the bed volume fraction profiles and by reasoning the grid accuracy and computational cost. The standard deviation concept was used to determine the mixing quality indexes. Simulated results showed that UDFs improvements increased the accuracy of the mathematical model. Smaller size ratio of the MSW-dolomite mixture revealed a more uniform mixing, and larger ratios enhanced segregation. Also, increased superficial gas velocity promoted the solid particles mixing. Heat transfer within the fluidized bed showed strong dependence on the MSW solid particles sizes, with smaller particles revealing a more effective process.

  17. Deep geologic disposal of mixed waste in bedded salt: The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, N.T.

    1993-01-01

    Mixed waste (i.e., waste that contains both chemically hazardous and radioactive components) poses a moral, political, and technical challenge to present and future generations. But an international consensus is emerging that harmful byproducts and residues can be permanently isolated from the biosphere in a safe and environmentally responsible manner by deep geologic disposal. To investigate and demonstrate such disposal for transuranic mixed waste, derived from defense-related activities, the US Department of Energy has prepared the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. This research and development facility was excavated approximately at the center of a 600 m thick sequence of salt (halite) beds, 655 m below the surface. Proof of the long-term tectonic and hydrological stability of the region is supplied by the fact that these salt beds have remained essentially undisturbed since they were deposited during the Late Permian age, approximately 225 million years ago. Plutonium-239, the main radioactive component of transuranic mixed waste, has a half-life of 24,500 years. Even ten half-lives of this isotope - amounting to about a quarter million years, the time during which its activity will decline to background level represent only 0.11 percent of the history of the repository medium. Therefore, deep geologic disposal of transuranic mixed waste in Permian bedded salt appears eminently feasible

  18. Wall-to-bed heat transfer in gas-solid fluidized beds: a computational and experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, D.J.; Smit, J.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The wall-to-bed heat transfer in gas-solid fluidized beds is mainly determined by phenomena prevailing in a thermal boundary layer with a thickness in the order of magnitude of the size of a single particle. In this thermal boundary layer the temperature gradients are very steep and the local

  19. Performance Assessment of a Generic Repository in Bedded Salt for DOE-Managed Nuclear Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, E. R.; Sevougian, S. D.; Hammond, G. E.; Frederick, J. M.; Mariner, P. E.

    2016-12-01

    A mined repository in salt is one of the concepts under consideration for disposal of DOE-managed defense-related spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW). Bedded salt is a favorable medium for disposal of nuclear waste due to its low permeability, high thermal conductivity, and ability to self-heal. Sandia's Generic Disposal System Analysis framework is used to assess the ability of a generic repository in bedded salt to isolate radionuclides from the biosphere. The performance assessment considers multiple waste types of varying thermal load and radionuclide inventory, the engineered barrier system comprising the waste packages, backfill, and emplacement drifts, and the natural barrier system formed by a bedded salt deposit and the overlying sedimentary sequence (including an aquifer). The model simulates disposal of nearly the entire inventory of DOE-managed, defense-related SNF (excluding Naval SNF) and HLW in a half-symmetry domain containing approximately 6 million grid cells. Grid refinement captures the detail of 25,200 individual waste packages in 180 disposal panels, associated access halls, and 4 shafts connecting the land surface to the repository. Equations describing coupled heat and fluid flow and reactive transport are solved numerically with PFLOTRAN, a massively parallel flow and transport code. Simulated processes include heat conduction and convection, waste package failure, waste form dissolution, radioactive decay and ingrowth, sorption, solubility limits, advection, dispersion, and diffusion. Simulations are run to 1 million years, and radionuclide concentrations are observed within an aquifer at a point approximately 4 kilometers downgradient of the repository. The software package DAKOTA is used to sample likely ranges of input parameters including waste form dissolution rates and properties of engineered and natural materials in order to quantify uncertainty in predicted concentrations and sensitivity to input parameters. Sandia

  20. Thermal energy storage systems using fluidized bed heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weast, T.; Shannon, L.

    1980-06-01

    A rotary cement kiln and an electric arc furnace were chosen for evaluation to determine the applicability of a fluid bed heat exchanger (FBHX) for thermal energy storage (TES). Multistage shallow bed FBHX's operating with high temperature differences were identified as the most suitable for TES applications. Analysis of the two selected conceptual systems included establishing a plant process flow configuration, an operational scenario, a preliminary FBHX/TES design, and parametric analysis. A computer model was developed to determine the effects of the number of stages, gas temperatures, gas flows, bed materials, charge and discharge time, and parasitic power required for operation. The maximum national energy conservation potential of the cement plant application with TES is 15.4 million barrels of oil or 3.9 million tons of coal per year. For the electric arc furnance application the maximum national conservation potential with TES is 4.5 million barrels of oil or 1.1 million tons of coal per year. Present time of day utility rates are near the breakeven point required for the TES system. Escalation of on-peak energy due to critical fuel shortages could make the FBHX/TES applications economically attractive in the future.

  1. Performance investigation on a 4-bed adsorption desalination cycle with internal heat recovery scheme

    KAUST Repository

    Thu, Kyaw; Yanagi, Hideharu; Saha, Bidyut Baran; Ng, Kim Choon

    2016-01-01

    Multi-bed adsorption cycle with the internal heat recovery between the condenser and the evaporator is investigated for desalination application. A numerical model is developed for a 4-bed adsorption cycle implemented with the master

  2. Experimental study on single-phase convection heat transfer characteristics of pebble bed channels with internal heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Xianke; Sun Zhongning; Zhou Ping; Xu Guangzhan

    2012-01-01

    The water-cooled pebble bed reactor core is the porous channels stacked with spherical fuel elements, having evident effect on enhancing heat transfer. Owing to the variability and randomness characteristics of it's interstice, pebble bed channels have a very complex heat transfer situation and have little correlative research. In order to research the heat transfer characters of pebble bed channels with internal heat source, electromagnetic induction heating method was adopted for overall heating the pebble bed which was composed of 8 mm diameter steel balls, and the internal heat transfer characteristics were researched. By comparing and analyzing the experimental data, the rule of power distribution and heat transfer coefficient with heat flux density, inlet temperature and working fluid's Re were got. According to the experimental data fitting, the dimensionless average heat transfer coefficient correlation criteria was got. The fitting results are good agreement with the experimental results within 12% difference. (authors)

  3. A Feasibility Study on District Heating and Cooling Business Using Urban Waste Heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Joon; Choi, Byoung Youn; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Lee, Jae Bong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jae In; Yoon, Jae Ho; Oh, Myung Do; Park, Moon Su; Kang, Han Kee; Yoo, Kyeoung Hoon; Bak, Jong Heon; Kim, Sun Chang; Park, Heong Kee; Bae, Tae Sik [Korea Academy of Industrial Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    Investigation of papers related to waste heat utilization using heat pump. Estimate of various kinds of urban waste heat in korea. Investigation and study on optimal control of district heating and cooling system. Prediction of energy saving and environmental benefits when the urban waste heat will be used as heat source and sink of heat pump for district heating and cooling. Estimation of economic feasibility on district heating and cooling project utilizing urban waste heat. (author). 51 refs., figs

  4. Performance Analysis of Waste Heat Driven Pressurized Adsorption Chiller

    KAUST Repository

    LOH, Wai Soong

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the transient modeling and performance of waste heat driven pressurized adsorption chillers for refrigeration at subzero applications. This innovative adsorption chiller employs pitch-based activated carbon of type Maxsorb III (adsorbent) with refrigerant R134a as the adsorbent-adsorbate pair. It consists of an evaporator, a condenser and two adsorber/desorber beds, and it utilizes a low-grade heat source to power the batch-operated cycle. The ranges of heat source temperatures are between 55 to 90°C whilst the cooling water temperature needed to reject heat is at 30°C. A parametric analysis is presented in the study where the effects of inlet temperature, adsorption/desorption cycle time and switching time on the system performance are reported in terms of cooling capacity and coefficient of performance. © 2010 by JSME.

  5. Waste heat of HTR power stations for district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnenberg, H.; Schlenker, H.V.

    1975-01-01

    The market situation, the applied techniques, and the transport, for district heating in combination with HTR plants are considered. Analysis of the heat market indicates a high demand for heat at temperatures between 100 and 150 0 C in household and industry. This market for district heating can be supplied by heat generated in HTR plants using two methods: (1) the combined heat and power generation in steam cycle plants by extracting steam from the turbine, and (2) the use of waste heat of a closed gas turbine cycle. The heat generation costs of (2) are negligible. The cost for transportation of heat over the average distance between existing plant sites and consumer regions (25 km) are between 10 and 20% of the total heat price, considering the high heat output of nuclear power stations. Comparing the price of heat gained by use of waste heat in HTR plants with that of conventional methods, considerable advantages are indicated for the combined heat and power generation in HTR plants. (author)

  6. Improving hydrolysis of food waste in a leach bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browne, James D.; Allen, Eoin; Murphy, Jerry D., E-mail: jerry.murphy@ucc.ie

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • This paper assesses leaching of food waste in a two phase digestion system. • Leaching is assessed with and without an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). • Without the UASB, low pH reduces hydrolysis, while increased flows increase leaching. • Inclusion of the UASB increases pH to optimal levels and greatly improves leaching. • The optimal conditions are suggested as low flow with connection to the UASB. - Abstract: This paper examines the rate of degradation of food waste in a leach bed reactor (LBR) under four different operating conditions. The effects of leachate recirculation at a low and high flow rate are examined with and without connection to an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). Two dilution rates of the effective volume of the leach bed reactors were investigated: 1 and 6 dilutions per LBR per day. The increase in dilution rate from 1 to 6 improved the destruction of volatile solids without connection to the UASB. However connection to the UASB greatly improved the destruction of volatile solids (by almost 60%) at the low recirculation rate of 1 dilution per day. The increase in volatile solids destruction with connection to the UASB was attributed to an increase in leachate pH and buffering capacity provided by recirculated effluent from the UASB to the leach beds. The destruction of volatile solids for both the low and high dilution rates was similar with connection to the UASB, giving 82% and 88% volatile solids destruction respectively. This suggests that the most efficient leaching condition is 1 dilution per day with connection to the UASB.

  7. Improving hydrolysis of food waste in a leach bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browne, James D.; Allen, Eoin; Murphy, Jerry D.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper assesses leaching of food waste in a two phase digestion system. • Leaching is assessed with and without an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). • Without the UASB, low pH reduces hydrolysis, while increased flows increase leaching. • Inclusion of the UASB increases pH to optimal levels and greatly improves leaching. • The optimal conditions are suggested as low flow with connection to the UASB. - Abstract: This paper examines the rate of degradation of food waste in a leach bed reactor (LBR) under four different operating conditions. The effects of leachate recirculation at a low and high flow rate are examined with and without connection to an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). Two dilution rates of the effective volume of the leach bed reactors were investigated: 1 and 6 dilutions per LBR per day. The increase in dilution rate from 1 to 6 improved the destruction of volatile solids without connection to the UASB. However connection to the UASB greatly improved the destruction of volatile solids (by almost 60%) at the low recirculation rate of 1 dilution per day. The increase in volatile solids destruction with connection to the UASB was attributed to an increase in leachate pH and buffering capacity provided by recirculated effluent from the UASB to the leach beds. The destruction of volatile solids for both the low and high dilution rates was similar with connection to the UASB, giving 82% and 88% volatile solids destruction respectively. This suggests that the most efficient leaching condition is 1 dilution per day with connection to the UASB

  8. Fluidized-Bed Gasification of Plastic Waste, Wood, and Their Blends with Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Zaccariello

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of fuel composition on gasification process performance was investigated by performing mass and energy balances on a pre-pilot scale bubbling fluidized bed reactor fed with mixtures of plastic waste, wood, and coal. The fuels containing plastic waste produced less H2, CO, and CO2 and more light hydrocarbons than the fuels including biomass. The lower heating value (LHV progressively increased from 5.1 to 7.9 MJ/Nm3 when the plastic waste fraction was moved from 0% to 100%. Higher carbonaceous fines production was associated with the fuel containing a large fraction of coal (60%, producing 87.5 g/kgFuel compared to only 1.0 g/kgFuel obtained during the gasification test with just plastic waste. Conversely, plastic waste gasification produced the highest tar yield, 161.9 g/kgFuel, while woody biomass generated only 13.4 g/kgFuel. Wood gasification showed a carbon conversion efficiency (CCE of 0.93, while the tests with two fuels containing coal showed lowest CCE values (0.78 and 0.70, respectively. Plastic waste and wood gasification presented similar cold gas efficiency (CGE values (0.75 and 0.76, respectively, while that obtained during the co-gasification tests varied from 0.53 to 0.73.

  9. Heat transfer between a fluidized bed and an immersed horizontal tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beasley, D.E.; Figliola, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    Reliable predictions will require a better understanding of the heat transfer mechanisms and bed hydrodynamics in the neighborhood of the submerged surface. In this investigation measurements of the instantaneous heat transfer between a submerged surface and a gas fluidized bed operating in the bubbling regime are presented. The experimental results are compared to existing predictive models for the particle convective and the overall heat transfer coefficients. For the range of particle size and flow velocity studied, the particle convective component of heat transfer dominates the overall heat transfer between the bed and the submerged surface. Experimental studies into particle size distribution effects on heat transfer suggest that mixtures augment the bed to surface heat transfer. Documentation of bed particle size distribution is necessary if heat transfer data are to be compared or predicted

  10. Carbon bed mercury emissions control for mixed waste treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soelberg, Nick; Enneking, Joe

    2010-11-01

    Mercury has various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so it is often present in radioactive and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. Compliance with air emission regulations such as the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards can require off-gas mercury removal efficiencies up to 99.999% for thermally treating some mixed waste streams. Test programs have demonstrated this level of off-gas mercury control using fixed beds of granular sulfur-impregnated activated carbon. Other results of these tests include (1) the depth of the mercury control mass transfer zone was less than 15-30 cm for the operating conditions of these tests; (2) MERSORB carbon can sorb mercury up to 19 wt % of the carbon mass; and (3) the spent carbon retained almost all (98.3-99.99%) of the mercury during Toxicity Characteristic Leachability Procedure (TCLP) tests, but when even a small fraction of the total mercury dissolves, the spent carbon can fail the TCLP test when the spent carbon contains high mercury concentrations.

  11. Nuclear waste repository transparency technology test bed demonstrations at WIPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betsill J, David; Elkins, Ned Z.; Wu, Chuan-Fu; Mewhinney, James D.; Aamodt, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, has stated that one of the nuclear waste legacy issues is ''The challenge of managing the fuel cycle's back end and assuring the safe use of nuclear power.'' Waste management (i.e., the back end) is a domestic and international issue that must be addressed. A key tool in gaining acceptance of nuclear waste repository technologies is transparency. Transparency provides information to outside parties for independent assessment of safety, security, and legitimate use of materials. Transparency is a combination of technologies and processes that apply to all elements of the development, operation, and closure of a repository system. A test bed for nuclear repository transparency technologies has been proposed to develop a broad-based set of concepts and strategies for transparency monitoring of nuclear materials at the back end of the fuel/weapons cycle. WIPP is the world's first complete geologic repository system for nuclear materials at the back end of the cycle. While it is understood that WIPP does not currently require this type of transparency, this repository has been proposed as realistic demonstration site to generate and test ideas, methods, and technologies about what transparency may entail at the back end of the nuclear materials cycle, and which could be applicable to other international repository developments. An integrated set of transparency demonstrations was developed and deployed during the summer, and fall of 1999 as a proof-of-concept of the repository transparency technology concept. These demonstrations also provided valuable experience and insight into the implementation of future transparency technology development and application. These demonstrations included: Container Monitoring Rocky Flats to WIPP; Underground Container Monitoring; Real-Time Radiation and Environmental Monitoring; Integrated level of confidence in the system and information provided. As the world's only operating deep geologic

  12. Thermoelectricity from wasted heat of integrated circuits

    KAUST Repository

    Fahad, Hossain M.

    2012-05-22

    We demonstrate that waste heat from integrated circuits especially computer microprocessors can be recycled as valuable electricity to power up a portion of the circuitry or other important accessories such as on-chip cooling modules, etc. This gives a positive spin to a negative effect of ever increasing heat dissipation associated with increased power consumption aligned with shrinking down trend of transistor dimension. This concept can also be used as an important vehicle for self-powered systemson- chip. We provide theoretical analysis supported by simulation data followed by experimental verification of on-chip thermoelectricity generation from dissipated (otherwise wasted) heat of a microprocessor.

  13. Ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    The objective of this study was to predict tensile stress levels in thin-walled titanium alloy and thick-walled carbon steel containers designed for the ocean disposal of heat-generating radioactive wastes. Results showed that tensile stresses would be produced in both designs by the expansion of the lead filter, for a temperature rise of 200 0 C. Tensile stress could be reduced if the waste heat output at disposal was reduced. Initial stresses for the titanium-alloy containers could be relieved by heat treatment. (UK)

  14. Mass and heat transfer between a fluidized bed and a freely moving submerged sphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, W.; Valk, M.

    1995-01-01

    For fluidized bed combustion and gasification of solid fuels, but also for various other fluidized bed processes such as drying, granulation and evaporation, mass and heat transport to (or from) a particle freely moving in the fluidized bed is of great importance. The combustion rate of a

  15. Heat exchangers and recuperators for high temperature waste gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, H.

    General considerations on high temperature waste heat recovery are presented. Internal heat recovery through combustion air preheating and external heat recovery are addressed. Heat transfer and pressure drop in heat exchanger design are discussed.

  16. Transient core-debris bed heat-removal experiments and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, T.; Klein, J.; Klages, J.; Schwarz, C.E.; Chen, J.C.

    1982-08-01

    An experimental investigation is reported of the thermal interaction between superheated core debris and water during postulated light-water reactor degraded core accidents. Data are presented for the heat transfer characteristics of packed beds of 3 mm spheres which are cooled by overlying pools of water. Results of transient bed temperature and steam flow rate measurements are presented for bed heights in the range 218 mm-433 mm and initial particle bed temperatures between 530K and 972K. Results display a two-part sequential quench process. Initial frontal cooling leaves pockets or channels of unquenched spheres. Data suggest that heat transfer process is limited by a mechanism of countercurrent two-phase flow. An analytical model which combines a bed energy equation with either a quasisteady version of the Lipinski debris bed model or a critical heat flux model reasonably well predicts the characteristic features of the bed quench process. Implications with respect to reactor safety are discussed

  17. High temperature absorption compression heat pump for industrial waste heat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinholdt, Lars; Horntvedt, B.; Nordtvedt, S. R.

    2016-01-01

    Heat pumps are currently receiving extensive interest because they may be able to support the integration of large shares of fluctuating electricity production based on renewable sources, and they have the potential for the utilization of low temperature waste heat from industry. In most industries......, the needed temperature levels often range from 100°C and up, but until now, it has been quite difficult to find heat pump technologies that reach this level, and thereby opening up the large-scale heat recovery in the industry. Absorption compression heat pumps can reach temperatures above 100°C......, and they have proved themselves a very efficient and reliable technology for applications that have large temperature changes on the heat sink and/or heat source. The concept of Carnot and Lorenz efficiency and its use in the analysis of system integration is shown. A 1.25 MW system having a Carnot efficiency...

  18. Research into Biomass and Waste Gasification in Atmospheric Fluidized Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skala, Zdenek; Ochrana, Ladislav; Lisy, Martin; Balas, Marek; Kohout, Premysl; Skoblja, Sergej

    2007-07-01

    Considerable attention is paid in the Czech Republic to renewable energy sources. The largest potential, out of them all, have biomass and waste. The aim therefore is to use them in CHP in smaller units (up to 5MWel). These are the subject of the research summarized in our article. The paper presents results of experimental research into gasification in a 100 kW AFB gasifier situated in Energy Institute, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, and fitted with gas cleaning equipment. Within the research, study was carried out into gas cleaning taking primary measures in the fluidized bed and using hot filter, metal-based catalytic filter, and wet scrubber. Descriptions and diagrams are given of the gasifier and new ways of cleaning. Results include: Impact of various fuels (farming and forest wastes and fast-growing woods and culm plants) on fuel gas quality. Individual kinds of biomass have very different thermal and physical properties; Efficiency of a variety of cleaning methods on content of dust and tars and comparison of these methods; and, Impact of gasifier process parameters on resultant gas quality. (auth)

  19. Packed bed reactor treatment of liquid hazardous and mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennant, R.A.; Wantuck, P.J.; Vargas, R.

    1992-01-01

    We are developing thermal-based packed bed reactor (PBR) technology as an alternative to incineration for treatment of hazardous organic liquid wastes. The waste streams targeted by this technology are machining fluids contaminated with chlorocarbons and/or chlorofluorocarbons and low levels of plutonium or tritium The PBR offers several distinct advantages including simplistic design, rugged construction, ambient pressure processing, economical operations, as well as ease of scalability and maintainability. In this paper, we provide a description of the apparatus as well as test results using prepared mixtures of machining oils/emulsions with trichloroethylene (TCE), carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ), trichloroethane (TCA), and Freon TF. The current treatment system is configured as a two stage device with the PBR (1st stage) coupled to a silent discharge plasma (SDP) cell. The SDP serves as a second stage for further treatment of the gaseous effluent from the PBR. One of the primary advantages of this two stage system is that its suitability for closed loop operation where radioactive components are well contained and even CO 2 is not released to the environment

  20. An examination of flame shape related to convection heat transfer in deep-fuel beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara M. Yedinak; Jack D. Cohen; Jason M. Forthofer; Mark A. Finney

    2010-01-01

    Fire spread through a fuel bed produces an observable curved combustion interface. This shape has been schematically represented largely without consideration for fire spread processes. The shape and dynamics of the flame profile within the fuel bed likely reflect the mechanisms of heat transfer necessary for the pre-heating and ignition of the fuel during fire spread....

  1. Visualization of bed material movement in a simulated fluidized bed heat exchanger by neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umekawa, Hisashi; Ozawa, Mamoru; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Matsubayashi, Masahito

    1999-01-01

    The bulk movement of fluidized bed material was visualized by neutron radiography by introducing tracers into the bed materials. The simulated fluidized bed consisted of aluminum plates, and the bed material was sand of 99.7% SiO 2 (mean diameter: 0.218 mm, density: 2555 kg/m 3 ). Both materials were almost transparent to neutrons. Then the sand was colored by the contamination of the sand coated by CdSO 4 . Tracer particles of about 2 mm diameter were made by the B 4 C, bonded by the vinyl resin. The tracer was about ten times as large as the particle of fluidized bed material, but the traceability was enough to observe the bed-material bulk movement owing to the large effective viscosity of the fluidized bed. The visualized images indicated that the bubbles and/or wakes were important mechanism of the behavior of the fluidized bed movement

  2. On dryout heat flux and pressure drop of a submerged inductively heated bed flow from below

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, F.F.; Catton, I.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation of dryout heat flux in a saturated porous medal with forced flow from below has been conducted using methanol as a coolant. The mass flux varied from 0 to 0.557 kg/m 2 sec. Particle sizes were 590-790 μm, 1.6 mm, 3.2 mm, and 4.8 mm. The dryout heat flux increases as the mass flux increases, and asymptotically goes to the total evaporation energy of the inlet flow. The pressure drop across the bed changed very rapidly near the dryout point due to the formation of dry zone

  3. Dry out of a fluidized particle bed with internal heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keowen, R.S.; Catton, I.

    1975-03-01

    An apparatus was designed to adequately simulate the characteristics of a particle bed formed by nuclear reactor fuel after the reactor has been operable for some length of time at high power. This was accomplished by using a 10 KW, 453 Kc induction heater, coupled through a multi-turn work coil to particle beds of cast steel shot and lead shot in water. The temperature response and dryout condition was determined for various bed levels, particle diameters, and heat fluxes. Analysis of the data retrieved from the bed was used to generate a family of curves to predict the necessary conditions for dryout to occur within a fluidized particle bed with internal heat generation. The results presented here, with internal heat generation, show that previous results with bottom heating and volume heating are conservative. (U.S.)

  4. Heat Transfer in a Fixed Biomass Char Bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Glarborg, P.

    2002-01-01

    A thermal conductivity model based on the Yagi and Kunii model together with a bed model was developed to describe the thermal conductivity of a straw char bed. The bed model describes the relationship between the distance between particles and the external porosity. To verify the model, thermal ...

  5. Position paper -- Waste storage tank heat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stine, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop and document a position on the heat removal system to be used on the waste storage tanks currently being designed for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF), project W-236A. The current preliminary design for the waste storage primary tank heat removal system consists of the following subsystems: (1) a once-through dome space ventilation system; (2) a recirculation dome space ventilation system; and (3) an annulus ventilation system. Recently completed and ongoing studies have evaluated alternative heat removal systems in an attempt to reduce system costs and to optimize heat removal capabilities. In addition, a thermal/heat transfer analysis is being performed that will provide assurance that the heat removal systems selected will be capable of removing the total primary tank design heat load of 1.25 MBtu/hr at an allowable operating temperature of 190 F. Although 200 F is the design temperature limit, 190 F has been selected as the maximum allowable operating temperature limit based on instrumentation sensitivity, instrumentation location sensitivity, and other factors. Seven options are discussed and recommendations are made

  6. Heat transfer in high-level waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickey, B.R.; Hogg, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    Heat transfer in the storage of high-level liquid wastes, calcining of radioactive wastes, and storage of solidified wastes are discussed. Processing and storage experience at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant are summarized for defense high-level wastes; heat transfer in power reactor high-level waste processing and storage is also discussed

  7. Making the most of waste heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-09-26

    Two papers to the first PEMEC conference on plant maintenance held in London, Sept. 1975, are reported. J. O'Shea (Integrated Energy Systems) discussed the financial savings possible in recovering waste heat from diesel engines, smoke-tube and water-tube boilers and gas turbines. He estimates that use of all the waste heat sources from a diesel engine would return a cost of 0.623 p/kWh. R. Aston described a conventional diesel generator standby power installation at Connolly's (Blackley) Manchester works, expressing doubts as to the economy of the peak-lopping operation, with the favorable tariffs they were getting from Norway.

  8. New waste heat district heating system with combined heat and power based on absorption heat exchange cycle in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Fangtian; Fu Lin; Zhang Shigang; Sun Jian

    2012-01-01

    A new waste heat district heating system with combined heat and power based on absorption heat exchange cycle (DHAC) was developed to increase the heating capacity of combined heat and power (CHP) through waste heat recovery, and enhance heat transmission capacity of the existing primary side district heating network through decreasing return water temperature by new type absorption heat exchanger (AHE). The DHAC system and a conventional district heating system based on CHP (CDH) were analyzed in terms of both thermodynamics and economics. Compared to CDH, the DHAC increased heating capacity by 31% and increased heat transmission capacity of the existing primary side district heating network by 75%. The results showed that the exergetic efficiency of DHAC was 10.41% higher and the product exergy monetary cost was 36.6¥/GJ less than a CHD. DHAC is an effective way to increase thermal utilization factor of CHP, and to reduce district heating cost. - Highlights: ► Absorption heat pumps are used to recover waste heat in CHP. ► Absorption heat exchanger can reduce exergy loss in the heat transfer process. ► New waste heat heating system (DHAC) can increase heating capacity of CHP by 31%. ► DHAC can enhance heat transmission capacity of the primary pipe network by 75%. ► DHAC system has the higher exergetic efficiency and the better economic benefit.

  9. Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2015-09-22

    A waste heat recovery (WHR) system connects a working fluid to fluid passages formed in an engine block and/or a cylinder head of an internal combustion engine, forming an engine heat exchanger. The fluid passages are formed near high temperature areas of the engine, subjecting the working fluid to sufficient heat energy to vaporize the working fluid while the working fluid advantageously cools the engine block and/or cylinder head, improving fuel efficiency. The location of the engine heat exchanger downstream from an EGR boiler and upstream from an exhaust heat exchanger provides an optimal position of the engine heat exchanger with respect to the thermodynamic cycle of the WHR system, giving priority to cooling of EGR gas. The configuration of valves in the WHR system provides the ability to select a plurality of parallel flow paths for optimal operation.

  10. Artificial neural network based modelling approach for municipal solid waste gasification in a fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Daya Shankar; Das, Saptarshi; Pan, Indranil; Leahy, James J; Kwapinski, Witold

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, multi-layer feed forward neural networks are used to predict the lower heating value of gas (LHV), lower heating value of gasification products including tars and entrained char (LHV p ) and syngas yield during gasification of municipal solid waste (MSW) during gasification in a fluidized bed reactor. These artificial neural networks (ANNs) with different architectures are trained using the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) back-propagation algorithm and a cross validation is also performed to ensure that the results generalise to other unseen datasets. A rigorous study is carried out on optimally choosing the number of hidden layers, number of neurons in the hidden layer and activation function in a network using multiple Monte Carlo runs. Nine input and three output parameters are used to train and test various neural network architectures in both multiple output and single output prediction paradigms using the available experimental datasets. The model selection procedure is carried out to ascertain the best network architecture in terms of predictive accuracy. The simulation results show that the ANN based methodology is a viable alternative which can be used to predict the performance of a fluidized bed gasifier. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nuclear waste solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorklund, William J.

    1977-01-01

    High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition.

  12. Nuclear waste solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorklund, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition

  13. Local total and radiative heat-transfer coefficients during the heat treatment of a workpiece in a fluidised bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, W.M.; Kong, L.X.; Hodgson, P.D.

    2006-01-01

    The heat-transfer coefficients around a workpiece immersed in an electrically heated heat treatment fluidised bed were studied. A suspension probe designed to simulate a workpiece of complex geometry was developed to measure local total and radiative heat-transfer coefficients at a high bed temperature. The probe consisted of an energy-storage region separated by insulation from the fluidised bed, except for the measuring surface, and a multi-thermocouple measurement system. Experiments in the fluidised bed were performed for a fluidising medium of 120-mesh alumina, a wide temperature range of 110-1050 deg. C and a fluidising number range of 1.18-4.24. It was found that the workpiece surface temperature has a more significant effect on heat transfer than the bed temperature. The total heat-transfer coefficient at the upper surface of the workpiece sharply decreased at the start of heating, and then steadily increased as heating progressed, while a sharp decrease became a rapid increase and then a slow increase for the radiative heat-transfer coefficient. A great difference in the heat-transfer coefficients around the workpiece was observed

  14. Measurement of the thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient of a binary bed of beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donne, M.D.; Piazza, G. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik; Goraieb, A.; Sordon, G.

    1998-01-01

    The four ITER partners propose to use binary beryllium pebble bed as neutron multiplier. Recently this solution has been adopted for the ITER blanket as well. In order to study the heat transfer in the blanket the effective thermal conductivity and the wall heat transfer coefficient of the bed have to be known. Therefore at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe heat transfer experiments have been performed with a binary bed of beryllium pebbles and the results have been correlated expressing thermal conductivity and wall heat transfer coefficients as a function of temperature in the bed and of the difference between the thermal expansion of the bed and of that of the confinement walls. The comparison of the obtained correlations with the data available from the literature show a quite good agreement. (author)

  15. Mineral sources of water and their influence on the safe disposal of radioactive wastes in bedded salt deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallis, S.M.

    1973-12-01

    With the increased use of nuclear energy, there will be subsequent increases in high-level radioactive wastes such as Sr/sup 90/, Cs/sup 137/, and Pu/sup 239/. Several agencies have considered the safest possible means to store or dispose of wastes in geologic environments such as underground storage in salt deposits, shale beds, abandoned dry mines, and in clay and shale pits. Salt deposits have received the most favorable attention because they exist in dry environments and because of other desirable properties of halite (its plasticity, gamma-ray shielding, heat dissipation ability, low mining cost, and worldwide abundance). Much work has been done on bedded salt deposits, particularly the Hutchinson Salt Member of the Wellington Formation at Lyons, Kansas. Salt beds heated by the decay of the radioactive wastes may release water by dehydration of hydrous minerals commonly present in evaporite sequences or water present in other forms such as fluid inclusions. More than 80 hydrous minerals are known to occur in evaporite deposits. The occurrences, total water contents (up to 63%) and dehydration temperatures (often less that 150/sup 0/C) of these minerals are given. Since it is desirable to dispose of radioactive wastes in a dry environment, care must be taken that large quantities of water are not released through the heating of hydrous minerals. Seventy-four samples from four cores taken at Lyons, Kansas, were analyzed by x-ray diffraction. The minerals detected were halite, anhydrite, gypsum, polyhalite, dolomite, magnesite, quartz, feldspar, and the clay minerals illite, chlorite, kaolinite, vermiculite, smectite, mixed-layer clay, and corrensite (interstratified chlorite-vermiculite). Of these, gypsum, polyhalite and the clay minerals are all capable of releasing water when heated.

  16. Mineral sources of water and their influence on the safe disposal of radioactive wastes in bedded salt deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallis, S.M.

    1973-12-01

    With the increased use of nuclear energy, there will be subsequent increases in high-level radioactive wastes such as Sr 90 , Cs 137 , and Pu 239 . Several agencies have considered the safest possible means to store or dispose of wastes in geologic environments such as underground storage in salt deposits, shale beds, abandoned dry mines, and in clay and shale pits. Salt deposits have received the most favorable attention because they exist in dry environments and because of other desirable properties of halite (its plasticity, gamma-ray shielding, heat dissipation ability, low mining cost, and worldwide abundance). Much work has been done on bedded salt deposits, particularly the Hutchinson Salt Member of the Wellington Formation at Lyons, Kansas. Salt beds heated by the decay of the radioactive wastes may release water by dehydration of hydrous minerals commonly present in evaporite sequences or water present in other forms such as fluid inclusions. More than 80 hydrous minerals are known to occur in evaporite deposits. The occurrences, total water contents (up to 63%) and dehydration temperatures (often less that 150 0 C) of these minerals are given. Since it is desirable to dispose of radioactive wastes in a dry environment, care must be taken that large quantities of water are not released through the heating of hydrous minerals. Seventy-four samples from four cores taken at Lyons, Kansas, were analyzed by x-ray diffraction. The minerals detected were halite, anhydrite, gypsum, polyhalite, dolomite, magnesite, quartz, feldspar, and the clay minerals illite, chlorite, kaolinite, vermiculite, smectite, mixed-layer clay, and corrensite (interstratified chlorite-vermiculite). Of these, gypsum, polyhalite and the clay minerals are all capable of releasing water when heated

  17. Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2014-08-12

    This disclosure relates to a waste heat recovery (WHR) system and to a system and method for regulation of a fluid inventory in a condenser and a receiver of a Rankine cycle WHR system. Such regulation includes the ability to regulate the pressure in a WHR system to control cavitation and energy conversion.

  18. Simulation of a high efficiency multi-bed adsorption heat pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TeGrotenhuis, W.E.; Humble, P.H.; Sweeney, J.B.

    2012-01-01

    Attaining high energy efficiency with adsorption heat pumps is challenging due to thermodynamic losses that occur when the sorbent beds are thermally cycled without effective heat recuperation. The multi-bed concept described here enables high efficiency by effectively transferring heat from beds being cooled to beds being heated. A simplified lumped-parameter model and detailed finite element analysis are used to simulate a sorption compressor, which is used to project the overall heat pump coefficient of performance. Results are presented for ammonia refrigerant and a nano-structured monolithic carbon sorbent specifically modified for the application. The effects of bed geometry and number of beds on system performance are explored, and the majority of the performance benefit is obtained with four beds. Results indicate that a COP of 1.24 based on heat input is feasible at AHRI standard test conditions for residential HVAC equipment. When compared on a basis of primary energy input, performance equivalent to SEER 13 or 14 are theoretically attainable with this system. - Highlights: ► A multi-bed concept for adsorption heat pumps is capable of high efficiency. ► Modeling is used to simulate sorption compressor and overall heat pump performance. ► Results are presented for ammonia refrigerant and a nano-structured monolithic carbon sorbent. ► The majority of the efficiency benefit is obtained with four beds. ► Predicted COP as high as 1.24 for cooling is comparable to SEER 13 or 14 for electric heat pumps.

  19. Fluidized-bed calcination of simulated commercial high-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeby, W.A.

    1975-11-01

    Work is in progress at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant to verify process flowsheets for converting simulated commercial high-level liquid wastes to granular solids using the fluidized-bed calcination process. Primary emphasis in the series of runs reported was to define flowsheets for calcining simulated Allied-General Nuclear Services (AGNS) waste and to evaluate product properties significant to calcination, solids storage, or post treatment. Pilot-plant studies using simulated high-level acid wastes representative of those to be produced by Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (NFS) are also included. Combined AGNS high-level and intermediate-level waste (0.26 M Na in blend) was successfully calcined when powdered iron was added (to result in a Na/Fe mole ratio of 1.0) to the feed to prevent particle agglomeration due to sodium nitrate. Long-term runs (approximately 100 hours) showed that calcination of the combined waste is practical. Concentrated AGNS waste containing sodium at concentrations less than 0.2 M were calcined successfully; concentrated waste containing 1.13 M Na calcined successfully when powdered iron was added to the feed to suppress sodium nitrate formation. Calcination of dilute AGNS waste by conventional fluid-bed techniques was unsuccessful due to the inability to control bed particle size--both particle size and bed level decreased. Fluid-bed solidification of AGNS dilute waste at conditions in which most of the calcined solids left the calciner vessel with the off-gas was successful. In such a concept, the steady-state composition of the bed material would be approximately 22 wt percent calcined solids deposited on inert particles. Calcination of simulated NFS acid waste indicated that solidification by the fluid-bed process is feasible

  20. Analysis of the geological stability of a hypothetical radioactive waste repository in a bedded salt formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tierney, M.S.; Lusso, F.; Shaw, H.R.

    1978-01-01

    This document reports on the development of mathematical models used in preliminary studies of the long-term safety of radioactive wastes deeply buried in bedded salt formations. Two analytical approaches to estimating the geological stability of a waste repository in bedded salt are described: (a) use of probabilistic models to estimate the a priori likelihoods of release of radionuclides from the repository through certain idealized natural and anthropogenic causes, and (b) a numerical simulation of certain feedback effects of emplacement of waste materials upon ground-water access to the repository's host rocks. These models are applied to an idealized waste repository for the sake of illustration

  1. Test bed control center design concept for Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundstrom, E.; Draper, J.V.; Fausz, A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the design concept for the control center for the Single Shell Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator System test bed and the design process behind the concept. The design concept supports all phases of the test bed mission, including technology demonstration, comprehensive system testing, and comparative evaluation for further development and refinement of the TWRMS for field operations

  2. Design and evaluation of fluidized bed heat recovery for diesel engine systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, J. R.; Newby, R. A.; Vidt, E. J.; Lippert, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    The potential of utilizing fluidized bed heat exchangers in place of conventional counter-flow heat exchangers for heat recovery from adiabatic diesel engine exhaust gas streams was studied. Fluidized bed heat recovery systems were evaluated in three different heavy duty transport applications: (1) heavy duty diesel truck; (2) diesel locomotives; and (3) diesel marine pushboat. The three applications are characterized by differences in overall power output and annual utilization. For each application, the exhaust gas source is a turbocharged-adiabatic diesel core. Representative subposed exhaust gas heat utilization power cycles were selected for conceptual design efforts including design layouts and performance estimates for the fluidized bed heat recovery heat exchangers. The selected power cycles were: organic rankine with RC-1 working fluid, turbocompound power turbine with steam injection, and stirling engine. Fuel economy improvement predictions are used in conjunction with capital cost estimates and fuel price data to determine payback times for the various cases.

  3. Dryout heat flux and flooding phenomena in debris beds consisting of homogeneous diameter particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Yu; Abe, Yutaka; Yamano, Norihiro; Soda, Kunihisa

    1988-08-01

    Since the TMI-2 accident, which occurred in 1979, necessity of understanding phenomena associated with a severe accident have been recognized and researches have been conducted in many countries. During a severe accident of a light water reactor, a debris bed consisting of the degraded core materials would be formed. Because the debris bed continues to release decay heat, the debris bed would remelt when the coolable geometry is not maintained. Thus the degraded core coolability experiments to investigate the influence of the debris particle diameter and coolant flow conditions on the coolability of the debris bed and the flooding experiments to investigate the dependence of flooding phenomena on the configuration of the debris bed have been conducted in JAERI. From the degraded core coolability experiments, the following conclusions were derived; the coolability of debris beds would be improved by coolant supply into the beds, Lipinski's 1-dimensional model shows good agreement with the measured dryout heat flux for the beds under stagnant and forced flow conditions from the bottom of the beds, and the analytical model used for the case that coolant is fed by natural circulation through the downcomer reproduces the experimental results. And the following conclusions were given from the flooding experiments ; no dependence between bed height and the flooding constant exists for the beds lower than the critical bed height, flooding phenomena of the stratified beds would be dominated by the layer consisting of smaller particles, and the predicted dryout heat flux by the analytical model based on the flooding theory gives underestimation under stagnant condition. (author)

  4. Fluidized bed steam reformed mineral waste form performance testing to support Hanford Supplemental Low Activity Waste Immobilization Technology Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pierce, E. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Cozzi, A. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Daniel, W. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Herman, C. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Miller, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Missimer, D. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, M. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Brown, C. F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qafoku, N. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Neeway, J. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Valenta, M. M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gill, G. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Swanberg, D. J. [Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), Richland, WA (United States); Robbins, R. A. [Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), Richland, WA (United States); Thompson, L. E. [Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report describes the benchscale testing with simulant and radioactive Hanford Tank Blends, mineral product characterization and testing, and monolith testing and characterization. These projects were funded by DOE EM-31 Technology Development & Deployment (TDD) Program Technical Task Plan WP-5.2.1-2010-001 and are entitled “Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-Level Waste Form Qualification”, Inter-Entity Work Order (IEWO) M0SRV00054 with Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) entitled “Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Savannah River Site (SRS) Low Activity Waste and Hanford Low Activity Waste Tank Samples”, and IEWO M0SRV00080, “Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Waste Form Qualification Testing Using SRS Low Activity Waste and Hanford Low Activity Waste Tank Samples”. This was a multi-organizational program that included Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), THOR® Treatment Technologies (TTT), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Office of River Protection (ORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS). The SRNL testing of the non-radioactive pilot-scale Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) products made by TTT, subsequent SRNL monolith formulation and testing and studies of these products, and SRNL Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) radioactive campaign were funded by DOE Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) Phase 2 Project in connection with a Work-For-Others (WFO) between SRNL and TTT.

  5. Effect of fluidization number on the combustion of simulated municipal solid waste in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar Johari; Mutahharah, M.M.; Abdul, A.; Salema, A.; Kalantarifard, A.; Rozainee, M.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of fluidization number on the combustion of simulated municipal solid was in a fluidized bed was investigated. Simulated municipal solid waste was used a sample and it was formulated from major waste composition found in Malaysia which comprised of food waste, paper, plastic and vegetable waste. Proximate and ultimate analyses of the simulated were conducted and results showed its composition was similar to the actual Malaysian municipal solid waste composition. Combustion study was carried out in a rectangular fluidized bed with sand of mean particle size of 0.34 mm as a fluidising medium. The range of fluidization numbers investigated was 3 to 11 U mf . The combustion was carried out at stoichiometric condition (Air Factor = 1). Results showed that the best fluidization number was in the range of 5 to 7 U mf with 5 U mf being the most optimum in which the bed temperature was sustained in a much longer period. (author)

  6. Heat transfer from a tube immersed in a fluidized bed with frosting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torikoshi, K.; Kawabata, K.; Yamashita, H.

    1990-01-01

    Heat-transfer and flow-visualization experiments were performed for a single cooled tube immersed horizontally in a fluidized bed under frosting conditions. Measurements were made from local and average heat-transfer coefficients around the cooled tube surface. Glass beads having nominal diameters of 0.43 mm, 0.89 mm, and 1.6 mm were employed as the bed material. The 30 mm diameter tube was located 100 mm above the distributor. All the results obtained under frosting conditions were for an air temperature of about 5 degrees C and an air relative humidity of about 80 percent. The heat-transfer coefficient with frosting evaluated in this investigation includes the heat-transfer coefficient from the frost surface to the bed and the thermal resistance of the frost layer. Comparisons are made to heat-transfer data without frosting. The heat transfer is found to be larger with frosting than without frosting under the fluidization state

  7. Thermo-catalytic pyrolysis of waste polyethylene bottles in a packed bed reactor with different bed materials and catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obeid, Farah; Zeaiter, Joseph; Al-Muhtaseb, Ala’a H.; Bouhadir, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermo-catalytic pyrolysis of waste polyethylene bottles was investigated. • The highest yield of liquid (82%) was obtained over a cement powder bed. • Acidic catalysts narrowed the carbon chain length of the paraffins to C 10 –C 28 . • Combination of cement bed with HBeta catalyst gave the highest yield of liquid. • Significant yield of aromatics was obtained mainly naphthalene and D-limonene. - Abstract: Plastic waste is an increasing economic and environmental problem as such there is a great need to process this waste and reduce its environmental impact. In this work, the pyrolysis of high density polyethylene (HDPE) waste products was investigated using both thermal and catalytic cracking techniques. The experimental work was carried out using packed bed reactor operating under an inert atmosphere at 450 °C. Different reactor bed materials, including sand, cement and white clay were used to enhance the thermal cracking of HDPE. In addition, the catalytic effect of sodium hydroxide, HUSY and HBeta zeolite catalysts on the degradation of HDPE waste was also investigated. The reactor beds were found to significantly alter the yield as well as the product composition. Products such as paraffins (⩽C 44 ), olefins (⩽C 22 ), aromatics (⩽C 14 ) and alcohols (C 16 and C 17 ) were obtained at varying rates. The highest yield of liquid (82%) was obtained over a cement powder bed with a paraffin yield of 58%. The yield of paraffins and olefins followed separate paths, for paraffins it was found to increase in the order or Cement > White clay > Silica Sand, whereas for the olefins it was in the reverse order Silica Sand > White clay > Cement. The results obtained in this work exhibited a higher P/O ratio than expected, where the amount of generated paraffins was greater than 60% in most cases. Less olefin was generated as a consequence. This indicates that the product generated is more suited to be used as a fuel rather than as a chemical

  8. Cooling of an internal-heated debris bed with fine particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Z.L.; Sehgal, B.R.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, an analytical model on dryout heat flux of ex-vessel debris beds with fines particles under top flooding conditions has been developed. The parametric study is performed on the effect of the stratification of the debris beds on the dryout heat flux. The calculated results show that the stratification configuration of the debris beds with smaller particles and lower porosity layer resting on the top of another layer of the beds has profound effect on the dryout heat flux for the debris beds both with and without a downcomer. The enhancement of the dryout heat flux by the downcomer is significant. The efficiency of the single downcomer on the enhancement of the dryout heat flux is also analyzed. This, in general, agrees well with experimental data. The model is also employed to perform the assessment on the coolability of the ex-vessel debris bed under representative accidental conditions. One conservative case is chosen, and it is found that the downcomer could be efficient measure to cool the debris bed and hence terminate the severe accident. (authors)

  9. Effect of flue gas recirculation on heat transfer in a supercritical circulating fluidized bed combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błaszczuk Artur

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on assessment of the effect of flue gas recirculation (FGR on heat transfer behavior in 1296t/h supercritical coal-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB combustor. The performance test in supercritical CFB combustor with capacity 966 MWth was performed with the low level of flue gas recirculation rate 6.9% into furnace chamber, for 80% unit load at the bed pressure of 7.7 kPa and the ratio of secondary air to the primary air SA/PA = 0.33. Heat transfer behavior in a supercritical CFB furnace between the active heat transfer surfaces (membrane wall and superheater and bed material has been analyzed for Geldart B particle with Sauter mean diameters of 0.219 and 0.246 mm. Bed material used in the heat transfer experiments had particle density of 2700 kg/m3. A mechanistic heat transfer model based on cluster renewal approach was used in this work. A heat transfer analysis of CFB combustion system with detailed consideration of bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient distributions along furnace height is investigated. Heat transfer data for FGR test were compared with the data obtained for representative conditions without recycled flue gases back to the furnace through star-up burners.

  10. Gasification of solid waste — potential and application of co-current moving bed gasifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, M.J.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1979-01-01

    A review is given of gasification processes for solid fuels with special emphasis on waste gasification. Although the co-current moving bed gasifier has not been under consideration for a long time, it offers interesting possibilities for waste gasification. Some operational data are given. Two

  11. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming For Treatment And Immobilization Of Low-Activity Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewitt, W.M.

    2011-01-01

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies remaining under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper provides the reader a general understanding of fluidized bed steam reforming and its possible application to treat and immobilize Hanford low-activity waste.

  12. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING FOR TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HEWITT WM

    2011-04-08

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies remaining under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper provides the reader a general understanding of fluidized bed steam reforming and its possible application to treat and immobilize Hanford low-activity waste.

  13. Ocean disposal of heat generating waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    A number of options for the disposal of vitrified heat generating waste are being studied to ensure that safe methods are available when the time comes for disposal operations to commence. This study has considered the engineering and operational aspects of the Penetrator Option for ocean disposal to enable technical comparisons with other options to be made. In the Penetrator Option concept, waste would be loaded into carefully designed containers which would be launched at a suitable deep ocean site where they would fall freely through the water and would embed themselves completely within the seabed sediments. Radiological protection would be provided by a multi-barrier system including the vitrified waste form, the penetrator containment, the covering sediment and the ocean. Calculations and demonstration have shown that penetrators could easily achieve embedment depths in excess of 30m and preliminary radiological assessments indicate that 30m of intact sediment would be an effective barrier for radionuclide isolation. The study concludes that a 75mm thickness of low carbon steel appears to be sufficient to provide a containment life of 500 to 1000 years during which time the waste heat output would have decayed to an insignificant level. Disposal costs have been assessed. (author)

  14. Characteristics of convective heat transport in a packed pebble-bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulmohsin, Rahman S., E-mail: rsar62@mst.edu [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 400 West 11th Street/231 Schrenk Hall, Rolla, MO 65409-1230 (United States); Al-Dahhan, Muthanna H., E-mail: aldahhanm@mst.edu [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 400 West 11th Street/231 Schrenk Hall, Rolla, MO 65409-1230 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, 301 W. 14th St./222 Fulton Hall (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • A fast-response heat transfer probe has been developed and used in this work. • Heat transport has been quantified in terms of local heat transfer coefficients. • The method of the electrically heated single sphere in packing has been applied. • The heat transfer coefficient increases from the center to the wall of packed bed. • This work advancing the knowledge of heat transport in the studied packed bed. - Abstract: Obtaining more precise results and a better understanding of the heat transport mechanism in the dynamic core of packed pebble-bed reactors is needed because this mechanism poses extreme challenges to the reliable design and efficient operation of these reactors. This mechanism can be quantified in terms of a solid-to-gas convective heat transfer coefficient. Therefore, in this work, the local convective heat transfer coefficients and their radial profiles were measured experimentally in a separate effect pilot-plant scale and cold-flow experimental setup of 0.3 m in diameter, using a sophisticated noninvasive heat transfer probe of spherical type. The effect of gas velocity on the heat transfer coefficient was investigated over a wide range of Reynolds numbers of practical importance. The experimental investigations of this work include various radial locations along the height of the bed. It was found that an increase in coolant gas flow velocity causes an increase in the heat transfer coefficient and that effect of the gas flow rate varies from laminar to turbulent flow regimes at all radial positions of the studied packed pebble-bed reactor. The results show that the local heat transfer coefficient increases from the bed center to the wall due to the change in the bed structure, and hence, in the flow pattern of the coolant gas. The findings clearly indicate that one value of an overall heat transfer coefficient cannot represent the local heat transfer coefficients within the bed; therefore, correlations are needed to

  15. Design of A District Heating System Including The Upgrading of Residual Industrial Waste Heat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falcao, P.W.; Mesbah, A.; Suherman, M.V.; Wennekes, S.

    2005-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the feasibility of using a waste heat stream from DSM for a District Heating System. A conceptual design was carried out with emphasis on the unit for upgrading the residual waste heat. Having reviewed heat pump technology, mechanical heat pump was found to be the

  16. Data Quality Objectives For Selecting Waste Samples To Test The Fluid Bed Steam Reformer Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banning, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    This document describes the data quality objectives to select archived samples located at the 222-S Laboratory for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing. The type, quantity and quality of the data required to select the samples for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing are discussed. In order to maximize the efficiency and minimize the time to treat Hanford tank waste in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, additional treatment processes may be required. One of the potential treatment processes is the fluid bed steam reformer (FBSR). A determination of the adequacy of the FBSR process to treat Hanford tank waste is required. The initial step in determining the adequacy of the FBSR process is to select archived waste samples from the 222-S Laboratory that will be used to test the FBSR process. Analyses of the selected samples will be required to confirm the samples meet the testing criteria.

  17. Use of photovoltaics for waste heat recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcyn, Adam D

    2013-04-16

    A device for recovering waste heat in the form of radiated light, e.g. red visible light and/or infrared light includes a housing having a viewing window, and a photovoltaic cell mounted in the housing in a relationship to the viewing window, wherein rays of radiated light pass through the viewing window and impinge on surface of the photovoltaic cell. The housing and/or the cell are cooled so that the device can be used with a furnace for an industrial process, e.g. mounting the device with a view of the interior of the heating chamber of a glass making furnace. In this manner, the rays of the radiated light generated during the melting of glass batch materials in the heating chamber pass through the viewing window and impinge on the surface of the photovoltaic cells to generate electric current which is passed onto an electric load.

  18. Transfer of heat to fluidized-solids beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1952-10-16

    The improvement in the method described and claimed in patent application 14,363/47 (136,186) for supplying heat to a dense turbulent mass of solid fluidized by a gas flowing upwardly therethrough and subjected to a high temperature in a treating zone, by heat transfer through heat-transfer surfaces of heat-transfer elements in contact with the said turbulent mass of finely divided solid and heated by means of a fluid heating medium, including burning fuels comprising contacting the said heat-transfer surfaces with a fuel and a combustion supporting gas under such conditions that the combustion of the fuel is localized in the heat-transfer element near the point of entry of the fuel and combustion-supporting gas and a substantial temperature gradient is maintained along the path of said fuel combustion-supporting gas and combustion products through the said heat-transfer element.

  19. Numerical and experimental studies on effects of moisture content on combustion characteristics of simulated municipal solid wastes in a fixed bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Rui; Ismail, Tamer M.; Ren, Xiaohan; Abd El-Salam, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of moisture content on the burning process of MSW are investigated. • A two-dimensional mathematical model was built to simulate the combustion process. • Temperature distributions, process rates, gas species were measured and simulated. • The The conversion ratio of C/CO and N/NO in MSW are inverse to moisture content. - Abstract: In order to reveal the features of the combustion process in the porous bed of a waste incinerator, a two-dimensional unsteady state model and experimental study were employed to investigate the combustion process in a fixed bed of municipal solid waste (MSW) on the combustion process in a fixed bed reactor. Conservation equations of the waste bed were implemented to describe the incineration process. The gas phase turbulence was modeled using the k–ε turbulent model and the particle phase was modeled using the kinetic theory of granular flow. The rate of moisture evaporation, devolatilization rate, and char burnout was calculated according to the waste property characters. The simulation results were then compared with experimental data for different moisture content of MSW, which shows that the incineration process of waste in the fixed bed is reasonably simulated. The simulation results of solid temperature, gas species and process rate in the bed are accordant with experimental data. Due to the high moisture content of fuel, moisture evaporation consumes a vast amount of heat, and the evaporation takes up most of the combustion time (about 2/3 of the whole combustion process). The whole bed combustion process reduces greatly as MSW moisture content increases. The experimental and simulation results provide direction for design and optimization of the fixed bed of MSW

  20. Numerical and experimental studies on effects of moisture content on combustion characteristics of simulated municipal solid wastes in a fixed bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Rui, E-mail: Sunsr@hit.edu.cn [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92, West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China); Ismail, Tamer M., E-mail: temoil@aucegypt.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Ren, Xiaohan [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92, West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China); Abd El-Salam, M. [Department of Basic Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • The effects of moisture content on the burning process of MSW are investigated. • A two-dimensional mathematical model was built to simulate the combustion process. • Temperature distributions, process rates, gas species were measured and simulated. • The The conversion ratio of C/CO and N/NO in MSW are inverse to moisture content. - Abstract: In order to reveal the features of the combustion process in the porous bed of a waste incinerator, a two-dimensional unsteady state model and experimental study were employed to investigate the combustion process in a fixed bed of municipal solid waste (MSW) on the combustion process in a fixed bed reactor. Conservation equations of the waste bed were implemented to describe the incineration process. The gas phase turbulence was modeled using the k–ε turbulent model and the particle phase was modeled using the kinetic theory of granular flow. The rate of moisture evaporation, devolatilization rate, and char burnout was calculated according to the waste property characters. The simulation results were then compared with experimental data for different moisture content of MSW, which shows that the incineration process of waste in the fixed bed is reasonably simulated. The simulation results of solid temperature, gas species and process rate in the bed are accordant with experimental data. Due to the high moisture content of fuel, moisture evaporation consumes a vast amount of heat, and the evaporation takes up most of the combustion time (about 2/3 of the whole combustion process). The whole bed combustion process reduces greatly as MSW moisture content increases. The experimental and simulation results provide direction for design and optimization of the fixed bed of MSW.

  1. Co-firing option of palm shell waste and Malaysian coal blends in a circulating fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Hussain; Farid Nasir Ani

    2010-01-01

    Palm oil shell waste is one of the main agriculture wastes in Malaysia. In order to utilize these wastes efficiently, pyrolysis of oil-palm shell waste was first carried out using Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The effects of heating rate on the pyrolytic properties were investigated to evaluate its suitability for co-firing. The TGA analyses of oil palm shell waste and Malaysian coal blends suggests that there is an obvious lateral shift in the thermo grams for different heating rate. Kinetics calculations were also done using integral method. For palm shell waste powder it was found that the activation energies ranged from 112-119 kJ/mole and for the Mukah coal blends it ranged from 93.3 -100.8 kJ/mole. Combustion studies for palm shell wastes and coal blends were done in a hot circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) test rig. This is the first practical experience of using this type of rig in Malaysia. The temperature dependence on the combustion and emission behaviour were identified. The effects of variation of primary air and feed rate have also been analyzed and their influence on emissions has been established. The combustion studies of palm shell wastes were done and it was found that the emission of NO x ranged from 20-164 ppm while the CO emissions were high for some operating conditions. For the co-firing studies, the NO x and CO deceased with the percentage increase in the blending ratio of coal with palm shell waste.. The optimum blending ratio was found to be in a ratio of 40 percent coal and 60 percent Mukah coal. It was also found that Mukah coal show agglomeration behaviour with when it is blended in 80% ratio. (author)

  2. Experimental study on heat pipe assisted heat exchanger used for industrial waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Hongting; Yin, Lihui; Shen, Xiaopeng; Lu, Wenqian; Sun, Yuexia; Zhang, Yufeng; Deng, Na

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHE) was used to recycle the waste heat in a slag cooling process of steel industry. • An specially designed on-line cleaning device was construed and used to enhance the heat transfer of HPHE. • The performance characteristics of a HPHE has been assessed by integrating the first and second law of thermodynamics. • The optimum operation conditions was determined by integrating the first and the second law of thermodynamics. - Abstract: Steel industry plays an important role economically in China. A great amount of hot waste liquids and gases are discharged into environment during many steelmaking processes. These waste liquids and gases have crucial energy saving potential, especially for steel slag cooling process. It could be possible to provide energy saving by employing a waste heat recovery system (WHRS). The optimum operation condition was assessed by integrating the first and the second law of thermodynamics for a water–water heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHE) for a slag cooling process in steel industry. The performance characteristics of a HPHE has been investigated experimentally by analyzing heat transfer rate, heat transfer coefficient, effectiveness, exergy efficiency and number of heat transfer units (NTU). A specially designed on-line cleaning device was used to clean the heat exchange tubes and enhance heat transfer. The results indicated that the exergy efficiency increased with the increment of waste water mass flow rate at constant fresh water mass flow rate, while the effectiveness decreased at the same operation condition. As the waste water mass flow rate varied from 0.83 m"3/h to 1.87 m"3/h, the effectiveness and exergy efficiency varied from 0.19 to 0.09 and from 34% to 41%, respectively. In the present work, the optimal flow rates of waste water and fresh water were 1.20 m"3/h and 3.00 m"3/h, respectively. The on-line cleaning device had an obvious effect on the heat transfer, by performing

  3. A feasibility study to determine the functionality of a novel rocking kiln - fluidized bed reactor for the treatment of waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Azman Che Mat Isa; Muhd Noor Muhd Yunus; Mohamad Puad Abu; Shahazrin Mohd Nasir; Mohd fairus Abdul Farid

    2004-01-01

    Rotary kiln has been widely used in incineration and studied by many researches. Solid wastes of various shapes, sizes and heat value can be fed into rotary kiln either in batches or continually. Waste combustion in rotary kiln involves rotation method and the residence time depends on the length and diameter of the rotary kiln and the total stoichiometric air given to the system. Rocking system is another technology used in incinerator. In the rocking system, internal elements in the combustion chamber move to transports and mix the burning waste so that all combustible material in the waste is fully burnt. Another technology in incinerator is the fluidized bed This method uses air to fluidized the sand thus enhancing the combustion process. The total air is controlled in order to obtain a suitable fluidized condition This preliminary study was conducted to study the feasibility of an incinerator system when three components viz. the rotary kiln, rocking system and fluidized bed are combined This research was also conducted to obtain preliminary data parameters of the three components such as the suitable temperature, the angle of the kiln, residence time, total air for fluidization, rocking speed and the devolatilization rate. The samples used in this research were the palm oil kernel shells. The results of the studies showed that the palm oil kernel shells combusted evenly using the new parameters. (Author)

  4. Dryout heat flux in a debris bed with forced coolant flow from below

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Kwang-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Myung

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to experimentally investigate the enhancement of dryout heat flux in debris beds with coolant flow from below. The experimental facility consists mainly of an induction heater (40 kW, 35 kHz), a double-wall quartz-tube test section containing steel-particle bed and coolant injection and recovery condensing loop. A fairly uniform heating of particle bed was achieved by induction heating. This paper reports the experimental data for 5 mm particle bed and 300 mm bed height. The dryout heat rate data were obtained of both top-flooding case and forced coolant injection from below with the injection mass flux up to 1.5 kg/m 2 s. For the top-flooded case, the volumetric dryout heat rate was about 4 MW/m 3 and it increased as the rate of coolant injection from below was increased. At the coolant injection mass flux of 1.5 kg/m 2 s, the volumetric dryout heat rate was about 10 MW/m 3 , the enhancement factor was more than two. (author)

  5. Modeling bubble heat transfer in gas-solid fluidized beds using DEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, A.V.; Peters, E.A.J.F.; Kolkman, T.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Discrete element method (DEM) simulations of a pseudo 2-D fluidized bed at non-isothermal conditions are presented. First implementation details are discussed. This is followed by a validation study where heating of a packed column by a flow of heated fluid is considered. Next hot gas injected into

  6. Heat transfer in a membrane assisted fluidised bed with immersed horizontal tubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshmukh, S.A.R.K.; Volkers, S.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of gas permeation through horizontally immersed membrane tubes on the heat transfer characteristics in a membrane assisted fluidised bed was investigated experimentally. Local time-averaged heat transfer coefficients from copper tubes arranged in a staggered formation with the membrane

  7. Heat transfer in a membrane assisted fluidized bed with immersed horizontal tubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshmukh, S.A.R.K.; Volkers, Sander; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of gas permeation through horizontally immersed membrane tubes on the heat transfer characteristics in a membrane assisted fluidized bed operated in the bubbling fluidization regime was investigated experimentally. Local time-averaged heat transfer coefficients from copper tubes arranged

  8. Evaluation of Heat Shields from RTS Wright Industries Magnesium and Uranium Beds

    CERN Document Server

    Korinko, P S

    2002-01-01

    Heat shields from a factory test of the furnaces that will be used to heat the magnesium and uranium beds for the tritium extraction facility (TEF) were examined to determine the cause of discoloration. The samples were examined using visual, optical microscopy, electron microscopy, x-ray spectroscopy, and Auger electron spectroscopy.

  9. An experimental study on quenching of a radially stratified heated porous bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, Arun K.; Sehgal, Bal Raj; Stepanyan, Armen V.

    2006-01-01

    The quenching characteristics of a volumetrically-heated particulate bed composed of radially stratified sand layers were investigated experimentally in the POMECO facility. The sand bed simulates the corium particulate debris bed which is formed when the molten corium released from the vessel fragments in water and deposits on the cavity floor during a postulated severe accident in a light water reactor (LWR). The electrically-heated bed was quenched by water from a water column established over top of it, and later also with water coming from its bottom, which was circulating from the water overlayer through downcomers. A series of experiments were conducted to reveal the effects of the size of downcomers, and their locations in the bed, on the quenching characteristics of the radially stratified debris beds. The downcomers were found to significantly increase the bed quenching rate. To simulate the non-condensable gases generated during the MCCI, air and argon were injected from the bottom of the bed at different flow rates. The effects of gas flow rate and its properties on the quenching behaviour were observed. The results indicate that the non-condensable gas flows reduce the quenching rate significantly. The gas properties also affect the quenching characteristics

  10. WASTE HEAT RECOVERY IN HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS: SOLUTION TO REDUCE GLOBAL WARMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Baradey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Energy conversion technologies, where waste heat recovery systems are included, have received significant attention in recent years due to reasons that include depletion of fossil fuel, increasing oil prices, changes in climatic conditions, and global warming. For low temperature applications, there are many sources of thermal waste heat, and several recovery systems and potential useful applications have been proposed by researchers [1-4]. In addition, many types of equipment are used to recover waste thermal energy from different systems at low, medium, and high temperature applications, such as heat exchangers, waste heat recovery boiler, thermo-electric generators, and recuperators. In this paper, the focus is on waste heat recovery from air conditioners, and an efficient application of these energy resources. Integration of solar energy with heat pump technologies and major factors that affect the feasibility of heat recovery systems have been studied and reviewed as well. KEYWORDS: waste heat recovery; heat pump.

  11. Optimum length of finned pipe for waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeylemez, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    A thermoeconomic feasibility analysis is presented yielding a simple algebraic optimization formula for estimating the optimum length of a finned pipe that is used for waste heat recovery. A simple economic optimization method is used in the present study by combining it with an integrated overall heat balance method based on fin effectiveness for calculating the maximum savings from a waste heat recovery system

  12. Waste Water Treatment-Bed of Coal Fly Ash for Dyes and Pigments Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Farman Ali Shah; Aziza Aftab; Noorullah Soomro; Mir Shah Nawaz; Kambiz Vafai

    2015-01-01

    The highly porous power plant waste ashes have been utilized to treat toxic effluent of a dyes manufacturing plant. An attempt has been made for the first time in Pakistan, to generate an effective and economically sound treatment facility for the toxic effluent of a dyes manufacturing plant. This is an indigenous bed which could replace expensive treatment facilities, such as reverse osmosis (RO), granulated activated carbon (GAC) bed, etc. The treatment efficiency was improved by coupling c...

  13. Organic rankine cycle waste heat applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasz, Joost J.; Biederman, Bruce P.

    2007-02-13

    A machine designed as a centrifugal compressor is applied as an organic rankine cycle turbine by operating the machine in reverse. In order to accommodate the higher pressures when operating as a turbine, a suitable refrigerant is chosen such that the pressures and temperatures are maintained within established limits. Such an adaptation of existing, relatively inexpensive equipment to an application that may be otherwise uneconomical, allows for the convenient and economical use of energy that would be otherwise lost by waste heat to the atmosphere.

  14. A review of waste heat recovery technologies for maritime applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Dig Vijay; Pedersen, Eilif

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Major waste heat sources available on ships have been reviewed. • A review of suitable waste heat recovery systems was conducted for marine vessels. • Technologies have been compared for their potential and suitability for marine use. • Kalina cycle offers the highest potential for marine waste heat recovery. • Turbo compound system most suitable for recovering diesel exhaust pressure energy. - Abstract: A waste heat recovery system produces power by utilizing the heat energy lost to the surroundings from thermal processes, at no additional fuel input. For marine vessels, about 50 percent of the total fuel energy supplied to diesel power-plant aboard is lost to the surroundings. While the total amount of wasted energy is considerable, the quality of this energy is quite low due to its low temperature and has limited potential for power production. Effective waste heat recovery systems use the available low temperature waste heat to produce mechanical/electrical power with high efficiency value. In this study a review of different waste heat recovery systems has been conducted, to lay out the potential recovery efficiencies and suitability for marine applications. This work helps in identifying the most suitable heat recovery technologies for maritime use depending on the properties of shipboard waste heat and achievable recovery efficiencies, whilst discussing the features of each type of system.

  15. Potential of waste heat in Croatian industrial sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bišćan Davor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Waste heat recovery in Croatian industry is of the highest significance regarding the national efforts towards energy efficiency improvements and climate protection. By recuperation of heat which would otherwise be wasted, the quantity of fossil fuels used for production of useful energy could be lowered thereby reducing the fuel costs and increasing the competitiveness of examined Croatian industries. Another effect of increased energy efficiency of industrial processes and plants is reduction of greenhouse gases i.e. the second important national goal required by the European Union (EU and United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC. Paper investigates and analyses the waste heat potential in Croatian industrial sector. Firstly, relevant industrial sectors with significant amount of waste heat are determined. Furthermore, significant companies in these sectors are selected with respect to main process characteristics, operation mode and estimated waste heat potential. Data collection of waste heat parameters (temperature, mass flow and composition is conducted. Current technologies used for waste heat utilization from different waste heat sources are pointed out. Considered facilities are compared with regard to amount of flue gas heat. Mechanisms for more efficient and more economic utilization of waste heat are proposed. [Acknoledgment. The authors would like to acknowledge the financial support provided by the UNITY THROUGH KNOWLEDGE FUND (UKF of the Ministry of Science, Education and Sports of the Republic of Croatia and the World Bank, under the Grant Agreement No. 89/11.

  16. Waste heat recovery technologies for offshore platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierobon, Leonardo; Benato, Alberto; Scolari, E.

    2014-01-01

    This article aims at finding the most suitable waste heat recovery technology for existing and future offshore facilities. The technologies considered in this work are the steam Rankine cycle, the air bottoming cycle and the organic Rankine cycle. A multi-objective optimization approach is employed...... to attain optimal designs for each bottoming unit by selecting specific functions tailored to the oil and gas sector, i.e. yearly CO2 emissions, weight and economic revenue. The test case is the gas turbine-based power system serving an offshore platform in the North Sea. Results indicate that the organic...... and of the primary heat exchanger, organic Rankine cycle turbogenerators appear thus to be the preferred solution to abate CO2 emissions and pollutants on oil and gas facilities. As a practical consequence, this paper provides guidelines for the design of high-efficiency, cost-competitive and low-weight power...

  17. Thermal conversion of waste polyolefins to the mixture of hydrocarbons in the reactor with molten metal bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelmachowski, M. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Process and Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Lodz, 90-924 Lodz, Wolczanska 213 (Poland)

    2010-10-15

    Energy crisis and environmental degradation by polymer wastes have been imperative to find and propose technologies for recovery of raw materials and energy from non-conventional sources like organic wastes, plastic wastes, scrap tires, etc. A variety of methods and processes connected with global or national policies have been proposed worldwide. A new type of a tubular reactor with the molten metal bed is proposed for conversion of waste plastics to fuel-like mixture of hydrocarbons. The results of the thermal degradation of polyolefins in the laboratory scale set-up based on this reactor are presented in the paper. The melting and cracking processes were carried out in a single apparatus at the temperature 390-420 C. The problems with: disintegration of wastes, heat transfer from the wall to the particles of polymers, cooking at the walls of reactor, and mixing of the molten volume of wastes were significantly reduced. The final product consisted of gaseous stream (8-16 wt% of the input) and liquid (84-92 wt%) stream. No solid products were produced. The light, ''gasoline'' fraction of the liquid hydrocarbons mixture (C{sub 4}-C{sub 10}) made over 50% of the liquid product. It may by used for fuel production or electricity generation. (author)

  18. Thermal conversion of waste polyolefins to the mixture of hydrocarbons in the reactor with molten metal bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelmachowski, M.

    2010-01-01

    Energy crisis and environmental degradation by polymer wastes have been imperative to find and propose technologies for recovery of raw materials and energy from non-conventional sources like organic wastes, plastic wastes, scrap tires, etc. A variety of methods and processes connected with global or national policies have been proposed worldwide. A new type of a tubular reactor with the molten metal bed is proposed for conversion of waste plastics to fuel like mixture of hydrocarbons. The results of the thermal degradation of polyolefins in the laboratory scale set-up based on this reactor are presented in the paper. The melting and cracking processes were carried out in a single apparatus at the temperature 390-420 deg. C. The problems with: disintegration of wastes, heat transfer from the wall to the particles of polymers, cooking at the walls of reactor, and mixing of the molten volume of wastes were significantly reduced. The final product consisted of gaseous stream (8-16 wt% of the input) and liquid (84-92 wt%) stream. No solid products were produced. The light, 'gasoline' fraction of the liquid hydrocarbons mixture (C 4 -C 10 ) made over 50% of the liquid product. It may by used for fuel production or electricity generation.

  19. Use of waste heat from a dairy for heating of a community house

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehn, C

    1976-01-01

    In a dairy, a lot of cooling capacity is needed. This article describes how this waste heat can be used for heating a community house including a sport establishment and producing hot water for that house. Four different technical solutions are discussed; (1) floor heat, (2) heat transfer connected to the ventilation, (3) regenerative heat exchanger, and (4) use of heat pumps.

  20. Development of the fluidized bed thermal treatment process for treating mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semones, G.B.; Williams, P.M.; Stiefvater, S.P.; Mitchell, D.L.; Roecker, B.D.

    1993-01-01

    A fluidized bed system is being developed at Rocky Flats for the treatment of mixed waste (a mixture of radioactive and chemically hazardous waste). The current program builds on experience gained in the 1970's and 1980's in tests with bench-scale, pilot-scale, and demonstration-scale fluidized bed systems. The system operates at low temperatures (∼ 525--600 degree C) which eliminates many of the disadvantages associated with high temperature thermal treatment processes. The process has shown the ability to destroy polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) with 99.9999% (''six-nines'') destruction efficiency in tests monitored by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The bed makes use of in situ neutralization of acidic off-gases by incorporating sodium carbonate (Na 2 CO 3 ) in the bed media. This eliminates using wet scrubbers to treat the off-gas; these produce a high volume of secondary waste. Once in operation, it is expected that the fluidized bed process will yield up to a 40:1 reduction in the volume of the waste

  1. Optimal study of a solar air heating system with pebble bed energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, D.L.; Li, Y.; Dai, Y.J.; Wang, R.Z.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Use two kinds of circulation media in the solar collector. → Air heating and pebble bed heat storage are applied with different operating modes. → Design parameters of the system are optimized by simulation program. → It is found that the system can meet 32.8% of the thermal energy demand in heating season. → Annual solar fraction aims to be 53.04%. -- Abstract: The application of solar air collectors for space heating has attracted extensive attention due to its unique advantages. In this study, a solar air heating system was modeled through TRNSYS for a 3319 m 2 building area. This air heating system, which has the potential to be applied for space heating in the heating season (from November to March) and hot water supply all year around in North China, uses pebble bed and water storage tank as heat storage. Five different working modes were designed based on different working conditions: (1) heat storage mode, (2) heating by solar collector, (3) heating by storage bed, (4) heating at night and (5) heating by an auxiliary source. These modes can be operated through the on/off control of fan and auxiliary heater, and through the operation of air dampers manually. The design, optimization and modification of this system are described in this paper. The solar fraction of the system was used as the optimization parameter. Design parameters of the system were optimized by using the TRNSYS program, which include the solar collector area, installation angle of solar collector, mass flow rate through the system, volume of pebble bed, heat transfer coefficient of the insulation layer of the pebble bed and water storage tank, height and volume of the water storage tank. The TRNSYS model has been verified by data from the literature. Results showed that the designed solar system can meet 32.8% of the thermal energy demand in the heating season and 84.6% of the energy consumption in non-heating season, with a yearly average solar fraction of 53.04%.

  2. Treatment of Mixed Wastes via Fixed Bed Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-10-28

    This report outlines the details of research performed under USDOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-96MC33258 to evaluate the ChemChar hazardous waste system for the destruction of mixed wastes, defined as those that contain both RCRA-regulated haz- ardous constituents and radionuclides. The ChemChar gasification system uses a granular carbonaceous char matrix to immobilize wastes and feed them into the gasifier. In the gasifier wastes are subjected to high temperature reducing conditions, which destroy the organic constituents and immobilize radionuclides on the regenerated char. Only about 10 percent of the char is consumed on each pass through the gasifier, and the regenerated char can be used to treat additional wastes. When tested on a 4-inch diameter scale with a continuous feed unit as part of this research, the ChemChar gasification system was found to be effective in destroying RCRA surrogate organic wastes (chlorobenzene, dichloroben- zene, and napht.halene) while retaining on the char RCRA heavy metals (chromium, nickel, lead, and cadmium) as well as a fission product surrogate (cesium) and a plutonium surrogate (cerium). No generation of harmful byproducts was observed. This report describes the design and testing of the ChemChar gasification system and gives the operating procedures to be followed in using the system safely and effectively for mixed waste treatment.

  3. Emergence of traveling wave endothermic reaction in a catalytic fixed bed under microwave heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasev, Alexander P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new phenomenon in a packed bed catalytic reactor under microwave heating - traveling wave (moving reaction zones) endothermic chemical reaction. A two-phase model is developed to simulate the nonlinear dynamic behavior of the packed bed catalytic reactor with an irreversible first-order chemical reaction. The absorbed microwave power was obtained from Lambert's law. The structure of traveling wave endothermic chemical reaction was explored. The effects of the gas velocity and microwave power on performance of the packed bed catalytic reactor were presented. Finally, the effects of the change in the location of the microwave source at the packed bed reactor was demonstrated. - Highlights: • A new phenomenon - traveling waves of endothermic reaction - is predicted. • The physical and mathematical model of a packed bed catalytic reactor under microwave heating is presented. • The structure of the traveling waves is explored. • The configuration of heating the packed bed reactor via microwave plays a key role.

  4. Experimental measurement of variation of heat transfer coefficient and temperature gradients in 16'' deep fluidised beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blacker, P.T.; McLain, D.R.

    1962-04-01

    The object of the experiments was to choose suitable particulate materials for a fluidised bed cooler, to test a deep fluidised bed for uniformity of heat transfer coefficient, and to explore the temperature distribution in a centrally heated annular fluidised bed. This memorandum records the techniques used and some of the practical aspects involved, together with the performance results obtained, for the assistance of other experimenters who may wish to use fluidised beds as a laboratory technique. Mathematical correlation of the results has not been attempted since some of the properties of the bed material were not known and to determine them was beyond the scope of the work programme. Rather, we have compared our results with those of other experimenters. Graphite tubes, for use in steady state thermal stress experiments, are to be heated by a graphite radiant heater situated in the bore and cooled on the outer surface. The tubes are 2 cm. bore, 8 cm. outside diameter and 48 cm. long. The outside temperature of the tubes is to be between 500 deg. C. and 1500 deg. C. It is estimated that the heat transfer rate required for fracture at the outer surface is 30 watts/cm 2 . This could readily be achieved by cooling with liquid metals, water or high velocity gas. However, serious problems of either materials compatibility or mechanical complexity make these undesirable. A water-cooled fluidised bed of compatible solids fluidised with nitrogen gas can overcome most of these problems and give heat transfer coefficients close to that required, vis. about 0.1 w/cm C . A coolant bed about 20'' long would be required and an annulus of about 2'' radial width round the specimen was considered to be practicable

  5. Experimental measurement of variation of heat transfer coefficient and temperature gradients in 16'' deep fluidised beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blacker, P T; McLain, D R [Reactor Development Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1962-04-15

    The object of the experiments was to choose suitable particulate materials for a fluidised bed cooler, to test a deep fluidised bed for uniformity of heat transfer coefficient, and to explore the temperature distribution in a centrally heated annular fluidised bed. This memorandum records the techniques used and some of the practical aspects involved, together with the performance results obtained, for the assistance of other experimenters who may wish to use fluidised beds as a laboratory technique. Mathematical correlation of the results has not been attempted since some of the properties of the bed material were not known and to determine them was beyond the scope of the work programme. Rather, we have compared our results with those of other experimenters. Graphite tubes, for use in steady state thermal stress experiments, are to be heated by a graphite radiant heater situated in the bore and cooled on the outer surface. The tubes are 2 cm. bore, 8 cm. outside diameter and 48 cm. long. The outside temperature of the tubes is to be between 500 deg. C. and 1500 deg. C. It is estimated that the heat transfer rate required for fracture at the outer surface is 30 watts/cm{sup 2}. This could readily be achieved by cooling with liquid metals, water or high velocity gas. However, serious problems of either materials compatibility or mechanical complexity make these undesirable. A water-cooled fluidised bed of compatible solids fluidised with nitrogen gas can overcome most of these problems and give heat transfer coefficients close to that required, vis. about 0.1 w/cm C . A coolant bed about 20'' long would be required and an annulus of about 2'' radial width round the specimen was considered to be practicable.

  6. Method and means for heating buildings in a district heating system with waste heat from a thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margen, P.H.E.

    1975-01-01

    The waste heat from a thermal power plant is transported through a municipal heating network to a plurality of buildings to be heated. The quantity of heat thus supplied to the buildings is higher than that required for the heating of the buildings. The excess heat is released from the buildings to the atmosphere in the form of hot air

  7. Ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    A study of container designs for heat generating radioactive waste disposal in the deep ocean sediments is presented. The purpose of the container would be to isolate the waste from the environment for a period of 500 to 1000 years. The container designs proposed are based on the use of either corrosion allowance or corrosion resistant metals. Appropriate overpack wall thicknesses are suggested for each design using the results of corrosion studies and experiments but these are necessarily preliminary and data relevant to corrosion in deep ocean sediments remain sparse. It is concluded that the most promising design concept involves a thin titanium alloy overpack in which all internal void spaces are filled with lead or cement grout. In situ temperatures for the sediment adjacent to the emplaced 50 year cooled waste containers are calculated to reach about 260 deg C. The behaviour of the sediments at such a high temperature is not well understood and the possibility of 100 years interim storage is recommended for consideration to allow further cooling. Further corrosion data and sediment thermal studies would be required to fully confirm the engineering feasibility of these designs. (author)

  8. Geological disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    A number of options for the disposal of vitrified heat-generating radioactive waste are being studied to ensure that safe methods are available when the time comes for disposal operations to commence. This study has considered the feasibility of three designs for containers which would isolate the waste from the environment for a minimum period of 500 to 1000 years. The study was sub-divided into the following major sections: manufacturing feasibility; stress analysis; integrity in accidents; cost benefit review. The candidate container designs were taken from the results of a previous study by Ove Arup and Partners (1985) and were developed as the study progressed. Their major features can be summarised as follows: (A) a thin-walled corrosion-resistant metal shell filled with lead or cement grout. (B) an unfilled thick-walled carbon steel shell. (C) an unfilled carbon steel shell planted externally with corrosion-resistant metal. Reference repository conditions in clay, granite and salt, reference disposal operations and metals corrosion data have been taken from various European Community radioactive waste management research and engineering projects. The study concludes that design Types A and B are feasible in manufacturing terms but design Type C is not. It is recommended that model containers should be produced to demonstrate the proposed methods of manufacture and that they should be tested to validate the analytical techniques used. (author)

  9. Radioactive wastes with negligible heat generation suitable for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennecke, P.; Schumacher, J.; Warnecke, E.

    1987-01-01

    It is planned to dispose of radioactive wastes with negligible heat generation in the Konrad repository. Preliminary waste acceptance requirements are derived taking the results of site-specific safety assessments as a basis. These requirements must be fulfilled by the waste packages on delivery. The waste amounts which are currently stored and those anticipated up to the year 2000 are discussed. The disposability of these waste packages in the Konrad repository was evaluated. This examination reveals that basically almost all radioactive wastes with negligible heat generation can be accepted. (orig.) [de

  10. Multi-gene genetic programming based predictive models for municipal solid waste gasification in a fluidized bed gasifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Daya Shankar; Pan, Indranil; Das, Saptarshi; Leahy, James J; Kwapinski, Witold

    2015-03-01

    A multi-gene genetic programming technique is proposed as a new method to predict syngas yield production and the lower heating value for municipal solid waste gasification in a fluidized bed gasifier. The study shows that the predicted outputs of the municipal solid waste gasification process are in good agreement with the experimental dataset and also generalise well to validation (untrained) data. Published experimental datasets are used for model training and validation purposes. The results show the effectiveness of the genetic programming technique for solving complex nonlinear regression problems. The multi-gene genetic programming are also compared with a single-gene genetic programming model to show the relative merits and demerits of the technique. This study demonstrates that the genetic programming based data-driven modelling strategy can be a good candidate for developing models for other types of fuels as well. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Modeling and Performance of Waste Tires as Media in Fixed Bed Sequence Batch Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Derakhshan

    2016-12-01

    Results: The maximum removal efficiencies of dissolved chemical oxygen demand for FBSBR and SBR reactors were 98.3 % and 97.9 %, respectively. In addition, Stover-Kincannon model provided a very suitable fitness (R2   > 0.99 for loading the bioreactor FBSBR. Conclusion: According to the results, not only waste tires can be reused, but also these wastes can be employed as a proper biological bed in wastewater refineries to improve their efficiency.

  12. Co-combustion of waste with coal in a circulating fluidised bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulyurtlu, I.; Boavida, D.; Abelha, P.; Lopes, H.; Cabrita, I. [DEECA-INETI, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2002-07-01

    The results of a study of cocombustion of waste with coal is described. Various wastes (biomass, sludge, and refuse derived fuel) were burned with coal in a circulating fluidised bed combustor. Conditions that prevent segregated combustion, reduce production of nitrogen oxides, and attain high combustion efficiency were studied. The effects of variations in air staging in the riser, mixing of air with volatiles, coal/biomass ratio, methods of feeding biomass, and temperature are described. 5 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Attrition, elutriation, and growth of particles produced in fluidized-bed waste calciners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, F.N.

    1982-09-01

    The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant reduces the volume of high-level liquid radioactive wastes in a fluidized bed to produce a granular calcine product. In the past, difficulties have been experienced in controlling the product's particle size when processing certain blends of sodium-bearing waste. Therefore, experiments in attrition, elutriation, and particle growth were done to characterize how best to control these three parameters. 15 figures, 16 tables

  14. Utilization of waste heat from nuclear power plants in agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horacek, P.

    1981-01-01

    The development of nuclear power will result in the relative and absolute increase in the amount of waste heat which can be used in agriculture for heating greenhouses, open spaces, for fish breeding in heated water, for growing edible mushrooms, growing algae, for frost protection of orchards, air conditioning of buildings for breeding livestock and poultry, and for other purposes. In addition of the positive effect of waste heat, the danger increases of disease, weeds and pests. Pilot plant installations should be build in Czechoslovakia for testing the development of waste heat utilization. (Ha)

  15. Low grade waste heat recovery using heat pumps and power cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bor, D.M. van de; Infante Ferreira, C.A.; Kiss, Anton A.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal energy represents a large part of the global energy usage and about 43% of this energy is used for industrial applications. Large amounts are lost via exhaust gases, liquid streams and cooling water while the share of low temperature waste heat is the largest. Heat pumps upgrading waste heat to process heat and cooling and power cycles converting waste heat to electricity can make a strong impact in the related industries. The potential of several alternative technologies, either for the upgrading of low temperature waste heat such as compression-resorption, vapor compression and trans-critical heat pumps, or for the conversion of this waste heat by using organic Rankine, Kalina and trilateral cycle engines, are investigated with regards to energetic and economic performance by making use of thermodynamic models. This study focuses on temperature levels of 45–60 °C as at this temperature range large amounts of heat are rejected to the environment but also investigates the temperature levels for which power cycles become competitive. The heat pumps deliver 2.5–11 times more energy value than the power cycles in this low temperature range at equal waste heat input. Heat engines become competitive with heat pumps at waste heat temperatures at 100 °C and above. - Highlights: • Application of heat pump technology for heating and cooling. • Compression resorption heat pumps operating with large glides approaching 100 K. • Compression-resorption heat pumps with wet compression. • Potential to convert Industrial waste heat to power or high grade heat. • Comparison between low temperature power cycles and heat pumps

  16. Heat transfer to immersed horizontal tubes in gas fluidized bed dryers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonassen, Ola

    1999-10-01

    The main objective of this study was to construct heat pump fluidized bed dryers of the FHT type with improved dewatering capacity for a given size of the dryer. The use of heat exchangers immersed in the fluidized bed drying chambers is an important part of the FHT (Fluidized Bed High Temperature Heat Pump Dryer) concept. A pilot plant FHT dryer was built and successfully tested on fish meal raw material and seaweed. The plant included two fluidized bed drying chambers with immersed heat exchangers. The gain in water vapor of the drying air through the chambers was increased up to four times that of adiabatic drying. The energy saving concept was retained as a SMER ratio of 3.5 to 4.7 was measured in the same tests. Therefore optimization of the immersed heat exchangers was considered the most important single objective for this work. The optimization study of the heat exchangers was confined to the actual operating conditions for the dryers using: (1) Bubbling gas fluidized beds were used, (2) air as the only type of fluidising gas, (3) beds at atmospheric pressure, (4) bed temperatures below 100 {sup o}C, (5) fluidized particles of Geldart classes B and D, (6) horizontal tube banks for the immersed heat exchanger, and the influence of radiation heat transfer was ignored. The heat transfer study was confined to the fluidized bed side of the heat exchanger surface. It was concluded early in this work that the bubbles play a major role in generating the particle circulation inside the bed and hence also in heat transfer. Publications describing the most important bubble induced mechanisms contributing to high rates of heat transfer were found to be limited. Therefore the first part of this study was aimed at establishing a method for locating and measuring the size and rise velocity of bubbles inside the bed. The method established through this work using differential pressure measurements from two static pressure probes was used later in the study of heat transfer

  17. Heat transfer to immersed horizontal tubes in gas fluidized bed dryers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonassen, Ola

    1999-07-01

    The main objective of this study was to construct heat pump fluidized bed dryers of the FHT type with improved dewatering capacity for a given size of the dryer. The use of heat exchangers immersed in the fluidized bed drying chambers is an important part of the FHT (Fluidized Bed High Temperature Heat Pump Dryer) concept. A pilot plant FHT dryer was built and successfully tested on fish meal raw material and seaweed. The plant included two fluidized bed drying chambers with immersed heat exchangers. The gain in water vapor of the drying air through the chambers was increased up to four times that of adiabatic drying. The energy saving concept was retained as a SMER ratio of 3.5 to 4.7 was measured in the same tests. Therefore optimization of the immersed heat exchangers was considered the most important single objective for this work. The optimization study of the heat exchangers was confined to the actual operating conditions for the dryers using: (1) Bubbling gas fluidized beds were used, (2) air as the only type of fluidizing gas,(3) beds at atmospheric pressure, (4) bed temperatures below 100 {sup o}C, (5) fluidized particles of Geldart classes B and D, (6) horizontal tube banks for the immersed heat exchanger and the influence of radiation heat transfer was ignored. The heat transfer study was confined to the fluidized bed side of the heat exchanger surface. It was concluded early in this work that the bubbles play a major role in generating the particle circulation inside the bed and hence also in heat transfer. Publications describing the most important bubble induced mechanisms contributing to high rates of heat transfer were found to be limited. Therefore the first part of this study was aimed at establishing a method for locating and measuring the size and rise velocity of bubbles inside the bed. The method established through this work using differential pressure measurements from two static pressure probes was used later in the study of heat transfer

  18. Continuous biological waste gas treatment in stirred trickle-bed reactor with discontinuous removal of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenzis, A; Heits, H; Wübker, S; Heinze, U; Friedrich, C; Werner, U

    1998-02-20

    A new reactor for biological waste gas treatment was developed to eliminate continuous solvents from waste gases. A trickle-bed reactor was chosen with discontinuous movement of the packed bed and intermittent percolation. The reactor was operated with toluene as the solvent and an optimum average biomass concentration of between 5 and 30 kg dry cell weight per cubic meter packed bed (m3pb). This biomass concentration resulted in a high volumetric degradation rate. Reduction of surplus biomass by stirring and trickling caused a prolonged service life and prevented clogging of the trickle bed and a pressure drop increase. The pressure drop after biomass reduction was almost identical to the theoretical pressure drop as calculated for the irregular packed bed without biomass. The reduction in biomass and intermittent percolation of mineral medium resulted in high volumetric degradation rates of about 100 g of toluene m-3pb h-1 at a load of 150 g of toluene m-3pb h-1. Such a removal rate with a trickle-bed reactor was not reported before. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. A review of dryout heat fluxes and coolability of particle beds. APRI 4, Stage 2 Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholm, Ilona

    2002-04-01

    Dryout heat flux experiments on particle beds have been reviewed. The observed dryout heat flux varies from some tens of kW/m 2 to well over 1 MW/m 2 . The variation can be qualitatively and to some extent also quantitatively explained. The effect of particle diameter has been clearly demonstrated. For particles having diameter less than about 1 mm, the dryout heat flux on the order of 100-200 kW/m 2 , and increases on square of the particle diameter. For larger than 1 mm particles the dryout heat flux increases on square root of the particle diameter. Typical values for ∼ 5 mm particles is 500 kW/m 2 to 1 MW/m 2 . An effect of bed thickness can be seen for small particles and medium range (50-500 mm) beds. For thick beds, > 500 mm, the dryout heat flux does not any more change as the bed height increases. The dryout heat flux increases with increasing coolant pressure. This can be explained by the increasing vapour density, which can remove more latent heat from the bed. Debris bed stratification, with small particles on top, clearly decreases the dryout heat flux. The dryout heat flux in a stratified bed can even be smaller than a heat flux of an equivalent debris bed consisting of the smaller particles alone. This is due to the capillary force, which draws liquid towards the smaller particles and causes the dryout to occur at the interface of the particle layers. A model has been developed by Lipinski to estimate dryout heat fluxes in a particle bed. The model has been derived based on solution of momentum, energy and mass conservation equations for two phases. The 1-D model can take into account variable particle sizes (stratification) along the bed and different coolant entry positions. It has been shown that the model can quite well predict the observed dryout characteristics in most experiments. The simpler 0-D model can give reasonable estimates for non-stratified beds. Results and observations of several tests on melt jet fragmentation in a water pool

  20. Low-temperature gasification of waste tire in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Gang; Ni Mingjiang; Chi Yong; Cen Kefa

    2008-01-01

    In order to recovery energy and materials from waste tire efficiently, low-temperature gasification is proposed. Experiments are carried out in a lab-scale fluidized bed at 400-800 deg. C when equivalence ratio (ER) is 0.2-0.6. Low heat value (LHV) of syngas increases with increasing temperature or decreasing ER, and the yield is in proportion to ER linearly. The yield of carbon black decreases with increasing temperature or ER lightly. When temperature is over 600 deg. C, characteristics of carbon black is similar. When temperature is over 700 deg. C, LHV of syngas rises up lightly with increasing temperature, which indicates that it hardly facilitates gasification any more. It is suitable for tire gasification when temperature is 650-700 deg. C and ER is 0.2-0.4. Under this condition, LHV and yield of syngas are about 4000-9000 kJ/Nm 3 and 1.8-3.7 Nm 3 /kg, respectively; surface area and yield of carbon black lie in range of 20-30 m 3 /g and 550-650 g/kg, respectively. The carbon balance of these experiments achieves 85-95% when temperature is over 600 deg. C

  1. Study of composition change and agglomeration of flue gas cleaning residue from a fluidized bed waste incinerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, P; Verbinnen, B; Bollaert, P; Alderweireldt, N; Mertens, G; Elsen, J; Vandecasteele, C

    2011-10-01

    Blocking of the collection hoppers of the baghouse filters in a fluidized bed incinerator for co-incineration of high calorific industrial solid waste and sludge was observed. The composition of the flue gas cleaning residue (FGCR), both from a blocked hopper and from a normal hopper, was investigated by (differential) thermogravimetric analysis, quantitative X-ray powder diffraction and wet chemical analysis. The lower elemental carbon concentration and the higher calcium carbonate concentration of the agglomerated sample was the result of oxidation of carbon and subsequent reaction of CO2 with CaO. The evolved heat causes a temperature increase, with the decomposition of CaOHCl as a consequence. The formation of calcite and calcium chloride and the evolution of heat caused agglomeration of the FGCR. Activated lignite coke was replaced by another adsorption agent with less carbon, so the auto-ignition temperature increased; since then no further block formation has occurred.

  2. Ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    The feasibility of safe ocean disposal options for heat-generating radioactive waste relies on the existence of suitable disposal sites. This review considers the status of the development of site selection criteria and the results of the study area investigations carried out under various national and international research programmes. In particular, the usefulness of the results obtained is related to the data needed for environmental and emplacement modelling. Preliminary investigations have identified fifteen potential deep ocean study areas in the North Atlantic. From these Great Meteor East (GME), Southern Nares Abyssal Plan (SNAP) and Kings Trough Flank (KTF) were selected for further investigation. The review includes appraisals of regional geology, geophysical studies, sedimentology, geotechnical studies, geochemical studies and oceanography. (author)

  3. Modeling transient heat transfer in nuclear waste repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaw-Yang; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2009-09-30

    The heat of high-level nuclear waste may be generated and released from a canister at final disposal sites. The waste heat may affect the engineering properties of waste canisters, buffers, and backfill material in the emplacement tunnel and the host rock. This study addresses the problem of the heat generated from the waste canister and analyzes the heat distribution between the buffer and the host rock, which is considered as a radial two-layer heat flux problem. A conceptual model is first constructed for the heat conduction in a nuclear waste repository and then mathematical equations are formulated for modeling heat flow distribution at repository sites. The Laplace transforms are employed to develop a solution for the temperature distributions in the buffer and the host rock in the Laplace domain, which is numerically inverted to the time-domain solution using the modified Crump method. The transient temperature distributions for both the single- and multi-borehole cases are simulated in the hypothetical geological repositories of nuclear waste. The results show that the temperature distributions in the thermal field are significantly affected by the decay heat of the waste canister, the thermal properties of the buffer and the host rock, the disposal spacing, and the thickness of the host rock at a nuclear waste repository.

  4. Optimal waste heat recovery and reuse in industrial zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stijepovic, Mirko Z.; Linke, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Significant energy efficiency gains in zones with concentrated activity from energy intensive industries can often be achieved by recovering and reusing waste heat between processing plants. We present a systematic approach to target waste heat recovery potentials and design optimal reuse options across plants in industrial zones. The approach first establishes available waste heat qualities and reuse feasibilities considering distances between individual plants. A targeting optimization problem is solved to establish the maximum possible waste heat recovery for the industrial zone. Then, a design optimization problem is solved to identify concrete waste heat recovery options considering economic objectives. The paper describes the approach and illustrates its application with a case study. -- Highlights: → Developed a systematic approach to target waste heat recovery potentials and to design optimal recovery and reuse options across plants in industrial zones. → Five stage approach involving data acquisition, analysis, assessment, targeting and design. → Targeting optimization problem establishes the maximum possible waste heat recovery and reuse limit for the industrial zone. → Design optimization problem provides concrete waste heat recovery and reuse network design options considering economic objectives.

  5. Ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    The detailed radiological assessment of any proposed operations for the disposal of heat-generating radioactive waste in deep ocean sediments would require data describing expected embedment depths and spacing of the waste. In this study a theoretical model which predicts penetrator trajectories from launch through to rest in the sediment has been produced and has been used to generate data for environmental models. The trajectory model has been used to study the effects of small imperfections and launch parameters on the motion of a reference penetrator through water and sediment. The model predicts that the horizontal displacements of the penetrators' final resting places in the sediment from their launch positions at the ocean surface could be limited to less than 15m by twisting their tail fins uniformly by just one degree to induce spinning. The reference penetrator is predicted to achieve satisfactory embedment depth for all the cases considered including allowance for the effect of curved penetration paths in the seabed. However, the ability of the model to represent highly non-linear sediment penetration paths is demonstrated. Distribution histograms of seabed impact points relative to specific release points are presented. The area of seabed required is calculated. (author)

  6. Ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    This report is based on an emplacement techniques review prepared for the Department of the Environment in February 1983, which appeared as Chapter III of the Nuclear Energy Agency, Seabed Working Group's Status Report. The original document (DOE/RW/83.032) has been amended to take account of the results of field trials carried out in March 1983 and to better reflect current UK Government policy on ocean disposal of HGW. In particular Figure 7 has been redrawn using more realistic drag factors for the calculation of the terminal velocity in water. This report reviews the work conducted by the SWG member countries into the different techniques of emplacing heat generating radioactive waste into the deep ocean sediments. It covers the waste handling from the port facilities to final emplacement in the seabed and verification of the integrity of the canister isolation system. The two techniques which are currently being considered in detail are drilled emplacement and the free fall penetrator. The feasibility study work in progress for both techniques as well as the mathematical and physical modelling work for embedment depth and hole closure behind the penetrator are reviewed. (author)

  7. Experimental investigation of thermal conductivity coefficient and heat exchange between fluidized bed and inclined exchange surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Stojanovic

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents experimental research of thermal conductivity coefficients of the siliceous sand bed fluidized by air and an experimental investigation of the particle size influence on the heat transfer coefficient between fluidized bed and inclined exchange surfaces. The measurements were performed for the specific fluidization velocity and sand particle diameters d p=0.3, 0.5, 0.9 mm. The industrial use of fluidized beds has been increasing rapidly in the past 20 years owing to their useful characteristics. One of the outstanding characteristics of a fluidized bed is that it tends to maintain a uniform temperature even with nonuniform heat release. On the basis of experimental research, the influence of the process's operational parameters on the obtained values of the bed's thermal conductivity has been analyzed. The results show direct dependence of thermal conductivity on the intensity of mixing, the degree of fluidization, and the size of particles. In the axial direction, the coefficients that have been treated have values a whole order higher than in the radial direction. Comparison of experimental research results with experimental results of other authors shows good agreement and the same tendency of thermal conductivity change. It is well known in the literature that the value of the heat transfer coefficient is the highest in the horizontal and the smallest in the vertical position of the heat exchange surface. Variation of heat transfer, depending on inclination angle is not examined in detail. The difference between the values of the relative heat transfer coefficient between vertical and horizontal heater position for all particle sizes reduces by approximately 15% with the increase of fluidization rate.

  8. Local description of the energy transfer process in a packed bed heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M.L.M.; Sampaio, R.; Gama, R.M.S. da.

    1990-01-01

    The energy transfer process in a packed-bed heat exchanger, in counter0flow arrangement is considered. The phenomenon is described through a Continuum Theory of Mixtures approach, in which fluid and solid (porous matrix) are regarded as continuous constituents possessing, each one, its own temperature and velocity fields. The heat 'exchangers consists of two channels, separated by an impermeable wall without thermal resistence, in which there exists a saturated flow. Some particular cases are simulated. (author)

  9. Experiments and procedures for bottom-heating heat-transfer experiments through UO2 debris beds in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowa, E.S.; Pedersen, D.R.; Pavlik, J.; Purviance, R.

    1982-01-01

    Real materials experiments in heat transfer through beds of UO 2 in sodium have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory over a period of years. The most recent method utilizes the resistive heating in a sheet tungsten filament located at the base of the debris container. A schematic diagram of the apparatus is shown. The tungsten is clamped between two water cooled copper electrodes. The filament is a sheet of tungsten 0.15 mm thick, 5 cm wide and 18 cm long. Two 6.5 mm thick sheets of boron nitride sandwich the filament. The upper face of the upper boron nitride sheet is in intimate contact with the bottom of the debris container. Temperatures are measured at various levels in the bed as well as in the boron nitride plate. In addition, the sodium pool temperature is measured by the thermocouple. The heat transferral through the bed is measured by the temperature difference and mass flowrate in a NaK condenser located above the debris bed. The NaK inlet and outlet temperatures are recorded individually, as well as, differentially

  10. Interactions among Carbon Dioxide, Heat, and Chemical Lures in Attracting the Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narinderpal Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Commercial bed bug (Cimex lectularius L. monitors incorporating carbon dioxide (CO2, heat, and chemical lures are being used for detecting bed bugs; however, there are few reported studies on the effectiveness of chemical lures in bed bug monitors and the interactions among chemical lure, CO2, and heat. We screened 12 chemicals for their attraction to bed bugs and evaluated interactions among chemical lures, CO2, and heat. The chemical lure mixture consisting of nonanal, 1-octen-3-ol, spearmint oil, and coriander Egyptian oil was found to be most attractive to bed bugs and significantly increased the trap catches in laboratory bioassays. Adding this chemical lure mixture when CO2 was present increased the trap catches compared with traps baited with CO2 alone, whereas adding heat did not significantly increase trap catches when CO2 was present. Results suggest a combination of chemical lure and CO2 is essential for designing effective bed bug monitors.

  11. Energetical and economical assessment of the waste heat problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demicheli, U.; Voort, E. van der; Schneiders, A.; Zegers, P.

    1977-01-01

    Electrical power plants produce large quantities of low grade heat that remain unused. For ecological reasons this waste heat must be dispersed by means of expensive cooling devices. Waste heat could be used in acquacultural and agricultural complexes this replacing large amounts of primary energy. Energetical and economical aspects are discussed. The state of the art of these and other utilisations is outlined. A different approach to the problem is to reduce the production of waste heat. Various strategies to achieve this challenge are outlined and their actual state and possible future developments are discussed. Finally, the various most promising utilizations are examined from an energetical point of view

  12. Evaluating the potential of process sites for waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oluleye, Gbemi; Jobson, Megan; Smith, Robin; Perry, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Analysis considers the temperature and duties of the available waste heat. • Models for organic Rankine cycles, absorption heat pumps and chillers proposed. • Exploitation of waste heat from site processes and utility systems. • Concept of a site energy efficiency introduced. • Case study presented to illustrate application of the proposed methodology. - Abstract: As a result of depleting reserves of fossil fuels, conventional energy sources are becoming less available. In spite of this, energy is still being wasted, especially in the form of heat. The energy efficiency of process sites (defined as useful energy output per unit of energy input) may be increased through waste heat utilisation, thereby resulting in primary energy savings. In this work, waste heat is defined and a methodology developed to identify the potential for waste heat recovery in process sites; considering the temperature and quantity of waste heat sources from the site processes and the site utility system (including fired heaters and, the cogeneration, cooling and refrigeration systems). The concept of the energy efficiency of a site is introduced – the fraction of the energy inputs that is converted into useful energy (heat or power or cooling) to support the methodology. Furthermore, simplified mathematical models of waste heat recovery technologies using heat as primary energy source, including organic Rankine cycles (using both pure and mixed organics as working fluids), absorption chillers and absorption heat pumps are developed to support the methodology. These models are applied to assess the potential for recovery of useful energy from waste heat. The methodology is illustrated for an existing process site using a case study of a petroleum refinery. The energy efficiency of the site increases by 10% as a result of waste heat recovery. If there is an infinite demand for recovered energy (i.e. all the recoverable waste heat sources are exploited), the site

  13. Optimum diameter of a circulating fluidised bed combustor with negative wall heat flux

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Baloyi, J

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available on irreversibilities in a 7 m circulating fluidised bed combustor with a negative wall heat flux, firing a mixture of air and solid pitch pine wood, was investigated. An analytical expression was derived that predicts the entropy generation rate, thereby...

  14. Numerical analysis of a heat-generating, truncated conical porous bed in a fluid-filled enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarty, Aranyak; Datta, Priyankan; Ghosh, Koushik; Sen, Swarnendu; Mukhopadhyay, Achintya

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of natural convection in enclosures containing heat generating porous medium has important applications related to geothermal, chemical, thermal and nuclear energy such as in-vessel cooling of debris beds in nuclear reactors, cooling of coal stockpiles etc. The objective of the present numerical study is to characterise the pattern of fluid flow and energy transfer during steady laminar natural convective flow in a cylindrical enclosure with a centrally placed heat generating porous bed. Flow through porous region is modelled using Darcy–Brinkmann–Forchheimer model and local thermal equilibrium is assumed for the porous region. Analysis is carried out for a wide range of Rayleigh number (Ra), Darcy number (Da) and thermal conductivity ratio, as well as for different bed geometries. It is observed that in addition to Ra and Da, the bed geometry also plays a very important role in determining flow field and temperature distribution within the enclosure. Interestingly, a significant change is observed in energy transfer mode from the porous bed corresponding to specific values of bed permeability and bed heat generation rate. This is characterised in terms of Ra and Da. Further, it is observed that this change in energy transfer mode is highly dependent on Ra. - Highlights: • Natural convection is analysed in an enclosure with a heat generating porous bed. • Effect of dimensionless parameters as well as bed geometry has been investigated. • Energy transfer mechanism from porous bed changes with dimensionless parameters. • Bed geometry significantly affects fluid flow and energy transfer in the enclosure.

  15. Dynamic behavior of tobacco waste in the coal-fired fluidized-bed boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kai; Chang, Jian; Chen, Honggang; Yang, Yongping [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). National Eng Lab for Biomass Power Generation Equipment; Yu, Bangting [China Univ. of Petroleum, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Heavy Oil Processing

    2013-07-01

    Circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology is an advanced method for utilizing coal and other solid fuels in an environmentally acceptable manner. During the processing procedure in the nicotiana tabacum plants, lots of tobacco stem wastes are produced, which are normally being dumped to the landfill field. If this kind of waste can be used as a part of the fuel to be added into the coal in a CFB combustor, it will reduce the use of coal and then cut the net carbon emissions. To understand the complicated fluid dynamics of nicotiana tabacum wastes in the coal-fired CFB boiler, the mixing and segregation behavior of tobacco stalk are preliminary measured in a cylindrical fluidized bed. Obvious segregation behavior is found due to distinct differences in density and shape between tobacco stem and coal, which results in poor fluidization quality and bad combustion efficiency. To overcome this disadvantage, a jet with high gas velocity is introduced through the air distributor and a detailed experimental study is conducted in a fluidized bed made up of stem-sand mixture with different solid components at various jet velocities, which greatly improve the mixing performance of stem in the fluidized bed. The above findings are helpful for the technological upgrading of small- or middle-sized CFB boiler with adding tobacco stem into coal.

  16. Thermal treatment of high-caloric waste in fluidized bed incineration plants in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragossnig, A.M.

    2001-05-01

    The importance of thermal treatment of waste and residues in Austria is expected to rise due to the current changes of the legal situation in waste management. Assessing the rank order of different thermal treatment processes for waste management it has been shown that - especially caused by the rising importance of the mechanical treatment step in the mechanical-biological residual waste treatment and the subsequent necessity of the thermal treatment of a high-caloric preprocessed waste stream - the importance of the fluidized bed technology will increase. The main advantages are the high existing capacities as well as the flexibility of this technology in regard of fuel properties and further on the fact of the lacking influence of the ash towards the quality of a product. This is true although the thermal treatment in fluidized bed incinerators requires some processing of the waste. This doctoral thesis also contains a thorough physical and chemical characterization of various waste fuels - especially those which have been used during full scale incineration experiments. This characterization includes a comparison with fossil fuel. The practical part contains the documentation and balancing of full scale incineration experiments. A comparison of a reference experiment with experiments when waste fuel has been thermally utilized showed that a significant increase of emissions to the atmosphere has not been observed. Based on the incineration experiments conclusions in regard of waste fuels as well as different categories of thermal treatment plants are being stated. Finally, a recommendation of the assignation of various waste streams to different categories of thermal treatment plants is being made. (author)

  17. Utilising heat from nuclear waste for space heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deacon, D.

    1982-01-01

    A heating unit utilising the decay heat from irradiated material comprises a storage envelope for the material associated with a heat exchange system, means for producing a flow of air over the heat exchange system to extract heat from the material, an exhaust duct capable of discharging the heated air to the atmosphere, and means for selectively diverting at least some of the heated air to effect the required heating. With the flow of air over the heat exchange system taking place by a natural thermosyphon process the arrangement is self regulating and inherently reliable. (author)

  18. Predicting freeboard heat transfer by using empirical correlations in high temperature fluidized beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biyikli, Suleyman [Okan University Tuzla Kampusu, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture (Turkey)], email: suleyman.biyikli@okan.edu.tr

    2011-07-01

    This article investigates the heat transfer characteristics for horizontal tubes in a freeboard region of high temperature fluidized beds. The freeboard entrainment heights are calculated by using empirical correlations described in detail and used in estimating the heat transfer coefficients from a horizontal tube occurring by radiation, gas convection, and particle contact mechanisms in high temperature a fluidized bed combustor. The total average of these coefficients around a horizontal tube carrying water in high temperature fluidized beds can be written as the sum of convective, radiative, and fluidized-particle contact heat transfer coefficients and these correlations are tested against certain published experimental measurements. In full agreement with this data, it was observed that the calculated heat transfer coefficients increased with increasing gas velocity at a given tube elevation and they decreased and approached the values of single-phase gas convection and radiation with increasing tube elevation in the freeboard region while the relative contribution of radiation increases and approaches a constant fraction of total heat transfer.

  19. Fluid flow and heat transfer investigation of pebble bed reactors using mesh-adaptive LES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Lathouwers, Danny

    2013-01-01

    The very high temperature reactor is one of the designs currently being considered for nuclear power generation. One its variants is the pebble bed reactor in which the coolant passes through complex geometries (pores) at high Reynolds numbers. A computational fluid dynamics model with anisotropic mesh adaptivity is used to investigate coolant flow and heat transfer in such reactors. A novel method for implicitly incorporating solid boundaries based on multi-fluid flow modelling is adopted. The resulting model is able to resolve and simulate flow and heat transfer in randomly packed beds, regardless of the actual geometry, starting off with arbitrarily coarse meshes. The model is initially evaluated using an orderly stacked square channel of channel-height-to-particle diameter ratio of unity for a range of Reynolds numbers. The model is then applied to the face-centred cubical geometry. coolant flow and heat transfer patterns are investigated

  20. Optimization criteria for low temperature waste heat utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranebitter, F.

    1977-01-01

    A special case in this field is the utilization of very low temperature waste heat. The temperature level under consideration in this paper is in the range between the body temperature of human beings and their environment. The waste heat from power generation and industrial processes is also considered. Thermal energy conversion will be mainly accomplished by heat cycles where discharged waste heat is reverse proportional to the upper cycle temperature. Limiting this upper cycle temperature by technological reasons the optimization of the heat cycle will depend on the nature of the cycle itself and specially on the temperature selected for the heat discharge. The waste heat discharge is typical for the different kinds of heat cycles and the paper presents the four most important of them. Feasible heat transfer methods and their economic evaluations are discussed and the distillation processes will be the basis for further considerations. The waste heat utilization for distillation purposes could be realized by three different cycles, the open cycle, the closed cycle and the multy cycle. Resulting problems as deaeration of large water streams and removal of the dissolved gases and their solutions are also discussed. (M.S.)

  1. A central solar-industrial waste heat heating system with large scale borehole thermal storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, F.; Yang, X.; Xu, L.; Torrens, I.; Hensen, J.L.M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a new research of seasonal thermal storage is introduced. This study aims to maximize the utilization of renewable energy source and industrial waste heat (IWH) for urban district heating systems in both heating and non-heating seasons through the use of large-scale seasonal thermal

  2. Experimental study on coolability of particulate core-metal debris bed with oxidization, (2). Fragmentation and enhanced heat transfer in zircaloy debris bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Guanghui; Sugiyama, Ken-ichiro; Aoki, Hiroomi; Kimura, Iichi

    2006-01-01

    The oxidization and coolability characteristics of the particulate Zircaloy debris bed, which is deposited under the hard debris and through which first vapor penetrates and then water penetrates, are studied in the present paper. In the vapor penetration experiments, it is found that Zircaloy debris particles are effectively broken into small pieces after making thick oxidized layer with deep clacks by rapid oxidization under the condition that vapor with 20 cm/s penetrates for 30 to 70 min at an initial debris bed temperature of 1,030degC. It is also confirmed in the water penetration experiments that the oxidized particle debris bed has potentially of high coolability when water penetrates through the fully oxidized particle bed because of a high capillary force originating from those particles with deep cracks on their surfaces. Based on the present study, a new scenario for the appearance and disappearance of the hot spot in the TMI-2 accident is possible. The particulate core-metal core-metal debris bed is first heated up by rapid oxidization with heat generation when vapor can penetrate through the debris bed with porosities. This corresponds to the appearance of the hot spot. The resultant oxidized particulate debris bed causes a high coolability due to its high capillary force when the water can touch the debris bed at wet condition. This corresponds to the disappearance of the hot spot. (author)

  3. Nonlinear thermal interaction between a heat-generating particulate bed and a solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, F.B.; Stein, R.P.; Epstein, M.; Gabor, J.D.; Bingle, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    The process of combined conduction and radiation in a large, heat-generating, dry particulate bed in sudden contact with a semi-infinite solid is studied analytically by a successive approximation method and numerically by a finite difference method. The transient behavior of the system, in particular, the behavior of the temperature at the particulate bed-solid interface, is obtained as a function of two dimensionless controlling parameters. Also obtained are the conditions leading to incipient melting of the system. Based upon the finite difference solution, the present approximate method, which is shown to be rather simple and convenient to use, is found to yield rapidly converging and sufficiently accurate results

  4. Secondary Waste Form Down-Selection Data Package—Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Waste Form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Westsik, Joseph H.; Strachan, Denis M.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Pires, Richard P.

    2011-09-12

    The Hanford Site in southeast Washington State has 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes stored in 177 underground tanks (ORP 2010). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), through its contractors, is constructing the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to convert the radioactive and hazardous wastes into stable glass waste forms for disposal. Within the WTP, the pretreatment facility will receive the retrieved waste from the tank farms and separate it into two treated process streams. These waste streams will be vitrified, and the resulting waste canisters will be sent to offsite (high-level waste [HLW]) and onsite (immobilized low-activity waste [ILAW]) repositories. As part of the pretreatment and ILAW processing, liquid secondary wastes will be generated that will be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) on the Hanford Site for further treatment. These liquid secondary wastes will be converted to stable solid waste forms that will be disposed of in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has initiated secondary waste form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is developing data packages to support that down-selection. The objective of the data packages is to identify, evaluate, and summarize the existing information on the four waste forms being considered for stabilizing and solidifying the liquid secondary wastes. At the Hanford Site, the FBSR process is being evaluated as a supplemental technology for treating and immobilizing Hanford LAW radioactive tank waste and for treating secondary wastes from the WTP pretreatment and LAW vitrification processes.

  5. Waste heat recovering device for reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Masanobu; Shiraishi, Tadashi; Mizuno, Hiroyuki; Sekine, Yasuhiro.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable utilization of auxiliary-equipment-cooling water from a non-regenerative heat exchanger as a heat source, as well as prevent radioactive contamination. Constitution: A water warming device for recovering the heat of auxiliary equipment cooling water from a non-regenerative heat exchanger is disposed at the succeeding stage of the heat exchanger. Heat exchange is performed in the water warming device between the auxiliary equipment cooling water and a heat source water set to a higher pressure and recycled through the water warming device. The heat recovered from the auxiliary equipment cooling water is utilized in the heat source water for operating relevant equipments. (Aizawa, K.)

  6. Analysis of the vertical penetration of a heated fluid layer in a solid, miscible bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eck, G.

    1982-03-01

    The present study investigates the mass and heat transfer for the vertical penetration of a heated fluid layer in a solid, miscible bed using water-salt solutions (ZnBr 2 , NaBr) and polyethylenglycol 1500 (PEG) as simulation materials. The time depending spatial distribution of the molten material (PEG) has been measured for the first time with conductivity probes. The dependence of the downward heat flux on the density ratio rho*, i.e. the density of the fluid / the density of the molten solid, has been investigated with two different methods of heating, planar heating with a heat exchanger in a defined initial distance to the PEG-surface and electrolytical volume heating with a defined and timely constant power input. For 1 2 two layers have been observed in the fluid. This phenomenon is caused among other things by an anomality of the mixture density of the system salt solution-PEG. This process affects the downward heat flux so strongly, that it is impossible to transfer the results of such a system in this region of rho* to another system, for example to a corecatcher. The discrepancies between the measured heat fluxes and heat transfer coefficients of this study and that of other authors can be explained by the different construction of the planar heater, or by different boundary conditions in the case of volume heating. (orig.) [de

  7. Method for utilizing decay heat from radioactive nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busey, H.M.

    1974-01-01

    Management of radioactive heat-producing waste material while safely utilizing the heat thereof is accomplished by encapsulating the wastes after a cooling period, transporting the capsules to a facility including a plurality of vertically disposed storage tubes, lowering the capsules as they arrive at the facility into the storage tubes, cooling the storage tubes by circulating a gas thereover, employing the so heated gas to obtain an economically beneficial result, and continually adding waste capsules to the facility as they arrive thereat over a substantial period of time

  8. Geological disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    A study has been made of the requirements and design features for containers to isolate vitrified heat generating radioactive waste from the environment for a period of 500 to 1000 years. The requirements for handling, storing and transporting containers have been identified following a study of disposal operations, and the pressures and temperatures which may possibly be experienced in clay, granite and salt formations have been estimated. A range of possible container designs have been proposed to satisfy the requirements of each of the disposal environments. Alternative design concepts in corrosion resistant or corrosion allowance material have been suggested. Potentially suitable container shell materials have been selected following a review of corrosion studies and although metals have not been specified in detail, titanium alloys and low carbon steels are thought to be appropriate for corrosion resistant and corrosion allowance designs respectively. Performance requirements for container filler materials have been identified and candidate materials assessed. A preliminary container stress analysis has shown the importance of thermal modelling and that if lead is used as a filler it dominates the stress response of the container. Possible methods of manufacturing disposal containers have been assessed and found to be generally feasible. (author)

  9. Fluidized-Bed Heat Transfer Modeling for the Development of Particle/Supercritical-CO2 Heat Exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zhiwen [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Martinek, Janna G [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-06-03

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) technology is moving toward high-temperature and high-performance design. One technology approach is to explore high-temperature heat-transfer fluids and storage, integrated with a high-efficiency power cycle such as the supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) Brayton power cycle. The s-CO2 Brayton power system has great potential to enable the future CSP system to achieve high solar-to-electricity conversion efficiency and to reduce the cost of power generation. Solid particles have been proposed as a possible high-temperature heat-transfer medium that is inexpensive and stable at high temperatures above 1,000 degrees C. The particle/heat exchanger provides a connection between the particles and s-CO2 fluid in the emerging s-CO2 power cycles in order to meet CSP power-cycle performance targets of 50% thermal-to-electric efficiency, and dry cooling at an ambient temperature of 40 degrees C. The development goals for a particle/s-CO2 heat exchanger are to heat s-CO2 to =720 degrees C and to use direct thermal storage with low-cost, stable solid particles. This paper presents heat-transfer modeling to inform the particle/s-CO2 heat-exchanger design and assess design tradeoffs. The heat-transfer process was modeled based on a particle/s-CO2 counterflow configuration. Empirical heat-transfer correlations for the fluidized bed and s-CO2 were used in calculating the heat-transfer area and optimizing the tube layout. A 2-D computational fluid-dynamics simulation was applied for particle distribution and fluidization characterization. The operating conditions were studied from the heat-transfer analysis, and cost was estimated from the sizing of the heat exchanger. The paper shows the path in achieving the cost and performance objectives for a heat-exchanger design.

  10. Co-combustion of agricultural wastes in a circulating fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huseyin Topal; Aysel T. Atimtay [Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2005-07-01

    In this study a circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) of 125 mm inside diameter and 1800 mm height was used to investigate the co-combustion characteristics of peach and apricot stones produced as a waste from the fruit juice industry, and sunflower stems produced as a waste from the edible oil industry with a lignite coal. Lignite coal is a coal most widely used in Turkey. On-line concentrations of O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NOx and total hydrocarbons (C{sub m}H{sub n}) were measured in the flue gas during combustion experiments. By changing the operating parameters the variation of emissions of various pollutants were studied. During combustion tests, it was observed that the volatile matter from agro-wastes quickly volatilizes and mostly burn in the riser. The temperature profiles along the bed and the rise also confirmed this phenomenon. It was found that as the volatile matter content of agro-waste increases, the combustion efficiency increases and the combustion takes place more in the upper region of the riser. These results suggest that agro-wastes are potential fuels that can be utilized for clean energy production by using CFBC in countries where agricultural activities are heavy. 3 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Local CFD kinetic model of cadmium vaporization during fluid bed incineration of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, J; Gauthier, D; Falcoz, Q; Flamant, G; Mazza, G

    2013-03-15

    The emissions of heavy metals during incineration of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) are a major issue to health and the environment. It is then necessary to well quantify these emissions in order to accomplish an adequate control and prevent the heavy metals from leaving the stacks. In this study the kinetic behavior of Cadmium during Fluidized Bed Incineration (FBI) of artificial MSW pellets, for bed temperatures ranging from 923 to 1073 K, was modeled. FLUENT 12.1.4 was used as the modeling framework for the simulations and implemented together with a complete set of user-defined functions (UDFs). The CFD model combines the combustion of a single solid waste particle with heavy metal (HM) vaporization from the burning particle, and it takes also into account both pyrolysis and volatiles' combustion. A kinetic rate law for the Cd release, derived from the CFD thermal analysis of the combusting particle, is proposed. The simulation results are compared with experimental data obtained in a lab-scale fluidized bed incinerator reported in literature, and with the predicted values from a particulate non-isothermal model, formerly developed by the authors. The comparison shows that the proposed CFD model represents very well the evolution of the HM release for the considered range of bed temperature. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Investigations on a new internally-heated tubular packed-bed methanol–steam reformer

    KAUST Repository

    Nehe, Prashant

    2015-05-01

    Small-scale reformers for hydrogen production through steam reforming of methanol can provide an alternative solution to the demand of continuous supply of hydrogen gas for the operation of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs). A packed-bed type reformer is one of the potential designs for such purpose. An externally heated reformer has issues of adverse lower temperature in the core of the reformer and significant heat loss to the environment thus impacting its performance. Experimental and numerical studies on a new concept of internally heated tubular packed-bed methanol-steam reformer have been reported in this paper with improved performance in terms of higher methanol conversion and reduced heat losses to surroundings. CuO/ZnO/Al2O3 is used as the catalyst for the methanol-steam reforming reaction and a rod-type electric heater at the center of the reactor is used for supplying necessary heat for endothermic steam reforming reaction. The vaporizer and the reformer unit with a constant volume catalyst bed are integrated in the annular section of a tubular reformer unit. The performance of the reformer was investigated at various operating conditions like feed rate of water-methanol mixture, mass of the catalyst and reforming temperature. The experimental and numerical results show that the methanol conversion and CO concentration increase with internal heating for a wide range of operating conditions. The developed reformer unit generates 50-80W (based on lower heating value) of hydrogen gas for applications in PEMFCs. For optimized design and operating conditions, the reformer unit produced 298sccm reformed gas containing 70% H2, 27% CO2 and 3% CO at 200-240°C which can produce a power output of 25-32W assuming 60% fuel cell efficiency and 80% of hydrogen utilization in a PEMFC. © 2015 Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC.

  13. Utilization of Aluminum Waste with Hydrogen and Heat Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buryakovskaya, O. A.; Meshkov, E. A.; Vlaskin, M. S.; Shkolnokov, E. I.; Zhuk, A. Z.

    2017-10-01

    A concept of energy generation via hydrogen and heat production from aluminum containing wastes is proposed. The hydrogen obtained by oxidation reaction between aluminum waste and aqueous solutions can be supplied to fuel cells and/or infrared heaters for electricity or heat generation in the region of waste recycling. The heat released during the reaction also can be effectively used. The proposed method of aluminum waste recycling may represent a promising and cost-effective solution in cases when waste transportation to recycling plants involves significant financial losses (e.g. remote areas). Experiments with mechanically dispersed aluminum cans demonstrated that the reaction rate in alkaline solution is high enough for practical use of the oxidation process. In theexperiments aluminum oxidation proceeds without any additional aluminum activation.

  14. Waste Water Treatment-Bed of Coal Fly Ash for Dyes and Pigments Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Farman Ali Shah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The highly porous power plant waste ashes have been utilized to treat toxic effluent of a dyes manufacturing plant. An attempt has been made for the first time in Pakistan, to generate an effective and economically sound treatment facility for the toxic effluent of a dyes manufacturing plant. This is an indigenous bed which could replace expensive treatment facilities, such as reverse osmosis (RO, granulated activated carbon (GAC bed, etc. The treatment efficiency was improved by coupling coagulants with fly ash adsorbent bed. The ash was collected from coal fired boilers of power plant at Lakhra Power Generation Company, Jamshoro, Pakistan. The use of this ash resolved the disposal and environmental issues by treating wastewater of chemical, dyes and pigment industry. The treatment bed comprised of briquettes of coal fly ash coupled with commercial coagulant ferrous sulfate-lime reduced COD, color, turbidity and TSS of effluent remarkably. An adsorption capacity and chemical behavior of fly ash bed was also studied. In coagulation treatment, coagulant FeSO4-lime influenced reduction of COD, color, turbidity and TSS by 32%, 48%, 50% and 51%, respectively. The CFAB coupled with coagulant, resulted an excessive removal of color, TSS, COD, and turbidity by 88%, 92%, 67% and89%, respectively.

  15. Waste Water Treatment-Bed of Coal Fly Ash for Dyes and Pigments Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, S.F.A.; Aftab, A.; Soomro, N.; Nawaz, M.S.; Vafai, K.

    2015-01-01

    The highly porous power plant waste ashes have been utilized to treat toxic effluent of a dyes manufacturing plant. An attempt has been made for the first time in Pakistan, to generate an effective and economically sound treatment facility for the toxic effluent of a dyes manufacturing plant. This is an indigenous bed which could replace expensive treatment facilities, such as reverse osmosis (RO), granulated activated carbon (GAC) bed, etc. The treatment efficiency was improved by coupling coagulants with fly ash adsorbent bed. The ash was collected from coal fired boilers of power plant at Lakhra Power Generation Company, Jamshoro, Pakistan. The use of this ash resolved the disposal and environmental issues by treating wastewater of chemical, dyes and pigment industry. The treatment bed comprised of briquettes of coal fly ash coupled with commercial coagulant ferrous sulfate-lime reduced COD, color, turbidity and TSS of effluent remarkably. An adsorption capacity and chemical behavior of fly ash bed was also studied. In coagulation treatment, coagulant FeSO/sun 4/-lime influenced reduction of COD, color, turbidity and TSS by 32 percentage, 48 percentage, 50 percentage and 51 percentage, respectively. The CFAB coupled with coagulant, resulted an excessive removal of color, TSS, COD, and turbidity by 88 percentage, 92 percentage, 67 percentage and 89 percentage, respectively. (author)

  16. Characterization of residues from waste combustion in fluidized bed boilers. Evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagman, U.; Elander, P.

    1996-04-01

    In this report a thorough characterization of the solid residues from municipal solid waste combustion in a Kvaerner EnviroPower bubbling fluidized bed boiler in Lidkoeping, is presented. Three different end products are generated, namely bottom ash, cyclone ash, and filter ash. The bottom ash, consisting of bed ash and hopper ash, is screened and useful bed material recycled. In the characterization, also the primary constituents bed ash and hopper ash have been included. A chemical characterization have been performed including total inorganic contents, content of unburnt matter, leaching behaviour (availability tests, column tests, pH-static tests) and leaching tests according to certain standards for classification (AFX31-210, DIN38414, TCLP). Physical characterization have included grain size distribution, grain density, compaction properties and stabilization of cyclone ash with subsequent testing of comprehensive strength and saturated hydraulic conductivity. From an environmental point of view, the quality of the bottom ash and probably the cyclone ash from fluidized bed combustion as determined in this study, indicate a potential for utilization. Utilization of the bottom ash could be accepted in certain countries, e.g. France, according to their current limit values. In other countries, e.g. Sweden, no general limit values are given and utilization have to be applied for in each case. The judgement is then based, not only on total contents in the residue and its leaching behaviour, but also on the specific environmental conditions at the site. 7 refs, 17 figs, 12 tabs

  17. Heat removal characteristics of waste storage tanks. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kummerer, M.

    1995-10-01

    A topical report that examines the relationship between tank heat load and maximum waste temperatures. The passive cooling response of the tanks is examined, and loss of active cooling in ventilated tanks is investigated

  18. Performance Analysis of Waste Heat Driven Pressurized Adsorption Chiller

    KAUST Repository

    LOH, Wai Soong; SAHA, Bidyut Baran; CHAKRABORTY, Anutosh; NG, Kim Choon; CHUN, Won Gee

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the transient modeling and performance of waste heat driven pressurized adsorption chillers for refrigeration at subzero applications. This innovative adsorption chiller employs pitch-based activated carbon of type Maxsorb III

  19. Combustion of agro-waste with coal in a fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atimtay, Aysel T. [Middle East Technical University, Department of Environmental Engineering, Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-02-15

    In this study, a review of the studies done on the co-combustion of some agro-waste in a bubbling fluidized bed combustor (BFBC) having an inside diameter of 102 mm and a height of 900 mm is given. The agro-waste used to investigate the co-combustion characteristics were peach and apricot stones produced as a waste from the fruit juice industry, and olive cake produced as a waste from the olive oil industry. These are typical wastes for a Mediterranean country. A lignite coal was used for co-combustion. On-line concentrations of O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and total hydrocarbons (C{sub m} H{sub n}) were measured in the flue gas during combustion experiments. Variations of emissions of various pollutants were studied by changing the operating parameters (excess air ratio, fluidization velocity and fuel feed rate). Temperature distribution along the bed was measured with thermocouples. Emissions were also monitored from the exhaust. Various combinations of coal and biomass mixtures were tested. During the combustion tests, it was observed that the volatile matter from the biomass quickly volatilizes and mostly burns in the freeboard. The temperature profiles along the bed and the freeboard also confirmed this phenomenon. It was found that as the volatile matter of the biomass increases, combustion takes place more in the freeboard region. Better combustion conditions occur at higher excess air ratios. The results showed that co-combustion with these three proposed biomasses lowers the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions considerably. CO and hydrocarbon emissions are lower at the higher excess air ratios. (orig.)

  20. Core-adjacent instrumentation systems for pebble bed reactors for process heat application - state of planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benninghofen, G.; Serafin, N.; Spillekothen, H.G.; Hecker, R.; Brixy, H.; Serpekian, T.

    1982-06-01

    Planning and theoretical/experimental development work for core surveillance instrumentation systems is being performed to meet requirements of pebble bed reactors for process heat application. Detailed and proved instrumentation concepts are now available for the core-adjacent instrumentation systems. The current work and the results of neutron flux measurements at high temperatures are described. Operation devices for long-term accurate gas outlet temperature measurements up to approximately 1423 deg. K will also be discussed. (author)

  1. Modelling heat transfer during flow through a random packed bed of spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burström, Per E. C.; Frishfelds, Vilnis; Ljung, Anna-Lena; Lundström, T. Staffan; Marjavaara, B. Daniel

    2018-04-01

    Heat transfer in a random packed bed of monosized iron ore pellets is modelled with both a discrete three-dimensional system of spheres and a continuous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. Results show a good agreement between the two models for average values over a cross section of the bed for an even temperature profiles at the inlet. The advantage with the discrete model is that it captures local effects such as decreased heat transfer in sections with low speed. The disadvantage is that it is computationally heavy for larger systems of pellets. If averaged values are sufficient, the CFD model is an attractive alternative that is easy to couple to the physics up- and downstream the packed bed. The good agreement between the discrete and continuous model furthermore indicates that the discrete model may be used also on non-Stokian flow in the transitional region between laminar and turbulent flow, as turbulent effects show little influence of the overall heat transfer rates in the continuous model.

  2. A multi-biofuel, fluidised-bed district heating plant in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    At the end of 1984, the city of Haessleholm in Sweden started up a 65 MW district heating plant which included a 14 MW solid fuel plant. The plant included a specially-designed fluidised-bed boiler, capable of burning all grades of solid fuel, including organic fuel of such low grade that no other boilers around Haessleholm could use it. By 1992, the district heating system served some 250 detached houses and 6,000 flats as well as several schools and industrial premises. The biofuel boiler provides almost 60% of the energy required. (UK)

  3. Performance investigation on a 4-bed adsorption desalination cycle with internal heat recovery scheme

    KAUST Repository

    Thu, Kyaw

    2016-10-08

    Multi-bed adsorption cycle with the internal heat recovery between the condenser and the evaporator is investigated for desalination application. A numerical model is developed for a 4-bed adsorption cycle implemented with the master-and-slave configuration and the aforementioned internal heat recovery scheme. The present model captures the reversed adsorption/desorption phenomena frequently associated with the unmatched switching periods. Mesoporous silica gel and water vapor emanated from the evaporation of the seawater are employed as the adsorbent and adsorbate pair. The experimental data and investigation for such configurations are reported for the first time at heat source temperatures from 50 °C to 70 °C. The numerical model is validated rigorously and the parametric study is conducted for the performance of the cycle at assorted operation conditions such as hot and cooling water inlet temperatures and the cycle times. The specific daily water production (SDWP) of the present cycle is found to be about 10 m/day per tonne of silica gel for the heat source temperature at 70 °C. Performance comparison is conducted for various types of adsorption desalination cycles. It is observed that the AD cycle with the current configuration provides superior performance whilst is operational at unprecedentedly low heat source temperature as low as 50 °C.

  4. Local CFD kinetic model of cadmium vaporization during fluid bed incineration of municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soria, J. [Instituto Multidisciplinario de Investigación y Desarrollo de la Patagonia Norte (IDEPA, CONICET-UNCo) y Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Buenos Aires 1400, 8300 Neuquén (Argentina); Laboratoire Procédés, Matériaux et Energie Solaire (CNRS-PROMES), 7 Rue du Four Solaire, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu (France); Gauthier, D., E-mail: Daniel.Gauthier@promes.cnrs.fr [Laboratoire Procédés, Matériaux et Energie Solaire (CNRS-PROMES), 7 Rue du Four Solaire, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu (France); Falcoz, Q.; Flamant, G. [Laboratoire Procédés, Matériaux et Energie Solaire (CNRS-PROMES), 7 Rue du Four Solaire, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu (France); Mazza, G. [Instituto Multidisciplinario de Investigación y Desarrollo de la Patagonia Norte (IDEPA, CONICET-UNCo) y Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Buenos Aires 1400, 8300 Neuquén (Argentina)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► A 2-D local CFD model for simulating the Cd vaporization process is presented. ► It includes a kinetic expression of Cd vaporization into the incineration process. ► Pyrolysis, volatiles’ combustion and residual carbon combustion are also taken into account. ► It fits very well the experimental results obtained on a lab-scale fluidized bed reported in literature. ► It also compares favorably with a model developed previously by the group. -- Abstract: The emissions of heavy metals during incineration of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) are a major issue to health and the environment. It is then necessary to well quantify these emissions in order to accomplish an adequate control and prevent the heavy metals from leaving the stacks. In this study the kinetic behavior of Cadmium during Fluidized Bed Incineration (FBI) of artificial MSW pellets, for bed temperatures ranging from 923 to 1073 K, was modeled. FLUENT 12.1.4 was used as the modeling framework for the simulations and implemented together with a complete set of user-defined functions (UDFs). The CFD model combines the combustion of a single solid waste particle with heavy metal (HM) vaporization from the burning particle, and it takes also into account both pyrolysis and volatiles’ combustion. A kinetic rate law for the Cd release, derived from the CFD thermal analysis of the combusting particle, is proposed. The simulation results are compared with experimental data obtained in a lab-scale fluidized bed incinerator reported in literature, and with the predicted values from a particulate non-isothermal model, formerly developed by the authors. The comparison shows that the proposed CFD model represents very well the evolution of the HM release for the considered range of bed temperature.

  5. Corrosivity of hot flue gases in the fluidized bed combustion of recovered waste wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enestam, S.

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, recovered waste wood has become a fuel of interest due to its green energy benefits and low price compared to virgin wood-based fuels. However, waste wood is often contaminated with paint, plastic, and metal components, producing concentrations of heavy metals such as zinc and lead, chlorine, sodium, and sometimes sulphur that are elevated relative to those in virgin wood. In several cases, boilers burning waste wood have experienced increased fouling and corrosion of furnace walls, superheaters, and economizers, problems associated with chlorine, zinc, lead, and alkali metals in the deposits. The location of the deposits and the corrosion as well as the composition of the deposits vary with the fuel composition, boiler design, combustion parameters, flue gas temperature, and material temperature. Experience gained from the operation of biofuel and waste boilers shows that corrosion damage can be reduced, or even avoided, by the selection of optimum materials or for heat exchanger surfaces, by the use of fuel mixtures or additives that decrease the corrosivity of the combustion environment, by the placement of superheaters in a less corrosive environment, and by adjusting the steam parameters. Finding the right solutions for boilers burning RWW requires a thorough understanding of the whole process, including the fuel fed into the boiler, the combustion atmosphere, the corrosivity of the flue gas and the deposits, and the corrosion resistance of different boiler materials under the prevailing conditions. The objective of this work was to shed more light on the combustion environment in bubbling fluidized bed boilers burning RWW and thus increase knowledge about the corrosivity of zinc- and lead-rich deposits formed during the combustion of RWW, with the final goal of developing a corrosion prediction tool for use in the design of boilers for RWW combustion. With such a tool, it would be possible to optimize boiler design and material selection with

  6. MINERALIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR): COMPARISONS TO VITREOUS WASTE FORMS, AND PERTINENT DURABILITY TESTING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.

    2008-01-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to generate a document for the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that would cover the following topics: (1) A description of the mineral structures produced by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) of Hanford type Low Activity Waste (LAW including LAWR which is LAW melter recycle waste) waste, especially the cage structured minerals and how they are formed. (2) How the cage structured minerals contain some contaminants, while others become part of the mineral structure (Note that all contaminants become part of the mineral structure and this will be described in the subsequent sections of this report). (3) Possible contaminant release mechanisms from the mineral structures. (4) Appropriate analyses to evaluate these release mechanisms. (5) Why the appropriate analyses are comparable to the existing Hanford glass dataset. In order to discuss the mineral structures and how they bond contaminants a brief description of the structures of both mineral (ceramic) and vitreous waste forms will be given to show their similarities. By demonstrating the similarities of mineral and vitreous waste forms on atomic level, the contaminant release mechanisms of the crystalline (mineral) and amorphous (glass) waste forms can be compared. This will then logically lead to the discussion of why many of the analyses used to evaluate vitreous waste forms and glass-ceramics (also known as glass composite materials) are appropriate for determining the release mechanisms of LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms and how the durability data on LAW/LAWR mineral waste forms relate to the durability data for LAW/LAWR glasses. The text will discuss the LAW mineral waste form made by FBSR. The nanoscale mechanism by which the minerals form will be also be described in the text. The appropriate analyses to evaluate contaminant release mechanisms will be discussed, as will the FBSR test results to

  7. Bio-oil production from fast pyrolysis of waste furniture sawdust in a fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Hyeon Su; Park, Hyun Ju; Park, Young-Kwon; Ryu, Changkook; Suh, Dong Jin; Suh, Young-Woong; Yim, Jin-Heong; Kim, Seung-Soo

    2010-01-01

    The amount of waste furniture generated in Korea was over 2.4 million tons in the past 3 years, which can be used for renewable energy or fuel feedstock production. Fast pyrolysis is available for thermo-chemical conversion of the waste wood mostly into bio-oil. In this work, fast pyrolysis of waste furniture sawdust was investigated under various reaction conditions (pyrolysis temperature, particle size, feed rate and flow rate of fluidizing medium) in a fluidized-bed reactor. The optimal pyrolysis temperature for increased yields of bio-oil was 450 degrees C. Excessively smaller or larger feed size negatively affected the production of bio-oil. Higher flow and feeding rates were more effective for the production of bio-oil, but did not greatly affect the bio-oil yields within the tested ranges. The use of product gas as the fluidizing medium had a potential for increased bio-oil yields.

  8. Coupling scales for modelling heavy metal vaporization from municipal solid waste incineration in a fluid bed by CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soria, José, E-mail: jose.soria@probien.gob.ar [Institute for Research and Development in Process Engineering, Biotechnology and Alternative Energies (PROBIEN, CONICET – UNCo), 1400 Buenos Aires St., 8300 Neuquén (Argentina); Gauthier, Daniel; Flamant, Gilles [Processes, Materials and Solar Energy Laboratory (PROMES-CNRS, UPR 8521), 7 Four Solaire Street, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu (France); Rodriguez, Rosa [Chemical Engineering Institute, National University of San Juan, 1109 Libertador (O) Avenue, 5400 San Juan (Argentina); Mazza, Germán [Institute for Research and Development in Process Engineering, Biotechnology and Alternative Energies (PROBIEN, CONICET – UNCo), 1400 Buenos Aires St., 8300 Neuquén (Argentina)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A CFD two-scale model is formulated to simulate heavy metal vaporization from waste incineration in fluidized beds. • MSW particle is modelled with the macroscopic particle model. • Influence of bed dynamics on HM vaporization is included. • CFD predicted results agree well with experimental data reported in literature. • This approach may be helpful for fluidized bed reactor modelling purposes. - Abstract: Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) in fluidized bed is a very interesting technology mainly due to high combustion efficiency, great flexibility for treating several types of waste fuels and reduction in pollutants emitted with the flue gas. However, there is a great concern with respect to the fate of heavy metals (HM) contained in MSW and their environmental impact. In this study, a coupled two-scale CFD model was developed for MSWI in a bubbling fluidized bed. It presents an original scheme that combines a single particle model and a global fluidized bed model in order to represent the HM vaporization during MSW combustion. Two of the most representative HM (Cd and Pb) with bed temperatures ranging between 923 and 1073 K have been considered. This new approach uses ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 as the modelling platform for the simulations along with a complete set of self-developed user-defined functions (UDFs). The simulation results are compared to the experimental data obtained previously by the research group in a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator. The comparison indicates that the proposed CFD model predicts well the evolution of the HM release for the bed temperatures analyzed. It shows that both bed temperature and bed dynamics have influence on the HM vaporization rate. It can be concluded that CFD is a rigorous tool that provides valuable information about HM vaporization and that the original two-scale simulation scheme adopted allows to better represent the actual particle behavior in a fluid bed incinerator.

  9. Coupling scales for modelling heavy metal vaporization from municipal solid waste incineration in a fluid bed by CFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria, José; Gauthier, Daniel; Flamant, Gilles; Rodriguez, Rosa; Mazza, Germán

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A CFD two-scale model is formulated to simulate heavy metal vaporization from waste incineration in fluidized beds. • MSW particle is modelled with the macroscopic particle model. • Influence of bed dynamics on HM vaporization is included. • CFD predicted results agree well with experimental data reported in literature. • This approach may be helpful for fluidized bed reactor modelling purposes. - Abstract: Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) in fluidized bed is a very interesting technology mainly due to high combustion efficiency, great flexibility for treating several types of waste fuels and reduction in pollutants emitted with the flue gas. However, there is a great concern with respect to the fate of heavy metals (HM) contained in MSW and their environmental impact. In this study, a coupled two-scale CFD model was developed for MSWI in a bubbling fluidized bed. It presents an original scheme that combines a single particle model and a global fluidized bed model in order to represent the HM vaporization during MSW combustion. Two of the most representative HM (Cd and Pb) with bed temperatures ranging between 923 and 1073 K have been considered. This new approach uses ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 as the modelling platform for the simulations along with a complete set of self-developed user-defined functions (UDFs). The simulation results are compared to the experimental data obtained previously by the research group in a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator. The comparison indicates that the proposed CFD model predicts well the evolution of the HM release for the bed temperatures analyzed. It shows that both bed temperature and bed dynamics have influence on the HM vaporization rate. It can be concluded that CFD is a rigorous tool that provides valuable information about HM vaporization and that the original two-scale simulation scheme adopted allows to better represent the actual particle behavior in a fluid bed incinerator

  10. Heat-deproteinated xenogeneic bone from slaughterhouse waste

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xenogeneic bone procured from the slaughterhouse waste was deproteinated by heat treatment method intended for use as a bone substitute. The effect of heat treatment was investigated by thermal analysis and by physico-chemical methods such as X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) ...

  11. An assessment of biological processes close to the sea bed in a slope region and its significance to the assessment of sea bed disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargreaves, P.M.; Ellis, C.J.; Angel, M.V.

    1984-01-01

    Vertical profiles of planktonic and micronektonic biomass observed close to the sea bed along a transect running up the continental slope on the southern flank of the Porcupine Seabight (to the southwest of Ireland) showed that a doubling in biomass concentration occurs from 100 to 10m above the sea bed. Comparison with biomass concentrations at two deep water stations, one in the Seabight and the other in the Rockall Trough, showed that there was a consistent increase in standing crop close to the sea bed over the slope. Supplementary data were collected on the northern flank of the Seabight. Analysis of both taxonomic groups and individual species showed that some taxa were more abundant near the sea floor and extended their vertical ranges to greater depths over the slope than over deep water, other taxa were unaffected. The implications to the problem of assessing the safety of sea bed disposal of high level radioactive waste are summarised. (author)

  12. Using waste oil to heat a greenhouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marla Schwartz

    2009-01-01

    During the winter of 1990, Northwoods Nursery (Elk River, ID) purchased a wood-burning system to heat the current greenhouses. This system burned slabs of wood to heat water that was then pumped into the greenhouses. The winter of 1990 was extremely harsh, requiring non-stop operation of the heating system. In order to keep seedlings in the greenhouse from freezing,...

  13. Species removal from aqueous radioactive waste by deep-bed filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobre, Tănase; Zicman, Laura Ruxandra; Pârvulescu, Oana Cristina; Neacşu, Elena; Ciobanu, Cătălin; Drăgolici, Felicia Nicoleta

    2018-05-26

    Performances of aqueous suspension treatment by deep-bed sand filtration were experimentally studied and simulated. A semiempirical deterministic model and a stochastic model were used to predict the removal of clay particles (20 μm) from diluted suspensions. Model parameters, which were fitted based on experimental data, were linked by multiple linear correlations to the process factors, i.e., sand grain size (0.5 and 0.8 mm), bed depth (0.2 and 0.4 m), clay concentration in the feed suspension (1 and 2 kg p /m 3 ), suspension superficial velocity (0.015 and 0.020 m/s), and operating temperature (25 and 45 °C). These relationships were used to predict the bed radioactivity determined by the deposition of radioactive suspended particles (>50 nm) from low and medium level aqueous radioactive waste. A deterministic model based on mass balance, kinetic, and interface equilibrium equations was developed to predict the multicomponent sorption of 60 Co, 137 Cs, 241 Am, and 3 H radionuclides (0.1-0.3 nm). A removal of 98.7% of radioactive particles was attained by filtering a radioactive wastewater volume of 10 m 3 (0.5 mm sand grain size, 0.3 m bed depth, 0.223 kg p /m 3 suspended solid concentration in the feed suspension, 0.003 m/s suspension superficial velocity, and 25 °C operating temperature). Predicted results revealed that the bed radioactivity determined by the sorption of radionuclides (0.01 kBq/kg b ) was significantly lower than the bed radioactivities caused by the deposition of radioactive particles (0.5-1.8 kBq/kg b ). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Radioactive Demonstrations Of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming As A Supplementary Treatment For Hanford's Low Activity Waste And Secondary Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Cozzi, A.; Bannochie, C.; Burket, P.; Daniel, G.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO4 that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides

  15. Research of waste heat energy efficiency for absorption heat pump recycling thermal power plant circulating water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Liansheng; E, Zhijun; Wang, Kun; Wang, Ziyue; Li, Guohao; Qu, Bin

    2018-02-01

    The waste heat energy efficiency for absorption heat pump recycling thermal power plant circulating water has been analyzed. After the operation of heat pump, the influences on power generation and heat generation of unit were taken into account. In the light of the characteristics of heat pump in different operation stages, the energy efficiency of heat pump was evaluated comprehensively on both sides of benefits belonging to electricity and benefits belonging to heat, which adopted the method of contrast test. Thus, the reference of energy efficiency for same type projects was provided.

  16. Atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (AFBC) co-firing of coal and hospital waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The proposed project involves co-firing of coal and medical waste (including infectious medical waste) in an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) to safely dispose of medical waste and produce steam for hospital needs. Combustion at the design temperature and residence time (duration) in the AFBC has been proven to render infectious medical waste free of disease producing organisms. The project would be located at the Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center in Lebanon, Pennsylvania. The estimated cost of the proposed AFBC facility is nearly $4 million. It would be jointly funded by DOE, Veterans Affairs, and Donlee Technologies, Inc., of York, Pennsylvania, under a cooperative agreement between DOE and Donlee. Under the terms of this agreement, $3.708 million in cost-shared financial assistance would be jointly provided by DOE and the Veterans Affairs (50/50), with $278,000 provided by Donlee. The purposes of the proposed project are to: (1) provide the VA Medical Center and the Good Samaritan Hospital (GSH), also of Lebanon, Pennsylvania, with a solution for disposal of their medical waste; and (2) demonstrate that a new coal-burning technology can safely incinerate infectious medical waste, produce steam to meet hospital needs, and comply with environmental regulations

  17. Using flowering and heat-loss models for improving greenhouse energy-use efficiency in annual bedding plant production

    Science.gov (United States)

    In temperate climates, annual bedding plants are typically produced in heated greenhouses from late winter through early summer. Temperature, photoperiod, light intensity, and transplant date are commonly manipulated during commercial production so that plants are in flower for predetermined market ...

  18. Pyrolysis Recovery of Waste Shipping Oil Using Microwave Heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Adibah Wan Mahari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the use of microwave pyrolysis as a recovery method for waste shipping oil. The influence of different process temperatures on the yield and composition of the pyrolysis products was investigated. The use of microwave heating provided a fast heating rate (40 °C/min to heat the waste oil at 600 °C. The waste oil was pyrolyzed and decomposed to form products dominated by pyrolysis oil (up to 66 wt. % and smaller amounts of pyrolysis gases (24 wt. % and char residue (10 wt. %. The pyrolysis oil contained light C9–C30 hydrocarbons and was detected to have a calorific value of 47–48 MJ/kg which is close to those traditional liquid fuels derived from fossil fuel. The results show that microwave pyrolysis of waste shipping oil generated an oil product that could be used as a potential fuel.

  19. Two stage, low temperature, catalyzed fluidized bed incineration with in situ neutralization for radioactive mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, J.F.; Williams, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    A two stage, low temperature, catalyzed fluidized bed incineration process is proving successful at incinerating hazardous wastes containing nuclear material. The process operates at 550 degrees C and 650 degrees C in its two stages. Acid gas neutralization takes place in situ using sodium carbonate as a sorbent in the first stage bed. The feed material to the incinerator is hazardous waste-as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act-mixed with radioactive materials. The radioactive materials are plutonium, uranium, and americium that are byproducts of nuclear weapons production. Despite its low temperature operation, this system successfully destroyed poly-chlorinated biphenyls at a 99.99992% destruction and removal efficiency. Radionuclides and volatile heavy metals leave the fluidized beds and enter the air pollution control system in minimal amounts. Recently collected modeling and experimental data show the process minimizes dioxin and furan production. The report also discusses air pollution, ash solidification, and other data collected from pilot- and demonstration-scale testing. The testing took place at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a US Department of Energy facility, in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s

  20. Biodegradation of phenolic waste liquors in stirred-tank, packed-bed, and fluidized-bed bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holladay, D W; Hancher, G W; Chilcote, D D; Scott, C D

    1978-11-01

    The biological degradation of phenolic scrub liquors similar to those that arise in coal conversion processes was studied for symbiotic bacterial populations contained in a continuously stirred tank bioreactor, a three-phase packed-bed bioreactor, and a three-phase, fluidized-bed bioreactor. The conversions of phenol compounds were comparable in the three-phase, packed-bed bioreactor and the continuously stirred tank bioreactor; however, the packed-bed bioreactor degradation rates were as much as twice those in the continuously stirred tank bioreactor, and packed-bed bioreactor retention times were as low as one- tenth those of the continuously stirred tank bioreactors (minimum time was 12 hours).

  1. NASA 50 amp hour nickel cadmium battery waste heat determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, V. C.

    1980-01-01

    A process for determining the waste heat generated in a 50-ampere-hour, nickel cadmium battery as a function of the discharge rate is described and results are discussed. The technique involved is essentially calibration of the battery as a heat transfer rate calorimeter. The tests are run at three different levels of battery activity, one at 40-watts of waste heat generated, one at 60, and one at 100. Battery inefficiency ranges from 14 to 18 percent at discharge rates of 284 to 588 watts, respectively and top-of-cell temperatures of 20 C.

  2. The cadastre of waste heat in the Upper Rhine Valley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomaei, G.; Kinzelbach, W.

    1980-04-01

    The cadastre of waste heat provides the distribution in space and time of anthropogeneous waste heat emissions on a 2 x 2 km 2 grid. In the case of the Upper Rhine Valley it serves as a basis for the numerical evaluations of climatic changes caused by man. Such a cadastre also allows to analyse the distribution of pollutant emissions and the heat or energy supply, respectively, of the region. In a close approximation the distribution of waste heat is equal to the distribution of energy consumption. As there are generally difficulties in obtaining data about the consumption of the types of energy on the grid level, methods were developed which allow to determine the local energy consumption by using the relevant structural data. The methods used for the Federal Republic of Germany and neighbouring countries and the results for the Upper Rhine Valley, obtained by these methods, are presented. The cadastre of waste heat is based on data of the year 1973 which was a time of great energy consumption. Only in 1978 this energy consumption was exceeded. To be able to estimate the change in the influence of the anthropogeneous waste heat during the next 20 years, the cadastre was extrapolated until the year 2000. (orig.) [de

  3. Regional waste treatment facilities with underground monolith disposal for all low-heat-generating nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1982-01-01

    An alternative system for treatment and disposal of all ''low-heat-generating'' nuclear wastes from all sources is proposed. The system, Regional Waste Treatment Facilities with Underground Monolith Disposal (RWTF/UMD), integrates waste treatment and disposal operations into single facilities at regional sites. Untreated and/or pretreated wastes are transported from generation sites such as reactors, hospitals, and industries to regional facilities in bulk containers. Liquid wastes are also transported in bulk after being gelled for transport. The untreated and pretreated wastes are processed by incineration, crushing, and other processes at the RWTF. The processed wastes are mixed with cement. The wet concrete mixture is poured into large low-cost, manmade caverns or deep trenches. Monolith dimensions are from 15 to 25 m wide, and 20 to 60 m high and as long as required. This alternative waste system may provide higher safety margins in waste disposal at lower costs

  4. Simulation of the distribution of radionuclides in the reservoir bed for deep-well injection disposal of acid liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noskov, M.D.; Istomin, A.D.; Kesler, A.G.; Zubkov, A.A.; Zakharova, E.V.; Egorov, G.F.

    2007-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for describing the changes in the state of the reservoir bed for dee-well injection disposal of acid liquid radioactive waste. The model considers the multicomponent filtration of the solution in the heterogeneous bed, sorption-desorption of radionuclides, taking into account the dependence of the distribution coefficient on the temperature and pH, as well as radioactive decay, interaction of acids with minerals, radiation-chemical and thermochemical decomposition of the acids, and dynamics of the temperature field, taking into account the convective heat transfer, thermal conductivity, and radiogenic heat release. The results of the simulation of the migration of radionuclides were reported, as well as of the distribution of the acids and the dynamics of the temperature field in the vicinity of the injection well of the site for deep-well injection disposal of the waste from Siberian Chemical Combine. A man-caused barrier is formed in the vicinity of the injection well, hindering the spread of radionuclides in the reservoir bed [ru

  5. Device for district heating with utilization of waste heat from power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korek, J.

    1976-01-01

    In order to utilize the waste heat developing in power plants - especially in nuclear power plants - the author suggests to lead the waste heat of the coolers for oil (which the bearings are lubricated with), hydrogen (which serves for the stator rotor-cooling), and the stator cooling water to the circulating district heating water and to arrange these heat exchangers one behind another or parallel to each other in the water circuit of the district heating system. The oil cooler of the engine transformer is also connected with the circulation of the district heating water. The runback water of the district heating network could thus be heated from approx. 40 0 C up to 65 0 C. (UA) [de

  6. Mathematical simulation of hazardous ion retention from radioactive waste in fixed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohsah, M.A.; Gohneim, M.M.; Othman, S.H.; El-Anadouli, B.E.

    2007-01-01

    Reactor design for fluid-solid, noncatalytic reaction depends on the prediction of the performance of the reactor kinetically. The most mathematical models used to handle fixed bed reactor in which the solid bed constitute one of the reactants, while a second reactant is in the fluid phase are complex and difficult to handle. A new mathematical model which easier to handle has been developed to describe the system under investigation. The model was examined theoretically and experimentally. A column backed with chelating cloth filter to separate radionuclide form radioactive waste solution is used as a practical application for the model. Comparison of the model predictions with the experimental results gives satisfactory agreement at most of the process stages

  7. Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank Farm Blend) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation (FBSR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Daniel, W. E.; Hall, H. K.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Supplemental Treatment is likely to be required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750°C) continuous method by which LAW can be processed irrespective of whether the waste contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be comparable to LAW glass, i.e. leaches Tc-99, Re and Na at 6 (the Hanford IDF criteria for Na) in the first few hours. The granular and monolithic waste forms also pass the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for all Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) components at the Universal Treatment

  8. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 5, Appendix C, Fluidized-bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-10-01

    This appendix provides information on fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) technology as it has been applied to municipal waste combustion (MWC). A review of the literature was conducted to determine: (1) to what extent FBC technology has been applied to MWC, in terms of number and size of units was well as technology configuration; (2) the operating history of facilities employing FBC technology; and (3) the cost of these facilities as compared to conventional MSW installations. Where available in the literature, data on operating and performance characteristics are presented. Tabular comparisons of facility operating/cost data and emissions data have been complied and are presented. The literature review shows that FBC technology shows considerable promise in terms of providing improvements over conventional technology in areas such as NOx and acid gas control, and ash leachability. In addition, the most likely configuration to be applied to the first large scale FBC dedicated to municipal solid waste (MSW) will employ circulating bed (CFB) technology. Projected capital costs for the Robbins, Illinois 1600 ton per day CFB-based waste-to-energy facility are competitive with conventional systems, in the range of $125,000 per ton per day of MSW receiving capacity.

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of waste heat power generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Jiangfeng; Xu, Mingtian; Cheng, Lin

    2010-01-01

    In the present work, a waste heat power generation system is analyzed based on the criteria with and without considering the heat/exergy loss to the environment. For the criteria without considering the heat/exergy loss to the environment, the first- and second-law efficiencies display different tendencies with the variations of some system parameters. When the heat/exergy loss to the environment is taken into consideration, the first and second law efficiencies display the same tendency. Thus, choosing the appropriate expressions for the performance criteria is crucial for the optimization design of the waste heat power generation system. It is found that there are two approaches to improving the system performance: one is to improve the heat/exergy input; the other is to enhance the heat-work conversion ability of the system. The former would deteriorate the environment if the heat-work conversion ability of the system remains unchanged; the latter could reduce the environmental impact but it's restricted by the heat/exergy input. Therefore, the optimal operation condition should be achieved at the trade-off between the heat/exergy input and the heat-work conversion ability of the system.

  10. A Study of Ballast Water Treatment Using Engine Waste Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Rajoo; Yaakob, Omar; Koh, Kho King; Adnan, Faizul Amri bin; Ismail, Nasrudin bin; Ahmad, Badruzzaman bin; Ismail, Mohd Arif bin

    2018-05-01

    Heat treatment of ballast water using engine waste heat can be an advantageous option complementing any proven technology. A treatment system was envisaged based on the ballast system of an existing, operational crude carrier. It was found that the available waste heat could raise the temperatures by 25 °C and voyage time requirements were found to be considerable between 7 and 12 days to heat the high volumes of ballast water. Further, a heat recovery of 14-33% of input energies from exhaust gases was recorded while using a test rig arrangement representing a shipboard arrangement. With laboratory level tests at temperature ranges of around 55-75 °C, almost complete species mortalities for representative phytoplankton, zooplankton and bacteria were observed while the time for exposure varied from 15 to 60 s. Based on the heat availability analyses for harvesting heat from the engine exhaust gases(vessel and test rig), heat exchanger designs were developed and optimized using Lagrangian method applying Bell-Delaware approaches. Heat exchanger designs were developed to suit test rig engines also. Based on these designs, heat exchanger and other equipment were procured and erected. The species' mortalities were tested in this mini-scale arrangement resembling the shipboard arrangement. The mortalities realized were > 95% with heat from jacket fresh water and exhaust gases alone. The viability of the system was thus validated.

  11. Stabilization of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Aqueous Waste by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C

    2004-01-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) in Aiken, South Carolina. Research and development programs have been conducted at SRNL for ∼50 years generating non-radioactive (hazardous and non-hazardous) and radioactive aqueous wastes. Typically the aqueous effluents from the R and D activities are disposed of from each laboratory module via the High Activity Drains (HAD) or the Low Activity Drains (LAD) depending on whether they are radioactive or not. The aqueous effluents are collected in holding tanks, analyzed and shipped to either H-Area (HAD waste) or the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) (LAD waste) for volume reduction. Because collection, analysis, and transport of LAD and HAD waste is cumbersome and since future treatment of this waste may be curtailed as the F/H-Area evaporators and waste tanks are decommissioned, SRNL laboratory operations requested several proof of principle demonstrations of alternate technologies that would define an alternative disposal path for the aqueous wastes. Proof of principle for the disposal of SRNL HAD waste using a technology known as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is the focus of the current study. The FBSR technology can be performed either as a batch process, e.g. in each laboratory module in small furnaces with an 8'' by 8'' footprint, or in a semi-continuous Bench Scale Reformer (BSR). The proof of principle experiments described in this study cover the use of the FBSR technology at any scale (pilot or full scale). The proof of principle experiments described in this study used a non-radioactive HAD simulant

  12. CFD Simulation and Experimental Analyses of a Copper Wire Woven Heat Exchanger Design to Improve Heat Transfer and Reduce the Size of Adsorption Beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John White

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The chief objective of this study is the proposal design and CFD simulation of a new compacted copper wire woven fin heat exchanger and silica gel adsorbent bed used as part of an adsorption refrigeration system. This type of heat exchanger design has a large surface area because of the wire woven fin design. It is estimated that this will help improve the coefficient of performance (COP of the adsorption phase and increase the heat transfer in this system arrangement. To study the heat transfer between the fins and porous adsorbent reactor bed, two experiments were carried out and matched to computational fluid dynamics (CFD results.

  13. Management of radioactive wastes with negligible heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alter, U.

    1990-01-01

    In the Federal Republic of Germany only one company is responsible for the management of radioactive wastes with negligible heat generations. This is the Company for Nuclear Service (GNS mbH). It was the intention of the competent authorities of the FRG to intensify state control during conditioning, intermediate storage and transport of low- and medium level radioactive waste. A guideline provides that the responsibility of the waste producers and of those concerned with conditioning, storage and transport of radioactive waste is assigned in the individual case and that the qualitative and quantitative registration of all waste streams will be ensured. An overview of the radioactive waste management within the last two years in the FRG is presented. (orig./DG)

  14. Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-30

    The problem addressed by our invention is that of municipal solid waste utilization. The dimensions of the problem can be visualized by the common comparison that the average individual in America creates in five years time an amount of solid waste equivalent in weight to the Statue of Liberty. The combustible portion of the more than 11 billion tons of solid waste (including municipal solid waste) produced in the United States each year, if converted into useful energy, could provide 32 quads per year of badly needed domestic energy, or more than one-third of our annual energy consumption. Conversion efficiency and many other factors make such a production level unrealistic, but it is clear that we are dealing with a very significant potential resource. This report describes research pertaining to the co-combustion of oil shale with solid municipal wastes in a circulating fluidized bed. The oil shale adds significant fuel content and also constituents that can possible produce a useful cementitious ash.

  15. Review of geochemical measurement techniques for a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauss, K.G.; Steinborn, T.L.

    1980-01-01

    A broad, general review is presented of geochemical measurement techniques that can provide data necessary for site selection and repository effectiveness assessment for a radioactive waste repository in bedded salt. The available measurement techniques are organized according to the parameter measured. The list of geochemical parameters include all those measurable geochemical properties of a sample whole values determine the geochemical characteristics or behavior of the system. For each technique, remarks are made pertaining to the operating principles of the measurement instrument and the purpose for which the technique is used. Attention is drawn to areas where further research and development are needed

  16. Heat transfer in vitrified radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palancar, M.C.; Luis, M.A.; Luis, P.; Aragon, J.M.; Montero, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental method for measuring the thermal conductivity and convection coefficient of borosilicate glass cylinders, containing a simulated high level radioactive waste, is described. A simulation of the thermal behaviour of matrices of solidified waste during the cooling in air, water and a geological repository has been done. The experimental values of the thermal conductivity are ranging from 0.267 to 0.591 w/m K, for matrices with simulated waste contents of 10 to 40% (the waste is simulated by no radioactive isotopes). The convection coefficient for air/cylinders under the operating conditions used is 116 w/m 2 K. The simulated operation of cooling in air shows that about 1-2 days are enough to cool a solidified waste cylinder 0.6m diameter from 900 to 400 0 C. The cooling under water from 400 to near 80 0 C is faster than in air, but sharp temperature gradients within the matrices could be expected. The simulation of geological repositories lead to some criteria of arranging the matrices for avoiding undesirable high temperature points. (author) 1 fig

  17. Recov'Heat: An estimation tool of urban waste heat recovery potential in sustainable cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goumba, Alain; Chiche, Samuel; Guo, Xiaofeng; Colombert, Morgane; Bonneau, Patricia

    2017-02-01

    Waste heat recovery is considered as an efficient way to increase carbon-free green energy utilization and to reduce greenhouse gas emission. Especially in urban area, several sources such as sewage water, industrial process, waste incinerator plants, etc., are still rarely explored. Their integration into a district heating system providing heating and/or domestic hot water could be beneficial for both energy companies and local governments. EFFICACITY, a French research institute focused on urban energy transition, has developed an estimation tool for different waste heat sources potentially explored in a sustainable city. This article presents the development method of such a decision making tool which, by giving both energetic and economic analysis, helps local communities and energy service companies to make preliminary studies in heat recovery projects.

  18. Computer simulation of an internally pressurized radioactive waste disposal room in a bedded salt formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W.T.; Weatherby, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico was created by the U.S. Department of Energy as an underground research and development facility to demonstrate the safe storage of transuranic waste generated from defense activities. This facility consists of storage rooms mined from a bedded salt formation at a depth of about 650 meters. Each room will accommodate about 6800 55-gallon drums filled with waste. After waste containers are emplaced, the storage rooms are to be backfilled with mined salt or other backfill materials. As time passes, reconsolidation of this backfill will reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the room. However, gases produced by decomposition and corrosion of waste and waste containers may cause a slow build-up of pressure which can retard consolidation of the waste and backfilled salt. The authors have developed a finite-element model of an idealized disposal room which is assumed to be perfectly sealed. The assumption that no gas escapes from the disposal room is a highly idealized and extreme condition which does not account for leakage paths, such as interbeds, that exist in the surrounding salt formation. This model has been used in a parametric study to determine how reconsolidation is influenced by various assumed gas generation rates and total amounts of gas generated. Results show that reductions in the gas generation, relative to the baseline case, can increase the degree of consolidation and reduce the peak gas pressure in disposal rooms. Even higher degrees of reconsolidation can be achieved by reducing both amounts and rates of gas generation. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  19. Applications guide for waste heat recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, P. I.

    1983-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of commercially available organic Rankine cycle (ORC) hardware from a literature search and industry survey is assessed. Engineering criteria for applying ORC technology are established, and a set of nomograms to enable the rapid sizing of the equipment is presented. A comparison of an ORC system with conventional heat recovery techniques can be made with a nomogram developed for a recuperative heat exchanger. A graphical technique for evaluating the economic aspects of an ORC system and conventional heat recovery method is discussed: also included is a description of anticipated future trends in organic Rankine cycle R&D.

  20. Preliminary area selection considerations for radioactive waste repositories in bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagoner, J.L.; Steinborn, T.L.

    1979-01-01

    This guide describes an approach to selection of areas of bedded salt which contain potentially suitable sites for the storage of radioactive waste. To evaluate a site selected by a license applicant, it is necessary to understand the technical site characteristics which should be considered in the preliminary phase of site selection. These site characteristics are presented here in checklist form, and each item is accompanied by a discussion which explains its significance. These qualitative considerations are used first to select an area of interest within a broad geologic or geomorphic region. Once an area has been selected, more quantitative information must be acquired to determine whether the proposed site meets the resultations for storage of nuclear waste

  1. Study on neutron diffusion and time dependence heat ina fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilhena, M.T. de.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to model the neutron diffusion and heat transfer for a Fluidized Bed Nuclear Reactor and its solution by Laplace Transform Technique with numerical inversion using Fourier Series. Also Gaussian quadrature and residues techniques were applied for numerical inversion. The neutron transport, diffusion, and point Kinetic equation for this nuclear reactor concept are developed. A matricial and Taylor Series methods are proposed for the solution of the point Kinetic equation which is a time scale problem of Stiff type

  2. The impact of municipal waste combustion in small heat sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantúch, Martin; Kaduchová, Katarína; Lenhard, Richard

    2016-06-01

    At present there is a tendency to make greater use for heating houses for burning solid fuel, such as pieces of wood, coal, coke, local sources of heat to burn natural gas. This tendency is given both the high price of natural gas as well as the availability of cheaper solid fuel. In many cases, in the context saving heating costs, respectively in the context of the disposal of waste is co-incinerated with municipal solid fuels and wastes of different composition. This co entails increased production emissions such as CO (carbon monoxide), NOx (nitrogen oxides), particulate matter (particulate matter), PM10, HCl (hydrogen chloride), PCDD/F (polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans), PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) and others. The experiment was focused on the emission factors from the combustion of fossil fuels in combination with municipal waste in conventional boilers designed to burn solid fuel.

  3. Affordable Rankine Cycle Waste Heat Recovery for Heavy Duty Trucks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Swami Nathan [Eaton Corporation

    2017-06-30

    Nearly 30% of fuel energy is not utilized and wasted in the engine exhaust. Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) based waste heat recovery (WHR) systems offer a promising approach on waste energy recovery and improving the efficiency of Heavy-Duty diesel engines. Major barriers in the ORC WHR system are the system cost and controversial waste heat recovery working fluids. More than 40% of the system cost is from the additional heat exchangers (recuperator, condenser and tail pipe boiler). The secondary working fluid loop designed in ORC system is either flammable or environmentally sensitive. The Eaton team investigated a novel approach to reduce the cost of implementing ORC based WHR systems to Heavy-Duty (HD) Diesel engines while utilizing safest working fluids. Affordable Rankine Cycle (ARC) concept aimed to define the next generation of waste energy recuperation with a cost optimized WHR system. ARC project used engine coolant as the working fluid. This approach reduced the need for a secondary working fluid circuit and subsequent complexity. A portion of the liquid phase engine coolant has been pressurized through a set of working fluid pumps and used to recover waste heat from the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and exhaust tail pipe exhaust energy. While absorbing heat, the mixture is partially vaporized but remains a wet binary mixture. The pressurized mixed-phase engine coolant mixture is then expanded through a fixed-volume ratio expander that is compatible with two-phase conditions. Heat rejection is accomplished through the engine radiator, avoiding the need for a separate condenser. The ARC system has been investigated for PACCAR’s MX-13 HD diesel engine.

  4. Drying of bio fuel utilizing waste heat; Torkning av biobraenslen med spillvaerme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Inge; Larsson, Sara; Wennberg, Olle [S.E.P. Scandinavian Energy Project AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2004-10-01

    . In these evaluations the costs for transport has also been taken into account. A survey of available waste heat sources at saw mills and pulp mills has been done. The energy content in theses sources were compared with the energy needed for the drying process to see if the sources were large enough. The study has resulted in the following conclusions: There are large sources of waste heat available that could be used for drying purposes at pulp and paper mills. At sawmills the sources of waste heat are lower in comparison with the energy needed for drying. At pulp and paper mills it should be profitable with an investment in a biofuel dryer utilizing waste heat. The most profitable alternative is to use flue gases from the recovery boiler as drying gas (presuming that no flue gas condenser is installed). The profitability of a drying process at a sawmill is also good. Bed drying seems to be the most suitable technology both from a technical and commercial point of view.

  5. Alternatives Generation and Analysis for Heat Removal from High Level Waste Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WILLIS, W.L.

    2000-06-15

    This document addresses the preferred combination of design and operational configurations to provide heat removal from high-level waste tanks during Phase 1 waste feed delivery to prevent the waste temperature from exceeding tank safety requirement limits. An interim decision for the preferred method to remove the heat from the high-level waste tanks during waste feed delivery operations is presented herein.

  6. Alternatives Generation and Analysis for Heat Removal from High Level Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WILLIS, W.L.

    2000-01-01

    This document addresses the preferred combination of design and operational configurations to provide heat removal from high-level waste tanks during Phase 1 waste feed delivery to prevent the waste temperature from exceeding tank safety requirement limits. An interim decision for the preferred method to remove the heat from the high-level waste tanks during waste feed delivery operations is presented herein

  7. Method of heat decomposition for chemical decontaminating resin waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Akira.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To make resin wastes into non-deleterious state, discharge them into a resin waste storage tank of existent radioactive waste processing facility and store and dispose them. Constitution: In the processing of chemical decontaminating resin wastes, iron exchange resins adsorbing chemical decontaminating agents comprising a solution of citric acid, oxalic acid, formic acid and EDTA alone or as a mixture of them are heated to dry, thermally decomposed and then separated from the ion exchange resins. That is, the main ingredients of the chemical decontaminating agents are heat-decomposed when heated and dried at about 250 deg C in air and converted into non-toxic gases such as CO, CO 2 , NO, NO 2 or H 2 O. Further, since combustion or carbonization of the basic materials for the resin is not caused at such a level of temperature, the resin wastes removed with organic acid and chelating agents are transferred to an existent resin waste storage tank and stored therein. In this way, facility cost and radiation exposure can remarkably be decreased. (Kamimura, M.)

  8. Heat exchanger modeling and identification for control of waste heat recovery systems in diesel engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feru, E.; Willems, F.P.T.; Rojer, C.; Jager, B. de; Steinbuch, M.

    2013-01-01

    To meet future CO2 emission targets, Waste Heat Recovery systems have recently attracted much attention for automotive applications, especially for long haul trucks. This paper focuses on the development of a dynamic counter-flow heat exchanger model for control purposes. The model captures the

  9. Analyses of pebble-bed reactors for the generation of heat for heating purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlensiep, J.; Fricke, U.; Inhester, K.H.; Kugeler, K.; Phlippen, P.W.; Schmidtlein, P.; Swatoch, R.; Wagner, U.

    1986-10-01

    Marginal conditions are described for the use of a nuclear power reactor for long-distance heat supply in densely populated areas. For the design of the high-temperature heat generating reactor, plant components and possible arrangements are analyzed with consideration to safety and costs. System sizes are reasonably chosen on the basis of analyzed parameters, the paramount design goal being to adequately retain the fission products in the coated particles of the fuel elements, in anticipation of probable accidents. With the help of the data record obtained, a system is designed with a cuboid-shaped core as its characteristic feature; the advantage of the core consists in the fact that it quickly discharges the after-heat outwards even in case of a hypothetical accident. Due to the core shape, it is possible to install heat-exchanging components near the core, and to place the safety rods where they can be very effective in reflector borings. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Investigation of hydrodynamics and heat transfer in pseudo 2D spouted beds with and without draft plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Hosseini

    Full Text Available Abstract In the present study, hydrodynamics and gas to particle heat transfer in pseudo two dimensional spouted beds (2DSB with and without draft plates were investigated using the Eulerian-Eulerian approach. The main objective of the study was to provide an understanding of effects of the presence of draft plates on the hydrodynamics and heat transfer behavior of solid particles in the spouted beds. To validate the model, the predicted mean particle vertical velocity at the bed axis, the lateral profiles of vertical particle velocity at different bed heights for both systems, and the particle velocity vector fields in the beds were compared with the experimental measurements. A close agreement between the CFD results and the experimental data was found for both systems. The simulation results showed that the particle volume fraction in the spout and fountain regions of the spouted bed with draft plates is considerably lower than that in a conventional spouted bed (without draft plates. Simulation results also showed significant differences between the temperature distributions of gas and solid phases in spouted beds with and without draft plates.

  11. Entropy Generation of Desalination Powered by Variable Temperature Waste Heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Warsinger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Powering desalination by waste heat is often proposed to mitigate energy consumption and environmental impact; however, thorough technology comparisons are lacking in the literature. This work numerically models the efficiency of six representative desalination technologies powered by waste heat at 50, 70, 90, and 120 °C, where applicable. Entropy generation and Second Law efficiency analysis are applied for the systems and their components. The technologies considered are thermal desalination by multistage flash (MSF, multiple effect distillation (MED, multistage vacuum membrane distillation (MSVMD, humidification-dehumidification (HDH, and organic Rankine cycles (ORCs paired with mechanical technologies of reverse osmosis (RO and mechanical vapor compression (MVC. The most efficient technology was RO, followed by MED. Performances among MSF, MSVMD, and MVC were similar but the relative performance varied with waste heat temperature or system size. Entropy generation in thermal technologies increases at lower waste heat temperatures largely in the feed or brine portions of the various heat exchangers used. This occurs largely because lower temperatures reduce recovery, increasing the relative flow rates of feed and brine. However, HDH (without extractions had the reverse trend, only being competitive at lower temperatures. For the mechanical technologies, the energy efficiency only varies with temperature because of the significant losses from the ORC.

  12. Catalytic gasification in fluidized bed, of orange waste. Comparison with non catalytic gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar Trujillo, Leonardo; Marquez Montesinos, Francisco; Ramos Robaina, Boris A.; Guerra Reyes, Yanet; Arauzo Perez, Jesus; Gonzalo Callejo, Alberto; Sanchez Cebrian, Jose L

    2011-01-01

    The industry processing of the orange, generates high volumes of solid waste. This waste has been used as complement in the animal feeding, in biochemical processes; but their energy use has not been valued by means of the gasification process. They were carried out gasification studies with air in catalytic fluidized bed (using dolomite and olivine as catalysts in a secondary reactor, also varying the temperature of the secondary reactor and the catalyst mass), of the solid waste of orange and the results are compared with those obtained in the gasification with non catalytic air. In the processes we use a design of complete factorial experiment of 2k, valuing the influence of the independent variables and their interactions in the answers, using the software Design-Expert version 7 and a grade of significance of 95 %. The results demonstrate the qualities of the solid waste of orange in the energy use by means of the gasification process for the treatment of these residuals, obtaining a gas of low caloric value. The use of catalysts also diminishes the yield of tars obtained in the gasification process, being more active the dolomite that the olivine in this process. (author)

  13. Air gasification of agricultural waste in a fluidized bed gasifier: hydrogen production performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan Ab Karim Ghani, W. A.; Moghadam, R. A.; Mohd Salleh, M. A. [Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Alias, A. B. [Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia, 54500 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2009-07-01

    Recently, hydrogen production from biomass has become an attractive technology for power generation. The main objective pursued in this work is to investigate the hydrogen production potential from agricultural wastes (coconut coir and palm kernel shell) by applying the air gasification technique. An experimental study was conducted using a bench-scale fluidized bed gasifier with 60 mm diameter and 425 mm height. During the experiments, the fuel properties and the effects of operating parameters such as gasification temperatures (700 to 900 {sup o}C), fluidization ratio (2 to 3.33 m/s), static bed height (10 to 30 mm) and equivalence ratio (0.16 to 0.46) were studied. It was concluded that substantial amounts of hydrogen gas (up to 67 mol%) could be produced utilizing agricultural residues such as coconut and palm kernel shell by applying this fluidization technique. For both samples, the rise of temperature till 900 {sup o}C favored further hydrocarbon reactions and allowed an increase of almost 67 mol% in the release of hydrogen. However, other parameters such as fluidising velocity and feed load showed only minor effects on hydrogen yield. In conclusion, agricultural waste can be assumed as an alternative renewable energy source to the fossil fuels, and the environmental pollution originating from the disposal of agricultural residues can be partially reduced. (author)

  14. Air Gasification of Agricultural Waste in a Fluidized Bed Gasifier: Hydrogen Production Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Alias

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, hydrogen production from biomass has become an attractive technology for power generation. The main objective pursued in this work is to investigate the hydrogen production potential from agricultural wastes (coconut coir and palm kernel shell by applying the air gasification technique. An experimental study was conducted using a bench-scale fluidized bed gasifier with 60 mm diameter and 425 mm height. During the experiments, the fuel properties and the effects of operating parameters such as gasification temperatures (700 to 900°C, fluidization ratio (2 to 3.33 m/s, static bed height (10 to 30 mm and equivalence ratio (0.16 to 0.46 were studied. It was concluded that substantial amounts of hydrogen gas (up to 67 mol% could be produced utilizing agricultural residues such as coconut and palm kernel shell by applying this fluidization technique. For both samples, the rise of temperature till 900°C favored further hydrocarbon reactions and allowed an increase of almost 67 mol% in the release of hydrogen. However, other parameters such as fluidizing velocity and feed load showed only minor effects on hydrogen yield. In conclusion, agricultural waste can be assumed as an alternative renewable energy source to the fossil fuels, and the environmental pollution originating from the disposal of agricultural residues can be partially reduced.

  15. Improved combustion performance of waste-fired FB-boilers -The influence of the dynamics of the bed on the air-/fuel interaction; Foerbaettrad foerbraenningsprestanda vid avfallsfoerbraenning i FB-pannor -Baeddynamikens inverkan paa luft-/braensleomblandningen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Johanna (Hoegskolan i Boraas (Sweden)); Pallares, David; Thunman, Henrik; Johnsson, Filip (Chalmers (Sweden)); Andersson, Bengt-Aake (E.on/Hoegskolan i Boraas (Sweden)); Victoren, Anders (Metso Power AB (Sweden)); Johansson, Andreas (SP, Boraas (Sweden))

    2010-07-01

    One of the key benefits of fluidized bed combustion is that the bed - through mixing of fuel and air and accumulated heat - facilitates combustion at low stoichiometry and with low emissions. Even so, it is not unusual that waste-fired FB-boilers are operated at 6-8% oxygen that corresponds to 30-40% higher flows of gas than theoretically needed. In addition to that and in comparison to grate furnaces, FB-boiler can cause high pressure drop losses because of the fluidization of the bottom bed, which in turn are associated with high costs for power (fans). This work aims therefore at increasing the knowledge for how the dynamics of the bed affects the air and fuel mixture. Methods to explain and characterize the phenomenon have been derived within this work showing: - Distribution of air in a bed for various cases and the influence of pressure drop, bed height and fluidization velocity - A semi-empiric method to calculate an even bubble distribution - The relation between fluidization and fuel distribution for various fluidization flows and fuels - Dispersion rates for various fuels - Volatilization rates for waste in relation to biomass The result can be useful when optimizing units, for instance through finding as low pressure drops as possible with an even bubble distribution, low risk for sintering and unwanted emissions. The work has thereby reached its ultimate goal of increasing the generic knowledge about waste combustion in FB-boiler

  16. Experiments on forced convection form a horizontal heated plate in a packed bed of glass spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renken, K.J. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (USA)); Poulikakos, D. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago (USA))

    1989-02-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of boundary-layer forced convective heat transfer from a flat isothermal plate in a packed bed of spheres. Extensive experimental results are reported for the thermal boundary-layer thickness, the temperature field, and the local wall heat flux (represented by the local Nusselt number). Theoretical findings of previous investigations using the Darcy flow model as well as a general model for themomentum equation accouting for flow inertia and macroscopic shear wtih and without variable porosity are used to evaluate the theoretical models. Several trends are revealed regarding the conditions of validity of these flow models. Overall the general flow model including variable porosity appears to perform better, even through the need for serious improvements in modeling becomes apparent.

  17. The prediction of heat transfer coefficient in circulating fluidized bed combustors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdan, M.A.; Al-qaq, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    In the present work, a theoretical study is performed to modify an existing model that is used to predict the heat transfer coefficient in circulating fluidized bed combustors. In the model, certain parameters were used as being of constant values, which leads to an error in the obtained value of the heat transfer coefficient. In this study and as a first step, the model is thoroughly studied and then the variation of the coefficient with these parameters is presented. Having done that, correlation for these parameters are obtained and then used in the model. Finally the modified model was tested against previously experimental and theoretical data that is available in literature. It was found that the accuracy of the model has been improved after it has been modified

  18. The prediction of heat transfer coefficient in circulating fluidized bed combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamdan, M.A.; Al-qaq, A.M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Jordan Amman, Qween Rania Street, Amman, AL Jbeeha 11942 (Jordan)

    2008-11-15

    In the present work, a theoretical study is performed to modify an existing model that is used to predict the heat transfer coefficient in circulating fluidized bed combustors. In the model, certain parameters were used as being of constant values, which leads to an error in the obtained value of the heat transfer coefficient. In this study and as a first step, the model is thoroughly studied and then the variation of the coefficient with these parameters is presented. Having done that, correlation for these parameters are obtained and then used in the model. Finally the modified model was tested against previously experimental and theoretical data that is available in literature. It was found that the accuracy of the model has been improved after it has been modified. (author)

  19. Utilizing waste heat. Energy recovery options for trade and industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieg, W

    1988-08-01

    The article shows options for efficient and low-cost thermal energy recovery. Heat recovery involves a number of problems, e.g. the type of waste heat, the uses of the energy recovered, and the best way of utilizing it. There is no generally applicable way of solving these problems. Some practical examples are presented. Economically efficient solutions require detailed technical knowledge as well as a good portion of creativity and imagination. (BR).

  20. Heat exchanger with dirt separator for the use of the heat energy of waste water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-11-13

    Well-known heat exchanger systems consist of separate heat exchangers and dirt separators. In the case here in question both devices form a unit. A finned tube heat exchanger is positioned in the center of the dirt separator and is given extra protection through deflection sheets. A safety overflow is supplied so that no residue can appear in the waste water line when decanting.

  1. A Preliminary Study on Rock Bed Heat Storage from Biomass Combustion for Rice Drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelwan, L. O.; Wulandani, D.; Subrata, I. D. M.

    2018-05-01

    One of the main constraints of biomass fuel utilization in a small scale rice drying system is the operating difficulties related to the adjustment of combustion/feeding rate. Use of thermal storage may reduce the problem since combustion operation can be accomplished in a much shorter time and then the use of heat can be regulated by simply adjusting the air flow. An integrated biomass furnace-rock bed thermal storage with a storage volume of 540 L was designed and tested. There were four experiments conducted in this study. Charging was performed within 1-2 hours with a combustion rate of 11.5-15.5 kg/h. In discharging process, the mixing of air passing through the rock bed and ambient air were regulated by valves. Without adjusting the valve during the discharging process, air temperature increased up to 80°C, which is not suitable for rice batch drying process. Charging with sufficiently high combustion rate (14 kg/h) within 1 hour continued by adjusting the valve during discharging process below 60°C increased the discharge-charge time ratio (DCTR) up to 5.33 at average air temperature of 49°C and ambient temperature of 33°C.The efficiency of heat discharging was ranged from 34.5 to 45.8%. From the simulation, as much as 156.8-268.8 kg of rice was able to be dried by the discharging conditions.

  2. Numerical Simulation of a Coolant Flow and Heat Transfer in a Pebble Bed Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, Wang-Kee; Kim, Min-Hwan; Lee, Won-Jae

    2008-01-01

    Pebble Bed Reactor(PBR) is one of the very high temperature gas cooled reactors(VHTR) which have been reviewed in the Generation IV International Forum as potential sources for future energy needs, particularly for a hydrogen production. The pebble bed modular reactor(PBMR) exhibits inherent safety features due to the low power density and the large amount of graphite present in the core. PBR uses coated fuel particles(TRISO) embedded in spherical graphite fuel pebbles. The fuel pebbles flow down through the PBR core during a reactor operation and the coolant flows around randomly distributed spheres. For the reliable operation and the safety of the PBR, it is important to understand the coolant flow structure and the fuel pebble temperature in the PBR core. There have been few experimental and numerical studies to investigate the fluid and heat transfer phenomena in the PBR core. The objective of this paper is to predict the fluid and heat transfer in the PBR core. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, STAR-CCM+(V2.08) is used to perform the CFD analysis using the design data for the PBMR400

  3. Effect of surface roughness on heat transfer from horizontal immersed tubes in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grewal, N.S.; Saxena, S.C.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental results of the total heat transfer coefficient between 12.7 mm dia copper tubes with four different rough surfaces and glass beads of three different sizes as taken in a 0.305 m x 0.305 m square fluidized bed as a function of fluidizing velocity are reported. The comparison of results for the rough and technically smooth tubes suggests that the heat transfer coefficient strongly depends on the ratio of pitch (P/sub f/) to the average particle diameter (d/sub p/), where P/sub f/ is the distance between the two corresponding points on consecutive threads or knurls. By the proper choice of (P/sub f//d/sub p/) ratio, the maximum total heat transfer coefficient for V-thread tubes (h/sub w/fb) can be increased by as much as 40 percent over the value for a smooth tube with the same outside diameter. However, for values of (P/sub f//d/sub p/) less than 0.95, the maximum heat transfer coefficient for the V-thread rough tubes is smaller than the smooth tube having the same outside diameter. The qualitative variation of the heat transfer coefficient for rough tubes with (P/sub f//d) is explained on the basis of the combined effect of contact geometry between the solid particles and the heat transfer surface, and the solids renewal rate at the surface. The present findings are critically compared with somewhat similar investigations from the literature on the heat transfer from horizontal or vertical rough tubes and tubes with small fins

  4. Utilization of waste heat from aluminium electrolytic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosek, Radovan; Gavlas, Stanislav; Lenhard, Richard; Malcho, Milan; Sedlak, Veroslav; Teie, Sebastian

    2017-12-01

    During the aluminium production, 50% of the supplied energy is consumed by the chemical process, and 50% of the supplied energy is lost in form of heat. Heat losses are necessary to maintain a frozen side ledge to protect the side walls, so extra heat has to be wasted. In order to increase the energy efficiency of the process, it is necessary to significantly lower the heat losses dissipated by the furnace's external surface. Goodtech Recovery Technology (GRT) has developed a technology based on the use of heat pipes for utilization energy from the waste heat produced in the electrolytic process. Construction of condenser plays important role for efficient operation of energy systems. The condensation part of the heat pipe is situated on top of the heating zone. The thermal oil is used as cooling medium in the condenser. This paper analyses the effect of different operation condition of thermal oil to thermal performance. From the collected results it is obvious that the larger mass flow and higher temperature cause better thermal performance and lower pressure drop.

  5. Fluid-bed process for SYNROC production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, F.J.; Grens, J.Z.; Ryerson, F.J.; Hoenig, C.L.; Bazan, F.; Peters, P.E.; Smith, R.; Campbell, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    SYNROC is a titanate-based ceramic waste developed for the immobilization of high-level nuclear reactor waste. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has investigated a fluid-bed technique for the large-scale production of SYNROC precursor powders. Making SYNROC in a fluid bed permits slurry drying, calcination and reduction-oxidation reactions to be carried out in a single unit. We present the results of SYNROC fluid-bed studies from two fluid-bed units 10 cm in diameter: an internally heated fluid-bed unit developed by Exxon Idaho and an externally heated unit constructed at LLNL. Bed operation over a range of temperatures, feed rates, fluidizing rates, and redox conditions indicate that SYNROC powders of a high density and a uniform particle size can be produced. These powders facilitate the densification step and yield dense ceramics (greater than 95% theoretical density) with well-developed phases and low leaching rates

  6. Nuclear power plant waste heat utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryther, J.H.; Huke, R.E.; Archer, J.C.; Price, D.R.; Jewell, W.J.; Hayes, T.D.; Witherby, H.R.

    1977-09-01

    The possibility of using Vermont Yankee condenser effluent for commercial food growth enhancement was examined. It was concluded that for the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Station, commercial success, both for horticulture and aquaculture endeavors, could not be assured without additional research in both areas. This is due primarily to two problems. First, the particularly low heat quality of our condenser discharge, being nominally 72 +- 2/sup 0/F; and second, to the capital intensive support systems. The capital needed for the support systems include costs of pumps, piping and controls to move the heated water to growing facilities and the costs of large, efficient heat exchangers that may be necessary to avoid regulatory difficulties due to the 1958 Delaney Amendment to the U.S. Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act. Recommendations for further work include construction of a permanent aquaculture research laboratory and a test greenhouse complex based on a greenhouse wherein a variety of heating configurations would be installed and tested. One greenhouse would be heated with biogas from an adjacent anaerobic digester thermally boosted during winter months by Vermont Yankee condenser effluent. The aquaculture laboratory would initially be dedicated to the Atlantic salmon restoration program. It appears possible to raise fingerling salmon to smolt size within 7 months using water warmed to about 60/sup 0/F. The growth rate by this technique is increased by a factor of 2 to 3. A system concept has been developed which includes an aqua-laboratory, producing 25,000 salmon smolt annually, a 4-unit greenhouse test horticulture complex and an 18,000 square foot commercial fish-rearing facility producing 100,000 pounds of wet fish (brook trout) per year. The aqualab and horticulture test complex would form the initial phase of construction. The trout-rearing facility would be delayed pending results of laboratory studies confirming its commercial viability.

  7. Nuclear power plant waste heat utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryther, J.H.; Huke, R.E.; Archer, J.C.; Price, D.R.; Jewell, W.J.; Hayes, T.D.; Witherby, H.R.

    1977-09-01

    The possibility of using Vermont Yankee condenser effluent for commercial food growth enhancement was examined. It was concluded that for the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Station, commercial success, both for horticulture and aquaculture endeavors, could not be assured without additional research in both areas. This is due primarily to two problems. First, the particularly low heat quality of our condenser discharge, being nominally 72 +- 2 0 F; and second, to the capital intensive support systems. The capital needed for the support systems include costs of pumps, piping and controls to move the heated water to growing facilities and the costs of large, efficient heat exchangers that may be necessary to avoid regulatory difficulties due to the 1958 Delaney Amendment to the U.S. Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act. Recommendations for further work include construction of a permanent aquaculture research laboratory and a test greenhouse complex based on a greenhouse wherein a variety of heating configurations would be installed and tested. One greenhouse would be heated with biogas from an adjacent anaerobic digester thermally boosted during winter months by Vermont Yankee condenser effluent. The aquaculture laboratory would initially be dedicated to the Atlantic salmon restoration program. It appears possible to raise fingerling salmon to smolt size within 7 months using water warmed to about 60 0 F. The growth rate by this technique is increased by a factor of 2 to 3. A system concept has been developed which includes an aqua-laboratory, producing 25,000 salmon smolt annually, a 4-unit greenhouse test horticulture complex and an 18,000 square foot commercial fish-rearing facility producing 100,000 pounds of wet fish (brook trout) per year. The aqualab and horticulture test complex would form the initial phase of construction. The trout-rearing facility would be delayed pending results of laboratory studies confirming its commercial viability

  8. Analysis of an integrated packed bed thermal energy storage system for heat recovery in compressed air energy storage technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega-Fernández, Iñigo; Zavattoni, Simone A.; Rodríguez-Aseguinolaza, Javier; D'Aguanno, Bruno; Barbato, Maurizio C.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •A packed bed TES system is proposed for heat recovery in CAES technology. •A CFD-based approach has been developed to evaluate the behaviour of the TES unit. •TES system enhancement and improvement alternatives are also demonstrated. •TES performance evaluated according to the first and second law of thermodynamics. -- Abstract: Compressed air energy storage (CAES) represents a very attracting option to grid electric energy storage. Although this technology is mature and well established, its overall electricity-to-electricity cycle efficiency is lower with respect to other alternatives such as pumped hydroelectric energy storage. A meager heat management strategy in the CAES technology is among the main reasons of this gap of efficiency. In current CAES plants, during the compression stage, a large amount of thermal energy is produced and wasted. On the other hand, during the electricity generation stage, an extensive heat supply is required, currently provided by burning natural gas. In this work, the coupling of both CAES stages through a thermal energy storage (TES) unit is introduced as an effective solution to achieve a noticeable increase of the overall CAES cycle efficiency. In this frame, the thermal energy produced in the compression stage is stored in a TES unit for its subsequent deployment during the expansion stage, realizing an Adiabatic-CAES plant. The present study addresses the conceptual design of a TES system based on a packed bed of gravel to be integrated in an Adiabatic-CAES plant. With this objective, a complete thermo-fluid dynamics model has been developed, including the implications derived from the TES operating under variable-pressure conditions. The formulation and treatment of the high pressure conditions were found being particularly relevant issues. Finally, the model provided a detailed performance and efficiency analysis of the TES system under charge/discharge cyclic conditions including a realistic operative

  9. Simulation and uncertainties of the heat transfer from a heat-generating DEBRIS bed in the lower plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaaf, K.; Trambauer, K.

    1999-01-01

    The findings of the TMI-2 post-accident analyses indicated that internal cooling mechanisms may have a considerable potential to sustain the vessel integrity after a relocation of core material to the lower plenum, provided that water is continuously available in the RPV. Numerous analytical and experimental research activities are currently underway in this respect. This paper illustrates some major findings of the experimental work on internal cooling mechanisms and describes the limitations and the uncertainties in the simulation of the heat transfer processes. Reference is made especially to the joint German DEBRIS/ RPV research program, which encompasses the experimental investigation of the thermal-hydraulics in gaps, of the heat transfer within a particulate debris bed, and of the high temperature performance of vessel steel, as well as the development of simulation models for the heat transfer in the lower head and the structural response of the RPV. In particular, the results of uncertainty and sensitivity analyses are presented, which have been carried out at GRS using an integral model that describes the major phenomena governing the long-term integrity of the reactor vessel. The investigation of a large-scale relocation indicated that the verification of a gap cooling mechanism as an inherent mechanism is questionable in terms of a stringent probabilistic uncertainty criterion, as long as the formation of a large molten pool cannot be excluded. (author)

  10. The influence of heat accumulation on the surface roughness in powder-bed additive manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamshidinia, Mahdi; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2015-01-01

    The influence of heat accumulation on surface roughness during powder-bed additive manufacturing was investigated. A series of Ti-6Al-4V thin plates were produced by using an identical heat input by electron beam melting® (EBM). Spacing distances of 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm were used. The surface roughness of as-built thin plates was measured using a two-axis profilometer. A numerical model was developed to study the influence of spacing distance on heat accumulation. An inverse relationship between the spacing distance and surface roughness was revealed. The experimental and numerical results showed that the surface quality of buildups could be controlled not only by process parameters, but also by the arrangement of components in the buildup chamber. At a constant spacing distance, an increase in the number of powder layers resulted in the accumulation of more heat between the thin plates. An increase in the spacing distance resulted in an upward translation of the Bearing Area Curve (BAC) toward shallower depths, with a reduced core roughness depth (R k ) and peak height (R pk ). A logarithmic regression equation was established from the experimental data. This equation could be used to predict the surface roughness of parts fabricated by EBM® in the studied range of spacing distances. (paper)

  11. Temperature control of evaporators in automotive waste heat recovery systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oom, M.E.E.; Feru, E.; de Jager, A.G.; de Lange, H.C.; Ouwerkerk, H.

    2017-01-01

    his paper presents a control strategy for the steam generation process in automotive waste heat recovery systems that are based on the subcritical Rankine cycle. The central question is how to regulate the flow of water into the evaporator such that dry steam is generated at its outlet, subject to

  12. Heat-deproteinated xenogeneic bone from slaughterhouse waste ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Xenogeneic bone procured from the slaughterhouse waste was deproteinated by heat treatment method intended for use as a bone ... bone resembles hydroxyapatite (HA) with composition,. Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2. HA is a potential implant .... order to obtain antigenic-free inorganic bone minerals. To gain information about the ...

  13. Optimal Control of Diesel Engines with Waste Heat Recovery System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, F.P.T.; Donkers, M.C.F.; Kupper, F.

    2014-01-01

    This study presents an integrated energy and emission management strategy for a Euro-VI diesel engine with Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) system. This Integrated Powertrain Control (IPC) strategy optimizes the CO2-NOx trade-off by minimizing the operational costs associated with fuel and AdBlue

  14. Optimal control of diesel engines with waste heat recovery systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, F.P.T.; Donkers, M.C.F.; Kupper, F.; Waschl, H.; Kolmanovsky, I.; Steinbuch, M.; Del Re, L.

    2014-01-01

    This study presents an integrated energy and emission management strategy for a Euro-VI diesel engine with Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) system. This Integrated Powertrain Control (IPC) strategy optimizes the CO 2 - NO x trade-off by minimizing the operational costs associated with fuel and AdBlue

  15. Control of automotive waste heat recovery systems with parallel evaporators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feru, E.; Willems, F.P.T.; Rascanu, G.C.; Jager, de A.G.; Steinbuch, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, Model Predictive Control (MPC) is applied to control a Waste Heat Recovery system for a highly dynamic automotive application. As a benchmark, a commonly applied control strategy is used that consists of a feedforward based on engine conditions and of two PI controllers that

  16. Heat-transfer characteristics of flowing and stationary particle-bed-type fusion-reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nietert, R.E.

    1983-02-01

    The following five appendices are included: (1) physical properties of materials, (2) thermal entrance length Nusselt number variations, (3) stationary particle bed temperature variations, (4) falling bed experimental data and calculations, and (5) stationary bed experimental data and calculations

  17. Heat transfer studies in waste repository design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, R.F.; Chen, Y.T.; Izzeldin, A.; Kuharic, W.; Sudan, N.

    1994-01-01

    The main task of this project is the development of visualization methods in heat transfer through porous media. Experiments have been performed related to the determination of the wavelength that gives equality of the refractive indices of the porous material and the liquid. The work has been accomplished using the calibration setup consisting of a 2-in. long test cell filled with 2-mm diameter soda-lime glass beads. A supplemental task is an unsaturated flow experiment with heat transfer in porous media. For this work the medium of interest in quartz beads. Essentially two-dimensional flows of admitted water are able to be examined. During this quarter, the setup and calibration of the experimental instrumentation was done. Also the modification of the main experimental tank and the inflow system was carried out. Initial testing was done

  18. Co-firing coal and hospital waste in a circulating fluidized bed boiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulthard, E.J.; Korenberg, J.; Oswald, K.D.

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Energy - Morgantown Energy Technology Center and the Pennsylvania Energy Development Authority are co-funding a project which will demonstrate the reduction of infectious hospital waste to an environmentally safe disposable ash by cofiring the waste with coal in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB). The main objective of this paper is increased utilization of coal but the project also provides a solution to a problem which has grown rapidly and become very visible in recent years (e.g., hospital waste washed up on beaches). The application of CFB boilers in hospitals introduces an economical clean coal technology into a size range and market dominated by gas and oil combustion systems. The use of CFB represents the utilization of state-of-the-art technology for burning coal in an environmentally benign manner. SO 2 , NO x , CO and particulate emissions lower than the latest New Source Performance Standards have proven to be achievable in CFB combustion systems. By processing the infectious waste in a steam generation system which operates continuously, the problem of creating excessive gaseous emissions during repeated start-ups (as is the case with current incinerator technology) is avoided. The operating conditions with respect to residence time, temperature and turbulence that are inherent to a CFB combustion system, provide an excellent environment for complete combustion and destruction of potentially hazardous solid and gaseous emissions (e.g., dioxins). The limestone, which is injected into the combustion system to reduce SO 2 emissions, will also react with chlorine. Thus chlorine compound emissions and the corrosive nature of the flue gas are reduced. The work efforts to date indicate that infectious waste thermal processing in a coal-fired CFB is a technically and economically viable on-site disposal option

  19. Optimization-based design of waste heat recovery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cignitti, Stefano

    /or selected. This dissertation focuses on the chemical product and process systems used for waste heat recovery. Here, chemical products are working fluids, which are under continuous development and screening to fulfill regulatory environmental protection and safe operation requirements. Furthermore......, for the recovery of low-grade waste heat, new fluids and processes are needed to make the recovery technically and economically feasible. As the chemical product is influential in the design of the process system, the design of novel chemical products must be considered with the process system. Currently, state...... product and process system in terms of efficiency and sustainability. Today, some of the most important chemical product design problems are solvents and working fluids. Solvents are a vital part in the recovery of valuable resources in separation processes or waste water treatment. Working fluids...

  20. Prototype implementation and experimental analysis of water heating using recovered waste heat of chimneys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Khaled

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This work discusses a waste heat recovery system (WHRS applied to chimneys for heating water in residential buildings. A prototype illustrating the suggested system is implemented and tested. Different waste heat scenarios by varying the quantity of burned firewood (heat input are experimented. The temperature at different parts of the WHRS and the gas flow rates of the exhaust pipes are measured. Measurements showed that the temperature of 95 L tank of water can be increased by 68 °C within one hour. Obtained results show that the convection and radiation exchanges at the bottom surface of the tank have a considerable impact on the total heat transfer rate of the water (as high as 70%.

  1. Thermodynamic performance comparison between ORC and Kalina cycles for multi-stream waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yufei; Tang, Qikui; Wang, Mengying; Feng, Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Comparison between ORC and Kalina cycles (KC) for multi-stream waste heat recovery. • Divide waste heat into straight, convex and concave based on its composite curve. • Use heat ratio and temperature of the most point to show the feature of waste heat. • KC is suitable for straight and most concave heat, while ORC for convex one. - Abstract: Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) and Kalina cycle are the main technologies to recover waste heat for power generation. Up to now, many works dealing with the thermodynamic performance comparison between ORC and Kalina cycles are available, but these studies considered for heat recovery from a single heat source or stream. In the process industry, there are multiple waste heat streams, forming a complex heat source profile. In this paper, based on the simulation model developed in the Aspen Hysys software, the two cycles are calculated and compared. According to the waste heat composite curve, the multi-stream waste heat is divided into three kinds, straight, convex, and concave waste heat. Two parameters, the ratio of the heat above and below the most salient/concave point (R) and the temperature of the most point, are used to roughly express the feature of waste heat. With the efficiency from waste heat (exergy) to power as energy performance indicator, the calculation results for waste heat with maximum supply temperature 180 °C show that for straight and concave waste heat with R not less than 0.2, Kalina cycle is better than ORC, while for convex waste heat, ORC is preferable. The work can provide a reference to choose a suitable technology to recover low temperature waste heat for power generation in the process industry.

  2. Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank Farm Blend) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation (FBSR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Cozzi, A. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Daniel, W. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hall, H. K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Miller, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Missimer, D. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, M. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Supplemental Treatment is likely to be required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP’s LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750°C) continuous method by which LAW can be processed irrespective of whether the waste contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be comparable to LAW glass, i.e. leaches Tc-99, Re and Na at <2g/m2 during ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency) durability testing. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product was investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage. Monolithing in an inorganic geopolymer binder, which is

  3. Feasibility of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery from Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byunghee

    2015-01-01

    A thermoelectric generator has the most competitive method to regenerate the waste heat from research reactors, because it has no limitation on operating temperature. In addition, since the TEG is a solid energy conversion device converting heat to electricity directly without moving parts, the regenerating power system becomes simple and highly reliable. In this regard, a waste heat recovery using thermoelectric generator (TEG) from 15-MW pool type research reactor is suggested and the feasibility is demonstrated. The producible power from waste heat is estimated with respect to the reactor parameters, and an application of the regenerated power is suggested by performing a safety analysis with the power. The producible power from TEG is estimated with respect to the LMTD of the HX and the required heat exchange area is also calculated. By increasing LMTD from 2 K to 20K, the efficiency and the power increases greatly. Also an application of the power regeneration system is suggested by performing a safety analysis with the system, and comparing the results with reference case without the power regeneration

  4. Synthesis of biodiesel from waste cooking oil using immobilized lipase in fixed bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yingming [School of Environment and Urban Construction, Wuhan University of Science and Engineering, Wuhan 430073 (China); Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Science, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Xiao Bo [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Chang Jie [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China)], E-mail: changjie@scut.edu.cn; Fu Yan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Lv Pengmei; Wang Xuewei [Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Science, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2009-03-15

    Waste cooking oil (WCO) is the residue from the kitchen, restaurants, food factories and even human and animal waste which not only harm people's health but also causes environmental pollution. The production of biodiesel from waste cooking oil to partially substitute petroleum diesel is one of the measures for solving the twin problems of environment pollution and energy shortage. In this project, synthesis of biodiesel was catalyzed by immobilized Candida lipase in a three-step fixed bed reactor. The reaction solution was a mixture of WCO, water, methanol and solvent (hexane). The main product was biodiesel consisted of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME), of which methyl oleate was the main component. Effects of lipase, solvent, water, and temperature and flow of the reaction mixture on the synthesis of biodiesel were analyzed. The results indicate that a 91.08% of FAME can be achieved in the end product under optimum conditions. Most of the chemical and physical characters of the biodiesel were superior to the standards for 0 diesel (GB/T 19147) and biodiesel (DIN V51606 and ASTM D-6751)

  5. Synthesis of biodiesel from waste cooking oil using immobilized lipase in fixed bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yingming [School of Environment and Urban Construction, Wuhan University of Science and Engineering, Wuhan 430073 (China)]|[Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Science, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Xiao, Bo [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Chang, Jie; Fu, Yan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Lv, Pengmei; Wang, Xuewei [Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Science, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2009-03-15

    Waste cooking oil (WCO) is the residue from the kitchen, restaurants, food factories and even human and animal waste which not only harm people's health but also causes environmental pollution. The production of biodiesel from waste cooking oil to partially substitute petroleum diesel is one of the measures for solving the twin problems of environment pollution and energy shortage. In this project, synthesis of biodiesel was catalyzed by immobilized Candida lipase in a three-step fixed bed reactor. The reaction solution was a mixture of WCO, water, methanol and solvent (hexane). The main product was biodiesel consisted of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME), of which methyl oleate was the main component. Effects of lipase, solvent, water, and temperature and flow of the reaction mixture on the synthesis of biodiesel were analyzed. The results indicate that a 91.08% of FAME can be achieved in the end product under optimum conditions. Most of the chemical and physical characters of the biodiesel were superior to the standards for 0diesel (GB/T 19147) and biodiesel (DIN V51606 and ASTM D-6751). (author)

  6. Synthesis of biodiesel from waste cooking oil using immobilized lipase in fixed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yingming; Xiao Bo; Chang Jie; Fu Yan; Lv Pengmei; Wang Xuewei

    2009-01-01

    Waste cooking oil (WCO) is the residue from the kitchen, restaurants, food factories and even human and animal waste which not only harm people's health but also causes environmental pollution. The production of biodiesel from waste cooking oil to partially substitute petroleum diesel is one of the measures for solving the twin problems of environment pollution and energy shortage. In this project, synthesis of biodiesel was catalyzed by immobilized Candida lipase in a three-step fixed bed reactor. The reaction solution was a mixture of WCO, water, methanol and solvent (hexane). The main product was biodiesel consisted of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME), of which methyl oleate was the main component. Effects of lipase, solvent, water, and temperature and flow of the reaction mixture on the synthesis of biodiesel were analyzed. The results indicate that a 91.08% of FAME can be achieved in the end product under optimum conditions. Most of the chemical and physical characters of the biodiesel were superior to the standards for 0 diesel (GB/T 19147) and biodiesel (DIN V51606 and ASTM D-6751)

  7. Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, Christi D.; Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from United

  8. Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, Christi D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from

  9. Heat Pipe-Assisted Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology for Waste Heat Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ju-Chan; Chi, Ri-Guang; Rhi, Seok-Ho; Lee, Kye-Bock; Hwang, Hyun-Chang; Lee, Ji-Su; Lee, Wook-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    Currently, large amounts of thermal energy dissipated from automobiles are emitted through hot exhaust pipes. This has resulted in the need for a new efficient recycling method to recover energy from waste hot exhaust gas. The present experimental study investigated how to improve the power output of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) system assisted by a wickless loop heat pipe (loop thermosyphon) under the limited space of the exhaust gas pipeline. The present study shows a novel loop-type heat pipe-assisted TEG concept to be applied to hybrid vehicles. The operating temperature of a TEG's hot side surface should be as high as possible to maximize the Seebeck effect. The present study shows a novel TEG concept of transferring heat from the source to the sink. This technology can transfer waste heat to any local place with a loop-type heat pipe. The present TEG system with a heat pipe can transfer heat and generate an electromotive force power of around 1.3 V in the case of 170°C hot exhaust gas. Two thermoelectric modules (TEMs) for a conductive block model and four Bi2Te3 TEMs with a heat pipe-assisted model were installed in the condenser section. Heat flows to the condenser section from the evaporator section connected to the exhaust pipe. This novel TEG system with a heat pipe can be placed in any location on an automobile.

  10. Coupling scales for modelling heavy metal vaporization from municipal solid waste incineration in a fluid bed by CFD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, José; Gauthier, Daniel; Flamant, Gilles; Rodriguez, Rosa; Mazza, Germán

    2015-09-01

    Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) in fluidized bed is a very interesting technology mainly due to high combustion efficiency, great flexibility for treating several types of waste fuels and reduction in pollutants emitted with the flue gas. However, there is a great concern with respect to the fate of heavy metals (HM) contained in MSW and their environmental impact. In this study, a coupled two-scale CFD model was developed for MSWI in a bubbling fluidized bed. It presents an original scheme that combines a single particle model and a global fluidized bed model in order to represent the HM vaporization during MSW combustion. Two of the most representative HM (Cd and Pb) with bed temperatures ranging between 923 and 1073K have been considered. This new approach uses ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 as the modelling platform for the simulations along with a complete set of self-developed user-defined functions (UDFs). The simulation results are compared to the experimental data obtained previously by the research group in a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator. The comparison indicates that the proposed CFD model predicts well the evolution of the HM release for the bed temperatures analyzed. It shows that both bed temperature and bed dynamics have influence on the HM vaporization rate. It can be concluded that CFD is a rigorous tool that provides valuable information about HM vaporization and that the original two-scale simulation scheme adopted allows to better represent the actual particle behavior in a fluid bed incinerator. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Waste Heat Recovery. Technology and Opportunities in U.S. Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Ilona [BCS, Inc., Laurel, MD (United States); Choate, William T. [BCS, Inc., Laurel, MD (United States); Davidson, Amber [BCS, Inc., Laurel, MD (United States)

    2008-03-01

    This study was initiated in order to evaluate RD&D needs for improving waste heat recovery technologies. A bottomup approach is used to evaluate waste heat quantity, quality, recovery practices, and technology barriers in some of the largest energyconsuming units in U.S. manufacturing. The results from this investigation serve as a basis for understanding the state of waste heat recovery and providing recommendations for RD&D to advance waste heat recovery technologies.

  12. Applications of thermal energy storage to waste heat recovery in the food processing industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnar, F.; Lunberg, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    A study to assess the potential for waste heat recovery in the food industry and to evaluate prospective waste heat recovery system concepts employing thermal energy storage was conducted. The study found that the recovery of waste heat in canning facilities can be performed in significant quantities using systems involving thermal energy storage that are both practical and economical. A demonstration project is proposed to determine actual waste heat recovery costs and benefits and to encourage system implementation by the food industry.

  13. The quality of microorganism on coal bed methane processing with various livestock waste in laboratory scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlina, E. T.; Kurnani, Tb. B. A.; Hidayati, Y. A.; Rahmah, K. N.; Joni, I. M.; Harlia, E.

    2018-02-01

    Coal-bed Methane (CBM) is a form of natural gas extracted from coal and has been developed as future energy source. Organic materials are required as nutrition source for methanogenic microbes. The addition of cattle waste in the formation of CBM on coal media can be utilized as organic materials as well as methanogenic microbe sources. This research covered study of total amount of anaerobic microbes, methane production, protozoa, fungi and endoparasites. Descriptive approach is conducted for this study. Media used for culturing methanogens is Nutrient Agar in powder form and Lactose Broth with the addition of rumen fluid. The technique for counting microbes is through Total Plate Count in anaerobic Hungate tube, methane was analyzed using Gas Chromatography (GC), while identification of protozoa, fungi and endoparasites based on its morphology is conducted before and after anaerobic fermentation process. Incubation period is 30 days. The results showed that growth of anaerobic microbes from dairy cattle waste i.e. biogas sludge is 3.57×103 CFU/ml and fresh feces is 3.38 × 104 CFU/ml, growth of anaerobic microbes from beef cattle waste i.e. biogas sludge is 7.0 × 105 CFU/ml; fresh feces is 7.5 x 104 CFU/ml; and rumen contents of about 1.33 × 108 CFU/ml. Methane production in dairy cattle waste in sludge and fresh feces amounted to 10.57% and 2.39%, respectively. Methane production in beef cattle waste in sludge accounted for 5.95%; in fresh feces it is about 0.41%; and rumen contents of 4.92%. Decreasing of protozoa during fermentation to 84.27%, dominated by Eimeria sp. Decreasing of fungi to 16%, dominated by A. Niger, A. Flavus, A. Fumigatus and Monilia sitophila. Decreasing of endoparasitic worms to 15%, dominated by Strongylus sp. and Fasciola sp. The growth of anaerobic microbes and methane production indicated that dairy cattle waste and beef cattle waste have potential as source of methanogenic microbes, meanwhile the decreasing amount of protozoa

  14. Heat pipe cooling system for underground, radioactive waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, K.C.; Prenger, F.C.

    1980-02-01

    An array of 37 heat pipes inserted through the central hole at the top of a radioactive waste storage tank will remove 100,000 Btu/h with a heat sink of 70 0 F atmospheric air. Heat transfer inside the tank to the heat pipe is by natural convection. Heat rejection to outside air utilizes a blower to force air past the heat pipe condenser. The heat pipe evaporator section is axially finned, and is constructed of stainless steel. The working fluid is ammonia. The finned pipes are individually shrouded and extend 35 ft down into the tank air space. The hot tank air enters the shroud at the top of the tank and flows downward as it is cooled, with the resulting increased density furnishing the pressure difference for circulation. The cooled air discharges at the center of the tank above the sludge surface, flows radially outward, and picks up heat from the radioactive sludge. At the tank wall the heated air rises and then flows inward to comple the cycle

  15. Two-phase plate-fin heat exchanger modeling for waste heat recovery systems in diesel engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feru, E.; Jager, de A.G.; Willems, F.P.T.; Steinbuch, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the modeling and model validation for a modular two-phase heat exchanger that recovers energy in heavy-duty diesel engines. The model is developed for temperature and vapor quality prediction and for control design of the waste heat recovery system. In the studied waste heat

  16. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT AND FRICTION FACTOR OF Al2O3 NANOFLUID IN A PACKED BED COLUMN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Srinivasa Rao

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The forced convection heat transfer coefficient and friction factor are determined for the flow of water and nanofluid in a vertical packed bed column. The analysis is undertaken in the laminar and transition Reynolds number range. The column is filled with spherical glass beads as the bed material. The heat transfer coefficients with Al2O3 nanofluid increased by 12% to 15% with the increase of volume concentration from 0.02% to 0.5% compared with water. The experimental values of axial temperature are in good agreement with the NTU-ε method proposed by Schumann’s model.

  17. RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

    2012-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline

  18. Radioactive Demonstration Of Final Mineralized Waste Forms For Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste By Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Using The Bench Scale Reformer Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as 137 Cs, 129 I, 99 Tc, Cl, F, and SO 4 that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form

  19. Review of geotechnical measurement techniques for a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    This report presents a description of geotechnical measurement techniques that can provide the data necessary for safe development - i.e., location, design, construction, operation, decommissioning and abandonment - of a radioactive waste repository in bedded salt. Geotechnical data obtained by a diversity of measurement techniques are required during all phases of respository evolution. The techniques discussed in this report are grouped in the following categories: geologic, geophysical and geodetic; rock mechanics; hydrologic, hydrogeologic and water quality; and thermal. The major contribution of the report is the presentation of extensive tables that provide a review of available measurement techniques for each of these categories. The techniques are also discussed in the text to the extent necessary to describe the measurements and associated instruments, and to evaluate the applicability or limitations of the method. More detailed discussions of thermal phenomena, creep laws and geophysical methods are contained in the appendices; references to detailed explanations of measurement techniques and instrumentation are inluded throughout the report

  20. Review of geotechnical measurement techniques for a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    This report presents a description of geotechnical measurement techniques that can provide the data necessary for safe development - i.e., location, design, construction, operation, decommissioning and abandonment - of a radioactive waste repository in bedded salt. Geotechnical data obtained by a diversity of measurement techniques are required during all phases of respository evolution. The techniques discussed in this report are grouped in the following categories: geologic, geophysical and geodetic; rock mechanics; hydrologic, hydrogeologic and water quality; and thermal. The major contribution of the report is the presentation of extensive tables that provide a review of available measurement techniques for each of these categories. The techniques are also discussed in the text to the extent necessary to describe the measurements and associated instruments, and to evaluate the applicability or limitations of the method. More detailed discussions of thermal phenomena, creep laws and geophysical methods are contained in the appendices; references to detailed explanations of measurement techniques and instrumentation are inluded throughout the report.

  1. Groundwater recharge and discharge scenarios for a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, D.W.; Steinborn, T.L.; Thorson, L.D.

    1979-01-01

    Twelve potential scenarios have been identified whereby groundwater may enter or exit a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt. The 12 scenarios may be grouped into 4 categories or failure modes: dissolution, fracturing, voids, and penetration. Dissolution modes include breccia pipe and breccia blanket formation, and dissolution around boreholes. Fracture modes include flow through preexisting or new fractures and the effects of facies changes. Voids include interstitial voids (pores) and fluid inclusions. Penetration modes include shaft and borehole sealing failures, undetected boreholes, and new mines or wells constructed after repository decommissioning. The potential importance of thermal effects on groundwater flow patterns and on the recharge-discharge process is discussed. The appropriate levels of modeling effort, and the interaction between the adequacy of the geohydrologic data base and the warranted degree of model complexity are also discussed

  2. Secondary Waste Form Screening Test Results—THOR® Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Product in a Geopolymer Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, Richard P.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Mattigod, Shas V.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.

    2011-07-14

    Screening tests are being conducted to evaluate waste forms for immobilizing secondary liquid wastes from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Plans are underway to add a stabilization treatment unit to the Effluent Treatment Facility to provide the needed capacity for treating these wastes from WTP. The current baseline is to use a Cast Stone cementitious waste form to solidify the wastes. Through a literature survey, DuraLith alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer, fluidized-bed steam reformation (FBSR) granular product encapsulated in a geopolymer matrix, and a Ceramicrete phosphate-bonded ceramic were identified both as candidate waste forms and alternatives to the baseline. These waste forms have been shown to meet waste disposal acceptance criteria, including compressive strength and universal treatment standards for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals (as measured by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure [TCLP]). Thus, these non-cementitious waste forms should also be acceptable for land disposal. Information is needed on all four waste forms with respect to their capability to minimize the release of technetium. Technetium is a radionuclide predicted to be in the secondary liquid wastes in small quantities, but the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) risk assessment analyses show that technetium, even at low mass, produces the largest contribution to the estimated IDF disposal impacts to groundwater.

  3. Utilisation of diesel engine waste heat by Organic Rankine Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kölsch, Benedikt; Radulovic, Jovana

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, three different organic liquids were investigated as potential working fluids in an Organic Rankine Cycle. Performance of Methanol, Toluene and Solkatherm SES36 was modelled in an ORC powered by a diesel engine waste heat. The ORC model consists of a preheater, evaporator, superheater, turbine, pump and two condensers. With variable maximum cycle temperatures and high cycle pressures, the thermal efficiency, net power output and overall heat transfer area have been evaluated. Methanol was found to have the best thermal performance, but also required the largest heat transfer area. While Toluene achieved lower thermal efficiency, it showed great work potential at high pressures and relatively low temperatures. Our model identified the risks associated with employing these fluids in an ORC: methanol condensing during the expansion and toluene not sufficiently superheated at the turbine inlet, which can compromise the cycle operation. The best compromise between the size of heat exchanger and thermodynamic performance was found for Methanol ORC at intermediate temperatures and high pressures. Flammability and toxicity, however, remain the obstacles for safe implementation of both fluids in ORC systems. - Highlights: • ORC powered by diesel-engine waste heat was developed. • Methanol, Toluene and Solkatherm were considered as working fluids. • Methanol was selected due to the best overall thermal performance. • Optimal cycle operating parameters and heat exchanger area were evaluated

  4. Production Of Bio fuel Starter From Biomass Waste Using Rocking Kiln Fluidized Bed System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Azman Che Mat Isa; Muhd Noor Muhd Yunus; Zulkafli Ghazali; Mohd Zaid Mohamed; Phongsakorn, P.T.; Mohamad Puad Abu

    2014-01-01

    The biggest biomass source in Malaysia comes from oil palm industry. According to the statistic in 2010, Malaysia produced 40 million tones per year of biomass of which 30 million tones of biomass originated from the oil palm industries. The biomass waste such as palm kernel shell can be used to produce activated carbon and bio fuel starter. A new type of rotary kiln, called Rocking Kiln Fluidized Bed (RKFB) was developed in Nuclear Malaysia to utilize the large amount of the biomass to produce high value added products. This system is capable to process biomass with complete combustion to produce bio fuel starter. With this system, the produced charcoal has calorific value, 33MJ/ kg that is better than bituminous coal with calorific value, 25-30 MJ/ kg. In this research, the charcoals produced were further used to produce the bio fuel starter. This paper will elaborate the experimental set-up of the Rocking Kiln Fluidized Bed (RKFB) for bio fuel starter production and the quality of the produced bio fuel starter. (author)

  5. Co-firing of biomass and other wastes in fluidised bed systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulyurtlu, I.; Lopes, H.; Boavida, D.; Abelha, P. [INETI/DEECA, Lisboa (Portugal); Werther, J.; Hartge, E.-U.; Wischnewski, R. [TU Hamburg-Harburg (Georgia); Leckner, B.; Amand, L.-E.; Davidsson, K. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology (Sweden); Salatino, P.; Chirone, R.; Scala, F.; Urciuolo, M. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Universita di Napoli Frederico II and Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione (Italy); Oliveira, J.F.; Lapa, N.

    2006-07-01

    A project on co-firing in large-scale power plants burning coal is currently funded by the European Commission. It is called COPOWER. The project involves 10 organisations from 6 countries. The project involves combustion studies over the full spectrum of equipment size, ranging from small laboratory-scale reactors and pilot plants, to investigate fundamentals and operating parameters, to proving trials on a commercial power plant in Duisburg. The power plant uses a circulating fluidized bed boiler. The results to be obtained are to be compared as function of scale-up. There are two different coals, 3 types of biomass and 2 kinds of waste materials are to be used for blending with coal for co-firing tests. The baseline values are obtained during a campaign of one month at the power station and the results are used for comparison with those to be obtained in other units of various sizes. Future tests will be implemented with the objective to achieve improvement on baseline values. The fuels to be used are already characterized. There are ongoing studies to determine reactivities of fuels and chars produced from the fuels. Reactivities are determined not only for individual fuels but also for blends to be used. Presently pilot-scale combustion tests are also undertaken to study the effect of blending coal with different types of biomass and waste materials. The potential for synergy to improve combustion is investigated. Simultaneously, studies to verify the availability of biomass and waste materials in Portugal, Turkey and Italy have been undertaken. Techno-economic barriers for the future use of biomass and other waste materials are identified. The potential of using these materials in coal fired power stations has been assessed. The conclusions will also be reported.

  6. Studies on Pyrolysis Kinetic of Newspaper Wastes in a Packed Bed Reactor: Experiments, Modeling, and Product Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Sarkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Newspaper waste was pyrolysed in a 50 mm diameter and 640 mm long reactor placed in a packed bed pyrolyser from 573 K to 1173 K in nitrogen atmosphere to obtain char and pyro-oil. The newspaper sample was also pyrolysed in a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA under the same experimental conditions. The pyrolysis rate of newspaper was observed to decelerate above 673 K. A deactivation model has been attempted to explain this behaviour. The parameters of kinetic model of the reactions have been determined in the temperature range under study. The kinetic rate constants of volatile and char have been determined in the temperature range under study. The activation energies 25.69 KJ/mol, 27.73 KJ/mol, 20.73 KJ/mol and preexponential factors 7.69 min−1, 8.09 min−1, 0.853 min−1 of all products (solid reactant, volatile, and char have been determined, respectively. A deactivation model for pyrolysis of newspaper has been developed under the present study. The char and pyro-oil obtained at different pyrolysis temperatures have been characterized. The FT-IR analyses of pyro-oil have been done. The higher heating values of both pyro-products have been determined.

  7. Governing equations for heat and mass transfer in heat-generating porous beds-II. Particulate melting and substrate penetration by dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chawla, T C; Minkowycz, W J; Pedersen, D R

    1985-11-01

    Upon dryout of the bed, the dominant modes of heat transfer are conduction and radiation. Radiation is modeled through the Rosseland approximation. The melting of stainless-steel particulate imbedded in the fuel is modeled by assuming the bed to be a continuum with conduction and radiatio as the dominant modes of heat transfer. The molten steel, after it drains to the bottom of the bed, is assumed to disappear into cracks and mortar joints of the MgO bricks. The melting of fuel in the interior of the bed is modeled identically to the steel particulate, except for the bed settling which is more pronounced in the case of fuel melting and is assumed to be instantaneous owing to the significant weight of overlying bed and sodium pool. The molten layer of fuel, as it collects at the bottom of the bed, causes the heatup of the MgO lining to the eutectic temperature (2280/sup 0/C), and the MgO lining begins to dissolve. The density gradient caused by the dissolution of MgO leads to natural convection and mixing in the molten layer. The submerged fuel particulate also begins to dissolve in the molten solution and ultimately leads to the conversion of debris to a molten pool of fuel and MgO. The process of penetration of the MgO lining continues until the mixing process lowers the concentration of fuel in the volume of the pool to the level where the internal heat rate per unit volume is not enough to keep the body of the pool molten and leads to freezing in the cooler part of the pool. A the molten pool reaches a frozen or a quiescent state, the MgO brick lining thickness provided is deemed ''safe'' for a given bed loading and the external rate of cooling.

  8. Performance and availability of seawater distiller with heat pipe utilizing low grade waste heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Dae; Chung, Kyung Yul [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Tanaka, Hiroshi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Exhaust gas from a small portable electric generator is simply exhausted to the surroundings because the capacity and quality of the waste heat of this gas is generally not sufficient to recover and utilize. We have proposed a seawater distiller utilizing the thermal energy of waste gas from an electric generator. The distiller recovers heat from the waste gas by means of a heat pipe and uses it effectively through a multiple effect diffusion type structure. We constructed an experimental apparatus with a vertical single effect still having a 4 stroke 50cc generator engine and found that the experimental results for distillate productivity show good agreement with the theoretical predictions. The results show that the distiller can recover 52W of waste heat from the gas at 171.deg.C, and {approx}85%, of the recovered heat can be utilized for distillation to produce 70g/h of fresh water. This is equivalent to a productivity of 500g/h in the case of a 10 effect still. Therefore, the proposed distiller should be useful in remote areas where electricity and water grids are inadequate.

  9. Thermoelectric System Absorbing Waste Heat from a Steel Ladle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Baiyi; Meng, Xiangning; Zhu, Miaoyong; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2018-06-01

    China's iron and steel industry has made great progress in energy savings and emission reductions with the application of many waste heat recovery technologies. However, most of the medium and low temperature waste heat and radiant waste heat has not been effectively utilized. This paper proposes a thermoelectric system that generates electricity by absorbing the radiant heat from the surface of steel ladles in a steel plant. The thermoelectric behavior of modules in this system is analyzed by a numerical simulation method. The effects of external resistance and module structure on thermoelectric performance are also discussed in the temperature range of the wall surface of a steel ladle. The results show that the wall temperature has a significant influence on the thermoelectric behavior of the module, so its uniformity and stability should be considered in practical application. The ratio of the optimum external resistance to the internal resistance of the thermoelectric module is in the range of 1.6-2.0, which indicates the importance of external load optimization for a given thermoelectric system. In addition, the output power and the conversion efficiency of the module can be significantly improved by increasing the length of the thermoelectric legs and adopting a double-layer structure. Finally, through the optimization of external resistance and structure, the power output can reach 83-304 W/m2. This system is shown to be a promising approach for energy recovery.

  10. Two-step upflow anaerobic sludge bed system for sewage treatment under subtropical conditions with posttreatment in waste stabilization ponds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seghezzo, L.; Trupiano, A.P.; Liberal, V.; Todd, P.G.; Figueroa, M.E.; Gutierrez, M.A.; Silva Wilches, Da A.C.; Iribarnegaray, M.; Guerra, R.G.; Arena, A.; Cuevas, C.M.; Zeeman, G.; Lettinga, G.

    2003-01-01

    A pilot-scale sewage treatment system consisting of two upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors followed by five waste stabilization ponds (WSPs) in series was studied under subtropical conditions. The first UASB reactor started up in only 1 mo (stable operation, high chemical oxygen demand

  11. Characterising boiler ash from a circulating fluidised bed municipal solid waste incinerator and distribution of PCDD/F and PCB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mengmei; Buekens, Alfons; Li, Xiaodong

    2018-05-31

    In this study, ash samples were collected from five locations situated in the boiler of a circulating fluidised bed municipal solid waste incinerator (high- and low-temperature superheater, evaporator tubes and upper and lower economiser). These samples represent a huge range of flue gas temperatures and were characterised for their particle size distribution, surface characteristics, elemental composition, chemical forms of carbon and chlorine and distribution of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD), dibenzofurans (PCDF) and biphenyls (PCB). Enrichment of chlorine, one of the main elements of organochlorinated pollutants, and copper, zinc and lead, major catalytic metals for dioxin-like compounds, was observed in lower-temperature ash deposits. The speciation of carbon and chlorine on ash surfaces was established, showing a positive correlation between organic chlorine and oxygen-containing carbon functional groups. The load of PCDD/F and PCB (especially dioxin-like PCB) tends to rise rapidly with falling temperature of flue gas, reaching their highest value in economiser ashes. The formation of PCDD/F congeners through the chlorophenol precursor route apparently was enhanced downstream the boiler. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to study the links between the ash characteristics and distribution of chloro-aromatics. The primary purpose of this study is improving the understanding of any links between the characteristics of ash from waste heat systems and its potential to form PCDD/F and PCB. The question is raised whether further characterisation of fly ash may assist to establish a diagnosis of poor plant operation, inclusive the generation, destruction and eventual emission of persistent organic pollutants (POPs).

  12. Technologies and Materials for Recovering Waste Heat in Harsh Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimbalkar, Sachin U. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Thekdi, Arvind [E3M, Inc. North Potomac, MD (United States); Rogers, Benjamin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kafka, Orion L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wenning, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-12-15

    A large amount (7,204 TBtu/year) of energy is used for process heating by the manufacturing sector in the United States (US). This energy is in the form of fuels mostly natural gas with some coal or other fuels and steam generated using fuels such as natural gas, coal, by-product fuels, and some others. Combustion of these fuels results in the release of heat, which is used for process heating, and in the generation of combustion products that are discharged from the heating system. All major US industries use heating equipment such as furnaces, ovens, heaters, kilns, and dryers. The hot exhaust gases from this equipment, after providing the necessary process heat, are discharged into the atmosphere through stacks. This report deals with identification of industries and industrial heating processes in which the exhaust gases are at high temperature (>1200 F), contain all of the types of reactive constituents described, and can be considered as harsh or contaminated. It also identifies specific issues related to WHR for each of these processes or waste heat streams.

  13. Evaluation of radiation heat transfer in porous medial: Application for a pebble bed modular reactor cooled by CO2 gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidi-Ali Kamel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work analyses the contribution of radiation heat transfer in the cooling of a pebble bed modular reactor. The mathematical model, developed for a porous medium, is based on a set of equations applied to an annular geometry. Previous major works dealing with the subject have considered the forced convection mode and often did not take into account the radiation heat transfer. In this work, only free convection and radiation heat transfer are considered. This can occur during the removal of residual heat after shutdown or during an emergency situation. In order to derive the governing equations of radiation heat transfer, a steady-state in an isotropic and emissive porous medium (CO2 is considered. The obtained system of equations is written in a dimensionless form and then solved. In order to evaluate the effect of radiation heat transfer on the total heat removed, an analytical method for solving the system of equations is used. The results allow quantifying both radiation and free convection heat transfer. For the studied situation, they show that, in a pebble bed modular reactor, more than 70% of heat is removed by radiation heat transfer when CO2 is used as the coolant gas.

  14. Numerical Modeling of Fin and Tube Heat Exchanger for Waste Heat Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Shobhana; Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph

    In the present work, multiphysics numerical modeling is carried out to predict the performance of a liquid-gas fin and tube heat exchanger design. Three-dimensional (3D) steady-state numerical model using commercial software COMSOL based on finite element method (FEM) is developed. The study...... associates conjugate heat transfer phenomenon with the turbulent flow to describe the variable temperature and velocity profile. The performance of heat exchanger design is investigated in terms of overall heat transfer coefficient, Nusselt number, Colburn j-factor, flow resistance factor, and efficiency...... between fin and tube. The present numerical model predicts the performance of the heat exchanger design, therefore, can be applied to existing waste heat recovery systems to improve the overall performance with optimized design and process-dependent parameters....

  15. Self-disposal option for heat-generating waste - 59182

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojovan, Michael I.; Poluektov, Pavel P.; Kascheev, Vladimir A.

    2012-01-01

    Self-descending heat generating capsules can be used for disposal of dangerous radioactive wastes in extremely deep layers of the Earth preventing any release of radionuclides into the biosphere. Self-disposal option for heat-generating radioactive waste such as spent fuel, high level reprocessing waste or spent sealed radioactive sources, known also as rock melting concept, was considered in the 70's as a viable alternative disposal option by both Department of Energy in the USA and Atomic Industry Ministry in the USSR. Self-disposal is currently reconsidered as a potential alternative route to existing options for solving the nuclear waste problem and is associated with the renaissance of nuclear industry. Self- disposal option utilises the heat generated by decaying radionuclides of radioactive waste inside a heavy and durable capsule to melt the rock on its way down. As the heat from radionuclides within the capsule partly melts the enclosing rock, the relatively low viscosity and density of the silicate melt allow the capsule to be displaced upwards past the heavier capsule as it sinks. Eventually the melt cools and solidifies (e.g. vitrifies or crystallizes), sealing the route along which the capsule passed. Descending or self-disposal continues until enough heat is generated by radionuclides to provide partial melting of surrounding rock. Estimates show that extreme depths of several tens and up to hundred km can be reached by capsules which could never be achieved by other techniques. Self- disposal does not require complex and expensive disposal facilities and provides a minimal footprint used only at operational stage. It has also an extremely high non- proliferation character and degree of safety. Utilisation of heat generated by relatively short-lived radionuclides diminishes the environmental uncertainties of self-disposal and increases the safety of this concept. Self-sinking heat-generating capsules could be launched from the bottom of the sea as

  16. Absorption technology for solar and waste heat utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, G.

    1993-01-01

    Absorption heat pumps, first developed in the 19th century, have received renewed and growing attention in the past two decades. With the increasing cost of oil and electricity, the particular features of this heat-powered cycle have made it attractive for both residential and industrial applications. Solar-powered air conditioning, gas-fired domestic cooling and waste-heat-powered temperature boosters are some of the applications on which intensive research and development has been conducted. This paper describes the operation of absorption systems and discusses several practical applications. It surveys recent advances in absorption technology, including the selection of working fluids, cycle improvements and multi-staging, and fundamentals of the combined heat and mass transfer in absorption processes. (author)

  17. Heat pipe effects in nuclear waste isolation: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doughty, C.; Pruess, K.

    1985-12-01

    The existence of fractures favors heat pipe development in a geologic repository as does a partially saturated medium. A number of geologic media are being considered as potential repository sites. Tuff is partially saturated and fractured, basalt and granite are saturated and fractured, salt is unfractured and saturated. Thus the most likely conditions for heat pipe formation occur in tuff while the least likely occur in salt. The relative permeability and capillary pressure dependences on saturation are of critical importance for predicting thermohydraulic behavior around a repository. Mineral redistribution in heat pipe systems near high-level waste packages emplaced in partially saturated formations may significantly affect fluid flow and heat transfer processes, and the chemical environment of the packages. We believe that a combined laboratory, field, and theoretical effort will be needed to identify the relevant physical and chemical processes, and the specific parameters applicable to a particular site. 25 refs., 1 fig

  18. Current and future prospects for heat recovery from waste in European district heating systems: A literature and data review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Urban; Münster, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Municipal solid waste has seen increasing annual volumes for many decades in contemporary Europe and constitutes, if not properly managed, an environmental problem due to local pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. From an energy perspective, waste is also an alternative fuel for power and heat...... to establish and assess current and future EU (European Union) waste generation and management. Main conclusions are that more heat can be recovered from current Waste-to-Energy facilities operating at low average heat recovery efficiencies, that efficient incineration capacity is geographically concentrated...... heat distribution infrastructures, without which no large-scale recovery and utilisation of excess heat is possible. In this paper, which aims to estimate municipal solid waste volumes available for heat recovery in European district heating systems in 2030, a literature and data review is performed...

  19. Numerical modeling of heat transfer during hydrogen absorption in thin double-layered annular ZrCo beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yehui; Zeng, Xiangguo; Kou, Huaqin; Ding, Jun; Wang, Fang

    2018-06-01

    In this work a three-dimensional (3D) hydrogen absorption model was proposed to study the heat transfer behavior in thin double-layered annular ZrCo beds. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate the effects of conversion layer thickness, thermal conductivity, cooling medium and its flow velocity on the efficiency of heat transfer. Results reveal that decreasing the layer thickness and improving the thermal conductivity enhance the ability of heat transfer. Compared with nitrogen and helium, water appears to be a better medium for cooling. In order to achieve the best efficiency of heat transfer, the flow velocity needs to be maximized.

  20. Estimates of relative areas for the disposal in bedded salt of LWR wastes from alternative fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lincoln, R.C.; Larson, D.W.; Sisson, C.E.

    1978-01-01

    The relative mine-level areas (land use requirements) which would be required for the disposal of light-water reactor (LWR) radioactive wastes in a hypothetical bedded-salt formation have been estimated. Five waste types from alternative fuel cycles have been considered. The relative thermal response of each of five different site conditions to each waste type has been determined. The fuel cycles considered are the once-through (no recycle), the uranium-only recycle, and the uranium and plutonium recycle. The waste types which were considered include (1) unreprocessed spent reactor fuel, (2) solidified waste derived from reprocessing uranium oxide fuel, (3) plutonium recovered from reprocessing spent reactor fuel and doped with 1.5% of the accompanying waste from reprocessing uranium oxide fuel, (4) waste derived from reprocessing mixed uranium/plutonium oxide fuel in the third recycle, and (5) unreprocessed spent fuel after three recycles of mixed uranium/plutonium oxide fuels. The relative waste-disposal areas were determined from a calculated value of maximum thermal energy (MTE) content of the geologic formations. Results are presented for each geologic site condition in terms of area ratios. Disposal area requirements for each waste type are expressed as ratios relative to the smallest area requirement (for waste type No. 2 above). For the reference geologic site condition, the estimated mine-level disposal area ratios are 4.9 for waste type No. 1, 4.3 for No. 3, 2.6 for No. 4, and 11 for No. 5

  1. Hazardous waste incinerators under waste uncertainty: balancing and throughput maximization via heat recuperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiliyannis, Christos Aristeides

    2013-09-01

    Hazardous waste incinerators (HWIs) differ substantially from thermal power facilities, since instead of maximizing energy production with the minimum amount of fuel, they aim at maximizing throughput. Variations in quantity or composition of received waste loads may significantly diminish HWI throughput (the decisive profit factor), from its nominal design value. A novel formulation of combustion balance is presented, based on linear operators, which isolates the wastefeed vector from the invariant combustion stoichiometry kernel. Explicit expressions for the throughput are obtained, in terms of incinerator temperature, fluegas heat recuperation ratio and design parameters, for an arbitrary number of wastes, based on fundamental principles (mass and enthalpy balances). The impact of waste variations, of recuperation ratio and of furnace temperature is explicitly determined. It is shown that in the presence of waste uncertainty, the throughput may be a decreasing or increasing function of incinerator temperature and recuperation ratio, depending on the sign of a dimensionless parameter related only to the uncertain wastes. The dimensionless parameter is proposed as a sharp a' priori waste 'fingerprint', determining the necessary increase or decrease of manipulated variables (recuperation ratio, excess air, auxiliary fuel feed rate, auxiliary air flow) in order to balance the HWI and maximize throughput under uncertainty in received wastes. A 10-step procedure is proposed for direct application subject to process capacity constraints. The results may be useful for efficient HWI operation and for preparing hazardous waste blends. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. EMISSION AND TRENDS IN RECLAIMING WASTE HEAT IN INDUSTRIAL INSTALATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Hys

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the analysis of waste heat emission in a typical industrial installation. On the basis of the process monitoring system, periodic analyses of fumes composition, installation process manual and the conducted measurements of the heat fluxes from individual sources emitting heat on the way of natural convection from the devices’ coats and forced convection in the fumes flux were calculated. According to the authors the heat of temperature 140–155 °C and surface power density 860–970 W/m2 emitted by devices’ covers can be reclaimed in ORC techniques, Peltier’s modules and the systems realising Stirling cycle. Part of the waste heat included in fumes, which makes c.a. 76% of the total emission from the installation, should be returned to the process of fuel oxidation, what will reduce the emission by c.a. 18% and the volume of consumed fuel by c.a. 25 m3 CH4/h, according to the presented calculations.

  3. Nickel removal from nickel plating waste water using a biologically active moving-bed sand filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pümpel, Thomas; Macaskie, Lynne E; Finlay, John A; Diels, Ludo; Tsezos, Marios

    2003-12-01

    Efficient removal of dissolved nickel was observed in a biologically active moving-bed 'MERESAFIN' sand filter treating rinsing water from an electroless nickel plating plant. Although nickel is fully soluble in this waste water, its passage through the sand filter promoted rapid removal of approximately 1 mg Ni/l. The speciation of Ni in the waste water was modelled; the most probable precipitates forming under the conditions in the filter were predicted using PHREEQC. Analyses of the Ni-containing biosludge using chemical, electron microscopical and X-ray spectroscopic techniques confirmed crystallisation of nickel phosphate as arupite (Ni3(PO4)2 x 8H2O), together with hydroxyapatite within the bacterial biofilm on the filter sand grains. Biosorption contributed less than 1% of the overall sequestered nickel. Metabolising bacteria are essential for the process; the definitive role of specific components of the mixed population is undefined but the increase in pH promoted by metabolic activity of some microbial components is likely to promote nickel desolubilisation by others.

  4. Environment-friendly heat supply with natural refrigerants. Large heat pumps use industrial waste heat and waste water; Umweltschonende Waermeversorgung mit natuerlichen Kaeltemitteln. Grosswaermepumpen nutzen industrielle Abwaerme und Abwaesser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2011-01-15

    Everywhere, where industrial processes occur or coldness is produced, simultaneously heat is produced. While many private houses use geothermal energy or ambient air for the production of heat, waste water and waste heat prove to be optimal energy sources for the industrial need due to higher output temperatures. By means of large heat pumps the residual heat is used for heating or the supply of hot water for example in local heat supply grids and makes an important contribution to climate protection.

  5. Heat Transfer in Pebble-Bed Nuclear Reactor Cores Cooled by Fluoride Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddar, Lakshana Ravindranath

    With electricity demand predicted to rise by more than 50% within the next 20 years and a burgeoning world population requiring reliable emissions-free base-load electricity, can we design advanced nuclear reactors to help meet this challenge? At the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) Fluoride-salt-cooled High Temperature Reactors (FHR) are currently being investigated. FHRs are designed with better safety and economic characteristics than conventional light water reactors (LWR) currently in operation. These reactors operate at high temperature and low pressure making them more efficient and safer than LWRs. The pebble-bed FHR (PB-FHR) variant includes an annular nuclear reactor core that is filled with randomly packed pebble fuel. It is crucial to characterize the heat transfer within this unique geometry as this informs the safety limits of the reactor. The work presented in this dissertation focused on furthering the understanding of heat transfer in pebble-bed nuclear reactor cores using fluoride salts as a coolant. This was done through experimental, analytical and computational techniques. A complex nuclear system with a coolant that has never previously been in commercial use requires experimental data that can directly inform aspects of its design. It is important to isolate heat transfer phenomena in order to understand the underlying physics in the context of the PB-FHR, as well as to make decisions about further experimental work that needs to be done in support of developing the PB-FHR. Certain organic oils can simulate the heat transfer behaviour of the fluoride salt if relevant non-dimensional parameters are matched. The advantage of this method is that experiments can be done at a much lower temperature and at a smaller geometric scale compared to FHRs, thereby lowering costs. In this dissertation, experiments were designed and performed to collect data demonstrating similitude. The limitations of these experiments were also elucidated by

  6. Sea water desalination utilizing waste heat by low temperature evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raha, A.; Srivastava, A.; Rao, I.S.; Majumdar, M.; Srivastava, V.K.; Tewari, P.K.

    2007-01-01

    Economics of a process is controlled by management of energy and resources. Fresh water has become most valued resource in industries. Desalination is a process by which fresh water resource is generated from sea water or brackish water, but it is an energy intensive process. The energy cost contributes around 25-40% to the total cost of the desalted water. Utilization of waste heat from industrial streams is one of the ecofriendly ways to produce low cost desalted water. Keeping this in mind Low Temperature Evaporation (LTE) desalination technology utilizing low quality waste heat in the form of hot water (as low as 50 deg C) or low pressure steam (0.13 bar) has been developed for offshore and land based applications to produce high purity water (conductivity < 2μS/cm) from sea water. The probability of the scale formation is practically eliminated by operating it at low temperature and controlling the brine concentration. It also does not require elaborate chemical pretreatment of sea water except chlorination, so it has no environmental impact. LTE technology has found major applications in nuclear reactors where large quantity of low quality waste heat is available to produce high quality desalted water for make up water requirement replacing conventional ion exchange process. Successful continuous operation of 30 Te/day LTE desalination plant utilizing waste heat from nuclear research reactor has demonstrated the safety, reliability, extreme plant availability and economics of nuclear desalination by LTE technology. It is also proposed to utilize waste heat from Main Heat Transport (MHT) purification circuit of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) to produce about 250 Te/ day high quality desalinated water by Low Temperature Evaporation (LTE) process for the reactor make up and plant utilization. Recently we have commissioned a 50 Te/day 2-effect low temperature desalination plant with cooling tower where the specific energy and cooling water requirement are

  7. Heating a school by means of waste heat from an ice hall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    As the first building in Norway, Gimle school in Halden can be heated by means of a special combination system that gives up waste heat from a nearby ice hall and earth heat. This system will reduce the expenses of the municipality with the equivalent of USD 30 000 per year, or 618 000 kWh. 308 000 kWh comes from the refrigeration plant of the ice hall and 310 000 kWh from the ground. Although the system is both environmentally friendly end energy conserving, financial state support has been refused

  8. Passive deca-heat removal in the fixed bed nuclear reactor (FBNR) - 15551

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solano Diaz, E.C.; Luna Aguilera, G.M.; Santos, R.A.; Vaca, D.E.

    2015-01-01

    The Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR) is a Generation IV small reactor concept, where the spherical elements contain Triso-type microspheres with UO 2 , which serves as nuclear fuel. In the event that adverse operation conditions occur, the water pump is automatically shut off and the fuel pebbles fall back by gravity into the fuel chamber. Since the FBNR relies on passive security systems, the removal of the decay heat in the fuel chamber is achieved by contact with quiescent water. In the present paper, a mathematical simulation of the passive cooling of the system was conducted in SOLIDWORKS so as to obtain a temperature profile in the body during the decay heat removal process. Homogenization techniques were employed to smooth out spatial variations across the multiphase system and to derive expression for the effective thermophysical properties that are valid through the macroscopic entry (the chamber). The simulation showed that the chamber's temperature rose from 573 K to its maximum temperature, 1234 K, in the first hour. Afterwards, the temperature fluctuated, but stayed under 552 K. Since the temperature of the system was always kept under the value of the safety parameter (1200 C. degrees) the simulation confirmed that an effective passive cooling of the fuel chamber is indeed feasible. (authors)

  9. A heating system for piglets in farrowing house using waste heat from biogas engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payungsak Junyusen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to design and test a heating system for piglets in farrowing house by utilising the waste heat from a biogas engine as a heat source. The study was separated into three parts: the study on the biogas combined heat and power plant, the investigation on the properties of the heat panel, and the installation and testing of the heating system. From the experiment, the condition producing 60 kW of electrical power was a proper one, in which electrical efficiency and specific fuel consumption were 14% and 1.22 m3/kWh respectively. Generating both electricity and heat increased the overall efficiency to 37.7% and decreased the specific fuel consumption to 0.45 m3/kWh. The heat panel, which was made of a plastic material, had a thermal conductivity of 0.58 W/mC and the maximum compressive force and operating pressure of 8.1 kN and 0.35 bar respectively. The surface temperature of the panel was dependent on the inlet water temperature. When hot water of 44C was supplied into the farrowing house with room temperature of 26C, the average surface temperature was 33C. The developed heating system could provide heat for 4.3 farrowing houses. The payback period of this project was 2.5 years.

  10. Development of low grade waste heat thermoelectric power generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvit Punnachaiya

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to develop a 50 watt thermoelectric power generator using low grade waste heat as a heat source,in order to recover and utilize the excess heat in cooling systems of industrial processes and high activity radioisotope sources. Electricity generation was based on the reverse operation of a thermoelectric cooling (TEC device. The TEC devices weremodified and assembled into a set of thermal cell modules operating at a temperature less than 100°C. The developed powergenerator consisted of 4 modules, each generating 15 watts. Two cascade modules were connected in parallel. Each modulecomprised of 96 TEC devices, which were connected in series. The hot side of each module was mounted on an aluminumheat transfer pipe with dimensions 12.212.250 cm. Heat sinks were installed on the cold side with cooling fans to provideforced air cooling.To test electricity generation in the experiment, water steam was used as a heat source instead of low grade waste heat.The open-circuit direct current (DC of 250 V and the short-circuit current of 1.2 A was achieved with the following operatingconditions: a hot side temperature of 96°C and a temperature difference between the hot and cold sides of 25°C. The DC poweroutput was inverted to an AC power source of 220 V with 50 Hz frequency, which can continuously supply more than 50 wattsof power to a resistive load as long as the heat source was applied to the system. The system achieved an electrical conversionefficiency of about 0.47 percent with the capital cost of 70 US$/W.

  11. Applications of thermal energy storage to process heat and waste heat recovery in the iron and steel industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katter, L. B.; Peterson, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The system identified operates from the primary arc furnace evacuation system as a heat source. Energy from the fume stream is stored as sensible energy in a solid medium (packed bed). A steam-driven turbine is arranged to generate power for peak shaving. A parametric design approach is presented since the overall system design, at optimum payback is strongly dependent upon the nature of the electric pricing structure. The scope of the project was limited to consideration of available technology so that industry-wide application could be achieved by 1985. A search of the literature, coupled with interviews with representatives of major steel producers, served as the means whereby the techniques and technologies indicated for the specific site are extrapolated to the industry as a whole and to the 1985 time frame. The conclusion of the study is that by 1985, a national yearly savings of 1.9 million barrels of oil could be realized through recovery of waste heat from primary arc furnace fume gases on an industry-wide basis. Economic studies indicate that the proposed system has a plant payback time of approximately 5 years.

  12. Feasibility study of a granular bed prefilter for purifying combustion gases from a solid radioactive waste incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girod, M.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of incineration is to minimize the volumes of radioactive waste to be stored. Cleaning combustion gases from these incinerators requires prefilters to protect the very high efficiency filters (known by the French acronym THE). These prefilters should make it possible to recover products such as plutonium while at the same time presenting a very limited source of secondary waste. This document sets out the feasibility study for a granular bed prefilter. This bed should be made of a material which is itself combustible so that it can be recycled in the incinerator to minimize production of secondary waste. During an initial stage, a design study of a demonstration device was carried out using a calculation code constructed on the basis of existing physical models, and which makes it possible to forecast the performance of the support. This theoretical approach has been correlated against experimental results from the validation test. During a second stage, the study dealt with the selection of the material from which the bed was made as well as quantification of the release of radiation during incineration of the plutonium contamined material. In this way, the very low transfer of radioactivity into the gaseous phase was demonstrated. Finally, during a third stage, a study of the change in efficiency and the loss of charge of a granular bed filter was carried out during industrial operation using an incinerator. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that the granular bed represents a viable solution for prefiltering at 200 deg C. Research might develop along a different path and involve using the granular bed as a high temperature filter at 500 to 600 deg C

  13. Study on heat and mass transfer between a greenhouse considered as a solar air heater and a rock packed bed as ambient control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajona Maeztu, J.I.

    1990-01-01

    A general study on heat transfer in dry packed beds is made, with special emphasis in comparing different transient models and in identifying the required conditions by which the attained results are equivalent. The differences in thermal behaviour on packed beds, when simultaneous heat mass transfer occurs as wet air is used as heat transfer fluid and exchanges heat and water with the solid in the bed, is analyzed. We modelize wet packed beds considering them as one dimension adsorbents beds, with dispersive and non-dispersive models, where adsorption, condensation-evaporation and liquid water downward flow from condensate phenomena are present. Models were solved numerically and experiments with a rock bed with dry and wet air through it, were made to test assumptions and to further understand the behavior of the system, obtaining a pretty good agreement between expected and measured profiles of the temperature evolution within the packed bed. As a possible application of the wet rock bed for storage purposes, a forced ventilation greenhouse was characterized as a wet air solar heater and analyzed the energetic potential of storing the heat that has to be rejected during daytime to control the crop ambient conditions, in a rock bed for later use at night for heating. (author)

  14. Analysis of a waste-heat boiler by CFD simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yongziang; Jokilaakso, A. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Waste-heat boilers play important roles in the continuous operation of a smelter and in the conservation of energy. However, the fluid flow and heat transfer behaviour has not been well studied, concerning the boiler performance and design. This presentation describes simulated gas flow and heat transfer of a waste-heat boiler in the Outokumpu copper flash smelting process. The governing transport equations for the conservation of mass, momentum and enthalpy were solved with a commercial CFD-code PHOENICS. The standard k-{epsilon} turbulence model and a composite-flux radiation model were used in the computations. The computational results show that the flow is strongly recirculating and distinctly three-dimensional in most part of the boiler, particularly in the radiation section. The predicted flow pattern and temperature distribution were in a good agreement with laboratory models and industrial measurements. The results provide detailed information of flow pattern, the temperature distribution and gas cooling efficiency. The CFD proved to be a useful tool in analysing the boiler operation. (author)

  15. Analysis of a waste-heat boiler by CFD simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yongziang; Jokilaakso, A [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Waste-heat boilers play important roles in the continuous operation of a smelter and in the conservation of energy. However, the fluid flow and heat transfer behaviour has not been well studied, concerning the boiler performance and design. This presentation describes simulated gas flow and heat transfer of a waste-heat boiler in the Outokumpu copper flash smelting process. The governing transport equations for the conservation of mass, momentum and enthalpy were solved with a commercial CFD-code PHOENICS. The standard k-{epsilon} turbulence model and a composite-flux radiation model were used in the computations. The computational results show that the flow is strongly recirculating and distinctly three-dimensional in most part of the boiler, particularly in the radiation section. The predicted flow pattern and temperature distribution were in a good agreement with laboratory models and industrial measurements. The results provide detailed information of flow pattern, the temperature distribution and gas cooling efficiency. The CFD proved to be a useful tool in analysing the boiler operation. (author)

  16. Current and future prospects for heat recovery from waste in European district heating systems: A literature and data review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Urban; Münster, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Municipal solid waste has seen increasing annual volumes for many decades in contemporary Europe and constitutes, if not properly managed, an environmental problem due to local pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. From an energy perspective, waste is also an alternative fuel for power and heat generation; energy recovery from waste represents an effective measure to reduce landfilling and avoid disposal emissions while simultaneously reducing the equivalent demand for primary energy supply. A key factor for obtaining the full synergetic benefits of this energy recovery is the presence of local heat distribution infrastructures, without which no large-scale recovery and utilisation of excess heat is possible. In this paper, which aims to estimate municipal solid waste volumes available for heat recovery in European district heating systems in 2030, a literature and data review is performed to establish and assess current and future EU (European Union) waste generation and management. Main conclusions are that more heat can be recovered from current Waste-to-Energy facilities operating at low average heat recovery efficiencies, that efficient incineration capacity is geographically concentrated, and that waste available for heat recovery in 2030 is equally determined by total generation volumes by this year as by future EU deployment levels of district heating. - Highlights: • European municipal solid waste time series data analysed from 1995 to 2012. • Review of modelling approaches to assess future European waste generation. • Weather corrected district heat data for EU Member States in 1995 and 2012. • Low average heat recovery efficiency in current European waste incineration. • Future heat recovery efficiencies as determinant as future generation volumes.

  17. Pyrolysis of waste animal fats in a fixed-bed reactor: Production and characterization of bio-oil and bio-char

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Hassen-Trabelsi, A., E-mail: aidabenhassen@yahoo.fr [Centre de Recherche et de Technologies de l’Energie (CRTEn), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, B.P 95, 2050, Hammam Lif (Tunisia); Kraiem, T. [Centre de Recherche et de Technologies de l’Energie (CRTEn), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, B.P 95, 2050, Hammam Lif (Tunisia); Département de Géologie, Université de Tunis, 2092, Tunis (Tunisia); Naoui, S. [Centre de Recherche et de Technologies de l’Energie (CRTEn), Technopôle Borj-Cédria, B.P 95, 2050, Hammam Lif (Tunisia); Belayouni, H. [Département de Géologie, Université de Tunis, 2092, Tunis (Tunisia)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Produced bio-fuels (bio-oil and bio-char) from some animal fatty wastes. • Investigated the effects of main parameters on pyrolysis products distribution. • Determined the suitable conditions for the production of the maximum of bio-oil. • Characterized bio-oils and bio-chars obtained from several animal fatty wastes. - Abstract: Several animal (lamb, poultry and swine) fatty wastes were pyrolyzed under nitrogen, in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor and the main products (liquid bio-oil, solid bio-char and syngas) were obtained. The purpose of this study is to produce and characterize bio-oil and bio-char obtained from pyrolysis of animal fatty wastes. The maximum production of bio-oil was achieved at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C and a heating rate of 5 °C/min. The chemical (GC–MS analyses) and spectroscopic analyses (FTIR analyses) of bio-oil showed that it is a complex mixture consisting of different classes of organic compounds, i.e., hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, cyclic compounds…etc.), carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, esters,…etc. According to fuel properties, produced bio-oils showed good properties, suitable for its use as an engine fuel or as a potential source for synthetic fuels and chemical feedstock. Obtained bio-chars had low carbon content and high ash content which make them unattractive for as renewable source energy.

  18. Pyrolysis of waste animal fats in a fixed-bed reactor: Production and characterization of bio-oil and bio-char

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Hassen-Trabelsi, A.; Kraiem, T.; Naoui, S.; Belayouni, H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Produced bio-fuels (bio-oil and bio-char) from some animal fatty wastes. • Investigated the effects of main parameters on pyrolysis products distribution. • Determined the suitable conditions for the production of the maximum of bio-oil. • Characterized bio-oils and bio-chars obtained from several animal fatty wastes. - Abstract: Several animal (lamb, poultry and swine) fatty wastes were pyrolyzed under nitrogen, in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor and the main products (liquid bio-oil, solid bio-char and syngas) were obtained. The purpose of this study is to produce and characterize bio-oil and bio-char obtained from pyrolysis of animal fatty wastes. The maximum production of bio-oil was achieved at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C and a heating rate of 5 °C/min. The chemical (GC–MS analyses) and spectroscopic analyses (FTIR analyses) of bio-oil showed that it is a complex mixture consisting of different classes of organic compounds, i.e., hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, cyclic compounds…etc.), carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, esters,…etc. According to fuel properties, produced bio-oils showed good properties, suitable for its use as an engine fuel or as a potential source for synthetic fuels and chemical feedstock. Obtained bio-chars had low carbon content and high ash content which make them unattractive for as renewable source energy

  19. Improved energy efficiency in juice production through waste heat recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.-O.; Elfgren, E.; Westerlund, L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A heating system at a juice production was investigated and improved. • Different impacts of drying cycle improvements at the energy usage were explored. • The total heat use for drying could thereby be decreased with 52%. • The results point out a significant decrease of heat consumption with low investment costs. - Abstract: Berry juice concentrate is produced by pressing berries and heating up the juice. The by-products are berry skins and seeds in a press cake. Traditionally, these by-products have been composted, but due to their valuable nutrients, it could be profitable to sell them instead. The skins and seeds need to be separated and dried to a moisture content of less than 10 %wt (on dry basis) in order to avoid fermentation. A berry juice plant in the north of Sweden has been studied in order to increase the energy and resource efficiency, with special focus on the drying system. This was done by means of process integration with mass and energy balance, theory from thermodynamics and psychrometry along with measurements of the juice plant. Our study indicates that the drying system could be operated at full capacity without any external heat supply using waste heat supplied from the juice plant. This would be achieved by increasing the efficiency of the dryer by recirculation of the drying air and by heat supply from the flue gases of the industrial boiler. The recirculation would decrease the need of heat in the dryer with about 52%. The total heat use for the plant could thereby be decreased from 1262 kW to 1145 kW. The improvements could be done without compromising the production quality

  20. Recovery of Exhaust Waste Heat for ICE Using the Beta Type Stirling Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Aladayleh, Wail; Alahmer, Ali

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the potential of utilizing the exhaust waste heat using an integrated mechanical device with internal combustion engine for the automobiles to increase the fuel economy, the useful power, and the environment safety. One of the ways of utilizing waste heat is to use a Stirling engine. A Stirling engine requires only an external heat source as wasted heat for its operation. Because the exhaust gas temperature may reach 200 to 700°C, Stirling engine will work effectively....

  1. Assessment of capability of models for prediction of pressure drop and dryout heat flux in a heat generating particulate debris bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, P.P.; Nayak, A.K.; Rashid, M.; Kulenovic, R.

    2009-01-01

    During a severe accident in a light water reactor, the core can melt and be relocated to the lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel. There it can form a particulate debris bed due to the possible presence of water. This bed, if not quenched in time, can lead to the failure of the pressure vessel because of the insufficient heat removal of decay heat in the debris bed. Therefore, addressing the issue of coolability behaviour of heat generating particulate debris bed is of prime importance in the framework of severe accident management strategies, particularly in case of above mentioned late phase scenario of an accident. In order to investigate the coolability behaviour of particulate debris bed, experiments were carried out at IKE test facility 'DEBRIS' on particle beds of irregularly shaped particles mixed with spheres under top- and bottom-flooding condition. The pressure drop and dryout heat flux (DHF) were measured for top- and bottom-flooding conditions. For top-flooding conditions, it was found that the pressure gradients are all smaller than the hydrostatic pressure gradient of water, indicating an important role of the counter-current interfacial shear stress of the two-phase flow. For bottom-flooding with a relatively high liquid inflow velocity, the pressure gradient increases consistently with the vapour velocity and the fluid-particle drags become important. Also, with additional forced liquid inflow from the bottom, the DHF increases dramatically. In all the cases, it was found that the DHF is significantly larger with bottom-flooding condition compared to top-flooding condition. Different models such as Lipinski, Reed, Tung and Dhir, Hu and Theophanous, and Schulenberg and Mueller have been used to predict the pressure drop characteristics and the DHF of heat generating particulate debris beds. Comparison is made among above mentioned models and experimental results for DHF and pressure drop characteristics. Considering the overall trend in

  2. Optimizing Waste Heat Utilization in Vehicle Bio-Methane Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhen

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Current vehicle bio-methane plants have drawbacks associated with high energy consumption and low recovery levels of waste heat produced during the gasification process. In this paper, we have optimized the performance of heat exchange networks using pinch analysis and through the introduction of heat pump integration technology. Optimal results for the heat exchange network of a bio-gas system producing 10,000 cubic meters have been calculated using a pinch point temperature of 50 °C, a minimum heating utility load of 234.02 kW and a minimum cooling utility load of 201.25 kW. These optimal parameters are predicted to result in energy savings of 116.08 kW (19.75%, whilst the introduction of new heat pump integration technology would afford further energy savings of 95.55 kW (16.25%. The combined energy saving value of 211.63 kW corresponds to a total energy saving of 36%, with economic analysis revealing that these reforms would give annual savings of 103,300 USD. The installation costs required to introduce these process modifications are predicted to require an initial investment of 423,200 USD, which would take 4.1 years to reach payout time based on predicted annual energy savings.

  3. Models comparative study for heat storage in fixed beds; Estudo comparativo de modelos para armazenamento de calor em leitos fixos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuginski, Junior, Rubens

    1991-07-01

    This work presents comparative results of a numerical investigation of four possible models for the prediction of thermal performance of fixed bed storage units and their thermal design. These models includes Schumann's model, the radial dispersion model, a model that include both axial heat conduction in the fluid phase and admits thermal gradient in the solids particles and finally a two dimensional single phase model. For each of these models a computer code was written and tested to evaluate the computing time of same data and analyze any other computational problems. The tests of thermal performance included particle size, porosity, particle material, flow rate, inlet temperature and heat losses form tank walls and extremities. Dynamics behaviour of the storage units due to transient variation in either flow rate or inlet temperature was also investigated. The results presented include temperature gradients, pressure drop and heat storage. The results obtained are very useful for analysis and design of fixed bed storage units. (author)

  4. Fluid flow and heat transfer investigation of pebble bed reactors using mesh adaptive large-eddy simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlidis, D.; Lathouwers, D.

    2011-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics model with anisotropic mesh adaptivity is used to investigate coolant flow and heat transfer in pebble bed reactors. A novel method for implicitly incorporating solid boundaries based on multi-fluid flow modelling is adopted. The resulting model is able to resolve and simulate flow and heat transfer in randomly packed beds, regardless of the actual geometry, starting off with arbitrarily coarse meshes. The model is initially evaluated using an orderly stacked square channel of channel-height-to-particle diameter ratio of unity for a range of Reynolds numbers. The model is then applied to the face-centred cubical geometry. Coolant flow and heat transfer patterns are investigated. (author)

  5. Energy generation by air gasification of two industrial plastic wastes in a pilot scale fluidized bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arena, Umberto; Di Gregorio, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Two plastic wastes obtained as co-products from an industrial process were fed in a pilot-scale bubbling fluidized bed gasifier, having an internal diameter of 0.38 m and a maximum thermal output of about 400 kW. The experimental runs were carried out by reaching a condition of thermal and chemical steady state under values of equivalence ratio ranging from 0.2 to 0.3. Olivine, a neo-silicate of Fe and Mg, already tested as a good catalyst for tar removal during gasification of polyolefin plastic wastes, was used as bed material. The results provide the complete composition of the syngas, including the tar, particulate and acid/basic gas contents as well as the chemical and physical characterization of the bed material and entrained fines. The gasification process appears technically feasible, yielding a producer gas of valuable quality for energy applications in an appropriate plant configuration. On the other hand, under the experimental conditions tested, olivine particles show a strongly reduced catalytic activity in all the runs. The differences in the gasification behaviour of the two industrial plastics are explained on the basis of the structure and composition of the wastes, taking also into account the results of a combined material and substance flow analysis. - Highlights: • Pilot-scale investigation of fluidized bed gasification of two industrial plastic wastes. • Tests under conditions of thermal/chemical steady state at various equivalence ratios. • Complete composition of the producer gas, including tar, particulate and acid/basic gases. • Differences in the gasification behaviour of plastic wastes. • Material, substance, and feedstock energy flow analysis for different gasification tests

  6. Waste truck-tyre processing by flash pyrolysis in a conical spouted bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, G.; Alvarez, J.; Amutio, M.; Mkhize, N.M.; Danon, B.; Gryp, P.; Görgens, J.F. van der; Bilbao, J.; Olazar, M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Flash pyrolysis improves TPO and limonene yields vs. slow pyrolysis. • The most suitable temperature for TPO and limonene maximization was 475 °C. • Operating at 575 °C gas yields and char quality was enhanced. • Temperature showed a limited effect on sulphur distribution among products. - Abstract: The flash pyrolysis of waste truck-tyres was studied in a conical spouted bed reactor (CSBR) operating in continuous regime. The influence of temperature on product distribution was analysed in the 425–575 °C range. A detailed characterization of the pyrolysis products was carried out in order to assess their most feasible application. Moreover, special attention was paid to the sulphur distribution among the products. The analysis of gaseous products was carried out using a micro-GC and the tyre pyrolysis oil (TPO) by means of GC-FID using peak areas for quantification, with GC/MS for identification and elemental analysis. Finally, the char was subjected to elemental analysis and surface characterization. According to the results, 475 °C is an appropriate temperature for the pyrolysis of waste tyres, given that it ensures total devolatilisation of tyre rubber and a high TPO yield, 58.2 wt.%. Moreover, the quality of the oil is optimum at this temperature, especially in terms of high concentrations of valuable chemicals, such as limonene. An increase in temperature to 575 °C reduced the TPO yield to 53.9 wt.% and substantially changed its chemical composition by increasing the aromatic content. However, the quality of the recovered char was improved at high temperatures.

  7. Thermophysical and heat transfer properties of phase change material candidate for waste heat transportation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaizawa, Akihide; Maruoka, Nobuhiro; Kawai, Atsushi; Kamano, Hiroomi; Jozuka, Tetsuji; Senda, Takeshi; Akiyama, Tomohiro

    2008-05-01

    A waste heat transportation system trans-heat (TH) system is quite attractive that uses the latent heat of a phase change material (PCM). The purpose of this paper is to study the thermophysical properties of various sugars and sodium acetate trihydrate (SAT) as PCMs for a practical TH system and the heat transfer property between PCM selected and heat transfer oil, by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) and a heat storage tube. As a result, erythritol, with a large latent heat of 344 kJ/kg at melting point of 117°C, high decomposition point of 160°C and excellent chemical stability under repeated phase change cycles was found to be the best PCM among them for the practical TH system. In the heat release experiments between liquid erythritol and flowing cold oil, we observed foaming phenomena of encapsulated oil, in which oil droplet was coated by solidification of PCM.

  8. Application and design of an economizer for waste heat recovery in a cogeneration plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martić Igor I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy increase cost has required its more effective use. However, many industrial heating processes generate waste energy. Use of waste-heat recovery systems decreases energy consumption. This paper presents case study of waste heat recovering of the exhaust flue gas in a 1415 kWe cogeneration plant. This waste heat can be recovered by installing an economizer to heat the condensed and fresh water in thermal degasification unit and reduce steam use for maintaining the temperature of 105˚C for oxygen removal. Design methodology of economizer is presented.

  9. Waste Heat Recovery from a High Temperature Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Jonas E.

    Government-mandated improvements in fuel economy and emissions from internal combustion engines (ICEs) are driving innovation in engine efficiency. Though incremental efficiency gains have been achieved, most combustion engines are still only 30-40% efficient at best, with most of the remaining fuel energy being rejected to the environment as waste heat through engine coolant and exhaust gases. Attempts have been made to harness this waste heat and use it to drive a Rankine cycle and produce additional work to improve efficiency. Research on waste heat recovery (WHR) demonstrates that it is possible to improve overall efficiency by converting wasted heat into usable work, but relative gains in overall efficiency are typically minimal ( 5-8%) and often do not justify the cost and space requirements of a WHR system. The primary limitation of the current state-of-the-art in WHR is the low temperature of the engine coolant ( 90 °C), which minimizes the WHR from a heat source that represents between 20% and 30% of the fuel energy. The current research proposes increasing the engine coolant temperature to improve the utilization of coolant waste heat as one possible path to achieving greater WHR system effectiveness. An experiment was performed to evaluate the effects of running a diesel engine at elevated coolant temperatures and to estimate the efficiency benefits. An energy balance was performed on a modified 3-cylinder diesel engine at six different coolant temperatures (90 °C, 100 °C, 125 °C, 150 °C, 175 °C, and 200 °C) to determine the change in quantity and quality of waste heat as the coolant temperature increased. The waste heat was measured using the flow rates and temperature differences of the coolant, engine oil, and exhaust flow streams into and out of the engine. Custom cooling and engine oil systems were fabricated to provide adequate adjustment to achieve target coolant and oil temperatures and large enough temperature differences across the

  10. Measurement of the heat transfer parameters in infiltrated binary beryllium beds. Comparison between the results with PEHTRA and SUPER-PEHTRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, M. dalle; Piazza, G.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.

    2000-01-01

    For the next generation fusion reactors with a ceramic breeder blanket the use, as a neutron multiplier, of either a binary bed of large (∼ 2 mm) and small (∼ 0.1-0.2 mm) beryllium pebbles or a single size bed made of 1 mm or 2 mm pebbles is foreseen. The heat transfer parameters of such a binary pebble bed, namely the thermal conductivity and the heat transfer coefficient to the containing wall, have been investigated previously in the experimental device PEHTRA available at FZK. The experiments allowed to measure the effect of the bed temperature and of constraint exerted by the containing walls. The constraint is defined by the bed interference, i.e. the difference in the radial expansion between bed and the constraining walls related to the bed thickness (Δl/l). However, with the PEHTRA experiments, it was only possible to achieve a Δl/l value of 0.1%. A new experimental rig (SUPER-PEHTRA) has been constructed at FZK, which allows to achieve Δl/l values of 0.3% and to measure the pressure of the expanding bed on the containing walls. First experiments with a binary bed have been performed. The present paper reports on further experiments with binary beds and the establishing of equations correlating the data obtained for the present binary beds and for the binary bed experiments described. (orig.)

  11. Co-pyrolysis of corn cob and waste cooking oil in a fixed bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanyi; Liu, Cong; Ma, Wenchao; Zhang, Xiaoxiong; Li, Yanbin; Yan, Beibei; Zhou, Weihong

    2014-08-01

    Corn cob (CC) and waste cooking oil (WCO) were co-pyrolyzed in a fixed bed. The effects of various temperatures of 500 °C, 550 °C, 600 °C and CC/WCO mass ratios of 1:0, 1:0.1, 1:0.5, 1:1 and 0:1 were investigated, respectively. Results show that co-pyrolysis of CC/WCO produce more liquid and less bio-char than pyrolysis of CC individually. Bio-oil and bio-char yields were found to be largely dependent on temperature and CC/WCO ratios. GC/MS of bio-oil show it consists of different classes and amounts of organic compounds other than that from CC pyrolysis. Temperature of 550 °C and CC/WCO ratio of 1:1 seem to be the optimum considering high bio-oil yields (68.6 wt.%) and good bio-oil properties (HHV of 32.78 MJ/kg). In this case, bio-char of 24.96 MJ/kg appears attractive as a renewable source, while gas with LHV of 16.06 MJ/Nm(3) can be directly used in boilers as fuel. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of irrigation and stainless steel drills on dental implant bed heat generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullon, B; Bueno, E F; Herrero, M; Fernandez-Palacin, A; Rios, J V; Bullon, P; Gil, F J

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is assessing the influence of the use of different drill types and external irrigation on heat generation in the bone. In-vitro study to compare two different sequences for implant-bed preparation by means of two stainless steels: precipitation-hardening stainless steel (AISI 420B) (K drills), and martensitic stainless steel (AISI 440) (S drills). Besides, the drilled sequences were realized without irrigation, and with external irrigation by means of normal saline solution at room temperature. The study was realized on bovine ribs using: K without irrigation (KSI) and with irrigation (KCI) and S without irrigation (SSI) and with irrigation (SCI) with five drills for each system. Each drill was used 100 times. Bone temperature was measured with a thermocouple immediately after drilled. Average bone temperature with irrigation was for K drills 17.58±3.32 °C and for S drills 16.66±1.30 °C. Average bone temperature without irrigation was for K drills 23.58±2.94 °C and for S drills 19.41±2.27 °C. Statistically significant differences were found between K without irrigation versus S with irrigation and K with irrigation (pstainless steel AISI 420B presents better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance than AISI440.

  13. Energy recovery from waste incineration: Assessing the importance of district heating networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruergaard, T.; Christensen, T.H.; Astrup, T.

    2010-01-01

    Municipal solid waste incineration contributes with 20% of the heat supplied to the more than 400 district heating networks in Denmark. In evaluation of the environmental consequences of this heat production, the typical approach has been to assume that other (fossil) fuels could be saved on a 1:1 basis (e.g. 1 GJ of waste heat delivered substitutes for 1 GJ of coal-based heat). This paper investigates consequences of waste-based heat substitution in two specific Danish district heating networks and the energy-associated interactions between the plants connected to these networks. Despite almost equal electricity and heat efficiencies at the waste incinerators connected to the two district heating networks, the energy and CO 2 accounts showed significantly different results: waste incineration in one network caused a CO 2 saving of 48 kg CO 2 /GJ energy input while in the other network a load of 43 kg CO 2 /GJ. This was caused mainly by differences in operation mode and fuel types of the other heat producing plants attached to the networks. The paper clearly indicates that simple evaluations of waste-to-energy efficiencies at the incinerator are insufficient for assessing the consequences of heat substitution in district heating network systems. The paper also shows that using national averages for heat substitution will not provide a correct answer: local conditions need to be addressed thoroughly otherwise we may fail to assess correctly the heat recovery from waste incineration.

  14. Evaluation and Analysis of Cotton Bedding as a Bulking Agent in an Aerobic Food Waste Composting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, A. S. L.

    2017-12-01

    Food wastage is a prominent issue in Hong Kong that should be addressed. Here at The Independent Schools Foundation Academy, we are continuously looking for ways to improve, including that of food waste. In 2013 the school installed an A900 Rocket Food Composter, in hopes of reducing carbon footprint. Since the installation, the school has tested various elements of the food composter to further improve upon it to make it increasingly more sustainable and effective. These improvements vary from the revamping of the odour control system, increasing the nitrogen content and the installation of an improved grease trap. The school composts the food waste through combining a variety of substances together: coffee, compost, food waste, and a bulking agent - which will be tested in this study. Recently, the school has changed the compost bulking agent from wood shavings and cardboard to cotton bedding - a side product of the production of UK passports. In this study, I will evaluate the effectiveness of cotton bedding as a bulking agent in an aerobic composting system, focusing primarily on three points: a) microbial activity - the identification of cellulose digesting bacteria and the associated kinetics, b) the soil gas composition - the data shall be collected through the use of the Gasmet DX 4015, and c) the chemical analysis of the compost - specifically the amount of aluminum in the compost and whether or not it is significant enough to discredit cotton bedding as an effective bulking agent. The the analysis of cotton bedding using these three specifications will allow ISF Academy to evaluate the overall effectiveness of cotton bedding as a bulking agent.

  15. Fluidized bed incineration system for U.S. Department of Energy Defense Waste, January--June 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.L.; Bell, B.A.; Feng, P.K.; Meyer, F.G.

    1978-12-01

    A fluidized bed incineration facility has been designed for installation at the Rocky Flats Plant to develop and demonstrate the process for the combustion of transuranic waste. The unit capacity will be about 82 kg/hour of combustible waste. The combustion process will utilize in situ neutralization of acid gases generated in the process. The equipment design is based on data generated on a pilot scale unit and represents a scale-up factor of nine. Equipment installation was completed on April 30, 1978. Equipment checkout and startup is in progress

  16. Fluidized bed incineration system for U.S. Department of Energy Defense Waste, July--December 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.L.; Meyer, F.G.; Feng, P.K.

    1978-01-01

    A fluidized-bed incineration facility has been designed for installation at the Rocky Flats Plant to develop and demonstrate the process for the combustion of transuranic waste. The unit capacity will be about 82 kg/hr of combustible waste. The combustion process will utilize in situ neutralization of acid gases generated in the process. The equipment design is based on data generated on a pilot scale unit and represents a scale-up factor of nine. Building modifications are complete and equipment installation has begun

  17. Fluidized bed incineration system for U.S. Department of Energy defense waste. Status report, July--December 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richey, L.L.; Faccini, P.T.; Feng, P.K.

    1978-01-01

    A fluidized-bed incineration facility has been designed for installation at the Rocky Flats Plant. The purpose is to develop and demonstrate the process for the combustion of transuranic waste. The unit capacity will be about 82 kg/hr of combustible waste. The combustion process will utilize in situ neutralization of acid gases generated in the process. The equipment design is based on data generated on a pilot scale unit and represents a scale-up factor of nine. Title II engineering is complete and construction work has begun

  18. Final flotation waste kinetics of sintering at different heating regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cocić Mira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the copper extraction, especially during the process of flotation enrichment and the pyrometallurgical processing, the waste materials that represent huge polluters of environment are being generated. In order to examine the application of Final flotation waste (FFW in the manufacturing of new materials from the glass-ceramic group phase and mineral composition were examined as well as thermal properties. FFW kinetics of sintering has been tested at different dyamics (1°C/min, 29°C/min and 43°C/min, in order to find the optimum conditions for sintering with a minimum amount of energy and time consumption. The samples were examined using: X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence analysis, SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy and thermal microscopy. The best results for the production of glass ceramic materials were obtained during the sintering at heating regime of 29°C/min. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176010

  19. Petrographic and X-ray diffraction analyses of selected samples from Marker Bed 139 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredrich, J.T.; Zeuch, D.H.

    1996-04-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is located 660 m underground in the Salado Formation which consists of thick, horizontally bedded pure and impure salt and thin, laterally continuous clay and anhydrite interbeds. The Salado Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program was established to provide site-specific-two-phase flow and other related rock properties to support performance assessment modeling of the WIPP repository. Owing to their potentially significant role in the hydrologic response of the repository, the program initially focused on the anhydrite interbeds, and in particular, on Marker Bed 139 (MB 139), which lies approximately 1 m below the planned waste storage rooms. This report synthesizes petrographic and X-ray powder diffraction studies performed to support the Salado Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program. Experimental scoping activities in this area were performed in FY 1993 by three independent laboratories in order to: (1) quantify the mineral composition to support laboratory studies of hydrologic properties and facilitate correlation of transport properties with composition; (2) describe textures, including grain size; and (3) describe observed porosity. Samples from various depths were prepared from six 6-inch diameter cores which were obtained by drilling into the marker bed from the floor of two separate rooms. The petrographic analyses are augmented here with additional study of the original thin sections, and the pore structure observations are also examined in relation to an independent observational study of microcracks in Marker Bed 139 core samples performed in FY 1994 by the Geomechanics Department at Sandia National Laboratories

  20. Petrographic and X-ray diffraction analyses of selected samples from Marker Bed 139 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrich, J.T.; Zeuch, D.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geomechanics Dept.

    1996-04-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is located 660 m underground in the Salado Formation which consists of thick, horizontally bedded pure and impure salt and thin, laterally continuous clay and anhydrite interbeds. The Salado Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program was established to provide site-specific-two-phase flow and other related rock properties to support performance assessment modeling of the WIPP repository. Owing to their potentially significant role in the hydrologic response of the repository, the program initially focused on the anhydrite interbeds, and in particular, on Marker Bed 139 (MB 139), which lies approximately 1 m below the planned waste storage rooms. This report synthesizes petrographic and X-ray powder diffraction studies performed to support the Salado Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program. Experimental scoping activities in this area were performed in FY 1993 by three independent laboratories in order to: (1) quantify the mineral composition to support laboratory studies of hydrologic properties and facilitate correlation of transport properties with composition; (2) describe textures, including grain size; and (3) describe observed porosity. Samples from various depths were prepared from six 6-inch diameter cores which were obtained by drilling into the marker bed from the floor of two separate rooms. The petrographic analyses are augmented here with additional study of the original thin sections, and the pore structure observations are also examined in relation to an independent observational study of microcracks in Marker Bed 139 core samples performed in FY 1994 by the Geomechanics Department at Sandia National Laboratories.

  1. Numerical modeling of heat transfer during hydrogen absorption in thin double-layered annular ZrCo beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehui Cui

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work a three-dimensional (3D hydrogen absorption model was proposed to study the heat transfer behavior in thin double-layered annular ZrCo beds. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate the effects of conversion layer thickness, thermal conductivity, cooling medium and its flow velocity on the efficiency of heat transfer. Results reveal that decreasing the layer thickness and improving the thermal conductivity enhance the ability of heat transfer. Compared with nitrogen and helium, water appears to be a better medium for cooling. In order to achieve the best efficiency of heat transfer, the flow velocity needs to be maximized. Keywords: Hydrogen storage, ZrCo metal hydride, Heat transfer, Three-dimensional simulation

  2. Thermal energy storage for industrial waste heat recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, H. W.; Kedl, R. J.; Duscha, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    The potential is examined for waste heat recovery and reuse through thermal energy storage in five specific industrial categories: (1) primary aluminum, (2) cement, (3) food processing, (4) paper and pulp, and (5) iron and steel. Preliminary results from Phase 1 feasibility studies suggest energy savings through fossil fuel displacement approaching 0.1 quad/yr in the 1985 period. Early implementation of recovery technologies with minimal development appears likely in the food processing and paper and pulp industries; development of the other three categories, though equally desirable, will probably require a greater investment in time and dollars.

  3. Recouping the thermal-to-electric conversion loss by the use of waste heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, W.J.

    1976-01-01

    This paper looks at ways to recoup the thermal-to-electric conversion loss of our thermal power generating stations. These stations now produce twice as much low-grade waste heat as they do electricity. We can improve the situation in two ways: by improving the station efficiency, and by utilizing the low-grade heat beneficially. The following options are examined: N 2 O 4 turbines condensing at 10 deg C; power from moderator waste heat; 50 MW heat pump for district heating; industrial parks with integrated waste heat upgrading station. (author)

  4. Preliminary studies of lignocellulosics and waste fuels for fixed bed gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olgun, H [Marmara Research Center, Kocaeli (Turkey). Energy Systems and Environmental Research Institute; Dogru, M; Howarth, C R [University of Newcastle (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical and Process Engineering; Malik, A A [University of Northumbria, Newcastle (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical and Life Science

    2001-07-01

    This study was carried out to understand the decomposition behaviour of a range of biofuel and waste feedstock during gasification in a downdraft gasifier. A laboratory scale large sample thermogravimetric analyser (LSTA) is used which allows the data on burn-out characteristics of different fuel particles to be measured under agitated conditions. The conditions chosen simulate the combustion behaviour in a gasifier for a range of biofuels and wastes, namely hazelnut, pistachio, and peanut shells, wood chips and sewage sludge pellets. From this data the activation energy is calculated for a heating rate of 20{sup o}C/min. It was found that, as the weight loss increases, the activation energy decreases. In addition the influence of a range of gasification air/N{sub 2} levels on constituents of the gas released during hazelnut shell decomposition was observed. It was found that the composition of the product gases consisted of CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. This was analysed as function of time for hazelnut shells showing that the primary products are H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}. (author)

  5. Decision Document for Heat Removal from High-Level Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WILLIS, W.L.

    2000-01-01

    This document establishes the combination of design and operational configurations that will be used to provide heat removal from high-level waste tanks during Phase 1 waste feed delivery to prevent the waste temperature from exceeding tank safety requirement limits. The chosen method--to use the primary and annulus ventilation systems to remove heat from the high-level waste tanks--is documented herein

  6. Coefficient of solid-gas heat transfer in particle fixed bed; Coeficiente de transferencia de calor gas-solido em leito fixo de particulas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes Filho, Francisco

    1991-03-01

    The work presents a study on heat transfer between gas and solid phases for fixed beds in the absence of mass transfer and chemical reactions. Mathematical models presented in the literature were analyzed concerning to the assumptions made on axial dispersion in the fluid phase and interparticle thermal conductivity. Heat transfer coefficients and their dependency on flow conditions, particles and packed bed characteristics were experimentally determined through the solution of the previous mathematical models. Pressure drop behaviour for the packed beds used for the heat transfer study was also included. (author) 32 refs., 12 figs.

  7. Low-temperature waste-heat recovery in the food and paper industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foell, W.K.; Lund, D.; Mitchell, J.W.; Ray, D.; Stevenson, R.; TenWolde, A.

    1980-11-01

    The potential of low-temperature waste-heat recovery technology is examined. An examination of barriers to impede waste-heat recovery is made and research programs are identified. Extensive information and data are presented in the following chapters: Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Food Industry; Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Pulp and Paper Industry; Industries' Economic Analysis of Energy Conservation Projects; Industrial Waste Heat Recovery (selection of heat-recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, simplified procedure for selection of heat recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, selection of heat pumps for industrial applications); Institutional Aspects of Industrial Energy Conservation (economic motivation for energy conservation and the industrial response, intrafirm idea channels and their sources, evaluation and approval of plant improvement projects, reported barriers to adopting waste heat recovery projects and recommendations for government involvement, and the final chapter is a summary with major conclusions given. Additional information is given in two appendices on the potential waste heat recovery in a cheese plant (calculation) and conditions for optimum exchanger size and break-even fuel cost. (MCW)

  8. Water infiltration and heat transfer in one dimensional unsaturated packed beds; Fuhowa ryushi sonai no ichijigen suibun nagare to dennetsu tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, K; Akahori, M; Hattori, M [Nagaoka University of Technology, Niigata (Japan); Shiraishi, N [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-05-25

    Water and heat transport in unsaturated packed beds due to supplying hot water have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. Using various sizes of glass beads, capillary pressure and permeability in packed beds were measured in unsaturated beds. The distributions in water saturation and temperature were predicted for one dimensional packed bed, based on a model assuming local thermal equilibrium among water, gas and particles at any specific space. The predicted temperature distributions were compared with the experimental results obtained using various glass sizes. In layered packed beds, water saturation becomes discontinuous at the interface of two layers because of the difference of the water characteristics between two beds. Water penetrates faster in coarse-over fine-textured profile compared with in fine-over coarse-textured profile. Similarly, the temperature rises faster in former profile under the same supplied heat quantity. 11 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Effect of heat bed temperature of 3D bioprinter to hardness and compressive strength of scaffold bovine hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triyono, Joko; Pratama, Aditya; Sukanto, Heru; Nugroho, Yohanes; Wijayanta, Agung Tri

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of heat bed temperature of 3D bioprinter toward compressive strength and hardness bovine bone hydroxyapatite scaffold for bone filler applications. BHA-glycerin mixed with a ratio of 1:1, and keep it for 24 hours. After the homogenization process acquired, bio-Ink with shaped slurry will be used as a material for a 3D printer. The printing process with a temperature variation have performed by setting up heat bed temperature. After printing process was completed, the 3D scaffold was detained on the heat bed for 10 minutes before being picked up. The test results in this study had the lowest hardness value of 9.82±0.62 VHN and the highest number of 24.32±0.99 VHN. The compressive strength testing had the lowest value of 1.62±0.16 MPa with the highest number of 5.67±0.39 MPa. Pore observation using a scanning electron microscope. The result shows that the size of the pores were not much different, that was ±100-200 µm. This observation also indicated that the pore form was square pores.

  10. Performance evaluation of thermophotovoltaic GaSb cell technology in high temperature waste heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utlu, Z.; Önal, B. S.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, waste heat was evaluated and examined by means of thermophotovoltaic systems with the application of energy production potential GaSb cells. The aim of our study is to examine GaSb cell technology at high temperature waste heat. The evaluation of the waste heat to be used in the system is designed to be used in the electricity, industry and iron and steel industry. Our work is research. Graphic analysis is done with Matlab program. The high temperature waste heat graphs applied on the GaSb cell are in the results section. Our study aims to provide a source for future studies.

  11. Examination of thermophotovoltaic GaSb cell technology in low and medium temperatures waste heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utlu, Z.; Önal, B. S.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, waste heat was evaluated and examined by means of thermophotovoltaic systems with the application of energy production potential GaSb cells. The aim of our study is to examine GaSb cell technology at low and medium temperature waste heat. The evaluation of the waste heat to be used in the system is designed to be used in the electricity, industry and iron and steel industry. Our work is research. Graphic analysis is done with Matlab program. The low and medium temperature waste heat graphs applied on the GaSb cell are in the results section. Our study aims to provide a source for future studies.

  12. Comparative assessment of alternative cycles for waste heat recovery and upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, Adrienne B.; Garimella, Srinivas

    2011-01-01

    Thermally activated systems based on sorption cycles, as well as mechanical systems based on vapor compression/expansion are assessed in this study for waste heat recovery applications. In particular, ammonia-water sorption cycles for cooling and mechanical work recovery, a heat transformer using lithium bromide-water as the working fluid pair to yield high temperature heat, and organic Rankine cycles using refrigerant R245fa for work recovery as well as versions directly coupled to a vapor compression cycle to yield cooling are analyzed with overall heat transfer conductances for heat exchangers that use similar approach temperature differences for each cycle. Two representative cases are considered, one for smaller-scale and lower temperature applications using waste heat at 60 o C, and the other for larger-scale and higher temperature waste heat at 120 o C. Comparative assessments of these cycles on the basis of efficiencies and system footprints guide the selection of waste heat recovery and upgrade systems for different applications and waste heat availabilities. Furthermore, these considerations are used to investigate four case studies for waste heat recovery for data centers, vehicles, and process plants, illustrating the utility and limitations of such solutions. The increased implementation of such waste heat recovery systems in a variety of applications will lead to decreased primary source inputs and sustainable energy utilization. -- Highlights: → Sorption and mechanical pathways for the conversion of waste heat streams to work, cooling, and temperature boosting were investigated. → Waste heat sources including 300 W of energy at 60 o C and 1 kW of energy at 120 o C were analyzed. → Up to about seventy percent of the input waste heat can be converted to cooling. → Up to about ten percent can be converted to work. → Up to about 47 percent can be upgraded to a higher temperature.

  13. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING MINERALIZATION FOR HIGH ORGANIC AND NITRATE WASTE STREAMS FOR THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

    2008-01-11

    Waste streams that may be generated by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Energy Initiative may contain significant quantities of organics (0-53 wt%) and/or nitrates (0-56 wt%). Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce the NO{sub x} in the off-gas to N{sub 2} to meet the Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during waste form stabilization regardless of which GNEP processes are chosen, e.g. organics in the feed or organics for nitrate destruction. High organic containing wastes cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by preprocessing. Alternative waste stabilization processes such as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operate at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). FBSR converts organics to CAA compliant gases, creates no secondary liquid waste streams, and creates a stable mineral waste form that is as durable as glass. For application to the high Cs-137 and Sr-90 containing GNEP waste streams a single phase mineralized Cs-mica phase was made by co-reacting illite clay and GNEP simulated waste. The Cs-mica accommodates up to 30% wt% Cs{sub 2}O and all the GNEP waste species, Ba, Sr, Rb including the Cs-137 transmutation to Ba-137. For reference, the cesium mineral pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), currently being studied for GNEP applications, can only be fabricated at {ge} 1000 C. Pollucite mineralization creates secondary aqueous waste streams and NO{sub x}. Pollucite is not tolerant of high concentrations of Ba, Sr or Rb and forces the divalent species into different mineral host phases. The pollucite can accommodate up to 33% wt% Cs{sub 2}O.

  14. CRUCIBLE TESTING OF TANK 48H RADIOACTIVE WASTE SAMPLE USING FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC DESTRUCTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, C

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of crucible scale testing with actual radioactive Tank 48H material was to duplicate the test results that had been previously performed on simulant Tank 48H material. The earlier crucible scale testing using simulants was successful in demonstrating that bench scale crucible tests produce results that are indicative of actual Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) pilot scale tests. Thus, comparison of the results using radioactive Tank 48H feed to those reported earlier with simulants would then provide proof that the radioactive tank waste behaves in a similar manner to the simulant. Demonstration of similar behavior for the actual radioactive Tank 48H slurry to the simulant is important as a preliminary or preparation step for the more complex bench-scale steam reformer unit that is planned for radioactive application in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF) later in 2008. The goals of this crucible-scale testing were to show 99% destruction of tetraphenylborate and to demonstrate that the final solid product produced is sodium carbonate. Testing protocol was repeated using the specifications of earlier simulant crucible scale testing, that is sealed high purity alumina crucibles containing a pre-carbonated and evaporated Tank 48H material. Sealing of the crucibles was accomplished by using an inorganic 'nepheline' sealant. The sealed crucibles were heat-treated at 650 C under constant argon flow to inert the system. Final product REDOX measurements were performed to establish the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of known amounts of added iron species in the final product. These REDOX measurements confirm the processing conditions (pyrolysis occurring at low oxygen fugacity) of the sealed crucible environment which is the environment actually achieved in the fluidized bed steam reformer process. Solid product dissolution in water was used to measure soluble cations and anions, and to investigate insoluble

  15. Exergo-economic analysis of finned tube for waste heat recovery including phase change heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Shuang Ying; Jiu, Jing Rui; Xiao, Lan; Li, You Rong; Liu, Chao; Xu, Jin Liang

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, an exergo-economic criterion, i.e. the net profit per unit transferred heat load, is established from the perspective of exergy recovery to evaluate the performance of finned tube used in waste heat recovery. Also, the dimensionless exergy change number is introduced to investigate the effect of the flow (mechanical) exergy loss rate on the recovered thermal exergy. Selecting R245fa as a working fluid and exhaust flue gas as a heat source, the effects of the internal Reynolds number Re_i, the external Reynolds number Re_o , the unit cost of thermal exergy ε_q , the geometric parameter of finned tube η_oβ and the phase change temperature T_v etc. on the performance of finned tube are discussed in detail. The results show that the higher T_v and η_oβ, and lower Re_i may lead to the negligible flow(mechanical) exergy loss rate. There exists an optimal value of Re_i where the net profit per unit transferred heat load peaks, while the variations of Re_o, ε_q and T_v cause monotonic change of the net profit per unit transferred heat load. The phase change temperature exerts relatively greater influence on the exergo-economic performance of finned tube in comparison with other parameters. And there exists a critical phase change temperature, where the net profit per unit transferred heat load is equal to zero.

  16. Application of wasted sea-shell to desulfurizer in fluidized bed coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naruse, Ichiro; Saito, Katsuhiro; Murakami, Takahiro

    1999-07-01

    Almost all wasted seashells consist of CaCo{sub 3}, and are similar to limestone. It would be proposed that the seashell could be applied as a desulfurizer. In this study, desulfurization characteristics of the seashell are fundamentally studied by using a thermobalance and a bubbling fluidized coal combustor with comparing the results obtained by limestone as a reference. Under the constant calcination temperature, the desulfurization efficiency for the seashells attains more than about 70% after the desulfurization period of 30 h. For the limestones, on the other hand, the desulfurization efficiency becomes only 38%. Under practical conditions of fluidized bed coal combustion, the desulfurization efficiency for the seashells also indicates higher value than that for the limestones. The desulfurization efficiency depends on the pore size distribution of CaO rather than its specific surface area. The mean pore size of the calcined seashell is about 10 times as large as that of the calcined limestones. from Scanning Electro-Microscope (SEM) photos of the surface of CaCO{sub 3}, CaO and the sulfurized particles of the seashells the large pores can be observed. In measuring cross-sectional distribution of sulfur inside the particles by using an Energy Dispersed X-ray (EDX) system, the sulfur in the sulfurized particle of limestone is only trapped near the particle surface. For the seashells, whereas, the sulfur is distributed over the whole body of particle. Desulfurization efficiency for the limestone, into which some alkali metal compounds are added, increases with increasing the concentration of alkali metal compounds added. In order of increasing effect the key elemental species to enhance the desulfurization activities are Cl, Na and K. Alkali metal compounds can enhance the desulfurization activities, due to solution of CaO in molten NaCl. This is one of the reasons why the desulfurization efficiency for the seashells improves.

  17. Thermoelectrics for waste heat recovery and climate control in automobiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maranville, Clay W. [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Schmitz, Peter [Ford Forschungszentrum Aachen GmbH, Aachen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) devices have received renewed attention in the past decade for use in light-duty automotive applications. Governmental organizations and private corporations world-wide are sponsoring research at both the basic materials level, as well as for applied research and technology demonstrations. This funding has led to measurable improvement in TE device cost and efficiency, as well as spurring the emergence and growth of a vertically-integrated TE industry. The two broad categories of applications that have been considered for thermoelectrics are power generation through waste-heat recovery and cabin climate control through the use of TE heat pumps. Neither of these uses of TE devices has ever been commercialized in large-scale vehicle applications, in large part due to the challenges of low device efficiency and high costs. While it is still not clear that TEs will emerge as a winner in the marketplace in the near-term, there are several new developments which provide justification for this renewed interest. Among these reasons are increasing electrification of the vehicle fleet, demands from governments and consumers for improvement in fuel economy and reduction in tailpipe CO{sub 2} emissions, and a greater emphasis on occupant comfort. With governments and industry around the world placing substantial financial bets on the promise of this technology to help address national and global concerns for reducing CO{sub 2} and hydrocarbon consumption, it makes sense for the automotive industry to leverage this investment and to re-evaluate TE-based technology for use in vehicles. In this paper, we will present an overview of Ford Motor Company's current and upcoming research efforts into TE technology. This effort is focused on the use of TE waste heat recovery systems in a vehicle exhaust; and the use of TE HVAC systems in hybrid vehicles. We will discuss the role of the automotive OEM in establishing guidelines and targets for cost, power density

  18. Conceptual design of retrieval systems for emplaced transuranic waste containers in a salt bed depository. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogleman, S.F.

    1980-04-01

    The US Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have jurisdiction over the nuclear waste management program. Design studies were previously made of proposed repository site configurations for the receiving, processing, and storage of nuclear wastes. However, these studies did not provide operational designs that were suitable for highly reliable TRU retrieval in the deep geologic salt environment for the required 60-year period. The purpose of this report is to develop a conceptual design of a baseline retrieval system for emplaced transuranic waste containers in a salt bed depository. The conceptual design is to serve as a working model for the analysis of the performance available from the current state-of-the-art equipment and systems. Suggested regulations would be based upon the results of the performance analyses

  19. Simulation of volumetrically heated pebble beds in solid breeding blankets for fusion reactors. Modelling, experimental validation and sensitivity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Gonzalez, Francisco Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The Breeder Units contains pebble beds of lithium orthosilicate (Li_4SiO_4) as tritium breeder material and beryllium as neutron multiplier. In this dissertation a closed validation strategy for the thermo-mechanical validation of the Breeder Units has been developed. This strategy is based on the development of dedicated testing and modeling tools, which are needed for the qualification of the thermo-mechanical functionality of these components in an out-of-pile experimental campaign. The neutron flux in the Breeder Units induces a nonhomogeneous volumetric heating in the pebble beds that must be mimicked in an out-of-pile experiment with an external heating system minimizing the intrusion in the pebble beds. Therefore, a heater system that simulates this volumetric heating has been developed. This heater system is based on ohmic heating and linear heater elements, which approximates the point heat sources of the granular material by linear sources. These linear sources represent ''linear pebbles'' in discrete locations close enough to relatively reproduce the thermal gradients occurring in the functional materials. The heater concept has been developed for the Li_4SiO_4 and it is based on a hexagonal matrix arrangement of linear and parallel heater elements of diameter 1 mm separated by 7 mm. A set of uniformly distributed thermocouples in the transversal and longitudinal direction in the pebble bed midplane allows a 2D temperature reconstruction of that measurement plane by means of biharmonic spline interpolation. This heating system has been implemented in a relevant Breeder Unit region and its proof-of-concept has been tested in a PRE-test Mock-Up eXperiment (PREMUX) that has been designed and constructed in the frame of this dissertation. The packing factor of the pebble bed with and without the heating system does not show significant differences, giving an indirect evidence of the low intrusion of the system. Such low intrusion has been confirmed by in

  20. Simulation of volumetrically heated pebble beds in solid breeding blankets for fusion reactors. Modelling, experimental validation and sensitivity studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Gonzalez, Francisco Alberto

    2016-10-14

    The Breeder Units contains pebble beds of lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) as tritium breeder material and beryllium as neutron multiplier. In this dissertation a closed validation strategy for the thermo-mechanical validation of the Breeder Units has been developed. This strategy is based on the development of dedicated testing and modeling tools, which are needed for the qualification of the thermo-mechanical functionality of these components in an out-of-pile experimental campaign. The neutron flux in the Breeder Units induces a nonhomogeneous volumetric heating in the pebble beds that must be mimicked in an out-of-pile experiment with an external heating system minimizing the intrusion in the pebble beds. Therefore, a heater system that simulates this volumetric heating has been developed. This heater system is based on ohmic heating and linear heater elements, which approximates the point heat sources of the granular material by linear sources. These linear sources represent ''linear pebbles'' in discrete locations close enough to relatively reproduce the thermal gradients occurring in the functional materials. The heater concept has been developed for the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} and it is based on a hexagonal matrix arrangement of linear and parallel heater elements of diameter 1 mm separated by 7 mm. A set of uniformly distributed thermocouples in the transversal and longitudinal direction in the pebble bed midplane allows a 2D temperature reconstruction of that measurement plane by means of biharmonic spline interpolation. This heating system has been implemented in a relevant Breeder Unit region and its proof-of-concept has been tested in a PRE-test Mock-Up eXperiment (PREMUX) that has been designed and constructed in the frame of this dissertation. The packing factor of the pebble bed with and without the heating system does not show significant differences, giving an indirect evidence of the low intrusion of the system. Such

  1. DuraLith geopolymer waste form for Hanford secondary waste: Correlating setting behavior to hydration heat evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Hui; Gong, Weiliang; Syltebo, Larry; Lutze, Werner; Pegg, Ian L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Quantitative correlations firstly established for cementitious waste forms. • Quantitative correlations firstly established for geopolymeric materials. • Ternary DuraLith geopolymer waste forms for Hanford radioactive wastes. • Extended setting times which improve workability for geopolymer waste forms. • Reduced hydration heat release from DuraLith geopolymer waste forms. - Abstract: The binary furnace slag-metakaolin DuraLith geopolymer waste form, which has been considered as one of the candidate waste forms for immobilization of certain Hanford secondary wastes (HSW) from the vitrification of nuclear wastes at the Hanford Site, Washington, was extended to a ternary fly ash-furnace slag-metakaolin system to improve workability, reduce hydration heat, and evaluate high HSW waste loading. A concentrated HSW simulant, consisting of more than 20 chemicals with a sodium concentration of 5 mol/L, was employed to prepare the alkaline activating solution. Fly ash was incorporated at up to 60 wt% into the binder materials, whereas metakaolin was kept constant at 26 wt%. The fresh waste form pastes were subjected to isothermal calorimetry and setting time measurement, and the cured samples were further characterized by compressive strength and TCLP leach tests. This study has firstly established quantitative linear relationships between both initial and final setting times and hydration heat, which were never discovered in scientific literature for any cementitious waste form or geopolymeric material. The successful establishment of the correlations between setting times and hydration heat may make it possible to efficiently design and optimize cementitious waste forms and industrial wastes based geopolymers using limited testing results

  2. Assessment of Feasibility of the Beneficial Use of Waste Heat from the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna P. Guillen

    2012-07-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using waste heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). A proposed glycol waste heat recovery system was assessed for technical and economic feasibility. The system under consideration would use waste heat from the ATR secondary coolant system to preheat air for space heating of TRA-670. A tertiary coolant stream would be extracted from the secondary coolant system loop and pumped to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, where heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air in the heating and ventilation system. Historical data from Advanced Test Reactor operations over the past 10 years indicates that heat from the reactor coolant was available (when needed for heating) for 43.5% of the year on average. Potential energy cost savings by using the waste heat to preheat intake air is $242K/yr. Technical, safety, and logistics considerations of the glycol waste heat recovery system are outlined. Other opportunities for using waste heat and reducing water usage at ATR are considered.

  3. Predicted peak temperature-rises around a high-level radioactive waste canister emplaced in the deep ocean bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kipp, K.L.

    1978-06-01

    A simple mathematical model of heat conduction was used to evaluate the peak temperature-rise along the wall of a canister of high-level radioactive waste buried in deep ocean sediment. Three different amounts of vitrified waste, corresponding to standard Harvest, large Harvest, and AVM canisters, and three different waste loadings were studied. Peak temperature-rise was computed for the nine cases as a function of canister geometry and storage time between reprocessing and burial. Lower waste loadings or longer storage times than initially envisaged are necessary to prevent the peak temperature-rise from exceeding 200 0 C. The use of longer, thinner cylinders only modestly reduces the storage time for a given peak temperature. Effects of stacking of waste canisters and of close-packing were also studied. (author)

  4. Bromine based mercury abatement in waste and coal combustion. Mercury retention in the catalyst bed of a tail-end-SCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vosteen, Bernhard W. [Vosteen Consulting GmbH, Koeln (Germany); Kanefke, Rico; Beyer, Joachim; Bonkhofer, Theodor Gerhard [CURRENTA GmbH und Co. OHG, Leverkusen (Germany); Ullrich, Rick [WastePro Engineering Inc., Kennett Square, PA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Observations and testing at a CURRENTA waste incineration plant and several coal fired power plants has derived the following aspects of mercury behavior in the plant's waste heat boiler and its gas cleaning train: - Hg{sub met} is oxidized to Hg{sub ion} most readily by bromine, and also by chlorine, - sulfur (SO{sub 2}) inhibit the Hg{sub met} chlorination but not the Hg{sub met} bromination, - Hg{sub met} passes through scrubbers and is adsorbed onto the catalyst bed of a tail-end SCR, slowly oxidized and finally elutes off as Hg{sub ion}, - sulfur (SO{sub 2}) impacts the reduction of molecular halogens in different ways; SO{sub 2} reduces Cl{sub 2} at elevated temperatures (boiler range), but reduces Br{sub 2} only at low temperatures (scrubber range) The operational tests and studies performed in the spring and summer of 2000 at this plant led to some specific knowledge about Hg{sub met} adsorption and also Hg{sub ion} desorption at the catalyst bed of a tail-end SCR. This knowledge, which was at that time in many respects novel, has provided more insight into the mercury oxidation behaviour. Today, process options derived from this knowledge could be implemented in hazardous waste incineration plants and also municipal solid waste incineration plants, to achieve complete mercury halogenation in the boiler flue gas, ahead of the scrubber system, at any time. This might prevent penetration of metallic mercury to the tail-end SCR and avoid the corresponding long time mercury elution. For effective prevention to be achieved in practice, it is strongly recommended to also install a continuously measuring (possibly uncalibrated) AAS mercury monitor for immediate detection of any unexpected Hg{sub met} breakthrough, for example caused by ''hidden mercury'' in the waste feed, and to initiate the rapid (preferably automized) injection of some bromine compound before even more mercury is transferred into the tail-end SCR, stored there as Hg

  5. Mineral and chemical composition of mine wastes of Markusovce sludge bed; Mineralne a chemicke zlozenie banskych odpadov odkaliska Markusovce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radkova, A; Volekova, B [Univerzita Komenskeho v Bratislave, Prirodovedecka fakulta, Katedra mineralogie a petrologie, 84215 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-04-25

    Identification of minerals occurring in sludge bed material allows to assess the extent of migration of elements in the actual body of the sludge bed. It provides important information on the potential environmental pollution as well as on possible contamination of groundwater by potentially toxic elements. In Markusovce sludge bed there is saved about 9.9 million tons of waste material after flotation treatment of barytes - siderite-sulphide ore. Currently, the sludge bed is being extracted again due to the high content of barite. Concentrations of potentially toxic elements can be considered as relatively low. The most commonly occurring minerals in the samples are siderite and quartz, with minor rates are represented muscovite and dolomite. The content of barite increases towards the depth, which may be due to imperfect ore processing technology during the early stages of mining. Hematite is abundantly presented in the heavy fraction of the samples. The sulphide content is generally low, pyrite, chalcopyrite, tetrahedrite and cinnabar are most frequently presented. Monitored potentially toxic elements are mainly bounded to the primary sulfide minerals that are poorly oxidized. (authors)

  6. Capturing the Invisible Resource. Analysis of Waste Heat Potential in Chinese Industry and Policy Options for Waste Heat to Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Hongyou [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This study analyzed the theoretical maximum potential and practical potential of waste heat in the cement, iron, and steel, and glass sectors in China, based on thermal energy modeling, expert interviews, and literature reviews.

  7. Quantitative flow visualization of fluidized-bed heat exchanger by neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, M.; Umekawa, H.; Furui, S.; Hayashi, K.; Takenaka, N.

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative flow visualization of a gas-solid fluidized-bed installed vertical tube-bank has been successfully conducted using neutron radiography and image processing technique. The quantitative data of void fraction distribution as well as the fluctuation data are presented. The time-averaged void fraction is well correlated by the drift-flux model. The bubbles formed in the bed, rise along the vertical tubes and the observed bubble size is smaller than that in a free bubbling bed without tube-banks. The bubble diameter is well correlated by the modified Mori and Wen's correlation taking into account the pitch of tube arrangement. The bubble rise velocity is also well correlated by applying the drift-flux model. These results are consistent for both bed materials of Geldart's B- and A-particles, while the bubble size is significantly different between two kinds of particles

  8. Bypass valve and coolant flow controls for optimum temperatures in waste heat recovery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Gregory P

    2013-10-08

    Implementing an optimized waste heat recovery system includes calculating a temperature and a rate of change in temperature of a heat exchanger of a waste heat recovery system, and predicting a temperature and a rate of change in temperature of a material flowing through a channel of the waste heat recovery system. Upon determining the rate of change in the temperature of the material is predicted to be higher than the rate of change in the temperature of the heat exchanger, the optimized waste heat recovery system calculates a valve position and timing for the channel that is configurable for achieving a rate of material flow that is determined to produce and maintain a defined threshold temperature of the heat exchanger, and actuates the valve according to the calculated valve position and calculated timing.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Flow and Heat Transfer in Structured Packed Beds with Smooth or Dimpled Spheres at Low Channel to Particle Diameter Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyang Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Packed beds are widely used in catalytic reactors or nuclear reactors. Reducing the pressure drop and improving the heat transfer performance of a packed bed is a common research aim. The dimpled structure has a complex influence on the flow and heat transfer characteristics. In the present study, the flow and heat transfer characteristics in structured packed beds with smooth or dimpled spheres are numerically investigated, where two different low channel to particle diameter ratios (N = 1.00 and N = 1.15 are considered. The pressure drop and the Nusselt number are obtained. The results show that, for N = 1.00, compared with the structured packed bed with smooth spheres, the structured packed bed with dimpled spheres has a lower pressure drop and little higher Nusselt number at 1500 < ReH < 14,000, exhibiting an improved overall heat transfer performance. However, for N = 1.15, the structured packed bed with dimpled spheres shows a much higher pressure drop, which dominantly affects the overall heat transfer performance, causing it to be weaker. Comparing the different channel to particle diameter ratios, we find that different configurations can result in: (i completely different drag reduction effect; and (ii relatively less influence on heat transfer enhancement.

  10. Impact of the amount of working fluid in loop heat pipe to remove waste heat from electronic component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smitka Martin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the options on how to remove waste heat from electronic components is using loop heat pipe. The loop heat pipe (LHP is a two-phase device with high effective thermal conductivity that utilizes change phase to transport heat. It was invented in Russia in the early 1980’s. The main parts of LHP are an evaporator, a condenser, a compensation chamber and a vapor and liquid lines. Only the evaporator and part of the compensation chamber are equipped with a wick structure. Inside loop heat pipe is working fluid. As a working fluid can be used distilled water, acetone, ammonia, methanol etc. Amount of filling is important for the operation and performance of LHP. This work deals with the design of loop heat pipe and impact of filling ratio of working fluid to remove waste heat from insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT.

  11. Automotive absorption air conditioner utilizing solar and motor waste heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popinski, Z. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    In combination with the ground vehicles powered by a waste heat generating electric motor, a cooling system including a generator for driving off refrigerant vapor from a strong refrigerant absorbant solution is described. A solar collector, an air-cooled condenser connected with the generator for converting the refrigerant vapor to its liquid state, an air cooled evaporator connected with the condenser for returning the liquid refrigerant to its vapor state, and an absorber is connected to the generator and to the evaporator for dissolving the refrigerant vapor in the weak refrigerant absorbant solution, for providing a strong refrigerant solution. A pump is used to establish a pressurized flow of strong refrigerant absorbant solution from the absorber through the electric motor, and to the collector.

  12. Utilization of waste heat from electricity generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.F.S.

    1977-06-01

    Historically the nuclear power station has been designed solely as an electricity producer. But in Canada today only 15 percent of our energy consumption is as electricity. The non-electrical needs today are supplied almost entirely by natural gas and oil. There is an incentive to see whether a nuclear station could supply energy for some of these non-electrical needs, thus freeing gas and oil for uses for which they may be more valuable and suitable, especially in transportation. A group located at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment undertook a series of studies to examine this problem. These studies were done in sufficient depth to provide technological and economic answers, and as a result several reports have been published on various topics. In this report, the findings from these studies are drawn together in an assessment of the potential in Canada for using waste heat. (author)

  13. Reducing the Cost of RLS: Waste Heat from Crop Production Can Be Used for Waste Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamparter, Richard; Flynn, Michael; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The applicability of plant-based life support systems has traditionally suffered from the limitations imposed by the high energy demand of controlled environment growth chambers. Theme types of systems are typically less than 2% efficient at converting electrical energy into biomass. The remaining 98% of supplied energy is converted to thermal energy. Traditionally this thermal energy is discharged to the ambient environment as waste heat. This paper describes an energy efficient plant-based life support system which has been designed for use at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. At the South Pole energy is not lost to the environment. What is lost is the ability to extract useful work from it. The CELSS Antarctic Analog Program (CAAP) has developed a system which is designed to extract useful work from the waste thermal energy generated from plant growth lighting systems. In the CAAP system this energy is used to purify Station Sewage.

  14. Model predictive control of a waste heat recovery system for automotive diesel engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feru, E.; Willems, F.P.T.; de Jager, A.G.; Steinbuch, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a switching Model Predictive Control strategy is designed for an automotive Waste Heat Recovery system with two parallel evaporators. The objective is to maximize Waste Heat Recovery system output power, while satisfying safe operation under highly dynamic disturbances from the

  15. System and method for determining the net output torque from a waste heat recovery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricaud, Christophe; Ernst, Timothy C.; Zigan, James A.

    2016-12-13

    The disclosure provides a waste heat recovery system with a system and method for calculation of the net output torque from the waste heat recovery system. The calculation uses inputs from existing pressure and speed sensors to create a virtual pump torque sensor and a virtual expander torque sensor, and uses these sensors to provide an accurate net torque output from the WHR system.

  16. Uses of the waste heat from the interim fuel storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehrum, A.

    It was the objective of this study to investigate the possibilities of a convenient use of the waste heat from the designed interim fuel storage at Ahaus. In this sense the following possibilities have been investigated: district heating, heat for industrial processes, fish-production, green house-heating, production of methane from original waste, agrotherm (agricultur field heating). It has been shown, that an economical behaviour for nearly all variations is not given without the financial help of the government, because of the high costs for heat transport and out-put. The most economical project is the intensive fish production plant. (orig.) [de

  17. Avoidable and unavoidable exergy destructions of a fluidized bed coal combustor and a heat recovery steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callak, Meliha; Balkan, Firuz; Hepbasli, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Performing advanced exergy analysis of a fluidized-bed combustion for the first time. • Comparing conventional and modified exergy efficiencies of the subsystems. • Deducting inefficiencies of the system components for possible improvements. - Abstract: Advanced exergy analysis was performed using the actual operational data taken from a fluidized bed coal combustor (FBCC) and a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) in a textile plant located at Torbalı, Izmir. First, the conventional exergy analysis of the units was carried out. The exergetic efficiencies of the units were found to be 44.2% and 46.2%, respectively. Advanced exergy analysis was then performed by splitting the exergy destructions of the units into avoidable and unavoidable parts. The avoidable exergy destruction rates of the FBCC and the HRSG were determined to be 2999 kW and 760 kW according to the measurements. Correspondingly, the exergy efficiencies were modified to 53.1% and 48.1%, respectively

  18. Experimental investigations on friction laws and dryout heat flux of particulate beds packed with multi-size spheres and irregular particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Liangxing; Ma, Weimin

    2011-01-01

    This paper is concerned with reducing uncertainty in quantification of debris bed coolability in a hypothetical severe accident of light water reactors (LWRs). A test facility named POMECO-FL is constructed to investigate the friction laws of adiabatic single and two-phase flow in a particulate bed packed with multi-size spheres or irregular particles. The same types of particles were then loaded in the test section of the POMECO-HT facility to obtain the dryout heat flux of the volumetrically heated particulate bed. The POMECO-HT facility features a high power capacity (up to 2.1 MW/m 2 ) which enables coolability study on particulate bed with broad variations in porosity and particle diameters under both top-flooding and bottom-injection conditions. The results show that given the effective particle diameter obtained from single-phase flow through the packed bed with multi-size spheres or irregular particles, both the pressure drop and the dryout heat flux of two-phase flow through the bed can be predicted by the Reed model. The bottom injection of coolant increases the dryout heat flux significantly. Meanwhile, the elevation of the dryout position is moving upwards with increasing bottom-injection flowrate. The experimental data provides insights for interpretation of debris bed coolability, as well as high-quality data for validation of the coolability analysis models and codes. (author)

  19. Simultaneous heat integration and techno-economic optimization of Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) for multiple waste heat stream recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Haoshui; Eason, John; Biegler, Lorenz T.; Feng, Xiao

    2017-01-01

    In the past decades, the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) has become a promising technology for low and medium temperature energy utilization. In refineries, there are usually multiple waste heat streams to be recovered. From a safety and controllability perspective, using an intermedium (hot water) to recover waste heat before releasing heat to the ORC system is more favorable than direct integration. The mass flowrate of the intermediate hot water stream determines the amount of waste heat recovered and the final hot water temperature affects the thermal efficiency of ORC. Both, in turn, exert great influence on the power output. Therefore, the hot water mass flowrate is a critical decision variable for the optimal design of the system. This study develops a model for techno-economic optimization of an ORC with simultaneous heat recovery and capital cost optimization. The ORC is modeled using rigorous thermodynamics with the concept of state points. The task of waste heat recovery using the hot water intermedium is modeled using the Duran-Grossmann model for simultaneous heat integration and process optimization. The combined model determines the optimal design of an ORC that recovers multiple waste heat streams in a large scale background process using an intermediate heat transfer stream. In particular, the model determines the optimal heat recovery approach temperature (HRAT), the utility load of the background process, and the optimal operating conditions of the ORC simultaneously. The effectiveness of this method is demonstrated with a case study that uses a refinery as the background process. Sensitivity of the optimal solution to the parameters (electricity price, utility cost) is quantified in this paper. - Highlights: • A new model for Organic Rankine cycle design optimization is presented. • Process heat integration and ORC are considered simultaneously. • Rigorous equation oriented models of the ORC are used for accurate results. • Impact of working

  20. Process Stability Identification Through Dynamic Study of Single-bed Ammonia Reactor with Feed-Effluent Heat Exchanger (FEHE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhi Tri Partono

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In ammonia reactor system, a feed-effluent heat exchanger (FEHE is typically installed to utilize reaction-generated heat to heat the reactor’s feed. Utilizing energy from exothermic reaction to the incoming feed stream is often called “autothermic operation”. Despite the advantage of FEHE, there is a risk of utilizing FEHE in a reactor system such as instability of process temperature or known as hysteresis. Hysteresis phenomena in chemical process could cause operational problems, for example it could damage the integrity of the equipment’s material. This paper aims to evaluate the dynamic behavior of a single-bed ammonia reactor with FEHE, particularly to propose a way to prevent instability within the system. The dynamic simulation of the single-bed ammonia reactor with FEHE was performed with Aspen HYSYS v8.8. The result of the simulation result shows that hysteresis phenomenon in the ammonia reactor system occurs when the feed’s temperature is below a certain value. If the feed temperature reaches that value, the temperature of the reactor’s outlet oscillates. One of the solution to keep the feed temperature above that critical value is by installing a trim heater within the system. Based on the simulation, trim heater installation within the system is able to prevent hysteresis in the system evaluated.

  1. Experimental study of gas combustion fluidized bed and radiation contribution to heat transfer inside the bed. Gas nensho ryudoso to sono sonai netsudentatsu ni okeru fukusha no kiyo ni tsuite no jikkenteki kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Y; Takahashi, S [Mechanical Engineering Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Maki, H [Science Univ. of Tokyo, Noda, Chiba (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology

    1992-11-25

    Fluidized bed as a coal combustion boiler has a practical application, but, there is not an example of which gas like helium as a cooling medium flow in a thin tube with diameter of 6 mm like a stirling engine and necessary data for selecting the medium of fluidized bed and estimating the heat transfer coefficient. Specially, it is difficult to correctly estimate the radiation effect concerned with the heat transfer coefficient in case of interposing the heat transfer tube at 800 [degree]C in the high-temperature fluidized bed at more than 900 [degree]C. Therefore, for investigating the thermal characteristics when the temperature of pipe itself is at high temperature, in the gas combustion fluidized bed in which alumina particle as fluidized medium is filled, the cooling tubes by using carbonic acid gas as a cooling medium was interposed, heat transfer coefficient was measured, radiation effect was clarified by experiment, and characteristics of the gas combustion and of the exhaust gas of fluidized bed when gas is used for a fuel was investigated. 13 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Radioactive Demonstration Of Mineralized Waste Forms Made From Hanford Low Activity Waste (Tank SX-105 And AN-103) By Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, Carol; Herman, Connie; Crawford, Charles; Bannochie, Christopher; Burket, Paul; Daniel, Gene; Cozzi, Alex; Nash, Charles; Miller, Donald; Missimer, David

    2014-01-10

    One of the immobilization technologies under consideration as a Supplemental Treatment for Hanford’s Low Activity Waste (LAW) is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR). The FBSR technology forms a mineral waste form at moderate processing temperatures thus retaining and atomically bonding the halides, sulfates, and technetium in the mineral phases (nepheline, sodalite, nosean, carnegieite). Additions of kaolin clay are used instead of glass formers and the minerals formed by the FBSR technology offers (1) atomic bonding of the radionuclides and constituents of concern (COC) comparable to glass, (2) short and long term durability comparable to glass, (3) disposal volumes comparable to glass, and (4) higher Na2O and SO{sub 4} waste loadings than glass. The higher FBSR Na{sub 2}O and SO{sub 4} waste loadings contribute to the low disposal volumes but also provide for more rapid processing of the LAW. Recent FBSR processing and testing of Hanford radioactive LAW (Tank SX-105 and AN-103) waste is reported and compared to previous radioactive and non-radioactive LAW processing and testing.

  3. Process and device for determining the effect of river water heating by waste heat on its temperature characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietzsch, L.; Kauer, H.; Lautersack, K.

    1979-01-01

    It is proposed to use measurements for determining the effect of heating river water by introducing waste heat from industrial plants or power-stations, instead of deriving the effect from calculations. A suitable method of measurement is proposed and discussed. (UWI) 891 HP/UWI 892 CKA [de

  4. Avoiding Carbon Bed Hot Spots in Thermal Process Off-Gas Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soelberg, Nick; Enneking, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Mercury has had various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so is often present in radioactive and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. Test programs performed in recent years have shown that mercury in off-gas streams from processes that treat radioactive wastes can be controlled using fixed beds of activated sulfur-impregnated carbon, to levels low enough to comply with air emission regulations such as the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. Carbon bed hot spots or fires have occurred several times during these tests, and also during a remediation of tanks that contained mixed waste. Hot spots occur when localized areas in a carbon bed become heated to temperatures where oxidation occurs. This heating typically occurs due to heat of absorption of gas species onto the carbon, but it can also be caused through external means such as external heaters used to heat the carbon bed vessel. Hot spots, if not promptly mitigated, can grow into bed fires. Carbon bed hot spots and fires must be avoided in processes that treat radioactive and mixed waste. Hot spots are detected by (a) monitoring in-bed and bed outlet gas temperatures, and (b) more important, monitoring of bed outlet gas CO concentrations. Hot spots are mitigated by (a) designing for appropriate in-bed gas velocity, for avoiding gas flow maldistribution, and for sufficient but not excessive bed depth, (b) appropriate monitoring and control of gas and bed temperatures and compositions, and (c) prompt implementation of corrective actions if bed hot spots are detected. Corrective actions must be implemented quickly if bed hot spots are detected, using a graded approach and sequence starting with corrective actions that are simple, quick, cause the least impact to the process, and are easiest to recover from.

  5. A combined thermodynamic cycle used for waste heat recovery of internal combustion engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Maogang; Zhang, Xinxin; Zeng, Ke; Gao, Ke

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a steady-state experiment, energy balance and exergy analysis of exhaust gas in order to improve the recovery of the waste heat of an internal combustion engine (ICE). Considering the different characteristics of the waste heat of exhaust gas, cooling water, and lubricant, a combined thermodynamic cycle for waste heat recovery of ICE is proposed. This combined thermodynamic cycle consists of two cycles: the organic Rankine cycle (ORC), for recovering the waste heat of lubricant and high-temperature exhaust gas, and the Kalina cycle, for recovering the waste heat of low-temperature cooling water. Based on Peng–Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS), the thermodynamic parameters in the high-temperature ORC were calculated and determined via an in-house computer program. Suitable working fluids used in high-temperature ORC are proposed and the performance of this combined thermodynamic cycle is analyzed. Compared with the traditional cycle configuration, more waste heat can be recovered by the combined cycle introduced in this paper. -- Highlights: ► We study the energy balance of fuel in internal combustion engine. ► Heat recovery effect of exhaust gas is good when ICE is at a high-load condition. ► We propose a new combined thermodynamic cycle for waste heat of ICE. ► The combined cycle has a higher recovery efficiency than previous configurations.

  6. APPLICATIONS OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE TO WASTE HEAT RECOVERY IN THE FOOD PROCESSING INDUSTRY, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, W. L.; Christenson, James A.

    1979-07-31

    A project is discussed in which the possibilities for economical waste heat recovery and utilization in the food industry were examined. Waste heat availability and applications surveys were performed at two manufacturing plants engaged in low temperature (freezing) and high temperature (cooking, sterilizing, etc.) food processing. The surveys indicate usable waste heat is available in significant quantities which could be applied to existing, on-site energy demands resulting in sizable reductions in factory fuel and energy usage. At the high temperature plant, the energy demands involve the heating of fresh water for boiler make-up, for the food processes and for the daily clean-up operation. Clean-up poses an opportunity for thermal energy storage since waste heat is produced during the one or two production shifts of each working day while the major clean-up effort does not occur until food production ends. At the frozen food facility, the clean-up water application again exists and, in addition, refrigeration waste heat could also be applied to warm the soil beneath the ground floor freezer space. Systems to recover and apply waste heat in these situations were developed conceptually and thermal/economic performance predictions were obtained. The results of those studies indicate the economics of waste heat recovery can be attractive for facilities with high energy demand levels. Small factories, however, with relatively low energy demands may find the economics marginal although, percentagewise, the fuel and energy savings are appreciable.

  7. Attenuation of the protein wasting associated with bed rest by branched-chain amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. P.; Schluter, M. D.; Leskiw, M. J.; Boden, G.

    1999-01-01

    Bed rest is generally accepted as being an appropriate ground-based model for human spaceflight. The objectives of this study were to test the hypothesis that increasing the amount of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) in the diet could attenuate the protein loss associated with bed rest. Nineteen healthy subjects were randomized into two groups according to diet. During the 6 d of bed rest, the diets were supplemented with either 30 mmol/d each of three non-essential amino acids, glycine, serine, and alanine (control group), or with 30 mmol/d each of the BCAAs, leucine, isoleucine, and valine (BCAA group). Nutrition was supplied as a commercially available defined formula diet at a rate of 1.3 x REE. Nitrogen (N) balance and urinary 3-MeH excretion were determined for the 6 d. In our results, the urine-based estimate of N balance was 22.2 +/- 14.4 (n = 9) mg N.kg-1.d-1 and 60.5 +/- 10.1 mg (n = 8) N.kg-1.d-1 for the control and BCAA-supplemented groups, respectively (P < 0.05). Urinary 3-MeH excretion was unchanged in both groups with bed rest. We conclude that BCAA supplementation attenuates the N loss during short-term bed rest.

  8. 40 CFR 63.6092 - Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Combustion Turbines What This Subpart Covers § 63.6092 Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY? No, duct burners and waste heat recovery units are considered steam generating units... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Are duct burners and waste heat...

  9. Energy, environmental and operation aspects of a SRF-fired fluidized bed waste-to-energy plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gisi, Sabino; Chiarelli, Agnese; Tagliente, Luca; Notarnicola, Michele

    2018-03-01

    A methodology based on the ISO 14031:2013 guideline has been developed and applied to a full-scale fluidized bed waste to energy plant (WtE) burning solid recovered fuel (SRF). With reference to 3years of operation, the data on energy and environmental performance, on raw materials consumptions such as sand and diesel fuel, accidental reasons of plant shutdown, have been acquired and analyzed. The obtained results have allowed to quantify the energy and environmental performance of the WtE plant under investigation by varying the amount and mixings of the inlet waste, available in form of thickened and fluff (similar to coriander) SRF. In terms of the energy performance, the fluidized bed technology applied to the SRF was able to guarantee an adequate production of electricity (satisfying the market demands), showing a relative flexibility with respect to the inlet waste. In terms of net energy production efficiency, the plant showed values in the range of 13.8-14.9% in line with similar installations. In terms of the environmental performance, the adoption of a cleaning system based on SNCR (Selective Non Catalitic Reduction)+semi-dry scrubbing+Fabric filter generated emissions usually well below the limits set by the EU Directive 2000/76/EC as well as the Italian Law 46/2014 (more restrictive) with reference to all the key parameters. In terms of the plant shutdown, the majority of problems focused on the combustion chamber and boiler due to the erosion of the refractory material of the furnace as well as to the breaking of the superheaters of the boiler. In contrast, the mechanical and electrical causes, along with those related to the control and instrumentation system, were of secondary importance. The sand bed de-fluidization was also among the leading causes of a frequent plant shutdown. In particular, results showed how although the SRF presents standard characteristics, the use of different mixtures may affect the number of plant shutdowns. The full

  10. Corrosion Behavior of Heat-Treated AlSi10Mg Manufactured by Laser Powder Bed Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Cabrini

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This experimental work is aimed at studying the effect of microstructural modifications induced by post-processing heat treatments on the corrosion behavior of silicon-aluminum alloys produced by means of laser powder bed fusion (LPBF. The manufacturing technique leads to microstructures characterized by the presence of melt pools, which are quite different compared to casting alloys. In this study, the behavior of an AlSi10Mg alloy was evaluated by means of intergranular corrosion tests according to ISO 11846 standard on heat-treated samples ranging from 200 to 500 °C as well as on untreated samples. We found that temperatures above 200 °C reduced microhardness of the alloy, and different corrosion morphologies occurred due to the modification of both size and distribution of silicon precipitates. Selective penetrating attacks occurred at melt pool borders. The intergranular corrosion phenomena were less intense for as-produced specimens without heat treatments compared to the heat-treated specimens at 200 and 300 °C. General corrosion morphologies were noticed for specimens heat treated at temperatures exceeding 400 °C.

  11. HWVP submerged bed scrubber waste treatment by ion exchange at high pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, L.A.; Carson, K.J.; Elovich, R.J.; Eakin, D.E.

    1996-03-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is expected to produce aqueous waste streams that will require further processing for cesium, strontium, and transuranic (TRU) removal prior to incorporation into grout. Fluor Daniel, Inc. has recommended that zeolite be added to these waste streams for adsorption of cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) following pH adjustment by sodium hydroxide (NAOH) addition. Filtration will then used to remove the TRU elements associated with the process solids and the zeolite containing the Cs and Sr

  12. HWVP submerged bed scrubber waste treatment by ion exchange at high pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bray, L.A.; Carson, K.J.; Elovich, R.J.; Eakin, D.E.

    1996-03-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is expected to produce aqueous waste streams that will require further processing for cesium, strontium, and transuranic (TRU) removal prior to incorporation into grout. Fluor Daniel, Inc. has recommended that zeolite be added to these waste streams for adsorption of cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) following pH adjustment by sodium hydroxide (NAOH) addition. Filtration will then used to remove the TRU elements associated with the process solids and the zeolite containing the Cs and Sr.

  13. Heat transfer analyses for grout disposal of radioactive double-shell slurry and customer wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, S.M.; Gilliam, T.M.; McDaniel, E.W.

    1987-04-01

    Grout immobilization is being considered by Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell Hanford) as a permanent disposal method for several radioactive waste streams. These include disposal of customer and double-shell slurry wastes in earthen trenches and in single-shell underground waste storage tanks. Heat transfer studies have previously been made to determine the maximum heat loading for grout disposal of various wastes under similar conditions, but a sensitivity analysis of temperature profiles to input parameters was needed. This document presents the results of heat transfer calculations for trenches containing grouted customer and double-shell slurry wastes and for in situ disposal of double-shell wastes in single-shell, domed concrete storage tanks. It discusses the conditions that lead to maximum grout temperatures of 250 0 F during the curing stage and 350 0 F thereafter and shows the dependence of these temperatures on input parameters such as soil and grout thermal conductivity, grout specific heat, waste loading, and disposal geometries. Transient heat transfer calculations were made using the HEATING6 computer code to predict temperature profiles in solidified low-level radioactive waste disposal scenarios at the Rockwell Hanford site. The calculations provide guidance for the development of safe, environmentally acceptable grout formulas for the Transportable Grout Facility. 11 refs

  14. Recovery of Exhaust Waste Heat for ICE Using the Beta Type Stirling Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wail Aladayleh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the potential of utilizing the exhaust waste heat using an integrated mechanical device with internal combustion engine for the automobiles to increase the fuel economy, the useful power, and the environment safety. One of the ways of utilizing waste heat is to use a Stirling engine. A Stirling engine requires only an external heat source as wasted heat for its operation. Because the exhaust gas temperature may reach 200 to 700°C, Stirling engine will work effectively. The indication work, real shaft power and specific fuel consumption for Stirling engine, and the exhaust power losses for IC engine are calculated. The study shows the availability and possibility of recovery of the waste heat from internal combustion engine using Stirling engine.

  15. Application of Waste Heat Recovery Energy Saving Technology in Reform of UHP-EAF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J. H.; Zhang, S. X.; Yang, W.; Yu, T.

    2017-08-01

    The furnace waste heat of a company’s existing 4 × 100t ultra-high-power electric arc furnaces is not used and discharged directly of the situation has been unable to meet the national energy-saving emission reduction requirements, and also affected their own competitiveness and sustainable development. In order to make full use of the waste heat of the electric arc furnace, this paper presents an the energy-saving transformation program of using the new heat pipe boiler on the existing ultra-high-power electric arc furnaces for recovering the waste heat of flue gas. The results show that after the implementation of the project can save energy equivalent to 42,349 tons of standard coal. The flue gas waste heat is fully utilized and dust emission concentration is accorded with the standard of Chinese invironmental protection, which have achieved good results.

  16. Parametric optimization and comparative study of organic Rankine cycle (ORC) for low grade waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Yiping; Wang Jiangfeng; Gao Lin

    2009-01-01

    Organic Rankine cycles for low grade waste heat recovery are described with different working fluids. The effects of the thermodynamic parameters on the ORC performance are examined, and the thermodynamic parameters of the ORC for each working fluid are optimized with exergy efficiency as an objective function by means of the genetic algorithm. The optimum performance of cycles with different working fluids was compared and analyzed under the same waste heat condition. The results show that the cycles with organic working fluids are much better than the cycle with water in converting low grade waste heat to useful work. The cycle with R236EA has the highest exergy efficiency, and adding an internal heat exchanger into the ORC system could not improve the performance under the given waste heat condition. In addition, for the working fluids with non-positive saturation vapor curve slope, the cycle has the best performance property with saturated vapor at the turbine inlet

  17. Energy aAnalysis and Kinetics of Mint Leaves Dehydration Using Vibro-Fluidized Bed Heat Pump Dryer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M Ataei Ardestani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fluidized bed dryers have not yet been used for drying products such as mint leaves. This could be due to high porosity and low mechanical resistance resulting in poor quality of fluidization. Applying vibration has been recommended to overcome problems such as channeling and defluidization, and hence improving the fluidization quality. In this research, a laboratory scale vibro-fluidized bed heat pump dryer was designed and constructed for drying mint leaves. The experiments were conducted at vibration frequency of 80 Hz and amplitude of 3 mm. The velocity and temperature of the inlet air was controlled by an automatic control system. Experiments were carried out at 40, 50 and 60 °C, and two methods: heat pump drying (HPD and non-heat pump drying (NHPD. The results revealed that drying process primarily occurred in the falling rate period. Effective moisture diffusivity of the samples increased with increase in drying air temperature and varied from 4.26656×10-11 to 2.95872×10-10 m2 s-1 for the HPD method, and 3.71918×10-11 to 1.29196×10-10 m2 s-1 for the NHPD method and was within the reported range of 10-9 to 10-11 m2 s-1 for drying of food materials. The activation energy was determined to be 84 kJ mol-1 for the HPD and 54.34 kJ mol-1 for the NHPD, both have very good agreement with the results of other investigators. The coefficient of performance and specific moisture evaporation rate showed the acceptable performance of the heat pump system. Moreover, the energy consumption of the dryer for the NHPD method was more than the HPD method.

  18. Heat and mass transfer in a reforming catalyst bed. Analytical prediction of distributions in the catalyst bed; Kaishitsu shokubaiso ni okeru netsu oyobi busshitsu ido. Suchi kaiseki ni yoru sonai bunpu no yosoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usami, Y [Tokyo Electric Power Co. Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Fukusako, S; Yamada, M [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2000-01-25

    Heat and mass transfer characteristics within a reforming catalyst bed have been analytically investigated. A numerical analysis was carried out in a two-dimensional steady-state model of reforming catalyst layer. Reforming tube was filled with catalyst and the tube wall was uniformly heated, a mixture of steam and methane was reformed through the catalyst bed. Predicted temperature, formed gas composition, methane conversion rate, and heat transfer coefficient distributions in the catalyst layer showed good agreement with experimental data. The effects of space velocity, steam carbon molar ratio, and wall temperature on the heat transfer coefficient were analytically presented. From temperature and composition distributions simulated by two-dimensional analysis, the effects of these factors above mentioned and diffusion on the transport phenomena were qualitatively predicted. (author)

  19. Computational study of fluid flow and heat transfer in composite packed beds of spheres with low tube to particle diameter ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jian; Wu, Jiangquan; Zhou, Lang; Wang, Qiuwang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Flow and heat transfer in composite packed beds with low d_t/d_p_e are investigated. • The wall effect would be restrained with radially layered composite packing (RLM). • Heat flux and overall heat transfer efficiency can be improved with RLM packing. - Abstract: The effect of the tube wall on the fluid flow and heat transfer would be important in the packed bed with low tube to particle diameter ratio, which may lead to flow and temperature maldistributions inside, and the heat transfer performance may be lowered. In the present paper, the flow and heat transfer performances in both the composite and uniform packed beds of spheres with low tube to particle diameter were numerically investigated, where the composite packing means randomly packing with non-uniform spheres and the uniform packing means randomly packing with uniform spheres, including radially layered composite packing (RLM), axially layered composite packing (ALM), randomly composite packing (RCM) and randomly uniform packing (RPM). Both the composite and uniform packings were generated with discrete element method (DEM), and the influence of the wall effect on the flow and heat transfer in the packed beds were carefully studied and compared with each other. Firstly, it is found that, the wall effect on the velocity and temperature distributions in the randomly packed bed of uniform spheres (RPM) with low tube to particle diameter ratio were obvious. The average velocity of the near-tube-wall region is higher than that of the inner-tube region in the bed. When the tube wall is adiabatic, the average temperature of the near-tube-wall region is lower. With radially layered composite packing method (RLM), smaller pores would be formed close to the tube wall and big flow channels would be formed in the inner-tube region of the bed, which would be benefit to restrain the wall effect and improve heat transfer in the bed with low tube to particle diameter ratio. Furthermore, it is also

  20. Computational study of fluid flow and heat transfer in composite packed beds of spheres with low tube to particle diameter ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jian, E-mail: yangjian81@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Thermo-Fluid Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education, School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Wu, Jiangquan [CSR Research of Electrical Technology and Material Engineering, Zhuzhou, Hunan 412001 (China); Zhou, Lang; Wang, Qiuwang [Key Laboratory of Thermo-Fluid Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education, School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Flow and heat transfer in composite packed beds with low d{sub t}/d{sub pe} are investigated. • The wall effect would be restrained with radially layered composite packing (RLM). • Heat flux and overall heat transfer efficiency can be improved with RLM packing. - Abstract: The effect of the tube wall on the fluid flow and heat transfer would be important in the packed bed with low tube to particle diameter ratio, which may lead to flow and temperature maldistributions inside, and the heat transfer performance may be lowered. In the present paper, the flow and heat transfer performances in both the composite and uniform packed beds of spheres with low tube to particle diameter were numerically investigated, where the composite packing means randomly packing with non-uniform spheres and the uniform packing means randomly packing with uniform spheres, including radially layered composite packing (RLM), axially layered composite packing (ALM), randomly composite packing (RCM) and randomly uniform packing (RPM). Both the composite and uniform packings were generated with discrete element method (DEM), and the influence of the wall effect on the flow and heat transfer in the packed beds were carefully studied and compared with each other. Firstly, it is found that, the wall effect on the velocity and temperature distributions in the randomly packed bed of uniform spheres (RPM) with low tube to particle diameter ratio were obvious. The average velocity of the near-tube-wall region is higher than that of the inner-tube region in the bed. When the tube wall is adiabatic, the average temperature of the near-tube-wall region is lower. With radially layered composite packing method (RLM), smaller pores would be formed close to the tube wall and big flow channels would be formed in the inner-tube region of the bed, which would be benefit to restrain the wall effect and improve heat transfer in the bed with low tube to particle diameter ratio. Furthermore, it

  1. Influence of thermophoresis on particle removal in a moving granular bed filter and heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudnick, S.N.; First, M.W.; Price, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Bench-scale investigations were made to determine the influence of thermophoresis on particle removal in a moving granular bed filter. A continuous flow of 2-mm diameter ceramic granules at ambient temperature entered the top of the filter and moved slowly downward under the influence of gravity countercurrent to the gas stream. At an inlet gas temperature of 240 0 C, gas mass velocity of 0.12 kg/(s.m 2 ), and granule velocities up to 0.015 cm/s, clean bed collection efficiency for a submicrometer sodium chloride aerosol was found to increase the more the gas was cooled, indicating that thermophoretic forces were playing a measurable role in particle collection

  2. Industrial Waste Heat Recovery - Potential Applications, Available Technologies and Crosscutting R&D Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thekdi, Arvind [E3M Inc, North Potomac, MD (United States); Nimbalkar, Sachin U. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to explore key areas and characteristics of industrial waste heat and its generation, barriers to waste heat recovery and use, and potential research and development (R&D) opportunities. The report also provides an overview of technologies and systems currently available for waste heat recovery and discusses the issues or barriers for each. Also included is information on emerging technologies under development or at various stages of demonstrations, and R&D opportunities cross-walked by various temperature ranges, technology areas, and energy-intensive process industries.

  3. Attenuation of the protein wasting associated with bed rest by branched-chain amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. P.; Schluter, M. D.; Leskiw, M. J.; Boden, G.

    1999-01-01

    Bed rest is generally accepted as being an appropriate ground-based model for human spaceflight. The objectives of this study were to test the hypothesis that increasing the amount of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) in the diet could attenuate the protein loss associated with bed rest. Nineteen healthy subjects were randomized into two groups according to diet. During the 6 d of bed rest, the diets were supplemented with either 30 mmol/d each of three non-essential amino acids, glycine, serine, and alanine (control group), or with 30 mmol/d each of the BCAAs, leucine, isoleucine, and valine (BCAA group). Nutrition was supplied as a commercially available defined formula diet at a rate of 1.3 x REE. Nitrogen (N) balance and urinary 3-MeH excretion were determined for the 6 d. In our results, the urine-based estimate of N balance was 22.2 +/- 14.4 (n = 9) mg N.kg-1.d-1 and 60.5 +/- 10.1 mg (n = 8) N.kg-1.d-1 for the control and BCAA-supplemented groups, respectively (P BCAA supplementation attenuates the N loss during short-term bed rest.

  4. Advanced Waste Heat Recovery Systems within Hybrid Powertrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Boretti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A waste heat recovery system (WHRS is very well known to provide no advantage during the cold start driving cycles, such as the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC, which are used for certification of emissions and assessment of fuel economy. Here, we propose a novel integrated WHRS using the internal combustion engine (ICE coolant passages and an exchanger on the exhaust working as pre-heater / boiler / super-heater of a Rankine cycle. The expander is connected to an electric generator unit (GU, and the pump is connected to an electric motor unit (MU. The vehicle is also fitted with an electric, kinetic energy recovery system (KERS. The expander and condenser are bypassed during the first part of the NEDC when the vehicle covers the four ECE-15 (Economic Commission for Europe - 15 - UDC (Urban Drive Cycle segments where the engine warms-up.  Only after the engine is fully warmed up, during the last part of the NEDC, the extra urban driving cycle (EUDC segment, the expander and condenser are activated to recover part of the coolant and exhaust energy.

  5. Biogas Engine Waste Heat Recovery Using Organic Rankine Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Benato

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Italy is a leading country in the biogas sector. Energy crops and manure are converted into biogas using anaerobic digestion and, then, into electricity using internal combustion engines (ICEs. Therefore, there is an urgent need for improving the efficiency of these engines taking the real operation into account. To this purpose, in the present work, the organic Rankine cycle (ORC technology is used to recover the waste heat contained in the exhaust gases of a 1 MWel biogas engine. The ICE behavior being affected by the biogas characteristics, the ORC unit is designed, firstly, using the ICE nameplate data and, then, with data measured during a one-year monitoring activity. The optimum fluid and the plant configuration are selected in both cases using an “in-house” optimization tool. The optimization goal is the maximization of the net electric power while the working fluid is selected among 115 pure fluids and their mixtures. Results show that a recuperative ORC designed using real data guarantees a 30% higher net electric power than the one designed with ICE nameplate conditions.

  6. Results concerning a clean co-combustion technology of waste biomass with fossil fuel, in a pilot fluidised bed combustion facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ionel, Ioana; Trif-Tordai, Gavril; Ungureanu, Corneliu; Popescu, Francisc; Lontis, Nicolae [Politehnica Univ. Timisoara (Romania). Faculty for Mechanical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    The research focuses on a facility, the experimental results, interpretation and future plans concerning a new developed technology of using waste renewable energy by applying the cocombustion of waste biomass with coal, in a fluidised bed system. The experimental facility is working entirely in accordance to the allowed limits for the exhaust flue gas concentration, with special concern for typical pollutants. The experiments conclude that the technology is cleaner, has as main advantage the possibility to reduce both the SO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} exhaust in comparison to standard fossil fuel combustion, under comparable circumstances. The combustion is occurring in a stable fluidised bed. (orig.)

  7. Collection of low-grade waste heat for enhanced energy harvesting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dede, Ercan M.; Schmalenberg, Paul; Wang, Chi-Ming; Zhou, Feng; Nomura, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced energy harvesting through the collection of low-grade waste heat is experimentally demonstrated. A structural optimization technique is exploited in the design of a thermal-composite substrate to guide and gather the heat emanating from multiple sources to a predetermined location. A thermoelectric generator is then applied at the selected focusing region to convert the resulting low-grade waste heat to electrical power. The thermal characteristics of the device are experimentally verified by direct temperature measurements of the system and numerically validated via heat conduction simulations. Electrical performance under natural and forced convection is measured, and in both cases, the device with optimized heat flow control plus energy harvesting demonstrates increased power generation when compared with a baseline waste heat recovery system. Electronics applications include energy scavenging for autonomously powered sensor networks or self-actuated devices.

  8. Collection of low-grade waste heat for enhanced energy harvesting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dede, Ercan M., E-mail: eric.dede@tema.toyota.com; Schmalenberg, Paul; Wang, Chi-Ming; Zhou, Feng [Toyota Research Institute, Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing North America, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105 (United States); Nomura, Tsuyoshi [Toyota Central Research and Development Laboratories, Inc., Nagakute 480-1192 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    Enhanced energy harvesting through the collection of low-grade waste heat is experimentally demonstrated. A structural optimization technique is exploited in the design of a thermal-composite substrate to guide and gather the heat emanating from multiple sources to a predetermined location. A thermoelectric generator is then applied at the selected focusing region to convert the resulting low-grade waste heat to electrical power. The thermal characteristics of the device are experimentally verified by direct temperature measurements of the system and numerically validated via heat conduction simulations. Electrical performance under natural and forced convection is measured, and in both cases, the device with optimized heat flow control plus energy harvesting demonstrates increased power generation when compared with a baseline waste heat recovery system. Electronics applications include energy scavenging for autonomously powered sensor networks or self-actuated devices.

  9. The use of coal mining wastes in building road beds; Utilizacion de los Esteriles del Carbon como Materiales para Capas de Firmes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This project was aimed at carrying out a study in order to determine the nature and characteristics of coal mining wastes for its possible use in building road beds and to establish the acceptance, implementation and quality control criteria, which can be included in the Spanish General Technical Standard of Road and Bridges Works (PG-3). With that aim, six types of coal mining wastes were selected out of an inventory and several tests were conducted and following the results, the most appropriate coal mining wastes, the acceptance limits and the quality control tests to be applied to the materials obtained from coal mining wastes to road beds were established. A grinding and classification plant was designed in order to obtain the necessary granular materials for conducting real scale compaction tests in road stages. Several types of coal mining wastes were tested: red, black, treated (in the above mentioned plant) untreated, with different bed thickness and runs in the compactors. Likewise, laboratory tests were carried out on black and red coal mining wastes by adding binder materials. The results proved that coal mining wastes can be used as granular material for building different road beds, such as bound with cement, gravel-emulsion or on their own. As a result of this study 53,000 tons of black coal mining wastes mixed with 6% of cement as binder were used for building a 5 km stage of the Highway Oviedo-Mieres, as well as 16,000 tons of red coal mining wastes in the Ujo-Caborana road, which is still being used in the works carried out a present. (Author)

  10. Wall heat flux influence on the thermodynamic optimisation of irreversibilities of a circulating fluidised bed combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Baloyi, J

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available . The irreversibilities generated were arrived at by computing the entropy generation rates due to the combustion and frictional pressure drop processes. For the combustor where the wall condition was changed from adiabatic to negative heat flux (that is heat leaving...

  11. Improvements in or relating to transfer of heat to fluidized-solid beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1952-01-30

    A method is described for supplying heat to a dense turbulent mass of finely divided solids fluidized by an upwardly flowing gas to resemble a boiling liquid having a well-defined upper level, which comprises contacting the mass with the surface of a heat-transfer element heated by a fluid combustion mixture burning in contact with the surface, the surface separating the mass from the mixture, wherein the burning of the combustion mixture is localized in the heat-transfer element near the point of entry of the combustion mixture. A substantial temperature gradient is maintained along the path of the combustion mixture and combustion products through the heat-transfer element.

  12. Preliminary research work on building of repositories for burial of NPP radioactive waste in loess beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanov, G.; Prodanov, Ya.

    1984-02-01

    The choice of a disposal site for burial of intermediate and low-level wastes from the NPS depends on a complex of conditions, requirements and methods resulting from the complex geologo-geographic and demographic conditions in the People's Republic of Bulgaria. The analysis of the geologic conditions shows that the various structures of the rocks, the tectonism, the seismicity in vast regions, the lack of plateau basalts hinder the choice of convenient sites for radioactive waste disposal. In Bulgaria the loess massives are studied and proposals are made to use them as a suitable environment for building of radioactive waste repositories

  13. The Herfa-Neurode hazardous waste repository in bedded salt as an operating model for safe mixed waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, N.T.

    1991-01-01

    For 18 years, The Herfa-Neurode underground repository has demonstrated the environmentally sound disposal of hazardous waste in a former potash mine. Its principal characteristics make it an excellent analogue to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The Environmental Protection Agency has ruled in its first conditional no-migration determination that is reasonably certain that no hazardous constituents of the mixed waste, destined for the WIPP during its test phase, will migrate from the site for up to ten years. Knowledge of and reference to the Herfa-Neurode operating model may substantially improve the no-migration variance petition for the WIPP's disposal phase and thereby expedite its approval. 2 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  14. Heat production thanks to waste water; Produire de l'energie grace aux eaux usees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellstein, J.

    2009-07-01

    The district heating of a large residential compound in Rheinfelden, Switzerland has been refurbished and extended in order to include new buildings and take advantage of the heat from the municipal waste water treatment plant. The initial system was built in 1976 and delivered heat to 3000 people in 1050 housing units, from three natural gas fired boilers with a total power of 3 MW. In 1993, a study supported by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy identified considerable possible energy savings. Some operational measures were implemented immediately. The recent extension of the district heating to a second residential compound in the neighbourhood increased the heat demand by about 50%. In the course of the planning process it was recognized that waste water from the joint municipal treatment plant of Rheinfelden and Magden - a second city located in the vicinity - has to be cooled by 5 K before being rejected into the Rhine River. This water is now used after filtration as the heat source for two big heat pumps (total 2.5 MW; working fluid: ammonia) supplying the refurbished and extended district heating. Peak heat demand is covered by natural gas boilers (total 9 MW) that can operate alone or in parallel with the heat pumps. Provision has been made to later connect another waste heat source to the district heating network: the municipal skating rink and swimming pool sport facility.

  15. Feasibility of deep ocean disposal of heat generating waste. V.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemming, C.R.

    1988-06-01

    This report summarises the research performed in the UK during the period 1977 to 1987 as part of the international programme investigating the feasibility of ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste. This study has involved: (i) the definition of the disposal operations needed to meet the minimum requirements for safely emplacing waste on or under the floor of the deep ocean; (ii) the identification and characterisation of areas of the deep ocean that might be suitable for containing heat generating waste; (iii) a study of the processes by which radionuclides might migrate through the multiple barriers that isolate the waste from man's environment; and (iv) a calculation of the radiological impact of the conceptual deep ocean repository. It is concluded that, from a technical and scientific viewpoint, disposal of heat generating waste in the deep ocean could provide a safe, economic and feasible alternative to deep disposal on land. (author)

  16. The feasibility study on supercritical methane Recuperated Brayton Cycle for waste heat recovery

    KAUST Repository

    Dyuisenakhmetov, Aibolat

    2017-01-01

    solar power. RBC’s compactness and the ease at which it can be integrated into existent power plants for waste heat recovery require few modifications. Methane, carbon dioxide and trifluoromethane are analyzed as possible working fluids. This work shows

  17. Study on a waste heat-driven adsorption cooling cum desalination cycle

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Kim Choon; Thu, Kyaw; Saha, Bidyut Baran; Chakraborty, Anutosh

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the performance analysis of a waste heat-driven adsorption cycle. With the implementation of adsorption-desorption phenomena, the cycle simultaneously produces cooling energy and high-grade potable water. A mathematical model

  18. On-Board Thermal Management of Waste Heat from a High-Energy Device

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klatt, Nathan D

    2008-01-01

    The use of on-board high-energy devices such as megawatt lasers and microwave emitters requires aircraft system integration of thermal devices to either get rid of waste heat or utilize it in other areas of the aircraft...

  19. Waste heat and water recovery opportunities in California tomato paste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amón, Ricardo; Maulhardt, Mike; Wong, Tony; Kazama, Don; Simmons, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Water and energy efficiency are important for the vitality of the food processing industry as demand for these limited resources continues to increase. Tomato processing, which is dominated by paste production, is a major industry in California – where the majority of tomatoes are processed in the United States. Paste processing generates large amounts of condensate as moisture is removed from the fruit. Recovery of the waste heat in this condensate and reuse of the water may provide avenues to decrease net energy and water use at processing facilities. However, new processing methods are needed to create demand for the condensate waste heat. In this study, the potential to recover condensate waste heat and apply it to the tomato enzyme thermal inactivation processing step (the hot break) is assessed as a novel application. A modeling framework is established to predict heat transfer to tomatoes during the hot break. Heat recovery and reuse of the condensate water are related to energy and monetary savings gained through decreased use of steam, groundwater pumping, cooling towers, and wastewater processing. This analysis is informed by water and energy usage data from relevant unit operations at a commercial paste production facility. The case study indicates potential facility seasonal energy and monetary savings of 7.3 GWh and $166,000, respectively, with most savings gained through reduced natural gas use. The sensitivity of heat recovery to various process variables associated with heat exchanger design and processing conditions is presented to identify factors that affect waste heat recovery. - Highlights: • The potential to recovery waste heat in tomato paste processing is examined. • Heat transfer from evaporator condensate to tomatoes in the hot break is modeled. • Processing facility data is used in model to predict heat recovery energy savings. • The primary benefit of heat recovery is reduced use of natural gas in boilers. • Reusing

  20. Aspen Plus® and economic modeling of equine waste utilization for localized hot water heating via fast pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Nicole L; Boateng, Akwasi A; Mullen, Charles A; Wheeler, M Clayton

    2013-10-15

    Aspen Plus(®) based simulation models have been developed to design a pyrolysis process for on-site production and utilization of pyrolysis oil from equine waste at the Equine Rehabilitation Center at Morrisville State College (MSC). The results indicate that utilization of all the available waste from the site's 41 horses requires a 6 oven dry metric ton per day (ODMTPD) pyrolysis system but it will require a 15 ODMTPD system for waste generated by an additional 150 horses at the expanded area including the College and its vicinity. For this a dual fluidized bed combustion reduction integrated pyrolysis system (CRIPS) developed at USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) was identified as the technology of choice for pyrolysis oil production. The Aspen Plus(®) model was further used to consider the combustion of the produced pyrolysis oil (bio-oil) in the existing boilers that generate hot water for space heating at the Equine Center. The model results show the potential for both the equine facility and the College to displace diesel fuel (fossil) with renewable pyrolysis oil and alleviate a costly waste disposal problem. We predict that all the heat required to operate the pyrolyzer could be supplied by non-condensable gas and about 40% of the biochar co-produced with bio-oil. Techno-economic Analysis shows neither design is economical at current market conditions; however the 15 ODMTPD CRIPS design would break even when diesel prices reach $11.40/gal. This can be further improved to $7.50/gal if the design capacity is maintained at 6 ODMTPD but operated at 4950 h per annum. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Experimental study on heat transfer performance of fin-tube exchanger and PSHE for waste heat recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Bae, Kyung Jin; Kwon, Oh Kyung

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, heat transfer characteristics of fin-tube heat exchanger and primary surface heat exchanger (PSHE) used in waste heat recovery were investigated experimentally. The flow in the fin-tube heat exchanger is cross flow and in PSHE counter flow. The variations of friction factor and Colburn j factor with air mass flow rate, and Nu number with Re number are presented. Various comparison methods are used to evaluate heat transfer performance, and the results show that the heat transfer rate of the PSHE is on average 17.3% larger than that of fin-tube heat exchanger when air mass flow rate is ranging from 1.24 to 3.45 kg/min. However, the PSHE causes higher pressure drop, and the fin-tube heat exchanger has a wider application range which leads to a 31.7% higher value of maximum heat transfer rate compared to that of the PSHE. Besides, under the same fan power per unit frontal surface, a higher heat transfer rate value is given in the fin-tube heat exchanger.

  2. HD Diesel engine equipped with a bottoming Rankine cycle as a waste heat recovery system. Part 1: Study and analysis of the waste heat energy

    OpenAIRE

    Dolz Ruiz, Vicente; Novella Rosa, Ricardo; García Martínez, Antonio; Sánchez Serrano, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the study of different bottoming Rankine cycles with water-steam and/or ORC configurations in classical and innovative setups such as a waste heat recovery system in a Heavy Duty Diesel (HDD) Engine. This work has been divided in two parts. This first part describes the model of the studied HDD engine and the available waste energy sources in this HDD Engine. The waste energy sources are studied from the standpoint of energy analysis to determine which are the most approp...

  3. Modeling Pumped Thermal Energy Storage with Waste Heat Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarr, Miles L. Lindsey

    This work introduces a new concept for a utility scale combined energy storage and generation system. The proposed design utilizes a pumped thermal energy storage (PTES) system, which also utilizes waste heat leaving a natural gas peaker plant. This system creates a low cost utility-scale energy storage system by leveraging this dual-functionality. This dissertation first presents a review of previous work in PTES as well as the details of the