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Sample records for bed nuclear reactor

  1. Water desalination by a fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The great need for potable water in the world motivated the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to study the feasibility of nuclear seawater desalination. The consensus reached is that nuclear desalination is technically feasible, though cost and social acceptability are recognized as major problems to overcome. Here an inherently safe reactor with reduced cost is proposed to overcome these barriers. The reactor is a simple small modular nuclear reactor based on fluidized bed concept with passive cooling characteristics. (orig.)

  2. Dynamic stability of a fluidized-bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in the study of a fluidized-bed nuclear reactor's stability, due to short and long time transients, are discussed. The point-kinetic model, which considers flux variation in the axial direction, is applied to study short time transients, and the theory of bifurcation is used for long time transients. Numerical results are presented for both transients. The preliminary results indicate that this concept of a nuclear reactor has a behavior similar to that of a conventional reactor regarding its dynamic stability

  3. A Spouted Bed Reactor Monitoring System for Particulate Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. S. Wendt; R. L. Bewley; W. E. Windes

    2007-06-01

    Conversion and coating of particle nuclear fuel is performed in spouted (fluidized) bed reactors. The reactor must be capable of operating at temperatures up to 2000°C in inert, flammable, and coating gas environments. The spouted bed reactor geometry is defined by a graphite retort with a 2.5 inch inside diameter, conical section with a 60° included angle, and a 4 mm gas inlet orifice diameter through which particles are removed from the reactor at the completion of each run. The particles may range from 200 µm to 2 mm in diameter. Maintaining optimal gas flow rates slightly above the minimum spouting velocity throughout the duration of each run is complicated by the variation of particle size and density as conversion and/or coating reactions proceed in addition to gas composition and temperature variations. In order to achieve uniform particle coating, prevent agglomeration of the particle bed, and monitor the reaction progress, a spouted bed monitoring system was developed. The monitoring system includes a high-sensitivity, low-response time differential pressure transducer paired with a signal processing, data acquisition, and process control unit which allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor. The pressure transducer is mounted upstream of the spouted bed reactor gas inlet. The gas flow into the reactor induces motion of the particles in the bed and prevents the particles from draining from the reactor due to gravitational forces. Pressure fluctuations in the gas inlet stream are generated as the particles in the bed interact with the entering gas stream. The pressure fluctuations are produced by bulk movement of the bed, generation and movement of gas bubbles through the bed, and the individual motion of particles and particle subsets in the bed. The pressure fluctuations propagate upstream to the pressure transducer where they can be monitored. Pressure fluctuation, mean differential pressure, gas flow rate, reactor

  4. Pellet bed reactor concepts for nuclear propulsion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Morley, N.J.; Pelaccio, D.G.; Juhasz, A. [Univ of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Pellet bed reactor (PeBR) concepts have been developed for nuclear thermal and nuclear electric propulsion, and bimodal applications. This annular core, fast spectrum reactor offers many desirable design and safety features. These features include high-power density, small reactor size, full retention of fission products, passive decay heat removal, redundancy in reactor control, negative temperature reactivity feedback, ground testing of the fully assembled reactor using electric heating and nonnuclear fuel elements, and the option of fueling on the launch pad or fueling and refueling in orbit. In addition to these features, the concepts for nuclear electric propulsion and for bimodal power and thermal propulsion have no single point failure. The average power density in the reactor for nuclear thermal propulsion ranges from 2.2 to 3.3 MW/I and for a 15-MWe nuclear electric propulsion system the total power system specific mass is about 3.3 kg/kWe. The bimodal-PeBR system concepts offer specific impulse in excess of 650 s, tens of Newtons of thrust, and total system specific power ranging from 11 to 21.9 We/kg at the 10- and 40-kWe levels, respectively. 35 refs.

  5. Nuclear Safeguards Considerations For The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillip Casey Durst; David Beddingfield; Brian Boyer; Robert Bean; Michael Collins; Michael Ehinger; David Hanks; David L. Moses; Lee Refalo

    2009-10-01

    High temperature reactors (HTRs) have been considered since the 1940s, and have been constructed and demonstrated in the United Kingdom (Dragon), United States (Peach Bottom and Fort Saint Vrain), Japan (HTTR), Germany (AVR and THTR-300), and have been the subject of conceptual studies in Russia (VGM). The attraction to these reactors is that they can use a variety of reactor fuels, including abundant thorium, which upon reprocessing of the spent fuel can produce fissile U-233. Hence, they could extend the stocks of available uranium, provided the fuel is reprocessed. Another attractive attribute is that HTRs typically operate at a much higher temperature than conventional light water reactors (LWRs), because of the use of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coated (TRISO) fuel particles embedded in ceramic graphite. Rather than simply discharge most of the unused heat from the working fluid in the power plant to the environment, engineers have been designing reactors for 40 years to recover this heat and make it available for district heating or chemical conversion plants. Demonstrating high-temperature nuclear energy conversion was the purpose behind Fort Saint Vrain in the United States, THTR-300 in Germany, HTTR in Japan, and HTR-10 and HTR-PM, being built in China. This resulted in nuclear reactors at least 30% or more thermodynamically efficient than conventional LWRs, especially if the waste heat can be effectively utilized in chemical processing plants. A modern variant of high temperature reactors is the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Originally developed in the United States and Germany, it is now being redesigned and marketed by the Republic of South Africa and China. The team examined historical high temperature and high temperature gas reactors (HTR and HTGR) and reviewed safeguards considerations for this reactor. The following is a preliminary report on this topic prepared under the ASA-100 Advanced Safeguards Project in support of the NNSA Next

  6. Core Physics of Pebble Bed High Temperature Nuclear Reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auwerda, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    To more accurately predict the temperature distribution inside the reactor core of pebble bed type high temperature reactors, in this thesis we investigated the stochastic properties of randomly stacked beds and the effects of the non-homogeneity of these beds on the neutronics and thermal-hydraulic

  7. Perspectives for Fluidized Bed Nuclear Reactor Technology using Rotating Fluidized Beds in a Static Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broqueville, Axel De; Wilde, Juray De

    The new concept of a rotating fluidized bed in a static geometry opens perspectives for fluidized bed nuclear reactor technology and is experimentally and numerically investigated. With conventional fluidized bed technology, the maximum attainable power is rather limited and maximum at a certain fluidization gas flow rate. Using a rotating fluidized bed in a static geometry, the fluidization gas drives both the centrifugal force and the counteracting radial gas-solid drag force in a similar way. This allows operating the reactor at any chosen sufficiently high solids loading over a much wider fluidization gas flow rate range and in particular at much higher fluidization gas flow rates than with conventional fluidized bed reactor technology, offering increased flexibility with respect to cooling via the fluidization gas. Furthermore, the centrifugal force can be a multiple of earth gravity, allowing radial gas-solid slip velocities much higher than in conventional fluidized beds. The latter result in gas-solid heat transfer coefficients one or multiple orders of magnitude higher than in conventional fluidized beds. The combination of dense operation and high fluidization gas flow rates allows process intensification and a more compact reactor design.

  8. Pellet bed reactor concept for nuclear electric propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Morley, Nicholas J.; Juhasz, Albert

    1993-01-01

    For Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) applications, gas cooled nuclear reactors with dynamic energy conversion systems offer high specific power and low total mass. This paper describes the Pellet Bed Reactor (PeBR) concept for potential NEP missions to Mars. The helium cooled, 75-80 MWt PeBR, consists of a single annular fuel region filled with a randomly packed bed of spherical fuel pellets, is designed for multiple starts, and offers unique safety and operation features. Each fuel pellet, about 8-10 mm in diameter, is composed of hundreds of TRISO type fuel microspheres embedded in a graphite matrix for a full retention of fission products. To eliminate the likelihood of a single-point failure, the annular core of the PeBR is divided into three 120° sectors. Each sector is self contained and separate and capable of operating and being cooled on its own and in cooperation with either one or two other sectors. Each sector is coupled to a separate, 5 MWe Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) energy conversion unit and is subcritical for safe handling and launching. In the event of a failure of the cooling system of a core sector, the reactor power level may be reduced, allowing adjacent sectors to convect the heat away using their own cooling system, thus maintaining reactor operation. Also, due to the absence of an internal core structure in the PeBR core, fueling of the reactor can easily be performed either at the launch facility or in orbit, and refueling can be accomplished in orbit as needed to extend the power system lifetime

  9. Sustainability and the Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhang Sefidvash

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability as a multifaceted and holistic concept is analyzed. Sustainability involves human relationship with elements such as natural environment, economy, power, governance, education and technology with the ultimate purpose of carrying forward an ever-advancing civilization. The Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR is an innovative, small, simple in design, inherently safe, non-proliferating, and environmentally friendly concept that its deployment can generate energy in a sustainable manner contributing to the prosperity of humanity. The development of FBNR will provide electricity as well as desalinated water through a simple but advanced technology for the developing, as well as developed countries. FBNR is environmentally friendly due to its inherent safety and the convenience of using its spent fuel as the source of radiation for irradiation purposes in agriculture, industry, and medicine. Politically, if a ping pong game brought peace between China and USA, a program of development of FBNR supported by the peace loving international community can become a more mature means to bring peace among certain apparently hostile nations who crave sustainable energy, desalinated water and simple advanced technology.

  10. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  11. Design of particle bed reactors for the space nuclear thermal propulsion program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.; Todosow, M.; Maise, G.; Barletta, R.; Schweitzer, D.G. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-02-01

    This paper describes the design for the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) that was considered for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Program. The methods of analysis and their validation are outlined first. Monte Carlo methods were used for the physics analysis, several new algorithms were developed for the fluid dynamics, heat transfer and transient analysis; and commercial codes were used for the stress analysis. We carried out a critical experiment, prototypic of the PBR to validate the reactor physics; blowdown experiments with beds of prototypic dimensions were undertaken to validate the power-extraction capabilities from particle beds. In addition, materials and mechanical design concepts for the fuel elements were experimentally validated. (author).

  12. Numerical Simulation of Accident Scenario in High Temperature Gas Cooled (Pebble Bed) Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, Geoffrey J. [Oregon Institute of Technology - Portland Center, Portland (United States)

    2012-03-15

    The accident scenario resulting from blockages due to the retention of dust in the coolant gas or from the rupture of one or more fuel particles used in the High Temperature Gas Cooled (Pebble Bed) Nuclear Reactors is considered in this paper. The next generation of Advanced High Temperature Reactors (AHTR), are considered for nuclear power production, and for high-temperature hydrogen production using nuclear reactors to reduce the carbon footprint. Blockages can cause LOCA variations in flow and heat transfer that may lead to hot spots within the bed that could compromise reactor safety. Therefore, it is important to know the void fraction distribution and the interstitial velocity field in the packed bed. The blockage for this numerical study simulated a region with significantly lower void than that in the rest of the bed. Finite difference technique solved the simplified continuity, momentum, and energy equations. Any meaningful outcome of the solution depended largely upon the validity of the boundary conditions. Among them, the inlet and outlet velocity profiles required special attention. Thus, a close approximation to these profiles obtained from an experimental set-up established the boundary conditions. This paper presents the development of the elliptic-partial equation for a bed of a bed of pebbles, and the solution procedure. The paper also discusses velocity and temperature profiles obtained from both numerical and experimental set-up, with and without effect of blockage. Based on the studies it is evident that knowledge of LOCA velocity and temperature distribution within the fuel element in a Pebble Bed Nuclear Reactor or AHTR is essential for reactor safety.

  13. Study on neutron diffusion and time dependence heat ina fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to model the neutron diffusion and heat transfer for a Fluidized Bed Nuclear Reactor and its solution by Laplace Transform Technique with numerical inversion using Fourier Series. Also Gaussian quadrature and residues techniques were applied for numerical inversion. The neutron transport, diffusion, and point Kinetic equation for this nuclear reactor concept are developed. A matricial and Taylor Series methods are proposed for the solution of the point Kinetic equation which is a time scale problem of Stiff type

  14. CFD-DEM simulation of a conceptual gas-cooled fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Lucilla C.; Su, Jian, E-mail: lucillalmeida@gmail.com, E-mail: sujian@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Aguirre, Joao, E-mail: aguirre@rocky-dem.com [Engineering Simulation and Scientific Software (ESSS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Several conceptual designs of the fluidized-bed nuclear reactor have been proposed due to its many advantages over conventional nuclear reactors such as PWRs and BWRs. Amongst their characteristics, the enhanced heat transfer and mixing enables a more uniform temperature distribution, reducing the risk of hot-spot and excessive fuel temperature, in addition to resulting in a higher burnup of the fuel. Furthermore, the relationship between the bed height and reactor neutronics turns the coolant flow rate control into a power production mechanism. Moreover, the possibility of removing the fuel by gravity from the movable core in case of a loss-of-cooling accident increases its safety. High-accuracy modeling of particles and coolant flow in fluidized bed reactors is needed to evaluate reliably the thermal-hydraulic efficiency and safety margin. The two-way coupling between solid and fluid can account for high-fidelity solid-solid interaction and reasonable accuracy in fluid calculation and fluid-solid interaction. In the CFD-DEM model, the particles are modeled as a discrete phase, following the DEM approach, whereas the fluid flow is treated as a continuous phase, described by the averaged Navier-Stokes equations on a computational cell scale. In this work, the coupling methodology between Fluent and Rocky is described. The numerical approach was applied to the simulation of a bubbling fluidized bed and the results were compared to experimental data and showed good agreement. (author)

  15. Method for loading, operating, and unloading a ball-bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a method of operating a ball-bed nuclear reactor with fuel element balls. Some have a fissionable material content different from that of others of the balls. It consists of: initially partly filling a reactor core with fuel balls of sufficient fissionable material content for establishing criticality and a desired level of power production at the completion of the partial filling and then, without any further filling of the reactor cavern, starting reactor operation; thereafter without any removal of fuel balls from the reactor cavern, filling fuel balls continually or in groups at relatively short intervals into the reactor cavern during increasing burning up of the fuel balls already, for compensation of the diminishing fissionable material content of the reactor core constituted by the fuel balls until a final total quantity of filling is reached; after the final filling quantity is reached and burning up has occurred, shutting down the reactor, cooling it off, releasing the pressure in the cavern, and thereafter unloading all the fuel balls from the reactor cavern, unloading being begun when the reactor is shut down and being completed before the reactor is restarted

  16. Experimental and computational investigation of flow of pebbles in a pebble bed nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khane, Vaibhav B.

    The Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) is a 4th generation nuclear reactor which is conceptually similar to moving bed reactors used in the chemical and petrochemical industries. In a PBR core, nuclear fuel in the form of pebbles moves slowly under the influence of gravity. Due to the dynamic nature of the core, a thorough understanding about slow and dense granular flow of pebbles is required from both a reactor safety and performance evaluation point of view. In this dissertation, a new integrated experimental and computational study of granular flow in a PBR has been performed. Continuous pebble re-circulation experimental set-up, mimicking flow of pebbles in a PBR, is designed and developed. Experimental investigation of the flow of pebbles in a mimicked test reactor was carried out for the first time using non-invasive radioactive particle tracking (RPT) and residence time distribution (RTD) techniques to measure the pebble trajectory, velocity, overall/zonal residence times, flow patterns etc. The tracer trajectory length and overall/zonal residence time is found to increase with change in pebble's initial seeding position from the center towards the wall of the test reactor. Overall and zonal average velocities of pebbles are found to decrease from the center towards the wall. Discrete element method (DEM) based simulations of test reactor geometry were also carried out using commercial code EDEM(TM) and simulation results were validated using the obtained benchmark experimental data. In addition, EDEM(TM) based parametric sensitivity study of interaction properties was carried out which suggests that static friction characteristics play an important role from a packed/pebble beds structural characterization point of view. To make the RPT technique viable for practical applications and to enhance its accuracy, a novel and dynamic technique for RPT calibration was designed and developed. Preliminary feasibility results suggest that it can be implemented as a non

  17. Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics analyses of the pellet bed reactor for nuclear thermal propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morley, N.J.; El-Genk, S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics design and analyses of the pellet bed reactor for nuclear thermal propulsion are performed based on consideration of reactor criticality, passive decay heat removal, maximum fuel temperature, and subcriticality during a water flooding accident. Besides calculating the dimensions of the reactor core to satisfy the excess reactivity requirement at the beginning-of-mission of 1.25 $ (K{sub eff} of 1.01), the TWODANT discrete ordinates code is used to estimate the radial and axial fission power density profiles in the core. These power profiles are used in the nuclear propulsion thermal-hydraulic analysis model (NUTHAM-S) to determine the two-dimensional steady-state temperature, pressure, and flow fields in the core and optimize the orificing in the hot frit to avoid hot spots in the core at full-power operation.

  18. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of the pellet bed reactor for nuclear thermal propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morley, N.J. (Institute for Space Nuclear Power Studies, Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1341 (United States)); El-Genk, M.S. (Institute for Space Nuclear Power Studies, Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1341 (United States))

    1994-09-01

    A two-dimensional steady-state thermal-hydraulics analysis of the pellet bed reactor for nuclear thermal propulsion is performed using the NUTHAM- S thermal-hydraulic code. The effects of axial heat and momentum transfers on the temperature and flow fields in the core are investigated. In addition, the porosity profile in the hot frit is optimized to avoid the development of a hot spot in the reactor core. Finally, a sensitivity analysis is performed using the optimized hot frit porosity profile to determine the effects of varying the propellant and core parameters on the peak fuel temperature and pressure drop across the core. These parameters include the inlet temperature and mass flow rate of the hydrogen propellant, average porosity of the core bed, the porosity of the hot frit, and local hot frit blockage. The peak temperature of the fuel is shown not to exceed its melting point as a result of changing any of these parameters from the base case, with the exception of hot frit blockage greater than 60% over a 0.12m axial segment of the hot frit. ((orig.))

  19. Conceptual design of a fluidized bed nuclear reactor: statics, dynamics and safety-related aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agung, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis a conceptual design of an innovative high temperature reactor based on the fluidization principle (FLUBER) is proposed. The reactor should satisfy the following requirements: (a) modular and low power, (b)) large shutdown margin, (c) able to produce power when the bed of particles exp

  20. Criticality investigations for the fixed bed nuclear reactor using thorium fuel mixed with plutonium or minor actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Suemer [Beykoz Lojistik Meslek Yueksekokulu, Beykoz, Istanbul (Turkey)], E-mail: sumer@gazi.edu.tr; Sahin, Haci Mehmet; Acir, Adem [Beykoz Lojistik Meslek Yueksekokulu, Istanbul (Turkey); Al-Kusayer, Tawfik Ahmed [King Saud University, College of Engineering, P.O. Box 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-08-15

    Prospective fuels for a new reactor type, the so called fixed bed nuclear reactor (FBNR) are investigated with respect to reactor criticality. These are (1) low enriched uranium (LEU); (2) weapon grade plutonium + ThO{sub 2}; (3) reactor grade plutonium + ThO{sub 2}; and (4) minor actinides in the spent fuel of light water reactors (LWRs) + ThO{sub 2}. Reactor grade plutonium and minor actinides are considered as highly radio-active and radio-toxic nuclear waste products so that one can expect that they will have negative fuel costs. The criticality calculations are conducted with SCALE5.1 using S{sub 8}-P{sub 3} approximation in 238 neutron energy groups with 90 groups in thermal energy region. The study has shown that the reactor criticality has lower values with uranium fuel and increases passing to minor actinides, reactor grade plutonium and weapon grade plutonium. Using LEU, an enrichment grade of 9% has resulted with k{sub eff} = 1.2744. Mixed fuel with weapon grade plutonium made of 20% PuO{sub 2} + 80% ThO{sub 2} yields k{sub eff} = 1.2864. Whereas a mixed fuel with reactor grade plutonium made of 35% PuO{sub 2} + 65% ThO{sub 2} brings it to k{sub eff} = 1.267. Even the very hazardous nuclear waste of LWRs, namely minor actinides turn out to be high quality nuclear fuel due to the excellent neutron economy of FBNR. A relatively high reactor criticality of k{sub eff} = 1.2673 is achieved by 50% MAO{sub 2} + 50% ThO{sub 2}. The hazardous actinide nuclear waste products can be transmuted and utilized as fuel in situ. A further output of the study is the possibility of using thorium as breeding material in combination with these new alternative fuels.

  1. Optimized core design and fuel management of a pebble-bed type nuclear reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, B.

    2009-01-01

    The core design of a pebble-bed type Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is optimized, aiming for an increase of the coolant outlet temperature to 1000 C, while retaining its inherent safety features. The VHTR has been selected by the international Generation IV research initiative as one of the si

  2. The importance of the AVR pebble-bed reactor for the future of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohl, P. [Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor AVR GmbH, Postfach 1160, 52412 Juelich (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    The AVR pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) at Juelich (Germany)) operated from 1967 to 1988 and was certainly the most important HTGR project of the past. The reactor was the mass test bed for all development steps of HTGR pebble fuel. Some early fuel charges failed under high temperature conditions and contaminated the reactor. An accurate pebble measurement (Cs 137) allowed to clean the core from unwanted pebbles after 1981. The coolant activity went down and remained very low for the remaining reactor operation. A melt-wire experiment in 1986 revealed max. coolant temperatures of >1280 deg. C and fuel temperatures of >1350 deg. C, explained by under-estimated bypasses. The fuel still in the core achieved high burn-ups and showed under the extreme temperature conditions excellent fission product retention. Thus, the AVR operation qualified the HTGR fuel, and an average discharge burn-up of 112% fifa revealed an excellent fuel economy of the pebble-bed reactor. Furthermore, the AVR operation offers many meaningful data for code-to-experiment comparisons. (authors)

  3. The pebble bed high temperature reactor as a source of nuclear process heat. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theoretical analysis is given for a series of 8 different variants of the pebble-bed reactor in the 'once through' fuel management scheme. The comparison gives some insight into the parametric sensitivities and into the development potential of this type. The thorium/U-233 recycling fuel cycle allows to increase the conversion ratio up to the range between 0.90 and 0.95. The feasibility for a changeover between different fuel cycles under full power operation. - The study is complemented by a review of the relevant previous investigations. (orig.)

  4. The modular pebble bed nuclear reactor - the preferred new sustainable energy source for electricity, hydrogen and potable water production?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a joint project of Massachusetts Institute of technology, Nu-Tec Inc. and Proto Power. The elegant simplicity of graphite moderated pebble bed reactor is the basis for the 'generation four' nuclear power plants. High Temperature Gas Cooled (HTGC) nuclear power plant have the potential to become the preferred base load sustainable energy source for the new millennium. The great attraction of these helium cooled 'Generation Four' nuclear plant can be summarised as follows: Factory assembly line production; Modularity and ease of delivery to site; High temperature Brayton Cycle ideally suited for cogeneration of electricity, potable water and hydrogen; Capital and operating costs competitive with hydrocarbon plant; Design is inherently meltdown proof and proliferation resistant

  5. Ultra high temperature particle bed reactor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazareth, Otto; Ludewig, Hans; Perkins, K.; Powell, J.

    1990-01-01

    A direct nuclear propulsion engine which could be used for a mission to Mars is designed. The main features of this reactor design are high values for I(sub sp) and very efficient cooling. This particle bed reactor consists of 37 cylindrical fuel elements embedded in a cylinder of beryllium which acts as a moderator and reflector. The fuel consists of a packed bed of spherical fissionable fuel particles. Gaseous H2 passes over the fuel bed, removes the heat, and is exhausted out of the rocket. The design was found to be neutronically critical and to have tolerable heating rates. Therefore, this particle bed reactor design is suitable as a propulsion unit for this mission.

  6. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  7. Supplemental Report on Nuclear Safeguards Considerations for the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, David Lewis [ORNL; Ehinger, Michael H [ORNL

    2010-05-01

    Recent reports by Department of Energy National Laboratories have discussed safeguards considerations for the low enriched uranium (LEU) fueled Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) and the need for bulk accountancy of the plutonium in used fuel. These reports fail to account effectively for the degree of plutonium dilution in the graphitized-carbon pebbles that is sufficient to meet the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) 'provisional' guidelines for termination of safeguards on 'measured discards.' The thrust of this finding is not to terminate safeguards but to limit the need for specific accountancy of plutonium in stored used fuel. While the residual uranium in the used fuel may not be judged sufficiently diluted to meet the IAEA provisional guidelines for termination of safeguards, the estimated quantities of {sup 232}U and {sup 236}U in the used fuel at the target burn-up of {approx}91 GWD/MT exceed specification limits for reprocessed uranium (ASTM C787) and will require extensive blending with either natural uranium or uranium enrichment tails to dilute the {sup 236}U content to fall within specification thus making the PBMR used fuel less desirable for commercial reprocessing and reuse than that from light water reactors. Also the PBMR specific activity of reprocessed uranium isotopic mixture and its A{sub 2} values for effective dose limit if released in a dispersible form during a transportation accident are more limiting than the equivalent values for light water reactor spent fuel at 55 GWD/MT without accounting for the presence of the principal carry-over fission product ({sup 99}Tc) and any possible plutonium contamination that may be present from attempted covert reprocessing. Thus, the potentially recoverable uranium from PBMR used fuel carries reactivity penalties and radiological penalties likely greater than those for reprocessed uranium from light water reactors. These factors impact the economics of

  8. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  9. Absorber rod for nuclear reactors in a pebble bed of spherical operating elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The claim refers to the constructional configuration of an absorber rod, whose and penetrating into the pebble bed has an opening to reduce the fracture rate, so that the operating elements can escape into a channel within the absorber rod. To suit this to the direction of movement of the elements a part of the end of the rod is flexibly connected to the hollow absorber rod via a joint. In this way the mechanical load of the element particles is reduced and simultaneously one achieves that much lower force is required to insert the absorber rod into the pebble bed. (UA)

  10. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor is described in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assemblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters in the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters in the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance

  11. South Africa's Pebble Bed Modular Reactor, a new design for our nuclear future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power Utilities will in the future need to look at various means of generating power during the 21st century. The demands regarding new generation are challenged by such issues as; costs, time to construct, the add on safety requirements of present day nuclear power plant designs and the emissions generated by fossil fuels as reflected in the Kyoto Protocol. These challenges are also aligned with the deforestation, land decimation and releases of methane gas caused by the so-called 'clean' Hydro power plants in many parts of the world. Presently South Africa is looking at various generation mixes for the future. Although the demand in South Africa is currently lower than the capacity, it is anticipated that new capacity will have to be commissioned by about 2008. Even the moderate growth of 2,5% (as was experienced in our last fiscal year) will result in peak electricity demand exceeding capacity between 2005 and 2010. In addition, Eskom's older power stations reach the end of their design life after 2025. South Africa will, therefore, need to access and use all natural resources to produce the additional 20,000MW of electricity that will be needed by 2025 this will of course include a nuclear option. Throughout the world, it is noted that, along with the environmental issues affecting power generation the real leading issue is cost. South Africa has one of the lowest power costs in the world, based on its abundant low-cost coal. As with other Eskom low cost options such as, coal fired generation situated at the pit-head and imported hydro, the PBMR costs will have to meet these demanding cost targets set by Eskom's existing power plants. However, PBMR is virtually independent of location and the intention is that PBMR costs will be in the order of US 2,0c/kWh. The costs of decommissioning, long-term storage of radioactive waste and insurance are included in these estimates. This cost per unit of electricity produced would, however, be much lower than a coal

  12. Nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.)

  13. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to reduce neutron embrittlement of the pressue vessel of an LWR, blanked off elements are fitted at the edge of the reactor core, with the same dimensions as the fuel elements. They are parallel to each other, and to the edge of the reactor taking the place of fuel rods, and are plates of neutron-absorbing material (stainless steel, boron steel, borated Al). (HP)

  14. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: SPOUTED BED REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Spouted Bed Reactor (SBR) technology utilizes the unique attributes of the "spouting " fluidization regime, which can provide heat transfer rates comparable to traditional fluid beds, while providing robust circulation of highly heterogeneous solids, concurrent with very agg...

  15. Fluidized Bed Reactor as Solid State Fermenter

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnaiah, K.; Janaun, J.; Prabhakar, A.

    2005-01-01

    Various reactors such as tray, packed bed, rotating drum can be used for solid-state fermentation. In this paper the possibility of fluidized bed reactor as solid-state fermenter is considered. The design parameters, which affect the performances are identified and discussed. This information, in general can be used in the design and the development of an efficient fluidized bed solid-state fermenter. However, the objective here is to develop fluidized bed solid-state fermenter for palm kerne...

  16. Pebble Bed Reactor review update. Fiscal year 1979 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Updated information is presented on the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) concept being developed in the Federal Republic of Germany for electricity generation and process heat applications. Information is presented concerning nuclear analysis and core performance, fuel cycle evaluation, reactor internals, and safety and availability

  17. Pebble Bed Reactor review update. Fiscal year 1979 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Updated information is presented on the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) concept being developed in the Federal Republic of Germany for electricity generation and process heat applications. Information is presented concerning nuclear analysis and core performance, fuel cycle evaluation, reactor internals, and safety and availability.

  18. Nuclear reactor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering. Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide, and new power reactors with improved fuel cycles are being developed. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. The second edition of this successful comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics has been completely updated, revised and enlarged to include the latest developme

  19. The pebble-bed high-temperature reactor as a source of nuclear process heat. Vol. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this volume the design conditions for a helium-heated steam reformer in the primary circuit of a high-temperature reactor are explained as far as today's knowledge allows. For the realization of helium-heated steam reformers, some fundamental questions at first occur regarding the heating temperature, heat fluxes, suitable materials and design solutions for steam reformers. It is shown that following the development program carried out until now, solutions to these questions can be seen. Moreover, details are given about the heat transfer, the mechanical design and the behaviour of reformer materials in helium with regard to H2- and T-permeation as well as corrosion. Furthermore, questions about the choice of the lay-out data, the design form, the arrangement in the helium circuits of the nuclear reactor and the necessary development steps are handled. Some design examples of heat exchangers for a 3,000 MW(th)-plant are given, too. (orig.)

  20. Large modular pebble-bed reactors with passive safety properties as a contribution for catastrophe-free nuclear technology. Flexibility in design and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worldwide investigations are carried out for different reactor concepts, in order to realize nuclear energy production in modular power plants. In that concept several small or middle sized reactors are joined together in a modular way to form one power plant. The size of MODUL-reactors is designed in such a way, that exclusively inherent safety properties perform the control of accidents without active technical proceedings. In order to achieve this, the reactor should be relatively small. On the other hand, it should be relatively large for economic and competitive reasons. The range of possible development of the modular pebble-bed reactor for raising the power output are discussed in this study. Based on the MODUL 200 MW concept, the design of the 'Great-Modul-Medul' reactor (GMM) with a power output of 500 MWth is introduced, in which the loading modus MEDUL is applied with repeated circulation of the spheres through the core. A 'Great-Modul-OTTO' GMO with a power output of 400 MWth is designed with only one pass of the pebbles (OTTO). In comparison to the GMM, that has the advantage of being simpler in construction and in the method of operation. Furthermore, another simplification is studied consisting of the combination (PO) of 'Peu a Peu' and 'OTTO' loading modus. All designed cases show a favourable flexibility when changing the application of the reactor from steam cycle to gas turbine cycle or to seawater desalination. The study outlines, that the inherently determined limitation of the excess temperature in case of a loss coolant accident and the ability for controling the water ingress reactivity are maintained for all variants being considered. (orig.)

  1. Fluidized Bed Reactor as Solid State Fermenter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnaiah, K.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Various reactors such as tray, packed bed, rotating drum can be used for solid-state fermentation. In this paper the possibility of fluidized bed reactor as solid-state fermenter is considered. The design parameters, which affect the performances are identified and discussed. This information, in general can be used in the design and the development of an efficient fluidized bed solid-state fermenter. However, the objective here is to develop fluidized bed solid-state fermenter for palm kernel cake conversion into enriched animal and poultry feed.

  2. Fossil nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurette, M.

    1976-01-01

    The discussion of fossil nuclear reactors (the Oklo phenomenon) covers the earth science background, neutron-induced isotopes and reactor operating conditions, radiation-damage studies, and reactor modeling. In conclusion possible future studies are suggested and the significance of the data obtained in past studies is summarized. (JSR)

  3. Research Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published in English and in French, this large report first proposes an overview of the use and history of research nuclear reactors. It discusses their definition, and presents the various types of research reactors which can be either related to nuclear power (critical mock-ups, material test reactors, safety test reactors, training reactors, prototypes), or to research (basic research, industry, health), or to specific particle physics phenomena (neutron diffraction, isotope production, neutron activation, neutron radiography, semiconductor doping). It reports the history of the French research reactors by distinguishing the first atomic pile (ZOE), and the activities and achievements during the fifties, the sixties and the seventies. It also addresses the development of instrumentation for research reactors (neutron, thermal, mechanical and fission gas release measurements). The other parts of the report concern the validation of neutronics calculations for different reactors (the EOLE water critical mock-up, the MASURCA air critical mock-up dedicated to fast neutron reactor study, the MINERVE water critical mock-up, the CALIBAN pulsed research reactor), the testing of materials under irradiation (OSIRIS reactor, laboratories associated with research reactors, the Jules Horowitz reactor and its experimental programs and related devices, irradiation of materials with ion beams), the investigation of accident situations (on the CABRI, Phebus, Silene and Jules Horowitz reactors). The last part proposes a worldwide overview of research reactors

  4. Nuclear reactor PBMR and cogeneration; Reactor nuclear PBMR y cogeneracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G., E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In recent years the nuclear reactor designs for the electricity generation have increased their costs, so that at the moment costs are managed of around the 5000 US D for installed kw, reason for which a big nuclear plant requires of investments of the order of billions of dollars, the designed reactors as modular of low power seek to lighten the initial investment of a big reactor dividing the power in parts and dividing in modules the components to lower the production costs, this way it can begin to build a module and finished this to build other, differing the long term investment, getting less risk therefore in the investment. On the other hand the reactors of low power can be very useful in regions where is difficult to have access to the electric net being able to take advantage of the thermal energy of the reactor to feed other processes like the water desalination or the vapor generation for the processes industry like the petrochemical, or even more the possible hydrogen production to be used as fuel. In this work the possibility to generate vapor of high quality for the petrochemical industry is described using a spheres bed reactor of high temperature. (Author)

  5. Reactors. Nuclear propulsion ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article has for object the development of nuclear-powered ships and the conception of the nuclear-powered ship. The technology of the naval propulsion P.W.R. type reactor is described in the article B.N.3 141 'Nuclear Boilers ships'. (N.C.)

  6. Nuclear reactor repairing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable free repairing of an arbitrary position in an LMFBR reactor. Constitution: A laser light emitted from a laser oscillator installed out of a nuclear reactor is guided into a portion to be repaired in the reactor by using a reflecting mirror, thereby welding or cutting it. The guidance of the laser out of the reactor into the reactor is performed by an extension tube depending into a through hole of a rotary plug, and the guidance of the laser light into a portion to be repaired is performed by the transmitting and condensing action of the reflecting mirror. (Kamimura, M.)

  7. Nuclear reactor physics course for reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The education and training of nuclear reactor operators is important to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. Therefore, a course on basic 'Nuclear reactor physics' in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The aim of the basic course on 'Nuclear Reactor Physics for reactor operators' is to provide the reactor operators with a basic understanding of the main concepts relevant to nuclear reactors. Seen the education level of the participants, mathematical derivations are simplified and reduced to a minimum, but not completely eliminated

  8. Initial prediction of dust production in pebble bed reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rostamian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the computational simulation of contact zones between pebbles in a pebble bed reactor. In this type of reactor, the potential for graphite dust generation from frictional contact of graphite pebbles and the subsequent transport of dust and fission products can cause significant safety issues at very high temperatures around 900 °C in HTRs. The present simulation is an initial attempt to quantify the amount of nuclear grade graphite dust produced within a very high temperature reactor.

  9. Special lecture on nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book gives a special lecture on nuclear reactor, which is divided into two parts. The first part has explanation on nuclear design of nuclear reactor and analysis of core with theories of integral transports, diffusion Nodal, transports Nodal and Monte Carlo skill parallel computer and nuclear calculation and speciality of transmutation reactor. The second part deals with speciality of nuclear reactor and control with nonlinear stabilization of nuclear reactor, nonlinear control of nuclear reactor, neural network and control of nuclear reactor, control theory of observer and analysis method of Adomian.

  10. Nuclear reactor simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Reactor Simulator was projected to help the basic training in the formation of the Nuclear Power Plants operators. It gives the trainee the opportunity to see the nuclear reactor dynamics. It's specially indicated to be used as the support tool to NPPT (Nuclear Power Preparatory Training) from NUS Corporation. The software was developed to Intel platform (80 x 86, Pentium and compatible ones) working under the Windows operational system from Microsoft. The program language used in development was Object Pascal and the compiler used was Delphi from Borland. During the development, computer algorithms were used, based in numeric methods, to the resolution of the differential equations involved in the process. (author)

  11. Numerical simulation of nuclear pebble bed configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shams, A., E-mail: shams@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands); Roelofs, F., E-mail: roelofs@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands); Komen, E.M.J., E-mail: komen@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands); Baglietto, E., E-mail: emiliob@MIT.EDU [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Numerical simulations of a single face cubic centred pebble bed are performed. • Wide range of turbulence modelling techniques are used to perform these calculations. • The methods include 1-DNS, 1-LES, 3-Hybrid (RANS/LES) and 3-RANS models, respectively. • The obtained results are extensively compared to provide guidelines for such flow regimes. • These guidelines are used to perform reference LES for a limited sized random pebble bed. - Abstract: High Temperature Reactors (HTRs) are being considered all over the world. An HTR uses helium gas as a coolant, while the moderator function is taken up by graphite. The fuel is embedded in the graphite moderator. A particular inherent safety advantage of HTR designs is that the graphite can withstand very high temperatures, that the fuel inside will stay inside the graphite pebble and cannot escape to the surroundings even in the event of loss of cooling. Generally, the core can be designed using a graphite pebble bed. Some experimental and demonstration reactors have been operated using a pebble bed design. The test reactors have shown safe and efficient operation, however questions have been raised about possible occurrence of local hot spots in the pebble bed which may affect the pebble integrity. Analysis of the fuel integrity requires detailed evaluation of local heat transport phenomena in a pebble bed, and since such phenomena cannot easily be modelled experimentally, numerical simulations are a useful tool. As a part of a European project, named Thermal Hydraulics of Innovative Nuclear Systems (THINS), a benchmarking quasi-direct numerical simulation (q-DNS) of a well-defined pebble bed configuration has been performed. This q-DNS will serve as a reference database in order to evaluate the prediction capabilities of different turbulence modelling approaches. A wide range of numerical simulations based on different available turbulence modelling approaches are performed and compared with

  12. Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program: German Pebble Bed Reactor Technology review update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a review of the German pebble bed reactor technology, and updates the information provided in the Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program Interim Report COO-4057-6, German Pebble Bed Reactor Design and Technology Review, dated September 1978. Most of the updated information is for the PNP-500 and the HHT-Prototype plants. The PNP-500 is a 500 MW(t) multi-purpose demonstration plant for coal conversion applications. The HHT-Prototype is a 1640 MWt reactor designed to produce 675 MWe of electricity using a direct cycle gas turbine. The report provides a description and evaluation of the overall plant and the nuclear reactor for both the PNP-500 and HHT-Prototype. A description and evaluation of the primary system components is presented for the process heat and gas turbine applications

  13. Determination of concentration distribution and velocity of a catalyst in a model of a fluidized bed reactor using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simplified model of a cracking unit was construct. The gaseous phase consisted of air, the solid phase (zeolite catalyst cracking) and both the phases circulate at the ambiente temperature in the steady state with 500 g of catalyst and air flow of 1600 1/h. Measurements for the circulation time of the solid phase (catalyst), concentration and radial distribution of catalyst have been carried out. The reduced experimental model of the cracking reactor (FCC) was used and radioctive tracer and attenuation of γ-radiation techniques were employed. (E.G.)

  14. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor fuel element comprising a column of vibration compacted fuel which is retained in consolidated condition by a thimble shaped plug. The plug is wedged into gripping engagement with the wall of the sheath by a wedge. The wedge material has a lower coefficient of expansion than the sheath material so that at reactor operating temperature the retainer can relax sufficient to accommodate thermal expansion of the column of fuel. (author)

  15. Nuclear reactor design

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on core design and methods for design and analysis. It is based on advances made in nuclear power utilization and computational methods over the past 40 years, covering core design of boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors, as well as fast reactors and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The objectives of this book are to help graduate and advanced undergraduate students to understand core design and analysis, and to serve as a background reference for engineers actively working in light water reactors. Methodologies for core design and analysis, together with physical descriptions, are emphasized. The book also covers coupled thermal hydraulic core calculations, plant dynamics, and safety analysis, allowing readers to understand core design in relation to plant control and safety.

  16. Generalities about nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From Zoe, the first nuclear reactor, till the current EPR, the French nuclear industry has always advanced by profiting from the feedback from dozens of years of experience and operations, in particular by drawing lessons from the most significant events in its history, such as the Fukushima accident. The new generations of reactors must improve safety and economic performance so that the industry maintain its legitimacy and its share in the production of electricity. This article draws the history of nuclear power in France, gives a brief description of the pressurized water reactor design, lists the technical features of the different versions of PWR that operate in France and compares them with other types of reactors. The feedback experience concerning safety, learnt from the major nuclear accidents Three Miles Island (1979), Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011) is also detailed. Today there are 26 third generation reactors being built in the world: 4 EPR (1 in Finland, 1 in France and 2 in China); 2 VVER-1200 in Russia, 8 AP-1000 (4 in China and 4 in the Usa), 8 APR-1400 (4 in Korea and 4 in UAE), and 4 ABWR (2 in Japan and 2 in Taiwan)

  17. Hydrodynamics of multi-phase packed bed micro-reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Márquez Luzardo, N.M.

    2010-01-01

    Why to use packed bed micro-reactors for catalyst testing? Miniaturized packed bed reactors have a large surface-to-volume ratio at the reactor and particle level that favors the heat- and mass-transfer processes at all scales (intra-particle, inter-phase and inter-particle or reactor level). If the

  18. Nuclear rocket engine reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-07-01

    Covers a new technology of nuclear reactors and the related materials aspects. Integrates physics, materials science and engineering Serves as a basic book for nuclear engineers and nuclear physicists. The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  19. Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  20. Nuclear reactor constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor construction comprising a reactor core submerged in a pool of liquid metal coolant in a primary vessel which is suspended from the roof structure of a containment vault. Control rods supported from the roof structure are insertable in the core which is carried on a support structure from the wall of the primary vessel. To prevent excessive relaxation of the support structure whereby the control rods would be displaced relative to the core, the support structure incorporates a normally inactive secondary structure designed to become effective in bracing the primary structure against further relaxation beyond a predetermined limit. (author)

  1. Method and apparatus for a combination moving bed thermal treatment reactor and moving bed filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badger, Phillip C.; Dunn, Jr., Kenneth J.

    2015-09-01

    A moving bed gasification/thermal treatment reactor includes a geometry in which moving bed reactor particles serve as both a moving bed filter and a heat carrier to provide thermal energy for thermal treatment reactions, such that the moving bed filter and the heat carrier are one and the same to remove solid particulates or droplets generated by thermal treatment processes or injected into the moving bed filter from other sources.

  2. Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER ) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  3. Nuclear power reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this book is to explain the physical working conditions of nuclear reactors for the benefit of non-specialized engineers and engineering students. One of the leading ideas of this course is to distinguish between two fundamentally different concepts: - a science which could be called neutrodynamics (as distinct from neutron physics which covers the knowledge of the neutron considered as an elementary particle and the study of its interactions with nuclei); the aim of this science is to study the interaction of the neutron gas with real material media; the introduction will however be restricted to its simplified expression, the theory and equation of diffusion; - a special application: reactor physics, which is introduced when the diffusing and absorbing material medium is also multiplying. For this reason the chapter on fission is used to introduce this section. In practice the section on reactor physics is much longer than that devoted to neutrodynamics and it is developed in what seemed to be the most relevant direction: nuclear power reactors. Every effort was made to meet the following three requirements: to define the physical bases of neutron interaction with different materials, to give a correct mathematical treatment within the limit of necessary simplifying hypotheses clearly explained; to propose, whenever possible, numerical applications in order to fix orders of magnitude

  4. Computational prediction of dust production in pebble bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Finite element analysis of frictional contact. ► Plasticity taken into account for nuclear graphite at room temperature. ► Prediction of order of magnitude for dust loading in PBRs. ► Archard wear model for wear mass calculations. - Abstract: This paper describes the computational modeling and simulation of graphite pebbles in frictional contacts as anticipated in a pebble bed reactor. For the high temperature gas-cooled reactor, the potential dust generation from frictional contact at the surface of pebbles and the subsequent lift-off and transport of dust and absorbed fission products are of safety concern at elevated temperatures under an air ingress accident. The aim of this work is to perform a computational study to estimate the quantity of the nuclear grade graphite dust produces from a typical anticipated configuration.

  5. Nuclear research reactors in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cota, Anna Paula Leite; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias, E-mail: aplc@cdtn.b, E-mail: amir@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The rising concerns about global warming and energy security have spurred a revival of interest in nuclear energy, giving birth to a 'nuclear power renaissance' in several countries in the world. Particularly in Brazil, in the recent years, the nuclear power renaissance can be seen in the actions that comprise its nuclear program, summarily the increase of the investments in nuclear research institutes and the government target to design and build the Brazilian Multipurpose research Reactor (BMR). In the last 50 years, Brazilian research reactors have been used for training, for producing radioisotopes to meet demands in industry and nuclear medicine, for miscellaneous irradiation services and for academic research. Moreover, the research reactors are used as laboratories to develop technologies in power reactors, which are evaluated today at around 450 worldwide. In this application, those reactors become more viable in relation to power reactors by the lowest cost, by the operation at low temperatures and, furthermore, by lower demand for nuclear fuel. In Brazil, four research reactors were installed: the IEA-R1 and the MB-01 reactors, both at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares (IPEN, Sao Paulo); the Argonauta, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN, Rio de Janeiro) and the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor, at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN, Belo Horizonte). The present paper intends to enumerate the characteristics of these reactors, their utilization and current academic research. Therefore, through this paper, we intend to collaborate on the BMR project. (author)

  6. Towards nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the middle of 21st century, the population on the earth is expected to double, and the energy that mankind consumes to triple. The nuclear fusion which is said the ultimate energy source for mankind is expected to solve this energy problem. As for fusion reactors, fuel materials exist inexhaustibly, distributing evenly, they have high safety in principle, the product of burning is harmless nonradioactive substance that does not require the treatment and disposal, and the attenuation of induced radioactivity due to neutrons is quick and the effect to global environment is little. The basic plan of second stage nuclear fusion research and development was decided in 1975, aiming at attaining the critical plasma condition. JT-60 has attained it in 1987. The project of international thermonuclear fusion experimental reactor (ITER) was started, and the conceptual design was carried out. Under such background, the third stage basic plan was decided in 1992, and its objective is self ignition condition, long time burning and the basis of the reactor engineering technology. The engineering design of the ITER is investigated. (K.I.)

  7. Nuclear reactor building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Townsend, Harold E.; Barbanti, Giancarlo

    1994-01-01

    A reactor building for enclosing a nuclear reactor includes a containment vessel having a wetwell disposed therein. The wetwell includes inner and outer walls, a floor, and a roof defining a wetwell pool and a suppression chamber disposed thereabove. The wetwell and containment vessel define a drywell surrounding the reactor. A plurality of vents are disposed in the wetwell pool in flow communication with the drywell for channeling into the wetwell pool steam released in the drywell from the reactor during a LOCA for example, for condensing the steam. A shell is disposed inside the wetwell and extends into the wetwell pool to define a dry gap devoid of wetwell water and disposed in flow communication with the suppression chamber. In a preferred embodiment, the wetwell roof is in the form of a slab disposed on spaced apart support beams which define therebetween an auxiliary chamber. The dry gap, and additionally the auxiliary chamber, provide increased volume to the suppression chamber for improving pressure margin.

  8. Measurement in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor construction has a flux detector comprising a bundle of fibre optics each having a bead incorporating a substance which scintillates on being struck by neutrons or gamma radiations. The other ends of the fibre optics terminate at an image intensifier. The optical fibres may be of glass made from a mixture of silica, alkaline earth metal oxide, cerous oxide and alkali metal oxide. The beads may be incorporated in a disc forming a detector head, which is in a protective guide tube, through which an inert gas may be passed. (author)

  9. Gas reactor international cooperative program interim report: German Pebble Bed Reactor design and technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes and evaluates several gas-cooled reactor plant concepts under development within the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). The concepts, based upon the use of a proven Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) fuel element design, include nuclear heat generation for chemical processes and electrical power generation. Processes under consideration for the nuclear process heat plant (PNP) include hydrogasification of coal, steam gasification of coal, combined process, and long-distance chemical heat transportation. The electric plant emphasized in the report is the steam turbine cycle (HTR-K), although the gas turbine cycle (HHT) is also discussed. The study is a detailed description and evaluation of the nuclear portion of the various plants. The general conclusions are that the PBR technology is sound and that the HTR-K and PNP plant concepts appear to be achievable through appropriate continuing development programs, most of which are either under way or planned

  10. BIODEGRADATION OF AROMATIC AMINE COMPOUNDS USING MOVING BED BIOFILM REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Delnavaz ، B. Ayati ، H. Ganjidoust

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Three moving bed biofilm reactors were used to treat synthesized wastewater of aromatic amine compounds including aniline, para-diaminobenzene and para-aminophenol that are found in many industrial wastewaters. The reactors with cylindrical shape had an internal diameter and an effective depth of 10 and 60 cm, respectively. The reactors were filled with light expanded clay aggregate as carriers and operated in an aerobic batch and continuous conditions. Evaluation of the reactors' efficiency was done at different retention time of 8, 24, 48 and 72 h with an influent COD from 100 to 3500 mg/L (filling ratio of 50%. The maximum obtained removal efficiencies were 90% (influent COD=2000 mg/L, 87% (influent COD=1000 mg/L and 75% (influent COD=750 mg/L for aniline, para-diaminobenzene and para-aminophenol, respectively. In the study of decrease in filling ratio from 50 to 30 percent, 6% decrease for both para-diaminobenzene and para-aminophenol and 7% increase for aniline degradation were obtained. The removal efficiency was decreased to about 10% after 15 days of continuous loading for each of the above three substrates. In the shock loading test, initially the COD removal rate was decreased in all reactors, but after about 10 days, it has been approached to the previous values. Finally, biodegradability of aromatic amines has been proved by nuclear magnetic resonance system.

  11. Virtual nuclear reactor for education of nuclear reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As one of projects that were programmed in the cultivation program for human resources in nuclear engineering sponsored by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, the development of a virtual reactor for education of nuclear reactor physics started in 2007. The purpose of the virtual nuclear reactor is to make nuclear reactor physics easily understood with aid of visualization. In the first year of this project, the neutron slowing down process was visualized. The data needed for visualization are provided by Monte Carlo calculations; The flights of the respective neutrons generated by nuclear fissions are traced through a reactor core until they disappear by neutron absorption or slow down to a thermal energy. With this visualization and an attached supplement textbook, it is expected that the learners can learn more clearly the physical implication of neutron slowing process that is mathematically described by the Boltzmann neutron transport equation. (author)

  12. Fluidized-bed reactors processes and operating conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, John G

    2016-01-01

    The fluidized-bed reactor is the centerpiece of industrial fluidization processes. This book focuses on the design and operation of fluidized beds in many different industrial processes, emphasizing the rationale for choosing fluidized beds for each particular process. The book starts with a brief history of fluidization from its inception in the 1940’s. The authors present both the fluid dynamics of gas-solid fluidized beds and the extensive experimental studies of operating systems and they set them in the context of operating processes that use fluid-bed reactors. Chemical engineering students and postdocs as well as practicing engineers will find great interest in this book.

  13. Theoretical comparison of packed bed and fluidized bed membrane reactors for methane reforming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallucci, Fausto; Sint Annaland, van Martin; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    In this theoretical work the performance of different membrane reactor concepts, both fluidized bed and packed bed membrane reactors, has been compared for ultra-pure hydrogen production via methane reforming. Using detailed theoretical models, the required membrane area to reach a given conversion

  14. Optimal control of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modern control theory is applied to the design of control systems for experimental nuclear reactors that do not belong to power reactors, the component forms of optimal control systems for nuclear reactors are demonstrated. The adoption of output quadratic integral criterion and incomplete state feedback technique can make these systems both efficient and economical. Moreover, approximate handling methods are given so as to simplify the calculations in design. In addition, the adoptable reference values of parameters are given in the illustration

  15. Nuclear reactor spacer assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor is disclosed wherein the fuel element receiving and supporting grid is comprised of a first metal, the guide tubes which pass through the grid assembly are comprised of a second metal and the grid is supported on the guide tubes by means of expanded sleeves located intermediate the grid and guide tubes. The fuel assembly is fabricated by inserting the sleeves, of initial outer diameter commensurate with the guide tube outer diameters, through the holes in the grid assembly provided for the guide tubes and thereafter expanding the sleeves radially outwardly along their entire length such that the guide tubes can subsequently be passed through the sleeves. The step of radial expansion, as a result of windows provided in the sleeves having dimensions commensurate with the geometry of the grid, mechanically captures the grid and simultaneously preloads the sleeve against the grid whereby relative motion between the grid and guide tube will be precluded

  16. Nuclear reactor measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An instrument to detect the temperature and flow-rate of the liquid metal current of a coolant fluid sample from adjacent sub-assemblies of a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor is described. It includes three thermocouple hot junctions mounted in series, each intended for exposure to a sample-current from a single sub-assembly, electromagnetic coils being mounted around an induction core which detects variations in the liquid metal flow-rate by deformation of the lines of flux. The instrument may also include a thermocouple to detect the mean temperature of the sample-current of coolant fluid from several sources, the result being that the temperature of the coolant fluid current in a sub-assembly may be inferred from the three temperature readings associated with this sub-assembly

  17. 21 CFR 892.1350 - Nuclear scanning bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nuclear scanning bed. 892.1350 Section 892.1350...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1350 Nuclear scanning bed. (a) Identification. A nuclear scanning bed is an adjustable bed intended to support a patient during a nuclear...

  18. Comparison of packed bed and fluidized bed membrane reactors for methane reforming

    OpenAIRE

    Gallucci, Fausto; Sint Annaland, van, Martin; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the performance of different membrane reactor concepts, both fluidized bed and packed bed membrane reactors, have been compared for the reforming of methane for the production of ultra-pure hydrogen. Using detailed theoretical models, the required membrane area to reach a given conversion and the prevailing temperature profiles have been compared. The extent of mass and heat transfer limitations in the different reactors have been evaluated, and strategies to decrease (or avoid) ...

  19. Fast reactors and nuclear nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems are discussed with regard to nuclear fuel cycle resistance in fast reactors to nuclear proliferation risk due to the potential for use in military programs of the knowledge, technologies and materials gained from peaceful nuclear power applications. Advantages are addressed for fast reactors in the creation of a more reliable mode of nonproliferation in the closed nuclear fuel cycle in comparison with the existing fully open and partially closed fuel cycles of thermal reactors. Advantages and shortcomings are also discussed from the point of view of nonproliferation from the start with fast reactors using plutonium of thermal reactor spent fuel and enriched uranium fuel to the gradual transition using their own plutonium as fuel. (author)

  20. Hydrodynamics of multi-phase packed bed micro-reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Márquez Luzardo, N.M.

    2010-01-01

    Why to use packed bed micro-reactors for catalyst testing? Miniaturized packed bed reactors have a large surface-to-volume ratio at the reactor and particle level that favors the heat- and mass-transfer processes at all scales (intra-particle, inter-phase and inter-particle or reactor level). If the mass-transfer processes are fast in respect to the reaction-rate, then the reaction-rate is under kinetic control over the entire range of conversion and it is possible to measure intrinsic kineti...

  1. Feedback linearizing control of a fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoufoussi, H.; Perrier, M.; Chaouki, J.; Chavarie, C.; Dochain, D. (Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Genie Chimique)

    1992-04-01

    A linearized technique has been applied to temperature control for a fluidized bed reactor. A nonlinear antiwindup mechanism for the reset action is used. Simulation tests show that the controller provides good setpoint tracking. 24 refs.; 11 figs.; 4 tabs.

  2. Teaching About Nature's Nuclear Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J M

    2005-01-01

    Naturally occurring nuclear reactors existed in uranium deposits on Earth long before Enrico Fermi built the first man-made nuclear reactor beneath Staggs Field in 1942. In the story of their discovery, there are important lessons to be learned about scientific inquiry and scientific discovery. Now, there is evidence to suggest that the Earth's magnetic field and Jupiter's atmospheric turbulence are driven by planetary-scale nuclear reactors. The subject of planetocentric nuclear fission reactors can be a jumping off point for stimulating classroom discussions about the nature and implications of planetary energy sources and about the geomagnetic field. But more importantly, the subject can help to bring into focus the importance of discussing, debating, and challenging current thinking in a variety of areas.

  3. Simulating the Dynamics of Spouted-Bed Nuclear Fuel Coaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Boyalakuntla, Dhanunjay S [ORNL; Syamlal, M [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); O' Brien, T. J. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

    2007-01-01

    We describe simulation studies of the dynamics of spouted beds used for CVD coating of nuclear fuel particles. Our principal modeling tool is the Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges (MFIX) code that was originally developed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for fossil energy process applications. In addition to standard MFIX features that allow coupling of transient hydrodynamics, heat and mass transfer, and chemical kinetics, we employ special post-processing tools to track particle mixing and circulation as functions of operating conditions and bed design. We describe in detail one major feature of the dynamics, which is the occurrence of very regular spontaneous pulsations of gas and particle flow in the spout. These pulsations appear to be critically linked to the entrainment and circulation of solids, and they produce readily accessible dynamic pressure variations that can be used for direct comparisons of model predictions with experiments. Spouted-bed dynamics are important from a CVD perspective because they directly determine the magnitude and variability of the concentration and species gradients in the zone where reactant gases first come into contact with hot particles. As this unsteady spouted-bed environment differs from other types of CVD reactors, the design and scale-up of such reactors is likely to involve unique modeling issues. Our primary goal here is to lay the groundwork for how computational simulation can be used to address these modeling issues in the specific context of nuclear fuel particle coating.

  4. Simulating the dynamics of spouted-bed nuclear fuel coaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannala, S.; Daw, C.S.; Finney, C.E.A.; Boyalakuntla, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Syamlal, M.; O' Brien, T.J. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV, 26505 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    We describe simulation studies of the dynamics of spouted beds used for CVD coating of nuclear fuel particles. Our principal modeling tool is the Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges (MFIX) code that was originally developed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for fossil energy process applications. In addition to standard MFIX features that allow coupling of transient hydrodynamics, heat and mass transfer, and chemical kinetics, we employ special post-processing tools to track particle mixing and circulation as functions of operating conditions and bed design. We describe in detail one major feature of the dynamics, which is the occurrence of very regular spontaneous pulsations of gas and particle flow in the spout. These pulsations appear to be critically linked to the entrainment and circulation of solids, and they produce readily accessible dynamic pressure variations that can be used for direct comparisons of model predictions with experiments. Spouted-bed dynamics are important from a CVD perspective because they directly determine the magnitude and variability of the concentration and species gradients in the zone where reactant gases first come into contact with hot particles. As this unsteady spouted-bed environment differs from other types of CVD reactors, the design and scale-up of such reactors is likely to involve unique modeling issues. Our primary goal here is to lay the groundwork for how computational simulation can be used to address these modeling issues in the specific context of nuclear fuel particle coating. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Nonlinear dynamics and control of a recycle fixed bed reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Recke, Bodil; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. Primarily to describe the dynamic behaviour that can be observed in a fixed bed reactor with recycle of unconverted reactant. Secondly to describe the possibilities of model reduction in order to facilitate control design. Reactant recycle has been shown to introduce periodic solution to the fixed bed reactor, a phenomenon which is not seen for the system without the recycle, at least not within the Peclet number range investigated in the present work. Th...

  6. Deleterious Thermal Effects Due To Randomized Flow Paths in Pebble Bed, and Particle Bed Style Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    A review of literature associated with Pebble Bed and Particle Bed reactor core research has revealed a systemic problem inherent to reactor core concepts which utilize randomized rather than structured coolant channel flow paths. For both the Pebble Bed and Particle Bed Reactor designs; case studies reveal that for indeterminate reasons, regions within the core would suffer from excessive heating leading to thermal runaway and localized fuel melting. A thermal Computational Fluid Dynamics model was utilized to verify that In both the Pebble Bed and Particle Bed Reactor concepts randomized coolant channel pathways combined with localized high temperature regions would work together to resist the flow of coolant diverting it away from where it is needed the most to cooler less resistive pathways where it is needed the least. In other words given the choice via randomized coolant pathways the reactor coolant will take the path of least resistance, and hot zones offer the highest resistance. Having identified the relationship between randomized coolant channel pathways and localized fuel melting it is now safe to assume that other reactor concepts that utilize randomized coolant pathways such as the foam core reactor are also susceptible to this phenomenon.

  7. Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlos Chavez-Mercado; Jaime B. Morales-Sandoval; Benjamin E. Zayas-Perez

    1998-12-31

    The Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory (NREAL) is a sophisticated computer system with state-of-the-art analytical tools and technology for analysis of light water reactors. Multiple application software tools can be activated to carry out different analyses and studies such as nuclear fuel reload evaluation, safety operation margin measurement, transient and severe accident analysis, nuclear reactor instability, operator training, normal and emergency procedures optimization, and human factors engineering studies. An advanced graphic interface, driven through touch-sensitive screens, provides the means to interact with specialized software and nuclear codes. The interface allows the visualization and control of all observable variables in a nuclear power plant (NPP), as well as a selected set of nonobservable or not directly controllable variables from conventional control panels.

  8. Nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center for Nuclear Engineering has shown expertise in the field of nuclear and energy systems ad correlated areas. Due to the experience obtained over decades in research and technological development at Brazilian Nuclear Program personnel has been trained and started to actively participate in the design of the main system that will compose the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) which will make Brazil self-sufficient in the production of radiopharmaceuticals. The institution has participated in the monitoring and technical support concerning the safety, licensing and modernization of the research reactors IPEN/MB-01 and IEA-R1. The Nuclear Fuel Center is responsible for the production of the nuclear fuel necessary for the continuous operation of the IEA-R1 research reactor. Development of new fuel technologies is also a permanent concern

  9. Random processes in nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, M M R

    1974-01-01

    Random Processes in Nuclear Reactors describes the problems that a nuclear engineer may meet which involve random fluctuations and sets out in detail how they may be interpreted in terms of various models of the reactor system. Chapters set out to discuss topics on the origins of random processes and sources; the general technique to zero-power problems and bring out the basic effect of fission, and fluctuations in the lifetime of neutrons, on the measured response; the interpretation of power reactor noise; and associated problems connected with mechanical, hydraulic and thermal noise sources

  10. Packed Bed Reactor Technology for Chemical-Looping Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorman, Sander; Sint Annaland, van Martin; Kuipers, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) has emerged as an alternative for conventional power production processes to intrinsically integrate power production and CO2 capture. In this work a new reactor concept for CLC is proposed, based on dynamically operated packed bed reactors. With analytical expressi

  11. Biological Phosphorus Removal in a Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helness, Herman

    2007-09-15

    The scope of this study was to investigate use of the moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) process for biological phosphorus removal. The goal has been to describe the operating conditions required for biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal in a MBBR operated as a sequencing batch reactor (SBR), and determine dimensioning criteria for such a process

  12. A Fixed Bed Barrier Reactor with Separate Feed of Reactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neomagus, H.W.J.P.; Saracco, G.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2001-01-01

    A new type of gas-solid reactor was developed and characterised in the series of reactor configurations with separate feed of reactants studied by our group. The novelty in the proposed design lies in the use of a fixed bed of small catalytic particles instead of a porous catalytic membrane. The maj

  13. Technique of nuclear reactors controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deal about 'Techniques of control of the nuclear reactors' in the goal to achieve the control of natural uranium reactors and especially the one of Saclay. This work is mainly about the measurement into nuclear parameters and go further in the measurement of thermodynamic variables,etc... putting in relief the new features required on behalf of the detectors because of their use in the thermal neutrons flux. In the domain of nuclear measurement, we indicate the realizations and the results obtained with thermal neutron detectors and for the measurement of ionizations currents. We also treat the technical problem of the start-up of a reactor and of the reactivity measurement. We give the necessary details for the comprehension of all essential diagrams and plans put on, in particular, for the reactor of Saclay. (author)

  14. Nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Center (CCN) of IPEN produces nuclear fuel for the continuous operation of the IEA-R1 research reactor of IPEN. The serial production started in 1988, when the first nuclear fuel element was delivered for IEA-R1. In 2011, CCN proudly presents the 100{sup th} nuclear fuel element produced. Besides routine production, development of new technologies is also a permanent concern at CCN. In 2005, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} were replaced by U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-based fuels, and the research of U Mo is currently under investigation. Additionally, the Brazilian Multipurpose Research Reactor (RMB), whose project will rely on the CCN for supplying fuel and uranium targets. Evolving from an annual production from 10 to 70 nuclear fuel elements, plus a thousand uranium targets, is a huge and challenging task. To accomplish it, a new and modern Nuclear Fuel Factory is being concluded, and it will provide not only structure for scaling up, but also a safer and greener production. The Nuclear Engineering Center has shown, along several years, expertise in the field of nuclear, energy systems and correlated areas. Due to the experience obtained during decades in research and technological development at Brazilian Nuclear Program, personnel has been trained and started to actively participate in design of the main system that will compose the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) which will make Brazil self-sufficient in production of radiopharmaceuticals. The institution has participated in the monitoring and technical support concerning the safety, licensing and modernization of the research reactors IPEN/MB-01 and IEA-R1. Along the last two decades, numerous specialized services of engineering for the Brazilian nuclear power plants Angra 1 and Angra 2 have been carried out. The contribution in service, research, training, and teaching in addition to the development of many related technologies applied to nuclear engineering and correlated areas enable the institution to

  15. Nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Fuel Center (CCN) of IPEN produces nuclear fuel for the continuous operation of the IEA-R1 research reactor of IPEN. The serial production started in 1988, when the first nuclear fuel element was delivered for IEA-R1. In 2011, CCN proudly presents the 100th nuclear fuel element produced. Besides routine production, development of new technologies is also a permanent concern at CCN. In 2005, U3O8 were replaced by U3Si2-based fuels, and the research of U Mo is currently under investigation. Additionally, the Brazilian Multipurpose Research Reactor (RMB), whose project will rely on the CCN for supplying fuel and uranium targets. Evolving from an annual production from 10 to 70 nuclear fuel elements, plus a thousand uranium targets, is a huge and challenging task. To accomplish it, a new and modern Nuclear Fuel Factory is being concluded, and it will provide not only structure for scaling up, but also a safer and greener production. The Nuclear Engineering Center has shown, along several years, expertise in the field of nuclear, energy systems and correlated areas. Due to the experience obtained during decades in research and technological development at Brazilian Nuclear Program, personnel has been trained and started to actively participate in design of the main system that will compose the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) which will make Brazil self-sufficient in production of radiopharmaceuticals. The institution has participated in the monitoring and technical support concerning the safety, licensing and modernization of the research reactors IPEN/MB-01 and IEA-R1. Along the last two decades, numerous specialized services of engineering for the Brazilian nuclear power plants Angra 1 and Angra 2 have been carried out. The contribution in service, research, training, and teaching in addition to the development of many related technologies applied to nuclear engineering and correlated areas enable the institution to fulfill its mission that is to

  16. Fundamentals of Nuclear Reactor Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, E E

    2008-01-01

    This new streamlined text offers a one-semester treatment of the essentials of how the fission nuclear reactor works, the various approaches to the design of reactors, and their safe and efficient operation. The book includes numerous worked-out examples and end-of-chapter questions to help reinforce the knowledge presented. This textbook offers an engineering-oriented introduction to nuclear physics, with a particular focus on how those physics are put to work in the service of generating nuclear-based power, particularly the importance of neutron reactions and neutron behavior. Engin

  17. Hydrodynamic Reaction Model of a Spouted Bed Electrolytic Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alireza Shirvanian, Pezhman; Calo, Joseph

    2002-08-01

    An Eulerian model is presented that has been developed to describe the hydrodynamics, mass transfer, and metal ion reduction mass transfer in a cylindrical, spouted bed electrolytic reactor. Appropriate boundary conditions are derived from kinetic theory and reaction kinetics for the hydrodynamics and mass transfer and reaction on the cathodic conical bottom of the reactor, respectively. This study was undertaken as a part of a project focused on the development of a Spouted Bed Electrolytic Reactor (SBER) for metals recovery. The results presented here include the effect of particle loading, inlet jet velocity, Solution pH, and temperature on void fraction distribution, pressure drop, particles recirculation rate, and metal recovery rate.

  18. nuclear reactor design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work , the sensitivity of different reactor calculation methods, and the effect of different assumptions and/or approximation are evaluated . A new concept named error map is developed to determine the relative importance of different factors affecting the accuracy of calculations. To achieve this goal a generalized, multigroup, multi dimension code UAR-DEPLETION is developed to calculate the spatial distribution of neutron flux, effective multiplication factor and the spatial composition of a reactor core for a period of time and for specified reactor operating conditions. The code also investigates the fuel management strategies and policies for the entire fuel cycle to meet the constraints of material and operating limitations

  19. GE's advanced nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The excess of US electrical generating capacity which has existed for the past 15 years is coming to an end as we enter the 1990s. Environmental and energy security issues associated with fossil fuels are kindling renewed interest in the nuclear option. The importance of these issues are underscored by the National Energy Strategy (NES) which calls for actions which open-quotes are designed to ensure that the nuclear power option is available to utilities.close quotes Utilities, utility associations, and nuclear suppliers, under the leadership of the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC), have jointly developed a 14-point strategic plan aimed at establishing a predictable regulatory environment, standardized and pre-licensed Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) nuclear plants, resolving the long-term waste management issue, and other open-quotes enabling conditions.close quotes GE is participating in this national effort and GE's family of advanced nuclear power plants feature two reactor designs, developed on a common technology base, aimed at providing a new generation of nuclear plants to provide safe, clean, economical electricity to the world's utilities in the 1990s and beyond. Together, the large-size (1300 MWe) Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) and the small-size (600 MWe) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) are innovative, near-term candidates for expanding electrical generating capacity in the US and worldwide. Both possess the features necessary to do so safety, reliably, and economically

  20. BWR type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To simplify the structure of an emergency core cooling system while suppressing the flow out of coolants upon rapture accidents in a coolant recycling device of BWR type reactors. Constitution: Recirculation pumps are located at a position higher than the reactor core in a pressure vessel, and the lower plenum is bisected vertically by a partition plate. Further, a gas-liquid separator is surrounded with a wall and the water level at the outer side of the wall is made higher than the water level in the inside of the wall. In this structure, coolants are introduced from the upper chamber in the lower plenum into the reactor core, and the steams generated in the reactor core are separated in the gas-liquid separator, whereby the separated liquid is introduced as coolants by way of the inner chamber into the lower chamber of the lower plenum and further sent by way of the outer chamber into the reactor core. Consequently, idle rotation of the recycling pumps due to the flow-in of saturated water is prevented and loss of coolants in the reactor core can also be prevented upon raptures in the pipeway and the driving section of the pump connected to the pressure vessel and in the bottom of the pressure vessel. (Horiuchi, T.)

  1. Medium voltage direct current (MVDC) converter for pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR) / Hendrik de Villiers Pretorius

    OpenAIRE

    Pretorius, Hendrik de Villiers

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear and renewable energy systems will probably be used more and more extensively in future due to high environmental demands regarding pollution and exhaustion of the world's gas and coal reserves. Because most types of renewable energy systems do not supply electric power at line frequency and voltage a converter is used to connect these sources to the existing power system. The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a nuclear power plant currently using a 50 Hz synchrono...

  2. Innovative designs of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The world development scenarios predict at least a 2.5 time increase in the global consumption of primary energy in the first half of the twenty-first century. Much of this growth can be provided by the nuclear power which possesses important advantages over other energy technologies. However, the large deployment of nuclear sources may take place only when the new generation of reactors appears on the market and will be free of the shortcomings found in the existing nuclear power installations. The public will be more inclined to accept nuclear plants that have better economics; higher safety; more efficient management of the radioactive waste; lower risk of nuclear weapons proliferation, and provided that the focus is made on the energy option free of ∇e2 generation. Currently, the future of nuclear power is trusted to the technology based on fast reactors and closed fuel cycle. The latter implies reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel of the nuclear plants and re-use of plutonium produced in power reactors

  3. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokkam, Ram [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  4. Design of fuzzy PID controller for high temperature pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badgujar, Kushal D.; Satpute, Satchidanand R.; Revankara, Shripad T.; Lee, John C.; Kim, Moo Hwan [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Control system is most important characteristic to be considered to control spontaneous fission reaction in the design of the nuclear reactor. Recently fuzzy based control systems have been designed and applied as control system for nuclear plants. This article emphasize on controlling the power of the high temperature pebble bed reactor (HTPBR) with the design of Fuzzy proportional integral derivative (PID) controller. A simplified reactor model with point kinetics equation and reactor heat balance equation is used. The reactivity feedback arising from power coefficient of reactivity and Xenon poisoning is also considered. The reactor is operated at various power levels by using fuzzy PID controller. The fuzzy logic eliminates the necessity of the tuning the gains of PID controller each time by extending the finite sets of the PID controller gains.

  5. AREVA's nuclear reactors portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reasonable assumption for the estimated new build market for the next 25 years is over 340 GWe net. The number of prospect countries is growing almost each day. To address this new build market, AREVA is developing a comprehensive portfolio of reactors intended to meet a wide range of power requirements and of technology choices. The EPR reactor is the flagship of the fleet. Intended for large power requirements, the four first EPRs are being built in Finland, France and China. Other countries and customers are in view, citing just two examples: the Usa where the U.S. EPR has been selected as the technology of choice by several U.S utilities; and the United Kingdom where the Generic Design Acceptance process of the EPR design submitted by AREVA and EDF is well under way, and where there is a strong will to have a plant on line in 2017. For medium power ranges, the AREVA portfolio includes a boiling water reactor and a pressurized water reactor which both offer all of the advantages of an advanced plant design, with excellent safety performance and competitive power generation cost: -) KERENA (1250+ MWe), developed in collaboration with several European utilities, and in particular with Eon; -) ATMEA 1 (1100+ MWe), a 3-loop evolutionary PWR which is being developed by AREVA and Mitsubishi. AREVA is also preparing the future and is deeply involved into Gen IV concepts. It has developed the ANTARES modular HTR reactor (pre-conceptual design completed) and is building upon its vast Sodium Fast Reactor experience to take part into the development of the next prototype. (author)

  6. Bed-to-wall heat transfer in a downer reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehner, P.; Wirth, K-E. [Erlangen-Nuremberg Univ., Lehrstuhl Mechanische Verfahrenstechnik, Erlangen (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    The effects of superficial gas velocity, solid circulating rate, suspension density and particle sizes on the bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient have been determined in a downer reactor 3.5 m high , with an internal diameter of 0.1 m. Results showed an increase in the bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient with increasing suspension density. The heat transfer coefficient by gas convection was found to play a significant role, especially at lower solid circulation rates or suspension densities and larger particle sizes. It was determined that at a given particle suspension density in the downer reactor, the heat transfer coefficient increase with decreasing particle size. A model was proposed to determine the bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient in a downer reactor. 24 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  7. Pebble Bed Reactors Design Optimization Methods and their Application to the Pebble Bed Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Anselmo Tomas, Jr.

    The Fluoride salt cooled High temperature Reactor (FHR) is a class of advanced nuclear reactors that combine the robust coated particle fuel form from high temperature gas cooled reactors, direct reactor auxillary cooling system (DRACS) passive decay removal of liquid metal fast reactors, and the transparent, high volumetric heat capacitance liquid fluoride salt working fluids---flibe (33%7Li2F-67%BeF)---from molten salt reactors. This combination of fuel and coolant enables FHRs to operate in a high-temperature low-pressure design space that has beneficial safety and economic implications. In 2012, UC Berkeley was charged with developing a pre-conceptual design of a commercial prototype FHR---the Pebble Bed- Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)---as part of the Nuclear Energy University Programs' (NEUP) integrated research project. The Mark 1 design of the PB-FHR (Mk1 PB-FHR) is 236 MWt flibe cooled pebble bed nuclear heat source that drives an open-air Brayton combine-cycle power conversion system. The PB-FHR's pebble bed consists of a 19.8% enriched uranium fuel core surrounded by an inert graphite pebble reflector that shields the outer solid graphite reflector, core barrel and reactor vessel. The fuel reaches an average burnup of 178000 MWt-d/MT. The Mk1 PB-FHR exhibits strong negative temperature reactivity feedback from the fuel, graphite moderator and the flibe coolant but a small positive temperature reactivity feedback of the inner reflector and from the outer graphite pebble reflector. A novel neutronics and depletion methodology---the multiple burnup state methodology was developed for an accurate and efficient search for the equilibrium composition of an arbitrary continuously refueled pebble bed reactor core. The Burnup Equilibrium Analysis Utility (BEAU) computer program was developed to implement this methodology. BEAU was successfully benchmarked against published results generated with existing equilibrium depletion codes VSOP

  8. DESIGN AND APPLICATION OF FLUIDIZED BED PHOTOCATALYTIC REACTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutant is a new and potential method to transform it to harmless inorganic material, such as CO2 and H2O. So far, most of photocatalytic reactors were cylinder or tabulate photoreactor. The relevant photocatalyst was TiO2 nanometer powder. Although a few investigators had aimed their research field to fluidized bed reactor, their reaction systems were of biphase, such as solid-liquid or solid-gas. Few people focused their research on the triphasic fluidized bed photocatalytic reactor[1]. Compared with traditional photoreactors, a triphasic fluidized bed photoreactor has more advantages[2]: (1) The solid photocatalyst can be separated easily. (2) Its configuration meets the requirement of higher surface area-to-volume ratio of photocatalytic, which is much lower in a fixed bed or a plate photoreactor. (3) The UV light can be used more efficiently. (4) The mass transfer conditions can be controlled and improved easily. (5) It suited to pilot-scale or large-scale operations. For the UV light penetration and photon efficiency should be considered, the photocatalytic reactor differed greatly from a typical fluidized bed reactor.

  9. Nuclear reactors and disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From a brief analysis of the perspectives of nuclear weapons arsenals reduction, a rational use of the energetic potential of the ogives and the authentic destruction of its warlike power is proposed. The fissionable material conversion contained in the nuclear fuel ogives for peaceful uses should be part of the disarmament agreements. This paper pretends to give an approximate idea on the resources re assignation implicancies. (Author)

  10. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upon reactor accident, hydrogen and oxygen are generated by water-zirconium reaction and radiolysis of water, which are accumulated in the reactor. If the concentration of hydrogen and oxygen exceeds a burning limit, there is a possibility of hydrogen burning to cause a danger of deteriorating the integrity of the reactor container and the equipments therein. The limit for the occurrence of the detonation is determined by a relationship between the scale of a detonation cell and the size of the container, and if the scale is greater than the container, the detonation does not occur. The scale of the cell is determined by a gas combustion rate and, if the combustion reaction is suppressed, detonation does not occur even in a large container. Then, an appropriate diluent is added to increase heat capacity of a gas mixture to thereby suppress the temperature elevation of the gas. Incombustible gases having a great heat capacity are preferred for the diluent, and CO2 is used. As the concentration of the CO2 gas to be added is increased, the detonation cell is made greater. Thus, occurrence of detonation due to combustion of the accumulated hydrogen can be prevented. (N.H.)

  11. Nonlinear dynamics and control of a recycle fixed bed reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recke, Bodil; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. Primarily to describe the dynamic behaviour that can be observed in a fixed bed reactor with recycle of unconverted reactant. Secondly to describe the possibilities of model reduction in order to facilitate control design. Reactant recycle has been shown...... to introduce periodic solution to the fixed bed reactor, a phenomenon which is not seen for the system without the recycle, at least not within the Peclet number range investigated in the present work. The possibility of model reduction by the methods of modal decomposition, and by characteristics...

  12. High power density reactors based on direct cooled particle beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. R.; Horn, F. L.

    Reactors based on direct cooled High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) type particle fuel are described. The small diameter particle fuel is packed between concentric porous cylinders to make annular fuel elements, with the inlet coolant gas flowing inwards. Hot exit gas flows out along the central channel of each element. Because of the very large heat transfer area in the packed beds, power densities in particle bed reactors (PBRs) are extremely high resulting in compact, lightweight systems. Coolant exit temperatures are high, because of the ceramic fuel temperature capabilities, and the reactors can be ramped to full power and temperature very rapidly. PBR systems can generate very high burst power levels using open cycle hydrogen coolant, or high continuous powers using closed cycle helium coolant. PBR technology is described and development requirements assessed.

  13. Health requirements for nuclear reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The health prerequisites established for the qualification of nuclear reactor operators according to CNEN-NE-1.01 Guidelines Licensing of nuclear reactor operators, CNEN-12/79 Resolution, are described. (M.A.)

  14. Nuclear Reactors and Technology; (USA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on EDB and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to EDB, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user's needs.

  15. Instrumentation for nuclear reactor control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This lecture is concerned with engineers and technicians not specialized in nuclear reactor control. The different methods of measurement used are briefly reviewed: current or pulse measurement, and Campbell system; the electronic networks are described and a part is devoted to the cables connecting detectors and electronic assemblies

  16. Automation of a fixed-bed continuous–flow reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Alcántara, R.; Canoira, L.; R. Conde; Fernández-Sánchez, J. M.; Navarro, A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the design and operation of a laboratory plant with a fixed-bed continuous-flow reactor, fully automated and controlled from a personal computer. The automated variables include two gas flows, one liquid flow, six temperatures, two pressures, one circulation of a cooling liquid, and 10 electrovalves. An adaptive-predictive control system was used. The chemical process chosen to run the automated reactor was the conversion of methanol to gasoline over a ZSM-5 catalyst. Thi...

  17. Nuclear reactor effluent monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minns, J.L.; Essig, T.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Radiological environmental monitoring and effluent monitoring at nuclear power plants is important both for normal operations, as well as in the event of an accident. During normal operations, environmental monitoring verifies the effectiveness of in-plant measures for controlling the release of radioactive materials in the plant. Following an accident, it would be an additional mechanism for estimating doses to members of the general public. This paper identifies the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory basis for requiring radiological environmental and effluent monitoring, licensee conditions for effluent and environmental monitoring, NRC independent oversight activities, and NRC`s program results.

  18. COPROX fixed bed reactor - temperature control schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giunta, P.; Moreno, M.; Marino, F.; Amadeo, N.; Lobarde, M. [Laboratorio de Procesos Cataliticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-06-15

    Different temperature control schemes for the COPROX stage of a 5-kW fuel cell system were analyzed. It was found that, among the schemes proposed, i.e., co- and countercurrent heat exchange, single adiabatic reactor and series of adiabatic reactors with interstage heat exchange, the best choice for temperature control was the series of adiabatic reactors with interstage heat exchange. This scheme represented the best way to keep the average temperature around 443 K, which was found to be the most suitable temperature for selectivity towards CO oxidation. If hydrogen is produced from ethanol steam reforming, the heat withdrawal can be carried out by the water/ethanol reformer feed mixture, thus contributing to the energy integration of the overall system. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. DEGRADATION OF AROMATIC COMPOUNDS USING MOVING BED BIOFILM REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ayati, H. Ganjidoust, M. Mir Fattah

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available For biological treatment of water, there are many different biofilm systems in use. Examples of them are trickling filters, rotating biological contactors, fixed media submerged biofilters, granular media biofilters and fluidized bed reactors. They all have their advantages and disadvantages. Hence, the Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor process was developed in Norway in the late 1980s and early 1990s to adopt the best features of the activated sludge process as well as those of the biofilter processes, without including the worst. Two cylindrical moving bed biofilm reactors were used in this study working in upflow stream conditions. Experiments have been done in aerobic batch flow regime. Laboratory experiments were conducted at room temperature (23–28C and synthetic wastewater comprising a composition of phenol and hydroquinone in each reactor as the main organic constituents, plus balanced nutrients and alkalinity were used to feed the reactor. The ratio of influent to effluent COD was determined at different retention times. The results indicated that the removal efficiency of each selected compound is affected by the detention time. At low phenol and hydroquinone concentration (from 700 to 1000 mg/L maximum removal efficiency (over 80 % was obtained. By further increasing in COD loading rate up to 3000 mg/L, a decrease in COD removal rate was occurred. In the reactor containing pyrogallol in COD of 1500 mg/L, the removal rate decreased to 10 percent because of its toxicity for microorganisms.

  20. Vinasses treatment in anaerobic fludized bed reactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. C. Terán

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The agricultural use of vinasse produced by the sugar industry has gone through many changes over the years. Coupled with concern over the increased agronomic efficiency and optimizing the management of the use of such waste, you can highlight the major global ecological awareness, developed after 90s. This study aims at the construction and operation of a reactor anaerobic cracker (RALF on pilot scale to verify the burden of chemical demand of oxygen (DQO of vinasse, under mesophilic. The stillage used for feeding the reactor was from a sugar cane processing plant, located in the city of Regente Feijó, São Paulo State. The inoculum was anaerobic sludge from a reactor and upward flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB treating wastewater from a factory of soda. The concentrations of vinasse to be treated ranged 17,239 mg DQO L-1 up to 28,174 mg DQO L-1. The effluent pH was maintained between 6.4 and 8.6 during the research. The productivity of biogas in the reactor has not achieved the expected rates, reaching only 46 mL day-1. Maximum efficiency attained during operation was 51.1 %, corresponding to a 14-day operation time, vinasses organic loading of 19.5 kg DQO m-3 dia-1 and to an hydraulic detention time of one day.

  1. Utilization of nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Report on an IAEA interregional training course, Budapest, Hungary, 5-30 November 1979. The course was attended by 19 participants from 16 Member States. Among the 28 training courses which the International Atomic Energy Agency organized within its 1979 programme of technical assistance was the Interregional Training Course on the Utilization of Nuclear Research Reactors. This course was held at the Nuclear Training Reactor (a low-power pool-type reactor) of the Technical University, Budapest, Hungary, from 5 to 30 November 1979 and it was complemented by a one-week Study Tour to the Nuclear Research Centre in Rossendorf near Dresden, German Democratic Republic. The training course was very successful, with 19 participants attending from 16 Member States - Bangladesh, Bolivia, Czechoslovakia, Ecuador, Egypt, India, Iraq, Korean Democratic People's Republic, Morocco, Peru, Philippines, Spain, Thailand, Turkey, Vietnam and Yugoslavia. Selected invited lecturers were recruited from the USA and Finland, as well as local scientists from Hungarian institutions. During the past two decades or so, many research reactors have been put into operation around the world, and the demand for well qualified personnel to run and fully utilize these facilities has increased accordingly. Several developing countries have already acquired small- and medium-size research reactors mainly for isotope production, research in various fields, and training, while others are presently at different stages of planning and installation. Through different sources of information, such as requests to the IAEA for fellowship awards and experts, it became apparent that many research reactors and their associated facilities are not being utilized to their full potential in many of the developing countries. One reason for this is the lack of a sufficient number of trained professionals who are well acquainted with all the capabilities that a research reactor can offer, both in research and

  2. Economic analysis of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents several methods for estimating the power costs of nuclear reactors. When based on a consistent set of economic assumptions, total power costs may be useful in comparing reactor alternatives. The principal items contributing to the total power costs of a nuclear power plant are: (1) capital costs, (2) fuel cycle costs, (3) operation and maintenance costs, and (4) income taxes and fixed charges. There is a large variation in capital costs and fuel expenses among different reactor types. For example, the standard once-through LWR has relatively low capital costs; however, the fuel costs may be very high if U3O8 is expensive. In contrast, the FBR has relatively high capital costs but low fuel expenses. Thus, the distribution of expenses varies significantly between these two reactors. In order to compare power costs, expenses and revenues associated with each reactor may be spread over the lifetime of the plant. A single annual cost, often called a levelized cost, may be obtained by the methods described. Levelized power costs may then be used as a basis for economic comparisons. The paper discusses each of the power cost components. An exact expression for total levelized power costs is derived. Approximate techniques of estimating power costs will be presented

  3. Nuclear reactor fuelling machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The refuelling machine described comprises a rotatable support structure having a guide tube attached to it by a parellel linkage mechanism, whereby the guide tube can be displaced sideways from the support structure. A gripper unit is housed within the guide tube for gripping the end of a fuel assembly or other reactor component and has means for maintenance in the engaging condition during travel of the unit along the guide tube, except for a small portion of the travel at one end of the guide tube, where the inner surface of the guide tube is shaped so as to maintain the gripper unit in a disengaging condition. The gripper unit has a rotatable head, means for moving it linearly within the guide tube so that a component carried by the unit can be housed in the guide tube, and means for rotating the head of the unit through 1800 relative to its body, to effect rotation of a component carried by the unit. The means for rotating the head of the gripper unit comprises ring and pinion gearing, operable through a series of rotatable shafts interconnected by universal couplings. The reason for provision for 1800 rotation is that due to the variation in the neutron flux across the reactor core the side of a fuel assembly towards the outside of the core will be subjected to a lower neutron flux and therefore will grow less than the side of the fuel assembly towards the inside of the core. This can lead to bowing and possible jamming of the fuel assemblies. Full constructional details are given. See also BP 1112384. (U.K.)

  4. The Performance of Structured Packings in Trickle-Bed Reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank, M.J.W.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate whether the use of structured packings might improve the mass transfer characteristics and the catalyst effectiveness of a trickle-bed reactor. Therefore, the performances of a structured packing, consisting of KATAPAK elements, and a dumped packi

  5. The performance of structured packings in trickle-bed reactors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank, M.J.W.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate whether the use of structured packings might improve the mass transfer characteristics and the catalyst effectiveness of a trickle-bed reactor. Therefore, the performances of a structured packing, consisting of KATAPAK elements, and a dumped packi

  6. Liquid-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen can be added to nuclear reactors with a liquid hydrogen-containing coolant on the suction side of a high pressure pump in the purification system. According to the invention this is performed by means of a liquid jet condenser which uses the coolant as liquid and which is preferably charged from the pressure side of the high pressure pump and conveys the liquid to a mixer connected in series with the high pressure pump. The invention is to be used especially in pressurized water reactors. (orig.)

  7. Circulating fluidized bed biological reactor for nutrients removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yubo CUI; Hongbo LIU; Chunxue BAI

    2008-01-01

    A new biological nitrogen removal process, which is named herein "The circulating fluidized bed bio-reactor (CFBBR)", was developed for simultaneous removal of nitrogen and organic matter. This process was composed of an anaerobic bed (Riser), aerobic bed (Downer) and connecting device. Influent and nitrified liquid from the aerobic bed enters the anaerobic bed from the bottom of the anaerobic bed, completing the removal of nitrogen and organic matter. The system performance under the conditions of different inflow loadings and nitrified liquid recirculation rates ranging from 200% to 600% was examined. From a technical and economic point of view, the optimum nitrified liquid recirculation rate was 400%. With a shortest total retention time of 2.5 h (0.8 h in the anaerobic bed and 1.5 h in the aerobic bed) and a nitrified liquid recir-culation rate of 400% based on the intluent flow rate, the average removal efficiencies of total nitrogen (TN) and sol-uble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) were found to be 88% and 95%, respectively. The average effluent concentra-tions of TN and SCOD were 3.5 mg/L and 16 mg/L, respectively. The volatile suspended solid (VSS) concentra-tion, nitrification rate and denitrification rate in the system were less than 1.0 g/L, 0.026-0.1 g NH4+-N/g VSS.d, and 0.016-0.074 g NOx--N/g VSS.d, respectively.

  8. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gas containing vessel has a water pool which is in communication with a dry well containing a reactor pressure vessel by way of a communication pipe is disposed. A capacity of a gas phase portion of the gas containing chamber, a capacity of the dry well, a water depth of a bent tube communicating the dry well with a pressure suppression pool of a pressure suppression chamber and a water depth of the communication pipe are determined so as to satisfy specific conditions. Since the water depth of the communication pipe is less than the water depth of the bent tube, incondensible gases and steams in the dry well flow into the water pool of the gas containing chamber at the initial stage of loss of coolant accident. Subsequently, steams in the dry well flow into the pressure suppression pool of the pressure suppression chamber by way of the bent tube. Accordingly, since the incondensible gases in the dry well do not flow into the pressure suppression chamber, pool swelling phenomenon in the pressure suppression chamber is not caused even if the water depth of the bent tube which leads to the pressure suppression chamber is great. Further, pressure increase due to transfer of the incondensible gases is decreased. (I.N.)

  9. Nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Buhl feels that nuclear-energy issues are too complex to be understood as single topics, and can only be understood in relationship to broader issues. In fact, goals and risks associated with all energy options must be seen as interrelated with other broad issues, and it should be understood that there are presently no clearcut criteria to ensure that the best decisions are made. The technical community is responsible for helping the public to understand the basic incompatibility of hard and soft technologies and that there is no risk-free energy source. Four principles are outlined for assessing the risks of various energy technologies: (1) take a holistic view; (2) compare the risk with the unit energy output; (3) compare the risk with those of everyday activities; and (4) identify unusual risks associated with a particular option. Dr. Buhl refers to the study conducted by Dr. Inhaber of Canada who used this approach and concluded that nuclear power and natural gas have the lowest overall risk

  10. Autonomous multi-purpose floating power system with a compact static pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsvetkov, Pavel; Vierow, Karen; Peddicord, Kenneth; Ragusa, Jean; McDeavitt, Sean; Poston, John Sr.; Shao, Lin; Willems, Greg [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The paper introduces a new concept of an autonomous multipurpose system with a compact static-bed pebble bed reactor as a power source. The system is envisioned as a small floating power complex in which a compact high-efficiency nuclear system provides the source of energy for a variety of industrial processes. It offers the near-term (with a conventional power source) and long-term (with a compact high-efficiency nuclear system) technologies for a low cost electricity/potable water supply compared to traditional systems for regions where local communities are isolated and do not have extensive industrial infrastructure and distribution networks. The complex can be quickly installed anywhere following demands and needs of local communities - coastal regions and islands. The reactor design and system layout, balance-of-plant evaluations, performance characteristics and deployment strategies are discussed. (authors)

  11. Proceedings of the ANS/ASME/NRC international topical meeting on nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics: LMFBR and HTGR advanced reactor concepts and analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning the thermal-hydraulics of LMFBR type reactors; mathematical methods in nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics; heat transfer in gas-cooled reactors; and thermal-hydraulics of pebble-bed reactors. Two papers have been previously abstracted and input to the data base

  12. Three dimensional diffusion calculations of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the three dimensional calculation of nuclear reactors using the code TRITON. The purposes of the work were to perform three-dimensional computations of the core of the Soreq nuclear reactor and of the power reactor ZION and to validate the TRITON code. Possible applications of the TRITON code in Soreq reactor calculations and in power reactor research are suggested. (H.K.)

  13. Torrefaction of sawdust in a fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Liu, Xinhua; Legros, Robert; Bi, Xiaotao T; Lim, C J; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, stable fluidization of sawdust was achieved in a bench fluidized bed with an inclined orifice distributor without inert bed materials. A solids circulation pattern was established in the bed without the presence of slugging and channeling. The effects of treatment severity and weight loss on the solid product properties were identified. The decomposition of hemicelluloses was found to be responsible for the significant changes of chemical, physical and mechanical properties of the torrefied sawdust, including energy content, particle size distribution and moisture absorption capacity. The hydrophobicity of the torrefied sawdust was improved over the raw sawdust with a reduction of around 40 wt.% in saturated water uptake rate, and enhanced with increasing the treatment severity due to the decomposition of hemicelluloses which are rich in hydroxyl groups. The results in this study provided the basis for torrefaction in fluidized bed reactors.

  14. Reactors for nuclear electric propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Propulsion is the key to space exploitation and power is the key to propulsion. This paper examines the role of nuclear fission reactors as the primary power source for high specific impulse electric propulsion systems for space missions of the 1980s and 1990s. Particular mission applications include transfer to and a reusable orbital transfer vehicle from low-Earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit, outer planet exploration and reconnaissance missions, and as a versatile space tug supporting lunar resource development. Nuclear electric propulsion is examined as an indispensable component in space activities of the next two decades.

  15. Reactors for nuclear electric propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propulsion is the key to space exploitation and power is the key to propulsion. This paper examines the role of nuclear fission reactors as the primary power source for high specific impulse electric propulsion systems for space missions of the 1980s and 1990s. Particular mission applications include transfer to and a reusable orbital transfer vehicle from low-Earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit, outer planet exploration and reconnaissance missions, and as a versatile space tug supporting lunar resource development. Nuclear electric propulsion is examined as an indispensable component in space activities of the next two decades

  16. Gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gas temperature of a hot gas loop in gas-cooled nuclear reactor plants shall be able to be modified without influencing the gas temperature of the other loops. If necessary, it should be possible to stop the loop. This is possible by means of a mixer which is places below the heat absorbing component in the hot channel and which is connected to a cold gas line. (orig.)

  17. Development of research reactor simulator and its application to dynamic test-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a real-time simulator for 'High-flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr (HANARO), and the Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR). The main purpose of this simulator is operator training, but we modified this simulator into a dynamic test-bed (DTB) to test the functions and dynamic control performance of reactor regulating system (RRS) in HANARO or JRTR before installation. The simulator hardware consists of a host computer, 6 operator stations, a network switch, and a large display panel. The software includes a mathematical model that implements plant dynamics in real-time, an instructor station module that manages user instructions, and a human machine interface module. The developed research reactor simulators are installed in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute nuclear training center for reactor operator training. To use the simulator as a dynamic test-bed, the reactor regulating system modeling software of the simulator was replaced by actual RRS cabinet, and was interfaced using a hard-wired and network-based interface. RRS cabinet generates control signals for reactor power control based on the various feedback signals from DTB, and the DTB runs plant dynamics based on the RRS control signals. Thus the Hardware-In-the-Loop Simulation between RRS and the emulated plant (DTB) has been implemented and tested in this configuration. The test result shows that the developed DTB and actual RRS cabinet works together simultaneously resulting in quite good dynamic control performances. (author)

  18. Rotating bed reactor for CLC: Bed characteristics dependencies on internal gas mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A mathematical model for the rotating CLC reactor has been developed. • The model reflects the gas distribution in the reactor during CLC operation. • Radial dispersion in the rotating bed is the main cause for internal gas mixing. • The model can be used to optimize the reactor design and particle characteristics. - Abstract: A newly designed continuous lab-scale rotating bed reactor for chemical looping combustion using CuO/Al2O3 oxygen carrier spheres and methane as fuel gives around 90% CH4 conversion and >90% CO2 capture efficiency based on converted methane at 800 °C. However, from a series of experiments using a broad range of operating conditions potential CO2 purities only in the range 20–65% were yielded, mostly due to nitrogen slip from the air side of the reactor into the effluent CO2 stream. A mathematical model was developed intending to understand the air-mixing phenomena. The model clearly reflects the gas slippage tendencies observed when varying the process conditions such as rotation frequency, gas flow and the flow if inert gas in the two sectors dividing the air and fuel side of the reactor. Based on the results, it is believed that significant improvements can be made to reduce gas mixing in future modified and scaled-up reactor versions

  19. Hydrodynamics of gas-solids downflow fluidized bed (downer) reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H.

    1999-07-01

    This study presents a semi-empirical model for the hydrodynamic flow structure in a circulating fluidized bed downer reactor. Circulating fluidized bed, or riser reactors are used in the petroleum industry for many applications including catalytic cracking, polyethylene production, calcination operations and combustion of a variety of fuels. The work in this thesis involved the development of a circulating fluidized bed riser and downer system that enables hydrodynamic studies to be carried out. The system was designed to incorporate both a riser and a downer in the same circulating operation, making it possible to conduct experimental studies on the riser and the downer separately or simultaneously. The hydrodynamics of the gas-solids downflow fluidized bed reactor were studied in a 9.3 m tall and 0.1 m i.d. circulating fluidized bed downer reactor using fluidized cracking catalyst (FCC) particles. In order to characterize the gas-solids flow structures, the following three parameters were measured: the radial distributions of the local solids holdups, the local particle velocities, and the pressure gradients along the downer column. The hydrodynamics in the co-current downflow reactor was also studied under a wide range of operating conditions. The gas-solids flow structure under zero superficial gas velocity conditions was characterized by measuring the radial distribution of the local solids holdups and particle velocities along the downer column with the superficial gas velocity set to zero. The results indicate that two basic flow regimes exist in the FCC downer system depending on the superficial gas velocity. The downer reactor was shown to have a more uniform radial flow structure compared to the riser. It also has a more uniform radial distribution of solids holdup and particle velocity as well as solids flux in both the development and fully developed zones. The highly uniform radial flow structure provides a nearly ideal plug flow condition in the

  20. Electrochemistry of Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project developed a comprehensive mathematical and simulation model for calculating thermal hydraulic, electrochemical, and corrosion parameters, viz. temperature, fluid flow velocity, pH, corrosion potential, hydrogen injection, oxygen contamination, stress corrosion cracking, crack growth rate, and other important quantities in the coolant circuits of water-cooled nuclear power plants, including both Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The model is being used to assess the three major operational problems in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), which include mass transport, activity transport, and the axial offset anomaly, and provide a powerful tool for predicting the accumulation of SCC damage in BWR primary coolant circuits as a function of operating history. Another achievement of the project is the development of a simulation tool to serve both as a training tool for plant operators and as an engineering test-bed to evaluate new equipment and operating strategies (normal operation, cold shut down and others). The development and implementation of the model allows us to estimate the activity transport or ''radiation fields'' around the primary loop and the vessel, as a function of the operating parameters and the water chemistry

  1. Electrochemistry of Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, Dgiby; Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna; Pitt, Jonathan

    2006-08-08

    This project developed a comprehensive mathematical and simulation model for calculating thermal hydraulic, electrochemical, and corrosion parameters, viz. temperature, fluid flow velocity, pH, corrosion potential, hydrogen injection, oxygen contamination, stress corrosion cracking, crack growth rate, and other important quantities in the coolant circuits of water-cooled nuclear power plants, including both Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The model is being used to assess the three major operational problems in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), which include mass transport, activity transport, and the axial offset anomaly, and provide a powerful tool for predicting the accumulation of SCC damage in BWR primary coolant circuits as a function of operating history. Another achievement of the project is the development of a simulation tool to serve both as a training tool for plant operators and as an engineering test-bed to evaluate new equipment and operating strategies (normal operation, cold shut down and others). The development and implementation of the model allows us to estimate the activity transport or "radiation fields" around the primary loop and the vessel, as a function of the operating parameters and the water chemistry.

  2. Research nuclear reactor operation management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some aspects of reactor operation management are highlighted. The main mission of the operational staff at a testing reactor is to operate it safely and efficiently, to ensure proper conditions for different research programs implying the use of the reactor. For reaching this aim, there were settled down operating plans for every objective, and procedure and working instructions for staff training were established, both for the start-up and for the safe operation of the reactor. Damages during operation or special situations which can arise, at stop, start-up, maintenance procedures were thoroughly considered. While the technical skill is considered to be the most important quality of the staff, the organising capacity is a must in the operation of any nuclear facility. Staff training aims at gaining both theoretical and practical experience based on standards about staff quality at each work level. 'Plow' sheet has to be carefully done, setting clear the decision responsibility for each person so that everyone's own technical level to be coupled to the problems which implies his responsibility. Possible events which may arise in operation, e.g., criticality, irradiation, contamination, and which do not arise in other fields, have to be carefully studied. One stresses that the management based on technical and scientific arguments have to cover through technical, economical and nuclear safety requirements a series of interlinked subprograms. Every such subprograms is subject to some peculiar demands by the help of which the entire activity field is coordinated. Hence for any subprogram there are established the objectives to be achieved, the applicable regulations, well-defined responsibilities, training of the personnel involved, the material and documentation basis required and activity planning. The following up of positive or negative responses generated by experiments and the information synthesis close the management scope. Important management aspects

  3. TREATMENT OF POME BY PILOT PLANT ANAEROBIC FLUIDISED BED REACTOR

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Al-Mamun; Azni Idris

    2010-01-01

    A pilot scale anaerobic fluidised bed reactor (AnFBR) of 2000 L capacity was studied to determine its performance to treat palm oil mill effluent (POME). The pilot plant was operated at ambient temperature with diluted POME as substrate. It took 17 days for the start-up of the reactor with pre-seeded sand media. The AnFBR was capable to remove a large portion of organics at relatively shorter retention time. Maximum and minimum COD removal efficiency of 85% and 65% were attained at a ...

  4. Analysis of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Model for the Pebble Bed High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yamoah

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The pebble bed type high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor is a promising option for next generation reactor technology and has the potential to provide high efficiency and cost effective electricity generation. The reactor unit heat transfer poses a challenge due to the complexity associated with the thermalflow design. Therefore to reliably simulate the flow and heat transport of the pebble bed modular reactor necessitates a heat transfer model that deals with radiation as well as thermal convection and conduction. In this study, a model with the capability to simulate fluid flow and heat transfer in the pebble bed modular reactor core has been developed. The developed model was implemented on a personal computer using FORTRAN 95 programming language. Several important fluid flow and heat transfer parameters have been examined: including the pressure drop over the reactor core, the heat transfer coefficient, the Nusselt number and the effective thermal conductivity of the fuel pebbles. Results obtained from the simulation experiments show a uniform pressure in the radial direction for a core to fuel element diameter (D/d ratio>20 and the heat transfer coefficient increases with increasing temperature and coolant mass flow rate. The model can adequately account for the flow and heat transfer phenomenon and the loss of pressure through friction in the pebble bed type high temperature nuclear reactor.

  5. Exporting apocalypse: CANDU reactors and nuclear proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author believes that the peaceful use of nuclear technology leads inevitably to the production of nuclear weapons, and that CANDU reactors are being bought by countries that are likely to build bombs. He states that exports of reactors and nuclear materials cannot be defended and must be stopped

  6. Development of the Packed Bed Reactor ISS Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Martin O.; Bruzas, Anthony E.; Rame, Enrique; Motil, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Packed bed reactors are compact, require minimum power and maintenance to operate, and are highly reliable. These features make this technology a leading candidate as a potential unit operation in support of long duration human space exploration. On earth, this type of reactor accounts for approximately 80% of all the reactors used in the chemical process industry today. Development of this technology for space exploration is truly crosscutting with many other potential applications (e.g., in-situ chemical processing of planetary materials and transport of nutrients through soil). NASA is developing an ISS experiment to address this technology with particular focus on water reclamation and air revitalization. Earlier research and development efforts funded by NASA have resulted in two hydrodynamic models which require validation with appropriate instrumentation in an extended microgravity environment. The first model developed by Motil et al., (2003) is based on a modified Ergun equation. This model was demonstrated at moderate gas and liquid flow rates, but extension to the lower flow rates expected in many advanced life support systems must be validated. The other model, developed by Guo et al., (2004) is based on Darcy s (1856) law for two-phase flow. This model has been validated for a narrow range of flow parameters indirectly (without full instrumentation) and included test points where the flow was not fully developed. The flight experiment presented will be designed with removable test sections to test the hydrodynamic models. The experiment will provide flexibility to test additional beds with different types of packing in the future. One initial test bed is based on the VRA (Volatile Removal Assembly), a packed bed reactor currently on ISS whose behavior in micro-gravity is not fully understood. Improving the performance of this system through an accurate model will increase our ability to purify water in the space environment.

  7. Fluidization Characteristics of a Prototype Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. ABERUAGBA

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The fluidization characteristics of a prototype-fluidized bed laboratory reactor were understudied in order to investigate the suitable conditions at which the dehydrogenation reaction of butane could be carried out. To achieve this, a reactor with an effective volume of 1100ml was fabricated and coupled with temperature and pressure accessories.Zeolites were obtained from the market and clay obtained from different sources and pre-treated was used as catalyst. Airflow at high velocity between 3000-7000ml/hr was used as the fluidising medium to obtain the bed characteristics while butane gas was used to obtain the dehydrogenation kinetics.The temperature of the reactor system was varied between 353K and 413K while maintaining constant pressure of 1.5 105 N/m2 through a manifold gauge and a constant catalyst weight. Various methods such as pressure fluctuations, visual observations, and bed expansion were used to determine the transition velocity at which fluidization begins. It was observed that this depends on factors such as mean particle size, particle size distribution, and column diameter.The minimum fluidizing velocity obtained for zeolite was 0.0133m/s and 0.0102m/s for treated clay materials both for a particle size of 250μm. The conversion of butane over the catalysts showed an increase in both cases with a maximum at 0.9813 at 413K. This decreases as the reaction progresses.

  8. Artificial intelligence in nuclear reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of four real fuzzy control applications at the MIT research reactor in the US, the FUGEN heavy water reactor in Japan, the BR1 research reactor in Belgium, and a TRIGA Mark III reactor in Mexico will be examined through a SWOT analysis (strengths, weakness, opportunities, and threats). Special attention will be paid to the current cooperation between the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK·CEN) and the Mexican Nuclear Centre (ININ) on AI-based intelligent control for nuclear reactor operation under the partial support of the National Council for Science and Technology of Mexico (CONACYT). (authors)

  9. Heat for industry from nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikoin, I.K.; Novikov, V.M.

    Two factors which incline nations toward the use of heat from nuclear reactors for industrial use are: 1) exhaustion of cheap fossil fuel resources, and 2) ecological problems associated both with extraction of fossil fuel from the earth and with its combustion. In addition to the usual problems that beset nuclear reactors, special problems associated with using heat from nuclear reactors in various industries are explored.

  10. Molten salts in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collection of references dealing with the physicochemical studies of fused salts, in particular the alkali and alkali earth halides. Numerous binary, ternary and quaternary systems of these halides with those of uranium and thorium are examined, and the physical properties, density, viscosity, vapour pressure etc... going from the halides to the mixtures are also considered. References relating to the corrosion of materials by these salts are included and the treatment of the salts with a view to recuperation after irradiation in a nuclear reactor is discussed. (author)

  11. The application problems of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latvia is surrounded by closely located nuclear reactors. In a distance of 1000 km from Latvia there are 62 working and 12 suspended high power nuclear reactors. Near the borders of Latvia, in the 3 km range four countries are exploiting 12 nuclear reactors, whose reliability and safe operation is always arousing profound interest in our community. On estimating the prospects of Latvian energetics we can conclude that at the beginning of the next century it will be extremely complicated task to supply our country with electricity and heat without nuclear reactors. This is due to lack of the domestic energy resources and to the necessity of reducing harmful pollutions of TECs. (authors)

  12. Autonomous Control of Space Nuclear Reactors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nuclear reactors to support future robotic and manned missions impose new and innovative technological requirements for their control and protection...

  13. Effect of calcium on moving-bed biofilm reactor biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, C; Allen, D G

    2011-03-01

    The effect of calcium concentration on the biofilm structure, microbiology, and treatment performance was evaluated in a moving-bed biofilm reactor. Three experiments were conducted in replicate laboratory-scale reactors to determine if wastewater calcium is an important variable for the design and optimization of these reactors. Biofilm structural properties, such as thickness, oxygen microprofiles, and the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were affected by increasing calcium concentrations. Above a threshold concentration of calcium between 1 and 50 mg/L, biofilms became thicker and denser, with a shift toward increasingly proteinaceous EPS at higher calcium concentrations up to 200 mgCa2+/L. At 300 mgCa2+/L, biofilms were found to become primarily composed of inorganic calcium precipitates. Microbiology was assessed through microscopy, denaturing grade gel electrophoresis, and enumeration of higher organisms. Higher calcium concentrations were found to change the bacterial community and promote the abundant growth of filamentous organisms and various protazoa and metazoan populations. The chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency was improved for reactors at calcium concentrations of 50 mg/L and above. Reactor effluents for the lowest calcium concentration (1 mgCa2+/L) were found to be turbid (>50 NTU), as a result of the detachment of small and poorly settling planktonic biomass, whereas higher concentrations promoted settling of the suspended phase. In general, calcium was found to be an important variable causing significant changes in biofilm structure and reactor function.

  14. Nuclear reactor built, being built, or planned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1990. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE, from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations, from US and foreign embassies, and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book is divided into three major sections: Section 1 consists of a reactor locator map and reactor tables; Section 2 includes nuclear reactors that are operating, being built, or planned; and Section 3 includes reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. Sections 2 and 3 contain the following classification of reactors: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly

  15. Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors, establishes reactor safety requirements to assure that reactors are sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that adequately protects health and safety and is in accordance with uniform standards, guides, and codes which are consistent with those applied to comparable licensed reactors. This document identifies nuclear safety criteria applied to NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) licensed reactors. The titles of the chapters and sections of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.70, Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Rev. 3, are used as the format for compiling the NRC criteria applied to the various areas of nuclear safety addressed in a safety analysis report for a nuclear reactor. In each section the criteria are compiled in four groups: (1) Code of Federal Regulations, (2) US NRC Regulatory Guides, SRP Branch Technical Positions and Appendices, (3) Codes and Standards, and (4) Supplemental Information. The degree of application of these criteria to a DOE-owned reactor, consistent with their application to comparable licensed reactors, must be determined by the DOE and DOE contractor.

  16. Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors, establishes reactor safety requirements to assure that reactors are sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that adequately protects health and safety and is in accordance with uniform standards, guides, and codes which are consistent with those applied to comparable licensed reactors. This document identifies nuclear safety criteria applied to NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] licensed reactors. The titles of the chapters and sections of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.70, Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Rev. 3, are used as the format for compiling the NRC criteria applied to the various areas of nuclear safety addressed in a safety analysis report for a nuclear reactor. In each section the criteria are compiled in four groups: (1) Code of Federal Regulations, (2) US NRC Regulatory Guides, SRP Branch Technical Positions and Appendices, (3) Codes and Standards, and (4) Supplemental Information. The degree of application of these criteria to a DOE-owned reactor, consistent with their application to comparable licensed reactors, must be determined by the DOE and DOE contractor

  17. Chemical looping combustion in a rotating bed reactor--finding optimal process conditions for prototype reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkonsen, Silje Fosse; Blom, Richard

    2011-11-15

    A lab-scale rotating bed reactor for chemical looping combustion has been designed, constructed, and tested using a CuO/Al(2)O(3) oxygen carrier and methane as fuel. Process parameters such as bed rotating frequency, gas flows, and reactor temperature have been varied to find optimal performance of the prototype reactor. Around 90% CH(4) conversion and >90% CO(2) capture efficiency based on converted methane have been obtained. Stable operation has been accomplished over several hours, and also--stable operation can be regained after intentionally running into unstable conditions. Relatively high gas velocities are used to avoid fully reduced oxygen carrier in part of the bed. Potential CO(2) purity obtained is in the range 30 to 65%--mostly due to air slippage from the air sector--which seems to be the major drawback of the prototype reactor design. Considering the prototype nature of the first version of the rotating reactor setup, it is believed that significant improvements can be made to further avoid gas mixing in future modified and up-scaled reactor versions.

  18. Development of Research Reactor Simulator and Its Application to Dynamic Test-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed HANARO and the Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) real-time simulator for operating staff training. The main purpose of this simulator is operator training, but we modified this simulator as a dynamic test-bed to test the reactor regulating system in HANARO or JRTR before installation. The simulator configuration is divided into hardware and software. The simulator hardware consists of a host computer, 6 operator stations, a network switch, and a large display panel. The simulator software is divided into three major parts: a mathematical modeling module, which executes the plant dynamic modeling program in real-time, an instructor station module that manages user instructions, and a human machine interface (HMI) module. The developed research reactors are installed in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute nuclear training center for reactor operator training. To use the simulator as a dynamic test-bed, the reactor regulating system modeling software of the simulator was replaced by a hardware controller and the simulator and target controller were interfaced with a hard-wired and network-based interface

  19. A novel reactor configuration for packed bed chemical-looping combustion of syngas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, H.P.; Gallucci, F.; Cobden, P.D.; Kimball, E.; Sint Annaland, M. van

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on the application of chemical looping combustion (CLC) in pressurized packed bed reactors using syngas as a fuel. High pressure operation of CLC in packed bed has a different set of challenges in terms of material properties, cycle and reactor design compared to fluidized bed ope

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Fluidized Bed Polymerization Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Rong [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Fluidized beds (FB) reactors are widely used in the polymerization industry due to their superior heat- and mass-transfer characteristics. Nevertheless, problems associated with local overheating of polymer particles and excessive agglomeration leading to FB reactors defluidization still persist and limit the range of operating temperatures that can be safely achieved in plant-scale reactors. Many people have been worked on the modeling of FB polymerization reactors, and quite a few models are available in the open literature, such as the well-mixed model developed by McAuley, Talbot, and Harris (1994), the constant bubble size model (Choi and Ray, 1985) and the heterogeneous three phase model (Fernandes and Lona, 2002). Most these research works focus on the kinetic aspects, but from industrial viewpoint, the behavior of FB reactors should be modeled by considering the particle and fluid dynamics in the reactor. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a powerful tool for understanding the effect of fluid dynamics on chemical reactor performance. For single-phase flows, CFD models for turbulent reacting flows are now well understood and routinely applied to investigate complex flows with detailed chemistry. For multiphase flows, the state-of-the-art in CFD models is changing rapidly and it is now possible to predict reasonably well the flow characteristics of gas-solid FB reactors with mono-dispersed, non-cohesive solids. This thesis is organized into seven chapters. In Chapter 2, an overview of fluidized bed polymerization reactors is given, and a simplified two-site kinetic mechanism are discussed. Some basic theories used in our work are given in detail in Chapter 3. First, the governing equations and other constitutive equations for the multi-fluid model are summarized, and the kinetic theory for describing the solid stress tensor is discussed. The detailed derivation of DQMOM for the population balance equation is given as the second section. In this section

  1. Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    This document is a compilation and source list of nuclear safety criteria that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) applies to licensed reactors; it can be used by DOE and DOE contractors to identify NRC criteria to be evaluated for application to the DOE reactors under their cognizance. The criteria listed are those that are applied to the areas of nuclear safety addressed in the safety analysis report of a licensed reactor. They are derived from federal regulations, USNRC regulatory guides, Standard Review Plan (SRP) branch technical positions and appendices, and industry codes and standards.

  2. Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a compilation and source list of nuclear safety criteria that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) applies to licensed reactors; it can be used by DOE and DOE contractors to identify NRC criteria to be evaluated for application to the DOE reactors under their cognizance. The criteria listed are those that are applied to the areas of nuclear safety addressed in the safety analysis report of a licensed reactor. They are derived from federal regulations, USNRC regulatory guides, Standard Review Plan (SRP) branch technical positions and appendices, and industry codes and standards

  3. Modularity of the MIT Pebble Bed Reactor for use by the commercial power industry

    OpenAIRE

    Hanlon-Hyssong, Jaime E.

    2008-01-01

    CIVINS The Modular Pebble Bed Reactor is a small high temperature helium cooled reactor that is being considered for both electric power and hydrogen production. Pebble bed reactors are being developed in South Africa, China and the US. To make smaller 120 Mwe reactors economically competitive with larger 1500 Mwe traditional light water reactors changes in the way these plants are built are needed. Economies of production need to be sufficiently large to compete with economies of sca...

  4. Proliferation Resistant Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global appetite for fission power is projected to grow dramatically this century, and for good reason. Despite considerable research to identify new sources of energy, fission remains the most plentiful and practical alternative to fossil fuels. The environmental challenges of fossil fuel have made the fission power option increasingly attractive, particularly as we are forced to rely on reserves in ecologically fragile or politically unstable corners of the globe. Caught between a globally eroding fossil fuel reserve as well as the uncertainty and considerable costs in the development of fusion power, most of the world will most likely come to rely on fission power for at least the remainder of the 21st century. Despite inevitable growth, fission power faces enduring challenges in sustainability and security. One of fission power's greatest hurdles to universal acceptance is the risk of potential misuse for nefarious purposes of fissionable byproducts in spent fuel, such as plutonium. With this issue in mind, we have discussed intrinsic concepts in this report that are motivated by the premise that the utility, desirability, and applicability of nuclear materials can be reduced. In a general sense, the intrinsic solutions aim to reduce or eliminate the quantity of existing weapons usable material; avoid production of new weapons-usable material through enrichment, breeding, extraction; or employ engineering solutions to make the fuel cycle less useful or more difficult for producing weapons-usable material. By their nature, these schemes require modifications to existing fuel cycles. As such, the concomitants of these modifications require engagement from the nuclear reactor and fuel-design community to fully assess their effects. Unfortunately, active pursuit of any scheme that could further complicate the spread of domestic nuclear power will probably be understandably unpopular. Nevertheless, the nonproliferation and counterterrorism issues are paramount, and

  5. TREATMENT OF POME BY PILOT PLANT ANAEROBIC FLUIDISED BED REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al-Mamun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A pilot scale anaerobic fluidised bed reactor (AnFBR of 2000 L capacity was studied to determine its performance to treat palm oil mill effluent (POME. The pilot plant was operated at ambient temperature with diluted POME as substrate. It took 17 days for the start-up of the reactor with pre-seeded sand media. The AnFBR was capable to remove a large portion of organics at relatively shorter retention time. Maximum and minimum COD removal efficiency of 85% and 65% were attained at a loading rate of 4.0 and 13.8 kgCOD/m3.d. BOD and TSS removal rates varied within the range of 64% - 91% and 68% - 89%, respectively. The AnFBR exhibited low sludge production with lower sludge volume indices (SVI. Maximum and minimum effluent indices for the effluent were 35 mL/g and 11 mL/g, respectively. Low SVI values indicated that, anaerobic fluidised bed reactors generate less sludge with fast settling properties. Promising performance at ambient temperature and for detention time shorter than the present practices supported the possibility of AnFBR to treat POME to meet the new requirement set by the DOE Malaysia.

  6. Problems of nuclear reactor safety. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of the 9. Topical Meeting 'Problems of nuclear reactor safety' are presented. Papers include results of studies and developments associated with methods of calculation and complex computerized simulation for stationary and transient processes in nuclear power plants. Main problems of reactor safety are discussed as well as rector accidents on operating NPP's are analyzed

  7. The Design of a Nuclear Reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this largely pedagogical article is toemploy pre-college physics to arrive at an understanding of a system as complex as a nuclear reactor. We focus on three key issues: the fuelpin, the moderator, and lastly the dimensions ofthe nuclear reactor.

  8. Pyrolysis of biomass in a jet spouted bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olazar, M.; Aguado, R.; Bilbao, J. [Universidad del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain)

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, the pyrolysis of sawdust and agroforest residues has been studied in a new reactor of conical geometry with the original regime of dilute spouted bed or jet spouted bed. On the basis of an experimental study in a wide range of conditions (temperature, biomass/nitrogen flowrate ratio, particle size and biomass nature) the good performance of the contactor has been proven. In addition to its great versatility, it is noteworthy that no inert material is needed (the char formed facilitates cyclic particle movement) and that a liquid product of high quality for its posterior use is obtained at low temperatures (down to 350 {degrees}C) and high conversion (up to 70%). The short gas residence time (10-100 milliseconds) minimizes the secondary decomposition reactions and the formation of gaseous and liquid byproducts. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Advanced Core Design And Fuel Management For Pebble-Bed Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans D. Gougar; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; William K. Terry

    2004-10-01

    A method for designing and optimizing recirculating pebble-bed reactor cores is presented. At the heart of the method is a new reactor physics computer code, PEBBED, which accurately and efficiently computes the neutronic and material properties of the asymptotic (equilibrium) fuel cycle. This core state is shown to be unique for a given core geometry, power level, discharge burnup, and fuel circulation policy. Fuel circulation in the pebble-bed can be described in terms of a few well?defined parameters and expressed as a recirculation matrix. The implementation of a few heat?transfer relations suitable for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors allows for the rapid estimation of thermal properties critical for safe operation. Thus, modeling and design optimization of a given pebble-bed core can be performed quickly and efficiently via the manipulation of a limited number key parameters. Automation of the optimization process is achieved by manipulation of these parameters using a genetic algorithm. The end result is an economical, passively safe, proliferation-resistant nuclear power plant.

  10. Experimental and theoretical investigation of anaerobic fluidized bed biofilm reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fuentes

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of anaerobic fluidized bed reactors (AFBRs. The bioreactors are modeled as dynamic three-phase systems. Biochemical transformations are assumed to occur only in the fluidized bed zone. The biofilm process model is coupled to the system hydrodynamic model through the biofilm detachment rate; which is assumed to be a first-order function of the energy dissipation parameter and a second order function of biofilm thickness. Non-active biomass is considered to be particulate material subject to hydrolysis. The model includes the anaerobic conversion for complex substrate degradation and kinetic parameters selected from the literature. The experimental set-up consisted of two mesophilic (36±1ºC lab-scale AFBRs (R1 and R2 loaded with sand as inert support for biofilm development. The reactor start-up policy was based on gradual increments in the organic loading rate (OLR, over a four month period. Step-type disturbances were applied on the inlet (glucose and acetic acid substrate concentration (chemical oxygen demand (COD from 0.85 to 2.66 g L-1 and on the feed flow rate (from 3.2 up to 6.0 L d-1 considering the maximum efficiency as the reactor loading rate switching. The predicted and measured responses of the total and soluble COD, volatile fatty acid (VFA concentrations, biogas production rate and pH were investigated. Regarding hydrodynamic and fluidization aspects, variations of the bed expansion due to disturbances in the inlet flow rate and the biofilm growth were measured. As rate coefficients for the biofilm detachment model, empirical values of 3.73⋅10(4 and 0.75⋅10(4 s² kg-1 m-1 for R1 and R2, respectively, were estimated.

  11. Hydrodynamic Studies on a Trickle Bed Reactor for Foaming Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Bansal

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamic studies of trickle bed reactors (TBRs are essential for the design and prediction of their performance. The hydrodynamic characteristics involving pressure drop and dynamic liquid saturation are greatly affected by the physical properties of the liquids. In the present study experiments have been carried out in a concurrent downflow air - liquid trickle bed reactor to investigate the dynamic liquid saturation and pressure drop for the water (non-foaming and 3% polyethylene glycol and 4% polyethylene glycol foaming liquids in the gas continuous regime (GCF and foaming pulsing regime (FP. In the GCF regime the dynamic liquid saturation was found to increase with increase in liquid flow rate for non-foaming and foaming liquids. While for 3% and 4% polyethylene glycol solutions the severe foaming was observed in the high interaction regime and the regime is referred to as foaming pulsing (FP regime. The decrease in dynamic liquid saturation followed by a sharp rise in the pressure drop was observed during transition from gas GCF to FP regime. However in the FP regime, a dip in the dynamic liquid saturation was observed. The pressure drop for foaming liquids is observed to be manifolds higher compared to non-foaming liquid in the GCF regime. ©2010 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 16th January 2010, Revised: 10th February 2010, Accepted: 21st Feberuary 2010[How to Cite: R. Gupta, A. Bansal. (2010. Hydrodynamic Studies on a Trickle Bed Reactor for Foaming Liquids. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 5 (1: 31-37. doi:10.9767/bcrec.5.1.775.31-37][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.5.1.775.31-37 ][Cited by: Scopus 1 |

  12. Nuclear reactor internals alignment configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Singleton, Norman R.

    2009-11-10

    An alignment system that employs jacking block assemblies and alignment posts around the periphery of the top plate of a nuclear reactor lower internals core shroud to align an upper core plate with the lower internals and the core shroud with the core barrel. The distal ends of the alignment posts are chamfered and are closely received within notches machined in the upper core plate at spaced locations around the outer circumference of the upper core plate. The jacking block assemblies are used to center the core shroud in the core barrel and the alignment posts assure the proper orientation of the upper core plate. The alignment posts may alternately be formed in the upper core plate and the notches may be formed in top plate.

  13. Glucose isomerization in simulated moving bed reactor by Glucose isomerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Alberto Borges da Silva

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out on the production of high-fructose syrup by Simulated Moving Bed (SMB technology. A mathematical model and numerical methodology were used to predict the behavior and performance of the simulated moving bed reactors and to verify some important aspects for application of this technology in the isomerization process. The developed algorithm used the strategy that considered equivalences between simulated moving bed reactors and true moving bed reactors. The kinetic parameters of the enzymatic reaction were obtained experimentally using discontinuous reactors by the Lineweaver-Burk technique. Mass transfer effects in the reaction conversion using the immobilized enzyme glucose isomerase were investigated. In the SMB reactive system, the operational variable flow rate of feed stream was evaluated to determine its influence on system performance. Results showed that there were some flow rate values at which greater purities could be obtained.Neste trabalho a tecnologia de Leito Móvel Simulado (LMS reativo é aplicada no processo de isomerização da glicose visando à produção de xarope concentrado de frutose. É apresentada a modelagem matemática e uma metodologia numérica para predizer o comportamento e o desempenho de unidades reativas de leito móvel simulado para verificar alguns aspectos importantes para o emprego desta tecnologia no processo de isomerização. O algoritmo desenvolvido utiliza a abordagem que considera as equivalências entre as unidades reativas de leito móvel simulado e leito móvel verdadeiro. Parâmetros cinéticos da reação enzimática são obtidos experimentalmente usando reatores em batelada pela técnica Lineweaver-Burk. Efeitos da transferência de massa na conversão de reação usando a enzima imobilizada glicose isomerase são verificados. No sistema reativo de LMS, a variável operacional vazão da corrente de alimentação é avaliada para conhecer o efeito de sua influência no

  14. PEBBED ANALYSIS OF HOT SPOTS IN PEBBLE-BED REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Hans D. Gougar; William K. Terry; Frederik Reitsma; Wessel Joubert

    2005-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory’s PEBBED code and simple probability considerations are used to estimate the likelihood and consequences of the accumulation of highly reactive pebbles in the region of peak power in a pebble-bed reactor. The PEBBED code is briefly described, and the logic of the probability calculations is presented in detail. The results of the calculations appear to show that hot-spot formation produces only moderate increases in peak accident temperatures, and no increases at all in normal operating temperatures.

  15. Nuclear reactor safety research in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : The paper summarizes activities being implemented by the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan in support of safe operation of nuclear reactors; shows its crucial efforts and further road map in this line. As is known, the world community considers nuclear reactor safety as one of the urgent research areas. Kazakhstan has been pursuing studies in support of nuclear energy safety since early 80s. The findings allow to coordinate available computational methods and design new ones while validating new NPP Projects and making analysis for reactor installations available

  16. Pyrolysis of Softwood Carbohydrates in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Yu. Murzin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present work pyrolysis of pure pine wood and softwood carbohydrates, namely cellulose and galactoglucomannan (the major hemicellulose in coniferous wood, was conducted in a batch mode operated fluidized bed reactor. Temperature ramping (5°C/min was applied to the heating until a reactor temperature of 460 °C was reached. Thereafter the temperature was kept until the release of non-condensable gases stopped. The different raw materials gave significantly different bio-oils. Levoglucosan was the dominant product in the cellulose pyrolysis oil. Acetic acid was found in the highest concentrations in both the galactoglucomannan and in the pine wood pyrolysis oils. Acetic acid is most likely formed by removal of O-acetyl groups from mannose units present in GGM structure.

  17. Characterization of biofilm in 200W fluidized bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Michelle H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Saurey, Sabrina D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lee, Brady D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Parker, Kent E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Eisenhauer, Emalee E. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cordova, Elsa A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Golovich, Elizabeth C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-29

    Contaminated groundwater beneath the 200 West Area at the Hanford Site in Southeast Washington is currently being treated using a pump and treat system to remove organics, inorganics, radionuclides, and metals. A granular activated carbon-based fluidized bed reactor (FBR) has been added to remove nitrate, hexavalent chromium and carbon tetrachloride. Initial analytical results indicated the microorganisms effectively reduced many of the contaminants to less than cleanup levels. However shortly thereafter operational upsets of the FBR include carbon carry over, over production of microbial extracellular polymeric substance (biofilm) materials, and over production of hydrogen sulfide. As a result detailed investigations were undertaken to understand the functional diversity and activity of the microbial community present in the FBR over time. Molecular analyses including terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses were performed on the microbial community extracted from the biofilm within the bed and from the inoculum, to determine functional dynamics of the FBR bed over time and following operational changes. Findings from these analyses indicated: 1) the microbial community within the bed was completely different than community used for inoculation, and was likely from the groundwater; 2) analyses early in the testing showed an FBR community dominated by a few Curvibacter and Flavobacterium species; 3) the final sample taken indicated that the microbial community in the FBR bed had become more diverse; and 4) qPCR analyses indicated that bacteria involved in nitrogen cycling, including denitrifiers and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria, were dominant in the bed. These results indicate that molecular tools can be powerful for determining functional diversity within FBR type reactors. Coupled with micronutrient, influent and effluent chemistry

  18. Characterization of Biofilm in 200W Fluidized Bed Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Michelle H.; Saurey, Sabrina D.; Lee, Brady D.; Parker, Kent E.; Eisenhauer, Emalee ER; Cordova, Elsa A.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.

    2014-09-29

    Contaminated groundwater beneath the 200 West Area at the Hanford Site in Southeast Washington is currently being treated using a pump and treat system to remove organics, inorganics, radionuclides, and metals. A granular activated carbon-based fluidized bed reactor (FBR) has been added to remove nitrate, hexavalent chromium and carbon tetrachloride. Initial analytical results indicated the microorganisms effectively reduced many of the contaminants to less than cleanup levels. However shortly thereafter operational upsets of the FBR include carbon carry over, over production of microbial extracellular polymeric substance (biofilm) materials, and over production of hydrogen sulfide. As a result detailed investigations were undertaken to understand the functional diversity and activity of the microbial community present in the FBR over time. Molecular analyses including terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses were performed on the microbial community extracted from the biofilm within the bed and from the inoculum, to determine functional dynamics of the FBR bed over time and following operational changes. Findings from these analyses indicated: 1) the microbial community within the bed was completely different than community used for inoculation, and was likely from the groundwater; 2) analyses early in the testing showed an FBR community dominated by a few Curvibacter and Flavobacterium species; 3) the final sample taken indicated that the microbial community in the FBR bed had become more diverse; and 4) qPCR analyses indicated that bacteria involved in nitrogen cycling, including denitrifiers and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria, were dominant in the bed. These results indicate that molecular tools can be powerful for determining functional diversity within FBR type reactors. Coupled with micronutrient, influent and effluent chemistry evaluations, a more

  19. Pebble bed modular reactor safeguards: developing new approaches and implementing safeguards by design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beddingfield, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Durst, Philip [INL; Bean, Robert [INL

    2010-01-01

    The design of the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) does not fit or seem appropriate to the IAEA safeguards approach under the categories of light water reactor (LWR), on-load refueled reactor (OLR, i.e. CANDU), or Other (prismatic HTGR) because the fuel is in a bulk form, rather than discrete items. Because the nuclear fuel is a collection of nuclear material inserted in tennis-ball sized spheres containing structural and moderating material and a PBMR core will contain a bulk load on the order of 500,000 spheres, it could be classified as a 'Bulk-Fuel Reactor.' Hence, the IAEA should develop unique safeguards criteria. In a multi-lab DOE study, it was found that an optimized blend of: (i) developing techniques to verify the plutonium content in spent fuel pebbles, (ii) improving burn-up computer codes for PBMR spent fuel to provide better understanding of the core and spent fuel makeup, and (iii) utilizing bulk verification techniques for PBMR spent fuel storage bins should be combined with the historic IAEA and South African approaches of containment and surveillance to verify and maintain continuity of knowledge of PBMR fuel. For all of these techniques to work the design of the reactor will need to accommodate safeguards and material accountancy measures to a far greater extent than has thus far been the case. The implementation of Safeguards-by-Design as the PBMR design progresses provides an approach to meets these safeguards and accountancy needs.

  20. Daddy, What's a Nuclear Reactor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No matter what we think of the nuclear industry, it is part of mankind's heritage. The decommissioning process is slowly making facilities associated with this industry disappear and not enough is being done to preserve the information for future generations. This paper provides some food for thought and provides a possible way forward. Industrial archaeology is an ever expanding branch of archaeology that is dedicated to preserving, interpreting and documenting our industrial past and heritage. Normally it begins with analyzing an old building or ruins and trying to determine what was done, how it was done and what changes might have occurred during its operation. We have a unique opportunity to document all of these issues and provide them before the nuclear facility disappears. Entombment is an acceptable decommissioning strategy; however we would have to change our concept of entombment. It is proposed that a number of nuclear facilities be entombed or preserved for future generations to appreciate. This would include a number of different types of facilities such as different types of nuclear power and research reactors, a reprocessing plant, part of an enrichment plant and a fuel manufacturing plant. One of the main issues that would require resolution would be that of maintaining information of the location of the buried facility and the information about its operation and structure, and passing this information on to future generations. This can be done, but a system would have to be established prior to burial of the facility so that no information would be lost. In general, our current set of requirements and laws may need to be re-examined and modified to take into account these new situations. As an alternative, and to compliment the above proposal, it is recommended that a study and documentation of the nuclear industry be considered as part of twentieth century industrial archaeology. This study should not only include the power and fuel cycle

  1. Nuclear reactor philosophy and criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power plant safety criteria and principles developed in Canada are directed towards minimizing the chance of failure of the fuel and preventing or reducing to an acceptably low level the escape of fission products should fuel failure occur. Safety criteria and practices are set forth in the Reactor Siting Guide, which is based upon the concept of defence in depth. The Guide specifies that design and construction shall follow the best applicable code, standard or practice; the total of all serious process system failures shall not exceed one in three years; special safety systems are to be physically and functionally separate from process systems and each other; and safety systems shall be testable, with unavailability less than 10-3. Doses to the most exposed member of the public due to normal operation, serious process failures, and dual failures are specified. Licensees are also required to consider the effects of extreme conditions due to airplane crashes, explosions, turbine disintegration, pipe burst, and natural disasters. Safety requirements are changing as nuclear power plant designs evolve and in response to social and economic pressures

  2. Dynamics and transient stability of a pebble bed reactor during start up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, B.; Pain, C.C.; Eaton, M.D.; Ziver, A.K.; Goddard, A.J.H. [Applied Modelling and Computation Group, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Dept. of Earth Science and Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Oliveira, C.R.E. de [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Program, The George W Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2005-07-01

    A design of a modular pebble bed reactor (PBR) is being developed for construction in South Africa. The design of this PBR is simulated in the FETCH nuclear criticality model. FETCH solves the neutron transport equations coupled to fluid dynamics and has been used in simulations of fluidized bed reactors. In the neutronics module of FETCH steady state neutronic calculations are performed to obtain the starting conditions for the subsequent calculation of transient behaviour. These include fuel temperature and control rod position. Neutron flux and the initial surplus reactivity are also calculated. Each step change in a simulated start-up is initiated by an excess reactivity which produces more severe transients than would be encountered in normal operation. The variations of several parameters with time are recorded, for example, temperature at various points in the reactor, temperature of the hottest pebble and fission rate. Spatial profiles are recorded at regular time intervals, including temperatures, power density, gas velocity and gas pressure. The stability of the reactor is demonstrated.

  3. Nuclear waste management, reactor decommisioning, nuclear liability and public attitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with several issues that are frequently raised by the public in any discussion of nuclear energy, and explores some aspects of public attitudes towards nuclear-related activities. The characteristics of the three types of waste associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, i.e. mine/mill tailings, reactor wastes and nuclear fuel wastes, are defined, and the methods currently being proposed for their safe handling and disposal are outlined. The activities associated with reactor decommissioning are also described, as well as the Canadian approach to nuclear liability. The costs associated with nuclear waste management, reactor decommissioning and nuclear liability are also discussed. Finally, the issue of public attitudes towards nuclear energy is addressed. It is concluded that a simple and comprehensive information program is needed to overcome many of the misconceptions that exist about nuclear energy and to provide the public with a more balanced information base on which to make decisions

  4. Proliferation Resistant Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, L W; Moody, K J; Bradley, K S; Lorenzana, H E

    2011-02-18

    Global appetite for fission power is projected to grow dramatically this century, and for good reason. Despite considerable research to identify new sources of energy, fission remains the most plentiful and practical alternative to fossil fuels. The environmental challenges of fossil fuel have made the fission power option increasingly attractive, particularly as we are forced to rely on reserves in ecologically fragile or politically unstable corners of the globe. Caught between a globally eroding fossil fuel reserve as well as the uncertainty and considerable costs in the development of fusion power, most of the world will most likely come to rely on fission power for at least the remainder of the 21st century. Despite inevitable growth, fission power faces enduring challenges in sustainability and security. One of fission power's greatest hurdles to universal acceptance is the risk of potential misuse for nefarious purposes of fissionable byproducts in spent fuel, such as plutonium. With this issue in mind, we have discussed intrinsic concepts in this report that are motivated by the premise that the utility, desirability, and applicability of nuclear materials can be reduced. In a general sense, the intrinsic solutions aim to reduce or eliminate the quantity of existing weapons usable material; avoid production of new weapons-usable material through enrichment, breeding, extraction; or employ engineering solutions to make the fuel cycle less useful or more difficult for producing weapons-usable material. By their nature, these schemes require modifications to existing fuel cycles. As such, the concomitants of these modifications require engagement from the nuclear reactor and fuel-design community to fully assess their effects. Unfortunately, active pursuit of any scheme that could further complicate the spread of domestic nuclear power will probably be understandably unpopular. Nevertheless, the nonproliferation and counterterrorism issues are paramount

  5. Fast Pyrolysis of Agricultural Wastes in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. H.; Chen, H. P.; Yang, H. P.; Dai, X. M.; Zhang, S. H.

    Solid biomass can be converted into liquid fuel through fast pyrolysis, which is convenient to be stored and transported with potential to be used as a fossil oil substitute. In China, agricultural wastes are the main biomass materials, whose pyrolysis process has not been researched adequately compared to forestry wastes. As the representative agricultural wastes in China, peanut shell and maize stalk were involved in this paper and pine wood sawdust was considered for comparing the different pyrolysis behaviors of agricultural wastes and forestry wastes. Fast pyrolysis experiments were carried out in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor. The bio-oil yieldsof peanut shell and maize stalk were obviously lower than that ofpine sawdust. Compared with pine sawdust, the char yields of peanut shell and maize stalk were higher but the heating value of uncondensable gaswas lower. This means that the bio-oil cost will be higher for agricultural wastes if taking the conventional pyrolysis technique. And the characteristic and component analysis resultsof bio-oil revealed that the quality of bio-oil from agricultural wastes, especially maize stalk, was worse than that from pine wood. Therefore, it is important to take some methods to improve the quality of bio-oilfrom agricultural wastes, which should promote the exploitation of Chinese biomass resources through fast pyrolysis in afluidized bed reactor.

  6. Pebble bed modular reactors versus other generation technologies. Costs and challenges for South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    South Africa is Africa's major economy, with plans to double its electricity generation capacity by 2026. South Africa has spent almost two decades developing a nuclear reactor known as a Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR), which could provide substantial benefits to the electricity grid but was recently mothballed due to high costs. This work estimates the lifecycle financial costs of South African PBMRs, then compares these costs to those of five other generation options: coal, nuclear as pressurized water reactors (PWRs), wind, and solar as photovoltaics (PV) or concentrating solar power (CSP). Each technology is evaluated with low, base case, and high assumptions for capital costs, construction time, and interest rates. Decommissioning costs, project lifetime, capacity factors, and sensitivity to carbon price are also considered. PBMR could be cost competitive with coal under certain low cost conditions, even without a carbon price. However, international lending practices and other factors suggest that a high capital cost, high interest rate nuclear plant is likely to be competing with a low capital cost, low interest rate coal plant in a market where cost recovery is challenging. PBMR could potentially become more competitive if low rate international loans were available to nuclear projects or became unavailable to coal projects. (author)

  7. Cocurrent downflow circulating fluidized bed (downer) reactors - a state of the art review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J.-X.; Yu, Z.-Q.; Jin, Y.; Grace, J.R.; Issangya, A. [University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada). Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

    1995-10-01

    A new type of chemical reactor known as the cocurrent downflow fluidized bed reactor (or reversed riser reactor or downer reactor), that overcomes some of the disadvantages of the riser reactor, is described. Since both the gas and solids flow directions are downwards in the cocurrent downflow fluidized bed reactor, particle residence times are uniform, and there is no backmixing. The literature on downer studies is reviewed. Laboratory results on axial voidage profiles, pressure profiles, radial flow, mixing and residence time distribution, heat transfer, and particle velocities are summarized. Suggestions are made both for possible industrial applications of downer reactors and for suitable research directions. 56 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  8. A Pebble-Bed Breed-and-Burn Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, Ehud [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The primary objective of this project is to use three-dimensional fuel shuffling in order to reduce the minimum peak radiation damage of ~550 dpa present Breed-and-Burn (B&B) fast nuclear reactor cores designs (they feature 2-D fuel shuffling) call for to as close as possible to the presently accepted value of 200 dpa thereby enabling earlier commercialization of B&B reactors which could make substantial contribution to energy sustainability and economic stability without need for fuel recycling. Another objective is increasing the average discharge burnup for the same peak discharge burnup thereby (1) increasing the fuel utilization of 2-D shuffled B&B reactors and (2) reducing the reprocessing capacity required to support a given capacity of FRs that are to recycle fuel.

  9. A Pebble-Bed Breed-and-Burn Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this project is to use three-dimensional fuel shuffling in order to reduce the minimum peak radiation damage of ~550 dpa present Breed-and-Burn (B&B) fast nuclear reactor cores designs (they feature 2-D fuel shuffling) call for to as close as possible to the presently accepted value of 200 dpa thereby enabling earlier commercialization of B&B reactors which could make substantial contribution to energy sustainability and economic stability without need for fuel recycling. Another objective is increasing the average discharge burnup for the same peak discharge burnup thereby (1) increasing the fuel utilization of 2-D shuffled B&B reactors and (2) reducing the reprocessing capacity required to support a given capacity of FRs that are to recycle fuel.

  10. Nuclear reactor kinetics and plant control

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2013-01-01

    Understanding time-dependent behaviors of nuclear reactors and the methods of their control is essential to the operation and safety of nuclear power plants. This book provides graduate students, researchers, and engineers in nuclear engineering comprehensive information on both the fundamental theory of nuclear reactor kinetics and control and the state-of-the-art practice in actual plants, as well as the idea of how to bridge the two. The first part focuses on understanding fundamental nuclear kinetics. It introduces delayed neutrons, fission chain reactions, point kinetics theory, reactivit

  11. Improving hydrolysis of food waste in a leach bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This paper assesses leaching of food waste in a two phase digestion system. • Leaching is assessed with and without an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). • Without the UASB, low pH reduces hydrolysis, while increased flows increase leaching. • Inclusion of the UASB increases pH to optimal levels and greatly improves leaching. • The optimal conditions are suggested as low flow with connection to the UASB. - Abstract: This paper examines the rate of degradation of food waste in a leach bed reactor (LBR) under four different operating conditions. The effects of leachate recirculation at a low and high flow rate are examined with and without connection to an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). Two dilution rates of the effective volume of the leach bed reactors were investigated: 1 and 6 dilutions per LBR per day. The increase in dilution rate from 1 to 6 improved the destruction of volatile solids without connection to the UASB. However connection to the UASB greatly improved the destruction of volatile solids (by almost 60%) at the low recirculation rate of 1 dilution per day. The increase in volatile solids destruction with connection to the UASB was attributed to an increase in leachate pH and buffering capacity provided by recirculated effluent from the UASB to the leach beds. The destruction of volatile solids for both the low and high dilution rates was similar with connection to the UASB, giving 82% and 88% volatile solids destruction respectively. This suggests that the most efficient leaching condition is 1 dilution per day with connection to the UASB

  12. Improving hydrolysis of food waste in a leach bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browne, James D.; Allen, Eoin; Murphy, Jerry D., E-mail: jerry.murphy@ucc.ie

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • This paper assesses leaching of food waste in a two phase digestion system. • Leaching is assessed with and without an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). • Without the UASB, low pH reduces hydrolysis, while increased flows increase leaching. • Inclusion of the UASB increases pH to optimal levels and greatly improves leaching. • The optimal conditions are suggested as low flow with connection to the UASB. - Abstract: This paper examines the rate of degradation of food waste in a leach bed reactor (LBR) under four different operating conditions. The effects of leachate recirculation at a low and high flow rate are examined with and without connection to an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). Two dilution rates of the effective volume of the leach bed reactors were investigated: 1 and 6 dilutions per LBR per day. The increase in dilution rate from 1 to 6 improved the destruction of volatile solids without connection to the UASB. However connection to the UASB greatly improved the destruction of volatile solids (by almost 60%) at the low recirculation rate of 1 dilution per day. The increase in volatile solids destruction with connection to the UASB was attributed to an increase in leachate pH and buffering capacity provided by recirculated effluent from the UASB to the leach beds. The destruction of volatile solids for both the low and high dilution rates was similar with connection to the UASB, giving 82% and 88% volatile solids destruction respectively. This suggests that the most efficient leaching condition is 1 dilution per day with connection to the UASB.

  13. Reaction engineering simulations of oxidative coupling of methane in a circulating fluidized-bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannek, U.; Mleczko, L. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Chemie

    1998-10-01

    Oxidative coupling of methane in a circulating fluidized-bed reactor was investigated by means of reaction engineering modeling and simulations. A model of the reactor that combines comprehensive kinetics of the OCM and a model for the description of the bed hydrodynamics was developed and applied to predict the reactor performance. The important goal of the simulations was a better understanding of the effect of the hydrodynamic conditions in the riser reactor on the reaction pathway and the product distribution. (orig.)

  14. Preliminary Neutronic Design of High Burnup OTTO Cycle Pebble Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Setiadipura

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The pebble bed type High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR is among the interesting nuclear reactor designs in terms of safety and flexibility for co-generation applications. In addition, the strong inherent safety characteristics of the pebble bed reactor (PBR which is based on natural mechanisms improve the simplicity of the PBR design, in particular for the Once-Through-Then-Out (OTTO cycle PBR design. One of the important challenges of the OTTO cycle PBR design, and nuclear reactor design in general, is improving the nuclear fuel utilization which is shown by attaining a higher burnup value. This study performed a preliminary neutronic design study of a 200 MWt OTTO cycle PBR with high burnup while fulfilling the safety criteria of the PBR design.The safety criteria of the design was represented by the per-fuel-pebble maximum power generation of 4.5 kW/pebble. The maximum burnup value was also limited by the tested maximum burnup value which maintained the integrity of the pebble fuel. Parametric surveys were performed to obtain the optimized parameters used in this study, which are the fuel enrichment, per-pebble heavy metal (HM loading, and the average axial speed of the fuel. An optimum design with burnup value of 131.1 MWd/Kg-HM was achieved in this study which is much higher compare to the burnup of the reference design HTR-MODUL and a previously proposed OTTO-cycle PBR design. This optimum design uses 17% U-235 enrichment with 4 g HM-loading per fuel pebble

  15. Preliminary neutronic design of high burnup OTTO cycle pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pebble bed type High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is among the interesting nuclear reactor designs in terms of safety and flexibility for co-generation applications. In addition, the strong inherent safety characteristics of the pebble bed reactor (PBR) which is based on natural mechanisms improve the simplicity of the PBR design, in particular for the Once-Through-Then-Out (OTTO) cycle PBR design. One of the important challenges of the OTTO cycle PBR design, and nuclear reactor design in general, is improving the nuclear fuel utilization which is shown by attaining a higher burnup value. This study performed a preliminary neutronic design study of a 200 MWt OTTO cycle PBR with high burnup while fulfilling the safety criteria of the PBR design.The safety criteria of the design was represented by the per-fuel-pebble maximum power generation of 4.5 kW/pebble. The maximum burnup value was also limited by the tested maximum burnup value which maintained the integrity of the pebble fuel. Parametric surveys were performed to obtain the optimized parameters used in this study, which are the fuel enrichment, per-pebble heavy metal (HM) loading, and the average axial speed of the fuel. An optimum design with burnup value of 131.1 MWd/Kg-HM was achieved in this study which is much higher compare to the burnup of the reference design HTR-MODUL and a previously proposed OTTO-cycle PBR design. This optimum design uses 17% U-235 enrichment with 4 g HM-loading per fuel pebble. (author)

  16. Proliferation resistance features in nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a review of the main principles for technologies and materials protection from unauthorized proliferation and application to be considered in nuclear reactors designing. Nuclear power features certain operations sensitive to nuclear weapons proliferation (such as separation of uranium isotopes (enrichment), long storage of spent fuel, processing of spent fuel, plutonium and/or uranium recovery from spent fuel, storage of recovered fissile materials). Proliferation resistance is defined as a nuclear energy system characteristic that impedes the diversion or undeclared production of nuclear material, or misuse of technology with the purpose of acquiring nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices. The basic principles of non-proliferation established in the INPRO international project sponsored by IAEA have been discussed as implemented for designing of the innovative nuclear energy systems based on fast lead-cooled nuclear reactors

  17. Countercurrent multistage fluidized bed reactor for immobilized biocatalysts: II. Operation of a laboratory-scale reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, H J; Zomerdijk, M; Groen, D J; Luyben, K C

    1990-08-01

    In Part I of this series,(1) we derived a model and made simulations for a multistage fluidized bed reactor (MFBR). It was concluded that the MFBR can be an attractive alternative for a fixed bed reactor when operated with a deactivating biocatalyst. In Part II of this series, the design of a laboratory-scale MFBR and its evaluation to investigate the practical feasibility of this reactor type, will be described. Experiments with a duration as long as 10 days were carried out successfully using immobilized glucose isomerase as a model reaction system. The results predicted by the model are in good agreement with the measured glucose concentration and biocatalyst activity gradients, indicating perfect mixing of the particles in the reactor compartments.The diameters of the biocatalyst particles used in the experiments showed a large spread, with the largest being 1.7 times the smallest. Therefore, an additional check was carried out, to make sure that the particles were not segregating according to size. Particles withdrawn from the reactor compartments were investigated using an image analyzer. Histograms of particle size distribution do not indicate segregation and it is concluded that the particles used have been mixed completely within the compartments. As a result, transport of biocatalyst is nearly plug flow. PMID:18595091

  18. Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program. Interim report. Safety and licensing evaluaion of German Pebble Bed Reactor concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-09-01

    The Pebble Bed Gas Cooled Reactor, as developed in the Federal Republic of Germany, was reviewed from a United States Safety and Licensing perspective. The primary concepts considered were the steam cycle electric generating pebble bed (HTR-K) and the process heat pebble bed (PNP), although generic consideration of the direct cycle gas turbine pebble bed (HHT) was included. The study examines potential U.S. licensing issues and offers some suggestions as to required development areas.

  19. Autonomous Control of Space Nuclear Reactors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nuclear reactors to support future lunar and Mars robotic and manned missions impose new and innovative technological requirements for their control and protection...

  20. MODERATOR ELEMENTS FOR UNIFORM POWER NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balent, R.

    1963-03-12

    This patent describes a method of obtaining a flatter flux and more uniform power generation across the core of a nuclear reactor. The method comprises using moderator elements having differing moderating strength. The elements have an increasing amount of the better moderating material as a function of radial and/or axial distance from the reactor core center. (AEC)

  1. Nuclear data requirements for fusion reactor shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear data requirements for experimental, demonstration and commercial fusion reactors are reviewed. Particular emphasis is given to the shield as well as major reactor components of concern to the nuclear performance. The nuclear data requirements are defined as a result of analyzing four key areas. These are the most likely candidate materials, energy range, types of needed nuclear data, and the required accuracy in the data. Deducing the latter from the target goals for the accuracy in prediction is also discussed. A specific proposal of measurements is recommended. Priorities for acquisition of data are also assigned. (author)

  2. Large Scale Weather Control Using Nuclear Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Singh-Modgil, M

    2002-01-01

    It is pointed out that controlled release of thermal energy from fission type nuclear reactors can be used to alter weather patterns over significantly large geographical regions. (1) Nuclear heat creates a low pressure region, which can be used to draw moist air from oceans, onto deserts. (2) Creation of low pressure zones over oceans using Nuclear heat can lead to Controlled Cyclone Creation (CCC).(3) Nuclear heat can also be used to melt glaciers and control water flow in rivers.

  3. Development of a generic engineering model for packed bed reactors using computational fluid dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinstra, B.F.

    2008-01-01

    Packed bed reactors are used in many chemical processes. With the advent of modern computers, flow simulation (Computational Fluid Dynamics, CFD) can be an aid in the design of process equipment. For particulate systems like packed bed reactors, simulation of the flow around the particles is very co

  4. Catalytic Pyrolysis of Oak via Pyroprobe and Bench Scale, Packed Bed Pyrolysis Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pyrolytic conversion of oak sawdust at 500°C in flowing He over eight proprietary catalysts is described and compared to the control bed material, quartz sand. The reactions were conducted and compared in two reactors, an analytical, ug-scale pyroprobe reactor and a bench, g-scale packed bed re...

  5. Celebrating 40 years anaerobic sludge bed reactors for industrial wastewater treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Lier, J.B.; Van der Zee, F.P.; Frijters, C.T.M.J.; Ersahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    In the last 40 years, anaerobic sludge bed reactor technology evolved from localized lab-scale trials to worldwide successful implementations at a variety of industries. High-rate sludge bed reactors are characterized by a very small foot print and high applicable volumetric loading rates. Best perf

  6. Materials for generation-IV nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials science and materials development are key issues for the implementation of innovative reactor systems such as those defined in the framework of the Generation IV. Six systems have been selected for Generation IV consideration: gas-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, molten salt-cooled reactor, sodium-cooled fast reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and very high temperature reactor. The structural materials need to resist much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses and extremely corrosive environment, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. For this reason, the first consideration in the development of Generation-IV concepts is selection and deployment of materials that operate successfully in the aggressive operating environments expected in the Gen-IV concepts. This paper summarizes the Gen-IV operating environments and describes the various candidate materials under consideration for use in different structural applications. (author)

  7. Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

    2013-03-19

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

  8. Research nuclear reactor RA - Annual Report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annual report concerning the project 'RA research nuclear reactor' for 1989, financed by the Serbian ministry of science is divided into two parts. First part is concerned with RA reactor operation and maintenance, which is the task of the Division for reactor engineering of the Institute for multidisciplinary studies and RA reactor engineering. Second part deals with radiation protection activities at the RA reactor which is the responsibility of the Institute for radiation protection. Scientific council of the Institute for multidisciplinary studies and RA reactor engineering has stated that this report describes adequately the activity and tasks fulfilled at the RA reactor in 1989. The scope and the quality of the work done were considered successful both concerning the maintenance and reconstruction, as well as radiation protection activities

  9. Evaluation of Fluidized Bed Reactor in treating Dyeing effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Poongoth

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Textile dyeing industries one of the complicated industries which use many chemicals like dyes, starch, acids, alkalis, surfactants and refractory organics for their process. As it is a wet process it requires more amount of water ranging 65-104 L/Kg of product and it discharges 52-95 L/Kg of product as wastewater. The COD, BOD,TDS, Colour and SS are the major pollutants from these industries to the receiving streams. Biological treatment is employed mostly when compared to the physicochemical treatment. More sludge, toxic bye products and cost for the treatment are the reasons for not employing the physiochemical treatment processes. Biological treatments like aerobic and anaerobic processes overcome the disadvantages of physicochemical treatment. The present study evaluates the Aerobic Fluidized bed Reactor for the treatment of Dyeing effluent. It has been observed through this study that 89% colour removal and 83.3% COD removal were achieved.

  10. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Zohuri, Bahman

    2015-01-01

    This text covers the fundamentals of thermodynamics required to understand electrical power generation systems and the application of these principles to nuclear reactor power plant systems. It is not a traditional general thermodynamics text, per se, but a practical thermodynamics volume intended to explain the fundamentals and apply them to the challenges facing actual nuclear power plants systems, where thermal hydraulics comes to play.  Written in a lucid, straight-forward style while retaining scientific rigor, the content is accessible to upper division undergraduate students and aimed at practicing engineers in nuclear power facilities and engineering scientists and technicians in industry, academic research groups, and national laboratories. The book is also a valuable resource for students and faculty in various engineering programs concerned with nuclear reactors. This book also: Provides extensive coverage of thermal hydraulics with thermodynamics in nuclear reactors, beginning with fundamental ...

  11. Pebble Bed Reactor Plant screening evaluation. Volume 1. Overall plant and reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report consists of three volumes which describe the design concepts and screening evaluation for a 3000 MW/sub t/ Pebble Bed Reactor Multiplex Plant (PBR-MX). The Multiplex plant produces both electricity and transportable chemical energy via the thermochemical pipeline (TCP). The evaluation was limited to a direct cycle plant which has the steam generators and steam reformers in the primary circuit. Volume 1 reports the overall plant and reactor system. Core scoping studies were performed which evaluated the effects of annular and cyclindrical core configurations, radial blanket zones, burnup, and ball heavy metal loadings. The reactor system, including the PCRV, was investigated for both the annular and cylindrical core configurations

  12. Safeguards Challenges for Pebble-Bed Reactors (PBRs):Peoples Republic of China (PRC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, Charles W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Moses, David Lewis [ORNL

    2009-11-01

    The Peoples Republic of China (PRC) is operating the HTR-10 pebble-bed reactor (PBR) and is in the process of building a prototype PBR plant with two modular reactors (250-MW(t) per reactor) feeding steam to a single turbine-generator. It is likely to be the first modular hightemperature reactor to be ready for commercial deployment in the world because it is a highpriority project for the PRC. The plant design features multiple modular reactors feeding steam to a single turbine generator where the number of modules determines the plant output. The design and commercialization strategy are based on PRC strengths: (1) a rapidly growing electric market that will support low-cost mass production of modular reactor units and (2) a balance of plant system based on economics of scale that uses the same mass-produced turbine-generator systems used in PRC coal plants. If successful, in addition to supplying the PRC market, this strategy could enable China to be the leading exporter of nuclear reactors to developing countries. The modular characteristics of the reactor match much of the need elsewhere in the world. PBRs have major safety advantages and a radically different fuel. The fuel, not the plant systems, is the primary safety system to prevent and mitigate the release of radionuclides under accident conditions. The fuel consists of small (6-cm) pebbles (spheres) containing coatedparticle fuel in a graphitized carbon matrix. The fuel loading per pebble is small (~9 grams of low-enriched uranium) and hundreds of thousands of pebbles are required to fuel a nuclear plant. The uranium concentration in the fuel is an order of magnitude less than in traditional nuclear fuels. These characteristics make the fuel significantly less attractive for illicit use (weapons production or dirty bomb); but, its unusual physical form may require changes in the tools used for safeguards. This report describes PBRs, what is different, and the safeguards challenges. A series of

  13. Thermofluid effect on energy storage in fluidized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoudi, Nadjiba; El Ganaoui, Mohammed; Moummi, Abdelhafid

    2016-05-01

    The development of innovative systems of heat storage is imperative to improve the efficiency of the existing systems used in the thermal solar energy applications. Several techniques were developed and realized in this context. The technology of the sand fluidized bed (sandTES) offers a promising alternative to the current state-of-the-art of the heat storage systems, such as fixed bed using a storage materials, as sand, ceramic, and stones, etc. Indeed, the use of the fluidization technique allows an effective heat transfer to the solid particles. With the sand, an important capacity of storage is obtained by an economic and ecological material [N. Mahfoudi, A. Moummi, M. El Ganaoui, Appl. Mech. Mater. 621, 214 (2014); N. Mahfoudi, A. Khachkouch, A. Moummi B. Benhaoua, M. El Ganaoui, Mech. Ind. 16, 411 (2015); N. Mahfoudi, A. Moummi, M. El Ganaoui, F. Mnasri, K.M. Aboudou, 3e Colloque internationale Francophone d"énergétique et mécanique, Comores, 2014, p. 91]. This paper presents a CFD simulation of the hydrodynamics and the thermal transient behavior of a fluidized bed reactor of sand, to determine the characteristics of storage. The simulation shows a symmetry breaking that occurs and gave way to chaotic transient generation of bubble formation after 3 s. Furthermore, the predicted average temperature of the solid phase (sand) increases gradually versus the time with a gain of 1 °C in an interval of 10 s. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage (ICOME 2015) - Elected submissions", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  14. Development of a thermal–hydraulic analysis code for the Pebble Bed Water-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Main design features of the PBWR were put forward. ► Thermal–hydraullics analysis code for the PBWR was developed and verified. ► Key thermal–hydraullics parameters were calculated in normal operation. ► The PBWR has a great pressure loss but an excellent heat transfer characteristic. ► Maximum fuel temperature and MDNBR are in conformity with safety criterion. - Abstract: The Pebble Bed Water-cooled Reactor (PBWR) is a water-moderated water-cooled pebble bed reactor in which millions of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) coated micro-fuel elements (MFE) pile in each assembly. Light water is used as coolant that flows from bottom to top in the assembly while the moderator water flows in the reverse direction out of the assembly. Steady-state thermal–hydraullic analysis code for the PBWR will provide a set of thermal hydraulic parameters of the primary loop so that heat transported out of the core can match with the heat generated by the core for a safe operation of the reactor. The key parameters of the core including the void fraction, pressure drop, heat transfer coefficients, the temperature distribution and the Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR) is calculated for the core in normal operation. The code can calculate for liquid region, water-steam two phase region and superheated steam region. The results show that the maximum fuel temperature is much lower than the design limitation and the flow distribution can meet the cooling requirement in the reactor core. As a new type of nuclear reactor, the main design features with a sufficient safety margin were also put forward in this paper.

  15. Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor. [LMFBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, L.R.

    1982-03-17

    This invention, which resulted from a contact with the United States Department of Energy, relates to a control mechanism for a nuclear reactor and, more particularly, to an assembly for selectively shifting different numbers of reactivity modifying rods into and out of the core of a nuclear reactor. It has been proposed heretofore to control the reactivity of a breeder reactor by varying the depth of insertion of control rods (e.g., rods containing a fertile material such as ThO/sub 2/) in the core of the reactor, thereby varying the amount of neutron-thermalizing coolant and the amount of neutron-capturing material in the core. This invention relates to a mechanism which can advantageously be used in this type of reactor control system.

  16. Moving bed biofilm reactor technology: process applications, design, and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, James P; Boltz, Joshua P

    2011-06-01

    The moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) can operate as a 2- (anoxic) or 3-(aerobic) phase system with buoyant free-moving plastic biofilm carriers. These systems can be used for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment, aquaculture, potable water denitrification, and, in roughing, secondary, tertiary, and sidestream applications. The system includes a submerged biofilm reactor and liquid-solids separation unit. The MBBR process benefits include the following: (1) capacity to meet treatment objectives similar to activated sludge systems with respect to carbon-oxidation and nitrogen removal, but requires a smaller tank volume than a clarifier-coupled activated sludge system; (2) biomass retention is clarifier-independent and solids loading to the liquid-solids separation unit is reduced significantly when compared with activated sludge systems; (3) the MBBR is a continuous-flow process that does not require a special operational cycle for biofilm thickness, L(F), control (e.g., biologically active filter backwashing); and (4) liquid-solids separation can be achieved with a variety of processes, including conventional and compact high-rate processes. Information related to system design is fragmented and poorly documented. This paper seeks to address this issue by summarizing state-of-the art MBBR design procedures and providing the reader with an overview of some commercially available systems and their components. PMID:21751715

  17. Moving bed biofilm reactor technology: process applications, design, and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, James P; Boltz, Joshua P

    2011-06-01

    The moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) can operate as a 2- (anoxic) or 3-(aerobic) phase system with buoyant free-moving plastic biofilm carriers. These systems can be used for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment, aquaculture, potable water denitrification, and, in roughing, secondary, tertiary, and sidestream applications. The system includes a submerged biofilm reactor and liquid-solids separation unit. The MBBR process benefits include the following: (1) capacity to meet treatment objectives similar to activated sludge systems with respect to carbon-oxidation and nitrogen removal, but requires a smaller tank volume than a clarifier-coupled activated sludge system; (2) biomass retention is clarifier-independent and solids loading to the liquid-solids separation unit is reduced significantly when compared with activated sludge systems; (3) the MBBR is a continuous-flow process that does not require a special operational cycle for biofilm thickness, L(F), control (e.g., biologically active filter backwashing); and (4) liquid-solids separation can be achieved with a variety of processes, including conventional and compact high-rate processes. Information related to system design is fragmented and poorly documented. This paper seeks to address this issue by summarizing state-of-the art MBBR design procedures and providing the reader with an overview of some commercially available systems and their components.

  18. Optimization of Moving Bed Biofilm ReactorUsing Taguchi Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Nabizadeh Nodehi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: in recent years, mobile bed biological reactors have been used progressively for municipal and industrial wastewaters treatment. Dissented experiment is a trial that significant changes will accrue for influent variables in the process, and generally used for identification of the effective factors and optimization of the process. The scope of this study was determination of the optimized conditions for the MBBR process by using of Taguchi method. "nMaterials and Methods: Reactor start up was done by using of the recycled activated sludge from Ahwaz wastewater treatment plant. After that and passing the acclimation period, with hydraulic residence time equal to 9 hours matched for 1000, 2000 and 3000 mg/l based on COD respectively, for optimization determination of the acclimated microbial growth, the variables change (pH, nitrogen source, chemical oxygen demand and salinity were determined in 9 steps, and all of the results were analyzed by Qualitek -4 (w32b."nResults:In this study, organic load removal based on COD was 97% and best optimized condition for MBBR were (inf. COD=1000 mg/l, pH= 8, salinity = 5% and the Nitrogen source= NH4CL"nConclusion: Based on our finding, we may conclude that Taguchi method is on of the appropriate procedure in determination the optimized condition for increasing removal efficiency of MBBR.

  19. Nuclear Power from Fission Reactors. An Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Technical Information Center.

    The purpose of this booklet is to provide a basic understanding of nuclear fission energy and different fission reaction concepts. Topics discussed are: energy use and production, current uses of fuels, oil and gas consumption, alternative energy sources, fossil fuel plants, nuclear plants, boiling water and pressurized water reactors, the light…

  20. U.S. Nuclear Power Reactor Plant Status

    Data.gov (United States)

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission — Demographic data on U.S. commercial nuclear power reactors, including: plant name/unit number, docket number, location, licensee, reactor/containment type, nuclear...

  1. Safety review, assessment and inspection on research reactors, experimental reactors, nuclear heating reactors and critical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1998, the NNSA organized to complete the nuclear safety review on the test loop in-reactor operation of the High-flux Engineering Experimental Reactor (HFEER) and the re-operation of the China Pulsed Reactor and the Uranium-water Criticality Facility. The NNSA conducted the nuclear safety review on the CP application of the China Experimental Fast Reactor (CEFR) and the siting of China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR), and carried out the construction supervision on HTR-10, and dealt with the event about the technological tube breakage of HWRR and other events

  2. Cold nuclear fusion reactor and nuclear fusion rocket

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Zhenqiang

    2013-01-01

    "Nuclear restraint inertial guidance directly hit the cold nuclear fusion reactor and ion speed dc transformer" [1], referred to as "cold fusion reactor" invention patents, Chinese Patent Application No. CN: 200910129632.7 [2]. The invention is characterized in that: at room temperature under vacuum conditions, specific combinations of the installation space of the electromagnetic field, based on light nuclei intrinsic magnetic moment and the electric field, the first two strings of the nucle...

  3. News on the natural nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data characterizing conditions of occurrence and the status of a natural nuclear reactor the remnants of which are discovered in the ore open pit of the Oklo deposit (Gabon) are presented. Transport of alkali earth elements (Rb, Sr, Cs and Ba) as well as Pd, Ag, Cd and Te isotopes near the reactor was investigated. Reactor criticality arose, probably, during or soon after U deposition. The reactor has ceased after 500000 years of operation; the energy of about 15 GW x year was generated. Approximately 80 t of uranium (12 tons of sup(235)U) were utilized during reactor operation. Approximately 10 tons of fission products and 4 tons of sup(239)Pu were formed. Reactor operation was periodical, multiply repeated. Water migrating over sandstone pores was not only a moderator but a self-regulator as well

  4. Thermal modeling of microwave heated packed and fluidized bed catalytic reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J R; Faucher, F

    2000-01-01

    Thermal models of small-scale, microwave-heated, packed-bed and fluidized-bed catalytic chemical reactors were developed to investigate the possibility of selectively heating the catalyst sites or the catalyst pellets with microwaves. Results indicate catalyst sites may be selectively heated under special conditions in a packed or fluidized bed, and catalyst pellets may be heated above the temperature of the cooling(and reacting) gas under certain conditions in a fluidized bed. PMID:11098441

  5. Nitrification of industrial and domestic saline wastewaters in moving bed biofilm reactor and sequencing batch reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassin, Joao P. [Programa de Engenharia Quimica/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Tecnologia, Bloco G - sala 116, P.O. Box 68502, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Dezotti, Marcia, E-mail: mdezotti@peq.coppe.ufrj.br [Programa de Engenharia Quimica/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Tecnologia, Bloco G - sala 116, P.O. Box 68502, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Sant' Anna, Geraldo L. [Programa de Engenharia Quimica/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Tecnologia, Bloco G - sala 116, P.O. Box 68502, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-01-15

    Nitrification of saline wastewaters was investigated in bench-scale moving-bed biofilm reactors (MBBR). Wastewater from a chemical industry and domestic sewage, both treated by the activated sludge process, were fed to moving-bed reactors. The industrial wastewater contained 8000 mg Cl{sup -}/L and the salinity of the treated sewage was gradually increased until that level. Residual substances present in the treated industrial wastewater had a strong inhibitory effect on the nitrification process. Assays to determine inhibitory effects were performed with the industrial wastewater, which was submitted to ozonation and carbon adsorption pretreatments. The latter treatment was effective for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal and improved nitrification efficiency. Nitrification percentage of the treated domestic sewage was higher than 90% for all tested chloride concentrations up to 8000 mg/L. Results obtained in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) were consistent with those attained in the MBBR systems, allowing tertiary nitrification and providing adequate conditions for adaptation of nitrifying microorganisms even under stressing and inhibitory conditions.

  6. Nitrification of industrial and domestic saline wastewaters in moving bed biofilm reactor and sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassin, João P; Dezotti, Marcia; Sant'anna, Geraldo L

    2011-01-15

    Nitrification of saline wastewaters was investigated in bench-scale moving-bed biofilm reactors (MBBR). Wastewater from a chemical industry and domestic sewage, both treated by the activated sludge process, were fed to moving-bed reactors. The industrial wastewater contained 8000 mg Cl(-)/L and the salinity of the treated sewage was gradually increased until that level. Residual substances present in the treated industrial wastewater had a strong inhibitory effect on the nitrification process. Assays to determine inhibitory effects were performed with the industrial wastewater, which was submitted to ozonation and carbon adsorption pretreatments. The latter treatment was effective for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal and improved nitrification efficiency. Nitrification percentage of the treated domestic sewage was higher than 90% for all tested chloride concentrations up to 8000 mg/L. Results obtained in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) were consistent with those attained in the MBBR systems, allowing tertiary nitrification and providing adequate conditions for adaptation of nitrifying microorganisms even under stressing and inhibitory conditions.

  7. Features of a subcritical nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The keff was calculated using six factor formula and MCNP code. • Both methods agree when the reactor is loaded from 800 to 1900 kg. • With the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra and doses were estimated. • The Ambient dose was measured outside the subcritical assembly. - Abstract: A subcritical nuclear reactor is a device where the nuclear-fission chain reaction is initiated and maintained using an external neutron source. It is a valuable educational and research tool where in a safe way many reactor parameters can be measured. Here, we have used the six-factor formula to calculate the effective multiplication factor of a subcritical nuclear reactor Nuclear Chicago model 9000. Using the MCNP5 code, a three-dimensional model of the subcritical reactor was developed to estimate the effective multiplication factor, the neutron spectra, and the total and thermal neutron fluences along the radial and axial axis. The MCNP5 results of the effective multiplication factor were compared with those obtained from the six-factor formula. The effective dose and the Ambient dose equivalent, at three sites outside the reactor, were estimated; the Ambient dose equivalent was also measured and compared with the calculated values

  8. Gas-solid hydroxyethylation of potato starch in a stirred vibrating fluidized bed reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, N.J M; Stamhuis, Eize; Beenackers, A.A C M

    1996-01-01

    A novel reactor for modifying cohesive C-powders such as in the gas-solid hydroxyethylation of semidry potato starch is characterized, the so-called stirred vibrating fluidized bed reactor. Good fluidization characteristics are obtained in this reactor for certain combinations of stirring and vibrat

  9. Sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming in fluidized bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, Kim

    2006-10-15

    Hydrogen is considered to be an important potential energy carrier; however, its advantages are unlikely to be realized unless efficient means can be found to produce it without generation of CO{sub 2}. Sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming (SE-SMR) represent a novel, energy-efficient hydrogen production route with in situ CO{sub 2} capture, shifting the reforming and water gas shift reactions beyond their conventional thermodynamic limits. The use of fluidized bed reactors for SE-SMR has been investigated. Arctic dolomite, a calcium-based natural sorbent, was chosen as the primary CO{sub 2}-acceptor in this study due to high absorption capacity, relatively high reaction rate and low cost. An experimental investigation was conducted in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor of diameter 0.1 m, which was operated cyclically and batch wise, alternating between reforming/carbonation conditions and higher-temperature calcination conditions. Hydrogen concentrations of >98 mole% on a dry basis were reached at 600 C and 1 atm, for superficial gas velocities in the range of {approx}0.03-0.1 m/s. Multiple reforming-regeneration cycles showed that the hydrogen concentration remained at {approx}98 mole% after four cycles. The total production time was reduced with an increasing number of cycles due to loss of CO{sub 2}-uptake capacity of the dolomite, but the reaction rates of steam reforming and carbonation seemed to be unaffected for the conditions investigated. A modified shrinking core model was applied for deriving carbonation kinetics of Arctic dolomite, using experimental data from a novel thermo gravimetric reactor. An apparent activation energy of 32.6 kj/mole was found from parameter fitting, which is in good agreement with previous reported results. The derived rate expression was able to predict experimental conversion up to {approx}30% very well, whereas the prediction of higher conversion levels was poorer. However, the residence time of sorbent in a continuous

  10. MOLTEN FLUORIDE NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, C.J.; Grimes, W.R.

    1960-01-01

    Molten-salt reactor fuel compositions consisting of mixtures of fluoride salts are reported. In its broadest form, the composition contains an alkali fluoride such as sodium fluoride, zirconium tetrafluoride, and a uranium fluoride, the latter being the tetrafluoride or trifluoride or a mixture of the two. An outstanding property of these fuel compositions is a high coeffieient of thermal expansion which provides a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity in reactors in which they are used.

  11. Thermionic reactors for space nuclear power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griaznov, Georgii M.; Zhabotinskii, Evgenii E.; Serbin, Victor I.; Zrodnikov, Anatolii V.; Pupko, Victor Ia.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, Nikolai N.; Usov, V. A.; Nikolaev, Iu. V.

    Compact thermionic nuclear reactor systems with satisfactory mass performance are competitive with space nuclear power systems based on the organic Rankine and closed Brayton cycles. The mass characteristics of the thermionic space nuclear power system are better than that of the solar power system for power levels beyond about 10 kWe. Longlife thermionic fuel element requirements, including their optimal dimensions, and common requirements for the in-core thermionic reactor design are formulated. Thermal and fast in-core thermionic reactors are considered and the ranges of their sensible use are discussed. Some design features of the fast in-core thermionic reactors cores (power range to 1 MWe) including a choice of coolants are discussed. Mass and dimensional performance for thermionic nuclear power reactor system are assessed. It is concluded that thermionic space nuclear power systems are promising power supplies for spacecrafts and that a single basic type of thermionic fuel element may be used for power requirements ranging to several hundred kWe.

  12. Optimally moderated nuclear fission reactor and fuel source therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Terry, William K.; Gougar, Hans D.

    2008-07-22

    An improved nuclear fission reactor of the continuous fueling type involves determining an asymptotic equilibrium state for the nuclear fission reactor and providing the reactor with a moderator-to-fuel ratio that is optimally moderated for the asymptotic equilibrium state of the nuclear fission reactor; the fuel-to-moderator ratio allowing the nuclear fission reactor to be substantially continuously operated in an optimally moderated state.

  13. Stable hydrogen production by methane steam reforming in a two zone fluidized bed reactor: Experimental assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Moreno, L.; Soler, J.; Herguido, J.; Menéndez, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Two Zone Fluidized Bed Reactor concept is proposed for hydrogen production via the steam reforming of methane (SRM) including integrated catalyst regeneration. In order to study the effect of the contact mode, the oxidative SRM has been carried out over a Ni/Al2O3 catalyst using a fixed bed reactor (fBR), a conventional fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) and the proposed two-zone fluidized bed reactor (TZFBR). The technical feasibility of these reactors has been studied experimentally, investigating their performance (CH4 conversion, CO and H2 selectivity, and H2 global yield) and stability under different operating conditions. Coke generation in the process has been verified by several techniques. A stable performance was obtained in the TZFBR, where coke formation was counteracted with continuous catalyst regeneration. The viability of the TZFBR for carrying out this process with a valuable global yield to hydrogen is demonstrated.

  14. Sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming in fluidized bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, Kim

    2006-10-15

    Hydrogen is considered to be an important potential energy carrier; however, its advantages are unlikely to be realized unless efficient means can be found to produce it without generation of CO{sub 2}. Sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming (SE-SMR) represent a novel, energy-efficient hydrogen production route with in situ CO{sub 2} capture, shifting the reforming and water gas shift reactions beyond their conventional thermodynamic limits. The use of fluidized bed reactors for SE-SMR has been investigated. Arctic dolomite, a calcium-based natural sorbent, was chosen as the primary CO{sub 2}-acceptor in this study due to high absorption capacity, relatively high reaction rate and low cost. An experimental investigation was conducted in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor of diameter 0.1 m, which was operated cyclically and batch wise, alternating between reforming/carbonation conditions and higher-temperature calcination conditions. Hydrogen concentrations of >98 mole% on a dry basis were reached at 600 C and 1 atm, for superficial gas velocities in the range of {approx}0.03-0.1 m/s. Multiple reforming-regeneration cycles showed that the hydrogen concentration remained at {approx}98 mole% after four cycles. The total production time was reduced with an increasing number of cycles due to loss of CO{sub 2}-uptake capacity of the dolomite, but the reaction rates of steam reforming and carbonation seemed to be unaffected for the conditions investigated. A modified shrinking core model was applied for deriving carbonation kinetics of Arctic dolomite, using experimental data from a novel thermo gravimetric reactor. An apparent activation energy of 32.6 kj/mole was found from parameter fitting, which is in good agreement with previous reported results. The derived rate expression was able to predict experimental conversion up to {approx}30% very well, whereas the prediction of higher conversion levels was poorer. However, the residence time of sorbent in a continuous

  15. Introduction to the neutron kinetics of nuclear power reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Tyror, J G; Grant, P J

    2013-01-01

    An Introduction to the Neutron Kinetics of Nuclear Power Reactors introduces the reader to the neutron kinetics of nuclear power reactors. Topics covered include the neutron physics of reactor kinetics, feedback effects, water-moderated reactors, fast reactors, and methods of plant control. The reactor transients following faults are also discussed, along with the use of computers in the study of power reactor kinetics. This book is comprised of eight chapters and begins with an overview of the reactor physics characteristics of a nuclear power reactor and their influence on system design and

  16. Water shielding nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor container of the present invention contains a reactor pressure vessel, and has double steel plate walls endurable to elevated inner pressure and keeping airtightness, and shielding water is filled inside from a water injection port. It is endurable to a great inner pressure satisfactorily and keep airtightness by the two spaced relatively thin steel plates. It exhibits radiation shielding effect by filling water substantially the same as that of a conventional reactor container made of iron reinforced concretes. Then, it is no more necessary to use concretes for the construction of the reactor container, which shortens the term of the construction, and saves the construction cost. In addition, a cooling effect for the reactor container is provided. Syphons are disposed contiguously to a water injection port and the top end of the syphon is immersed in an equipment temporarily storage pool, and further, pipelines are connected to the double steel plate walls or the syphons for supplying shielding water to enhance the cooling effect. (N.H.)

  17. The safety of Ontario's nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Select Committee of the Legislature of Ontario was established to examine the affairs of Ontario Hydro, the provincial electrical utility. Extensive public hearings were held on several topics including the safety of nuclear power reactors operating in Ontario. The Committee found that these reactors are acceptably safe. Many of the 24 recommendations in this report deal with the licensing process and public access to information. (O.T.)

  18. Nuclear Research Center IRT reactor dynamics calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main features of the code DIRT, for dynamical calculations are described in the paper. With the results obtained by the program, an analysis of the dynamic behaviour of the Research Reactor IRT of the Nuclear Research Center (CIN) is performed. Different transitories were considered such as variation of the system reactivity, coolant inlet temperature variation and also variations of the coolant velocity through the reactor core. 3 refs

  19. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignatiev, V. [ed.; Feinberg, O.; Morozov, A. [Russian Research Centre `Kurchatov Institute`, Moscow (Russian Federation); Devell, L. [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1995-07-01

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary.

  20. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary

  1. Steady-state thermal-hydraulic of pebble bed blanket on hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives thermal-hydraulic studies of pebble bed blanket on Hybrid Reactor. The concept of whole pebble bed blanket and the cooling methods are presented. The thermal-hydraulic characteristics of pebble bed are summarized. The theoretical model and code for solving heat transfer and flowing are presented. By using this code the calculation and analysis of thermal hydraulic of pebble bed Blanket of Hybrid Reactor are also given. In order to improve the flexibility, safety and economy, the authors select pebble beds not only to breed Tritium, but also to breed fission material and to multiply neutron. 5 MPa Helium is used as coolant and 0.05 MPa-0.1 MPa Helium is used as Purge gas. The heat transfer mechanisms of pebble bed are very complicated which include conduction, convection and radiation. In order to study the thermal-hydraulic of the bed, the authors just simply consider it as homogeneous and continuous binary phase medium as that used in the porous medium at the condition that the size of the bed is much greater than that of the balls. The coolant or the purge gas flowing through the bed is just considered existing a cooling source in the bed. It also significantly influences the effective conductivity's of the bed. Porous fraction, the main factor of the bed depends on the geometry position and parameters. From this model, one can obtain the thermal-hydraulic governing equations of the bed

  2. Thermal-hydraulic transient analysis of a packed particle bed reactor fuel element

    OpenAIRE

    Casey, William Emerson

    1990-01-01

    Title as it appears in the M.I.T. Graduate List, Jun. 4, 1990: Transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of a packed particle bed reactor fuel element A model which describes the thermal-hydraulic behavior of a packed particle bed reactor fuel element is developed and compared to a reference standard. The model represents a step toward a thermal-hydraulic module for a real-time, autonomous reactor powder controller. The general configuration of the fuel element is a bed of small (diameter about...

  3. Oklo reactors and implications for nuclear science

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, E D; Sharapov, E I

    2014-01-01

    We summarize the nuclear physics interests in the Oklo natural nuclear reactors, focusing particularly on developments over the past two decades. Modeling of the reactors has become increasingly sophisticated, employing Monte Carlo simulations with realistic geometries and materials that can generate both the thermal and epithermal fractions. The water content and the temperatures of the reactors have been uncertain parameters. We discuss recent work pointing to lower temperatures than earlier assumed. Nuclear cross sections are input to all Oklo modeling and we discuss a parameter, the $^{175}$Lu ground state cross section for thermal neutron capture leading to the isomer $^{176\\mathrm{m}}$ Lu, that warrants further investigation. Studies of the time dependence of dimensionless fundamental constants have been a driver for much of the recent work on Oklo. We critically review neutron resonance energy shifts and their dependence on the fine structure constant $\\alpha$ and the ratio $X_q=m_q/\\Lambda$ (where $m_...

  4. 78 FR 64028 - Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... COMMISSION Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... regulatory guide (RG) 1.184 ``Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Reactors.'' This guide describes a method NRC... decommissioning process for nuclear power reactors. The revision takes advantage of the 13 years...

  5. Numerical Simulation of Particle Flow Motion in a Two-Dimensional Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor with Discrete Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Modular pebble-bed nuclear reactor (MPBNR technology is promising due to its attractive features such as high fuel performance and inherent safety. Particle motion of fuel and graphite pebbles is highly associated with the performance of pebbled-bed modular nuclear reactor. To understand the mechanism of pebble’s motion in the reactor, we numerically studied the influence of number ratio of fuel and graphite pebbles, funnel angle of the reactor, height of guide ring on the distribution of pebble position, and velocity by means of discrete element method (DEM in a two-dimensional MPBNR. Velocity distributions at different areas of the reactor as well as mixing characteristics of fuel and graphite pebbles were investigated. Both fuel and graphite pebbles moved downward, and a uniform motion was formed in the column zone, while pebbles motion in the cone zone was accelerated due to the decrease of the cross sectional flow area. The number ratio of fuel and graphite pebbles and the height of guide ring had a minor influence on the velocity distribution of pebbles, while the variation of funnel angle had an obvious impact on the velocity distribution. Simulated results agreed well with the work in the literature.

  6. Nuclear reactor fuel element splitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for removing nuclear fuel from a clad fuel element. The fuel element is power driven past laser beams which simultaneously cut the cladding lengthwise into at least two longitudinal pieces. The axially cut lengths of cladding are then separated, causing the nuclear fuel contained therein to drop into a receptacle for later disposition. The cut lengths of cladding comprise nuclear waste which is disposed of in a suitable manner. 6 claims, 10 drawing figures

  7. Nuclear reactors with auxiliary boiler circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gas-cooled nuclear reactor has a main circulatory system for the gaseous coolant incorporating one or more main energy converting units, such as gas turbines, and an auxiliary circulatory system for the gaseous coolant incorporating at least one steam generating boiler arranged to be heated by the coolant after its passage through the reactor core to provide steam for driving an auxiliary steam turbine, such an arrangement providing a simplified start-up procedure also providing emergency duties associated with long term heat removal on reactor shut down

  8. Treatment of domestic wastewater in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor followed by moving bed biofilm reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tawfik, A.; El-Gohary, F.; Temmink, B.G.

    2010-01-01

    The performance of a laboratory-scale sewage treatment system composed of an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) at a temperature of (22-35 A degrees C) was evaluated. The entire treatment system was operated at different hydraulic retention times

  9. Packed bed reactor treatment of liquid hazardous and mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are developing thermal-based packed bed reactor (PBR) technology as an alternative to incineration for treatment of hazardous organic liquid wastes. The waste streams targeted by this technology are machining fluids contaminated with chlorocarbons and/or chlorofluorocarbons and low levels of plutonium or tritium The PBR offers several distinct advantages including simplistic design, rugged construction, ambient pressure processing, economical operations, as well as ease of scalability and maintainability. In this paper, we provide a description of the apparatus as well as test results using prepared mixtures of machining oils/emulsions with trichloroethylene (TCE), carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), trichloroethane (TCA), and Freon TF. The current treatment system is configured as a two stage device with the PBR (1st stage) coupled to a silent discharge plasma (SDP) cell. The SDP serves as a second stage for further treatment of the gaseous effluent from the PBR. One of the primary advantages of this two stage system is that its suitability for closed loop operation where radioactive components are well contained and even CO2 is not released to the environment

  10. Biohydrogen production from tequila vinasses using a fixed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrón, Germán; Prato-Garcia, Dorian; Zhang, Axue

    2014-01-01

    In Mexico, the industrial production of tequila leads to the discharge of more than 31.2 million of m(3) of vinasse, which causes serious environmental issues because of its acidity, high organic load and the presence of recalcitrant compounds. The aim of this research was to study the feasibility of a fixed bed reactor for the production of biohydrogen by using tequila vinasse as substrate. The experiments were carried out in a continuous mode under mesophilic and acidic conditions. The maximum hydrogen yield and hydrogen production rate were 1.3 mol H2 mol/mol glucose and 72 ± 9 mL H2/(Lreactor h), respectively. Biogas consisted of carbon dioxide (36%) and hydrogen (64%); moreover methane was not observed. The electron-equivalent mass balance fitted satisfactorily (sink of electrons from 0.8 to 7.6%). For vinasses, hydrogen production accounted for 10.9% of the total available electron-equivalents. In the liquid phase, the principal metabolites identified were acetic, butyric and iso-butyric acids, which indicated a butyrate-acetate type fermentation. Tequila vinasses did not result in potential inhibition of the fermentative process. Considering the process as a water treatment system, only 20% of the original carbon was removed (as carbon dioxide and biomass) when the tequila vinasses are used.

  11. Local AREA networks in advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report assesses Local Area Network Communications with a view to their application in advanced nuclear reactor control and protection systems. Attention is focussed on commercially available techniques and systems for achieving the high reliability and availability required. A basis for evaluating network characteristics in terms of broadband or baseband type, medium, topology, node structure and access method is established. The reliability and availability of networks is then discussed. Several commercial networks are briefly assessed and a distinction made between general purpose networks and those suitable for process control. The communications requirements of nuclear reactor control and protection systems are compared with the facilities provided by current technology

  12. Methods in nuclear reactors calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies are made of the neutron transport equation corresponding to the the real and virtual reactors, as well as the starting hypotheses. Methods are developed to solve the transport equation in slab geometry, and Pl; Bl; Ml; Sn and discrete ordinates approximations. (Author)

  13. Nuclear safety. Concerns about the nuclear power reactors in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1976, the Soviet Union and Cuba concluded an agreement to construct two 440-megawatt nuclear power reactors near Cienfuegos on the south central coast of Cuba, about 180 miles south of Key West, Florida. The construction of these reactors, which began around 1983, was a high priority for Cuba because of its heavy dependence on imported oil. Cuba is estimated to need an electrical generation capacity of 3,000 megawatts by the end of the decade. When completed, the first reactor unit would provide a significant percentage (estimated at over 15 percent) of Cuba's need for electricity. It is uncertain when Cuba's nuclear power reactors will become operational. On September 5, 1992, Fidel Castro announced the suspension of construction at both of Cuba's reactors because Cuba could not meet the financial terms set by the Russian government to complete the reactors. Cuban officials had initially planned to start up the first of the two nuclear reactors by the end of 1993. However, before the September 5 announcement, it was estimated that this reactor would not be operational until late 1995 or early 1996. The civil construction (such as floors and walls) of the first reactor is currently estimated to be about 90 percent to 97 percent complete, but only about 37 percent of the reactor equipment (such as pipes, pumps, and motors) has been installed. The civil construction of the second reactor is about 20 percent to 30 percent complete. No information was available about the status of equipment for the second reactor. According to former Cuban nuclear power and electrical engineers and a technician, all of whom worked at the reactor site and have recently emigrated from Cuba, Cuba's nuclear power program suffers from poor construction practices and inadequate training for future reactor operators. One former official has alleged, for example, that the first reactor containment structure, which is designed to prevent the accidental release of radioactive material into

  14. Modeling-based optimization of a fixed-bed industrial reactor for oxidative dehydrogenation of propane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Darvishi; Razieh Davand; Farhad Khorasheh; Moslem Fattahi

    2016-01-01

    An industrial scale propylene production via oxidative dehydrogenation of propane (ODHP) in multi-tubular re-actors was modeled. Multi-tubular fixed-bed reactor used for ODHP process, employing 10000 of smal diameter tubes immersed in a shel through a proper coolant flows. Herein, a theory-based pseudo-homogeneous model to describe the operation of a fixed bed reactor for the ODHP to correspondence olefin over V2O5/γ-Al2O3 catalyst was presented. Steady state one dimensional model has been developed to identify the operation parameters and to describe the propane and oxygen conversions, gas process and coolant temperatures, as well as other pa-rameters affecting the reactor performance such as pressure. Furthermore, the applied model showed that a double-bed multitubular reactor with intermediate air injection scheme was superior to a single-bed design due to the increasing of propylene selectivity while operating under lower oxygen partial pressures resulting in propane conversion of about 37.3%. The optimized length of the reactor needed to reach 100%conversion of the oxygen was theoretically determined. For the single-bed reactor the optimized length of 11.96 m including 0.5 m of inert section at the entrance region and for the double-bed reactor design the optimized lengths of 5.72 m for the first and 7.32 m for the second reactor were calculated. Ultimately, the use of a distributed oxygen feed with limited number of injection points indicated a significant improvement on the reactor performance in terms of propane conversion and propylene selectivity. Besides, this concept could overcome the reactor run-away temperature problem and enabled operations at the wider range of conditions to obtain enhanced propyl-ene production in an industrial scale reactor.

  15. Raising distillate selectivity and catalyst life time in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis by using a novel dual-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a novel dual bed reactor Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was studied by using two diff rent cobalt catalysts. An alkali-promoted cobalt catalyst was used in the first bed of a fixed-bed reactor followed by a Raiment promoted cobalt catalyst in the second bed. The activity, product selectivity and accelerated deactivation of the system were assessed and compared with a conventional single bed reactor system. The methane selectivity in the dual-bed reactor was about 18.9% less compared to that of the single-bed reactor. The C5+ selectivity for the dual-bed reactor was 10.9% higher than that of the single-bed reactor. Accelerated deactivation of the catalysts in the dual-bed reactor was 42% lower than that of the single-bed reactor. It was revealed that the amount of catalysts activity recovery after regeneration at 400degC in the dual-bed system is higher than that of the single-bed system

  16. A novel reactor configuration for packed bed chemical-looping combustion of syngas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamers, H.P.; Gallucci, F.; Van Sint Annaland, M. [Multiphase Reactor Group, Chemical Process Intensification, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Cobden, P.D. [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Kimball, E. [TNO Gas Treatment, P.O. Box 6000, 2600 JA Delft (Netherlands)

    2013-08-15

    This study reports on the application of chemical looping combustion (CLC) in pressurized packed bed reactors using syngas as a fuel. High pressure operation of CLC in packed bed has a different set of challenges in terms of material properties, cycle and reactor design compared to fluidized bed operation. However, high pressure operation allows the use of inherently more efficient power cycles than low pressure fluidized bed solutions. This paper quantifies the challenges in high pressure operation and introduces a novel reactor concept with which those challenges can be addressed. Continuous cyclic operation of a packed bed CLC system is simulated in a 1D numerical reactor model. Importantly, it is demonstrated that the temperature profiles that can occur in a packed bed reactor as a result of the different process steps do not accumulate, and have a negligible effect on the overall performance of the system. Moreover, it has been shown that an even higher energy efficiency can be achieved by feeding the syngas from the opposite direction during the reduction step (i.e. countercurrent operation). Unfortunately, in this configuration mode, more severe temperature fluctuations occur in the reactor exhaust, which is disadvantageous for the operation of a downstream gas turbine. Finally, a novel reactor configuration is introduced in which the desired temperature rise for obtained hot pressured air suitable for a gas turbine is obtained by carrying out the process with two packed bed reactor in series (two-stage CLC). This is shown to be a good alternative to the single bed configuration, and has the added advantage of decreasing the demands on both the oxygen carrier and the reactor materials and design specification.

  17. Advanced nuclear reactor systems - an Indian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Indian nuclear power programme envisages use of closed nuclear fuel cycle and thorium utilisation as its mainstay for its sustainable growth. The current levels of deployment of nuclear energy in India need to be multiplied nearly hundred fold to reach levels of electricity generation that would facilitate the country to achieve energy independence as well as a developed status. The Indian thorium based nuclear energy systems are being developed to achieve sustainability in respect of fuel resource along with enhanced safety and reduced waste generation. Advanced Heavy Water Reactor and its variants have been designed to meet these objectives. The Indian High Temperature Reactor programme also envisages use of thorium-based fuel with advanced levels of passive safety features. (author)

  18. Nuclear data for fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting was organized in four sessions and four working groups devoted to the following topics: Requirements of nuclear data for fusion reactor technology (6 papers); Status of experimental and theoretical investigations of microscopic nuclear data (10 papers); Status of existing libraries for fusion neutronic calculations (5 papers); and Status of integral experiments and benchmark tests (6 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  19. Reference Neutron Radiographs of Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    Reference neutron radiographs of nuclear reactor fuel were produced by the Euraton Neutron Radiography Working Group and published in 1984 by the Reidel Publishing Company. In this collection a classification is given of the various neutron radiographic findings, that can occur in different parts of pelletized, annular and vibro-conpacted nuclear fuel pins. Those parts of the pins are shown where changes of appearance differ from those for the parts as fabricated. Also radiographs of those as...

  20. Nuclear reactor alignment plate configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, David A; Forsyth, David R; Smith, Richard E; Singleton, Norman R

    2014-01-28

    An alignment plate that is attached to a core barrel of a pressurized water reactor and fits within slots within a top plate of a lower core shroud and upper core plate to maintain lateral alignment of the reactor internals. The alignment plate is connected to the core barrel through two vertically-spaced dowel pins that extend from the outside surface of the core barrel through a reinforcement pad and into corresponding holes in the alignment plate. Additionally, threaded fasteners are inserted around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad and into the alignment plate to further secure the alignment plate to the core barrel. A fillet weld also is deposited around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad. To accomodate thermal growth between the alignment plate and the core barrel, a gap is left above, below and at both sides of one of the dowel pins in the alignment plate holes through with the dowel pins pass.

  1. Intensification of Deep Hydrodesulfurization Through a Two-stage Combination of Monolith and Trickle Bed Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Xu; Hui Liu⁎; Shengfu Ji; Chengyue Li

    2014-01-01

    Deep hydrodesulfurization (HDS) is an important process to produce high quality liquid fuels with ultra-low sul-fur. Process intensification for deep HDS could be implemented by developing new active catalysts and/or new types of reactors. In this work, the kinetics of dibenzothiophene (DBT) hydrodesulfurization over Ni-P/SBA-15/cordierite catalyst was investigated at 340-380 °C and 3.0-5.0 MPa. The first-order reaction model with respect to both DBT and H2 was used to fit the kinetics data in a batch recycle operation system. It is found that both the activation energy and rate constant over the Ni-P monolithic catalyst under our operating conditions are close to those over conventionally used HDS catalysts. Comparative performance studies of two types of reactors, i.e., trickle bed reactor and monolithic reactor, were performed based on reactor modeling and simulation. The results indicate that the productivity of the monolithic reactor is 3 times higher than that of the trickle bed reactor on a catalyst weight basis since effective utilization of the catalyst is higher in the monolithic reactor, but the volumetric productivity of the monolithic reactor is lower for HDS of DBT. Based on simulation results, a two-reactor-in-series configuration for hydrodesulfurization is proposed, in which a monolithic reactor is followed by a tickled bed reactor so as to attain intensified performance of the system converting fuel oil of different sulfur-containing compounds. It is il ustrated that the two reactor scheme outperforms the trickle bed reactor both on reactor volume and catalyst mass bases while the content of sulfur is reduced from 200μg·g-1 to about 10μg·g-1.

  2. Neutronics of nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review, prepared on the occasion of 25th ETAN Conference describes the research activities in the field of neutronics which started in 1947. A number of researchers in Yugoslav Institutes was engaged in development of neutronics theory and calculation methods related to power reactors since 1960. To illustrate the activities of Yugoslav authors, this review contains the list of the most important relevant papers published in international journals

  3. Nuclear Data and the Oklo Natural Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, C. R.; Sharapov, E. I.; Sonzogni, A. A.

    2014-04-01

    Data from the Oklo natural nuclear reactors have enabled some of the most sensitive terrestrial tests of time variation of dimensionless fundamental constants. The constraints on variation of αEM, the fine structure constant are particular good, but depend on the reliability of the nuclear data, and on the reliability of the modeling of the reactor environment. We briefly review the history of these tests and discuss our recent work in 1) attempting to better bound the temperatures at which the reactors operated, 2) investigating whether the γ-ray fluxes in the reactors could have contributed to changing lutetium isotopic abundances and 3) determining whether lanthanum isotopic data could provide an alternate estimate of the neutron fluence.

  4. Decommissioning a nuclear reactor. [Water Boiler Reactor Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya, G.M.

    1991-01-01

    The process of decommissioning a facility such as a nuclear reactor or reprocessing plant presents many waste management options and concerns. Waste minimization is a primary consideration, along with protecting a personnel and the environment. Waste management is complicated in that both radioactive and chemical hazardous wastes must be dealt with. This paper presents the general decommissioning approach of a recent project at Los Alamos. Included are the following technical objectives: site characterization work that provided a thorough physical, chemical, and radiological assessment of the contamination at the site; demonstration of the safe and cost-effective dismantlement of a highly contaminated and activated nuclear-fuelded reactor; and techniques used in minimizing radioactive and hazardous waste. 12 figs.

  5. Technological Transfer from Research Nuclear Reactors to New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulescu, Laura; Pavelescu, Margarit

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is the analysis of the technological transfer role in the nuclear field, with particular emphasis on nuclear reactors domain. The presentation is sustained by historical arguments. In this frame, it is very important to start with the achievements of the first nuclear systems, for instant those with natural uranium as fuel and heavy water as moderator, following in time through the history until the New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors. Starting with 1940, the accelerated development of the industry has implied the increase of the global demand for energy. In this respect, the nuclear energy could play an important role, being essentially an unlimited source of energy. However, the nuclear option faces the challenges of increasingly demanding safety requirements, economic competitiveness and public acceptance. Worldwide, a significant amount of experience has been accumulated during development, licensing, construction, and operation of nuclear power reactors. The experience gained is a strong basis for further improvements. Actually, the nuclear programs of many countries are addressing the development of advanced reactors, which are intended to have better economics, higher reliability, improved safety, and proliferation-resistant characteristics in order to overcome the current concerns about nuclear power. Advanced reactors, now under development, may help to meet the demand for energy power of both developed and developing countries as well as for district heating, desalination and for process heat. The paper gives historical examples that illustrate the steps pursued from first research nuclear reactors to present advanced power reactors. Emphasis was laid upon the fact that the progress is due to the great discoveries of the nuclear scientists using the technological transfer.

  6. Nuclear reactors - the inevitable energy option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The demand for energy in India is sure to rise year after year. Every possible energy source needs to be utilized to its fullest potential to bridge the gap between the demand and supply of electricity. Even while deciding the energy option, the availability of natural resources for future generation and effect of environment for the energy option chosen are to be taken care of. Out of the non conventional sources of electricity, nuclear electricity has greatest potential. Robust and safe energy option has to be harnessed to its potential. We have to bring down the cost of electricity. Even among nuclear reactors, electricity through Fast Breeder Reactors has greater potential. The Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor is a trend setter for moving into an era of electricity generation in the country. The paper brings details of the safety features, accomplishments of the technical challenges and the efforts on hand to reduce the unit energy cost by Nuclear Reactors. The paper also touches upon advantages, environmental impact of Fast Breeder Reactors for this abundant energy resources. Paper will also give a glimpse on technological challenges in design, construction and the preservation. (author)

  7. Biodegradation of TBP in a packed bed reactor using pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tributyl phosphate (TBP), is an organophosphorus compound widely used as a solvent for the extraction of uranium and plutonium, from other radionuclides, in nuclear fuel processing. Several strains from contaminated sites were isolated and screened for their ability to degrade this organophosphorus compound. The most active strain identified as Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes could degrade 290μM of TBP and utilized it as a sole source of carbon and energy. Agarose immobilized cell systems were developed for the biodegradation of TBP. A packed bed reactor was constructed and operated for biological TBP removal. Degradation rates for repeated operations increased for successive batches indicating that cells grow better and get adapted to the reaction conditions over time. (author)

  8. Power Nuclear Reactors: technology and innovation for development in future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference is about some historicals task of the fission technology as well as many types of Nuclear Reactors. Enrichment of fuel, wastes, research reactors and power reactors, a brief advertisment about Uruguay electric siystem and power generation, energetic worldwide, proliferation, safety reactors, incidents, accidents, Three-Mile Island accident, Chernobil accident, damages, risks, classification and description of Power reactors steam generation, nuclear reactor cooling systems, future view

  9. A novel approach for harnessing biofilm communities in moving bed biofilm reactors for industrial wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lemire, Joe A.; Marc A Demeter; Iain George; Howard Ceri; Turner, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) are an effective biotechnology for treating industrial wastewater. Biomass retention on moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) carriers (biofilm support materials), allows for the ease-of-operation and high treatment capacity of MBBR systems. Optimization of MBBR systems has largely focused on aspects of carrier design, while little attention has been paid to enhancing strategies for harnessing microbial biomass. Previously, our research group demonstrated that ...

  10. Complex nonlinear behaviour of a fixed bed reactor with reactant recycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recke, Bodil; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1999-01-01

    The fixed bed reactor with reactant recycle investigated in this paper can exhibit periodic solutions. These solutions bifurcate from the steady state in a Hopf bifurcation. The Hopf bifurcation encountered at the lowest value of the inlet concentration turns the steady state unstable and marks......,that the dynamic behaviour of a fixed bed reactor with reactant recycle is much more complex than previously reported....

  11. The siting of UK nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choosing a suitable site for a nuclear power station requires the consideration and balancing of several factors. Some ‘physical’ site characteristics, such as the local climate and the potential for seismic activity, will be generic to all reactors designs, while others, such as the availability of cooling water, the area of land required and geological conditions capable of sustaining the weight of the reactor and other buildings will to an extent be dependent on the particular design of reactor chosen (or alternatively the reactor design chosen may to an extent be dependent on the characteristics of an available site). However, one particularly interesting tension is a human and demographic one. On the one hand it is beneficial to place nuclear stations close to centres of population, to reduce transmission losses and other costs (including to the local environment) of transporting electricity over large distances from generator to consumer. On the other it is advantageous to place nuclear stations some distance away from such population centres in order to minimise the potential human consequences of a major release of radioactive materials in the (extremely unlikely) event of a major nuclear accident, not only in terms of direct exposure but also concerning the management of emergency planning, notably evacuation. This paper considers the emergence of policies aimed at managing this tension in the UK. In the first phase of nuclear development (roughly speaking 1945–1965) there was a highly cautious attitude, with installations being placed in remote rural locations with very low population density. The second phase (1965–1985) saw a more relaxed approach, allowing the development of AGR nuclear power stations (which with concrete pressure vessels were regarded as significantly safer) closer to population centres (in ‘semi-urban’ locations, notably at Hartlepool and Heysham). In the third phase (1985–2005) there was very little new nuclear

  12. The siting of UK nuclear reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimston, Malcolm; Nuttall, William J; Vaughan, Geoff

    2014-06-01

    Choosing a suitable site for a nuclear power station requires the consideration and balancing of several factors. Some 'physical' site characteristics, such as the local climate and the potential for seismic activity, will be generic to all reactors designs, while others, such as the availability of cooling water, the area of land required and geological conditions capable of sustaining the weight of the reactor and other buildings will to an extent be dependent on the particular design of reactor chosen (or alternatively the reactor design chosen may to an extent be dependent on the characteristics of an available site). However, one particularly interesting tension is a human and demographic one. On the one hand it is beneficial to place nuclear stations close to centres of population, to reduce transmission losses and other costs (including to the local environment) of transporting electricity over large distances from generator to consumer. On the other it is advantageous to place nuclear stations some distance away from such population centres in order to minimise the potential human consequences of a major release of radioactive materials in the (extremely unlikely) event of a major nuclear accident, not only in terms of direct exposure but also concerning the management of emergency planning, notably evacuation.This paper considers the emergence of policies aimed at managing this tension in the UK. In the first phase of nuclear development (roughly speaking 1945-1965) there was a highly cautious attitude, with installations being placed in remote rural locations with very low population density. The second phase (1965-1985) saw a more relaxed approach, allowing the development of AGR nuclear power stations (which with concrete pressure vessels were regarded as significantly safer) closer to population centres (in 'semi-urban' locations, notably at Hartlepool and Heysham). In the third phase (1985-2005) there was very little new nuclear development, Sizewell

  13. Current Abstracts Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bales, J.D.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1993-01-01

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  14. Refueling machine for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved refuelling machine for inserting and removing fuel assemblies from a nuclear reactor is described which has been designed to increase the reliability of such machines. The system incorporates features which enable the refuelling operation to be performed more efficiently and economically. (U.K.)

  15. Particle agglomeration during energy recovery from plastic wastes by means of fluidized bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, U.; Mastellone, M.L.

    1999-07-01

    The occurrence and the significance of agglomeration phenomena during thermal treatments in a fluidized bed reactor of a couple of plastic wastes were studied. A small scale bubbling fluidized bed, made of quartz, was charged with pellets obtained from mono-material collections of polyethylene and polyethylene terephtalate. Batchwise and continuous experiments were carried out at different bed temperatures (from 450 to 850 C), under inert and oxidizing conditions and by operating the reactor with silica sand having a size range of 0.3--0.4 mm. Different mechanisms of defluidization were identified and characterized. The time at which the phenomena occurred, for each of bed temperatures used, was also determined. In particular, the continuous experiments showed that defluidization can occur, with different mechanisms, at temperatures lower than 850 C. An increase of bed temperature as well as that of oxygen content strongly reduces the potential concern of particle agglomeration and bed defluidization.

  16. Development of a trickle bed reactor of electro-Fenton process for wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Yangming [Key Laboratory of Reservoir Aquatic Environment, Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing 401122 (China); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Hong, E-mail: liuhong@cigit.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Reservoir Aquatic Environment, Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing 401122 (China); Shen, Zhemin, E-mail: zmshen@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wang, Wenhua [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • An electrochemical trickle bed reactor was composed of C-PTFE-coated graphite chips. • The trickle bed reactor had a high H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production rate in a dilute electrolyte. • An azo dye was effectively decomposed by the electro-Fenton process in the reactor. -- Abstract: To avoid electrolyte leakage and gas bubbles in the electro-Fenton (E-Fenton) reactors using a gas diffusion cathode, we developed a trickle bed cathode by coating a layer composed of carbon black and polytetrafluoroethylene (C-PTFE) onto graphite chips instead of carbon cloth. The trickle bed cathode was optimized by single-factor and orthogonal experiments, in which carbon black, PTFE, and a surfactant were considered as the determinant of the performance of graphite chips. In the reactor assembled by the trickle bed cathode, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was generated with a current of 0.3 A and a current efficiency of 60%. This performance was attributed to the fine distribution of electrolyte and air, as well as the effective oxygen transfer from the gas phase to the electrolyte–cathode interface. In terms of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation and current efficiency, the developed trickle bed reactor had a performance comparable to that of the conventional E-Fenton reactor using a gas diffusion cathode. Further, 123 mg L{sup −1} of reactive brilliant red X-3B in aqueous solution was decomposed in the optimized trickle bed reactor as E-Fenton reactor. The decolorization ratio reached 97% within 20 min, and the mineralization reached 87% within 3 h.

  17. Ultrasonic flaw detection device in nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Yoshishige; Takabayashi, Jun-ichi

    1996-02-02

    Flaws on an outer circumferential surface of a shroud at inner side than jet pumps in a nuclear reactor are simply and reliably detected using ultrasonic waves. Ultrasonic waves are irradiated to the shroud which surrounds a reactor core at the inner side and has a plurality of jet pumps at the outer side at predetermined distances. An ultrasonic wave probe which detects flaws based on reflecting waves is suspended using a suspending rope. A jet nozzle is attached to a probe-attaching portion and water is jetted out to reactor water to move the probe-attaching portion in the reactor. Then, flaws can be detected easily and reliably using ultrasonic waves even at a narrow gap at the inner side of each jet pump. (N.H.).

  18. Ultrasonic flaw detection device in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flaws on an outer circumferential surface of a shroud at inner side than jet pumps in a nuclear reactor are simply and reliably detected using ultrasonic waves. Ultrasonic waves are irradiated to the shroud which surrounds a reactor core at the inner side and has a plurality of jet pumps at the outer side at predetermined distances. An ultrasonic wave probe which detects flaws based on reflecting waves is suspended using a suspending rope. A jet nozzle is attached to a probe-attaching portion and water is jetted out to reactor water to move the probe-attaching portion in the reactor. Then, flaws can be detected easily and reliably using ultrasonic waves even at a narrow gap at the inner side of each jet pump. (N.H.)

  19. Safety review, assessment and inspection on research reactors, experimental reactors, nuclear heating reactors and critical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NNSA organized mainly in 1999 to complete the verification loop in core of the high flux experimental reactor with the 2000 kW fuel elements, the re-starting of China Pulsed Reactor, review and assessment on nuclear safety for the restarting of the Uranium-water critical Facility and treat the fracture event with the fuel tubes in the HWRR

  20. Safety review, assessment and inspection on research reactors, experimental reactors and nuclear heating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NNSA and its regional office step further strengthened the regulation on the safety of in-service research reactors in 1996. A lot of work has been done on the supervision of safe in rectifying the review and assessment of modified items, the review of operational documents, the treatment of accidents, the establishment of the system for operational experience feedback, daily and routine inspection on nuclear safety. The internal management of the operating organization on nuclear safety was further strengthened, nuclear safety culture was further enhanced, the promotion in nuclear safety and the safety situation for in-service research reactors were improved

  1. Fluidized bed as a solid precursor delivery system in a chemical vapor deposition reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Vahlas, Constantin; Caussat, Brigitte; Senocq, François; Gladfelter, Wayne L.; Sarantopoulos, Christos; Toro, David; Moersch, Tyler

    2005-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using precursors that are solids at operating temperatures and pressures, presents challenges due to their relatively low vapor pressures. In addition, the sublimation rates of solid state precursors in fixed bed reactors vary with particle and bed morphology. In a recent patent application, the use of fluidized bed (FB) technology has been proposed to provide high, reliable, and reproducible flux of such precursors in CVD processes. In the present contribution...

  2. Progress in the Development of the Modular Pebble-Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review article summarizes recent progress by students and faculty at U.C. Berkeley working on the development of the Pebble-Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR). The 410-MWe PBAHTR is a liquid salt cooled reactor that operates at near atmospheric pressure and high power density (20 to 30 MW/m3, compared to 4.8 MW/m3 for helium cooled reactors). Operating with a core inlet temperature of 600 deg. C and outlet temperature of 704 deg. C, the PB-AHTR uses well understood materials of construction including Alloy 800H with Hastelloy N cladding for the reactor vessel and primary loop components, and graphite for core and reflector structures. Recent work by the NE 170 senior design class has developed physical arrangements for the major reactor and power conversion components, along with the structural design for the reactor building and turbine hall featuring seismic base isolation, design for aircraft crash protection, shielding analysis, and design of a multiple-zone ventilation and containment system to provide effective control of radioactive and chemical contamination. The resulting total building volume is 260 m3/MWe, compared to 343 m3/MWe to 486 m3/MWe for current large (1150 to 1600 MWe) LWR designs. These results suggest the potential for significant reductions in construction time and cost. Neutronics studies have verified the capability to design the PB-AHTR with negative fuel and coolant temperature reactivity coefficients, for both LEU and deep-burn TRU fuels. Depletion analysis was also performed to identify optimal core designs to maximize fuel utilization. The additional moderation provided by the coolant simplifies design to achieve optimal moderation, and the spent fuel volume is approximately half that of helium cooled reactors. In collaboration with the Czech Nuclear Research Institute, initial zero-power critical tests were performed to validate PB-AHTR neutronics models. Liquid salts are unique among candidate reactor coolants due

  3. Use of nuclear reactors for seawater desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) status report on desalination, including nuclear desalination, was issued nearly 2 decades ago. The impending water crisis in many parts of the world, and especially in the Middle East, makes it appropriate to provide an updated report as a basis for consideration of future activities. This report provides a state-of-the-art review of desalination and pertinent nuclear reactor technology. Information is included on fresh water needs and costs, environmental risks associated with alternatives for water production, and data regarding the technical and economic characteristics of immediately available desalination systems, as well as compatible nuclear technology. 68 refs, 60 figs, 11 tabs

  4. Five Lectures on Nuclear Reactors Presented at Cal Tech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Alvin M.

    1956-02-10

    The basic issues involved in the physics and engineering of nuclear reactors are summarized. Topics discussed include theory of reactor design, technical problems in power reactors, physical problems in nuclear power production, and future developments in nuclear power. (C.H.)

  5. Simulation of a marine nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Kyouya, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Hideo; Ochiai, Masaaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Office of Nuclear Ship Research and Development

    1995-02-01

    A Nuclear-powered ship Engineering Simulation SYstem (NESSY) has been developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute as an advanced design tool for research and development of future marine reactors. A marine reactor must respond to changing loads and to the ship`s motions because of the ship`s maneuvering and its presence in a marine environment. The NESSY has combined programs for the reactor plant behavior calculations and the ship`s motion calculations. Thus, it can simulate reactor power fluctuations caused by changing loads and the ship`s motions. It can also simulate the behavior of water in the pressurizer and steam generators. This water sloshes in response to the ship`s motions. The performance of NESSY has been verified by comparing the simulation calculations with the measured data obtained by experiments performed using the nuclear ship Mutsu. The effects of changing loads and the ship`s motions on the reactor behavior can be accurately simulated by NESSY.

  6. Discharge Characteristics of Series Surface/Packed-Bed Discharge Reactor Diven by Bipolar Pulsed Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian; Jiang, Nan; Li, Jie; Shang, Kefeng; Lu, Na; Wu, Yan; Mizuno, Akira

    2016-03-01

    The discharge characteristics of the series surface/packed-bed discharge (SSPBD) reactor driven by bipolar pulse power were systemically investigated in this study. In order to evaluate the advantages of the SSPBD reactor, it was compared with traditional surface discharge (SD) reactor and packed-bed discharge (PBD) reactor in terms of the discharge voltage, discharge current, and ozone formation. The SSPBD reactor exhibited a faster rising time and lower tail voltage than the SD and PBD reactors. The distribution of the active species generated in different discharge regions of the SSPBD reactor was analyzed by optical emission spectra and ozone analysis. It was found that the packed-bed discharge region (3.5 mg/L), rather than the surface discharge region (1.3 mg/L) in the SSPBD reactor played a more important role in ozone generation. The optical emission spectroscopy analysis indicated that more intense peaks of the active species (e.g. N2 and OI) in the optical emission spectra were observed in the packed-bed region. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51177007), the Joint Funds of National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. U1462105), and Dalian University of Technology Fundamental Research Fund of China (No. DUT15RC(3)030)

  7. Metal supplementation to anaerobic granular sludge bed reactors: an environmental engineering approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez Fermoso, F.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research is the optimization of essential metal dosing in upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors used for methanogenic wastewater treatment. Optimization of essential metal dosing in UASB reactors is a compromise between achieving the maximal biological activity of the bio

  8. Dispersed plug flow model for upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactors with focus on granular sludge dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalyuzhnyi, S.V.; Fedorovich, V.V.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    A new approach to model upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB)-reactors, referred to as a one-dimensional dispersed plug flow model, was developed. This model focusses on the granular sludge dynamics along the reactor height, based on the balance between dispersion, sedimentation and convection using on

  9. Model description and kinetic parameter analysis of MTBE biodegradation in a packed bed reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waul, Christopher Kevin; Arvin, Erik; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2008-01-01

    A dynamic modeling approach was used to estimate in-situ model parameters, which describe the degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in a laboratory packed bed reactor. The measured dynamic response of MTBE pulses injected at the reactor's inlet was analyzed by least squares and parameter...

  10. Method and apparatus for increasing fuel efficiency in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes an improved method of producing a spectral shift in a nuclear reactor to achieve increased nuclear fuel efficiency, the nuclear reactor containing a fluid moderator juxtaposed with fuel elements containing the nuclear fuel, which comprises disposing within the fluid moderator stationary non-poison displacer rods for achieving the spectral shift, the displacer rods exhibiting a continuous reduction in volume during operation of the nuclear reactor whereby the fluid moderator increases in volume as the nuclear fuel is burned in the nuclear reactor

  11. Cold nuclear fusion reactor and nuclear fusion rocket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Zhenqiang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available "Nuclear restraint inertial guidance directly hit the cold nuclear fusion reactor and ion speed dc transformer" [1], referred to as "cold fusion reactor" invention patents, Chinese Patent Application No. CN: 200910129632.7 [2]. The invention is characterized in that: at room temperature under vacuum conditions, specific combinations of the installation space of the electromagnetic field, based on light nuclei intrinsic magnetic moment and the electric field, the first two strings of the nuclei to be bound fusion on the same line (track of. Re-use nuclear spin angular momentum vector inherent nearly the speed of light to form a super strong spin rotation gyro inertial guidance features, to overcome the Coulomb repulsion strong bias barrier to achieve fusion directly hit. Similar constraints apply nuclear inertial guidance mode for different speeds and energy ion beam mixing speed, the design of ion speed dc transformer is cold fusion reactors, nuclear fusion engines and such nuclear power plants and power delivery systems start important supporting equipment, so apply for a patent merger

  12. Distributed computing and nuclear reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-scale scientific and engineering calculations for nuclear reactor analysis can now be carried out effectively in a distributed computing environment, at costs far lower than for traditional mainframes. The distributed computing environment must include support for traditional system services, such as a queuing system for batch work, reliable filesystem backups, and parallel processing capabilities for large jobs. All ANL computer codes for reactor analysis have been adapted successfully to a distributed system based on workstations and X-terminals. Distributed parallel processing has been demonstrated to be effective for long-running Monte Carlo calculations

  13. Designing reverse-flow packed bed reactors for stable treatment of volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Fan Liang; Keith, Jason M

    2006-02-01

    Reverse-flow packed bed reactors can be used to treat gaseous pollutants from chemical plants. This article describes the design and operation of a modified reverse-flow reactor (MRFR) which has a recuperator on each end of the reactor and a reaction zone in the middle. The recuperators have low thermal dispersion and the reaction zone has a high thermal dispersion, obtained by placing metal inserts into the bed, parallel with the gas flow. Performance of the MRFR during extended lean and rich conditions is determined with analytical analysis and compares well with numerical simulations of CO oxidation; however, the theory is expected to be useful for any reaction kinetics. A major advantage of this MRFR design is an extended time for the reactor to extinguish during lean conditions. This work also describes MRFR performance with internal reactor cooling, which can be used as a control mechanism to maintain reactor temperature for proper removal of volatile organic compounds.

  14. Medical Radioisotopes Production Without A Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Keur, H.

    2010-05-15

    This report is answering the key question: Is it possible to ban the use of research reactors for the production of medical radioisotopes? Chapter 2 offers a summarized overview on the history of nuclear medicine. Chapter 3 gives an overview of the basic principles and understandings of nuclear medicine. The production of radioisotopes and its use in radiopharmaceuticals as a tracer for imaging particular parts of the inside of the human body (diagnosis) or as an agent in radiotherapy. Chapter 4 lists the use of popular medical radioisotopes used in nuclear imaging techniques and radiotherapy. Chapter 5 analyses reactor-based radioisotopes that can be produced by particle accelerators on commercial scale, other alternatives and the advantages of the cyclotron. Chapter 6 gives an overview of recent developments and prospects in worldwide radioisotopes production. Chapter 7 presents discussion, conclusions and recommendations, and is answering the abovementioned key question of this report: Is it possible to ban the use of a nuclear reactor for the production of radiopharmaceuticals? Is a safe and secure production of radioisotopes possible?.

  15. Nuclear safety cooperation for Soviet designed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986 first alerted the West to the significant safety risks of Soviet designed reactors. Five years later, this concern was reaffirmed when the IAEA, as a result of a review by an international team of nuclear safety experts, announced that it did not believe the Kozloduy nuclear power plants in Bulgaria could be operated safely. To address these safety concerns, the G-7 summit in Munich in July 1992 outlined a five point program to address the safety problems of Soviet Designed Reactors: operational safety improvement; near-term technical improvements to plants based on safety assessment; enhancing regulatory regimes; examination of the scope for replacing less safe plants by the development of alternative energy sources and the more efficient use of energy; and upgrading of the plants of more recent design. As of early 1994, over 20 countries and international organizations have pledged hundreds of millions of dollars in financial assistance to improve safety. This paper summarizes these assistance efforts for Soviet designed reactors, draws lessons learned from these activities, and offers some options for better addressing these concerns

  16. Lubrication greases for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubricating greases are essential components of many machines used in nuclear power plants. Where these machines are subject to radiation the life of the grease will be reduced due to deterioration of the components of the grease. According to the chemical nature of the grease used a greater or lesser resistance to radiation will be observed. Tests and techniques to evaluate the performance of greases before and after irradiation are described. The results of these tests show that conventional premium greases will resist comparatively low levels of irradiation, whilst greases formulated from correctly selected components can tolerate quite high levels of radiation permitting the machines they lubricate to attain their designed service lives

  17. Closed Brayton Cycle power system with a high temperature pellet bed reactor heat source for NEP applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Harper, William B., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Capitalizing on past and future development of high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) technology, a low mass 15 MWe closed gas turbine cycle power system using a pellet bed reactor heating helium working fluid is proposed for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) applications. Although the design of this directly coupled system architecture, comprising the reactor/power system/space radiator subsystems, is presented in conceptual form, sufficient detail is included to permit an assessment of overall system performance and mass. Furthermore, an attempt is made to show how tailoring of the main subsystem design characteristics can be utilized to achieve synergistic system level advantages that can lead to improved reliability and enhanced system life while reducing the number of parasitic load driven peripheral subsystems.

  18. PARTICLE COATING BY CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION IN A FLUIDI7ED BED REACTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gregor; Czok; Joachim; Werther

    2005-01-01

    Aluminum coatings were created onto glass beads by chemical vapor deposition in a fluidized bed reactor at different temperatures. Nitrogen was enriched with Triisobutylaluminum (TIBA) vapor and the latter was thermally decomposed inside the fluidized bed to deposit the elemental aluminum. To ensure homogeneous coating on the bed material, the fluidizing conditions necessary to avoid agglomeration were investigated for a broad range of temperatures.The deposition reaction was modeled on the basis of a discrete particle simulation to gain insight into homogeneity and thickness of the coating throughout the bed material. In particular, the take-up of aluminum was traced for selected particles that exhibited a large mass of deposited aluminum.

  19. Nuclear energy center site survey reactor plant considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harty, H.

    1976-05-01

    The Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 required the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to make a nuclear energy center site survey (NECSS). Background information for the NECSS report was developed in a series of tasks which include: socioeconomic inpacts; environmental impact (reactor facilities); emergency response capability (reactor facilities); aging of nuclear energy centers; and dry cooled nuclear energy centers.

  20. Nuclear energy center site survey reactor plant considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 required the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to make a nuclear energy center site survey (NECSS). Background information for the NECSS report was developed in a series of tasks which include: socioeconomic inpacts; environmental impact (reactor facilities); emergency response capability (reactor facilities); aging of nuclear energy centers; and dry cooled nuclear energy centers

  1. Quality assurance of ECCS in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Size and shape of split or rupture in clad increases the whole body radiation exposure to the staff of the nuclear reactors. Suggests that a plant operating with 0.125 percent pin-hole fuel cladding defects showed a general five-fold increase in whole-body radiation exposure rates in some areas of the plant when compared to a sister plant with high-integrity fuel. Therefore Quality Assurance (QA) checks on Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) in Nuclear Reactors are very important to ensure minimum radiation hazard during Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). These checks will protect environment and public from radiation to great extent. The rate of rise of fuel temperature subsequent to LOCA should be lower than 5.5℃/s

  2. Nuclear data requirements for fission reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting was attended by 13 participants from 8 Member States and 2 International Organizations who reviewed the status of the nuclear data libraries and computer codes used to calculate the radioactive inventory in the reactor unit components for the decommissioning purposes. Nuclides and nuclear reactions important for determination of the radiation fields during decommissioning and for the final disposal of radioactive waste from the decommissioned units were identified. Accuracy requirements for the relevant nuclear data were considered. The present publication contains the text of the reports by the participants and their recommendations to the Nuclear Data Section of the IAEA. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these reports. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. Reference Neutron Radiographs of Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    Reference neutron radiographs of nuclear reactor fuel were produced by the Euraton Neutron Radiography Working Group and published in 1984 by the Reidel Publishing Company. In this collection a classification is given of the various neutron radiographic findings, that can occur in different parts...... of pelletized, annular and vibro-conpacted nuclear fuel pins. Those parts of the pins are shown where changes of appearance differ from those for the parts as fabricated. Also radiographs of those as fabricated parts are included. The collection contains 158 neutron radiographs, reproduced on photographic paper...

  4. The regulatory challenges of decommissioning nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Each nuclear power plant, fuel cycle facility and nuclear research and test facility that is operating today will eventually reach the end of its useful life and cease operation. During the period of its decommissioning, it is important to properly manage the health and environmental hazards and physical protection measures of the shutdown facility in order to protect the health and safety of the public and workers and to safeguard any nuclear materials. In this regard, the nuclear safety regulatory body is responsible for independently assuring that decommissioning activities are conducted safely, that radioactive materials and spent nuclear fuel are disposed of properly and that the site is in an acceptable end state. The purpose of this report is to describe the broad range of safety, environmental, organisational, human factors and public policy issues that may arise during the decommissioning of nuclear reactors and that the regulatory body should be prepared to deal with in the framework of its national regulatory system. The intended audience is primarily nuclear regulators, although the information and ideas may also be of interest to government authorities, environmental regulators, nuclear operating organisations, technical expert organisations and the general public. (author)

  5. Some views on nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the text of a speech given by Pierre Y. Tanguy (Electricite de France) at the 22nd Water Reactor Safety Meeting held in Bethesda, MD in 1994. He describes the EDF nuclear program in broad terms and proceeds to discuss operational safety results with EDF plants. The speaker also outlines actions to enhance safety planned for the future, and he briefly mentions French cooperation with the Chinese on the Daya Bay project

  6. Shield structure for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved nuclear reactor shield structure is described for use where there are significant amounts of fast neutron flux above an energy level of approximately 70 keV. The shield includes structural supports and neutron moderator and absorber systems. A portion at least of the neutron moderator material is magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron. (U.K.)

  7. Multivariable Feedback Control of Nuclear Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Moen

    1982-07-01

    Full Text Available Multivariable feedback control has been adapted for optimal control of the spatial power distribution in nuclear reactor cores. Two design techniques, based on the theory of automatic control, were developed: the State Variable Feedback (SVF is an application of the linear optimal control theory, and the Multivariable Frequency Response (MFR is based on a generalization of the traditional frequency response approach to control system design.

  8. Some views on nuclear reactor safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanguy, P.Y. [Electricite de France, Paris (France)

    1995-04-01

    This document is the text of a speech given by Pierre Y. Tanguy (Electricite de France) at the 22nd Water Reactor Safety Meeting held in Bethesda, MD in 1994. He describes the EDF nuclear program in broad terms and proceeds to discuss operational safety results with EDF plants. The speaker also outlines actions to enhance safety planned for the future, and he briefly mentions French cooperation with the Chinese on the Daya Bay project.

  9. Modeling for Anaerobic Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B. Y. M.; Pfeffer, J. T.

    1989-06-01

    The specific objectives of this research were: 1. to develop an equilibrium model for chemical aspects of anaerobic reactors; 2. to modify the equilibrium model for non-equilibrium conditions; 3. to incorporate the existing biofilm models into the models above to study the biological and chemical behavior of the fixed-film anaerobic reactors; 4. to experimentally verify the validity of these models; 5. to investigate the biomass-holding ability of difference packing materials for establishing reactor design criteria.

  10. Nuclear vapor thermal reactor propulsion technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, Isaac; Diaz, Nils J.; Dugan, Edward T.; Watanabe, Yoichi; McClanahan, James A.; Wen-Hsiung Tu, Carman, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    The conceptual design of a nuclear rocket based on the vapor core reactor is presented. The Nuclear Vapor Thermal Rocket (NVTR) offers the potential for a specific impulse of 1000 to 1200 s at thrust-to-weight ratios of 1 to 2. The design is based on NERVA geometry and systems with the solid fuel replaced by uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) vapor. The closed-loop core does not rely on hydrodynamic confinement of the fuel. The hydrogen propellant is separated from the UF4 fuel gas by graphite structure. The hydrogen is maintained at high pressure (˜100 atm), and exits the core at 3,100 K to 3,500 K. Zirconium carbide and hafnium carbide coatings are used to protect the hot graphite from the hydrogen. The core is surrounded by beryllium oxide reflector. The nuclear reactor core has been integrated into a 75 klb engine design using an expander cycle and dual turbopumps. The NVTR offers the potential for an incremental technology development pathway to high performance gas core reactors. Since the fuel is readily available, it also offers advantages in the initial cost of development, as it will not require major expenditures for fuel development.

  11. Oklo reactors and implications for nuclear science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, E. D.; Gould, C. R.; Sharapov, E. I.

    2014-04-01

    We summarize the nuclear physics interests in the Oklo natural nuclear reactors, focusing particularly on developments over the past two decades. Modeling of the reactors has become increasingly sophisticated, employing Monte Carlo simulations with realistic geometries and materials that can generate both the thermal and epithermal fractions. The water content and the temperatures of the reactors have been uncertain parameters. We discuss recent work pointing to lower temperatures than earlier assumed. Nuclear cross-sections are input to all Oklo modeling and we discuss a parameter, the 175Lu ground state cross-section for thermal neutron capture leading to the isomer 176mLu, that warrants further investigation. Studies of the time dependence of dimensionless fundamental constants have been a driver for much of the recent work on Oklo. We critically review neutron resonance energy shifts and their dependence on the fine structure constant α and the ratio Xq = mq/Λ (where mq is the average of the u and d current quark masses and Λ is the mass scale of quantum chromodynamics (QCD)). We suggest a formula for the combined sensitivity to α and Xq that exhibits the dependence on proton number Z and mass number A, potentially allowing quantum electrodynamic (QED) and QCD effects to be disentangled if a broader range of isotopic abundance data becomes available.

  12. Opening Address: Japan's Nuclear Reactor Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thank you very much Mr. Chairman for your kind introduction. Distinguished colleagues, ladies and gentlemen, it is a great pleasure for me to have the chance to address you here in Kyoto at this 'International Conference on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycles (FR09)'. At the outset, I would like to thank the IAEA for organizing this conference and, taking this opportunity, I would like to assure its new Director General, Y. Amano, of Japan's continuing support for the IAEA. I am looking forward to continuing to work with the IAEA in order to extend the benefits of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and science and technology to a global population. We are witnessing today a global emergence of interest in the construction of nuclear power plants. There are a number of reasons for this. Major factors are the urgent and ever growing need for energy, particularly in the developing world, fluctuations in fossil fuel prices, the pursuit of security of energy supply and the growing recognition of the need to combat global warming. Despite the global economic crisis, the IAEA's latest projections continue to show a significant increase in nuclear generating capacity in the medium term. The low projection for 2030 is now 511 GW(e) of generating capacity, compared with 370 GW(e) today. The high projection is 807 GW(e); more than a doubling of present levels. Most of the 30 countries that already use nuclear power plan to expand their output. Growth targets have been raised significantly in China, India and the Russian Federation. In addition, according to the IAEA, some 50 countries - mostly in the developing world - have informed the IAEA that they might be interested in launching nuclear power programmes and 12 of these are actively considering nuclear power. Even in the high case projection, however, nuclear power's share of global power generation will go down from the current 16% level to 14% by 2030 and then rise to 22% by 2050, according to the projection

  13. The program of reactors and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Into de framework of the program of research reactors and nuclear power plants, the operating Argentine reactors are described. The uses of the research reactors in Argentina are summarized. The reactors installed by Argentina in other countries (Peru, Algeria, Egypt) are briefly described. The CAREM project for the design and construction of an innovator small power reactor (27 MWe) is also described in some detail. The next biennial research and development program for reactor is briefly outlined

  14. RB research nuclear reactor, Annual report for 1989, I - III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is made of three parts. Part one contains a short description of the reactor, reactor operation, incidents, status of reactor equipment and components (nuclear fuel, heavy water, reactor vessel, heavy water circulation system, electronic, electric and mechanical equipment, auxiliary systems and Vax-8250 computer). It includes dosimetry and radiation protection data, personnel and financial data. Second part of this report in concerned with maintenance of reactor components and instrumentation. Part three includes data about reactor utilization during 1989

  15. Thermoacoustic Thermometry for Nuclear Reactor Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Steven L. Garrett; Randall A. Ali

    2013-06-01

    On Friday, March 11, 2011, at 2:46pm (Japan Standard Trme), the Tohoku region on the east coast of northern Japan experi­enced what would become known as the largest earthquake in the country's history at magnitude 9.0 on the Richter scale. The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant suffered exten­sive and irreversible damage. Six operating units were at the site, each with a boiling water reactor. When the earthquake struck, three of the six reactors were operating and the others were in a periodic inspection outage phase. In one reactor, all of the fuel had been relocated to a spent fuel pool in the reactor building. The seismic acceleration caused by the earthquake brought the three operating units to an automatic shutdown. Since there was damage to the power transmission lines, the emergency diesel generators (EDG) were automat­ically started to ensure continued cooling of the reactors and spent fuel pools. The situation was under control until the tsunami hit about forty-five minutes later with a maximum wave height of approximately 15 meters, which was three times taller than the sea wall of 5m. The influx of water submerged the EDGs, the electrical switchgear, and dc batteries, resulting in the total loss of power to five of the six reactors. The flooding also resulted in the loss of instrumentation that would have other­ wise been used to monitor and control the emergency. The ugly aftermath included high radiation exposure to operators at the nuclear power plants and early contamina­tion of food supplies and water within several restricted areas in Japan, where high radiation levels have rendered them un­safe for human habitation. While the rest of the story will remain a tragic history, it is this part of the series of unfortunate events that has inspired our research. It has indubitably highlighted the need for a novel sensor and instrumentation system that can withstand similar or worse conditions to avoid future catastrophe and assume damage

  16. Beneficiation of pulverized coal combustion fly ash in fluidised bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammarota, A.; Chirone, R.; Solimene, R.; Urciuolo, M. [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione - C.N.R., P.le V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy)

    2008-07-15

    The paper addresses the thermal treatment of pulverized coal combustion fly ash belonging to the group C of Geldart powder classification in unconventional configurations of fluidised bed reactors. A sound-assisted fluidised bed combustor operated at 850 and 750 C, and a fluidised bed combustor characterized by a conical geometry, operated at 850 C, are the two lab-scale reactors tested. Combustion experiments have been carried out at different air excesses, ranging between 10% and 170%, and in the case of the conical fluidization column with different bed inventory. Both tested configurations have been proved to be efficient to reduce the carbon content initially present in the fly ash of 11%{sub w}, to a very low level, generally smaller than 1%{sub w}. Both the fly ash residence time in the reactor and the air excess strongly influenced the reactor performance. Residence times of 3-4 min and 10-60 min have been estimated for experiments carried out with the sound-assisted fluidised bed combustor and with the conical fluidised bed combustor, respectively. Regarding the possibility of a concurrent reduction of unburned carbon in the ash and of a particle size separation of the beneficiated material, on the basis of the obtained experimental data, the sound-assisted fluidised bed combustor is not able to separate the broad particle size distribution of the fly ash in different outlet solid streams. The use of a conical fluidised bed combustor is promising to realize an efficient separation of the inlet broad particle size distribution of the fly ash fed to the reactor into narrower outlet solid streams extracted from different locations: combustor exit, top and bottom of the bed. In this framework a hydrodynamic characterization of binary mixtures in a conical fluidised bed column carried out at ambient and high temperature (850 C) has demonstrated that the operating conditions of the conical fluidised bed combustor can be chosen on the basis of a compromise

  17. Elemental mercury vapor capture by powdered activated carbon in a fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrizio Scala; Riccardo Chirone; Amedeo Lancia [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione - CNR, Napoli (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    A bubbling fluidized bed of inert material was used to increase the activated carbon residence time in the reaction zone and to improve its performance for mercury vapor capture. Elemental mercury capture experiments were conducted at 100{sup o}C in a purposely designed 65 mm ID lab-scale pyrex reactor, that could be operated both in the fluidized bed and in the entrained bed configurations. Commercial powdered activated carbon was pneumatically injected in the reactor and mercury concentration at the outlet was monitored continuously. Experiments were carried out at different inert particle sizes, bed masses, fluidization velocities and carbon feed rates. Experimental results showed that the presence of a bubbling fluidized bed led to an increase of the mercury capture efficiency and, in turn, of the activated carbon utilization. This was explained by the enhanced activated carbon loading and gas-solid contact time that establishes in the reaction zone, because of the large surface area available for activated carbon adhesion/deposition in the fluidized bed. Transient mercury concentration profiles at the bed outlet during the runs were used to discriminate between the controlling phenomena in the process. Experimental data have been analyzed in the light of a phenomenological framework that takes into account the presence of both free and adhered carbon in the reactor as well as mercury saturation of the adsorbent. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Treatment of oilfield wastewater in moving bed biofilm reactors using a novel suspended ceramic biocarrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhiyong; Lu, Mang; Huang, Wenhui; Xu, Xiaochun

    2011-11-30

    In this study, a novel suspended ceramic carrier was prepared, which has high strength, optimum density (close to water), and high porosity. Two different carriers, unmodified and sepiolite-modified suspended ceramic carriers were used to feed two moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) with a filling fraction of 50% to treat oilfield produced water. The hydraulic retention time (HRT) was varied from 36 to 10h. The results, during a monitoring period of 190 days, showed that removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand was the highest in reactor 3 filled with the sepiolite-modified carriers, followed by reactor 2 filled with the unmodified carriers, with the lowest in reactor 1 (activated sludge reactor), at an HRT of 10h. Similar trends were found in the removal efficiencies of ammonia nitrogen and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Reactor 3 was more shock resistant than reactors 2 and 1. The results indicate that the suspended ceramic carrier is an excellent MBBR carrier.

  19. Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

    2010-09-01

    The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a ”standard,” UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge

  20. Nuclear power reactors and hydrogen storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among conclusions and results come by, a nuclear-electric-hydrogen integrated power system was suggested as a way to prevent the energy crisis. It was shown that the hydrogen power system using nuclear power as a leading energy resource would hold an advantage in the current international situation as well as for the long-term future. Results reported provide designers of integrated nuclear-electric-hydrogen systems with computation models and routines which will allow them to explore the optimal solution in coupling power reactors to hydrogen producing systems, taking into account the specific characters of hydrogen storage systems. The models were meant for average computers of a type easily available in developing countries. (author)

  1. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions

  2. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, B.

    1991-07-25

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions.

  3. Designed porosity materials in nuclear reactor components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yacout, A. M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Stan, Marius

    2016-09-06

    A nuclear fuel pellet with a porous substrate, such as a carbon or tungsten aerogel, on which at least one layer of a fuel containing material is deposited via atomic layer deposition, and wherein the layer deposition is controlled to prevent agglomeration of defects. Further, a method of fabricating a nuclear fuel pellet, wherein the method features the steps of selecting a porous substrate, depositing at least one layer of a fuel containing material, and terminating the deposition when the desired porosity is achieved. Also provided is a nuclear reactor fuel cladding made of a porous substrate, such as silicon carbide aerogel or silicon carbide cloth, upon which layers of silicon carbide are deposited.

  4. Styrene recovery from polystyrene by flash pyrolysis in a conical spouted bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artetxe, Maite; Lopez, Gartzen; Amutio, Maider; Barbarias, Itsaso; Arregi, Aitor; Aguado, Roberto; Bilbao, Javier; Olazar, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Continuous pyrolysis of polystyrene has been studied in a conical spouted bed reactor with the main aim of enhancing styrene monomer recovery. Thermal degradation in a thermogravimetric analyser was conducted as a preliminary study in order to apply this information in the pyrolysis in the conical spouted bed reactor. The effects of temperature and gas flow rate in the conical spouted bed reactor on product yield and composition have been determined in the 450-600°C range by using a spouting velocity from 1.25 to 3.5 times the minimum one. Styrene yield is strongly influenced by both temperature and gas flow rate, with the maximum yield being 70.6 wt% at 500°C and a gas velocity twice the minimum one. PMID:26077230

  5. Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor Project: Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program FY 2002 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew; Dolan, Thomas James; Miller, Gregory Kent; Moore, Richard Leroy; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Oh, Chang H; Gougar, Hans D

    2002-11-01

    This report documents the results of our research in FY-02 on pebble-bed reactor technology under our Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled the Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor. The MPBR is an advanced reactor concept that can meet the energy and environmental needs of future generations under DOE’s Generation IV initiative. Our work is focused in three areas: neutronics, core design and fuel cycle; reactor safety and thermal hydraulics; and fuel performance.

  6. Next generation advanced nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growing energy demand by technological developments and the increase of the world population and gradually diminishing energy resources made nuclear power an indispensable option. The renewable energy sources like solar, wind and geothermal may be suited to meet some local needs. Environment friendly nuclear energy which is a suitable solution to large scale demands tends to develop highly economical, advanced next generation reactors by incorporating technological developments and years of operating experience. The enhancement of safety and reliability, facilitation of maintainability, impeccable compatibility with the environment are the goals of the new generation reactors. The protection of the investment and property is considered as well as the protection of the environment and mankind. They became economically attractive compared to fossil-fired units by the use of standard designs, replacing some active systems by passive, reducing construction time and increasing the operation lifetime. The evolutionary designs were introduced at first by ameliorating the conventional plants, than revolutionary systems which are denoted as generation IV were verged to meet future needs. The investigations on the advanced, proliferation resistant fuel cycle technologies were initiated to minimize the radioactive waste burden by using new generation fast reactors and ADS transmuters.

  7. Thermal denitrification of evaporators concentrates in reactor with fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the treatments of liquid wastes coming from the Marcoule reprocessing plant, the study of a thermal denitrification process for evaporator concentrates has been chosen by the CEA/CEN Cadarache: the fluidized-bed calcination. This work presents the study of a calcination pilot-plant for wastes with a very high sodium nitrate content. After a reactional analysis carried out in a thermobalance on samples which are representative of the fluidized-bed compounds, the perfecting of many of the plant parameters - such as the solution injection system - was carried out on a scale-model at first. Then, it was verified on the pilot-plant, and some experiments have been carried out. A mathematical model for the particle growth inside the fluidized-bed is proposed. (author). 179 refs., 65 figs., 23 tabs

  8. Deposition reactors for solar grade silicon: A comparative thermal analysis of a Siemens reactor and a fluidized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, A.; Filtvedt, W. O.; Lindholm, D.; Ramachandran, P. A.; Rodríguez, A.; del Cañizo, C.

    2015-12-01

    Polysilicon production costs contribute approximately to 25-33% of the overall cost of the solar panels and a similar fraction of the total energy invested in their fabrication. Understanding the energy losses and the behaviour of process temperature is an essential requirement as one moves forward to design and build large scale polysilicon manufacturing plants. In this paper we present thermal models for two processes for poly production, viz., the Siemens process using trichlorosilane (TCS) as precursor and the fluid bed process using silane (monosilane, MS). We validate the models with some experimental measurements on prototype laboratory reactors relating the temperature profiles to product quality. A model sensitivity analysis is also performed, and the effects of some key parameters such as reactor wall emissivity and gas distributor temperature, on temperature distribution and product quality are examined. The information presented in this paper is useful for further understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of both deposition technologies, and will help in optimal temperature profiling of these systems aiming at lowering production costs without compromising the solar cell quality.

  9. Some Movement Mechanisms and Characteristics in Pebble Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingtuan Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pebblebed-type high temperature gas-cooled reactor is considered to be one of the promising solutions for generation IV advanced reactors, and the two-region arranged reactor core can enhance its advantages by flattening neutron flux. However, this application is held back by the existence of mixing zone between central and peripheral regions, which results from pebbles’ dispersion motions. In this study, experiments have been carried out to study the dispersion phenomenon, and the variation of dispersion region and radial distribution of pebbles in the specifically shaped flow field are shown. Most importantly, the standard deviation of pebbles’ radial positions in dispersion region, as a quantitative index to describe the size of dispersion region, is gotten through statistical analysis. Besides, discrete element method has been utilized to analyze the parameter influence on dispersion region, and this practice offers some strategies to eliminate or reduce mixing zone in practical reactors.

  10. Carbon Shale Combustion in the Fluidized Bed Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Olek Małgorzata; Kandefer Stanisław; Kaniowski Wiesław; Żukowski Witold; Baron Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the possibilities of coal shale combustion in furnaces with bubbling fluidized bed. Coal shale can be autothermally combusted in the fluidized bed, despite the low calorie value and high ash content of fuel. Established concentrations of CO (500 ppm) and VOC (30 mg/m3) have indicated a high conversion degree of combustible material during combustion process. Average concentrations of SO2 and NOx in the flue gas were higher than this received from the ...

  11. Simultaneous nitrification-denitrification and phosphorus removal in a fixed bed sequencing batch reactor (FBSBR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimi, Yousef, E-mail: you.rahimi@gmail.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Graduate Faculty of Environment, University of Tehran, No. 25 Qods St., Enghelab Ave, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Torabian, Ali, E-mail: atorabi@ut.ac.ir [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Graduate Faculty of Environment, University of Tehran, No. 25 Qods St., Enghelab Ave, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehrdadi, Naser, E-mail: mehrdadi@ut.ac.ir [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Graduate Faculty of Environment, University of Tehran, No. 25 Qods St., Enghelab Ave, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahmoradi, Behzad, E-mail: bshahmorady@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Science, University of Mysore, MGM-06 Mysore (India)

    2011-01-30

    Research highlights: {yields} Sludge production in FSBR reactor is 20-30% less than SBR reactor. {yields} FSBR reactor showed more nutrient removal rate than SBR reactor. {yields} FSBR reactor showed less VSS/TSS ratio than SBR reactor. - Abstract: Biological nutrient removal (BNR) was investigated in a fixed bed sequencing batch reactor (FBSBR) in which instead of activated sludge polypropylene carriers were used. The FBSBR performance on carbon and nitrogen removal at different loading rates was significant. COD, TN, and phosphorus removal efficiencies were at range of 90-96%, 60-88%, and 76-90% respectively while these values at SBR reactor were 85-95%, 38-60%, and 20-79% respectively. These results show that the simultaneous nitrification-denitrification (SND) is significantly higher than conventional SBR reactor. The higher total phosphorus (TP) removal in FBSBR correlates with oxygen gradient in biofilm layer. The influence of fixed media on biomass production yield was assessed by monitoring the MLSS concentrations versus COD removal for both reactors and results revealed that the sludge production yield (Y{sub obs}) is significantly less in FBSBR reactors compared with SBR reactor. The FBSBR was more efficient in SND and phosphorus removal. Moreover, it produced less excess sludge but higher in nutrient content and stabilization ratio (less VSS/TSS ratio).

  12. Investigation of Anaerobic Fluidized Bed Reactor Aerobic Mov-ing Bed Bio Reactor (AFBR/MMBR System for Treatment of Currant Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Jafari

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anaerobic treatment methods are more suitable for the treatment of concentrated wastewater streams, offer lower operating costs, the production of usable biogas product. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of an Anaerobic Fluidized Bed Reactor (AFBR-Aerobic Moving Bed Bio Reactor (MBBR in series arrangement to treat Currant wastewater.Methods: The bed materials of AFBR were cylindrical particles made of PVC with a diameter of 2-2.3 mm, particle density of 1250 kg/m3.The volume of all bed materials was 1.7 liter which expanded to 2.46 liters in fluidized situation. In MBBR, support media was composed of 1.5 liters Bee-Cell 2000 having porosity of 87% and specific surface area of 650m2/m3.Results: When system operated at 35 ºC, chemical oxygen demand (COD removal efficiencies were achieved to 98% and 81.6% for organic loading rates (OLR of 9.4 and 24.2 g COD/l.d, and hydraulic retention times (HRT of 48 and 18 h, in average COD concentration feeding of 18.4 g/l, respectively.Conclusion: The contribution of AFBR in total COD removal efficiency at an organic loading rate (OLR of 9.4 g COD/l.d was 95%, and gradually decreased to 76.5% in OLR of 24.2 g COD/l.d. Also with increasing in organic loading rate the contribution of aerobic reactor in removing COD gradually decreased. In this system, the anaerobic reactor played the most important role in the removal of COD, and the aerobic MBBR was actually needed to polish the anaerobic treated wastewate

  13. Role of Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor and Sequencing Batch Reactor in Biological Degradation of Formaldehyde Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ayati

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays formaldehyde is used as raw material in many industries. It has also disinfection applications in some public places. Due to its toxicity for microorganisms, chemical or anaerobic biological methods are applied for treating wastewater containing formaldehyde.In this research, formaldehyde removal efficiencies of aerobic biological treatment systems including moving bed biofilm (MMBR and sequencing batch reactors (SBR were investigated. During all experiments, the efficiency of SBR was more than MBBR, but the difference was not significant statistically. According to the results, the best efficiencies were obtained for influent formaldehyde COD of 200 mg/L in MBBR and SBR which were 93% and 99.4%, respectively. The systems were also capable to treat higher formaldehyde concentrations (up to 2500 mg/L with lower removal efficiency. The reaction kinetics followed the Stover-Kincannon second order model. The gram-positive and gram-negative bacillus and coccus as well as the gram-positive binary bacillus were found to be the most dominant species. The results of 13C-NMR analysis have shown that formaldehyde and urea were converted into N-{[(aminocarbonyl amino] methyl}urea and the residual formaldehyde was polymerized at room temperature.

  14. Microflora of nuclear research reactor pool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The circulation of pool water through the nuclear reactor core produces a bactericidal effect on the microflora due to the influence of various kinds of radiation. The microbe contents return to their initial level in 2 to 4 months after the circulation has stopped. The microflora comprises mainly cocci in large numbers, G-positive rods and fungi, and lower amounts of G-negative rods as compared with the water with which the reactor pool was initially filled. Increased amounts are present of radiation-resistant forms exhibiting intense production of catalase and nuclease. Supposedly, the presence of these enzymes is in some way beneficial to the microbes in their survival in the high-radiation zones. (author). 1 fig., 2 tabs., 12 refs

  15. Eugene Wigner, The First Nuclear Reactor Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Alvin M.

    2002-04-01

    All physicists recognize Eugene Wigner as a theoretical physicist of the very first rank. Yet Wigner's only advanced degree was in Chemical Engineering. His physics was largely self-taught. During WWII, Wigner brilliantly returned to his original occupation as an engineer. He led the small team of theoretical physicists and engineers who designed, in remarkable detail, the original graphite-moderated, water-cooled Hanford reactor, which produced the Pu239 of the Trinity and Nagasaki bombs. With his unparalleled understanding of chain reactors (matched only by Fermi) and his skill and liking for engineering, Wigner can properly be called the Founder of Nuclear Engineering. The evidence for this is demonstrated by a summary of his 37 Patents on various chain reacting systems.

  16. REACTOR PHYSICS MODELING OF SPENT NUCLEAR RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL FOR SNM ATTRIBUTION AND NUCLEAR FORENSICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternat, M.; Beals, D.; Webb, R.; Nichols, T.

    2010-06-09

    Nuclear research reactors are the least safeguarded type of reactor; in some cases this may be attributed to low risk and in most cases it is due to difficulty from dynamic operation. Research reactors vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power and burnup providing a significant challenge to any standardized safeguard system. If a whole fuel assembly was interdicted, based on geometry and other traditional forensics work, one could identify the material's origin fairly accurately. If the material has been dispersed or reprocessed, in-depth reactor physics models may be used to help with the identification. Should there be a need to attribute research reactor fuel material, the Savannah River National Laboratory would perform radiochemical analysis of samples of the material as well as other non-destructive measurements. In depth reactor physics modeling would then be performed to compare to these measured results in an attempt to associate the measured results with various reactor parameters. Several reactor physics codes are being used and considered for this purpose, including: MONTEBURNS/ORIGEN/MCNP5, CINDER/MCNPX and WIMS. In attempt to identify reactor characteristics, such as time since shutdown, burnup, or power, various isotopes are used. Complexities arise when the inherent assumptions embedded in different reactor physics codes handle the isotopes differently and may quantify them to different levels of accuracy. A technical approach to modeling spent research reactor fuel begins at the assembly level upon acquiring detailed information of the reactor to be modeled. A single assembly is run using periodic boundary conditions to simulate an infinite lattice which may be repeatedly burned to produce input fuel isotopic vectors of various burnups for a core level model. A core level model will then be constructed using the assembly level results as inputs for the specific fuel shuffling pattern in an attempt to establish an equilibrium cycle

  17. Dielectric Heaters for Testing Spacecraft Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, William Herbert; Bitteker, Leo; Godfroy, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A document proposes the development of radio-frequency-(RF)-driven dielectric heaters for non-nuclear thermal testing of the cores of nuclear-fission reactors for spacecraft. Like the electrical-resistance heaters used heretofore for such testing, the dielectric heaters would be inserted in the reactors in place of nuclear fuel rods. A typical heater according to the proposal would consist of a rod of lossy dielectric material sized and shaped like a fuel rod and containing an electrically conductive rod along its center line. Exploiting the dielectric loss mechanism that is usually considered a nuisance in other applications, an RF signal, typically at a frequency .50 MHz and an amplitude between 2 and 5 kV, would be applied to the central conductor to heat the dielectric material. The main advantage of the proposal is that the wiring needed for the RF dielectric heating would be simpler and easier to fabricate than is the wiring needed for resistance heating. In some applications, it might be possible to eliminate all heater wiring and, instead, beam the RF heating power into the dielectric rods from external antennas.

  18. Propylene polymerization in a circulating slugging fluidized bed reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, van Inge Cornelia

    2004-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis is concerned with research on the riser of a circulating fluidized bed system for olefin polymerization. In the riser section, fluidization takes place in the transporting slugging mode and polymer particles are produced in the riser in a non-isothermal way. Propert

  19. Styrene biofiltration in a trickle-bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Novak

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The biological treatment of styrene waste gas in a trickle-bed filter (TBF was investigated. The bioreactor consisted of a two-part glass cylinder (ID 150 mm filled with 25 mm polypropylene Pall rings serving as packing material. The bed height was 1m. Although the laboratory temperature was maintained at 22 ºC, the water temperature in the trickle-bed filter was slightly lower (about 18 ºC.The main aim of our study was to observe the effect of empty-bed residence time (EBRT on bioreactor performance at a constant pollutant concentration over an extended time period. The bioreactor was inoculated with a mixed microbial consortium isolated from a styrene-degrading biofilter that had been running for the previous two years. After three weeks of acclimation period, the bioreactor was loaded with styrene (100 mg.m-3. EBRT was in the range of 53 s to 13 s. A maximum elimination capacity (EC of 11.3 gC.m-3.h-1 was reached at an organic loading (OL rate of 18.6 gC.m-3.h-1.

  20. Modeling of a fluidized bed reactor for the ethylene-propylene copolymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Guillermo Cadavid Estrada

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model for the ethylene - propylene copolymerization with a Ziegler - Natta catalyst in a gas phase fludized bed reactor is presented. The model includes a two active site kinetic model with spontaneous transfer reactions and site deactivation. Also, it is studied and simulated the growth of a polymeric particle which is exposed to an outside atmosphere (monomers concentrations and temperature that represent the emulsion phase conditions of the reactor. Particle growth model is the basis for the study of the sizes distribution into the reactor. Two phase model of Kunii-Levenspiel is the basis for the modelling and simulation of the fluid bed reactor, the models developed consider two extreme cases for the gas mixed grade in emulsion phase (perfectly mixed and plug flow. The solution of the models includes mass (for the two monomers and energy balances, coupled with the particle growth and residence time distribution models.

  1. Liquid-cooled nuclear reactor, especially a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor with a special arrangement of fuel rods in the core is designed. Each fuel element has its shaft which is made of sheets, has the same cross section as the fuel element and protrudes at least the length of the control rod above the reactor core. Made of a zirconium alloy in the core area and of stainless steel above it, the shaft is equipped with channels for sliding the rods in and out and serves to spatially secure the position of the rods. Coolant flow is provided by the chimney effect. The shaft can conveniently enclose the control rod drive. It can also serve to bear the water separator. Moreover, it can constitute a part of the casing which surrounds the fuel rods and keeps the fuel in an intimate contact with the coolant; the other part of this casing is constituted by inserted sheets which can conveniently have the shape of angles. The walls of neighboring shafts form a compartment accommodating a neutron absorber plate. (M.D.). 11 figs

  2. Performance of a magnetically stabilized bed reactor with immobilized yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, V; Hristov, J; Dobreva, E; al-Hassan, Z; Penchev, I

    1996-05-01

    This paper is focused on the possibility to apply the magnetic stabilization technique in bioprocessing. The feasibility of a continuous ethanol fermentation process with immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in a magnetically stabilized bed (MSB) was demonstrated. The fermentation processes were carried out in an external magnetic field, transverse to the fluid flow. The flexibility to change the bed expansion owing to the independent change of the fluid flow and the field intensity (the "magnetization FIRST" mode) permitted the creation of fixed beds with different particle arrangements, which affected the bed porosity, the effective fluid-particle contact area, and the mass transfer processes on the particle-fluid interface. As a result, higher ethanol concentration, ethanol production, and glucose uptake rates than in conventional packed bed reactor were reached.

  3. Chemical Looping Reactor System Design : Double Loop Circulating Fluidized Bed (DLCFB)

    OpenAIRE

    Bischi, Aldo

    2012-01-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is continuously gaining more importance among the carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies. It is an unmixed combustion process which takes place in two steps. An effective way to realize CLC is to use two interconnected fluidized beds and a metallic powder circulating among them, acting as oxygen carrier. The metallic powder oxidizes at high temperature in one of the two reactors, the air reactor (AR). It reacts in a highly exothermic reaction with the ...

  4. Simulation for Supporting Scale-Up of a Fluidized Bed Reactor for Advanced Water Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Farhana Tisa; Abdul Aziz Abdul Raman; Wan Mohd Ashri Wan Daud

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of fluidized bed reactor (FBR) was accomplished for treating wastewater using Fenton reaction, which is an advanced oxidation process (AOP). The simulation was performed to determine characteristics of FBR performance, concentration profile of the contaminants, and various prominent hydrodynamic properties (e.g., Reynolds number, velocity, and pressure) in the reactor. Simulation was implemented for 2.8 L working volume using hydrodynamic correlations, continuous equation, and simp...

  5. Influence of dissolved oxygen in nitrification kinetics in a circulating bed reactor

    OpenAIRE

    V. Lazarova; R. Nogueira; J. Manem; Melo, L. F.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of dissolved oxygen concentration in nitrification kinetics was studied in a new biofilm reactor, the circulating bed reactor (CBR). The study was carried out partly at laboratory scale with synthetic water containing inorganic carbon and nitrogen compounds, and partly at pilot scale for secondary and tertiary nitrification of municipal wastewater. The experimental results showed that, either the ammonia or the oxygen concentration could be limiting for the nitrification rate...

  6. COMPARISON OF PHENOL REMOVAL IN ANAEROBIC FLUIDIZED BED REACTORS WITH SAND AND GAC MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Yazdanbakhsh; A.R. Mesdaghinia; A. Torabian; M. Shariat

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study two identical anaerobic completely mixed fluidized bed reactors with GAC and sand media were employed for COD & phenol removal. At loading rate of 1.6 g phenol L-1d-1, the efficiency of phenol removal in GAC & sand reactors were 97.7% & 74%, respectively. At high loading rate of phenol (6.09 g phenol I: 1d1 the efficiency of phenol removal in GAC reactor was better than 95%. In GAC reactor, the main mechanism for phenol removal at steady state condition was biological process; this was concluded through balance of gas production and COD removal. Better efficiency of GAC reactor comparing with sand reactor was because of resistance to fluctuations, higher surface for biomass growth and adsorption capacity of activated carbon.

  7. Solution of heat removal from nuclear reactors by natural convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zitek Pavel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the basis for the solution of heat removal by natural convection from both conventional nuclear reactors and reactors with fuel flowing coolant (such as reactors with molten fluoride salts MSR.The possibility of intensification of heat removal through gas lift is focused on. It might be used in an MSR (Molten Salt Reactor for cleaning the salt mixture of degassed fission products and therefore eliminating problems with iodine pitting. Heat removal by natural convection and its intensification increases significantly the safety of nuclear reactors. Simultaneously the heat removal also solves problems with lifetime of pumps in the primary circuit of high-temperature reactors.

  8. From field to factory-Taking advantage of shop manufacturing for the pebble bed modular reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The move of nuclear plant construction from the field to the factory for small, advanced pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR) designs has significant benefits compared to traditional light water reactor (LWR) field oriented designs. The use of modular factory construction techniques has a growing economic benefit over time through well-established process learning applications. This paper addresses the basic PBMR design objectives and commercialization model that drive this approach; provides a brief technical description of the PBMR design and layout with representative CAD views and discusses derived figures of merit highlighting the relative simplicity of PBMR compared to a modern LWR. The discussion emphasizes that more of PBMR can be built in the factory due to the simple design of a direct helium Brayton cycle compared to an indirect LWR steam cycle with its associated equipment. For the PBMR design there are fewer and less cumbersome auxiliary and safety systems with their attendant support requirements. Additionally, the labor force economic efficiency for nuclear projects is better in the factory than in the field, including consideration of labor costs and nuclear quality programs. Industrial learning is better in the factory because of the more controlled environment, mechanization optimization opportunities and because of the more stable labor force compared to the field. Supply chain benefits are more readily achievable with strategic contracts for module suppliers. Although building a nuclear power plant is not a typical high volume manufacturing process, for the PBMR-type of plant, with its high degree of standardization and relatively small, simplified design, the shift to factory work has a significant impact on overall project cost due to earlier identification and better coordination of parallel construction paths. This is in stark contrast to the construction of a large LWR in the past. Finally, the PBMR modular plant concept continues at the

  9. High-temperature and breeder reactors - economic nuclear reactors of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis begins with a review of the theory of nuclear fission and sections on the basic technology of nuclear reactors and the development of the first generation of gas-cooled reactors applied to electricity generation. It then deals in some detail with currently available and suggested types of high temperature reactor and with some related subsidiary issues such as the coupling of different reactor systems and various schemes for combining nuclear reactors with chemical processes (hydrogenation, hydrogen production, etc.), going on to discuss breeder reactors and their application. Further sections deal with questions of cost, comparison of nuclear with coal- and oil-fired stations, system analysis of reactor systems and the effect of nuclear generation on electricity supply. (C.J.O.G.)

  10. Core design of NPP Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) type using computer code MCNP-5 for beginning of life (BOL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The core design of Nuclear Power Plant for Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) type with 70 MWe capacity power in Beginning of Life (BOL) has been performed. The aim of this analysis, to know percent enrichment, temperature distribution and safety value by negative temperature coefficient at type PBMR if reactor power become lower equal to 70 MWe. This analysis was expected become one part of overview project development the power plant with 10.000 MWe of total capacity, spread evenly in territory of Indonesia especially to support of smelter industries. The results showed that, effective multiplication factor (keff) with power 70 MWe critical condition at enrichment 5,626 % is 1,00031±0, 00087, based on enrichment result, a value of the temperature coefficient reactivity is 10,0006 pcm/K. Based on the results of these studies, it can be concluded that the PBMR 70 MWe design is theoretically safe. (author)

  11. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, L.K.; Alper, N.I.

    1994-11-22

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump. 1 fig.

  12. Request for Naval Reactors Comment on Proposed Prometheus Space Flight Nuclear Reactor High Tier Reactor Safety Requirements and for Naval Reactors Approval to Transmit These Requirements to JPL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Kokkinos

    2005-04-28

    The purpose of this letter is to request Naval Reactors comments on the nuclear reactor high tier requirements for the PROMETHEUS space flight reactor design, pre-launch operations, launch, ascent, operation, and disposal, and to request Naval Reactors approval to transmit these requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory to ensure consistency between the reactor safety requirements and the spacecraft safety requirements. The proposed PROMETHEUS nuclear reactor high tier safety requirements are consistent with the long standing safety culture of the Naval Reactors Program and its commitment to protecting the health and safety of the public and the environment. In addition, the philosophy on which these requirements are based is consistent with the Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group recommendations on space nuclear propulsion safety (Reference 1), DOE Nuclear Safety Criteria and Specifications for Space Nuclear Reactors (Reference 2), the Nuclear Space Power Safety and Facility Guidelines Study of the Applied Physics Laboratory.

  13. Carbon Shale Combustion in the Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olek Małgorzata

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to present the possibilities of coal shale combustion in furnaces with bubbling fluidized bed. Coal shale can be autothermally combusted in the fluidized bed, despite the low calorie value and high ash content of fuel. Established concentrations of CO (500 ppm and VOC (30 mg/m3 have indicated a high conversion degree of combustible material during combustion process. Average concentrations of SO2 and NOx in the flue gas were higher than this received from the combustion of high quality hard coal, 600 ppm and 500 ppm, respectively. Optional reduction of SO2 and NOx emission may require the installation of flue gas desulphurization and de-NOx systems.

  14. Design of Complex Systems to Achieve Passive Safety: Natural Circulation Cooling of Liquid Salt Pebble Bed Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlat, Raluca Olga

    This dissertation treats system design, modeling of transient system response, and characterization of individual phenomena and demonstrates a framework for integration of these three activities early in the design process of a complex engineered system. A system analysis framework for prioritization of experiments, modeling, and development of detailed design is proposed. Two fundamental topics in thermal-hydraulics are discussed, which illustrate the integration of modeling and experimentation with nuclear reactor design and safety analysis: thermal-hydraulic modeling of heat generating pebble bed cores, and scaled experiments for natural circulation heat removal with Boussinesq liquids. The case studies used in this dissertation are derived from the design and safety analysis of a pebble bed fluoride salt cooled high temperature nuclear reactor (PB-FHR), currently under development in the United States at the university and national laboratories level. In the context of the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) methodology, new tools and approaches are proposed and demonstrated here, which are specifically relevant to technology in the early stages of development, and to analysis of passive safety features. A system decomposition approach is proposed. Definition of system functional requirements complements identification and compilation of the current knowledge base for the behavior of the system. Two new graphical tools are developed for ranking of phenomena importance: a phenomena ranking map, and a phenomena identification and ranking matrix (PIRM). The functional requirements established through this methodology were used for the design and optimization of the reactor core, and for the transient analysis and design of the passive natural circulation driven decay heat removal system for the PB-FHR. A numerical modeling approach for heat-generating porous media, with multi-dimensional fluid flow is presented. The application of this modeling

  15. Sludge combustion in fluidized bed reactors at laboratory scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combustion of a dried sewage sludge in laboratory scale fluidized bed has been studied in Naples by the Istituto di ricerche sulla combustione (Irc) in the framework of a National project named Thermal Process with Energy Recovery to be used in laboratory and pre-pilot scale apparatus. The attention has been focused on emissions of unreacted carbon as elutriated fines, on the emissions of pollutant gases and on the assessment of the inventory of fly- and bottom ashes. The combustion behaviour of sewage sludge has been compared with those of a market available Tyre Derived Fuel (TDF) and a biomass from Mediterranean area (Robinia Pseudoacacia) and with that of a South African bituminous coal. Stationary combustion tests were carried out at 8500 C by feeding particles in the size range 0-1 mm into a bed of silica sand without any sorbent addition. The fluidized bed combustor has been operated, at a superficial gas velocity of 0.4 m/s and different excesses of air ranging between 14 and 98%. Relatively high combustion efficiency, larger than 98.9% has been obtained in experiments carried out with sewage sludge and excess of air larger than 20%. These values, are comparable with those obtained in previously experimental activity carried out under similar operative conditions with a South Africa Bituminous coal (97-98%). It is larger than those obtained by using a Tyre Derived Fuel (89-90%) and the Robinia Pseudoacacia Biomass (93-93%). The relative importance of carbon fines elutriation, CO emissions and volatile bypassing the bed in determining the loss of combustion efficiency has been evaluated for the different fuels tested

  16. Mathematical model of processes of reactor with gasified fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An original scheme of steam generator with gasifying fluidized bed has been presented as a possible solution for reconstruction of furnace with pulverized burning of coal. The method is effective when applied in combination with desulfurization for the purpose of reducing the CO2 emissions level. A mathematical model has been developed, which determines the correlation primary (fluidizing) and (burning out) secondary air with sufficient for the practice accuracy

  17. Gasification of wood in a fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, L.C. de; Marti, T.; Frankenhaeuser, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    A first series of gasification experiments with our fluidized bed gasifier was performed using clean sawdust as fuel. The installation and the analytical systems were tested in a parametric study in which gasification temperature and equivalence ratio were varied. The data acquired will serve to establish the differences between the gasification of clean wood and the gasification of Altholz (scrapwood) and wood/plastics mixtures. (author) 1 fig., 3 tabs., 5 refs.

  18. Rotary Bed Reactor for Chemical-Looping Combustion with Carbon Capture. Part 1: Reactor Design and Model Development

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong

    2013-01-17

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel and promising technology for power generation with inherent CO2 capture. Currently, almost all of the research has been focused on developing CLC-based interconnected fluidized-bed reactors. In this two-part series, a new rotary reactor concept for gas-fueled CLC is proposed and analyzed. In part 1, the detailed configuration of the rotary reactor is described. In the reactor, a solid wheel rotates between the fuel and air streams at the reactor inlet and exit. Two purging sectors are used to avoid the mixing between the fuel stream and the air stream. The rotary wheel consists of a large number of channels with copper oxide coated on the inner surface of the channels. The support material is boron nitride, which has high specific heat and thermal conductivity. Gas flows through the reactor at elevated pressure, and it is heated to a high temperature by fuel combustion. Typical design parameters for a thermal capacity of 1 MW have been proposed, and a simplified model is developed to predict the performances of the reactor. The potential drawbacks of the rotary reactor are also discussed. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  19. CFD Simulation of Pilot HDS Trickle-Bed Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Tukač, V.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study is to compare experimental measurement obtained by RTD method with result of computational model. The goal of this work is to evaluate influence of dilution extent on operation of pilot test reactor and to forecast interaction between intrinsic reaction kinetic, hydrodynamics and mass transfer.

  20. A comparative study of sequencing batch reactor and moving-bed sequencing batch reactor for piggery wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwannate Sombatsompop

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to comparatively study the efficiency of piggery wastewater treatment by the moving-bed sequencing batch reactor (moving-bed SBR system with held medium, and the conventional sequencing batch reactor (SBR system, by varying the organic load from 0.59 to 2.36 kgCOD/m3.d. The COD treatment efficiency of the SBR and moving-bed SBR was higher than 60% at an organic load of 0.59 kgCOD/m3.d and higher than 80% at the organic loads of 1.18-2.36 kgCOD/m3.d. The BOD removal efficiency was greater than 90% at high organic loads of 1.18-2.36 kgCOD/m3.d. The moving-bed SBR gave TKN removal efficiency of 86-93%, whereas the SBR system exhibited the removal efficiency of 75-87% at all organic loads. The amount of effluent suspended solids for SBR systems exceeded the piggery wastewater limit of 200 mg/L at the organic load of 2.36 kgCOD/m3.d while that for the moving-bed SBR system did not. When the organic load was increased, the moving-bed SBR system yielded better treatment efficiency than that of the SBR system. The wastewater treated by the moving-bed SBR system met the criteria of wastewater standard for pig farms at all organic loads, while that treated by the SBR system was not satisfactory at a high organic load of 2.36 kgCOD/m3.d.

  1. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Measurements in Nuclear Reactor Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Brian T.

    Several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs, such as the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD), Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC), Light Water Reactor Sustainability, and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants (NGNP), are investigating new fuels, materials, and inspection paradigms for advanced and existing reactors. A key objective of such programs is to understand the performance of these fuels and materials during irradiation. In DOE-NE's FCRD program, ultrasonic based technology was identified as a key approach that should be pursued to obtain the high-fidelity, high-accuracy data required to characterize the behavior and performance of new candidate fuels and structural materials during irradiation testing. The radiation, high temperatures, and pressure can limit the available tools and characterization methods. In this thesis, two ultrasonic characterization techniques will be explored. The first, finite amplitude wave propagation has been demonstrated to be sensitive to microstructural material property changes. It is a strong candidate to determine fuel evolution; however, it has not been demonstrated for in-situ reactor applications. In this thesis, finite amplitude wave propagation will be used to measure the microstructural evolution in Al-6061. This is the first demonstration of finite amplitude wave propagation at temperatures in excess of 200 °C and during an irradiation test. Second, a method based on contact nonlinear acoustic theory will be developed to identify compressed cracks. Compressed cracks are typically transparent to ultrasonic wave propagation; however, by measuring harmonic content developed during finite amplitude wave propagation, it is shown that even compressed cracks can be characterized. Lastly, piezoelectric transducers capable of making these measurements are developed. Specifically, three piezoelectric sensors (Bismuth Titanate, Aluminum Nitride, and Zinc Oxide) are tested in the Massachusetts

  2. Decision aid systems for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of new techniques, especially in the field of artificial intelligence, makes it possible to design more powerful computerized systems, supporting tasks related to the design and operation of nuclear power plants. The potential contribution and perspectives for the integration of such systems depend upon whether the improvement of existing plants, the design of next generation reactors or future projects are concerned. We present four systems which show the state-of-the-art as regards knowledge-based systems. The first system is related to the automatic generation of procedures dealing with loss of electrical sources. The second one aims at assisting the power plant utility in following the technical specifications during maintenance operations. Finally, the last two are designed to help an emergency team evaluate and forecast the evolution of an accidental situation in a nuclear reactor. Perspectives for on-line operator assistance are then discussed, as well as the main technical themes which will make it possible to design such systems. We conclude with the difficulties which are encountered upon the integration of these tools: their validation and task sharing between man and machine

  3. Methane reforming with fast nuclear reactor steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper considers the concept of utilizing nuclear fast reactor (FR) with a sodium coolant for methane steam reforming. Steam conditions of a power FR, e.g. the BN-600 now operating in Russia: steam pressure P=13.2 MPa and steam temperature T=500degC, do not absolutely comply with the catalytic reactor working parameters, which produces a synthetic gas (syngas), a mix of hydrogen and carbon oxide. In this connection, the present paper addresses a possibility of utilizing steam produced in one of three independent the BN-600 loops in an amount of 640 t/h for preparing a gas-steam mixture with T=500degC and its additional heating in a converter up to the operating temperature, T=850degC, at the expense of natural gas burning or electrical energy supplying. In this case, the fraction of burned natural gas burning or electrical energy supplying. In this case, the fraction of burned natural gas significantly decreases. It is estimated that steam parameters of the BN-600 afford to obtain ∼3·105 nm3/h of hydrogen. It is also considered a concept of nuclear heat transfer to remote regions to be achieved with the aid of syngas incoming from the converter, its cooling further and transmitting through a pipeline to the place of its utilization, where it is restored into methane with the heat extraction. (author)

  4. Data acquisition system for nuclear reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have designed an online real time data acquisition system for nuclear reactor environment monitoring. Data acquisition system has eight channels of analog signals and one channel of pulsed input signal from detectors like GM Tube, or any other similar input. Connectivity between the data acquisition system and environmental parameters monitoring computer is made through a wireless data communication link of 151 MHz/100 mW RF power and 10 km maximum communication range for remote data telemetry. Sensors used are gamma ionizing radiation sensor made from CsI:Tl scintillator, atmospheric pressure sensor with +/-0.1 mbar precision, temperature sensor with +/-l milli degree Celsius precision, relative humidity with +/-0.1RH precision, pulse counts with +/-1 count in 0-10000 Hz count rate measurement precision and +/-1 count is accumulated count measurement precision. The entire data acquisition system and wireless telemetry system is 9 V battery powered and the device is to be fitted on a wireless controlled mobile robot for scanning the nuclear reactor zone from remote. Wireless video camera has been planned for integration into the existing system on a later date for moving the robotics environmental data acquisition system beyond human vision reach. System development cost is Rs.25 Lacs and has been developed for Department of Atomic Energy, Government of India and Indian Defense use. (author)

  5. Nuclear reactors: Notifiable events in 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notifiable events in nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany are reported to the regulatory authorities under the Atomic Energy Act in accordance with standardized national reporting criteria, and are recorded centrally. The binding legal provisions covering these reports can be found in the Nuclear Safety Commissioner and Reporting Ordinance (AtSMV). On an international level, events are classified in the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) comprising eight levels. The four quarterly reports covering 2002 include 167 notifiable events for nuclear power plants in operation and in the decommissioning stage. Of these events, 157 are in reporting category N (normal), while ten are in reporting category E (urgent). No events have been reported in category S (immediate). 154 events are INES level 0, 13 events are INES level 1. 13 category-N events were reported for research reactors. All of them are INES level 0. There were no releases of radioactive material above the licensed levels for ex-vent air and liquid effluents. (orig.)

  6. Magnetically stabilized bed reactor for selective hydrogenation of olefins in reformate with amorphous nickel alloy catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuhong; Mu; Enze; Min

    2007-01-01

    A magnetically stabilized bed (MSB) reactor for selective hydrogenation of olefins in reformate was developed by combining the advantages of MSB and amorphous nickel alloy catalyst. The effects of operating conditions, such as temperature, pressure, liquid space velocity, hydrogen-to-oil ratio, and magnetic field intensity on the reaction were studied. A mathematical model of MSB reactor for hydrogenation of olefins in reformate was established. A reforming flow scheme with a post-hydrogenation MSB reactor was proposed. Finally, MSB hydrogenation was compared with clay treatment and conventional post-hydrogenation.

  7. Improved performance of parallel surface/packed-bed discharge reactor for indoor VOCs decomposition: optimization of the reactor structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Hui, Chun-Xue; Li, Jie; Lu, Na; Shang, Ke-Feng; Wu, Yan; Mizuno, Akira

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a high-efficiency air-cleaning system for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) existing in the workshop of a chemical factory. A novel parallel surface/packed-bed discharge (PSPBD) reactor, which utilized a combination of surface discharge (SD) plasma with packed-bed discharge (PBD) plasma, was designed and employed for VOCs removal in a closed vessel. In order to optimize the structure of the PSPBD reactor, the discharge characteristic, benzene removal efficiency, and energy yield were compared for different discharge lengths, quartz tube diameters, shapes of external high-voltage electrode, packed-bed discharge gaps, and packing pellet sizes, respectively. In the circulation test, 52.8% of benzene was removed and the energy yield achieved 0.79 mg kJ-1 after a 210 min discharge treatment in the PSPBD reactor, which was 10.3% and 0.18 mg kJ-1 higher, respectively, than in the SD reactor, 21.8% and 0.34 mg kJ-1 higher, respectively, than in the PBD reactor at 53 J l-1. The improved performance in benzene removal and energy yield can be attributed to the plasma chemistry effect of the sequential processing in the PSPBD reactor. The VOCs mineralization and organic intermediates generated during discharge treatment were followed by CO x selectivity and FT-IR analyses. The experimental results indicate that the PSPBD plasma process is an effective and energy-efficient approach for VOCs removal in an indoor environment.

  8. The effect of operational conditions on the hydrodynamic characteristics of the sludge bed in UASB reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leitao, R.C.; Santaellla, S.T.; Haandel, van A.C.; Zeeman, G.; Lettinga, G.

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to evaluate the hydrodynamic properties of the sludge bed of Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors based on its settleability and expansion characteristics. The methodologies used for the evaluation of the settleability of aerobic activated sludge, and for the expansibility

  9. The influence of particle residence time distribution on the reactivity in fluidized bed reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesink, A.B.M.; Klaus, J.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of particle residence time distribution on the average conversion rate (or reactivity) of particles undergoing a non-catalytic gas-solid reaction inside a continuously operated fluidized bed reactor is evaluated. A so called ß-factor is defined as the ratio of the actual reactivity in

  10. Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass in a Fluidized Bed Reactor: In Situ Filtering of the Vapors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Elly; Hogendoorn, Kees J.A.; Wang, Xiaoquan; Westerhof, Roel J.M.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Swaaij, van Wim P.M.; Groeneveld, Michiel J.

    2009-01-01

    A system to remove in situ char/ash from hot pyrolysis vapors has been developed and tested at the University of Twente. The system consists of a continuous fluidized bed reactor (0.7 kg/h) with immersed filters (wire mesh, pore size 5 μm) for extracting pyrolysis vapors. Integration of the filter s

  11. Selenate removal in methanogenic and sulfate-reducing upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenz, M.; Hullebusch, van E.D.; Hommes, G.; Corvini, P.F.X.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper evaluates the use of upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) bioreactors (30 degrees C, pH = 7.0) to remove selenium oxyanions from contaminated waters (790 mu g Se L-1) under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions using lactate as electron donor. One UASB reactor received sulfate at dif

  12. A two-stage ethanol-based biodiesel production in a packed bed reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yuan; Nordblad, Mathias; Woodley, John

    2012-01-01

    A two-stage enzymatic process for producing fatty acid ethyl ester (FAEE) in a packed bed reactor is reported. The process uses an experimental immobilized lipase (NS 88001) and Novozym 435 to catalyze transesterification (first stage) and esterification (second stage), respectively. Both stages...

  13. Modelling of packed bed membrane reactors for autothermal production of ultrapure hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemersma, T.P.; Patil, C.S.; Sint Annaland, van M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The conceptual feasibility of a packed bed membrane reactor for the autothermal reforming (ATR) of methane for the production of ultrapure hydrogen was investigated. By integrating H2 permselective Pd-based membranes under autothermal conditions, a high degree of process integration and intensificat

  14. Membrane assisted fluidized bed reactor: experimental demonstration for partial oxidation of methanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshmukh, Salim Abdul Rashid Khan

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis the reactor concept has been developed on the basis of an experimental study on the effect of fluidization conditions on the membrane permeation rate in a MAFBR, the extent of gas back mixing and the tube-to-bed heat transfer rates in the presence of membrane bundles with and without

  15. Microbiological and chemical approaches to degradation of mecoprop in a Moving-Bed Biofilm-Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escola, Monica; Tue Kjærgaard Nielsen, Tue; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg;

    Micro-pollutants are ubiquitous in wastewater effluents. Therefore, in-situ treatments of highly polluted water or polishing treatments after classical wastewater treatment have been proposed as a solution. Moving Bed Biofilm-Reactors (MBBRs) are a recent-developed biofilm technology for wastewater...

  16. Post-treatment of Fly Ash by Ozone in a Fixed Bed Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Hougaard; Melia, M. C.; Jensen, Anker Degn;

    2009-01-01

    prevents the AEA to be adsorbed. In the present work, two fly ashes have been ozonated in a fixed bed reactor and the results showed that ozonation is a potential post-treatment method that can lower the AEA requirements of a fly ash up to 6 times. The kinetics of the carbon oxidation by ozone was found...

  17. Nuclear-safety criteria and specifications for space nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The policy of the United States for all US nuclear power sources in space is to ensure that the probability of release of radioactive material and the amounts released are such that an undue risk is not presented, considering the benefits of the mission. The objective of this document is to provide safety criteria which a mission/reactor designer can use to help ensure that the design is acceptable from a radiological safety standpoint. These criteria encompass mission design, reactor design, and radiological impact limitation requirements for safety, and the documentation required. They do not address terrestrial operations, occupational safety or system reliability except where the systems are important for radiological safety. Specific safety specifications based on these criteria shall also be generated and made part of contractual requirements

  18. Treatment of domestic wastewater in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor followed by moving bed biofilm reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Tawfik, A.; El-Gohary, F.; Temmink, B.G.

    2010-01-01

    The performance of a laboratory-scale sewage treatment system composed of an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) at a temperature of (22-35 A degrees C) was evaluated. The entire treatment system was operated at different hydraulic retention times (HRT's) of 13.3, 10 and 5.0 h. An overall reduction of 80-86% for CODtotal; 51-73% for CODcolloidal and 20-55% for CODsoluble was found at a total HRT of 5-10 h, respectively. By prolonging the HRT...

  19. Conversion enhancement of tubular fixed-bed reactor for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis using static mixer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Phavanee Narataruksa; Sabaithip Tungkamani; Karn Pana-Suppamassadu; Phongsak Keeratiwintakorn; Siriluck Nivitchanyong; Piyapong Hunpinyo; Hussanai Sukkathanyawat; Prayut Jiamrittiwong; Visarut Nopparat

    2012-01-01

    Recently,Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) has become an interesting technology because of its potential role in producing biofuels via Biomassto-Liquids (BTL) processes.In Fischer-Tropsch (FT) section,biomass-derived syngas,mainly composed of a mixture of carbon monoxide (CO)and hydrogen (H2),is converted into various forms of hydrocarbon products over a catalyst at specified temperature and pressure.Fixed-bed reactors are typically used for these processes as conventional FT reactors.The fixed-bed or packed-bed type reactor has its drawbacks,which are heat transfer limitation,i.e.a hot spot problem involved highly exothermic characteristics of FT reaction,and mass transfer limitation due to the condensation of liquid hydrocarbon products occurred on catalyst surface.This work is initiated to develop a new chemical reactor design in which a better distribution of gaseous reactants and hydrocarbon products could be achieved,and led to higher throughput and conversion.The main goal of the research is the enhancement of a fixed-bed reactor,focusing on the application of KenicsTM static mixer insertion in the tubular packed-bed reactor.Two FTS experiments were carried out using two reactors i.e.,with and without static mixer insertion within catalytic beds.The modeled syngas used was a mixed gas composed of H2/CO in 2 ∶ 1 molar ratio that was fed at the rate of 30 mL(STP)·min-1 (GHSV ≈ 136 mL·g-1cat·h-1) into the fixed Ru supported aluminum catalyst bed of weight 13.3 g.The reaction was carried out at 180 ℃ and atmospheric pressure continuously for 36 h for both experiments.Both transient and steady-state conversions (in terms of time on stream) were reported.The results revealed that the steady-state CO conversion for the case using the static mixer was approximately 3.5 times higher than that of the case without static mixer.In both cases,the values of chain growth probability of hydrocarbon products (α) for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were 0.92 and 0.89 for

  20. Fluidized-bed atomic layer deposition reactor for the synthesis of core-shell nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of a fluidized bed atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor is described in detail. The reactor consists of three parts that have all been placed in one protective cabinet: precursor dosing, reactor, and residual gas treatment section. In the precursor dosing section, the chemicals needed for the ALD reaction are injected into the carrier gas using different methods for different precursors. The reactor section is designed in such a way that a homogeneous fluidized bed can be obtained with a constant, actively controlled, reactor pressure. Furthermore, no filters are required inside the reactor chamber, minimizing the risk of pressure increase due to fouling. The residual gas treatment section consists of a decomposition furnace to remove residual precursor and a particle filter and is installed to protect the pump. In order to demonstrate the performance of the reactor, SiO2 particles have been coated with TiO2 using tetrakis-dimethylamino titanium (TDMAT) and H2O as precursors. Experiments with varying pulse times show that saturated growth can be obtained with TDMAT pulse times larger than 600 s. Analysis of the powder with High-Angle Annular Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF-STEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed that after 50 cycles, all SiO2 particles were coated with a 1.6 nm homogenous shell of TiO2

  1. Comparison of the Effects of Fluidized-Bed and Fixed-Bed Reactors in Microwave-Assisted Catalytic Decomposition of TCE by Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Lili Ren; Jin Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) decomposition by hydrogen with microwave heating under different reaction systems was investigated. The activities of a series of catalysts for microwave-assisted TCE hydrodechlorination were tested through the fixed-bed and the fluidized-bed reactor systems. This study found that the different reaction system is suitable for different catalyst type. And there is an interactive relationship between the catalyst type and the reaction bed type.

  2. Comparison of the Effects of Fluidized-Bed and Fixed-Bed Reactors in Microwave-Assisted Catalytic Decomposition of TCE by Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Ren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichloroethylene (TCE decomposition by hydrogen with microwave heating under different reaction systems was investigated. The activities of a series of catalysts for microwave-assisted TCE hydrodechlorination were tested through the fixed-bed and the fluidized-bed reactor systems. This study found that the different reaction system is suitable for different catalyst type. And there is an interactive relationship between the catalyst type and the reaction bed type.

  3. Chlorination of commercial molybdenite concentrate in a fluidized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, K. U.; Sathiyamoorthy, D.; Bose, D. K.; Sundaresan, M.; Gupta, C. K.

    1987-06-01

    Studies on recovery of molybdenum from commercial grade molybdenite using the technique of fluidized bed chlorination in the presence of oxygen are presented. Molybdenum recovery above 99 pct at a chlorine utilization efficiency of 84 pct has been achieved for a fluidizing gas flow-rate of 3 L/min of the gases Cl2, O2, and N2 mixed in the proportion of 2∶5∶23, respectively, at 300 °C. The investigations on kinetics showed that the overall oxychlorination reaction is controlled by chemical reaction and is of first order with respect to particle surface area.

  4. On the selfacting safe limitation of fission power and fuel temperature in innovative nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy probably will not contribute significantly to the future worldwide energy supply until it can be made catastrophe-free. Therefore it has to be shown, that the consequences of even largest accidents will have no major impact to the environment of a power plant. In this paper one of the basic conditions for such a nuclear technology is discussed. Using mainly the modular pebble-bed high-temperature reactor as an example, the design principles, analytical methods and the level of knowledge as given today in controlling reactivity accidents by inherent safety features of innovative nuclear reactors are described. Complementary possibilities are shown to reach this goal with systems of different types of construction. Questions open today and resulting requirements for future activities are discussed. Today's knowledge credibly supports the possibility of a catastrophe-free nuclear technology with respect to reactivity events. (orig.)

  5. Trickle bed reactor model to simulate the performance of commercial diesel hydrotreating unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Murali; R.K. Voolapalli; N. Ravichander; D.T. Gokak; N.V. Choudary [Bharat Petroleum Corporation Ltd., Udyog Kendra (India). Corporate R& amp; D Centre

    2007-05-15

    A two phase mathematical model was developed to simulate the performance of bench scale and commercial hydrotreating reactors. Major hydrotreating reactions, namely, hydrodesulphurization, hydrodearomatization and olefins saturation were modeled. Experiments were carried out in a fixed bed reactor to study the effect of different process variables and these results were used for estimating kinetic parameters. Significant amount of feed vaporization (20-50%) was estimated under normal operating conditions of DHDS suggesting the importance of considering feed vaporization in DHDS modeling. The model was validated with plant operating data, under close to ultra low sulphur levels by correctly accounting for feed vaporization in heat balance relations and appropriate use of hydrodynamic correlations. The model could predict the product quality, reactor bed temperature profiles and chemical hydrogen consumption in commercial plant adequately. 14 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Development of an Internally Circulating Fluidized Bed Membrane Reactor for Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Dong-lai; GRACE John R; LIM C Jim

    2006-01-01

    An innovative Internally Circulating Fluidized Bed Membrane Reactor (ICFBMR) was designed and operated for ultra-pure hydrogen production from natural gas. The reactor includes internal catalyst solids circulation for conveying heat between a reforming zone and an oxidation zone. In the reforming zone, catalyst particles are transported upwards by reactant gas where steam reforming reactions are taking place and hydrogen is permeating through the membrane surfaces. Air is injected into the oxidation zone to generate heat which is carried by catalyst particles to the reforming zone supporting the endothermic steam reforming reaction. The technology development process is introduced: cold model test,pilot plant and industrial demonstration unit. The process flow diagram and key components of each unit are described.The ICFBMR process has the potential to provide improved performance relative to conventional SMR fixed-bed tubular reactors.

  7. Cleaning of porous filters in fossilized bed reactors; Estudio de limpieza de filtros porosos en reactores de lecho fluidizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigo Otero, A.; Sancho Rod, J.

    1965-07-01

    In this report are established the optimum working conditions of a filter cleaning system by blow back. For this purpose it was determined in the first place the blow back air rate necessary to have a good cleaning. The reasons for which it was not possible until now to control the pressure in a fluidized bed calcination reactor are analyzed and a criteria is established to calculate the optimum floe necessary to clean efficiently a porous by this procedures. (Author)

  8. Conceptual Design Studies of a Passively Safe Thorium Breeder Pebble Bed Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Wols, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear power plants are expected to play an important role in the worldwide electricity production in the coming decades, since they provide an economically attractive, reliable and low-carbon source of electricity with plenty of resources available for at least the coming hundreds of years. However, the design of nuclear reactors can be improved significantly in terms of safety, by designing reactors with fully passive safety systems, and sustainability, by making more efficient use of natu...

  9. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1988. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington Headquarters and field offices of DOE, from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations, from US and foreign embassies, and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book is divided into three major sections: Section 1 consists of a reactor locator map and reactor tables. Section 2 includes nuclear reactors that are operating, being built, or planned. Section 3 includes reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled

  10. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned: 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1987. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually for Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear regulatory Commission; from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The major change in this revision involves the data related to shutdown and dismantled facilities. Because this information serves substantially different purposes, it has been accumulated in a separate section, ''Reactors and Facilities Shutdown or Dismantled.'' Cancelled reactors or reactors whose progress has been terminated at some stage before operation are included in this section

  11. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1993. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: civilian, production, military, export, and critical assembly

  12. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1993. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: civilian, production, military, export, and critical assembly.

  13. Effect of Mass-Transport Limitations on the Performance of a Packed Bed Membrane Reactor for Partial Oxidations. Transport from the Membrane to the Packed Bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sint Annaland, van M.; Kürten, U.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    With a packed bed membrane reactor, the product yield can be significantly enhanced for partial oxidation systems, via distributive addition of oxygen to the reaction mixture along the axial coordinate of the reactor, provided that the reaction order in oxygen of the formation rate of the target pro

  14. CATALYTIC RECOMBINER FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L.D.P.

    1960-07-01

    A hydrogen-oxygen recombiner is described for use with water-boiler type reactors. The catalyst used is the wellknown platinized alumina, and the novelty lies in the structural arrangement used to prevent flashback through the gas input system. The recombiner is cylindrical, the gases at the input end being deflected by a baffle plate through a first flashback shield of steel shot into an annular passage adjacent to and extending the full length of the housing. Below the baffle plate the gases flow first through an outer annular array of alumina pellets which serve as a second flashback shield, a means of distributing the flowing gases evenly and as a means of reducing radiation losses to the walls. Thereafter the gases flow inio the centrally disposed catalyst bed where recombination is effected. The steam and uncombined gases flow into a centrally disposed cylindrical passage inside the catalyst bod and thereafter out through the exit port. A high rate of recombination is effected.

  15. Spent nuclear fuel discharges from U.S. reactors 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    Spent Nuclear Fuel Discharges from US Reactors 1994 provides current statistical data on fuel assemblies irradiated at commercial nuclear reactors operating in the US. This year`s report provides data on the current inventories and storage capacities at these reactors. Detailed statistics on the data are presented in four chapters that highlight 1994 spent fuel discharges, storage capacities and inventories, canister and nonfuel component data, and assembly characteristics. Five appendices, a glossary, and bibliography are also included. 10 figs., 34 tabs.

  16. Spent nuclear fuel discharges from U.S. reactors 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent Nuclear Fuel Discharges from US Reactors 1994 provides current statistical data on fuel assemblies irradiated at commercial nuclear reactors operating in the US. This year's report provides data on the current inventories and storage capacities at these reactors. Detailed statistics on the data are presented in four chapters that highlight 1994 spent fuel discharges, storage capacities and inventories, canister and nonfuel component data, and assembly characteristics. Five appendices, a glossary, and bibliography are also included. 10 figs., 34 tabs

  17. Pebble Bed Reactor Power Systems for Lunar Outposts: Long Operation Life and End-of Life Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Schriener, Timothy M.

    2010-09-01

    The Pellet Bed Reactor(PeBR) and power system for supporting future lunar outposts offer many desirable design, operation and safety features and address post operation storage of spent nuclear fuel. In addition to its long, full power operation life of 66 year, the PeBR is launched without fuel and loaded after placement below grade on the lunar surface with spherical fuel pellets, designed to fully contain fission products. The fuel pellets(~1.0 cm dia.) are launched separately in subcritical canisters. The post-operation PeBR is stored below grade for > 300 year to allow the radioactivity in the spent fuel to decay to a sufficiently low level. The PeBR power system, designed for avoidance of single point failures in reactor cooling and energy conversion, nominally generates ~100 kWe at a thermal efficiency of ~ 21%. In addition to the sectored reactor core, it uses three Closed Brayton Cycle loops with centrifugal flow turbo-machines for energy conversion and He-Xe(40 g/mol) binary gas mixture working fluid and reactor coolant.

  18. New reactor programs from passive to pebble bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruschi, H.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The market for new nuclear power plants is small and challenged by alternative means of electric power generation. Customers and countries may vary in their requirements for a new nuclear plant; but all have a common theme of seeking a design that possesses favorable economics. This paper sets forth the economic challenges a new nuclear plant must overcome. In particular, it delineates the capital cost, construction time, and generation cost required to compete with combined cycle gas electric power generation. The U.S. power generation market is used as a point of comparison. Following this, the portfolio of BNFL/ Westinghouse plant designs are described and the methods by which they will meet the economic challenges previously delineated will be discussed. The portfolio includes the family of passive plants originated by the AP600 Design Certification process in the U.S. These plants are marked by a high degree of safety and simplicity, short construction times, and superior economics. In addition, the effort to meet European requirements for passive plants will be described. Lastly, the paper explores some advanced nuclear designs that are not yet licensed, and the hope that they hold for meeting the industry challenge ahead. (author)

  19. Sludge Bed Granules’ Growth in the HUASB Reactor Treating High Strength Industrial Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Abood Habeeb

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of anaerobic sludge granules in a hybrid up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (HUASB reactor in terms of granular size and solids content was observed. After appropriate pre-treatment of the palm oil mill effluent (POME, it was continuously fed to the HUASB reactor under room temperature condition (27°C.  Particle size analysis and solids content examination were conducted for 196 days. A volatile solid ratio was ranging from 0.36 to 0.51 which was quite low, and granules particle size of less than 1 mm diameter was reported during the operating period. Results obtained in this study indicated that sludge bed development based on the sludge particle size distribution and the volatile solid ratio, was quite slow due to the bulk solids that entering the reactor resulting in certain inhibition of the anaerobes’ activity. It has been concluded that anaerobic wastewater treatment process in anaerobic reactors such as the HUASB reactor, can be significantly affected by the organic loading rate, hydraulic retention time applied to the reactor and the wastewater characteristics.

  20. Synthesis gas and zinc production in a noncatalytic packed-bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimi, A.A.; Ebrahim, H.A.; Jamshidi, E.; Faramarzi, A.H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    A noncatalytic packed-bed reactor has been constructed for management of the reduction of ZnO by methane, which leads to co-production of synthesis gas and zinc. The reactor consisted of a simple vertical pipe filled with ZnO pellets. These pellets underwent reaction with a pure methane flow. Experimental tests were conducted in the temperature range 860-995 C at atmospheric pressure in an electrically heated reactor. The results showed complete chemical conversion of methane to synthesis gas in the aforementioned temperature range. In addition, analysis of the product solids indicated that the collected solids in the outlet of the reactor were entirely zinc. The maximum methane flow rates (149-744 mL min{sup -1}) were adjusted to ensure complete chemical conversion of methane. These adjustments were performed for different bed heights at various operating temperatures. Analysis of the product gases revealed high quality synthesis gas production without the influence of methane cracking or other undesired side reactions in the experimental tests. Finally, the governing partial differential equations of the reactor modeling were solved by the finite element method. Consequently, the gaseous profiles along the reactor and the breakthrough curves were predicted and compared with the experimental tests. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Dynamics and Predictive Control of Gas Phase Propylene Polymerization in Fluidized Bed Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmad Shamiri; Mohamed azlan Hussain; Farouq sabri Mjalli; Navid Mostoufi; Seyedahmad Hajimolana

    2013-01-01

    A two-phase dynamic model, describing gas phase propylene polymerization in a fluidized bed reactor, was used to explore the dynamic behavior and process control of the polypropylene production rate and reactor temperature. The open loop analysis revealed the nonlinear behavior of the polypropylene fluidized bed reactor, jus-tifying the use of an advanced control algorithm for efficient control of the process variables. In this case, a central-ized model predictive control (MPC) technique was implemented to control the polypropylene production rate and reactor temperature by manipulating the catalyst feed rate and cooling water flow rate respectively. The corre-sponding MPC controller was able to track changes in the setpoint smoothly for the reactor temperature and pro-duction rate while the setpoint tracking of the conventional proportional-integral (PI) controller was oscillatory with overshoots and obvious interaction between the reactor temperature and production rate loops. The MPC was able to produce controller moves which not only were well within the specified input constraints for both control vari-ables, but also non-aggressive and sufficiently smooth for practical implementations. Furthermore, the closed loop dynamic simulations indicated that the speed of rejecting the process disturbances for the MPC controller were also acceptable for both controlled variables.

  2. Prospects for applications of ship-propulsion nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitenkov, F.M.

    1994-10-01

    The use of ship-propulsion nuclear power reactors in remote areas of Russia is examined. Two ship reactors were analyzed: the KLT-40, a 170 MW-thermal reactor; and the KN-3, a 300 MW-thermal reactor. The applications considered were electricity generation, desalination, and drinking water production. Analyses showed that the applications are technically justified and could be economically advantageous. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djurcic, Zelimir; Detwiler, Jason A.; Piepke, Andreas; Foster Jr., Vince R.; Miller, Lester; Gratta, Giorgio

    2008-08-06

    Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these quantities for commercial power plants and their impact on the calculated interaction rates in {bar {nu}}{sub e} detectors is examined. We discuss reactor-to-reactor correlations between the leading uncertainties, and their relevance to reactor {bar {nu}}{sub e} experiments.

  4. Inherently safe reactors and a second nuclear era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, A M; Spiewak, I

    1984-06-29

    The Swedish PIUS reactor and the German-American small modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor are inherently safe-that is, their safety relies not upon intervention of humans or of electromechanical devices but on immutable principles of physics and chemistry. A second nuclear era may require commercialization and deployment of such inherently safe reactors, even though existing light-water reactors appear to be as safe as other well-accepted sources of central electricity, particularly hydroelectric dams.

  5. Nuclear reactor materials at the atomic scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle A. Marquis

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available With the renewed interest in nuclear energy, developing new materials able to respond to the stringent requirements of the next-generation fission and future fusion reactors has become a priority. An efficient search for such materials requires detailed knowledge of material behaviour under irradiation, high temperatures and corrosive environments. Minimizing the rates of materials degradation will be possible only if the mechanisms by which it occurs are understood. Atomic-scale experimental probing as well as modelling can provide some answers and help predict in-service behaviour. This article illustrates how this approach has already improved our understanding of precipitation under irradiation, corrosion behaviour, and stress corrosion cracking. It is also now beginning to provide guidance for the development of new alloys.

  6. Research nuclear reactor start-up simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents the design and FPGA implementation of a research nuclear reactor start-up simulator. Its aim is to generate a set of signals that allow replacing the neutron detector for stimulated signals, to feed the measurement electronic of the start-up channels, to check its operation, together with the start-up security logic. The simulator presented can be configured on three independent channels and adjust the shape of the output pulses. Furthermore, each channel can be configured in 'rate' mode, where you can specify the growth rate of the pulse frequency in %/s. Result and details of the implementation on FPGA of the different functional blocks are given. (author)

  7. Control rod for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A control rod assembly for a nuclear reactor is disclosed having a remotely disengageable coupling between the control rod and the control rod drive shaft. The coupling is actuated by first lowering then raising the drive shaft. The described motion causes axial repositioning of a pin in a grooved rotatable cylinder, each being attached to different parts of the drive shaft which are axially movable relative to each other. In one embodiment, the relative axial motion of the parts of the drive shaft is used either to couple or to uncouple the connection by forcing resilient members attached to the drive shaft into or out of shouldered engagement, respectively, with an indentation formed in the control rod

  8. Nuclear reactors transients identification and classification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the study and test of a system capable to identify and classify transients in thermo-hydraulic systems, using a neural network technique of the self-organizing maps (SOM) type, with the objective of implanting it on the new generations of nuclear reactors. The technique developed in this work consists on the use of multiple networks to do the classification and identification of the transient states, being each network a specialist at one respective transient of the system, that compete with each other using the quantization error, that is a measure given by this type of neural network. This technique showed very promising characteristics that allow the development of new functionalities in future projects. One of these characteristics consists on the potential of each network, besides responding what transient is in course, could give additional information about that transient. (author)

  9. Neutron measurements at nuclear power reactors [55

    CERN Document Server

    Scherpelz, R I

    2002-01-01

    Staff from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (operated by Battelle Memorial Institute), have performed neutron measurements at a number of commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. Neutron radiation fields at light water reactor (LWR) power plants are typically characterized by low-energy distributions due to the presence of large amounts of scattering material such as water and concrete. These low-energy distributions make it difficult to accurately monitor personnel exposures, since most survey meters and dosimeters are calibrated to higher-energy fields such as those produced by bare or D sub 2 O-moderated sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf sources. Commercial plants typically use thermoluminescent dosimeters in an albedo configuration for personnel dosimetry and survey meters based on a thermal-neutron detector inside a cylindrical or spherical moderator for dose rate assessment, so their methods of routine monitoring are highly dependent on the energy of the neutron fields. Battelle has participate...

  10. Comparison of waste water treatment between completely mixed and fluidised bed reactor; development and structure of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toman, M.; Mejac, B.

    1988-08-01

    The aerobic biological treatment of waste water from production of semisynthetic antibiotics in a completely mixed reactor and in a fluidised bed reactor was studied. The formation and development of new biomass on the sand of a fluidised bed was observed, so that differences in the structure of organisms of the concomitant biocenosis could be detected. In a fluidised bed reactor the same quality of treatednwater was gained on account of a 4-5 times higher volumetric and hydraulic loading as it was the case with a conventional activated sludge plant. The biocenosis of the fluidised bed was abundant in individua and species. The biofilm of the sand depended on substrate degradation rate as well as on rubbing among the sand particles. An optimal biofilm developed on the sand of a fluidised bed reactor 10 to 15 days after the experiment had began, and that condition remained unchanged as the experiment continued.

  11. Nuclear reactor safety and Federal regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Public confidence in nuclear reactors requires that technical people translate complex safety information into a form that the public can understand well enough to make a judgment. An overall picture is drawn of the major areas of concern: (1) risks and safety measures, (2) government regulation, (3) licensing, (4) plant operation, (5) safety experience, and (6) quality assurance. Although the possibilities of a reactor core melting through the concrete containment barrier are slight, rigorous safety efforts are required. Government regulation and technical developments have developed concurrently so that the high standards set for government facilities can be carried over to commercial efforts. There are two stages in the licensing procedure: a construction permit and an operating license. Reviews of the proposed site, design, emergency cooling systems are all held, followed by a public hearing. Inspection and backfitting of new safety equipment are required in operating plants. The 60 plants now in operation have a good performance record, but good management for quality assurance increases safety and efficiency factors

  12. Structural integrity of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, John F.

    2013-09-01

    The paper starts from concerns expressed by Sir Alan Cottrell, in the early 1970s, related to the safety of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) proposed at that time for the next phase of electrical power generation. It proceeds to describe the design and operation of nuclear generation plant and gives details of the manufacture of PWR reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Attention is paid to stress-relief cracking and under-clad cracking, experienced with early RPVs, explaining the mechanisms for these forms of cracking and the means taken to avoid them. Particular note is made of the contribution of non-destructive inspection to structural integrity. Factors affecting brittle fracture in RPV steels are described: in particular, effects of neutron irradiation. The use of fracture mechanics to assess defect tolerance is explained, together with the failure assessment diagram embodied in the R6 procedure. There is discussion of the Master Curve and how it incorporates effects of irradiation on fracture toughness. Dangers associated with extrapolation of data to low probabilities are illustrated. The treatment of fatigue-crack growth is described, in the context of transients that may be experienced in the operation of PWR plant. Detailed attention is paid to the thermal shock associated with a large loss-of-coolant accident. The final section reviews the arguments advanced to justify 'Incredibility of Failure' and how these are incorporated in assessments of the integrity of existing plant and proposed 'new build' PWR pressure vessels.

  13. In-core instrument for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention concerns, in particular, an improvement for in-core equipments in a nuclear reactor having sliding members. Deposition layers of particles of metal carbides and metal nitrides are formed at the sliding surface of members in the in-core eqiupments. The matrix materials constituting the members are melted under irradiation of laser beams to form a welded layer integrated with the deposition layer. In this way, since the thickness of the welded layer is remarkably thin as compared with of the substrate material, when the irradiation of the laser beams is interrupted, corrosion resistance in water at high temperature can be improved remarkably since the melted portion is quenched and no chromium carbide is deposited at the crystal boudary. Accordingly, due to excellent corrosion resistance and abrasion resistance of the welded layer relative to the in-core equipments in the reactor having sliding surfaces, sliding incapability does not occur between each of the members under crevice conditions. Accordingly, no withdrawal incapability for equipments, for example, neutron monitors should occur upon periodical inspection. (I.S.)

  14. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned: 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1989. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE, from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations, from US and foreign embassies, and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. Information is presented in five parts, each of which is categorized by primary function or purpose: civilian, production, military, export, and critical assembly facilities

  15. Nuclear safety in light water reactors severe accident phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Sehgal, Bal Raj

    2011-01-01

    This vital reference is the only one-stop resource on how to assess, prevent, and manage severe nuclear accidents in the light water reactors (LWRs) that pose the most risk to the public. LWRs are the predominant nuclear reactor in use around the world today, and they will continue to be the most frequently utilized in the near future. Therefore, accurate determination of the safety issues associated with such reactors is central to a consideration of the risks and benefits of nuclear power. This book emphasizes the prevention and management of severe accidents to teach nuclear professionals

  16. Effect of static bed height in the upper fluidized bed on flow behavior in the lower riser section of a coupled reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dewu Wang; Chunxi Lu; Chaoyu Yan

    2009-01-01

    To study olefin reduction by using an auxiliary reactor for FCC naphtha upgrading, a large-scale cold model of a riser-bed coupled to an upper fluidized bed was established. The effect of static bed height in the upper fluidized bed on particle flow behavior in the lower riser was investigated experimentally. A restriction index of solids holdup was used to evaluate quantitatively the restrictive effect of the upper fluidized bed. Experimental results show that, under the restrictive effect of the upper fluidized bed, the riser could be divided into three regions in the longitudinal direction: accelerating, fully developed and restriction. The axial distribution of solids holdup in the riser is characterized by large solids holdup in the top and bottom sections and small solids holdup in the middle section. Overall solids holdup increased with increasing static bed height in the upper fluidized bed, while particle velocity decreased. Such restrictive effect of the upper fluidized bed could extend from the middle and top sections to the whole riser volume when riser outlet resistance is increased, which increases with increasing static bed height in the upper fluidized bed. The upper bed exerts the strongest restriction on the area close to the riser outlet.

  17. On-line interrogation of pebble bed reactor fuel using passive gamma-ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianwei

    The Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) is a helium-cooled, graphite-moderated high temperature nuclear power reactor. In addition to its inherently safe design, a unique feature of this reactor is its multipass fuel cycle in which graphite fuel pebbles (of varying enrichment) are randomly loaded and continuously circulated through the core until they reach their prescribed end-of-life burnup limit (˜80,000--100,000 MWD/MTU). Unlike the situation with conventional light water reactors (LWRs), depending solely on computational methods to perform in-core fuel management will be highly inaccurate. As a result, an on-line measurement approach becomes the only accurate method to assess whether a particular pebble has reached its end-of-life burnup limit. In this work, an investigation was performed to assess the feasibility of passive gamma-ray spectrometry assay as an approach for on-line interrogation of PBR fuel for the simultaneous determination of burnup and enrichment on a pebble-by-pebble basis. Due to the unavailability of irradiated or fresh pebbles, Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the gamma-ray spectra of the PBR fuel at various levels of burnup. A pebble depletion calculation was performed using the ORIGEN code, which yielded the gamma-ray source term that was introduced into the input of an MCNP simulation. The MCNP simulation assumed the use of a high-purity coaxial germanium detector. Due to the lack of one-group high temperature reactor cross sections for ORIGEN, a heterogeneous MCNP model was developed to describe a typical PBR core. Subsequently, the code MONTEBURNS was used to couple the MCNP model and ORIGEN. This approach allowed the development of the burnup-dependent, one-group spectral-averaged PBR cross sections to be used in the ORIGEN pebble depletion calculation. Based on the above studies, a relative approach for performing the measurements was established. The approach is based on using the relative activities of Np-239/I-132 in combination

  18. Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor -A New Perspective In Pulp And Paper Waste Water Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Vaidhegi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The pulp and paper mill effluent is one of the high polluting effluent amongst the effluents obtained from polluting industries. All the available methods for treatment of pulp and paper mill effluent have certain drawbacks. In this work, experiments were conducted to treat the pulp and paper mill effluent using moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR.The wastewater generated by these industries contains high COD, BOD, colour, organic substances and toxic chemicals. This study was carried out on laboratory scale Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor with proflex type biocarriers, where the biofilm grows on small, free floating plastic elements with a large surface area and a density slightly less than 1.0 g/cm3 . The reactor was operated continuously at 50% percentages filling of biocarriers. During the filling percentage, the removal efficiencies of COD & BOD were monitored at the time period of 2h, 4h, 6h and 8h. The result showed that the maximum COD and BOD removal of 87% were achieved for the 50 percent filling of biocarriers at the HRT of 8 h. From the experimental results, the moving bed biofilm reactor could be used as an ideal and efficient option for the organic and inorganic removal from the wastewater of pulp and paper industry

  19. Effect of wall structure on pebble stagnation behavior in pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • DEM study of wall structure role in preventing near wall crystallization is carried out. • Suggestions on pebble’s kinematic parameters and wall structure design are provided. • Triangle is better than arc and sawtooth shapes for wall structure design. • Wall structure size should be close to the scale of pebble diameter. • Suitable intervals can prevent crystallization without significantly increasing the flow resistance. - Abstract: Crystallization of pebbles in pebble bed is a crucial problem in high temperature gas-cooled pebble-bed reactors. This phenomenon usually happens along the internal surface and leads to a large number of stagnated pebbles, which poses a threat to reactor safety. In real reactor engineering, wall structures have been utilized to avoid this problem. This article verifies the crystallization phenomenon through DEM (discrete element method) simulation, and explains how wall structures work in preventing crystallization. Moreover, several kinematic parameters have been adopted to evaluate wall structures with different shapes, sizes and intervals. Detailed information shows the impact of wall structure on flow field in pebble bed. Lastly, the preferred characteristics of an effective wall structure are suggested for reactor engineering

  20. Hydrogen production by biomass gasification in supercritical water with a fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Y.J.; Jin, H.; Guo, L.J.; Zhang, X.M.; Cao, C.Q.; Guo, X. [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering (SKLMF), Xi' an Jiaotong University, 28 Xianning West Road, Xi' an 710049, Shaanxi (China)

    2008-11-15

    Hydrogen production by biomass gasification in supercritical water (SCW) is a promising technology for utilizing high moisture content biomass, but reactor plugging is a critical problem for biomass gasification in the tubular reactor. A novel SCW fluidized bed system for biomass gasification was developed successfully in State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering (SKLMF) to prevent the plugging and it was designed for the temperature up to 923 K and the pressure up to 30 MPa. Model compound (glucose) and real biomass (corn cob) were gasified under SCW conditions to generate hydrogen-rich fuel gas and a performance testing of the new SCW fluidized bed system was conducted. The product gas composed of H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, CO and small amount of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6} was obtained. The effects of solution concentration, temperature, pressure and oxidant concentration on gasification were studied. 30 wt% glucose and 18 wt% corn cob feedstocks were continually and stably gasified and reactor plugging was not observed. The results showed that using fluidized bed reactor for biomass gasification in SCW has many advantages and good prospects. (author)

  1. Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials: News for the Reactor Materials Crosscut, May 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science in Radiation and Dynamics Extremes

    2016-09-26

    In this newsletter for Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials, pages 1-3 cover highlights from the DOE-NE (Nuclear Energy) programs, pages 4-6 cover determining the stress-strain response of ion-irradiated metallic materials via spherical nanoindentation, and pages 7-8 cover theoretical approaches to understanding long-term materials behavior in light water reactors.

  2. Sustainable and safe nuclear fission energy technology and safety of fast and thermal nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Kessler, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Unlike existing books of nuclear reactor physics, nuclear engineering and nuclear chemical engineering this book covers a complete description and evaluation of nuclear fission power generation. It covers the whole nuclear fuel cycle, from the extraction of natural uranium from ore mines, uranium conversion and enrichment up to the fabrication of fuel elements for the cores of various types of fission reactors. This is followed by the description of the different fuel cycle options and the final storage in nuclear waste repositories. In addition the release of radioactivity under normal and possible accidental conditions is given for all parts of the nuclear fuel cycle and especially for the different fission reactor types.

  3. CO2 Absorption in a Lab-Scale Fixed Solid Bed Reactor: Modelling and Experimental Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gabbrielli

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The CO2 absorption in a lab-scale fixed solid bed reactor filled with different solid sorbents has been studied under different operative conditions regarding temperature (20-200°C and input gas composition (N2, O2, CO2, H2O at 1bar pressure. The gas leaving the reactor has been analysed to measure the CO2 and O2 concentrations and, consequently, to evaluate the overall CO2 removal efficiency. In order to study the influence of solid sorbent type (i.e. CaO, coal bottom ash, limestone and blast furnace slag and of mass and heat transfer processes on CO2 removal efficiency, a one-dimensional time dependent mathematical model of the reactor, which may be considered a Plug Flow Reactor, has been developed. The quality of the model has been confirmed using the experimental results.

  4. Biodegradation of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater by staged Moving Bed Biofilm Reactors (MBBR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escola Casas, Monica; Chhetri, Ravi Kumar; Ooi, Gordon Tze Hoong;

    2015-01-01

    for hospital wastewater treatment. To investigate the potential of such a hybrid system for the removal of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater a pilot plant consisting of a series of one activated sludge reactor, two Hybas™ reactors and one moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) has been established and adapted...... during 10 months of continuous operation. After this adaption phase batch and continuous experiments were performed for the determination of degradation of pharmaceuticals. Removal of organic matter and nitrification mainly occurred in the first reactor. Most pharmaceuticals were removed significantly....... The removal of pharmaceuticals (including X-ray contrast media, β-blockers, analgesics and antibiotics) was fitted to a single first-order kinetics degradation function, giving degradation rate constants from 0 to 1.49 h− 1, from 0 to 7.78 × 10− 1 h− 1, from 0 to 7.86 × 10− 1 h− 1 and from 0 to 1.07 × 10− 1 h...

  5. Innovative Nuclear Reactors: The future of nuclear reactor technology towards sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between a third and a quarter of human population does not have access to electricity, relying on burning wood as its only energy source. On the other hand, the developed countries, which consume most of the energy generated in the world, have an energy matrix based on the use of fossil sources. Such an energy matrix, if life unviable. Thus, promoting the development of third world countries, seeking equity and a better wealth distribution, is a challenge that impacts the survival of mankind. A particularly concerning issue is the increase of green house emissions (GH G) resulting from burning fossil fuels and the climatic consequences of such emissions. According to the intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), through is most evidences that anthropogenic causes, and in particular Co2 emissions, are among the main driving forces of global warming. Studies such as those of IPCC indicate that nuclear energy will have an important role as a key mitigation technology for containing Co2 emissions in the next decades. Nonetheless, the effective contribution of nuclear energy will depend on various factors related to economics, safety and security, public acceptance and sustain ability. There are two important initiatives regarding the discussions on the future of nuclear reactor technology. One of those is co-ordinated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and is known as International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactor and fuel cycles (INPRO). The other is lead by the Department of Energy of the United States and is known as Generation IV (GIF). Indeed, the challenge facing the development of innovative nuclear reactors is, through comprehensive R§§D programs, to establish technological breakthroughs that overcome seemingly contradictory objectives of economy, safety and security, public acceptance and sustain ability

  6. Liability problems arising from nuclear reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In case of damage to health or property, it has always been approved legal tradition in all highly developed legal systems to perform compensation for damage in money. This principle also applies to damage caused by nuclear accidents. In the F.R.G., care has been taken at a very early stage to provide for appropriate liability provisions to afford financial security to the extent required by the special hazards involved in the peaceful use of atomic energy. Recent events have shown that the legal provisions available are appropriate and practicable. Citizens affected will receive fair compensation for damage. The Federal Administrative Office so far counted 30.392 applications for compensation in compliance with section 38, sub-sec. (2) Atomic Energy Act. Up to June 16, 1986, payments for compensation of losses amounted to DM 38.7 millions. By accepting the claims for compensation the State provides protection for German nationals and persons of equal rank. A limitation to DM one billion for compensation for damage caused by nuclear energy seems to be appropriate also in the light of the Chernobyl reactor accident. (orig./HP)

  7. A brief history of design studies on innovative nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    In a short period after the success of CP1, many types of nuclear reactors were proposed and investigated. However, soon only a small number of reactors were selected for practical use. Around 1970, only LWRs with small number of CANDUs were operated in the western world, and FBRs were under development. It was about the time when Apollo moon landing was accomplished. However, at the same time, the future of human being was widely considered pessimistic and Limits to Growth was published. In the end of 1970's the TMI accident occurred and many nuclear reactor contracts were cancelled in USA and any more contracts had not been concluded until recent years. From the reflection of this accident, many Inherent Safe Reactors (ISRs) were proposed, though none of them were constructed. A common idea of ISRs is smallness of their size. Tokyo Institute of Technology (TokyoTech) held a symposium on small reactors, SR/TIT, in 1991, where many types of small ISRs were presented. Recently small reactors attract interest again. The most ideas employed in these reactors were the same discussed in SR/TIT. In 1980's the radioactive wastes from fuel cycle became a severe problem around the world. In TokyoTech, this issue was discussed mainly from the viewpoint of nuclear transmutations. The neutron economy became inevitable for these innovative nuclear reactors especially small long-life reactors and transmutation reactors.

  8. A brief history of design studies on innovative nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi, E-mail: hsekimot@gmail.com [Emeritus Professor, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

    2014-09-30

    In a short period after the success of CP1, many types of nuclear reactors were proposed and investigated. However, soon only a small number of reactors were selected for practical use. Around 1970, only LWRs with small number of CANDUs were operated in the western world, and FBRs were under development. It was about the time when Apollo moon landing was accomplished. However, at the same time, the future of human being was widely considered pessimistic and Limits to Growth was published. In the end of 1970’s the TMI accident occurred and many nuclear reactor contracts were cancelled in USA and any more contracts had not been concluded until recent years. From the reflection of this accident, many Inherent Safe Reactors (ISRs) were proposed, though none of them were constructed. A common idea of ISRs is smallness of their size. Tokyo Institute of Technology (TokyoTech) held a symposium on small reactors, SR/TIT, in 1991, where many types of small ISRs were presented. Recently small reactors attract interest again. The most ideas employed in these reactors were the same discussed in SR/TIT. In 1980’s the radioactive wastes from fuel cycle became a severe problem around the world. In TokyoTech, this issue was discussed mainly from the viewpoint of nuclear transmutations. The neutron economy became inevitable for these innovative nuclear reactors especially small long-life reactors and transmutation reactors.

  9. Modeling of reaction kinetics in bubbling fluidized bed biomass gasification reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.K. Thapa, C. Pfeifer, B. M. Halvorsen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bubbling fluidized beds are widely used as biomass gasification reactors as at the biomass gasification plant in Güssing, Austria. The reactor in the plant is a dual circulating bubbling fluidized bed gasification reactor. The plant produces 2MW electricity and 4.5MW heat from the gasification of biomass. Wood chips as biomass and olivine particles as hot bed materials are fluidized with high temperature steam in the reactor. As a result, biomass undergoes endothermic chemical reaction to produce a mixture of combustible gases in addition to some carbon-dioxide (CO2. The combustible gases are mainly hydrogen (H2, carbon monoxide (CO and methane (CH4. The gas is used to produce electricity and heat via utilization in a gas engine. Alternatively, the gas is further processed for gaseous or liquid fuels, but still on the process of development level. Composition and quality of the gas determine the efficiency of the reactor. A computational model has been developed for the study of reaction kinetics in the gasification rector. The simulation is performed using commercial software Barracuda virtual reactor, VR15. Eulerian-Lagrangian approach in coupling of gas-solid flow has been implemented. Fluid phase is treated with an Eulerian formulation. Discrete phase is treated with a Lagrangian formulation. Particle-particle and particle-wall interactions and inter-phase heat and mass transfer have been taken into account. Series of simulations have been performed to study model prediction of the gas composition. The composition is compared with data from the gasifier at the CHP plant in Güssing, Austria. The model prediction of the composition of gases has good agreements with the result of the operating plant.

  10. Modeling of reaction kinetics in bubbling fluidized bed biomass gasification reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thapa, R.K.; Halvorsen, B.M. [Telemark University College, Kjolnes ring 56, P.O. Box 203, 3901 Porsgrunn (Norway); Pfeifer, C. [University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    Bubbling fluidized beds are widely used as biomass gasification reactors as at the biomass gasification plant in Gussing, Austria. The reactor in the plant is a dual circulating bubbling fluidized bed gasification reactor. The plant produces 2MW electricity and 4.5MW heat from the gasification of biomass. Wood chips as biomass and olivine particles as hot bed materials are fluidized with high temperature steam in the reactor. As a result, biomass undergoes endothermic chemical reaction to produce a mixture of combustible gases in addition to some carbon-dioxide (CO2). The combustible gases are mainly hydrogen (H2), carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4). The gas is used to produce electricity and heat via utilization in a gas engine. Alternatively, the gas is further processed for gaseous or liquid fuels, but still on the process of development level. Composition and quality of the gas determine the efficiency of the reactor. A computational model has been developed for the study of reaction kinetics in the gasification rector. The simulation is performed using commercial software Barracuda virtual reactor, VR15. Eulerian-Lagrangian approach in coupling of gas-solid flow has been implemented. Fluid phase is treated with an Eulerian formulation. Discrete phase is treated with a Lagrangian formulation. Particle-particle and particle-wall interactions and inter-phase heat and mass transfer have been taken into account. Series of simulations have been performed to study model prediction of the gas composition. The composition is compared with data from the gasifier at the CHP plant in Güssing, Austria. The model prediction of the composition of gases has good agreements with the result of the operating plant.

  11. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 4, Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RA research reactor is thermal heavy water moderated and cooled reactor. Metal uranium 2% enriched fuel elements were used at the beginning of its operation. Since 1976, 80% enriched uranium oxide dispersed in aluminium fuel elements were gradually introduced into the core and are the only ones presently used. Reactor core is cylindrical, having diameter 40 cm and 123 cm high. Reaktor core is made up of 82 fuel elements in aluminium channels, lattice is square, lattice pitch 13 cm. Reactor vessel is cylindrical made of 8 mm thick aluminium, inside diameter 140 cm and 5.5 m high surrounded with neutron reflector and biological shield. There is no containment, the reactor building is playing the shielding role. Three pumps enable circulation of heavy water in the primary cooling circuit. Degradation of heavy water is prevented by helium cover gas. Control rods with cadmium regulate the reactor operation. There are eleven absorption rods, seven are used for long term reactivity compensation, two for automatic power regulation and two for safety shutdown. Total anti reactivity of the rods amounts to 24%. RA reactor is equipped with a number of experimental channels, 45 vertical (9 in the core), 34 in the graphite reflector and two in the water biological shield; and six horizontal channels regularly distributed in the core. This volume include detailed description of systems and components of the RA reactor, reactor core parameters, thermal hydraulics of the core, fuel elements, fuel elements handling equipment, fuel management, and experimental devices

  12. Proposal of Space Reactor for Nuclear Electric Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Hidetaka; Nishiyama, Takaaki; Nakashima, Hideki

    Currently, the solar battery, the chemical cell, and the RI battery are used for the energy source in space. However, it is difficult for them to satisfy requirements for deep space explorations. Therefore, other electric power sources which can stably produce high electric energy output, regardless of distance from the sun, are necessary to execute such missions. Then, we here propose small nuclear reactors as power sources for deep space exploration, and consider a conceptual design of a small nuclear reactor for Nuclear Electric Propulsion System. It is found from nuclear analyses that the Gas-Cooled reactor could not meet the design requirement imposed on the core mass. On the other hand, a light water reactor is found to be a promising alternative to the Gas-Cooled reactor.

  13. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1991. The book is divided into three major sections: Section 1 consists of a reactor locator map and reactor tables; Section 2 includes nuclear reactors that are operating, being built, or planned; and Section 3 includes reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. Sections 2 and 3 contain the following classification of reactors: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is an American company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4, in each section). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5)

  14. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, B.

    1992-07-01

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1991. The book is divided into three major sections: Section 1 consists of a reactor locator map and reactor tables; Section 2 includes nuclear reactors that are operating, being built, or planned; and Section 3 includes reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. Sections 2 and 3 contain the following classification of reactors: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is an American company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4, in each section). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

  15. A safety re-evaluation of the AVR pebble bed reactor operation and its consequences for future HTR concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moormann, R.

    2008-06-15

    The AVR pebble bed reactor (46 MW{sub th}) was operated 1967-88 at coolant outlet temperatures up to 990 C. A principle difference of pebble bed HTRs as AVR to conventional reactors is the continuous movement of fuel element pebbles through the core which complicates thermohydraulic, nuclear and safety estimations. Also because of a lack of other experience AVR operation is still a relevant basis for future pebble bed HTRs and thus requires careful examination. This paper deals mainly with some insufficiently published unresolved safety problems of AVR operation and of pebble bed HTRs but skips the widely known advantageous features of pebble bed HTRs. The AVR primary circuit is heavily contaminated with metallic fission products (Sr-90, Cs-137) which create problems in current dismantling. The amount of this contamination is not exactly known, but the evaluation of fission product deposition experiments indicates that the end of life contamination reached several percent of a single core inventory, which is some orders of magnitude more than precalculated and far more than in large LWRs. A major fraction of this contamination is bound on graphitic dust and thus partly mobile in depressurization accidents, which has to be considered in safety analyses of future reactors. A re-evaluation of the AVR contamination is performed here in order to quantify consequences for future HTRs (400 MW{sub th}). It leads to the conclusion that the AVR contamination was mainly caused by inadmissible high core temperatures, increasing fission product release rates, and not - as presumed in the past - by inadequate fuel quality only. The high AVR core temperatures were detected not earlier than one year before final AVR shut-down, because a pebble bed core cannot yet be equipped with instruments. The maximum core temperatures are still unknown but were more than 200 K higher than calculated. Further, azimuthal temperature differences at the active core margin of up to 200 K were

  16. Rotating-bed reactor as a power source for EM gun applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, J.; Botts, T.; Stickley, C.M.; Meth, S.

    1980-01-01

    Electromagnetic gun applications of the Rotating Bed Reactor (RBR) are examined. The RBR is a compact (approx. 1 m/sup 3/), (up to several thousand MW(th)), high-power reactor concept, capable of producing a high-temperature (up to approx. 300/sup 0/K) gas stream with a MHD generator coupled to it, the RBR can generate electric power (up to approx. 1000 MW(e)) in the pulsed or cw modes. Three EM gun applications are investigated: a rail gun thruster for orbit transfer, a rapid-fire EM gun for point defense, and a direct ground-to-space launch. The RBR appears suitable for all applications.

  17. Synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from methyl carbamate and methanol using a Fixed-Bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, D. [Zaozhuang University, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zaozhuang (China); Zhang, X. [Zaozhuang University, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zaozhuang (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Coal Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion, Taiyuan (China); Wei, W.; Sun, Y. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Coal Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion, Taiyuan (China)

    2012-12-15

    Several mixed oxide catalysts were prepared by coprecipitation for dimethyl carbonate (DMC) synthesis from methyl carbamate and methanol. During the batch process, the DMC yield was below 35 %. In order to minimize the unfavorable thermodynamic equilibrium and side reactions for the DMC synthesis, a fixed-bed reactor was designed. A maximum DMC yield of {proportional_to} 73 % could be realized over a ZnO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. The effects of reaction conditions for this type of reactor were investigated in detail. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Modeling of sorption enhanced steam methane reforming in an adiabatic fixed bed reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández García, José Ramón; Abanades García, Juan Carlos; Murillo Villuendas, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    Sorption enhanced methane reforming (SER), employing a CaO-based solid as a high temperature CO2 sorbent, is generally considered to be a promising route for H2 production. In this paper we present a dynamic pseudo-homogeneous model to describe the operation of a packed bed reactor in which the SER reaction is carried out under adiabatic conditions. This reactor can be implemented according to several process schemes, including a novel Ca/Cu looping process for hydrogen generation with inhere...

  19. Rotating-bed reactor as a power source for EM gun applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electromagnetic gun applications of the Rotating Bed Reactor (RBR) are examined. The RBR is a compact (approx. 1 m3), (up to several thousand MW(th)), high-power reactor concept, capable of producing a high-temperature (up to approx. 3000K) gas stream with a MHD generator coupled to it, the RBR can generate electric power (up to approx. 1000 MW(e)) in the pulsed or cw modes. Three EM gun applications are investigated: a rail gun thruster for orbit transfer, a rapid-fire EM gun for point defense, and a direct ground-to-space launch. The RBR appears suitable for all applications

  20. Performance of Anammox granular sludge bed reactor started up with nitrifying granular sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Ping; LIN Feng-mei; HU Bao-lan; CHEN Jian-song

    2004-01-01

    The anaerobic ammonia oxidation(Anammox) granular sludge bed reactor was started up successfully withnitrifying granular sludge. During the operation, the nitrifying granular sludge was gradually converted into Anammoxgranular sludge with good settling property and high conversion activity. The Anammox reactor worked well with theshortest HRT of 2.43 h. Under the condition that HRT was 6.39 h and influent concentration of ammonia and nitritewas 10 mmol/L, the removal of ammonia and nitrite was 97.17% and 100.00%, respectively. Corresponding

  1. Heat-transfer characteristics of flowing and stationary particle-bed-type fusion-reactor blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nietert, R.E.

    1983-02-01

    The heat-transfer characteristics of flowing and stationary packed-particle beds have recently become of interest in connection with conceptual designs of fusion reactor blankets. A detailed literature survey has shown that the processes taking place in such beds are not fully understood despite their widespread use in the chemical industry and other engineering disciplines for more than five decades. In this study, two experimental investigations were pursued. In the first, a heat-transfer loop was constructed through which glass microspheres were allowed to flow by rgravity at controlled rates through an electrically heated stainless steel tubular test section. In the second, an annular packed bed was constructed in which heat was applied through the outer wall by electric heating of a stainless steel tube. Cooling occurred at the inner wall of the annular bed by flowing air through the central tube. A second air stream was allowed to flow through the voids of the packed bed. An error-minimization technique was utilized in order to obtain the two-dimensional one-parameter effective conductivity for the bed by comparing the experimental and theoretically predicted temperature profiles. Experiments were conducted for various modified Reynolds numbers less than ten.

  2. Heat-transfer characteristics of flowing and stationary particle-bed-type fusion-reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heat-transfer characteristics of flowing and stationary packed-particle beds have recently become of interest in connection with conceptual designs of fusion reactor blankets. A detailed literature survey has shown that the processes taking place in such beds are not fully understood despite their widespread use in the chemical industry and other engineering disciplines for more than five decades. In this study, two experimental investigations were pursued. In the first, a heat-transfer loop was constructed through which glass microspheres were allowed to flow by rgravity at controlled rates through an electrically heated stainless steel tubular test section. In the second, an annular packed bed was constructed in which heat was applied through the outer wall by electric heating of a stainless steel tube. Cooling occurred at the inner wall of the annular bed by flowing air through the central tube. A second air stream was allowed to flow through the voids of the packed bed. An error-minimization technique was utilized in order to obtain the two-dimensional one-parameter effective conductivity for the bed by comparing the experimental and theoretically predicted temperature profiles. Experiments were conducted for various modified Reynolds numbers less than ten

  3. A study on future nuclear reactor technology and development strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Sohn, D. S.; Suk, S. D.; Zee, S. K.; Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. J.; Park, W. S

    2000-12-01

    Development of nuclear reactor and fuel cycle technology for future is essential to meet the current issues such as enhancement of nuclear power reactor safety, economically competitive with gas turbine power generation, less production of radioactive waste, proliferation resistant fuel cycle, and public acceptance in consideration of lack of energy resources in the nuclear countries worldwide as well as in Korea. This report deals with as follows, 1) Review the world energy demand and supply perspective and analyse nature of energy and sustainable development to set-up nuclear policy in Korea 2) Recaptitulate the current long term nuclear R and D activities 3) Review nuclear R and D activities and programs of USA, Japan, France, Russia, international organizations such as IAEA, OECD/NEA 4) Recommend development directions of nuclear reactors and fuels.

  4. Theory of neutron slowing down in nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Ferziger, Joel H; Dunworth, J V

    2013-01-01

    The Theory of Neutron Slowing Down in Nuclear Reactors focuses on one facet of nuclear reactor design: the slowing down (or moderation) of neutrons from the high energies with which they are born in fission to the energies at which they are ultimately absorbed. In conjunction with the study of neutron moderation, calculations of reactor criticality are presented. A mathematical description of the slowing-down process is given, with particular emphasis on the problems encountered in the design of thermal reactors. This volume is comprised of four chapters and begins by considering the problems

  5. The current status of nuclear research reactor in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sittichai, C.; Kanyukt, R.; Pongpat, P. [Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Bangkok (Thailand)

    1998-10-01

    Since 1962, the Thai Research Reactor has been serving for various kinds of activities i.e. the production of radioisotopes for medical uses and research and development on nuclear science and technology, for more than three decades. The existing reactor site should be abandoned and relocated to the new suitable site, according to Thai cabinet`s resolution on the 27 December 1989. The decommissioning project for the present reactor as well as the establishment of new nuclear research center were planned. This paper discussed the OAEP concept for the decommissioning programme and the general description of the new research reactor and some related information were also reported. (author)

  6. Microstructure of multicrystalline silicon seeded by polysilicon chips and fluidized bed reactor granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrøm, K. E.; Stokkan, G.; Autruffe, A.; Søndenå, R.; Dalaker, H.; Arnberg, L.; Di Sabatino, M.

    2016-05-01

    Multicrystalline silicon displays a considerable smaller average grain size and reduced dislocation generation when being seeded by polycrystalline silicon chips or fluidized bed reactor silicon granules. A simple texture analysis shows how the initially random grain structure of the seeds develops a weak preference for near- and near- oriented grains upwards in the ingot. Closer investigations reveal a considerable coarsening of the initial microstructure of the seeds during the directional solidification process, especially for small fluidized bed reactor granules. The irregular shape of polysilicon chips allows for melt penetration into the seeding structure and potential indentation effects that may account for the increased dislocation generation observed in this case. The increased generation may, however, also be related to a higher ratio of ∑27 grain boundaries.

  7. Drying kinetics characteristic of Indonesia lignite coal (IBC) using lab scale fixed bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, TaeJin; Jeon, DoMan; Namkung, Hueon; Jang, DongHa; Jeon, Youngshin; Kim, Hyungtaek [Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of). Div. of Energy Systems Research

    2013-07-01

    Recent instability of energy market arouse a lot of interest about coal which has a tremendous amount of proven coal reserves worldwide. South Korea hold the second rank by importing 80 million tons of coal in 2007 following by Japan. Among various coals, there is disused coal. It's called Low Rank Coal (LRC). Drying process has to be preceded before being utilized as power plant. In this study, drying kinetics of LRC is induced by using a fixed bed reactor. The drying kinetics was deduced from particle size, the inlet gas temperature, the drying time, the gas velocity, and the L/D ratio. The consideration on Reynold's number was taken for correction of gas velocity, particle size, and the L/D ratio was taken for correction packing height of coal. It can be found that active drying of free water and phase boundary reaction is suitable mechanism through the fixed bed reactor experiments.

  8. Modeling of Isobutane/Butene Alkylation Using Solid Acid Catalysts in a Fixed Bed Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zheng; Tang Xiaojin; Hu Lifeng; Hou Shuandi

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic mass transfer model of isobutane/butene alkylation over solid acid catalysts in a ifxed bed reactor was established. In the model, a modiifed equation for the relationship between point activity and effective diffusion coefifcient was proposed. It is found that the simulation results ift the experimental data well and the breakthrough time of the bed layer is predicted accurately. By modeling the alkylation process, the time-space distribution of butene and point activity proifles of catalysts can be obtained. Furthermore, the reasons for the deactivation of solid acid catalysts were investigated. It indicates that the main reason for the deactivation of catalysts is the site coverage near the inlet of the reactor, while it is ascribed to the steric effect in the region far away from the inlet.

  9. Hydrogen sulfide removal from air by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans in a trickle bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, M; Gómez, J M; Cantero, D; Páca, J; Halecký, M; Kozliak, E I; Sobotka, M

    2009-09-01

    A strain of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans immobilized in polyurethane foam was utilized for H(2)S removal in a bench-scale trickle-bed reactor, testing the limits of acidity and SO(4) (2-) accumulation. The use of this acidophilic strain resulted in remarkable stability in the performance of the system. The reactor maintained a >98-99 % H(2)S removal efficiency for c of up to 66 ppmv and empty bed residence time 98 % H(2)S was achieved under steady-state conditions, over the pH range of 0.44-7.30. Despite the accumulation of acidity and SO(4) (2-) (up to 97 g/L), the system operated without inhibition.

  10. Production of structured lipids in a packed-bed reactor with Thermomyces lanuginosa lipase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xuebing; Porsgaard, Trine; Zhang, Hong;

    2002-01-01

    Lipase-catalyzed interesterification between fish oil and medium-chain TAG has been investigated in a packed-bed reactor with a commercially immobilized enzyme. The enzyme, a Thermomyces lanuginosa lipase immobilized on silica by granulation (Lipozyme TL IM; Novozymes A/S, Bagsvaerd, Denmark), has...... recently been developed for fat modification. This study focuses on the new characteristics of the lipase in a packed-bed reactor when applied to interesterification of TAG. The degree of reaction was strongly related to the flow rate (residence time) and temperature, whereas formation of hydrolysis by......-products (DAG and FFA) were only slightly affected by reaction conditions. The degree of reaction reached equilibrium at 30-40 min residence time, and the most suitable temperature was 60degreesC or higher with respect to the maximal degree of reaction. The lipase was stable in a 2-wk continuous operation...

  11. Flow Field of Circulating Fluidized Bed Reactor with Venturi Inlet Configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Jinbang; LI Yanping; CHEN Anxin

    2005-01-01

    Different two-equation k-ε models were used to simulate the gas flow field generated by a new type of circulating fluidized bed reactor with venturi gas distributor. The numerical results were compared with the experimental data. It has been shown that the simulation results from the standard k-ε model have the best match with the experimental data. Based on this model, the gas flow field in the venturi diffuser and riser was analyzed by the concept of velocity nonuniformity and dead zone percentage. Both the nonuniformity of gas velocity and the dead zone percentage reach the maximum at the venturi outlet due to the effect of the vortex. At the same time, it provides a good platform for the further optimization of the inlet configuration of circulating fluidized bed reactor.

  12. Treatment of oilfield wastewater in moving bed biofilm reactors using a novel suspended ceramic biocarrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Zhiyong, E-mail: bluemanner@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China); Lu, Mang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jingdezhen Ceramic Institute, Jingdezhen 333001, Jiangxi Province (China); Huang, Wenhui [School of Energy Resources, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Xu, Xiaochun [School of Geosciences and Resources, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We invented a novel suspended ceramic carrier. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The suspended ceramic carrier is modified with sepiolite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carriers were used in MBBR to remediate wastewater. - Abstract: In this study, a novel suspended ceramic carrier was prepared, which has high strength, optimum density (close to water), and high porosity. Two different carriers, unmodified and sepiolite-modified suspended ceramic carriers were used to feed two moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) with a filling fraction of 50% to treat oilfield produced water. The hydraulic retention time (HRT) was varied from 36 to 10 h. The results, during a monitoring period of 190 days, showed that removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand was the highest in reactor 3 filled with the sepiolite-modified carriers, followed by reactor 2 filled with the unmodified carriers, with the lowest in reactor 1 (activated sludge reactor), at an HRT of 10 h. Similar trends were found in the removal efficiencies of ammonia nitrogen and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Reactor 3 was more shock resistant than reactors 2 and 1. The results indicate that the suspended ceramic carrier is an excellent MBBR carrier.

  13. Ozo-Dyes mixture degradation in a fixed bed biofilm reactor packed with volcanic porous rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras-Blancas, E.; Cobos-Vasconcelos, D. de los; Juarez-Ramirez, C.; Poggi-Varaldo, H. M.; Ruiz-Ordaz, N.; Galindez-Mayer, J.

    2009-07-01

    Textile industries discharge great amounts of dyes and dyeing-process auxiliaries, which pollute streams and water bodies. Several dyes, especially the ones containing the azo group, can cause harmful effects to different organisms including humans. Through bacterial and mammalian tests, azo dyes or their derived aromatic amines have shown cell genotoxicity. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of air flow rate on azo-dyes mixture biodegradation by a microbial community immobilized in a packed bed reactor. (Author)

  14. Mathematical modeling of municipal solid waste plasma gasification in a fixed-bed melting reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qinglin

    2011-01-01

    The increasing yield of municipal solid waste (MSW) is one of the main by-products of modern society. Among various MSW treatment methods, plasma gasification in a fixed-bed melting reactor (PGM) is a new technology, which may provide an efficient and environmental friendly solution for problems related to MSW disposals. General objectives of this work are to develop mathematical models for the PGM process, and using these models to analyze the characteristics of this new technology. In this ...

  15. Evaluation of Heavy Metal Removal from Wastewater in a Modified Packed Bed Biofilm Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Shohreh Azizi; Ilunga Kamika; Memory Tekere

    2016-01-01

    For the effective application of a modified packed bed biofilm reactor (PBBR) in wastewater industrial practice, it is essential to distinguish the tolerance of the system for heavy metals removal. The industrial contamination of wastewater from various sources (e.g. Zn, Cu, Cd and Ni) was studied to assess the impacts on a PBBR. This biological system was examined by evaluating the tolerance of different strengths of composite heavy metals at the optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2 h...

  16. Ozo-Dyes mixture degradation in a fixed bed biofilm reactor packed with volcanic porous rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Textile industries discharge great amounts of dyes and dyeing-process auxiliaries, which pollute streams and water bodies. Several dyes, especially the ones containing the azo group, can cause harmful effects to different organisms including humans. Through bacterial and mammalian tests, azo dyes or their derived aromatic amines have shown cell genotoxicity. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of air flow rate on azo-dyes mixture biodegradation by a microbial community immobilized in a packed bed reactor. (Author)

  17. Eulerian-Lagrangian simulation of a bubbling fluidized bed reactor: Assessment of drag force correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ku Xiao-Ke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An Eulerian-Lagrangian approach is developed within the OpenFOAM framework to investigate the effects of three well-known inter-phase drag force correlations on the fluidization behavior in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor. The results show a strong dependency on the restitution coefficient and the friction coefficient and no occurrence of bubbling and slugging for the ideal-collision case. The mean pressure drops predicted by the three models agree quite well with each other.

  18. Reactors. Nuclear propulsion ships; Reacteurs. Navires a propulsion nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fribourg, Ch. [Technicatome, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2001-07-01

    This article has for object the development of nuclear-powered ships and the conception of the nuclear-powered ship. The technology of the naval propulsion P.W.R. type reactor is described in the article B.N.3 141 'Nuclear Boilers ships'. (N.C.)

  19. Safety review and assessment and inspection on research reactors, experimental reactors, nuclear heating reactors and critical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More operational events were occurred at various research reactors in 1995. The NNSA and its regional offices conducted careful investigation and strict regulation. In order to analyze comprehensively the safety situation of inservice research reactors and find same countermeasures the NNSA convened a meeting of the safety regulation on research reactors and a meeting for change experience of the safety regulation on research reactors that were participated in by the operating organizations in 1995. A lot of work has been done in the respects of propagation of regulations on nuclear safety, education of nuclear safety culture, the investigation and treatment of operational events, the reexamine of operation documents, the implementation of rectifying items on nuclear safety, the daily inspection and routine inspection on nuclear safety and the studying on the extending service life of research reactors etc

  20. Characteristics of convective heat transport in a packed pebble-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A fast-response heat transfer probe has been developed and used in this work. • Heat transport has been quantified in terms of local heat transfer coefficients. • The method of the electrically heated single sphere in packing has been applied. • The heat transfer coefficient increases from the center to the wall of packed bed. • This work advancing the knowledge of heat transport in the studied packed bed. - Abstract: Obtaining more precise results and a better understanding of the heat transport mechanism in the dynamic core of packed pebble-bed reactors is needed because this mechanism poses extreme challenges to the reliable design and efficient operation of these reactors. This mechanism can be quantified in terms of a solid-to-gas convective heat transfer coefficient. Therefore, in this work, the local convective heat transfer coefficients and their radial profiles were measured experimentally in a separate effect pilot-plant scale and cold-flow experimental setup of 0.3 m in diameter, using a sophisticated noninvasive heat transfer probe of spherical type. The effect of gas velocity on the heat transfer coefficient was investigated over a wide range of Reynolds numbers of practical importance. The experimental investigations of this work include various radial locations along the height of the bed. It was found that an increase in coolant gas flow velocity causes an increase in the heat transfer coefficient and that effect of the gas flow rate varies from laminar to turbulent flow regimes at all radial positions of the studied packed pebble-bed reactor. The results show that the local heat transfer coefficient increases from the bed center to the wall due to the change in the bed structure, and hence, in the flow pattern of the coolant gas. The findings clearly indicate that one value of an overall heat transfer coefficient cannot represent the local heat transfer coefficients within the bed; therefore, correlations are needed to

  1. Research means to back the development of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After 50 year long feedback experience on nuclear reactor operations it is legitimate to wonder whether experimental facilities used to support nuclear power programs are still necessary. The various participants of this conference said yes for mainly 4 reasons: -) to validate the extension of the service life of a reactor without putting at risk its high safety standard, -) to give the reactor more flexibility to cope with the power demand, -) to confront the results given by computerized simulations with experimental data, and -) to qualify the nuclear systems of tomorrow. (A.C.)

  2. Core and fuel design for Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) using SRAC computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Core and fuel down scale analysis on PBMR-HTR using SRAC program aims to identify the influence of U235 enrichment, burnable poison, coolant flow rate and coolant temperature entered to criticality core and safety aspects of nuclear reactor with the parameters are multiplication factor (keff) and fuel temperature coefficient, moderator temperature coefficient and coolant temperature coefficient. Core PBMR-HTR finite cylindrical with a hole in the middle which contains 334,000 pebble fuel bed. That consist of UO2 fuel, graphite moderator and helium coolant. Down scale the design model performed on the half core represent the whole core. The study was conducted by varying the fuel enrichment of 8%; 8.5%; 9%; 9.5% and 10%, while variation burnable poison enrichment at 5 ppm, 7 ppm, 9 ppm, 11 ppm and 15 ppm. The variation of coolant flow rate of 60%, 80%, 100%, 120% and 140% from its original value at 17.118 kg/s while the variation of coolant temperature input at 673.15 K; 723.15 K; 773.15 K; 823.15 K and 873.15 K. In this research, value of keff without Gd2O3 are 1.026213 (BOL) and 1.004173 (EOL) with excess reactivity of 2.55% with 9% U235 enrichment. While keff on BOL by using 7 ppm Gd2O3 of 1.006968 and 1.004198 for EOL with excess reactivity of 0.69%. Fuel temperature reactivity coefficient, moderator and coolant in a row for -8.597317E-05/K; -2.595284E-05 /K and 1.1496E-06/K. Temperature reactivity coefficient is negative. This indicates inherent safety characteristic have been met. Increasing the input temperature and coolant flow rate reduction lowers the value of keff core, and it will contribute to negative reactivity coefficient. (author)

  3. Synthesis of Linear Alkylbenzene in a Novel Liquid-Solid Circulating Moving Bed Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩明汉; 徐聪; 崔哲; 金涌

    2004-01-01

    For the alkylation of benzene with long-chain olefins, using Hβ zeolite catalyst as replacement of HF or A1Cl3 has the advantages of no corrosion, less environmental pollution, and much more 2-phenyl isomer, which has the highest biodegradability and solubility, and better detergent properties among the related isomers. The characterization of the coke shows that the deactivation of catalyst is caused by the jam of bulkier molecules, such as naphthalene, indane and linear alkylbenzenes, which are too big to move quickly in the intracrystalline pores of catalyst. The deactivated catalyst can be regenerated by benzene washing at higher temperature. To make the processes of reaction and regeneration continuous, a novel moving bed reactor is developed. Comparing with the processes with fixed bed reactors, the processes in this work have the advantages of continuous operation, low temperature, low pressure, low mole ratio of benzene to olefins, and high weight hourly space velocity.Keywords t3 zeolite, alkylation, linear alkylbenzene, moving bed reactor

  4. Theoretical and experimental studies of fixed-bed coal gasification reactors. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, B.; Bhattacharya, A.; Salam, L.; Dudukovic, M.P.

    1983-09-01

    A laboratory fixed-bed gasification reactor was designed and built with the objective of collecting operational data for model validation and parameter estimation. The reactor consists of a 4 inch stainless steel tube filled with coal or char. Air and steam is fed at one end of the reactor and the dynamic progress of gasification in the coal or char bed is observed through thermocouples mounted at various radial and axial locations. Product gas compositions are also monitored as a function of time. Results of gasification runs using Wyoming coal are included in this report. In parallel with the experimental study, a two-dimensional model of moving bed gasifiers was developed, coded into a computer program and tested. This model was used to study the laboratory gasifier by setting the coal feed rate equal to zero. The model is based on prior work on steady state and dynamic modeling done at Washington University and published elsewhere in the literature. Comparisons are made between model predictions and experimental results. These are also included in this report. 23 references, 18 figures, 6 tables.

  5. Thermal-hydraulics numerical analyses of Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor hot channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The thermal hydraulics behavior of the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) hot channel was studied. Purpose: We aim to analyze the thermal-hydraulics behavior of the PB-AHTR, such as pressure drop, temperature distribution of coolant and pebble bed as well as thermal removal capacity in the condition of loss of partial coolant. Methods: We used a modified FLUENT code which was coupled with a local non-equilibrium porous media model by introducing a User Defined Scalar (UDS) in the calculation domain of the reactor core and subjoining different resistance terms (Ergun and KTA) to calculate the temperature of coolant, solid phase of pebble bed and pebble center in the core. Results: Computational results showed that the resistance factor has great influence on pressure drop and velocity distribution, but less impact on the temperature of coolant, solid phase of pebble bed and pebble center. We also confirmed the heat removal capacity of the PB-AHTR in the condition of nominal and loss of partial coolant conditions. Conclusion: The numerical analyses results can provide a useful proposal to optimize the design of PB-AHTR. (authors)

  6. Pebble Bed Modular Reactor. Executive summary, Issue D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PBMR Project has been under active investigation by Eskom, as part of the Integrated Electricity Planning process, since 1993. The overall objectives of these investigations have been to establish whether such a system could form part of Eskom's expansion planning and what specific advantages it would bring over current options. This would include a technical performance and economic evaluation associated with the project. A comprehensive evaluation was performed as to the international interest existing within this field of technology, including the availability of this technology. The first phase of this investigation is now complete and the results have been compiled in a comprehensive set of technical and costing reports. A basic engineering simulator is being developed which provides engineering design support. The present results of this study show that the design has been established in enough detail to support key safety studies, confirm operating limits and estimated costing. The costing includes: - Production costs for a single module and a unit (unit = 10 x module) cost; - Operation and maintenance costing; - Fuel plant costing ? Design and development costing The studies showed that the technology required for the design has been demonstrated adequately to avoid fundamental technical risk. The increased level of inherent safety (over current designs) is fundamental to the cost reductions achieved over other nuclear designs. By demonstrating a catastrophe free design the requirements for both safety grade backup systems and an off-site emergency plan are removed

  7. Molecular analysis of the biomass of a fluidized bed reactor treating synthetic vinasse at anaerobic and micro-aerobic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, E.; Lopes, A.; Fdz-Polanco, M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Garcia Encina, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    The microbial communities (Bacteria and Archaea) established in an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor used to treat synthetic vinasse (betaine, glucose, acetate, propionate, and butyrate) were characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and phylogenetic analysis. This study was focu

  8. Research nuclear reactor RA - Annual Report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities related to revitalisation of the RA reactor started in 1986 were fulfilled except the exchange of the complete reactor instrumentation. Since 1992, due to economic and political reasons, RA reactor is in a difficult situation. The old RA reactor instrumentation was dismantled. Decision about the future status of the reactor should be made because the aging of all the components is becoming dramatic. Control and maintenance of the reactor components was done regularly and efficiently. The most important activity and investment in 1998 was improvement of conditions for spent fuel storage in the existing pools at the RA reactor. Russian company ENTEK and IAEA are involved in this activity which was initiated 1997. Fuel inspection by the IAEA safeguards inspectors was done on a monthly basis. Research reactor RA Annual report for year 2000 is divided into two main parts to cover: (1) operation and maintenance and (2) activities related to radiation protection

  9. Research nuclear reactor RA - Annual Report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities related to revitalisation of the RA reactor started in 1986 were fulfilled except the exchange of the complete reactor instrumentation. Since 1992, due to economic and political reasons, RA reactor is in a difficult situation. The old RA reactor instrumentation was dismantled. Decision about the future status of the reactor should be made because the aging of all the components is becoming dramatic. Control and maintenance of the reactor components was done regularly and efficiently. The most important activity and investment in 1998 was improvement of conditions for spent fuel storage in the existing pools at the RA reactor. Russian company ENTEK and IAEA are involved in this activity which was initiated 1997. Fuel inspection by the IAEA safeguards inspectors was done on a monthly basis. Research reactor RA Annual report for year 1998 is divided into two main parts to cover: (1) operation and maintenance and (2) activities related to radiation protection

  10. Viewing device for the inside of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inspection stand with a telescopic cylinder for repeat testing in pebble bed reactors is described, which is situated so that it can be moved to both sides. There is a TV camera in the innermost tube of the inspection stand. (HP)

  11. Gas Reactor International Cooperative program. Pebble bed reactor plant: screening evaluation. Volume 2. Conceptual balance of plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report consists of three volumes which describe the design concepts and screening evaluation for a 3000 MW(t) Pebble Bed Reactor Multiplex Plant (PBR-MX). The Multiplex plant produces both electricity and transportable chemical energy via the thermochemical pipeline (TCP). The evaluation was limited to a direct cycle plant which has the steam generators and steam reformers in the primary circuit. This volume describes the conceptual balance-of-plant (BOP) design and was prepared by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc. of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The major emphasis of the BOP study was a preliminary design of an overall plant to provide a basis for future studies

  12. Pebble bed reactors simulation using MCNP: The Chinese HTR-10 reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SA Hosseini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   Given the role of Gas-Graphite reactors as the fourth generation reactors and their recently renewed importance, in 2002 the IAEA proposed a set of Benchmarking problems. In this work, we propose a model both efficient in time and resources and exact to simulate the HTR-10 reactor using MCNP-4C code. During the present work, all of the pressing factors in PBM reactor design such as the inter-pebble leakage, fuel particle distribution and fuel pebble packing fraction effects have been taken into account to obtain an exact and easy to run model. Finally, the comparison between the results of the present work and other calculations made at INEEL proves the exactness of the proposed model.

  13. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    This publication contains unclassified information about facilities, built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1996. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S. Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters, and field offices of DOE; from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the U. S. reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from U.S. and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled.

  14. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned: 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication contains unclassified information about facilities, built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1996. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S. Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters, and field offices of DOE; from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the U. S. reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from U.S. and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled

  15. Use of a seeder reactor to manage crystal growth in the fluidized bed reactor for phosphorus recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, Kazuaki; Ishikawa, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Hirasawa, Izumi

    2007-04-01

    The authors have been engaged in the development of a phosphorus recovery system capable of maintaining high recovery efficiencies, with the chemical cost suppressed. This time, they conducted demonstration tests of a fluidized bed magnesium ammonium phosphate reactor provided with a seeder reactor for the supernatant from anaerobic digestion using a pilot experimental plant with a wastewater treatment capacity of 20 m3/d. For the digestion supernatant with a phosphorus concentration of approximately 300 mg/L, the treated water phosphorus concentration was 10 to 25 mg/L, and the phosphorus recovery efficiency was more than 90%. Relative to the chemical cost in the case of magnesium chloride, the chemical cost in the case of magnesium hydroxide is approximately 40%. Thus, with the new system, it was possible to reduce the running cost while maintaining high recovery efficiencies. PMID:17489275

  16. Nuclear reactor core modelling in multifunctional simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puska, E.K. [VTT Energy, Nuclear Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-06-01

    The thesis concentrates on the development of nuclear reactor core models for the APROS multifunctional simulation environment and the use of the core models in various kinds of applications. The work was started in 1986 as a part of the development of the entire APROS simulation system. The aim was to create core models that would serve in a reliable manner in an interactive, modular and multifunctional simulator/plant analyser environment. One-dimensional and three-dimensional core neutronics models have been developed. Both models have two energy groups and six delayed neutron groups. The three-dimensional finite difference type core model is able to describe both BWR- and PWR-type cores with quadratic fuel assemblies and VVER-type cores with hexagonal fuel assemblies. The one- and three-dimensional core neutronics models can be connected with the homogeneous, the five-equation or the six-equation thermal hydraulic models of APROS. The key feature of APROS is that the same physical models can be used in various applications. The nuclear reactor core models of APROS have been built in such a manner that the same models can be used in simulator and plant analyser applications, as well as in safety analysis. In the APROS environment the user can select the number of flow channels in the three-dimensional reactor core and either the homogeneous, the five- or the six-equation thermal hydraulic model for these channels. The thermal hydraulic model and the number of flow channels have a decisive effect on the calculation time of the three-dimensional core model and thus, at present, these particular selections make the major difference between a safety analysis core model and a training simulator core model. The emphasis on this thesis is on the three-dimensional core model and its capability to analyse symmetric and asymmetric events in the core. The factors affecting the calculation times of various three-dimensional BWR, PWR and WWER-type APROS core models have been

  17. Neutron spectrometer for fast nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Osipenko, M; Ricco, G; Caiffi, B; Pompili, F; Pillon, M; Angelone, M; Verona-Rinati, G; Cardarelli, R; Mila, G; Argiro, S

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe the development and first tests of a neutron spectrometer designed for high flux environments, such as the ones found in fast nuclear reactors. The spectrometer is based on the conversion of neutrons impinging on $^6$Li into $\\alpha$ and $t$ whose total energy comprises the initial neutron energy and the reaction $Q$-value. The $^6$LiF layer is sandwiched between two CVD diamond detectors, which measure the two reaction products in coincidence. The spectrometer was calibrated at two neutron energies in well known thermal and 3 MeV neutron fluxes. The measured neutron detection efficiency varies from 4.2$\\times 10^{-4}$ to 3.5$\\times 10^{-8}$ for thermal and 3 MeV neutrons, respectively. These values are in agreement with Geant4 simulations and close to simple estimates based on the knowledge of the $^6$Li(n,$\\alpha$)$t$ cross section. The energy resolution of the spectrometer was found to be better than 100 keV when using 5 m cables between the detector and the preamplifiers.

  18. Development of nuclear fuel for integrated reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kee Nam; Kim, H. K.; Kang, H. S.; Yoon, K. H.; Chun, T. H.; In, W. K.; Oh, D. S.; Kim, D. W.; Woo, Y. M

    1999-04-01

    The spacer grid assembly which provides both lateral and vertical support for the fuel rods and also provides a flow channel between the fuel rods to afford the heat transfer from the fuel pellet into the coolant in a reactor, is one of the major structural components of nuclear fuel for LWR. Therefore, the spacer grid assembly is a highly ranked component when the improvement of hardware is pursued for promoting fuel performance. Main objective of this project is to develop the inherent spacer grid assembly and to research relevant technologies on the spacer grid assembly. And, the UO{sub 2}-based SMART fuel is preliminarily designed for the 330MWt class SMART, which is planned to produce heat as well as electricity. Results from this project are listed as follows. 1. Three kinds of spacer grid candidates have been invented and applied for domestic and US patents. In addition, the demo SG(3x3 array) were fabricated, which the mechanical/structural test was carried out with. 2. The mechanical/structural technologies related to the spacer grid development are studied and relevant test requirements were established. 3. Preliminary design data of the UO{sub 2}-based SMART fuel have been produced. The structural characteristics of several components such as the top/bottom end piece and the holddown spring assembly were analysed by consulting the numerical method.

  19. Method for inspecting nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique for disassembling a nuclear reactor fuel element without destroying the individual fuel pins and other structural components from which the element is assembled is described. A traveling bridge and trolley span a water-filled spent fuel storage pool and support a strongback. The strongback is under water and provides a working surface on which the spent fuel element is placed for inspection and for the manipulation that is associated with disassembly and assembly. To remove, in a non-destructive manner, the grids that hold the fuel pins in the proper relative positions within the element, bars are inserted through apertures in the grids with the aid of special tools. These bars are rotated to flex the adjacent grid walls and, in this way relax the physical engagement between protruding portions of the grid walls and the associated fuel pins. With the grid structure so flexed to relax the physical grip on the individual fuel pins, these pins can be withdrawn for inspection or replacement as necessary without imposing a need to destroy fuel element components

  20. Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows Through Packed Bed Reactors in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motil, Brian J.; Balakotaiah, Vemuri

    2001-01-01

    The simultaneous flow of gas and liquid through a fixed bed of particles occurs in many unit operations of interest to the designers of space-based as well as terrestrial equipment. Examples include separation columns, gas-liquid reactors, humidification, drying, extraction, and leaching. These operations are critical to a wide variety of industries such as petroleum, pharmaceutical, mining, biological, and chemical. NASA recognizes that similar operations will need to be performed in space and on planetary bodies such as Mars if we are to achieve our goals of human exploration and the development of space. The goal of this research is to understand how to apply our current understanding of two-phase fluid flow through fixed-bed reactors to zero- or partial-gravity environments. Previous experiments by NASA have shown that reactors designed to work on Earth do not necessarily function in a similar manner in space. Two experiments, the Water Processor Assembly and the Volatile Removal Assembly have encountered difficulties in predicting and controlling the distribution of the phases (a crucial element in the operation of this type of reactor) as well as the overall pressure drop.

  1. Experimental and modeling study of sulfur dioxide oxidation in packed-bed tubular reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanen NOURI

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of sulfur dioxide into sulfur trioxide is a reaction which interests not only the industry of sulfuric acid production but also the processes of pollution control of certain gas effluents containing SO2. This exothermic reaction needs a very good control of temperature, that's why it is led in the industry in a multistage converter with intermediate heat exchangers. Microreactors represent a good alternative for such reaction due to their intensification of mass and heat transfer and enhancement of temperature control. In this study, this reaction was conducted in a stainless steel tubular (4mm ID packed bed reactor using particles of vanadium pentoxide as catalyst at atmospheric pressure. Experiments were performed with different inlet SO2 concentration in 3-9% range and reaction temperature between 685-833K. We noticed that the conversion decreases with the amount of SO2 and increases with the temperature until an optimum, above this value the conversion drop according to the shape of the equilibrium curve. Controlling rate mechanism is studied by varying temperature. Pseudohomogeneous perfect plug flow is used to describe this small tubular reactor. Numerical simulations with MATLAB were performed to validate the experimental results. Good agreement between the model predictions and the experimental results is achieved. Fluid flow description inside the packed bed reactor was performed by using the free fluid and porous media flow model. This model was solved by the commercial software COMSOL Multiphysics. Velocity profile inside the reactor is theoretically obtained.

  2. A simulation of a pebble bed reactor core by the MCNP-4C computer code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhshayesh Moshkbar Khalil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Lack of energy is a major crisis of our century; the irregular increase of fossil fuel costs has forced us to search for novel, cheaper, and safer sources of energy. Pebble bed reactors - an advanced new generation of reactors with specific advantages in safety and cost - might turn out to be the desired candidate for the role. The calculation of the critical height of a pebble bed reactor at room temperature, while using the MCNP-4C computer code, is the main goal of this paper. In order to reduce the MCNP computing time compared to the previously proposed schemes, we have devised a new simulation scheme. Different arrangements of kernels in fuel pebble simulations were investigated and the best arrangement to decrease the MCNP execution time (while keeping the accuracy of the results, chosen. The neutron flux distribution and control rods worth, as well as their shadowing effects, have also been considered in this paper. All calculations done for the HTR-10 reactor core are in good agreement with experimental results.

  3. Racemization of undesired enantiomers: Immobilization of mandelate racemase and application in a fixed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzosek, Katarzyna; Rivera, Mariel A García; Bettenbrock, Katja; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Production of optically pure products can be based on simple unselective synthesis of racemic mixtures combined with a subsequent separation of the enantiomers; however, this approach suffers from a 50% yield limitation which can be overcome by racemization of the undesired enantiomer and recycling. Application of biocatalyst for the racemization steps offers an attractive option for high-yield manufacturing of commercially valuable compounds. Our work focuses on exploiting the potential of racemization with immobilized mandelate racemase. Immobilization of crude mandelate racemase via covalent attachment was optimized for two supports: Eupergit(®) CM and CNBr-activated Sepharose 4 Fast Flow. To allow coupling of enzymatic reaction with enantioselective chromatography, a mobile phase composition compatible with both processes was used in enzymatic reactor. Kinetic parameters obtained analyzing experiments carried out in a batch reactor could be successfully used to predict fixed-bed reactor performance. The applicability of the immobilized enzyme and the determined kinetic parameters were validated in transient experiments recording responses to pulse injections of R-mandelic acid. The approach investigated can be used for futher design and optimization of high yield combined resolution processes. The characterized fixed-bed enzymatic reactor can be integrated e.g. with chromatographic single- or multicolumn steps in various configurations.

  4. Conceptual design study of Pebble Bed Type High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor with annular core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the Conceptual Design Study of Pebble Bed Type High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor with Annular Core Structure. From this study, it is made clear that the thermal power of the Pebble Bed Type Reactor can be increased to 500MW through introducing the annular core structure without losing the inherent safe characteristics (in the coolant depressurization accident, the fuel temperature does not exceed the temperature where the fuel defect begins.) This thermal power is two times higher than the inherent safe Pebble Bed Type High temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR) designed in West Germany. From this result, it is foreseen that the ratio of the plant cost to the reactor power is reduced and the economy of the plant operation is improved. The reactor performances e.g. fuel burnup and fuel temperature are maintained in same level of the MHTGR. (author)

  5. Sequential UASB and dual media packed-bed reactors for domestic wastewater treatment - experiment and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Gómez, Raúl; Renman, Gunno

    2016-01-01

    A wastewater treatment system composed of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor followed by a packed-bed reactor (PBR) filled with Sorbulite(®) and Polonite(®) filter material was tested in a laboratory bench-scale experiment. The system was operated for 50 weeks and achieved very efficient total phosphorus (P) removal (99%), 7-day biochemical oxygen demand removal (99%) and pathogenic bacteria reduction (99%). However, total nitrogen was only moderately reduced in the system (40%). A model focusing on simulation of organic material, solids and size of granules was then implemented and validated for the UASB reactor. Good agreement between the simulated and measured results demonstrated the capacity of the model to predict the behaviour of solids and chemical oxygen demand, which is critical for successful P removal and recovery in the PBR. PMID:27332842

  6. Elimination of weapons grade plutonium via burning in a Particle Bed Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Maise, G.; Todosow, M.

    1993-08-01

    An initial assessment of a concept for burning weapons grade plutonium based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) is described. The high power density/flux level achievable with the PBR make it an attractive candidate for this application. The PBR based plutonium burner concept also possesses a number of safety and economic benefits relative to other reactor based Pu-burner approaches including a safeguards advantages, a low inventory of radionuclides, and high integrity, coated fuel particles which can withstand extremely high temperatures while retaining virtually all fission products. In addition the reactor also possesses a number of ``engineered safety features,`` which, along with the use of high temperature capable materials further enhance its safety characteristics.

  7. Las degradation in a fluidized bed reactor and phylogenetic characterization of the biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A fluidized bed reactor was used to study the degradation of the surfactant linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS. The reactor was inoculated with anaerobic sludge and was fed with a synthetic substrate supplemented with LAS in increasing concentrations (8.2 to 45.8 mg l-1. The removal efficiency of 93% was obtained after 270 days of operation. Subsequently, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the sample at the last stage of the reactor operation recovered 105 clones belonging to the domain Bacteria. These clones represented a variety of phyla with significant homology to Bacteroidetes (40%, Proteobacteria (42%, Verrucomicrobia (4%, Acidobacteria (3%, Firmicutes (2%, and Gemmatimonadetes (1%. A small fraction of the clones (8% was not related to any phylum. Such phyla variety indicated the role of microbial consortia in degrading the surfactant LAS.

  8. Steam reforming of propane in a fluidized bed membrane reactor for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakib, Mohammad A.; Grace, John R.; Lim, C. Jim; Ghiasi, Bahman [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of British Columbia, 2360 East Mall, Vancouver BC (Canada); Elnashaie, Said S.E.H. [College of Engineering, Misr University for Science and Technology, Distinguished District, 6th of October Province (Egypt)

    2010-06-15

    Steam reforming of propane was carried out in a fluidized bed membrane reactor to investigate a feedstock other than natural gas for production of pure hydrogen. Close to equilibrium conditions were achieved inside the reactor with fluidized catalyst due to the very fast steam reforming reactions. Use of hydrogen permselective Pd{sub 77}Ag{sub 23} membrane panels to extract pure hydrogen shifted the reaction towards complete conversion of the hydrocarbons, including methane, the key intermediate product. Irreversible propane steam reforming is limited by the reversibility of the steam reforming of this methane. To assess the performance improvement due to pure hydrogen withdrawal, experiments were conducted with one and six membrane panels installed along the height of the reactor. The results indicate that a compact reformer can be achieved for pure hydrogen production for a light hydrocarbon feedstock like propane, at moderate operating temperatures of 475-550 C, with increased hydrogen yield. (author)

  9. Fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor for nanoparticles coating via atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Chen-Long; Liu, Xiao; Chen, Rong, E-mail: rongchen@mail.hust.edu.cn, E-mail: bshan@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Shan, Bin, E-mail: rongchen@mail.hust.edu.cn, E-mail: bshan@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die & Mould Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2015-07-15

    A fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor has been designed for coating on nanoparticles (NPs) via atomic layer deposition. It consists of five major parts: reaction chamber, dosing and fluidizing section, pumping section, rotary manipulator components, as well as a double-layer cartridge for the storage of particles. In the deposition procedure, continuous fluidization of particles enlarges and homogenizes the void fraction in the particle bed, while rotation enhances the gas-solid interactions to stabilize fluidization. The particle cartridge presented here enables both the fluidization and rotation acting on the particle bed, demonstrated by the analysis of pressure drop. Moreover, enlarged interstitials and intense gas–solid contact under sufficient fluidizing velocity and proper rotation speed facilitate the precursor delivery throughout the particle bed and consequently provide a fast coating process. The cartridge can ensure precursors flowing through the particle bed exclusively to achieve high utilization without static exposure operation. By optimizing superficial gas velocities and rotation speeds, minimum pulse time for complete coating has been shortened in experiment, and in situ mass spectrometry showed the precursor usage can reach 90%. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy results suggested a saturated growth of nanoscale Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films on spherical SiO{sub 2} NPs. Finally, the uniformity and composition of the shells were characterized by high angle annular dark field-transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  10. Investigation of Multiphase Flow in a Packed Bed Reactor Under Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Yongsheng; Motil, Brian; Rame, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study the two-phase flow phenomena in a packed bed reactor using an integrated experimental and numerical method. The cylindrical bed is filled with uniformly sized spheres. In the experiment water and air are injected into the bed simultaneously. The pressure distribution along the bed will be measured. The numerical simulation is based on a two-phase flow solver which solves the Navier-Stokes equations on Cartesian grids. A novel coupled level set and moment of fluid method is used to construct the interface. A sequential method is used to position spheres in the cylinder. Preliminary experimental results showed that the tested flow rates resulted in pulse flow. The numerical simulation revealed that air bubbles could merge into larger bubbles and also could break up into smaller bubbles to pass through the pores in the bed. Preliminary results showed that flow passed through regions where the porosity is high. Comparison between the experimental and numerical results in terms of pressure distributions at different flow injection rates will be conducted. Comparison of flow phenomena under terrestrial gravity and microgravity will be made.

  11. Special Nuclear Material Control by the Power Reactor Operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A relatively new and extremely valuable fuel for electric power production, uranium, requires very careful inventory control from the time the reactor operator assumes financial responsibility for this material until, as partially expended fuel, it is transferred to another facility and the remaining part of its initial value is recovered. Most power reactor operators were operating fossil-fuelled power plants before the advent of nuclear power and have long since established rather complete and adequate controls for these fossil fuels. The reactor operator must have no less adequate controls for the special nuclear material used in his nuclear plant. Power reactor, operation is not an ancient science and during its relatively short history our engineers and scientists have been constantly improving plant designs and methods of operation to reduce costs and make our nuclear plants competitive with fossil-fuelled conventional plants. Nuclear material management must be as modern and efficient as is humanly possible to ensure that technological advances leading to reduced costs are not lost by poor handling of nuclear fuel and the records pertaining to fuel inventory. Nuclear material management requires the maintaining of complete and informative records by the power reactor operator. These records need not be complex to satisfy the criteria of completeness and adequacy. In fact, simplicity is extremely desirable. Despite the fact that nuclear fuel is new and completely different to our conventional fuels no mystery should be attached thereto. Nuclear material control as part of nuclear material management is not limited to simple inventory work but it is the basis for a great deal of other activity that is an inherent part of any power reactor operations such as irradiated fuel shipments, reprocessing of spent fuel, with its associated accounting for reclaimed fuel and material produced during reactor operation, and the establishing and maintaining of an adequate

  12. Integrated lid unit for a nuclear reactor of standard construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is an integrated lid unit for a nuclear reactor of standard construction, where many components and sub-groups of the upper reactor structure are collected into one unit, which is lifted in one lifting operation from the reactor containment vessel. The integrated lid unit includes, in particular, the pressure vessel lid, a cooling jacket, the control rod drive mechanisms, a catch plate, a lifting device, a winch and a cable connection plate. (orig.)

  13. Chernobyl and the safety of nuclear reactors in OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report assesses the possible bearing of the Chernobyl accident on the safety of nuclear reactors in OECD countries. It discusses analyses of the accident performed in several countries as well as improvements to the safety of RBMK reactors announced by the USSR. Several remaining questions are identified. The report compares RBMK safety features with those of commercial reactors in OECD countries and evaluates a number of issues raised by the Chernobyl accident

  14. Plutonium and minor actinide utilisation in a pebble-bed high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper contains results of the analysis of the pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled PUMA reactor loaded with plutonium and minor actinide (Pu/MA) fuel. Starting from knowledge and experience gained in the Euratom FP5 projects HTR-N and HTR-N1, this study aims at demonstrating the potential of high temperature reactors to utilize or transmute Pu/MA fuel. The work has been performed within the Euratom FP6 project PUMA. A number of different fuel types and fuel configurations have been analyzed and compared with respect to incineration performance and safety-related reactor parameters. The results show the excellent plutonium and minor actinide burning capabilities of the high temperature reactor. The largest degree of incineration is attained in the case of an HTR fuelled by pure plutonium fuel as it remains critical at very deep burnup of the discharged pebbles. Addition of minor actinides to the fuel leads to decrease of the achievable discharge burnup and therefore smaller fraction of actinides incinerated during reactor operation. The inert-matrix fuel design improves the transmutation performance of the reactor, while the 'wallpaper' fuel does not have advantage over the standard fuel design in this respect. After 100 years of decay following the fuel discharge, the total amount of actinides remains almost unchanged for all of the fuel types considered. Among the plutonium isotopes, only the amount of Pu-241 is reduced significantly due to its relatively short half-life. (authors)

  15. Plutonium and minor actinide utilisation in a pebble-bed high temperature reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, B. Y.; Kuijper, J. C.; Oppe, J.; De Haas, J. B. M. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01

    This paper contains results of the analysis of the pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled PUMA reactor loaded with plutonium and minor actinide (Pu/MA) fuel. Starting from knowledge and experience gained in the Euratom FP5 projects HTR-N and HTR-N1, this study aims at demonstrating the potential of high temperature reactors to utilize or transmute Pu/MA fuel. The work has been performed within the Euratom FP6 project PUMA. A number of different fuel types and fuel configurations have been analyzed and compared with respect to incineration performance and safety-related reactor parameters. The results show the excellent plutonium and minor actinide burning capabilities of the high temperature reactor. The largest degree of incineration is attained in the case of an HTR fuelled by pure plutonium fuel as it remains critical at very deep burnup of the discharged pebbles. Addition of minor actinides to the fuel leads to decrease of the achievable discharge burnup and therefore smaller fraction of actinides incinerated during reactor operation. The inert-matrix fuel design improves the transmutation performance of the reactor, while the 'wallpaper' fuel does not have advantage over the standard fuel design in this respect. After 100 years of decay following the fuel discharge, the total amount of actinides remains almost unchanged for all of the fuel types considered. Among the plutonium isotopes, only the amount of Pu-241 is reduced significantly due to its relatively short half-life. (authors)

  16. Hydrogen production by water dissociation from a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This memento presents the production of hydrogen by water decomposition, the energy needed for the electrolysis, the thermochemical cycles for a decomposition at low temperature and the possible nuclear reactors associated. (A.L.B.)

  17. Accelerators and nuclear reactors as tools in hot atom chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of accelerators and of nuclear reactors - the latter to a lesser extent - are discussed in view of their present and future use in hot atom chemistry research and its applications. (author)

  18. Solid0Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2008-09-30

    This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP).

  19. Reactor/Brayton power systems for nuclear electric spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies are currently underway to assess the technological feasibility of a nuclear-reactor-powered spacecraft propelled by electric thrusters. The purpose of this study was to provide comparative information on a closed cycle gas turbine power conversion system

  20. Plutonium Discharge Rates and Spent Nuclear Fuel Inventory Estimates for Nuclear Reactors Worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian K. Castle; Shauna A. Hoiland; Richard A. Rankin; James W. Sterbentz

    2012-09-01

    This report presents a preliminary survey and analysis of the five primary types of commercial nuclear power reactors currently in use around the world. Plutonium mass discharge rates from the reactors’ spent fuel at reload are estimated based on a simple methodology that is able to use limited reactor burnup and operational characteristics collected from a variety of public domain sources. Selected commercial reactor operating and nuclear core characteristics are also given for each reactor type. In addition to the worldwide commercial reactors survey, a materials test reactor survey was conducted to identify reactors of this type with a significant core power rating. Over 100 material or research reactors with a core power rating >1 MW fall into this category. Fuel characteristics and spent fuel inventories for these material test reactors are also provided herein.