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Sample records for bed nuclear reactor

  1. Fixed bed nuclear reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The fixed bed nuclear reactor (FBNR) is essentially a pressurized light water reactor (PWR) having spherical fuel elements constituting a suspended reactor core at its lowest bed porosity. The core is movable thus under any adverse condition, the fuel elements can leave the reactor core naturally through the force of gravity and fall into the passively cooled fuel chamber or leave the reactor all together entering the spent fuel pool. It is a small and modular reactor being simple in design. Its spent fuel is in such a convenient form and size that may be utilized directly as the source for irradiation and applications in agriculture and industry. This feature results in a positive impact on waste management and environmental protection. The principle features of the proposed reactor are that the concept is polyvalent, simple in design, may operate either as fixed or fluidized bed, have the core suspended contributing to inherent safety, passive cooling features of the reactor. The reactor is modular and has integrated primary system utilizing either water, supercritical steam or helium gas as its coolant. Some of the advantages of the proposed reactor are being modular, low environmental impact, exclusion of severe accidents, short construction period, flexible adaptation to demand, excellent load following characteristics, and competitive economics. The characteristics of the Fluidized Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR) concept may be analyzed under the light of the requirements set for the IV generation nuclear reactors. It is shown that FBNR meet the goals of (1) Providing sustainable energy generation that meets clean air objectives and promotes long-term availability of systems and effective fuel utilization for worldwide energy production, (2) Minimize and manage their nuclear waste and notably reduce the long term stewardship burden in the future, thereby improving protection for the public health and the environment, (3) Excel in safety and reliability

  2. Fixed bed suspended core nuclear reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fixed bed nuclear reactor (FBNR) is essentially a pressurized light water reactor having spherical fuel elements constituting a suspended reactor core at its lowest bed porosity. The principle features of the proposed reactor are that the concept is polyvalent, simple in design, may operate either as fixed or fluidized bed, have the core suspended contributing to inherent safety, passive cooling features of the reactor. The reactor is modular and has an integrated primary system utilizing either water, supercritical steam or helium gas as its coolant. Some of the advantages of the proposed reactor are being modular, low environmental impact, exclusion of severe accidents, short construction period, flexible adaptation to demand, excellent load following characteristics, and competitive economics. (orig.)

  3. The fixed bed nuclear reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The core of a water moderated Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR), possessing, for instance, an electrical power of 40 MW, consists of 1.35 million fuel pellets (9.5 t) with a diameter of 1.5 cm each. The low enriched uranium fuel is made of TRISO type microspheres used in the HTGR, embedded in a graphite matrix and cladded by a shell of 1 mm SiC. Under any thinkable operational condition the fuel temperature will be below 400 C whereas its stability limit is at about 1600 C. The first characteristic of the FBNR is, therefore, its robust fuel under relatively 'cold' operating conditions and - due to the outer SiC - shell layer - the freedom from any hydrogen production. To operate the reactor the fuel pellets are pumped by a flow of water from below into the core regions where they form a stable fixed bed of about 4 cubic meter and become critical for energy production heating the outlet water to about 330 C (at 160 bar) which feeds a steam generator. The new safety feature is now the following: In case of any abnormity (e.g. external power failure, overheating etc.) the circulating pump stops and - due to gravity - the fuel pellets fall automatically out of the core region into a helical 'fuel chamber' underneath the core where their decay heat is transferred passively by natural circulation to a water tank housing the fuel chamber. The safety principle, applied here, is: The loss of an active component (circulating pump) induces a self-controlled, passively working shut-down manoeuvre accompanied by a foolproof decay heat removal without any emergency power system or any human interaction. The fuel chamber is sealed and is transported as the only reactor component to and from the reactor site. There is no possibility to irradiate fertile fuel, too. For a long-life core (larger than a 10 years cycle time) the fuel can either be poisoned by gadolinium-oxide or by a piston type core limiter adjusting the height and controlling thereby the number of the fuel pellets in

  4. An energy amplifier fluidized bed nuclear reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of a fluidized bed nuclear reactor driven by an energy amplifier system is described. The reactor has promising characteristics of inherent safety and passive cooling. The reactor can easily operate with any desired spectrum in order to be a plutonium burner or have it operate with thorium fuel cycle. (orig.)

  5. Water desalination by a fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The great need for potable water in the world motivated the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to study the feasibility of nuclear seawater desalination. The consensus reached is that nuclear desalination is technically feasible, though cost and social acceptability are recognized as major problems to overcome. Here an inherently safe reactor with reduced cost is proposed to overcome these barriers. The reactor is a simple small modular nuclear reactor based on fluidized bed concept with passive cooling characteristics. (orig.)

  6. Fluidized bed nuclear reactor as a IV generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this paper is to analyze the characteristics of the Fluidized Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR) concept under the light of the requirements set for the IV generation nuclear reactors. It is seen that FBNR generally meets the goals of providing sustainable energy generation that meets clean air objectives and promotes long-term availability of systems and effective fuel utilization for worldwide energy production; minimize and manage their nuclear waste and notably reduce the long term stewardship burden in the future, thereby improving protection for the public health and the environment; increase the assurance that it is a very unattractive and least desirable route for diversion or theft of weapons-usable materials; excel in safety and reliability; have a very low likelihood and degree of reactor core damage; eliminate the need for offsite emergency response; have a clear life-cycle cost advantage over other energy sources; have a level of financial risk comparable to other energy projects. The other advantages of the proposed design are being modular, low environmental impact, exclusion of severe accidents, short construction period, flexible adaptation to demand, excellent load following characteristics, and competitive economics. (author)

  7. Study of reactivity of fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor physics calculations of a 19 module Fluidized Bed Nuclear Reactor using Leopard and Odog codes are performed. The behaviour of the reactor was studied by calculating the reactivity of the reactor as a function of the parameters governing the operational and accidental conditions of the reactor. The effects of temperature, pressure, and vapor generation in the core on the reactivity are calculated. Also the start up behaviour of the reactor is analyzed. For the purpose of the study of a prototype research reactor, the calculations on a one module reactor have been performed. (Author)

  8. A Spouted Bed Reactor Monitoring System for Particulate Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conversion and coating of particle nuclear fuel is performed in spouted (fluidized) bed reactors. The reactor must be capable of operating at temperatures up to 2000 C in inert, flammable, and coating gas environments. The spouted bed reactor geometry is defined by a graphite retort with a 2.5 inch inside diameter, conical section with a 60o included angle, and a 4 mm gas inlet orifice diameter through which particles are removed from the reactor at the completion of each run. The particles may range from 200 (micro)m to 2 mm in diameter. Maintaining optimal gas flow rates slightly above the minimum spouting velocity throughout the duration of each run is complicated by the variation of particle size and density as conversion and/or coating reactions proceed in addition to gas composition and temperature variations. In order to achieve uniform particle coating, prevent agglomeration of the particle bed, and monitor the reaction progress, a spouted bed monitoring system was developed. The monitoring system includes a high-sensitivity, low-response time differential pressure transducer paired with a signal processing, data acquisition, and process control unit which allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor. The pressure transducer is mounted upstream of the spouted bed reactor gas inlet. The gas flow into the reactor induces motion of the particles in the bed and prevents the particles from draining from the reactor due to gravitational forces. Pressure fluctuations in the gas inlet stream are generated as the particles in the bed interact with the entering gas stream. The pressure fluctuations are produced by bulk movement of the bed, generation and movement of gas bubbles through the bed, and the individual motion of particles and particle subsets in the bed. The pressure fluctuations propagate upstream to the pressure transducer where they can be monitored. Pressure fluctuation, mean differential pressure, gas flow rate, reactor

  9. A Spouted Bed Reactor Monitoring System for Particulate Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. S. Wendt; R. L. Bewley; W. E. Windes

    2007-06-01

    Conversion and coating of particle nuclear fuel is performed in spouted (fluidized) bed reactors. The reactor must be capable of operating at temperatures up to 2000°C in inert, flammable, and coating gas environments. The spouted bed reactor geometry is defined by a graphite retort with a 2.5 inch inside diameter, conical section with a 60° included angle, and a 4 mm gas inlet orifice diameter through which particles are removed from the reactor at the completion of each run. The particles may range from 200 µm to 2 mm in diameter. Maintaining optimal gas flow rates slightly above the minimum spouting velocity throughout the duration of each run is complicated by the variation of particle size and density as conversion and/or coating reactions proceed in addition to gas composition and temperature variations. In order to achieve uniform particle coating, prevent agglomeration of the particle bed, and monitor the reaction progress, a spouted bed monitoring system was developed. The monitoring system includes a high-sensitivity, low-response time differential pressure transducer paired with a signal processing, data acquisition, and process control unit which allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor. The pressure transducer is mounted upstream of the spouted bed reactor gas inlet. The gas flow into the reactor induces motion of the particles in the bed and prevents the particles from draining from the reactor due to gravitational forces. Pressure fluctuations in the gas inlet stream are generated as the particles in the bed interact with the entering gas stream. The pressure fluctuations are produced by bulk movement of the bed, generation and movement of gas bubbles through the bed, and the individual motion of particles and particle subsets in the bed. The pressure fluctuations propagate upstream to the pressure transducer where they can be monitored. Pressure fluctuation, mean differential pressure, gas flow rate, reactor

  10. Dynamic stability of a fluidized-bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in the study of a fluidized-bed nuclear reactor's stability, due to short and long time transients, are discussed. The point-kinetic model, which considers flux variation in the axial direction, is applied to study short time transients, and the theory of bifurcation is used for long time transients. Numerical results are presented for both transients. The preliminary results indicate that this concept of a nuclear reactor has a behavior similar to that of a conventional reactor regarding its dynamic stability

  11. Study on transient of fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The point kinetic equations for a Fluidized-Bed Nuclear Reactor are solved by the method of Hansen. Due to the time varying nature of the reactor volume, the equations have a non-conventional formulation (moving boundary problem), but the method of solution preserves its asymptotic convergence and efficiency characteristics under this formulation. A one dimensional and linearized thermal hydraulics feedback model was coupled to the point kinetic equations in order to obtain a more realistic representation of the reactor power. The resulting equations are solved by the Euler explicit method. (author)

  12. Pellet bed reactor concepts for nuclear propulsion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Morley, N.J.; Pelaccio, D.G.; Juhasz, A. [Univ of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Pellet bed reactor (PeBR) concepts have been developed for nuclear thermal and nuclear electric propulsion, and bimodal applications. This annular core, fast spectrum reactor offers many desirable design and safety features. These features include high-power density, small reactor size, full retention of fission products, passive decay heat removal, redundancy in reactor control, negative temperature reactivity feedback, ground testing of the fully assembled reactor using electric heating and nonnuclear fuel elements, and the option of fueling on the launch pad or fueling and refueling in orbit. In addition to these features, the concepts for nuclear electric propulsion and for bimodal power and thermal propulsion have no single point failure. The average power density in the reactor for nuclear thermal propulsion ranges from 2.2 to 3.3 MW/I and for a 15-MWe nuclear electric propulsion system the total power system specific mass is about 3.3 kg/kWe. The bimodal-PeBR system concepts offer specific impulse in excess of 650 s, tens of Newtons of thrust, and total system specific power ranging from 11 to 21.9 We/kg at the 10- and 40-kWe levels, respectively. 35 refs.

  13. Nuclear Safeguards Considerations For The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillip Casey Durst; David Beddingfield; Brian Boyer; Robert Bean; Michael Collins; Michael Ehinger; David Hanks; David L. Moses; Lee Refalo

    2009-10-01

    High temperature reactors (HTRs) have been considered since the 1940s, and have been constructed and demonstrated in the United Kingdom (Dragon), United States (Peach Bottom and Fort Saint Vrain), Japan (HTTR), Germany (AVR and THTR-300), and have been the subject of conceptual studies in Russia (VGM). The attraction to these reactors is that they can use a variety of reactor fuels, including abundant thorium, which upon reprocessing of the spent fuel can produce fissile U-233. Hence, they could extend the stocks of available uranium, provided the fuel is reprocessed. Another attractive attribute is that HTRs typically operate at a much higher temperature than conventional light water reactors (LWRs), because of the use of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coated (TRISO) fuel particles embedded in ceramic graphite. Rather than simply discharge most of the unused heat from the working fluid in the power plant to the environment, engineers have been designing reactors for 40 years to recover this heat and make it available for district heating or chemical conversion plants. Demonstrating high-temperature nuclear energy conversion was the purpose behind Fort Saint Vrain in the United States, THTR-300 in Germany, HTTR in Japan, and HTR-10 and HTR-PM, being built in China. This resulted in nuclear reactors at least 30% or more thermodynamically efficient than conventional LWRs, especially if the waste heat can be effectively utilized in chemical processing plants. A modern variant of high temperature reactors is the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Originally developed in the United States and Germany, it is now being redesigned and marketed by the Republic of South Africa and China. The team examined historical high temperature and high temperature gas reactors (HTR and HTGR) and reviewed safeguards considerations for this reactor. The following is a preliminary report on this topic prepared under the ASA-100 Advanced Safeguards Project in support of the NNSA Next

  14. Performance analysis of 233U for fixed bed nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criticality and burn up behavior of the Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR) are investigated for the mixed fuel 233UO2/ThO2 as an alternative to low enriched 235UO2 fuel. CERMET fuel with a zirconium matrix and cladding has been used throughout the study. The main results of the study can be summarized as follows: Reactor criticality is already achieved by ∝2% 233UO2 with the mixed 233UO2/ThO2 fuel. At higher 233U fractions, reactor criticality rises rapidly and exceeds keff > 1.5 already by 9% 233UO2. With 100% 233UO2, start up criticality can reach keff = 2.0975. Time dependent reactor criticality keff and fuel burn up have been investigated for two different mixed fuel 233UO2/ThO2 compositions, namely: 4% 233UO2 + 96% ThO2 for a reactor power of 40 MWel (120 MWth) and 9% 233UO2 + 91% ThO2 for a reactor power of 70 MWel (210 MWth). Sufficient reactor criticality (keff > 1.06) for continuous operation without fuel change can be sustained during ∝ 5 and 12 years with 4% and 9% 233UO2 fractions in the mixed fuel, leading to burn ups of ∝ 36000 and > 105000 MWD/t, respectively. Thorium based fuel produces no prolific uranium. Plutonium production remains negligible. (orig.)

  15. Pellet bed reactor concept for nuclear electric propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) applications, gas cooled nuclear reactors with dynamic energy conversion systems offer high specific power and low total mass. This paper describes the Pellet Bed Reactor (PeBR) concept for potential NEP missions to Mars. The helium cooled, 75--80 MWt PeBR, consists of a single annular fuel region filled with a randomly packed bed of spherical fuel pellets, is designed for multiple starts, and offers unique safety and operation features. Each fuel pellet, about 8--10 mm in diameter, is composed of hundreds of TRISO type fuel microspheres embedded in a graphite matrix for a full retention of fission products. To eliminate the likelihood of a single-point failure, the annular core of the PeBR is divided into three 120 degree sectors. Each sector is self contained and separate and capable of operating and being cooled on its own and in cooperation with either one or two other sectors. Each sector is coupled to a separate, 5 MWe Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) energy conversion unit and is subcritical for safe handling and launching. In the event of a failure of the cooling system of a core sector, the reactor power level may be reduced, allowing adjacent sectors to convect the heat away using their own cooling system, thus maintaining reactor operation. Also, due to the absence of an internal core structure in the PeBR core, fueling of the reactor can easily be performed either at the launch facility or in orbit, and refueling can be accomplished in orbit as needed to extend the power system lifetime

  16. Sustainability and the Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhang Sefidvash

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability as a multifaceted and holistic concept is analyzed. Sustainability involves human relationship with elements such as natural environment, economy, power, governance, education and technology with the ultimate purpose of carrying forward an ever-advancing civilization. The Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR is an innovative, small, simple in design, inherently safe, non-proliferating, and environmentally friendly concept that its deployment can generate energy in a sustainable manner contributing to the prosperity of humanity. The development of FBNR will provide electricity as well as desalinated water through a simple but advanced technology for the developing, as well as developed countries. FBNR is environmentally friendly due to its inherent safety and the convenience of using its spent fuel as the source of radiation for irradiation purposes in agriculture, industry, and medicine. Politically, if a ping pong game brought peace between China and USA, a program of development of FBNR supported by the peace loving international community can become a more mature means to bring peace among certain apparently hostile nations who crave sustainable energy, desalinated water and simple advanced technology.

  17. The fission power of a conceptual fluidised bed thermal nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fluidised bed thermal nuclear reactor investigated in this paper is an innovative reactor design in which 1 mm diameter TRISO-coated fuel particles are fluidised by helium gas coolant in a 2,5 m diameter and 6 m high cylindrical bed. The coolant flow rate provides part of the reactivity control mechanism. The TRISO-coated particles have an enriched uranium oxide kernel surrounded by layers of porous carbon, pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. This paper presents detailed transient modelling results of this conceptual fluidised bed thermal nuclear reactor obtained using the FETCH nuclear criticality model. Previous work has provided evidence to suggest that such a reactor can be dynamically stable for low power outputs of ∝20 MWt. This work focuses on a reactor with a much higher thermal output of 100 MWt. To simulate the fluidised bed reactor the FETCH model has been used to solve the neutron transport equation in full-phase space, coupled to multi-phase gas-particle fluid dynamics. The main difficulty in modelling such a reactor is that its reactivity is a sensitive function of the fuel particle distribution inside the inner fluidised bed reactor cavity. This fuel particle distribution varies chaotically with time which is the root cause of the reactor's power variability. (orig.)

  18. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  19. Design of particle bed reactors for the space nuclear thermal propulsion program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.; Todosow, M.; Maise, G.; Barletta, R.; Schweitzer, D.G. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-02-01

    This paper describes the design for the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) that was considered for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Program. The methods of analysis and their validation are outlined first. Monte Carlo methods were used for the physics analysis, several new algorithms were developed for the fluid dynamics, heat transfer and transient analysis; and commercial codes were used for the stress analysis. We carried out a critical experiment, prototypic of the PBR to validate the reactor physics; blowdown experiments with beds of prototypic dimensions were undertaken to validate the power-extraction capabilities from particle beds. In addition, materials and mechanical design concepts for the fuel elements were experimentally validated. (author).

  20. Numerical Simulation of Accident Scenario in High Temperature Gas Cooled (Pebble Bed) Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, Geoffrey J. [Oregon Institute of Technology - Portland Center, Portland (United States)

    2012-03-15

    The accident scenario resulting from blockages due to the retention of dust in the coolant gas or from the rupture of one or more fuel particles used in the High Temperature Gas Cooled (Pebble Bed) Nuclear Reactors is considered in this paper. The next generation of Advanced High Temperature Reactors (AHTR), are considered for nuclear power production, and for high-temperature hydrogen production using nuclear reactors to reduce the carbon footprint. Blockages can cause LOCA variations in flow and heat transfer that may lead to hot spots within the bed that could compromise reactor safety. Therefore, it is important to know the void fraction distribution and the interstitial velocity field in the packed bed. The blockage for this numerical study simulated a region with significantly lower void than that in the rest of the bed. Finite difference technique solved the simplified continuity, momentum, and energy equations. Any meaningful outcome of the solution depended largely upon the validity of the boundary conditions. Among them, the inlet and outlet velocity profiles required special attention. Thus, a close approximation to these profiles obtained from an experimental set-up established the boundary conditions. This paper presents the development of the elliptic-partial equation for a bed of a bed of pebbles, and the solution procedure. The paper also discusses velocity and temperature profiles obtained from both numerical and experimental set-up, with and without effect of blockage. Based on the studies it is evident that knowledge of LOCA velocity and temperature distribution within the fuel element in a Pebble Bed Nuclear Reactor or AHTR is essential for reactor safety.

  1. Thermal-hydraulic analysis techniques for axisymmetric pebble bed nuclear reactor cores. [PEBBLE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroh, K.R.

    1979-03-01

    The pebble bed reactor's cylindrical core volume contains a random bed of small, spherical fuel-moderator elements. These graphite spheres, containing a central region of dispersed coated-particle fissile and fertile material, are cooled by high pressure helium flowing through the connected interstitial voids. A mathematical model and numerical solution technique have been developed which allow calculation of macroscopic values of thermal-hydraulic variables in an axisymmetric pebble bed nuclear reactor core. The computer program PEBBLE is based on a mathematical model which treats the bed macroscopically as a generating, conducting porous medium. The steady-state model uses a nonlinear Forchheimer-type relation between the coolant pressure gradient and mass flux, with newly derived coefficients for the linear and quadratic resistance terms. The remaining equations in the model make use of mass continuity, and thermal energy balances for the solid and fluid phases.

  2. CFD-DEM simulation of a conceptual gas-cooled fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Lucilla C.; Su, Jian, E-mail: lucillalmeida@gmail.com, E-mail: sujian@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Aguirre, Joao, E-mail: aguirre@rocky-dem.com [Engineering Simulation and Scientific Software (ESSS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Several conceptual designs of the fluidized-bed nuclear reactor have been proposed due to its many advantages over conventional nuclear reactors such as PWRs and BWRs. Amongst their characteristics, the enhanced heat transfer and mixing enables a more uniform temperature distribution, reducing the risk of hot-spot and excessive fuel temperature, in addition to resulting in a higher burnup of the fuel. Furthermore, the relationship between the bed height and reactor neutronics turns the coolant flow rate control into a power production mechanism. Moreover, the possibility of removing the fuel by gravity from the movable core in case of a loss-of-cooling accident increases its safety. High-accuracy modeling of particles and coolant flow in fluidized bed reactors is needed to evaluate reliably the thermal-hydraulic efficiency and safety margin. The two-way coupling between solid and fluid can account for high-fidelity solid-solid interaction and reasonable accuracy in fluid calculation and fluid-solid interaction. In the CFD-DEM model, the particles are modeled as a discrete phase, following the DEM approach, whereas the fluid flow is treated as a continuous phase, described by the averaged Navier-Stokes equations on a computational cell scale. In this work, the coupling methodology between Fluent and Rocky is described. The numerical approach was applied to the simulation of a bubbling fluidized bed and the results were compared to experimental data and showed good agreement. (author)

  3. Study on neutron diffusion and time dependence heat ina fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to model the neutron diffusion and heat transfer for a Fluidized Bed Nuclear Reactor and its solution by Laplace Transform Technique with numerical inversion using Fourier Series. Also Gaussian quadrature and residues techniques were applied for numerical inversion. The neutron transport, diffusion, and point Kinetic equation for this nuclear reactor concept are developed. A matricial and Taylor Series methods are proposed for the solution of the point Kinetic equation which is a time scale problem of Stiff type

  4. Control rod for a pebble bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to leave the density of the pebble bed unchanged when the control rod is driven in and out, the tip of the control rod is provided with moving parts in the form of conical hemispheres or spoons. These parts move close to the control rod when it is driven in and spread out due to the effect of gravity when it is driven out. This loosens the heap of pebble shaped operating elements again. (DG)

  5. Entropy generation minimization for a packed bed reactor in nuclear hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermochemical copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) cycle is a promising method to produce hydrogen with nuclear energy. In this paper, the fluid flow and heat transfer processes are examined for a packed bed chemical reactor in the Cu-Cl cycle. The heat transfer rate is predicted by a heat-momentum analogy for external flow over a particle, using the friction factor and Reynolds number. The Nusselt number correlation compares well against three prior methods to predict the Nusselt number in a packed bed (for various combinations of the void fraction, Reynolds and Prandtl numbers). The analysis is extended to minimize the entropy generation due to heat transfer and fluid flow irreversibilities in the packed bed reactor. (author)

  6. Method for loading, operating, and unloading a ball-bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a method of operating a ball-bed nuclear reactor with fuel element balls. Some have a fissionable material content different from that of others of the balls. It consists of: initially partly filling a reactor core with fuel balls of sufficient fissionable material content for establishing criticality and a desired level of power production at the completion of the partial filling and then, without any further filling of the reactor cavern, starting reactor operation; thereafter without any removal of fuel balls from the reactor cavern, filling fuel balls continually or in groups at relatively short intervals into the reactor cavern during increasing burning up of the fuel balls already, for compensation of the diminishing fissionable material content of the reactor core constituted by the fuel balls until a final total quantity of filling is reached; after the final filling quantity is reached and burning up has occurred, shutting down the reactor, cooling it off, releasing the pressure in the cavern, and thereafter unloading all the fuel balls from the reactor cavern, unloading being begun when the reactor is shut down and being completed before the reactor is restarted

  7. Nuclear thermal propulsion engine based on particle bed reactor using light water steam as a propellant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the possibility of configuring a water cooled Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) rocket, based on a Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) is investigated. This rocket will be used to operate on water obtained from near earth objects. The conclusions reached in this paper indicate that it is possible to configure a PBR based NTP rocket to operate on water and meet the mission requirements envisioned for it. No insurmountable technology issues have been identified

  8. Experimental and computational investigation of flow of pebbles in a pebble bed nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khane, Vaibhav B.

    The Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) is a 4th generation nuclear reactor which is conceptually similar to moving bed reactors used in the chemical and petrochemical industries. In a PBR core, nuclear fuel in the form of pebbles moves slowly under the influence of gravity. Due to the dynamic nature of the core, a thorough understanding about slow and dense granular flow of pebbles is required from both a reactor safety and performance evaluation point of view. In this dissertation, a new integrated experimental and computational study of granular flow in a PBR has been performed. Continuous pebble re-circulation experimental set-up, mimicking flow of pebbles in a PBR, is designed and developed. Experimental investigation of the flow of pebbles in a mimicked test reactor was carried out for the first time using non-invasive radioactive particle tracking (RPT) and residence time distribution (RTD) techniques to measure the pebble trajectory, velocity, overall/zonal residence times, flow patterns etc. The tracer trajectory length and overall/zonal residence time is found to increase with change in pebble's initial seeding position from the center towards the wall of the test reactor. Overall and zonal average velocities of pebbles are found to decrease from the center towards the wall. Discrete element method (DEM) based simulations of test reactor geometry were also carried out using commercial code EDEM(TM) and simulation results were validated using the obtained benchmark experimental data. In addition, EDEM(TM) based parametric sensitivity study of interaction properties was carried out which suggests that static friction characteristics play an important role from a packed/pebble beds structural characterization point of view. To make the RPT technique viable for practical applications and to enhance its accuracy, a novel and dynamic technique for RPT calibration was designed and developed. Preliminary feasibility results suggest that it can be implemented as a non

  9. Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics analyses of the pellet bed reactor for nuclear thermal propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morley, N.J.; El-Genk, S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics design and analyses of the pellet bed reactor for nuclear thermal propulsion are performed based on consideration of reactor criticality, passive decay heat removal, maximum fuel temperature, and subcriticality during a water flooding accident. Besides calculating the dimensions of the reactor core to satisfy the excess reactivity requirement at the beginning-of-mission of 1.25 $ (K{sub eff} of 1.01), the TWODANT discrete ordinates code is used to estimate the radial and axial fission power density profiles in the core. These power profiles are used in the nuclear propulsion thermal-hydraulic analysis model (NUTHAM-S) to determine the two-dimensional steady-state temperature, pressure, and flow fields in the core and optimize the orificing in the hot frit to avoid hot spots in the core at full-power operation.

  10. Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics analyses of the pellet bed reactor for nuclear thermal propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics design and analyses of the pellet bed reactor for nuclear thermal propulsion are performed based on consideration of reactor criticality, passive decay heat removal, maximum fuel temperature, and subcriticality during a water flooding accident. Besides calculating the dimensions of the reactor core to satisfy the excess reactivity requirement at the beginning-of-mission of 1.25 $ (Keff of 1.01), the TWODANT discrete ordinates code is used to estimate the radial and axial fission power density profiles in the core. These power profiles are used in the nuclear propulsion thermal-hydraulic analysis model (NUTHAM-S) to determine the two-dimensional steady-state temperature, pressure, and flow fields in the core and optimize the orificing in the hot frit to avoid hot spots in the core at full-power operation

  11. Space nuclear power studies in France. - A new concept of particle bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cooperative program about space nuclear turboelectric space power systems was initiated in 1982 by both the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) agencies of the French government, with a view to assessing the feasibility, the lead time and the cost for the development of nuclear space power systems relevant to the power range of 20 to 400 kWe. The effort on conceptual studies recently shifted towards low power systems (20 kWe). In order to widely cover the range of possible technologies for the 20-kWe space power systems, and to assess the impact of the reactor concept (liquid metal versus gas cooled) and of the relevant operating temperature upon the system performances, a set of three reference turboelectric systems were selected for comparison. Those considered for both extreme bounds of the explored range of maximum heat source temperature (970 K and 1470 K), use a liquid metal cooled reactor (sodium or Nak and lithium respectively) and the basic features of the 200 kWe system. In addition to both liquid metal cooled systems, a third system using a gas cooled epithermal particle bed reactor, to drive a direct cycle conversion system with a turbine inlet temperature of 1120 K is being investigated; this system is intended to make full use of the heat resisting materials and of the techniques, which have been developed for the high temperature gas cooled reactors

  12. Optimized Core Design and Fuel Management of a Pebble-Bed Type Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) has been selected by the international Generation IV research initiative as one of the six most promising nuclear reactor concepts that are expected to enter service in the second half of the 21st century. The VHTR is characterized by a high plant efficiency and a high fuel discharge burnup level. More specifically, the (pebble-bed type) High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is known for its inherently safe characteristics, coming from a negative temperature reactivity feedback, a low power density and a large thermal inertia of the core. The core of a pebble-bed reactor consists of graphite spheres (pebbles) that form a randomly packed porous bed, which is cooled by high pressure helium. The pebbles contain thousands of fuel particles, which are coated with several pyrocarbon and silicon carbon layers that are designed to contain the fission products that are formed during operation of the reactor. The inherent safety concept has been demonstrated in small pebble-bed reactors in practice, but an increase in the reactor size and power is required for cost-effective power production. An increase of the power density in order to increase the helium coolant outlet temperature is attractive with regard to the efficiency and possible process heat applications. However, this increase leads in general to higher fuel temperatures, which could lead to a consequent increase of the fuel coating failure probability. This thesis deals with the pebble-bed type VHTR that aims at an increased coolant outlet temperature of 1000 degrees C and beyond. For the simulation of the neutronic and thermal-hydraulic behavior of the reactor the DALTON-THERMIX coupled code system has been developed and has been validated against experiments performed in the AVR and HTR-10 reactors. An analysis of the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) design shows that the inherent safety concept that has been demonstrated in practice in the smaller AVR and HTR-10

  13. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of the pellet bed reactor for nuclear thermal propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morley, N.J. (Institute for Space Nuclear Power Studies, Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1341 (United States)); El-Genk, M.S. (Institute for Space Nuclear Power Studies, Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1341 (United States))

    1994-09-01

    A two-dimensional steady-state thermal-hydraulics analysis of the pellet bed reactor for nuclear thermal propulsion is performed using the NUTHAM- S thermal-hydraulic code. The effects of axial heat and momentum transfers on the temperature and flow fields in the core are investigated. In addition, the porosity profile in the hot frit is optimized to avoid the development of a hot spot in the reactor core. Finally, a sensitivity analysis is performed using the optimized hot frit porosity profile to determine the effects of varying the propellant and core parameters on the peak fuel temperature and pressure drop across the core. These parameters include the inlet temperature and mass flow rate of the hydrogen propellant, average porosity of the core bed, the porosity of the hot frit, and local hot frit blockage. The peak temperature of the fuel is shown not to exceed its melting point as a result of changing any of these parameters from the base case, with the exception of hot frit blockage greater than 60% over a 0.12m axial segment of the hot frit. ((orig.))

  14. Criticality and burn up evolutions of the Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor with alternative fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time evolution of criticality and burn-up grades of the Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR) are investigated for alternative fuels. These are: (1) low enriched uranium, (2) weapon grade plutonium, (3) reactor grade plutonium, and (4) minor actinides in the spent fuel of light water reactors (LWRs). The criticality calculations are conducted with SCALE 5.1 using S8-P3 approximation in 238 neutron energy groups with 90 groups in thermal energy region. The main results of the study can be summarized as follows: (1)Low enriched uranium (UO2): FBNR with an enrichment grade of 9% and 19% will start with keff = 1.2744 and keff = 1.36 and can operate ∼8 and >15 years with the same fuel charge, where criticality drops to keff = 1.06 and a burn-up grade of 54 000 and >110 000 MW.D/t can be attained. (2)Weapon grade plutonium: Such a high quality nuclear fuel suggests to be mixed with thorium. Second series of criticality calculations are conducted with fuel compositions made of thoria (ThO2) and weapon grade PuO2, where PuO2 component has been varied from 1% to 100%. Criticality with keff > 1.0 is achieved by ∼2.5% PuO2. At 4% PuO2, the reactor criticality will become satisfactory (keff = 1.1121), rapidly increasing with more PuO2. A reasonable mixture will by around 20% PuO2 and 80% ThO2 with a keff = 1.2864. This mixed fuel would allow full power reactor operation for >20 years and burn-up grade can reach 136 000 MW.D/t. (3)Reactor grade plutonium: Third series of criticality calculations are conducted with fuel compositions made of thoria and reactor grade PuO2, where PuO2 is varied from 1% to 100%. Reactor becomes critical by ∼8% PuO2 content. One can achieve keff = 1.2670 by 35% PuO2 and would allow full power reactor operation also for >20 years and burn-up grade can reach 123 000 MW.D/t. (4)Minor actinides in the spent fuel of LWRs: Fourth series of criticality calculations are conducted with fuel compositions made of thoria and MAO2, where MAO2 is varied from 1

  15. Conceptual design of a fluidized bed nuclear reactor: statics, dynamics and safety-related aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agung, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis a conceptual design of an innovative high temperature reactor based on the fluidization principle (FLUBER) is proposed. The reactor should satisfy the following requirements: (a) modular and low power, (b)) large shutdown margin, (c) able to produce power when the bed of particles exp

  16. The importance of the AVR pebble-bed reactor for the future of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohl, P. [Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor AVR GmbH, Postfach 1160, 52412 Juelich (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    The AVR pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) at Juelich (Germany)) operated from 1967 to 1988 and was certainly the most important HTGR project of the past. The reactor was the mass test bed for all development steps of HTGR pebble fuel. Some early fuel charges failed under high temperature conditions and contaminated the reactor. An accurate pebble measurement (Cs 137) allowed to clean the core from unwanted pebbles after 1981. The coolant activity went down and remained very low for the remaining reactor operation. A melt-wire experiment in 1986 revealed max. coolant temperatures of >1280 deg. C and fuel temperatures of >1350 deg. C, explained by under-estimated bypasses. The fuel still in the core achieved high burn-ups and showed under the extreme temperature conditions excellent fission product retention. Thus, the AVR operation qualified the HTGR fuel, and an average discharge burn-up of 112% fifa revealed an excellent fuel economy of the pebble-bed reactor. Furthermore, the AVR operation offers many meaningful data for code-to-experiment comparisons. (authors)

  17. An analysis of the thermal behaviour of pebble-bed nuclear reactors in the case of emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the performance of pebble-bed nuclear reactors under very severe emergencies will be analysed. Calculated hypotheses take into consideration total failure of decay heat removal systems and any other active equipment, including electric power supply. It has been shown that pebble temperatures will remain well below safety limits if the reactor design embodies a core catcher with a passive cooling reservoir and a pebble draining system which would be naturally activated by a lack of a power supply. Although these features apply to any pebble-bed reactor, particular attention is paid to accelerator-driven sub-critical assemblies, where reactivity noise produced pebble quivering has a practical negligible effect. (authors)

  18. Pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1993, the pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR) was identified by ESKOM, the electric utility of South Africa, as a leading option for the installation of new generating capacity to their electric grid. This innovative nuclear power plant incorporates a closed cycle primary coolant system utilizing helium to transport heat energy directly from the modular pebble bed reactor to a recuperative power conversion unit with a single-shaft turbine/compressor/generator. This replacement of the steam cycle that is common in present nuclear power plants (NPP) with a direct gas cycle provides the benefits of simplification and a substantial increase in overall system efficiency with the attendant lowering of capital and operational costs. Although the historical development of this plant is interrelated to other types of high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs), the principle focus herein is on the pebble bed (spherical) fuel element type reactor. The long-term development of this reactor type began in Germany by the KFA Nuclear Research Center (now FZJ). Two pebble bed plants were constructed in Germany, the 46 MW(th)/15 MW(e) Arbeitsgemeinshaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) and the 750 MW(th)/296 MW(e) thorium high temperature reactor (THTR-300). Basically, these steam/electric plants validated the temperature and fission product retention capabilities of the ceramic (TRISO) coated fuel particle and the safety characteristics of the HTGR. Most notable of the operational achievements was with the AVR in sustaining longterm operation at an average core outlet temperature of 950 deg. C, and in demonstration of safety such as extended loss of forced cooling on the core. More details on the AVR and THTR-300 plants are provided The next evolution of the pebble bed plant began in the early 1980s with development of the modular reactor. This small reactor added the unique characteristic of being able to cool the core entirely by passive heat transfer mechanisms following postulated

  19. The pebble bed high temperature reactor as a source of nuclear process heat. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theoretical analysis is given for a series of 8 different variants of the pebble-bed reactor in the 'once through' fuel management scheme. The comparison gives some insight into the parametric sensitivities and into the development potential of this type. The thorium/U-233 recycling fuel cycle allows to increase the conversion ratio up to the range between 0.90 and 0.95. The feasibility for a changeover between different fuel cycles under full power operation. - The study is complemented by a review of the relevant previous investigations. (orig.)

  20. FBR and RBR particle bed space reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compact, high-performance nuclear reactor designs based on High-Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs) particulate fuel are investigated. The large surface area available with the small-diameter (approx. 500 microns) particulate fuel allows very high power densities (MW's/liter), small temperature differences between fuel and coolant (approx. 100K), high coolant-outlet temperatures (1500 to 30000K, depending on design), and fast reactor startup (approx. 2 to 3 seconds). Two reactor concepts are developed - the Fixed Bed Reactor (FBR), where the fuel particles are packed into a thin annular bed between two porous cylindrical drums, and the Rotating Bed Reactor (RBR), where the fuel particles are held inside a cold rotating (typically approx. 500 rpm) porous cylindrical drum. The FBR can operate steady-state in the closed-cycle He-cooled mode or in the open-cycle H2-cooled mode. The RBR will operate only in the open-cycle H2-cooled mode

  1. The modular pebble bed nuclear reactor - the preferred new sustainable energy source for electricity, hydrogen and potable water production?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a joint project of Massachusetts Institute of technology, Nu-Tec Inc. and Proto Power. The elegant simplicity of graphite moderated pebble bed reactor is the basis for the 'generation four' nuclear power plants. High Temperature Gas Cooled (HTGC) nuclear power plant have the potential to become the preferred base load sustainable energy source for the new millennium. The great attraction of these helium cooled 'Generation Four' nuclear plant can be summarised as follows: Factory assembly line production; Modularity and ease of delivery to site; High temperature Brayton Cycle ideally suited for cogeneration of electricity, potable water and hydrogen; Capital and operating costs competitive with hydrocarbon plant; Design is inherently meltdown proof and proliferation resistant

  2. Supplemental Report on Nuclear Safeguards Considerations for the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent reports by Department of Energy National Laboratories have discussed safeguards considerations for the low enriched uranium (LEU) fueled Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) and the need for bulk accountancy of the plutonium in used fuel. These reports fail to account effectively for the degree of plutonium dilution in the graphitized-carbon pebbles that is sufficient to meet the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) 'provisional' guidelines for termination of safeguards on 'measured discards.' The thrust of this finding is not to terminate safeguards but to limit the need for specific accountancy of plutonium in stored used fuel. While the residual uranium in the used fuel may not be judged sufficiently diluted to meet the IAEA provisional guidelines for termination of safeguards, the estimated quantities of 232U and 236U in the used fuel at the target burn-up of ∼91 GWD/MT exceed specification limits for reprocessed uranium (ASTM C787) and will require extensive blending with either natural uranium or uranium enrichment tails to dilute the 236U content to fall within specification thus making the PBMR used fuel less desirable for commercial reprocessing and reuse than that from light water reactors. Also the PBMR specific activity of reprocessed uranium isotopic mixture and its A2 values for effective dose limit if released in a dispersible form during a transportation accident are more limiting than the equivalent values for light water reactor spent fuel at 55 GWD/MT without accounting for the presence of the principal carry-over fission product (99Tc) and any possible plutonium contamination that may be present from attempted covert reprocessing. Thus, the potentially recoverable uranium from PBMR used fuel carries reactivity penalties and radiological penalties likely greater than those for reprocessed uranium from light water reactors. These factors impact the economics of reprocessing, but a more significant consideration is that reprocessing

  3. Supplemental Report on Nuclear Safeguards Considerations for the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, David Lewis [ORNL; Ehinger, Michael H [ORNL

    2010-05-01

    Recent reports by Department of Energy National Laboratories have discussed safeguards considerations for the low enriched uranium (LEU) fueled Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) and the need for bulk accountancy of the plutonium in used fuel. These reports fail to account effectively for the degree of plutonium dilution in the graphitized-carbon pebbles that is sufficient to meet the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) 'provisional' guidelines for termination of safeguards on 'measured discards.' The thrust of this finding is not to terminate safeguards but to limit the need for specific accountancy of plutonium in stored used fuel. While the residual uranium in the used fuel may not be judged sufficiently diluted to meet the IAEA provisional guidelines for termination of safeguards, the estimated quantities of {sup 232}U and {sup 236}U in the used fuel at the target burn-up of {approx}91 GWD/MT exceed specification limits for reprocessed uranium (ASTM C787) and will require extensive blending with either natural uranium or uranium enrichment tails to dilute the {sup 236}U content to fall within specification thus making the PBMR used fuel less desirable for commercial reprocessing and reuse than that from light water reactors. Also the PBMR specific activity of reprocessed uranium isotopic mixture and its A{sub 2} values for effective dose limit if released in a dispersible form during a transportation accident are more limiting than the equivalent values for light water reactor spent fuel at 55 GWD/MT without accounting for the presence of the principal carry-over fission product ({sup 99}Tc) and any possible plutonium contamination that may be present from attempted covert reprocessing. Thus, the potentially recoverable uranium from PBMR used fuel carries reactivity penalties and radiological penalties likely greater than those for reprocessed uranium from light water reactors. These factors impact the economics of

  4. Absorber rod for nuclear reactors in a pebble bed of spherical operating elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The claim refers to the constructional configuration of an absorber rod, whose and penetrating into the pebble bed has an opening to reduce the fracture rate, so that the operating elements can escape into a channel within the absorber rod. To suit this to the direction of movement of the elements a part of the end of the rod is flexibly connected to the hollow absorber rod via a joint. In this way the mechanical load of the element particles is reduced and simultaneously one achieves that much lower force is required to insert the absorber rod into the pebble bed. (UA)

  5. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  6. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This draft chart contains graphical symbols from which the type of (nuclear) reactor can be seen. They will serve as illustrations for graphical sketches. Important features of the individual reactor types are marked out graphically. The user can combine these symbols to characterize a specific reactor type. The basic graphical symbol is a square with a point in the centre. Functional groups can be depicted for closer specification. If two functional groups are not clearly separated, this is symbolized by a dotted line or a channel. Supply and discharge lines for coolant, moderator and fuel are specified in accordance with DIN 2481 and can be further specified by additional symbols if necessary. The examples in the paper show several different reactor types. (orig./AK)

  7. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor has a large prompt negative temperature coefficient of reactivity. A reactor core assembly of a plurality of fluid-tight fuel elements is located within a water-filled tank. Each fuel element contains a solid homogeneous mixture of 50-79 w/o zirconium hydride, 20-50 w/o uranium and 0.5-1.5 W erbium. The uranium is not more than 20 percent enriched, and the ratio of hydrogen atoms to zirconium atoms is between 1.5:1 and 7:1. The core has a long lifetime, E.G., at least about 1200 days

  8. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a liquid cooled nuclear reactor, the combination is described for a single-walled vessel containing liquid coolant in which the reactor core is submerged, and a containment structure, primarily of material for shielding against radioactivity, surrounding at least the liquid-containing part of the vessel with clearance therebetween and having that surface thereof which faces the vessel make compatible with the liquid, thereby providing a leak jacket for the vessel. The structure is preferably a metal-lined concrete vault, and cooling means are provided for protecting the concrete against reaching a temperature at which damage would occur. (U.S.)

  9. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  10. Reactor vessel for pebble beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wall and the bottom of the vessel for the gas-cooled pebble-bed reactor consist of numerous blocks of graphite or carbon rock piled up. They are held together by an exterior cylindrical or polygonal ring and supported by a foundation. The blocks form coherent sectors resp. annular sectors with well-defined separating lines. At high temperatures or load change operation these sectors behave like monolithic blocks expanding heely and contracting again, the center of the vessel remaining fixed. The forces causing the compression result from the own weight of the sectors and the weight of the pebble bed. This motion is supported by the convex arrangement of the opposite surfaces of the sectors and the supporting walls and by roller bearings. The bottom of the vessel may be designed funnel-shaped, in this way facilitating the removal of spheres. (DG)

  11. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor cooled by a freezable liquid has a vessel for containing said liquid and comprising a structure shaped as a container, and cooling means in the region of the surface of said structure for effecting freezing of said liquid coolant at and for a finite distance from said surface for providing a layer of frozen coolant on and supported by said surface for containing said liquid coolant. In a specific example, where the reactor is sodium-cooled, the said structure is a metal-lined concrete vault, cooling is effected by closed cooling loops containing NaK, the loops extending over the lined surface of the concrete vault with outward and reverse pipe runs of each loop separated by thermal insulation, and air is flowed through cooling pipes embedded in the concrete behind the metal lining. 7 claims, 3 figures

  12. South Africa's Pebble Bed Modular Reactor, a new design for our nuclear future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power Utilities will in the future need to look at various means of generating power during the 21st century. The demands regarding new generation are challenged by such issues as; costs, time to construct, the add on safety requirements of present day nuclear power plant designs and the emissions generated by fossil fuels as reflected in the Kyoto Protocol. These challenges are also aligned with the deforestation, land decimation and releases of methane gas caused by the so-called 'clean' Hydro power plants in many parts of the world. Presently South Africa is looking at various generation mixes for the future. Although the demand in South Africa is currently lower than the capacity, it is anticipated that new capacity will have to be commissioned by about 2008. Even the moderate growth of 2,5% (as was experienced in our last fiscal year) will result in peak electricity demand exceeding capacity between 2005 and 2010. In addition, Eskom's older power stations reach the end of their design life after 2025. South Africa will, therefore, need to access and use all natural resources to produce the additional 20,000MW of electricity that will be needed by 2025 this will of course include a nuclear option. Throughout the world, it is noted that, along with the environmental issues affecting power generation the real leading issue is cost. South Africa has one of the lowest power costs in the world, based on its abundant low-cost coal. As with other Eskom low cost options such as, coal fired generation situated at the pit-head and imported hydro, the PBMR costs will have to meet these demanding cost targets set by Eskom's existing power plants. However, PBMR is virtually independent of location and the intention is that PBMR costs will be in the order of US 2,0c/kWh. The costs of decommissioning, long-term storage of radioactive waste and insurance are included in these estimates. This cost per unit of electricity produced would, however, be much lower than a coal

  13. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: SPOUTED BED REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Spouted Bed Reactor (SBR) technology utilizes the unique attributes of the "spouting " fluidization regime, which can provide heat transfer rates comparable to traditional fluid beds, while providing robust circulation of highly heterogeneous solids, concurrent with very agg...

  14. Pebble Bed Reactor review update. Fiscal year 1979 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Updated information is presented on the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) concept being developed in the Federal Republic of Germany for electricity generation and process heat applications. Information is presented concerning nuclear analysis and core performance, fuel cycle evaluation, reactor internals, and safety and availability

  15. Pebble Bed Reactor review update. Fiscal year 1979 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Updated information is presented on the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) concept being developed in the Federal Republic of Germany for electricity generation and process heat applications. Information is presented concerning nuclear analysis and core performance, fuel cycle evaluation, reactor internals, and safety and availability.

  16. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor is described in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assemblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters in the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters in the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance

  17. Water Cooled FBNR Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new era of nuclear energy is emerging through innovative nuclear reactors that are to satisfy the new philosophies and criteria that are developed by the INPRO program of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The IAEA is establishing a new paradigm in relation to nuclear energy. The future reactors should meet the new standards in respect to safety, economy, non-proliferation, nuclear waste, and environmental impact. The Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR) is a small (70 MWe) nuclear reactor that meets all the established requirements. It is an inherently safe and passively cooled reactor that is fool proof against nuclear proliferation. It is simple in design and economic. It can serve as a dual purpose plant to produce simultaneously both electricity and desalinated water thus making it especially suitable to the needs of most of developing countries. FBNR is developed with the support of the IAEA under its program of Small Reactors Without On-Site Refuelling (SRWOSR). The FBNR reactor uses the pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology. It fulfills the objectives of design simplicity, inherent and passive safety, economy, standardization, shop fabrication, easy transportability and high availability. The inherent safety characteristic of the reactor dispenses with the need for containment; however, a simple underground containment is envisaged for the reactor in order to reduce any adverse visual impact. (author)

  18. Status of the pebble bed modular reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskom is the South African state electricity utility, with an installed capacity of 38397 MW at the end of 1996 (some 98% of all national generating assets). It is largely coal-based with a small proportion (5%) nuclear. As part of Eskom's long-term planning process, investigations have been made into new power generation options. On reconsidering the nuclear option, Eskom identified two key issues: cost and public acceptance. It was considered that both of these were driven by the safety issues related to potential accidents and the only way to obtain competitive costs with nuclear power was to remove the potential (however remote) for accidents with significant off-site consequences. The only reactor type that was seen to meet this safety standard was the pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR). This paper discusses the PBMR project history, plant performance and design, its benefits, safety features, and current status. It concludes that the PBMR will provide South Africa with a competitive option for coastal generation and, internationally, it will be highly competitive with virtually all other generation options. (author)

  19. The pebble-bed high-temperature reactor as a source of nuclear process heat. Vol. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this volume the design conditions for a helium-heated steam reformer in the primary circuit of a high-temperature reactor are explained as far as today's knowledge allows. For the realization of helium-heated steam reformers, some fundamental questions at first occur regarding the heating temperature, heat fluxes, suitable materials and design solutions for steam reformers. It is shown that following the development program carried out until now, solutions to these questions can be seen. Moreover, details are given about the heat transfer, the mechanical design and the behaviour of reformer materials in helium with regard to H2- and T-permeation as well as corrosion. Furthermore, questions about the choice of the lay-out data, the design form, the arrangement in the helium circuits of the nuclear reactor and the necessary development steps are handled. Some design examples of heat exchangers for a 3,000 MW(th)-plant are given, too. (orig.)

  20. Large modular pebble-bed reactors with passive safety properties as a contribution for catastrophe-free nuclear technology. Flexibility in design and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worldwide investigations are carried out for different reactor concepts, in order to realize nuclear energy production in modular power plants. In that concept several small or middle sized reactors are joined together in a modular way to form one power plant. The size of MODUL-reactors is designed in such a way, that exclusively inherent safety properties perform the control of accidents without active technical proceedings. In order to achieve this, the reactor should be relatively small. On the other hand, it should be relatively large for economic and competitive reasons. The range of possible development of the modular pebble-bed reactor for raising the power output are discussed in this study. Based on the MODUL 200 MW concept, the design of the 'Great-Modul-Medul' reactor (GMM) with a power output of 500 MWth is introduced, in which the loading modus MEDUL is applied with repeated circulation of the spheres through the core. A 'Great-Modul-OTTO' GMO with a power output of 400 MWth is designed with only one pass of the pebbles (OTTO). In comparison to the GMM, that has the advantage of being simpler in construction and in the method of operation. Furthermore, another simplification is studied consisting of the combination (PO) of 'Peu a Peu' and 'OTTO' loading modus. All designed cases show a favourable flexibility when changing the application of the reactor from steam cycle to gas turbine cycle or to seawater desalination. The study outlines, that the inherently determined limitation of the excess temperature in case of a loss coolant accident and the ability for controling the water ingress reactivity are maintained for all variants being considered. (orig.)

  1. Nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.)

  2. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to reduce neutron embrittlement of the pressue vessel of an LWR, blanked off elements are fitted at the edge of the reactor core, with the same dimensions as the fuel elements. They are parallel to each other, and to the edge of the reactor taking the place of fuel rods, and are plates of neutron-absorbing material (stainless steel, boron steel, borated Al). (HP)

  3. Thermal-hydraulic study of fixed bed nuclear reactor (FBNR), in FCC, BCC and pseudo-random configurations of the core through CFD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of thermal-hydraulic performance of a fixed bed nuclear reactor (FBNR) core and the effect of the porosity was studied by the CFD method with 'SolidWorks' software. The representative sections of three different packed beds arrangements were analyzed: face-centered cubic (FCC), body-centered cubic (BCC), and a pseudo-random, with values of porosity of 0.28, 0.33 and 0.53 respectively. The minimum coolant flow required to avoid the phase change for each one of the configurations was determined. The results show that the heat transfer rate increases when the porosity value decreases, and consequently the minimum coolant flow in each configuration. The results of minimum coolant flow were: 728.51 kg/s for the FCC structure, 372.72 kg/s for the BCC, and 304.96 kg/s for the pseudo-random. Meanwhile, the heat transfer coefficients in each packed bed were 6480 W/m2*K, 3718 W/m2*K and 3042 W/m2*K respectively. Finally the pressure drop was calculated, and the results were 0.588 MPa for FCC configuration, 0.033 MPa for BCC and 0.017 MPa for the pseudo-random one. This means that with a higher porosity, the fluid can circulate easier because there are fewer obstacles to cross, so there are fewer energy losses. (authors)

  4. Types of Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation is based on the following areas: Types of Nuclear Reactors, coolant, moderator, neutron spectrum, fuel type, pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR) reactor pressurized heavy water (PHWR), gas-cooled reactor, RBMK , Nuclear Electricity Generation,Challenges in Nuclear Technology Deployment,EPR, APR1400, A P 1000, A PWR, ATMEA 1, VVER-1000, A PWR, VVER 1200, Boiling Water Reactor, A BWR, A BWR -II, ESBUR, Ke ren, AREVA, Heavy Water Reactor, Candu 6, Acr-1000, HWR, Bw, Iris, CAREM NuCcale, Smart, KLT-HOS, Westinghouse small modular Reactor, Gas Cooled Reactors, PBMR.

  5. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an improved reactor core for a high conversion BWR reactor, Pu-breeding type BWR type reactor, Pu-breeding type BWR type rector, FEBR type reactor, etc., two types of fuel assemblies are loaded such that fuel assemblies using a channel box of a smaller irradiation deformation ratio are loaded in a high conversion region, while other fuel assemblies are loaded in a burner region. This enables to suppress the irradiation deformation within an allowable limit in the high conversion region where the fast neutron flux is high and the load weight from the inside of the channel box due to the pressure loss is large. At the same time, the irradiation deformation can be restricted within an allowable limit without deteriorating the neutron economy in the burner region in which fast neutron flux is low and the load weight from the inside of the channel box is small since a channel box with smaller neutron absorption cross section or reduced wall thickness is charged. As a result, it is possible to prevent structural deformations such as swelling of the channel box, bending of the entire assemblies, bending of fuel rods, etc. (K.M.)

  6. Fluidized-Bed Silane-Decomposition Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iya, Sridhar K.

    1991-01-01

    Fluidized-bed pyrolysis reactor produces high-purity polycrystalline silicon from silane or halosilane via efficient heterogeneous deposition of silicon on silicon seed particles. Formation of silicon dust via homogeneous decomposition of silane minimized, and deposition of silicon on wall of reactor effectively eliminated. Silicon used to construct solar cells and other semiconductor products.

  7. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The liquid metal (sodium) cooled fast breeder reactor has got fuel subassemblies which are bundled and enclosed by a common can. In order to reduce bending of the sides of the can because of the load caused by the coolant pressure the can has got a dodecagon-shaped crosssection. The surfaces of the can may be of equal width. One out of two surfaces may also be convex towards the center. (RW)

  8. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detector having high sensitivity to fast neutrons and having low sensitivity to thermal neutrons is disposed for reducing influences of neutron detector signals on detection values of neutron fluxes when the upper end of control rod pass in the vicinity of the neutron flux detector. Namely, the change of the neutron fluxes is greater in the thermal neutron energy region while it is smaller in the fast neutron energy region. This is because the neutron absorbing cross section of B-10 used as neutron absorbers of control rods is greater in the thermal neutron region and it is smaller in the fast neutron region. As a result, increase of the neutron detection signals along with the local neutron flux change can be reduced, and detection signals corresponding to the reactor power can be obtained. Even when gang withdrawal of operating a plurality of control rods at the same time is performed, the reactor operation cycle can be measured accurately, thereby enabling to shorten the reactor startup time. (N.H.)

  9. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cover gas spaces for primary coolant vessel, such as a reactor container, a pump vessel and an intermediate heat exchanger vessel are in communication with each other by an inverted U-shaped pressure conduit. A transmitter and a receiver are disposed to the pressure conduit at appropriate positions. If vibration frequencies (pressure vibration) from low frequency to high frequency are generated continuously from the transmitter to the inside of the communication pipe, a resonance phenomenon (air-column resonance oscillation) is caused by the inherent frequency or the like of the communication pipe. The frequency of the air-column resonance oscillation is changed by the inner diameter and the clogged state of the pipelines. Accordingly, by detecting the change of the air-column oscillation characteristics by the receiver, the clogged state of the flow channels in the pipelines can be detected even during the reactor operation. With such procedures, steams of coolants flowing entrained by the cover gases can be prevented from condensation and coagulation at a low temperature portion of the pipelines, otherwise it would lead clogging in the pipelines. (I.N.)

  10. Introduction of Nuclear Reactor Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book introduces development, status, supply and demand and resource of nuclear reactor. It deals with basic knowledge of nuclear reactor, which are reactor system, heat recovery in reactor core, structural feature in reactor, materials of structure in reactor, shielding of gamma ray, shielding of reactor, safety and environmental problem of nuclear power plant, nuclear fuel and economical efficiency of nuclear energy.

  11. Nuclear reactor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering. Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide, and new power reactors with improved fuel cycles are being developed. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. The second edition of this successful comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics has been completely updated, revised and enlarged to include the latest developme

  12. Thermal regeneration in fix-bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal behaviour of a catalytic reactor with regeneration, from a simplified model is studied. Plug-flow is postulated to the reactor and a two-phase model for simulating heat transfer between the bed and the gas is used, disregarding the conduction terms. The computational results for an exothermal catalytic reaction are presented. The effect of the duration of the period and the inlet temperature of the gas in the bed temperature profiles is studied, as well as the evolution since the functioning until the steady state. (E.G.)

  13. Numerical simulation of nuclear pebble bed configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shams, A., E-mail: shams@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands); Roelofs, F., E-mail: roelofs@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands); Komen, E.M.J., E-mail: komen@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands); Baglietto, E., E-mail: emiliob@MIT.EDU [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Numerical simulations of a single face cubic centred pebble bed are performed. • Wide range of turbulence modelling techniques are used to perform these calculations. • The methods include 1-DNS, 1-LES, 3-Hybrid (RANS/LES) and 3-RANS models, respectively. • The obtained results are extensively compared to provide guidelines for such flow regimes. • These guidelines are used to perform reference LES for a limited sized random pebble bed. - Abstract: High Temperature Reactors (HTRs) are being considered all over the world. An HTR uses helium gas as a coolant, while the moderator function is taken up by graphite. The fuel is embedded in the graphite moderator. A particular inherent safety advantage of HTR designs is that the graphite can withstand very high temperatures, that the fuel inside will stay inside the graphite pebble and cannot escape to the surroundings even in the event of loss of cooling. Generally, the core can be designed using a graphite pebble bed. Some experimental and demonstration reactors have been operated using a pebble bed design. The test reactors have shown safe and efficient operation, however questions have been raised about possible occurrence of local hot spots in the pebble bed which may affect the pebble integrity. Analysis of the fuel integrity requires detailed evaluation of local heat transport phenomena in a pebble bed, and since such phenomena cannot easily be modelled experimentally, numerical simulations are a useful tool. As a part of a European project, named Thermal Hydraulics of Innovative Nuclear Systems (THINS), a benchmarking quasi-direct numerical simulation (q-DNS) of a well-defined pebble bed configuration has been performed. This q-DNS will serve as a reference database in order to evaluate the prediction capabilities of different turbulence modelling approaches. A wide range of numerical simulations based on different available turbulence modelling approaches are performed and compared with

  14. Numerical simulation of nuclear pebble bed configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Numerical simulations of a single face cubic centred pebble bed are performed. • Wide range of turbulence modelling techniques are used to perform these calculations. • The methods include 1-DNS, 1-LES, 3-Hybrid (RANS/LES) and 3-RANS models, respectively. • The obtained results are extensively compared to provide guidelines for such flow regimes. • These guidelines are used to perform reference LES for a limited sized random pebble bed. - Abstract: High Temperature Reactors (HTRs) are being considered all over the world. An HTR uses helium gas as a coolant, while the moderator function is taken up by graphite. The fuel is embedded in the graphite moderator. A particular inherent safety advantage of HTR designs is that the graphite can withstand very high temperatures, that the fuel inside will stay inside the graphite pebble and cannot escape to the surroundings even in the event of loss of cooling. Generally, the core can be designed using a graphite pebble bed. Some experimental and demonstration reactors have been operated using a pebble bed design. The test reactors have shown safe and efficient operation, however questions have been raised about possible occurrence of local hot spots in the pebble bed which may affect the pebble integrity. Analysis of the fuel integrity requires detailed evaluation of local heat transport phenomena in a pebble bed, and since such phenomena cannot easily be modelled experimentally, numerical simulations are a useful tool. As a part of a European project, named Thermal Hydraulics of Innovative Nuclear Systems (THINS), a benchmarking quasi-direct numerical simulation (q-DNS) of a well-defined pebble bed configuration has been performed. This q-DNS will serve as a reference database in order to evaluate the prediction capabilities of different turbulence modelling approaches. A wide range of numerical simulations based on different available turbulence modelling approaches are performed and compared with

  15. Nuclear Reactor Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2001-02-01

    An authoritative textbook and up-to-date professional's guide to basic and advanced principles and practices Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering, and as the first comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics to appear in a quarter century, this book fills a large gap in the professional literature. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a textbook for students new to the subject, for others who need a basic understanding of how nuclear reactors work, as well as for those who are, or wish to become, specialists in nuclear reactor physics and reactor physics computations. It is also a valuable resource for engineers responsible for the operation of nuclear reactors. Dr. Weston Stacey begins with clear presentations of the basic physical principles, nuclear data, and computational methodology needed to understand both the static and dynamic behaviors of nuclear reactors. This is followed by in-depth discussions of advanced concepts, including extensive treatment of neutron transport computational methods. As an aid to comprehension and quick mastery of computational skills, he provides numerous examples illustrating step-by-step procedures for performing the calculations described and chapter-end problems. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a useful textbook and working reference. It is an excellent self-teaching guide for research scientists, engineers, and technicians involved in industrial, research, and military applications of nuclear reactors, as well as government regulators who wish to increase their understanding of nuclear reactors.

  16. Thorium utilization in a pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorium reserves in the earth's crust are much more than those of uranium, which today measure about 1.5 million tonnes of reasonably assured resources, plus 3 million tonnes of estimated additional resources. These large amount of thorium reserves, also available in Turkey encourages to focus on the utilization of thorium. The most remarkable applications of the use of thorium have been in high temperature reactors. The high temperature pebble bed reactor, which has been chosen as the basis for this study, is a close approximation of the thorium utilizing German reactor THTR. Pebble bed reactors have some unique features which are suitable to burn thorium. (i) The fuel is loaded in the form of coated particles, which are embedded in the graphite matrix of the fuel pebbles, allowing exceptionally high heavy metal burnups; and (ii) the continuous (on-line) fuel loading allows a high utilization factor. The criticality search of the pebble bed reactor is computed by the use of the SCALE4.4 code, CSASIX and KENOVa modules. And the in-core fuel management is computed via SCALE4.4 code, ORIGEN-S module

  17. In-core fuel management for pebble-bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milian Perez, Daniel; Rodriguez Garcia, Lorena; Garcia Hernandez, Carlos; Milian Lorenzo, Daniel, E-mail: dperez@instec.cu, E-mail: cgh@instec.cu, E-mail: dmilian@instec.cu [Higher Institute of Technologies and Applied Sciences, Havana (Cuba); Velasco, Abanades, E-mail: abanades@etsii.upm.es [Department of Simulation of Thermo Energy Systems, Polytechnic University of Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    In this paper a calculation procedure to reduce the power peak in the core of a Very High Temperature pebble bed Reactor is presented. This procedure combines the fuel depletion and the neutronic behavior of the fuel in the reactor core, modeling once-through-then-out cycles as well as cycles in which pebbles are recirculated through the core an arbitrary number of times, obtaining the asymptotic fuel-loading pattern. The procedure consists in several coupled computational codes, which are used iteratively until convergence is reached. The utilization of the MCNPX 2.6e, as one of these computational codes, is validated through the calculation of benchmarks announced by IAEA (IAEA-TECDOC-1249, 2001). To complete the verification of the calculation procedure a base case described in (Annals of Nuclear Energy 29 (2002) 1345-1364), was performed. The procedure has been applied to a model of Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (200 MW) design. (author)

  18. Nuclear reactor theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This textbook is composed of two parts. Part 1 'Elements of Nuclear Reactor Theory' is composed of only elements but the main resource for the lecture of nuclear reactor theory, and should be studied as common knowledge. Much space is therefore devoted to the history of nuclear energy production and to nuclear physics, and the material focuses on the principles of energy production in nuclear reactors. However, considering the heavy workload of students, these subjects are presented concisely, allowing students to read quickly through this textbook. (J.P.N.)

  19. Pebble Bed Reactor Dust Production Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of pebble bed reactors, including fuel circulation, can generate graphite dust, which in turn could be a concern for internal components; and to the near field in the remote event of a break in the coolant circuits. The design of the reactor system must, therefore, take the dust into account and the operation must include contingencies for dust removal and for mitigation of potential releases. Such planning requires a proper assessment of the dust inventory. This paper presents a predictive model of dust generation in an operating pebble bed with recirculating fuel. In this preliminary work the production model is based on the use of the assumption of proportionality between the dust production and the normal force and distance traveled. The model developed in this work uses the slip distances and the inter-pebble forces computed by the authors PEBBLES. The code, based on the discrete element method, simulates the relevant static and kinetic friction interactions between the pebbles as well as the recirculation of the pebbles through the reactor vessel. The interaction between pebbles and walls of the reactor vat is treated using the same approach. The amount of dust produced is proportional to the wear coefficient for adhesive wear (taken from literature) and to the slip volume, the product of the contact area and the slip distance. The paper will compare the predicted volume with the measured production rates. The simulation tallies the dust production based on the location of creation. Two peak production zones from intra pebble forces are predicted within the bed. The first zone is located near the pebble inlet chute due to the speed of the dropping pebbles. The second peak zone occurs lower in the reactor with increased pebble contact force due to the weight of supported pebbles. This paper presents the first use of a Discrete Element Method simulation of pebble bed dust production

  20. Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program: German Pebble Bed Reactor Technology review update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a review of the German pebble bed reactor technology, and updates the information provided in the Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program Interim Report COO-4057-6, German Pebble Bed Reactor Design and Technology Review, dated September 1978. Most of the updated information is for the PNP-500 and the HHT-Prototype plants. The PNP-500 is a 500 MW(t) multi-purpose demonstration plant for coal conversion applications. The HHT-Prototype is a 1640 MWt reactor designed to produce 675 MWe of electricity using a direct cycle gas turbine. The report provides a description and evaluation of the overall plant and the nuclear reactor for both the PNP-500 and HHT-Prototype. A description and evaluation of the primary system components is presented for the process heat and gas turbine applications

  1. Fossil nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurette, M.

    1976-01-01

    The discussion of fossil nuclear reactors (the Oklo phenomenon) covers the earth science background, neutron-induced isotopes and reactor operating conditions, radiation-damage studies, and reactor modeling. In conclusion possible future studies are suggested and the significance of the data obtained in past studies is summarized. (JSR)

  2. Research Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published in English and in French, this large report first proposes an overview of the use and history of research nuclear reactors. It discusses their definition, and presents the various types of research reactors which can be either related to nuclear power (critical mock-ups, material test reactors, safety test reactors, training reactors, prototypes), or to research (basic research, industry, health), or to specific particle physics phenomena (neutron diffraction, isotope production, neutron activation, neutron radiography, semiconductor doping). It reports the history of the French research reactors by distinguishing the first atomic pile (ZOE), and the activities and achievements during the fifties, the sixties and the seventies. It also addresses the development of instrumentation for research reactors (neutron, thermal, mechanical and fission gas release measurements). The other parts of the report concern the validation of neutronics calculations for different reactors (the EOLE water critical mock-up, the MASURCA air critical mock-up dedicated to fast neutron reactor study, the MINERVE water critical mock-up, the CALIBAN pulsed research reactor), the testing of materials under irradiation (OSIRIS reactor, laboratories associated with research reactors, the Jules Horowitz reactor and its experimental programs and related devices, irradiation of materials with ion beams), the investigation of accident situations (on the CABRI, Phebus, Silene and Jules Horowitz reactors). The last part proposes a worldwide overview of research reactors

  3. Hydrodynamics of multi-phase packed bed micro-reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Márquez Luzardo, N.M.

    2010-01-01

    Why to use packed bed micro-reactors for catalyst testing? Miniaturized packed bed reactors have a large surface-to-volume ratio at the reactor and particle level that favors the heat- and mass-transfer processes at all scales (intra-particle, inter-phase and inter-particle or reactor level). If the

  4. Mechanics of the pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a survey, the quite different type of problems which arise for the reactor designer from the mechanics of the pebble bed are demonstrated by examples. It becomes clear why the apparently simple system of a static heap of pebbles of the same diameter is such a complex problem, so that even after research and development work extending over three decades, it cannot be regarded as completely solved. (orig.)

  5. Research nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the divergence of the first nuclear reactor in 1942, about 600 research or test reactors have been built throughout the world. Today 255 research reactors are operating in 57 countries and about 70% are over 25 years old. Whereas there are very few reactor types for power plants because of rationalization and standardisation, there is a great diversity of research reactors. We can divide them into 2 groups: heavy water cooled reactors and light water moderated reactors. Heavy water cooled reactors are dedicated to the production of high flux of thermal neutrons which are extracted from the core by means of neutronic channels. Light water moderated reactors involved pool reactors and slightly pressurized closed reactors, they are polyvalent but their main purposes are material testing, technological irradiations, radionuclide production and neutron radiography. At the moment 8 research reactors are being built in Canada, Germany, Iran, Japan, Kazakhstan, Morocco, Russia and Slovakia and 8 others are planned in 7 countries (France, Indonesia, Nigeria, Russia, Slovakia, Thailand and Tunisia. Different research reactors are described: Phebus, Masurca, Phenix and Petten HFR. The general principles of nuclear safety applied to test reactors are presented. (A.C.)

  6. Nuclear reactor PBMR and cogeneration; Reactor nuclear PBMR y cogeneracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G., E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In recent years the nuclear reactor designs for the electricity generation have increased their costs, so that at the moment costs are managed of around the 5000 US D for installed kw, reason for which a big nuclear plant requires of investments of the order of billions of dollars, the designed reactors as modular of low power seek to lighten the initial investment of a big reactor dividing the power in parts and dividing in modules the components to lower the production costs, this way it can begin to build a module and finished this to build other, differing the long term investment, getting less risk therefore in the investment. On the other hand the reactors of low power can be very useful in regions where is difficult to have access to the electric net being able to take advantage of the thermal energy of the reactor to feed other processes like the water desalination or the vapor generation for the processes industry like the petrochemical, or even more the possible hydrogen production to be used as fuel. In this work the possibility to generate vapor of high quality for the petrochemical industry is described using a spheres bed reactor of high temperature. (Author)

  7. Determination of concentration distribution and velocity of a catalyst in a model of a fluidized bed reactor using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simplified model of a cracking unit was construct. The gaseous phase consisted of air, the solid phase (zeolite catalyst cracking) and both the phases circulate at the ambiente temperature in the steady state with 500 g of catalyst and air flow of 1600 1/h. Measurements for the circulation time of the solid phase (catalyst), concentration and radial distribution of catalyst have been carried out. The reduced experimental model of the cracking reactor (FCC) was used and radioctive tracer and attenuation of γ-radiation techniques were employed. (E.G.)

  8. Method and apparatus for a combination moving bed thermal treatment reactor and moving bed filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, Phillip C.; Dunn, Jr., Kenneth J.

    2015-09-01

    A moving bed gasification/thermal treatment reactor includes a geometry in which moving bed reactor particles serve as both a moving bed filter and a heat carrier to provide thermal energy for thermal treatment reactions, such that the moving bed filter and the heat carrier are one and the same to remove solid particulates or droplets generated by thermal treatment processes or injected into the moving bed filter from other sources.

  9. Nuclear reactor PBMR and cogeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years the nuclear reactor designs for the electricity generation have increased their costs, so that at the moment costs are managed of around the 5000 US D for installed kw, reason for which a big nuclear plant requires of investments of the order of billions of dollars, the designed reactors as modular of low power seek to lighten the initial investment of a big reactor dividing the power in parts and dividing in modules the components to lower the production costs, this way it can begin to build a module and finished this to build other, differing the long term investment, getting less risk therefore in the investment. On the other hand the reactors of low power can be very useful in regions where is difficult to have access to the electric net being able to take advantage of the thermal energy of the reactor to feed other processes like the water desalination or the vapor generation for the processes industry like the petrochemical, or even more the possible hydrogen production to be used as fuel. In this work the possibility to generate vapor of high quality for the petrochemical industry is described using a spheres bed reactor of high temperature. (Author)

  10. Gas reactor international cooperative program interim report. Pebble bed reactor fuel cycle evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel cycles were evaluated for the Pebble Bed Gas Cooled Reactor under development in the Federal Republic of Germany. The basic fuel cycle specified for the HTR-K and PNP is well qualified and will meet the requirements of these reactors. Twenty alternate fuel cycles are described, including high-conversion cycles, net-breeding cycles, and proliferation-resistant cycles. High-conversion cycles, which have a high probability of being successfully developed, promise a significant improvement in resource utilization. Proliferation-resistant cycles, also with a high probability of successful development, compare very favorably with those for other types of reactors. Most of the advanced cycles could be adapted to first-generation pebble bed reactors with no significant modifications

  11. Nuclear reactor internals arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor internals arrangement is disclosed which facilitates reactor refueling. A reactor vessel and a nuclear core is utilized in conjunction with an upper core support arrangement having means for storing withdrawn control rods therein. The upper core support is mounted to the underside of the reactor vessel closure head so that upon withdrawal of the control rods into the upper core support, the closure head, the upper core support and the control rods are removed as a single unit thereby directly exposing the core for purposes of refueling

  12. Reactors. Nuclear propulsion ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article has for object the development of nuclear-powered ships and the conception of the nuclear-powered ship. The technology of the naval propulsion P.W.R. type reactor is described in the article B.N.3 141 'Nuclear Boilers ships'. (N.C.)

  13. Nuclear reactor repairing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable free repairing of an arbitrary position in an LMFBR reactor. Constitution: A laser light emitted from a laser oscillator installed out of a nuclear reactor is guided into a portion to be repaired in the reactor by using a reflecting mirror, thereby welding or cutting it. The guidance of the laser out of the reactor into the reactor is performed by an extension tube depending into a through hole of a rotary plug, and the guidance of the laser light into a portion to be repaired is performed by the transmitting and condensing action of the reflecting mirror. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. Nuclear reactor physics course for reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The education and training of nuclear reactor operators is important to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. Therefore, a course on basic 'Nuclear reactor physics' in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The aim of the basic course on 'Nuclear Reactor Physics for reactor operators' is to provide the reactor operators with a basic understanding of the main concepts relevant to nuclear reactors. Seen the education level of the participants, mathematical derivations are simplified and reduced to a minimum, but not completely eliminated

  15. Special lecture on nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book gives a special lecture on nuclear reactor, which is divided into two parts. The first part has explanation on nuclear design of nuclear reactor and analysis of core with theories of integral transports, diffusion Nodal, transports Nodal and Monte Carlo skill parallel computer and nuclear calculation and speciality of transmutation reactor. The second part deals with speciality of nuclear reactor and control with nonlinear stabilization of nuclear reactor, nonlinear control of nuclear reactor, neural network and control of nuclear reactor, control theory of observer and analysis method of Adomian.

  16. Reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a BWR type nuclear reactor, the number of first fuel assemblies (uranium) loaded in a reactor core is smaller than that of second fuel assemblies (mixed oxide), the average burnup degree upon take-out of the first fuel assemblies is reduced to less than that of the second fuel assemblies, and the number of the kinds of the fuel rods constituting the first fuel assemblies is made smaller than that of the fuel rods constituting the second fuel assemblies. As a result, the variety of the plutonium enrichment degree is reduced to make the distribution of the axial enrichment degree uniform, thereby enabling to simplify the distribution of the enrichment degree. Then the number of molding fabrication steps for MOX fuel assemblies can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce the cost for molding and fabrication. (N.H.)

  17. The nuclear soliton reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic reactor physics of a completely novel nuclear fission reactor design - the soliton-reactor - is presented on the basis of a simple model. In such a reactor, the neutrons in the critical region convert either fertile material in the adjacent layers into fissile material or reduce the poisoning of fissile material in such a manner that successively new critical regions emerge. The result is an autocatalytically driven burn-up wave which propagates throughout the reactor. Thereby, the relevant characteristic spatial distributions (neutron flux, specific power density and the associated particle densities) are solitons - wave phenomena resulting from non-linear partial differential equations which do not change their shape during propagation. A qualitativley new kind of harnessing nuclear fission energy may become possible with fuel residence times comparable with the useful lifetime of the reactor system. In the long run, fast breeder systems which exploit the natural uranium and thorium resources, without any reprocessing capacity are imaginable. (orig.)

  18. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved nuclear power reactor fuel element is described which consists of fuel rods, rod guide tubes and an end plate. The system allows direct access to an end of each fuel rod for inspection purposes. (U.K.)

  19. Nuclear reactor simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Reactor Simulator was projected to help the basic training in the formation of the Nuclear Power Plants operators. It gives the trainee the opportunity to see the nuclear reactor dynamics. It's specially indicated to be used as the support tool to NPPT (Nuclear Power Preparatory Training) from NUS Corporation. The software was developed to Intel platform (80 x 86, Pentium and compatible ones) working under the Windows operational system from Microsoft. The program language used in development was Object Pascal and the compiler used was Delphi from Borland. During the development, computer algorithms were used, based in numeric methods, to the resolution of the differential equations involved in the process. (author)

  20. Computational prediction of dust production in pebble bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Finite element analysis of frictional contact. ► Plasticity taken into account for nuclear graphite at room temperature. ► Prediction of order of magnitude for dust loading in PBRs. ► Archard wear model for wear mass calculations. - Abstract: This paper describes the computational modeling and simulation of graphite pebbles in frictional contacts as anticipated in a pebble bed reactor. For the high temperature gas-cooled reactor, the potential dust generation from frictional contact at the surface of pebbles and the subsequent lift-off and transport of dust and absorbed fission products are of safety concern at elevated temperatures under an air ingress accident. The aim of this work is to perform a computational study to estimate the quantity of the nuclear grade graphite dust produces from a typical anticipated configuration.

  1. Physics of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manual covers all the aspects of the science of neutron transport in nuclear reactors and can be used with great advantage by students, engineers or even reactor experts. It is composed of 18 chapters: 1) basis of nuclear physics, 2) the interactions of neutrons with matter, 3) the interactions of electromagnetic radiations and charged-particles with matter, 4) neutron slowing-down, 5) resonant absorption, 6) Doppler effect, 7) neutron thermalization, 8) Boltzmann equation, 9) calculation methods in neutron transport theory, 10) neutron scattering, 11) reactor reactivity, 12) theory of the critical homogenous pile, 13) the neutron reflector, 14) the heterogeneous reactor, 15) the equations of the fuel cycle, 16) neutron counter-reactions, 17) reactor kinetics, and 18) calculation methods in neutron scattering

  2. SNAP Nuclear Space Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corliss, William R

    1966-01-01

    This booklet describes the principles of nuclear-reactor space power plants and shows how they will contribute to the exploration and use of space. It compares them with chemical fuels, solar cells, and systems using energy from radioisotopes. The SNAP (Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power) Program, begun in 1955, is described.

  3. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor fuel element comprising a column of vibration compacted fuel which is retained in consolidated condition by a thimble shaped plug. The plug is wedged into gripping engagement with the wall of the sheath by a wedge. The wedge material has a lower coefficient of expansion than the sheath material so that at reactor operating temperature the retainer can relax sufficient to accommodate thermal expansion of the column of fuel. (author)

  4. Water cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The description is given of a water cooled nuclear reactor comprising a core, cooling water that rises through the core, vertical guide tubes located inside the core and control rods vertically mobile in the guide tubes. In this reactor the cooling water is divided into a first part introduced at the bottom end of the core and rising through it and a second part introduced at the top end of the guide tubes so as to drop in them

  5. Nuclear reactor design

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on core design and methods for design and analysis. It is based on advances made in nuclear power utilization and computational methods over the past 40 years, covering core design of boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors, as well as fast reactors and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The objectives of this book are to help graduate and advanced undergraduate students to understand core design and analysis, and to serve as a background reference for engineers actively working in light water reactors. Methodologies for core design and analysis, together with physical descriptions, are emphasized. The book also covers coupled thermal hydraulic core calculations, plant dynamics, and safety analysis, allowing readers to understand core design in relation to plant control and safety.

  6. Integral nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention deals with an inprovement of the design of an integral pressurized water nuclear reactor. A typical embodyment of the invention includes a generally cylindrical pressure vessel that is assembled from three segments which are bolted together at transverse joints to form a pressure tight unit that encloses the steam generator and the reactor. The new construction permits primary to secondary coolant heat exchange and improved control rod drive mecanisms which can be exposed for full service access during reactor core refueling, maintenance and inspection

  7. Generalities about nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From Zoe, the first nuclear reactor, till the current EPR, the French nuclear industry has always advanced by profiting from the feedback from dozens of years of experience and operations, in particular by drawing lessons from the most significant events in its history, such as the Fukushima accident. The new generations of reactors must improve safety and economic performance so that the industry maintain its legitimacy and its share in the production of electricity. This article draws the history of nuclear power in France, gives a brief description of the pressurized water reactor design, lists the technical features of the different versions of PWR that operate in France and compares them with other types of reactors. The feedback experience concerning safety, learnt from the major nuclear accidents Three Miles Island (1979), Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011) is also detailed. Today there are 26 third generation reactors being built in the world: 4 EPR (1 in Finland, 1 in France and 2 in China); 2 VVER-1200 in Russia, 8 AP-1000 (4 in China and 4 in the Usa), 8 APR-1400 (4 in Korea and 4 in UAE), and 4 ABWR (2 in Japan and 2 in Taiwan)

  8. A fluidized-bed reactor for silane pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iya, S.

    1984-01-01

    The silane decomposition in a fluidized bed reactor was studied. The process feasibility and operating windows were determined. Long duration tests were conducted and silicon purity was demonstrated. A high purity linear was installed in the fluid bed reactor; the FBR product was melted and single crystallized. Product purity improvements are noted.

  9. BIODEGRADATION OF AROMATIC AMINE COMPOUNDS USING MOVING BED BIOFILM REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Delnavaz ، B. Ayati ، H. Ganjidoust

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Three moving bed biofilm reactors were used to treat synthesized wastewater of aromatic amine compounds including aniline, para-diaminobenzene and para-aminophenol that are found in many industrial wastewaters. The reactors with cylindrical shape had an internal diameter and an effective depth of 10 and 60 cm, respectively. The reactors were filled with light expanded clay aggregate as carriers and operated in an aerobic batch and continuous conditions. Evaluation of the reactors' efficiency was done at different retention time of 8, 24, 48 and 72 h with an influent COD from 100 to 3500 mg/L (filling ratio of 50%. The maximum obtained removal efficiencies were 90% (influent COD=2000 mg/L, 87% (influent COD=1000 mg/L and 75% (influent COD=750 mg/L for aniline, para-diaminobenzene and para-aminophenol, respectively. In the study of decrease in filling ratio from 50 to 30 percent, 6% decrease for both para-diaminobenzene and para-aminophenol and 7% increase for aniline degradation were obtained. The removal efficiency was decreased to about 10% after 15 days of continuous loading for each of the above three substrates. In the shock loading test, initially the COD removal rate was decreased in all reactors, but after about 10 days, it has been approached to the previous values. Finally, biodegradability of aromatic amines has been proved by nuclear magnetic resonance system.

  10. Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  11. Materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The improved performance of present generation nuclear reactors and the realization of advanced reactor concepts, both, require development of better materials. Physical metallurgy/materials science principles which have been exploited in meeting the exacting requirements of nuclear reactor materials (fuels and structural materials), are outlined citing a few specific examples. While the incentive for improvement of traditional fuels (e.g., UO2 fuel) is primarily for increasing the average core burn up, the development of advanced fuels (e.g., MOX, mixed carbide, nitride, silicide and dispersion fuels) are directed towards better utilization of fissile and fertile inventories through adaptation of innovative fuel cycles. As the burn up of UO2 fuel reaches higher levels, a more detailed and quantitative understanding of the phenomena such as fission gas release, fuel restructuring induced by radiation and thermal gradients and pellet-clad interaction is being achieved. Development of zirconium based alloys for both cladding and pressure tube applications is discussed with reference to their physical metallurgy, fabrication techniques and in-reactor degradation mechanisms. The issue of radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is covered drawing a comparison between the western and eastern specifications of RPV steels. The search for new materials which can stand higher rates of atomic displacement due to radiation has led to the development of swelling resistant austenitic and ferritic stainless steels for fast reactor applications as exemplified by the development of the D-9 steel for Indian fast breeder reactor. The presentation will conclude by listing various materials related phenomena, which have a strong bearing on the successful development of future nuclear energy systems. (author)

  12. Gas reactor international cooperative program interim report: German Pebble Bed Reactor design and technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes and evaluates several gas-cooled reactor plant concepts under development within the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). The concepts, based upon the use of a proven Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) fuel element design, include nuclear heat generation for chemical processes and electrical power generation. Processes under consideration for the nuclear process heat plant (PNP) include hydrogasification of coal, steam gasification of coal, combined process, and long-distance chemical heat transportation. The electric plant emphasized in the report is the steam turbine cycle (HTR-K), although the gas turbine cycle (HHT) is also discussed. The study is a detailed description and evaluation of the nuclear portion of the various plants. The general conclusions are that the PBR technology is sound and that the HTR-K and PNP plant concepts appear to be achievable through appropriate continuing development programs, most of which are either under way or planned

  13. Nuclear reactor power monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The device of the present invention monitors phenomena occurred in a nuclear reactor more accurately than usual case. that is, the device monitors a reactor power by signals sent from a great number of neutron monitors disposed in the reactor. The device has a means for estimating a phenomenon occurred in the reactor based on the relationship of a difference of signals between each of the great number of neutron monitors to the positions of the neutron monitors disposed in the reactor. The estimation of the phenomena is conducted by, for example, conversion of signals sent from the neutron monitors to a code train. Then, a phenomenon is estimated rapidly by matching the code train described above with a code train contained in a data base. Further. signals sent from the neutron monitors are processed statistically to estimate long term and periodical phenomena. As a result, phenomena occurred in the reactor are monitored more accurately than usual case, thereby enabling to improve reactor safety and operationability. (I.S.)

  14. CANDU nuclear reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has over 40 years of experience in the nuclear field. Over the past 20 years, this unique Canadian nuclear technology has made a worldwide presence, In addition to 22 CANDU reactors in Canada, there are also two in India, one in Pakistan, one in Argentina, four in Korea and five in Romania. CANDU advancements are based on evolutionary plant improvements. They consist of system performance improvements, design technology improvements and research and development in support of advanced nuclear power. Given the good performance of CANOU plants, it is important that this CANDU operating experience be incorporated into new and repeat designs

  15. Comparison of packed bed and fluidized bed membrane reactors for methane reforming

    OpenAIRE

    Gallucci, Fausto; Sint Annaland, van, Martin; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the performance of different membrane reactor concepts, both fluidized bed and packed bed membrane reactors, have been compared for the reforming of methane for the production of ultra-pure hydrogen. Using detailed theoretical models, the required membrane area to reach a given conversion and the prevailing temperature profiles have been compared. The extent of mass and heat transfer limitations in the different reactors have been evaluated, and strategies to decrease (or avoid) ...

  16. Multiscale Analysis of Pebble Bed Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans Gougar; Woo Yoon; Abderrafi Ougouag

    2010-10-01

    – The PEBBED code was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for design and analysis of pebble-bed high temperature reactors. The diffusion-depletion-pebble-mixing algorithm of the original PEBBED code was enhanced through coupling with the THERMIX-KONVEK code for thermal fluid analysis and by the COMBINE code for online cross section generation. The COMBINE code solves the B-1 or B-3 approximations to the transport equation for neutron slowing down and resonance interactions in a homogeneous medium with simple corrections for shadowing and thermal self-shielding. The number densities of materials within specified regions of the core are averaged and transferred to COMBINE from PEBBED for updating during the burnup iteration. The simple treatment of self-shielding in previous versions of COMBINE led to inaccurate results for cross sections and unsatisfactory core performance calculations. A new version of COMBINE has been developed that treats all levels of heterogeneity using the 1D transport code ANISN. In a 3-stage calculation, slowing down is performed in 167 groups for each homogeneous subregion (kernel, particle layers, graphite shell, control rod absorber annulus, etc.) Particles in a local average pebble are homogenized using ANISN then passed to the next (pebble) stage. A 1D transport solution is again performed over the pebble geometry and the homogenized pebble cross sections are passed to a 1-d radial model of a wedge of the pebble bed core. This wedge may also include homogeneous reflector regions and a control rod region composed of annuli of different absorbing regions. Radial leakage effects are therefore captured with discrete ordinates transport while axial and azimuthal effects are captured with a transverse buckling term. In this paper, results of various PBR models will be compared with comparable models from literature. Performance of the code will be assessed.

  17. Nuclear reactor constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor construction comprising a reactor core submerged in a pool of liquid metal coolant in a primary vessel which is suspended from the roof structure of a containment vault. Control rods supported from the roof structure are insertable in the core which is carried on a support structure from the wall of the primary vessel. To prevent excessive relaxation of the support structure whereby the control rods would be displaced relative to the core, the support structure incorporates a normally inactive secondary structure designed to become effective in bracing the primary structure against further relaxation beyond a predetermined limit. (author)

  18. A Pebble Bed Reactor cross section methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is presented for the evaluation of microscopic cross sections for the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) neutron diffusion computational models during convergence to an equilibrium (asymptotic) fuel cycle. This method considers the isotopics within a core spectral zone and the leakages from such a zone as they arise during reactor operation. The randomness of the spatial distribution of fuel grains within the fuel pebbles and that of the fuel and moderator pebbles within the core, the double heterogeneity of the fuel, and the indeterminate burnup of the spectral zones all pose a unique challenge for the computation of the local microscopic cross sections. As prior knowledge of the equilibrium composition and leakage is not available, it is necessary to repeatedly re-compute the group constants with updated zone information. A method is presented to account for local spectral zone composition and leakage effects without resorting to frequent spectrum code calls. Fine group data are pre-computed for a range of isotopic states. Microscopic cross sections and zone nuclide number densities are used to construct fine group macroscopic cross sections, which, together with fission spectra, flux modulation factors, and zone buckling, are used in the solution of the slowing down balance to generate a new or updated spectrum. The microscopic cross-sections are then re-collapsed with the new spectrum for the local spectral zone. This technique is named the Spectral History Correction (SHC) method. It is found that this method accurately recalculates local broad group microscopic cross sections. Significant improvement in the core eigenvalue, flux, and power peaking factor is observed when the local cross sections are corrected for the effects of the spectral zone composition and leakage in two-dimensional PBR test problems.

  19. Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER ) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  20. Survey of dust production in pebble bed reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We review potential sources of the graphite dust found in the German pebble bed reactors. → Available literature on graphite wear coefficients in pebble bed core-like conditions is reviewed. → Limited conclusions and remaining open questions are discussed. - Abstract: Graphite dust produced via mechanical wear from the pebbles in a pebble bed reactor is an area of concern for licensing. Both the German pebble bed reactors produced graphite dust that contained activated elements. These activation products constitute an additional source term of radiation and must be taken under consideration during the conduct of accident analysis of the design. This paper discusses the available literature on graphite dust production and measurements in pebble bed reactors. Limited data is available on the graphite dust produced from the AVR and THTR-300 pebble bed reactors. Experiments that have been performed on wear of graphite in pebble-bed-like conditions are reviewed. The calculation of contact forces, which are a key driving mechanism for dust in the reactor, are also included. In addition, prior graphite dust predictions are examined, and future areas of research are identified.

  1. COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Essam A

    2013-01-09

    Details of numerical simulations of two-phase gas-solid turbulent flow in the riser section of Circulating Fluidized Bed Reactor (CFBR) using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique are reported. Two CFBR riser configurations are considered and modeled. Each of these two riser models consist of inlet, exit, connecting elbows and a main pipe. Both riser configurations are cylindrical and have the same diameter but differ in their inlet lengths and main pipe height to enable investigation of riser geometrical scaling effects. In addition, two types of solid particles are exploited in the solid phase of the two-phase gas-solid riser flow simulations to study the influence of solid loading ratio on flow patterns. The gaseous phase in the two-phase flow is represented by standard atmospheric air. The CFD-based FLUENT software is employed to obtain steady state and transient solutions for flow modulations in the riser. The physical dimensions, types and numbers of computation meshes, and solution methodology utilized in the present work are stated. Flow parameters, such as static and dynamic pressure, species velocity, and volume fractions are monitored and analyzed. The differences in the computational results between the two models, under steady and transient conditions, are compared, contrasted, and discussed.

  2. Nuclear power reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this book is to explain the physical working conditions of nuclear reactors for the benefit of non-specialized engineers and engineering students. One of the leading ideas of this course is to distinguish between two fundamentally different concepts: - a science which could be called neutrodynamics (as distinct from neutron physics which covers the knowledge of the neutron considered as an elementary particle and the study of its interactions with nuclei); the aim of this science is to study the interaction of the neutron gas with real material media; the introduction will however be restricted to its simplified expression, the theory and equation of diffusion; - a special application: reactor physics, which is introduced when the diffusing and absorbing material medium is also multiplying. For this reason the chapter on fission is used to introduce this section. In practice the section on reactor physics is much longer than that devoted to neutrodynamics and it is developed in what seemed to be the most relevant direction: nuclear power reactors. Every effort was made to meet the following three requirements: to define the physical bases of neutron interaction with different materials, to give a correct mathematical treatment within the limit of necessary simplifying hypotheses clearly explained; to propose, whenever possible, numerical applications in order to fix orders of magnitude

  3. Computational and experimental prediction of dust production in pebble bed reactors, Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Custom-built high temperature, high pressure tribometer is designed. • Two different wear phenomena at high temperatures are observed. • Experimental wear results for graphite are presented. • The graphite wear dust production in a typical Pebble Bed Reactor is predicted. -- Abstract: This paper is the continuation of Part I, which describes the high temperature and high pressure helium environment wear tests of graphite–graphite in frictional contact. In the present work, it has been attempted to simulate a Pebble Bed Reactor core environment as compared to Part I. The experimental apparatus, which is a custom-designed tribometer, is capable of performing wear tests at PBR relevant higher temperatures and pressures under a helium environment. This environment facilitates prediction of wear mass loss of graphite as dust particulates from the pebble bed. The experimental results of high temperature helium environment are used to anticipate the amount of wear mass produced in a pebble bed nuclear reactor

  4. Nuclear reactor constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improvement in the construction of liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors of the kind in which the fuel assembly is submerged in a pool of coolant contained by a primary vessel housed in a concrete vault, is described. In this modification the roof of the vault carries heat exchangers immersed in the pool of coolant, the lower ends of which are hydraulically damped against oscillation caused by seismic disturbances. (U.K.)

  5. Water cooled FBNR nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FBNR enjoys the economy of mass production. FBNR can serve a dual purpose plant generating electricity and producing desalinated water at the same time at lower cost. The FBNR has been evaluated by the IAEA's INPRO Methodology from the safety and nonproliferation points of view and is shown to be a fool proof reactor against nuclear proliferation and have inherent safety against any conceivable accident. The reactor has in its upper part the reactor core and a steam generator and in its lower part the fuel chamber. The core consists of two concentric perforated zircaloy tubes of 31 cm and 171 cm in diameters, inside which, during the reactor operation, the spherical fuel elements are held together by the coolant flow in a fixed bed configuration, forming a suspended fixed core. The coolant flows vertically up into the inner perforated tube and then, passing horizontally through the fuel elements and the outer perforated tube, enters the outer shell where it flows up vertically to the steam generator. The reserve fuel chamber is a 60 cm diameter tube made of high neutron absorbing alloy, which is directly connected underneath the core tube. The fuel chamber consists of a helical 40 cm diameter tube flanged to the reserve fuel chamber that is sealed by the national and international authorities. A grid is provided at the lower part of the tube to hold the fuel elements within it. A steam generator of the shell-and-tube type is integrated in the upper part of the module. A control rod can slide inside the centre of the core for fine reactivity adjustments. The reactor is provided with a pressurizer system to keep the coolant at a constant pressure. The pump circulates the coolant inside the reactor moving it up through the fuel chamber, the core, and the steam generator. Thereafter, the coolant flows back down to the pump through the concentric annular passage. At a flow velocity called terminal velocity, the water coolant carries the 15 mm diameter spherical fuel

  6. Simulating the Dynamics of Spouted-Bed Nuclear Fuel Coaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Boyalakuntla, Dhanunjay S [ORNL; Syamlal, M [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); O' Brien, T. J. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

    2007-01-01

    We describe simulation studies of the dynamics of spouted beds used for CVD coating of nuclear fuel particles. Our principal modeling tool is the Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges (MFIX) code that was originally developed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for fossil energy process applications. In addition to standard MFIX features that allow coupling of transient hydrodynamics, heat and mass transfer, and chemical kinetics, we employ special post-processing tools to track particle mixing and circulation as functions of operating conditions and bed design. We describe in detail one major feature of the dynamics, which is the occurrence of very regular spontaneous pulsations of gas and particle flow in the spout. These pulsations appear to be critically linked to the entrainment and circulation of solids, and they produce readily accessible dynamic pressure variations that can be used for direct comparisons of model predictions with experiments. Spouted-bed dynamics are important from a CVD perspective because they directly determine the magnitude and variability of the concentration and species gradients in the zone where reactant gases first come into contact with hot particles. As this unsteady spouted-bed environment differs from other types of CVD reactors, the design and scale-up of such reactors is likely to involve unique modeling issues. Our primary goal here is to lay the groundwork for how computational simulation can be used to address these modeling issues in the specific context of nuclear fuel particle coating.

  7. Simulating the dynamics of spouted-bed nuclear fuel coaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannala, S.; Daw, C.S.; Finney, C.E.A.; Boyalakuntla, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Syamlal, M.; O' Brien, T.J. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV, 26505 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    We describe simulation studies of the dynamics of spouted beds used for CVD coating of nuclear fuel particles. Our principal modeling tool is the Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges (MFIX) code that was originally developed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for fossil energy process applications. In addition to standard MFIX features that allow coupling of transient hydrodynamics, heat and mass transfer, and chemical kinetics, we employ special post-processing tools to track particle mixing and circulation as functions of operating conditions and bed design. We describe in detail one major feature of the dynamics, which is the occurrence of very regular spontaneous pulsations of gas and particle flow in the spout. These pulsations appear to be critically linked to the entrainment and circulation of solids, and they produce readily accessible dynamic pressure variations that can be used for direct comparisons of model predictions with experiments. Spouted-bed dynamics are important from a CVD perspective because they directly determine the magnitude and variability of the concentration and species gradients in the zone where reactant gases first come into contact with hot particles. As this unsteady spouted-bed environment differs from other types of CVD reactors, the design and scale-up of such reactors is likely to involve unique modeling issues. Our primary goal here is to lay the groundwork for how computational simulation can be used to address these modeling issues in the specific context of nuclear fuel particle coating. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Hydrodynamics of multi-phase packed bed micro-reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Márquez Luzardo, N.M.

    2010-01-01

    Why to use packed bed micro-reactors for catalyst testing? Miniaturized packed bed reactors have a large surface-to-volume ratio at the reactor and particle level that favors the heat- and mass-transfer processes at all scales (intra-particle, inter-phase and inter-particle or reactor level). If the mass-transfer processes are fast in respect to the reaction-rate, then the reaction-rate is under kinetic control over the entire range of conversion and it is possible to measure intrinsic kineti...

  9. JPL in-house fluidized-bed reactor research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Fluidized bed reactor research techniques for fabrication of quartz linears was reviewed. Silane pyrolysis was employed in this fabrication study. Metallic contaminant levels in the silicon particles were below levels detectable by emission spectroscopy.

  10. Feedback linearizing control of a fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoufoussi, H.; Perrier, M.; Chaouki, J.; Chavarie, C.; Dochain, D. (Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Genie Chimique)

    1992-04-01

    A linearized technique has been applied to temperature control for a fluidized bed reactor. A nonlinear antiwindup mechanism for the reset action is used. Simulation tests show that the controller provides good setpoint tracking. 24 refs.; 11 figs.; 4 tabs.

  11. Deleterious Thermal Effects Due To Randomized Flow Paths in Pebble Bed, and Particle Bed Style Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    A review of literature associated with Pebble Bed and Particle Bed reactor core research has revealed a systemic problem inherent to reactor core concepts which utilize randomized rather than structured coolant channel flow paths. For both the Pebble Bed and Particle Bed Reactor designs; case studies reveal that for indeterminate reasons, regions within the core would suffer from excessive heating leading to thermal runaway and localized fuel melting. A thermal Computational Fluid Dynamics model was utilized to verify that In both the Pebble Bed and Particle Bed Reactor concepts randomized coolant channel pathways combined with localized high temperature regions would work together to resist the flow of coolant diverting it away from where it is needed the most to cooler less resistive pathways where it is needed the least. In other words given the choice via randomized coolant pathways the reactor coolant will take the path of least resistance, and hot zones offer the highest resistance. Having identified the relationship between randomized coolant channel pathways and localized fuel melting it is now safe to assume that other reactor concepts that utilize randomized coolant pathways such as the foam core reactor are also susceptible to this phenomenon.

  12. Nonlinear dynamics and control of a recycle fixed bed reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Recke, Bodil; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. Primarily to describe the dynamic behaviour that can be observed in a fixed bed reactor with recycle of unconverted reactant. Secondly to describe the possibilities of model reduction in order to facilitate control design. Reactant recycle has been shown to introduce periodic solution to the fixed bed reactor, a phenomenon which is not seen for the system without the recycle, at least not within the Peclet number range investigated in the present work. Th...

  13. Pebble bed modular reactor - The first Generation IV reactor to be constructed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ion, S. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, Warrington (United Kingdom); Nicholls, D. [ESKOM, Sandton, Johannesburg (South Africa); Matzie, R. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Windsor, CT (United States); Matzner, D. [Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (Pty) Ltd, Centurion (South Africa)

    2004-02-01

    Substantial interest has been generated in advanced reactors over the past few years. This interest is motivated by the view that new nuclear power reactors will be needed to provide low carbon generation of electricity and possibly hydrogen to support the future growth in demand for both of these commodities. Some governments feel that substantially different designs will be needed to satisfy the desires for public perception, improved safety, proliferation resistance, reduced waste and competitive economics. This has motivated the creation of the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems programme in which ten countries have agreed on a framework for international cooperation in research for advanced reactors. Six designs have been selected for continued evaluation, with the objective of deployment by 2030. One of these designs is the very high temperature reactor (VHTR), which is a thermal neutron spectrum system with a helium-cooled core utilising carbon-based fuel. The pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR), being developed in South Africa through a worldwide international collaborative effort led by Eskom, the national utility, will represent a key milestone on the way to achievement of the VHTR design objectives, but in the much nearer term. This paper outlines the design objectives, safety approach and design details of the PBMR, which is already at a very advanced stage of development. (author)

  14. Nuclear research reactors in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cota, Anna Paula Leite; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias, E-mail: aplc@cdtn.b, E-mail: amir@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The rising concerns about global warming and energy security have spurred a revival of interest in nuclear energy, giving birth to a 'nuclear power renaissance' in several countries in the world. Particularly in Brazil, in the recent years, the nuclear power renaissance can be seen in the actions that comprise its nuclear program, summarily the increase of the investments in nuclear research institutes and the government target to design and build the Brazilian Multipurpose research Reactor (BMR). In the last 50 years, Brazilian research reactors have been used for training, for producing radioisotopes to meet demands in industry and nuclear medicine, for miscellaneous irradiation services and for academic research. Moreover, the research reactors are used as laboratories to develop technologies in power reactors, which are evaluated today at around 450 worldwide. In this application, those reactors become more viable in relation to power reactors by the lowest cost, by the operation at low temperatures and, furthermore, by lower demand for nuclear fuel. In Brazil, four research reactors were installed: the IEA-R1 and the MB-01 reactors, both at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares (IPEN, Sao Paulo); the Argonauta, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN, Rio de Janeiro) and the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor, at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN, Belo Horizonte). The present paper intends to enumerate the characteristics of these reactors, their utilization and current academic research. Therefore, through this paper, we intend to collaborate on the BMR project. (author)

  15. Towards nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the middle of 21st century, the population on the earth is expected to double, and the energy that mankind consumes to triple. The nuclear fusion which is said the ultimate energy source for mankind is expected to solve this energy problem. As for fusion reactors, fuel materials exist inexhaustibly, distributing evenly, they have high safety in principle, the product of burning is harmless nonradioactive substance that does not require the treatment and disposal, and the attenuation of induced radioactivity due to neutrons is quick and the effect to global environment is little. The basic plan of second stage nuclear fusion research and development was decided in 1975, aiming at attaining the critical plasma condition. JT-60 has attained it in 1987. The project of international thermonuclear fusion experimental reactor (ITER) was started, and the conceptual design was carried out. Under such background, the third stage basic plan was decided in 1992, and its objective is self ignition condition, long time burning and the basis of the reactor engineering technology. The engineering design of the ITER is investigated. (K.I.)

  16. Nuclear reactor building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Townsend, Harold E.; Barbanti, Giancarlo

    1994-01-01

    A reactor building for enclosing a nuclear reactor includes a containment vessel having a wetwell disposed therein. The wetwell includes inner and outer walls, a floor, and a roof defining a wetwell pool and a suppression chamber disposed thereabove. The wetwell and containment vessel define a drywell surrounding the reactor. A plurality of vents are disposed in the wetwell pool in flow communication with the drywell for channeling into the wetwell pool steam released in the drywell from the reactor during a LOCA for example, for condensing the steam. A shell is disposed inside the wetwell and extends into the wetwell pool to define a dry gap devoid of wetwell water and disposed in flow communication with the suppression chamber. In a preferred embodiment, the wetwell roof is in the form of a slab disposed on spaced apart support beams which define therebetween an auxiliary chamber. The dry gap, and additionally the auxiliary chamber, provide increased volume to the suppression chamber for improving pressure margin.

  17. Granular Dynamics in Pebble Bed Reactor Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Michael Robert

    This study focused on developing a better understanding of granular dynamics in pebble bed reactor cores through experimental work and computer simulations. The work completed includes analysis of pebble motion data from three scaled experiments based on the annular core of the Pebble Bed Fluoride Salt-Cooled High- Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR). The experiments are accompanied by the development of a new discrete element simulation code, GRECO, which is designed to offer a simple user interface and simplified two-dimensional system that can be used for iterative purposes in the preliminary phases of core design. The results of this study are focused on the PB-FHR, but can easily be extended for gas-cooled reactor designs. Experimental results are presented for three Pebble Recirculation Experiments (PREX). PREX 2 and 3.0 are conventional gravity-dominated granular systems based on the annular PB-FHR core design for a 900 MWth commercial prototype plant and a 16 MWth test reactor, respectively. Detailed results are presented for the pebble velocity field, mixing at the radial zone interfaces, and pebble residence times. A new Monte Carlo algorithm was developed to study the residence time distributions of pebbles in different radial zones. These dry experiments demonstrated the basic viability of radial pebble zoning in cores with diverging geometry before pebbles reach the active core. Results are also presented from PREX 3.1, a scaled facility that uses simulant materials to evaluate the impact of coupled fluid drag forces on the granular dynamics in the PB-FHR core. PREX 3.1 was used to collect first of a kind pebble motion data in a multidimensional porous media flow field. Pebble motion data were collected for a range of axial and cross fluid flow configurations where the drag forces range from half the buoyancy force up to ten times greater than the buoyancy force. Detailed analysis is presented for the pebble velocity field, mixing behavior, and residence time

  18. Transuranics elimination in an optimised pebble-bed sub-critical reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a nuclear energy economy the nuclear waste is a big burden to its further development and deployment. The possibility of eliminating the long-term part of the waste presents an appealing opportunity to the sustainability and acceptance of a better and cleaner source of energy. It is shown that the proposed pebble-bed transmutator has suitable characteristics to transmute most of the isotopes that contribute to the long-term radioactivity. This proposed reactor presents also inherent safety characteristics, which is a necessary element in a new reactor design to be accepted by the society. Throughout this paper, we will characterise the new reactor concept, and present some of the neutronics and safety characteristics of an accelerator driven pebble-bed reactor, (ADS) for transuranics elimination. (author)

  19. Measurement in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor construction has a flux detector comprising a bundle of fibre optics each having a bead incorporating a substance which scintillates on being struck by neutrons or gamma radiations. The other ends of the fibre optics terminate at an image intensifier. The optical fibres may be of glass made from a mixture of silica, alkaline earth metal oxide, cerous oxide and alkali metal oxide. The beads may be incorporated in a disc forming a detector head, which is in a protective guide tube, through which an inert gas may be passed. (author)

  20. Biological Phosphorus Removal in a Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helness, Herman

    2007-09-15

    The scope of this study was to investigate use of the moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) process for biological phosphorus removal. The goal has been to describe the operating conditions required for biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal in a MBBR operated as a sequencing batch reactor (SBR), and determine dimensioning criteria for such a process

  1. Hydrodynamic Reaction Model of a Spouted Bed Electrolytic Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alireza Shirvanian, Pezhman; Calo, Joseph

    2002-08-01

    An Eulerian model is presented that has been developed to describe the hydrodynamics, mass transfer, and metal ion reduction mass transfer in a cylindrical, spouted bed electrolytic reactor. Appropriate boundary conditions are derived from kinetic theory and reaction kinetics for the hydrodynamics and mass transfer and reaction on the cathodic conical bottom of the reactor, respectively. This study was undertaken as a part of a project focused on the development of a Spouted Bed Electrolytic Reactor (SBER) for metals recovery. The results presented here include the effect of particle loading, inlet jet velocity, Solution pH, and temperature on void fraction distribution, pressure drop, particles recirculation rate, and metal recovery rate.

  2. Absorber rod for pebble-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorber rod that can be moved into the pebble bed from the top reflector is enclosed by a cladding tube which, if it is completely moved down, ends above the pebble bed and is open at the bottom. Through the cladding tube the absorber rod is cooled with gas. The cladding tube consists of e.g. boron steel. If the absorber rod is drawn it takes along the cladding tube which is moved into the guide tube like a telescope. The rigidity of that part of the absorber rod projecting from the pebble bed is thus guaranteed. (DG)

  3. Virtual nuclear reactor for education of nuclear reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As one of projects that were programmed in the cultivation program for human resources in nuclear engineering sponsored by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, the development of a virtual reactor for education of nuclear reactor physics started in 2007. The purpose of the virtual nuclear reactor is to make nuclear reactor physics easily understood with aid of visualization. In the first year of this project, the neutron slowing down process was visualized. The data needed for visualization are provided by Monte Carlo calculations; The flights of the respective neutrons generated by nuclear fissions are traced through a reactor core until they disappear by neutron absorption or slow down to a thermal energy. With this visualization and an attached supplement textbook, it is expected that the learners can learn more clearly the physical implication of neutron slowing process that is mathematically described by the Boltzmann neutron transport equation. (author)

  4. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokkam, Ram [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  5. Nuclear reactor with control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention relates to liquid cooled nuclear reactors. In particular, it concerns reactors with mobile control rods in a straight line and guide tubes to guide these control rods through the internal upper components of the reactor vessel and in the aligned fuel assemblies of the core

  6. Nuclear reaction data and nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These two volumes contain the lecture notes of the workshop 'Nuclear Reaction Data and Nuclear Reactors: Physics, Design and Safety', which was held at the Abdus Salam ICTP in the Spring of 2000. The workshop consisted of five weeks of lecture courses followed by practical computer exercises on nuclear data treatment and design of nuclear power systems. The spectrum of topics is wide enough to timely cover the state-of-the-art and the perspectives of this broad field. The first two weeks were devoted to nuclear reaction models and nuclear data evaluation. Nuclear data processing for applications to reactor calculations was the subject of the third week. On the last two weeks reactor physics and on-going projects in nuclear power generation, waste disposal and safety were presented

  7. Reactor modeling and physicochemical properties characterization for a polyethylene fluidized bed reactor

    OpenAIRE

    F. A. N. Fernandes; L. M. F. LONA BATISTA

    1999-01-01

    A new steady state model for the fluidized bed reactor and a physicochemical characterization model were developed for the simulation of polyethylene production using gas-phase technology. The association of these models was done in order to predict the characteristics of the polymer produced in the fluidized bed reactor (molecular weight, polydispersity, melt index, and other characteristics) throughout the reactor and also to predict the growth of the polymer particle.

  8. Reactor modeling and physicochemical properties characterization for a polyethylene fluidized bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FERNANDES F. A. N.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A new steady state model for the fluidized bed reactor and a physicochemical characterization model were developed for the simulation of polyethylene production using gas-phase technology. The association of these models was done in order to predict the characteristics of the polymer produced in the fluidized bed reactor (molecular weight, polydispersity, melt index, and other characteristics throughout the reactor and also to predict the growth of the polymer particle.

  9. Medium voltage direct current (MVDC) converter for pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR) / Hendrik de Villiers Pretorius

    OpenAIRE

    Pretorius, Hendrik de Villiers

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear and renewable energy systems will probably be used more and more extensively in future due to high environmental demands regarding pollution and exhaustion of the world's gas and coal reserves. Because most types of renewable energy systems do not supply electric power at line frequency and voltage a converter is used to connect these sources to the existing power system. The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a nuclear power plant currently using a 50 Hz synchrono...

  10. Optimal control of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modern control theory is applied to the design of control systems for experimental nuclear reactors that do not belong to power reactors, the component forms of optimal control systems for nuclear reactors are demonstrated. The adoption of output quadratic integral criterion and incomplete state feedback technique can make these systems both efficient and economical. Moreover, approximate handling methods are given so as to simplify the calculations in design. In addition, the adoptable reference values of parameters are given in the illustration

  11. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The description is given of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly comprising fuel elements arranged in a supporting frame composed of two end pieces, one at the top and the other at the bottom, on which are secured the ends of a number of vertical tubes, each end piece comprising a plane bottom on which two series of holes are made for holding the tubes and for the passage of the coolant. According to the invention, the bottom of each end piece is fixed to an internal plate fitted with the same series of holes for holding the tubes and for the fluid to pass through. These holes are of oblong section and are fitted with fixing elements cooperating with corresponding elements for securing these tubes by transversal movement of the inside plate

  12. Nuclear reactor inspection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A typical embodiment of the invention combines a novel cellular end fitting for a nuclear reactor fuel assembly with a new design for a fuel rod end cap and a radiation sensing device probe to provide a means for swiftly and accurately distinguishing sound fuel rods from those rods that have developed leaks. For example, a somewhat thinner than usual fuel rod end cap is accessible through the open cellular structure of the end fitting to permit a hollow metal probe to contact the fuel rod end cap. This direct contact excludes most of the water, metal and other shielding materials from the volume between the interior of the fuel rod and the radiation detector, thereby improving the quality of the fuel rod examination. A bridge and trolley structure for accurately positioning the probe also is described

  13. Nuclear reactor spacer assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor is disclosed wherein the fuel element receiving and supporting grid is comprised of a first metal, the guide tubes which pass through the grid assembly are comprised of a second metal and the grid is supported on the guide tubes by means of expanded sleeves located intermediate the grid and guide tubes. The fuel assembly is fabricated by inserting the sleeves, of initial outer diameter commensurate with the guide tube outer diameters, through the holes in the grid assembly provided for the guide tubes and thereafter expanding the sleeves radially outwardly along their entire length such that the guide tubes can subsequently be passed through the sleeves. The step of radial expansion, as a result of windows provided in the sleeves having dimensions commensurate with the geometry of the grid, mechanically captures the grid and simultaneously preloads the sleeve against the grid whereby relative motion between the grid and guide tube will be precluded

  14. Nuclear reactor measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An instrument to detect the temperature and flow-rate of the liquid metal current of a coolant fluid sample from adjacent sub-assemblies of a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor is described. It includes three thermocouple hot junctions mounted in series, each intended for exposure to a sample-current from a single sub-assembly, electromagnetic coils being mounted around an induction core which detects variations in the liquid metal flow-rate by deformation of the lines of flux. The instrument may also include a thermocouple to detect the mean temperature of the sample-current of coolant fluid from several sources, the result being that the temperature of the coolant fluid current in a sub-assembly may be inferred from the three temperature readings associated with this sub-assembly

  15. Sodium-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book first explains the choice of sodium-cooled reactors by outlining the reasons of the choice of fast neutron reactors (fast neutrons instead of thermal neutrons, recycling opportunity for plutonium, full use of natural uranium, nuclear waste optimization, flexibility of fast neutron reactors in nuclear material management, fast neutron reactors as complements of water-cooled reactors), and by outlining the reasons for the choice of sodium as heat-transfer material. Physical, chemical, and neutron properties of sodium are presented. The second part of the book first presents the main design principles for sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors and their core. The third part proposes an historical overview and an assessment of previously operated sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors (French reactors from Rapsodie to Superphenix, other reactors in the world), and an assessment of the main incidents which occurred in these reactors. It also reports the experience and lessons learned from the dismantling of various sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors in the world. The next chapter addresses safety issues (technical and safety aspects related to the use of sodium) and environmental issues (dosimetry, gaseous and liquid releases, solid wastes, and cooling water). Then, various technological aspects of these reactors are addressed: the energy conversion system, main components, sodium chemistry, sodium-related technology, advances in in-service inspection, materials used in reactors and their behaviour, and fuel system. The next chapter addresses the fuel cycle in these reactors: its integrated specific character, report of the French experience in fast neutron reactor fuel processing, description of the transmutation of minor actinides in these reactors. The last chapter proposes an overview of reactors currently projected or under construction in the world, presents the Astrid project, and gives an assessment of the economy of these reactors. A glossary and an index

  16. Effect of bed configuration on pebble flow uniformity and stagnation in the pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Pebble flow uniformity and stagnation characteristics are very important for HTR-PM. • Arc- and brachistochrone-shaped configuration effects are studied by DEM simulation. • Best bed configurations with uniform flow and no stagnated pebbles are suggested. • Detailed quantified characteristics of bed configuration effects are shown for explanation. - Abstract: Pebble flow uniformity and stagnation characteristics are very important for the design of pebble bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor. Pebble flows inside some specifically designed contraction configurations of pebble bed are studied by discrete element method. The results show the characteristics of stagnation rates, recycling rates, radial distribution of pebble velocity and residence time. It is demonstrated clearly that the bed with a brachistochrone-shaped configuration achieves optimum levels of flow uniformity and recycling rate concentration, and almost no pebbles are stagnated in the bed. Moreover, the optimum choice among the arc-shaped bed configurations is demonstrated too. Detailed information shows the quantified characteristics of bed configuration effects on flow uniformity. In addition, a good design of the pebble bed configuration is suggested

  17. Fast reactors and nuclear nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems are discussed with regard to nuclear fuel cycle resistance in fast reactors to nuclear proliferation risk due to the potential for use in military programs of the knowledge, technologies and materials gained from peaceful nuclear power applications. Advantages are addressed for fast reactors in the creation of a more reliable mode of nonproliferation in the closed nuclear fuel cycle in comparison with the existing fully open and partially closed fuel cycles of thermal reactors. Advantages and shortcomings are also discussed from the point of view of nonproliferation from the start with fast reactors using plutonium of thermal reactor spent fuel and enriched uranium fuel to the gradual transition using their own plutonium as fuel. (author)

  18. Proliferation Resistant Fuel for Pebble Bed Modular Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proliferation of nuclear weapons produced with power reactors plutonium has always been amajor problem of the nuclear energy industry. This includes the PebbleBed Modular Reactor(PBMR), which is a specific design of a GenIV High-Temperature Reactor (HTR), mainly due to its online refueling feature, which may be misused for the production of weapons gradeplutonium. A promising approach toward preventing the proliferation of power reactorplutoniumis to denaturate the plutonium by increasing the ratio of 238Pu to total Pu in the spentfuel(1). The 238Pu isotope is characterized by a high heat rate (approximately 567 W/kg) due to thealpha decay of the 238Pu with half-life of 87.74 yr, in addition to its high spontaneous fissionneutron emission, which is higher than that of 240Pu. Thus, the presence of 238Pu in Pu considerably complicates the design and construction of nuclear weapons based on Pu, owing tothese characteristics of 238Pu. Recent papers(2,3) show that a Pu mixture is proliferation resistant given that the weight ratio of 238Pu to Pu is larger than 6%. In this paper we have studied afeasible technique for ensuring that the 238Pu to Pu ratio, in the Pu produced in PBMR, is larger than 6% during the entire fuel cycle. Contamination of the spent fuel with 238Pu may be achieved by doping the nuclear fuel witheither 241Am or 237Np(4-13). The 238Pu isotope is obtained from both 241Am and 237Np by a neutron-capture reaction and the subsequent decay of the reaction products(13).The 237Np isotopeis by itself a potential weapons grade material. However, its large critical mass of 57±4 kg(14) andthe difficulty of extracting it from irradiated fuel elements make it impractical for weapons purposes. On the other hand, the critical mass of 241Am is smaller, i.e. 34 to 45 kg. However, withdecay heat production of 114W/kg, the critical mass becomes a heat source of 3.9 to 5.1 KW,which makes 241Am unsuitable for weapons applications(3). As a result, it is a non

  19. Propylene polymerization in a circulating slugging fluidized bed reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Putten, van, J.P.M.

    2004-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis is concerned with research on the riser of a circulating fluidized bed system for olefin polymerization. In the riser section, fluidization takes place in the transporting slugging mode and polymer particles are produced in the riser in a non-isothermal way. Properties of the polymerization reaction and of the hydrodynamics were studied and their behavior with respect to conditions in the reactor were described. A reactor model was constructed that accurately...

  20. Automation of a fixed-bed continuous–flow reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Alcántara, R.; Canoira, L.; R. Conde; Fernández-Sánchez, J. M.; Navarro, A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the design and operation of a laboratory plant with a fixed-bed continuous-flow reactor, fully automated and controlled from a personal computer. The automated variables include two gas flows, one liquid flow, six temperatures, two pressures, one circulation of a cooling liquid, and 10 electrovalves. An adaptive-predictive control system was used. The chemical process chosen to run the automated reactor was the conversion of methanol to gasoline over a ZSM-5 catalyst. Thi...

  1. Nuclear reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent seismic vibrations of external buildings from transmitting to the side walls of a reactor container in a tank type FBR reactor building. Constitution: The reactor building is structured such that the base mat for a reactor container chamber and a reactor container is separated from the base mat for the walls of building, and gas-tight material such as silicon rubber is filled in the gap therebetween. With such a constitution, even if the crane-supporting wall vibrates violently upon occurrence of earthqualkes, the seismic vibrations do not transmit toward the reactor container chamber. (Horiuchi, T.)

  2. DEGRADATION OF AROMATIC COMPOUNDS USING MOVING BED BIOFILM REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ayati, H. Ganjidoust, M. Mir Fattah

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available For biological treatment of water, there are many different biofilm systems in use. Examples of them are trickling filters, rotating biological contactors, fixed media submerged biofilters, granular media biofilters and fluidized bed reactors. They all have their advantages and disadvantages. Hence, the Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor process was developed in Norway in the late 1980s and early 1990s to adopt the best features of the activated sludge process as well as those of the biofilter processes, without including the worst. Two cylindrical moving bed biofilm reactors were used in this study working in upflow stream conditions. Experiments have been done in aerobic batch flow regime. Laboratory experiments were conducted at room temperature (23–28C and synthetic wastewater comprising a composition of phenol and hydroquinone in each reactor as the main organic constituents, plus balanced nutrients and alkalinity were used to feed the reactor. The ratio of influent to effluent COD was determined at different retention times. The results indicated that the removal efficiency of each selected compound is affected by the detention time. At low phenol and hydroquinone concentration (from 700 to 1000 mg/L maximum removal efficiency (over 80 % was obtained. By further increasing in COD loading rate up to 3000 mg/L, a decrease in COD removal rate was occurred. In the reactor containing pyrogallol in COD of 1500 mg/L, the removal rate decreased to 10 percent because of its toxicity for microorganisms.

  3. Circulating fluidized bed biological reactor for nutrients removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yubo CUI; Hongbo LIU; Chunxue BAI

    2008-01-01

    A new biological nitrogen removal process, which is named herein "The circulating fluidized bed bio-reactor (CFBBR)", was developed for simultaneous removal of nitrogen and organic matter. This process was composed of an anaerobic bed (Riser), aerobic bed (Downer) and connecting device. Influent and nitrified liquid from the aerobic bed enters the anaerobic bed from the bottom of the anaerobic bed, completing the removal of nitrogen and organic matter. The system performance under the conditions of different inflow loadings and nitrified liquid recirculation rates ranging from 200% to 600% was examined. From a technical and economic point of view, the optimum nitrified liquid recirculation rate was 400%. With a shortest total retention time of 2.5 h (0.8 h in the anaerobic bed and 1.5 h in the aerobic bed) and a nitrified liquid recir-culation rate of 400% based on the intluent flow rate, the average removal efficiencies of total nitrogen (TN) and sol-uble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) were found to be 88% and 95%, respectively. The average effluent concentra-tions of TN and SCOD were 3.5 mg/L and 16 mg/L, respectively. The volatile suspended solid (VSS) concentra-tion, nitrification rate and denitrification rate in the system were less than 1.0 g/L, 0.026-0.1 g NH4+-N/g VSS.d, and 0.016-0.074 g NOx--N/g VSS.d, respectively.

  4. Lagrangian Approach to Study Catalytic Fluidized Bed Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madi, Hossein; Hossein Madi Team; Marcelo Kaufman Rechulski Collaboration; Christian Ludwig Collaboration; Tilman Schildhauer Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Lagrangian approach of fluidized bed reactors is a method, which simulates the movement of catalyst particles (caused by the fluidization) by changing the gas composition around them. Application of such an investigation is in the analysis of the state of catalysts and surface reactions under quasi-operando conditions. The hydrodynamics of catalyst particles within a fluidized bed reactor was studied to improve a Lagrangian approach. A fluidized bed methanation employed in the production of Synthetic Natural Gas from wood was chosen as the case study. The Lagrangian perspective was modified and improved to include different particle circulation patterns, which were investigated through this study. Experiments were designed to evaluate the concepts of the model. The results indicate that the setup is able to perform the designed experiments and a good agreement between the simulation and the experimental results were observed. It has been shown that fluidized bed reactors, as opposed to fixed beds, can be used to avoid the deactivation of the methanation catalyst due to carbon deposits. Carbon deposition on the catalysts tested with the Lagrangian approach was investigated by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) analysis of ex-situ catalyst samples. This investigation was done to identify the effects of particles velocity and their circulation patterns on the amount and type of deposited carbon on the catalyst surface. Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne(EPFL), Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI)

  5. The Performance of Structured Packings in Trickle-Bed Reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank, M.J.W.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate whether the use of structured packings might improve the mass transfer characteristics and the catalyst effectiveness of a trickle-bed reactor. Therefore, the performances of a structured packing, consisting of KATAPAK elements, and a dumped packi

  6. The performance of structured packings in trickle-bed reactors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank, M.J.W.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate whether the use of structured packings might improve the mass transfer characteristics and the catalyst effectiveness of a trickle-bed reactor. Therefore, the performances of a structured packing, consisting of KATAPAK elements, and a dumped packi

  7. Nonlinear dynamics and control of a recycle fixed bed reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recke, Bodil; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. Primarily to describe the dynamic behaviour that can be observed in a fixed bed reactor with recycle of unconverted reactant. Secondly to describe the possibilities of model reduction in order to facilitate control design. Reactant recycle has been shown to...

  8. Dicyclopentadiene Hydrogenation in Trickle Bed Reactor under Forced Periodic Control

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skála, D.; Hanika, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 2 (2008), s. 215-218. ISSN 1336-7242 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FT-TA/039 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : periodic control * trickle-bed reactor * dicyclopentadiene Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  9. Combustion of Corn Straw in a Fluidized-Bed Reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Durda, Tomáš

    Prague : Institute of Chemical Process Fundamental of the CAS, v. v. i, 2015 - (Bendová, M.; Wagner, Z.), s. 22-23 ISBN 978-80-86186-70-2. [Bažant Postgraduate Conference 2015. Prague (CZ)] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : fluidized-bed reactor * combustion processes * corn straw Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  10. Trickle Bed Reactor Operation under Forced Liquid Feed Rate Modulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanika, Jiří; Jiřičný, Vladimír; Karnetová, P.; Kolena, J.; Lederer, J.; Skála, D.; Staněk, Vladimír; Tukač, V.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2007), s. 192-198. ISSN 1451-9372 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FT-TA/039 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : trickle-bed reactor * period * feed rate Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  11. Theoretical study of a solar fixed bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizarro, P.; Le Palec, G.; Daguenet, M. (Laboratoire de Thermodynamique et Energetique, Universite de Perpignan (France))

    1984-01-01

    The authors calculate numerically the temperature and concentration profiles in a catalytic packed bed reactor submitted to concentrated solar radiation. They examine the co-current case (gas circulates in the direction of heat flow) as well as the counter-current case (gas circulates in the opposite direction) and study the influence of various parameters on the chemical reaction rate.

  12. Teaching About Nature's Nuclear Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J M

    2005-01-01

    Naturally occurring nuclear reactors existed in uranium deposits on Earth long before Enrico Fermi built the first man-made nuclear reactor beneath Staggs Field in 1942. In the story of their discovery, there are important lessons to be learned about scientific inquiry and scientific discovery. Now, there is evidence to suggest that the Earth's magnetic field and Jupiter's atmospheric turbulence are driven by planetary-scale nuclear reactors. The subject of planetocentric nuclear fission reactors can be a jumping off point for stimulating classroom discussions about the nature and implications of planetary energy sources and about the geomagnetic field. But more importantly, the subject can help to bring into focus the importance of discussing, debating, and challenging current thinking in a variety of areas.

  13. Safety device for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to a safety device for a nuclear reactor, particularly a liquid metal (generally sodium) cooled fast reactor. This safety device includes an absorbing element with a support head connected by a disconnectable connector formed by the armature of an electromagnet at the end of an axially mobile vertical control rod. This connection is so designed that in the event of it becoming disconnected, the absorbing element gravity slides in a passage through the reactor core into an open container

  14. Control rod drive of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to nuclear reactors and, more particularly, to a drive of a control rod of a nuclear reactor and allows power control, excess reactivity compensation, and emergency shut-down of a reactor. (author)

  15. High power density reactors based on direct cooled particle beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactors based on direct cooled HTGR type particle fuel are described. The small diameter particle fuel is packed between concentric porous cylinders to make annular fuel elements, with the inlet coolant gas flowing inwards. Hot exit gas flows out long the central channel of each element. Because of the very large heat transfer area in the packed beds, power densities in particle bed reactors (PBR's) are extremely high resulting in compact, lightweight systems. Coolant exit temperatures are high, because of the ceramic fuel temperature capabilities, and the reactors can be ramped to full power and temperature very rapidly. PBR systems can generate very high burst power levels using open cycle hydrogen coolant, or high continuous powers using closed cycle helium coolant. PBR technology is described and development requirements assessed. 12 figs

  16. Pellet bed reactor for multi-modal space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of forthcoming space power needs for both civil and military missions indicates that power requirements will be in tens of megawatts. It is envisioned that the electrical power requirements will be two-fold; long-duration low power will be needed for station keeping, communications and/or surveillance, while short-duration high power will be required for pulsed power devices. These power characteristics led to authors to propose a multi-modal space power reactor using a pellet bed design. Characteristics desired for such a multi-megawatt reactor power source are the following: standby, alert and pulsed power modes; high thermal output heat source (around 1000 MWt peak power); long lifetime standby power (10-30 yrs); high temperature output (1500-1750 K); rapid burst power transition; high reliability (>95%); and meets stringent safety requirements. The proposed pellet bed reactor concept is designed to satisfy these characteristics

  17. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 11, Reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume includes the following chapters describing: Organisation of reactor operation (including operational safety, fuel management, and regulatory rules for RA reactor operation); Control and maintenance of reactor components (reactor core, nuclear fuel, heavy water and cover gas systems, mechanical structures, electric power supply system, reactor instrumentation); Quality assurance and Training of the reactor personnel

  18. Pebble Bed Reactor: core physics and fuel cycle analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pebble Bed Reactor is a gas-cooled, graphite-moderated high-temperature reactor that is continuously fueled with small spherical fuel elements. The projected performance was studied over a broad range of reactor applicability. Calculations were done for a burner on a throwaway cycle, a converter with recycle, a prebreeder and breeder. The thorium fuel cycle was considered using low, medium (denatured), and highly enriched uranium. The base calculations were carried out for electrical energy generation in a 1200 MW/sub e/ plant. A steady-state, continuous-fueling model was developed and one- and two-dimensional calculations were used to characterize performance. Treating a single point in time effects considerable savings in computer time as opposed to following a long reactor history, permitting evaluation of reactor performance over a broad range of design parameters and operating modes

  19. Nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center for Nuclear Engineering has shown expertise in the field of nuclear and energy systems ad correlated areas. Due to the experience obtained over decades in research and technological development at Brazilian Nuclear Program personnel has been trained and started to actively participate in the design of the main system that will compose the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) which will make Brazil self-sufficient in the production of radiopharmaceuticals. The institution has participated in the monitoring and technical support concerning the safety, licensing and modernization of the research reactors IPEN/MB-01 and IEA-R1. The Nuclear Fuel Center is responsible for the production of the nuclear fuel necessary for the continuous operation of the IEA-R1 research reactor. Development of new fuel technologies is also a permanent concern

  20. Rotating bed reactor for CLC: Bed characteristics dependencies on internal gas mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A mathematical model for the rotating CLC reactor has been developed. • The model reflects the gas distribution in the reactor during CLC operation. • Radial dispersion in the rotating bed is the main cause for internal gas mixing. • The model can be used to optimize the reactor design and particle characteristics. - Abstract: A newly designed continuous lab-scale rotating bed reactor for chemical looping combustion using CuO/Al2O3 oxygen carrier spheres and methane as fuel gives around 90% CH4 conversion and >90% CO2 capture efficiency based on converted methane at 800 °C. However, from a series of experiments using a broad range of operating conditions potential CO2 purities only in the range 20–65% were yielded, mostly due to nitrogen slip from the air side of the reactor into the effluent CO2 stream. A mathematical model was developed intending to understand the air-mixing phenomena. The model clearly reflects the gas slippage tendencies observed when varying the process conditions such as rotation frequency, gas flow and the flow if inert gas in the two sectors dividing the air and fuel side of the reactor. Based on the results, it is believed that significant improvements can be made to reduce gas mixing in future modified and scaled-up reactor versions

  1. Autonomous multi-purpose floating power system with a compact static pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper introduces a new concept of an autonomous multipurpose system with a compact static-bed pebble bed reactor as a power source. The system is envisioned as a small floating power complex in which a compact high-efficiency nuclear system provides the source of energy for a variety of industrial processes. It offers the near-term (with a conventional power source) and long-term (with a compact high-efficiency nuclear system) technologies for a low cost electricity/potable water supply compared to traditional systems for regions where local communities are isolated and do not have extensive industrial infrastructure and distribution networks. The complex can be quickly installed anywhere following demands and needs of local communities - coastal regions and islands. The reactor design and system layout, balance-of-plant evaluations, performance characteristics and deployment strategies are discussed. (authors)

  2. Autonomous multi-purpose floating power system with a compact static pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsvetkov, Pavel; Vierow, Karen; Peddicord, Kenneth; Ragusa, Jean; McDeavitt, Sean; Poston, John Sr.; Shao, Lin; Willems, Greg [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The paper introduces a new concept of an autonomous multipurpose system with a compact static-bed pebble bed reactor as a power source. The system is envisioned as a small floating power complex in which a compact high-efficiency nuclear system provides the source of energy for a variety of industrial processes. It offers the near-term (with a conventional power source) and long-term (with a compact high-efficiency nuclear system) technologies for a low cost electricity/potable water supply compared to traditional systems for regions where local communities are isolated and do not have extensive industrial infrastructure and distribution networks. The complex can be quickly installed anywhere following demands and needs of local communities - coastal regions and islands. The reactor design and system layout, balance-of-plant evaluations, performance characteristics and deployment strategies are discussed. (authors)

  3. Random processes in nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, M M R

    1974-01-01

    Random Processes in Nuclear Reactors describes the problems that a nuclear engineer may meet which involve random fluctuations and sets out in detail how they may be interpreted in terms of various models of the reactor system. Chapters set out to discuss topics on the origins of random processes and sources; the general technique to zero-power problems and bring out the basic effect of fission, and fluctuations in the lifetime of neutrons, on the measured response; the interpretation of power reactor noise; and associated problems connected with mechanical, hydraulic and thermal noise sources

  4. The future of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Commission Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards began work in early 1948 with the firm and unanimous conviction that nuclear power could not survive a significant damaging accident. They as a committee felt that their job was to make reactors so safe that no such event would ever occur. However, ambitious reactor planners did not like all the buts and cautions that the committee was raising. They seemed to delay unduly their setting sail into the brave new world of clean, cheap, safe nuclear energy. The committee was soon nicknamed the Committee on Reactor Prevention. Reactors, of course, represented a tremendous step into the future. To an unprecedented extent, they were based on theory. But the committee did not have the luxury of putting a preliminary model into operation and waiting for difficulties to show up. In assessing new designs and developments, they had to anticipate future difficulties. Their proposals in good part were accepted, but their deep emphasis on safety did not become a part of the program. Today, forty years later, the author still believes both in the need for nuclear reactors and in the need of a thorough-going, pervasive emphasis on their safety. Real, understandable safety can be achieved, and that achievement is the key to our nuclear future. The details he gives are only examples. The need for reactors that are not only safe but obviously safe can be ignored only at our peril

  5. Studies on nuclear reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    this thesis presents two studies for safety aspects in nuclear reactor design. the fission process that occurs in the reactor core is the most important process for the harmful effect of produced radiation especially neutrons with different energies and gamma radiations for their strong penetrability . so studying the criticality of the fissile materials in the reactor is one of the most important safety aspects for the reactor design, the attenuation of the neutrons and gammas using suitable shielding materials with suitable thicknesses is the second study that is discussed in this thesis

  6. Gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention aims at simplying gas-cooled nuclear reactors. For the cooling gas, the reactor is provided with a main circulation system comprising one or several energy conversion main groups such as gas turbines, and an auxiliary circulation system comprising at least one steam-generating boiler heated by the gas after its passage through the reactor core and adapted to feed a steam turbine with motive steam. The invention can be applied to reactors the main groups of which are direct-cycle gas turbines

  7. Biodenitrification of gaseous diffusion plant aqueous wastes: stirred bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately 30 kilograms of nitrates per day are discarded in the raffinates (acid wastes) of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant's X-705 Uranium Recovery and Decontamination Facility. A biodenitrification process employing continuous-flow, stirred-bed reactors has been successfully used to remove nitrates from similar acid wastes at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Laboratory studies have been made at Portsmouth to characterize the X-705 raffinates and to test the stirred-bed biodenitrification process on such raffinates. Raffinates which had been previously characterized were pumped through continuous-flow, stirred-bed, laboratory-scale reactors. Tests were conducted over a period of 146 days and involved variations in composition, mixing requirements, and the fate of several metal ions in the raffinates. Tests results show that 20 weight percent nitrates were reduced to a target nitrate effluent concentration of 100 μg/ml with a 99.64 percent efficiency. However, the average denitrification rate achieved was only 33% of that demonstrated with the Y-12 stirred-bed system. These low rates were probably due to the toxic effects of heavy metal ions on the denitrifying bacteria. Also, most of the uranium in the raffinate feed remained in the biomass and calcite, which collected in the reactor. This could cause criticality problems. For these reasons, it was decided not to make use of the stirred-bed bioreactor at Portsmouth. Instead, the biodenitrification installation now planned will use fluidized bed columns whose performance will be the subject of a subsequent report

  8. Technique of nuclear reactors controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deal about 'Techniques of control of the nuclear reactors' in the goal to achieve the control of natural uranium reactors and especially the one of Saclay. This work is mainly about the measurement into nuclear parameters and go further in the measurement of thermodynamic variables,etc... putting in relief the new features required on behalf of the detectors because of their use in the thermal neutrons flux. In the domain of nuclear measurement, we indicate the realizations and the results obtained with thermal neutron detectors and for the measurement of ionizations currents. We also treat the technical problem of the start-up of a reactor and of the reactivity measurement. We give the necessary details for the comprehension of all essential diagrams and plans put on, in particular, for the reactor of Saclay. (author)

  9. Low-power nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief development history of low-power nuclear reactors is presented in this paper. Nowadays, some countries have plans to build a series of small nuclear power plants (also floating ones) for use in remote regions. Present constructions of such NPP are presented in this paper. (author)

  10. Nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Fuel Center (CCN) of IPEN produces nuclear fuel for the continuous operation of the IEA-R1 research reactor of IPEN. The serial production started in 1988, when the first nuclear fuel element was delivered for IEA-R1. In 2011, CCN proudly presents the 100th nuclear fuel element produced. Besides routine production, development of new technologies is also a permanent concern at CCN. In 2005, U3O8 were replaced by U3Si2-based fuels, and the research of U Mo is currently under investigation. Additionally, the Brazilian Multipurpose Research Reactor (RMB), whose project will rely on the CCN for supplying fuel and uranium targets. Evolving from an annual production from 10 to 70 nuclear fuel elements, plus a thousand uranium targets, is a huge and challenging task. To accomplish it, a new and modern Nuclear Fuel Factory is being concluded, and it will provide not only structure for scaling up, but also a safer and greener production. The Nuclear Engineering Center has shown, along several years, expertise in the field of nuclear, energy systems and correlated areas. Due to the experience obtained during decades in research and technological development at Brazilian Nuclear Program, personnel has been trained and started to actively participate in design of the main system that will compose the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) which will make Brazil self-sufficient in production of radiopharmaceuticals. The institution has participated in the monitoring and technical support concerning the safety, licensing and modernization of the research reactors IPEN/MB-01 and IEA-R1. Along the last two decades, numerous specialized services of engineering for the Brazilian nuclear power plants Angra 1 and Angra 2 have been carried out. The contribution in service, research, training, and teaching in addition to the development of many related technologies applied to nuclear engineering and correlated areas enable the institution to fulfill its mission that is to

  11. Fundamentals of Nuclear Reactor Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, E E

    2008-01-01

    This new streamlined text offers a one-semester treatment of the essentials of how the fission nuclear reactor works, the various approaches to the design of reactors, and their safe and efficient operation. The book includes numerous worked-out examples and end-of-chapter questions to help reinforce the knowledge presented. This textbook offers an engineering-oriented introduction to nuclear physics, with a particular focus on how those physics are put to work in the service of generating nuclear-based power, particularly the importance of neutron reactions and neutron behavior. Engin

  12. Development of research reactor simulator and its application to dynamic test-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a real-time simulator for 'High-flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr (HANARO), and the Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR). The main purpose of this simulator is operator training, but we modified this simulator into a dynamic test-bed (DTB) to test the functions and dynamic control performance of reactor regulating system (RRS) in HANARO or JRTR before installation. The simulator hardware consists of a host computer, 6 operator stations, a network switch, and a large display panel. The software includes a mathematical model that implements plant dynamics in real-time, an instructor station module that manages user instructions, and a human machine interface module. The developed research reactor simulators are installed in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute nuclear training center for reactor operator training. To use the simulator as a dynamic test-bed, the reactor regulating system modeling software of the simulator was replaced by actual RRS cabinet, and was interfaced using a hard-wired and network-based interface. RRS cabinet generates control signals for reactor power control based on the various feedback signals from DTB, and the DTB runs plant dynamics based on the RRS control signals. Thus the Hardware-In-the-Loop Simulation between RRS and the emulated plant (DTB) has been implemented and tested in this configuration. The test result shows that the developed DTB and actual RRS cabinet works together simultaneously resulting in quite good dynamic control performances. (author)

  13. Proposal for an international experimental pebble bed reactor - HTR2008-58174

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HTRs, both prismatic block fuelled and pebble fuelled, feature a number of uniquely beneficial characteristics that will be discussed in this paper. In this paper the construction of an international experimental pebble bed reactor is proposed, possible experiments suggested and an invitation extended to interested partners for co-operation in the project. Experimental verification by nuclear regulators in order to facilitate licensing and the development of a new generation of reactors create a strong need for such a reactor. Suggested experiments include: Optimized incineration of waste Pu in a pebble bed reactor: The capability to incineration pure reactor grade plutonium by means of ultra high burn-up in pebble bed reactors will be presented at this conference in the track on fuel and fuel cycles. This will enable incineration of the global stockpile of separated reactor grade Pu within a relatively short time span. Testing of fuel sphere geometries, aimed at improving neutron moderation and a decrease in fuel temperatures. Th/Pu fuel cycles: Previous HTR programs demonstrated the viability of a Th-232 fuel-cycle, using highly enriched uranium (HEU) as driver material. However, considerations favoring proliferation resistance limit the enrichment level of uranium in commercial reactors to 20 %, thereby lowering the isotopic efficiency. Therefore, Pu driver material should be developed to replace the HEU component. Instead of deploying a (Th, Pu)O fuel concept, the proposal is to use the unique capability offered by pebble bed reactors in deploying separate Th- and Pu-containing pebbles, which can be cycled differently. Testing of carbon-fiber-carbon (CFC) structures for in-core or near-core applications, such as guide tubes for reserve shutdown systems, thus creating the possibility to safely shutdown reactors with increased diameter. Development of very high temperature reactor components for process heat applications. Advanced decay heat removal systems e

  14. nuclear reactor design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work , the sensitivity of different reactor calculation methods, and the effect of different assumptions and/or approximation are evaluated . A new concept named error map is developed to determine the relative importance of different factors affecting the accuracy of calculations. To achieve this goal a generalized, multigroup, multi dimension code UAR-DEPLETION is developed to calculate the spatial distribution of neutron flux, effective multiplication factor and the spatial composition of a reactor core for a period of time and for specified reactor operating conditions. The code also investigates the fuel management strategies and policies for the entire fuel cycle to meet the constraints of material and operating limitations

  15. Nuclear reactor internal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The upper internal structures of the reactor are connected to the closing head so as to be readily removed with the latter and a skirt connected to the lower portion of said upper structures so as to surround the latter, extends under the control rods when they are removed from the reactor core. Through such an arrangement the skirt protects the control rods and supports the vessel closing-head and the core upper structures, whenever the head is severed from the vessel and put beside the latter in order to discharge the reactor

  16. GE's advanced nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The excess of US electrical generating capacity which has existed for the past 15 years is coming to an end as we enter the 1990s. Environmental and energy security issues associated with fossil fuels are kindling renewed interest in the nuclear option. The importance of these issues are underscored by the National Energy Strategy (NES) which calls for actions which open-quotes are designed to ensure that the nuclear power option is available to utilities.close quotes Utilities, utility associations, and nuclear suppliers, under the leadership of the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC), have jointly developed a 14-point strategic plan aimed at establishing a predictable regulatory environment, standardized and pre-licensed Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) nuclear plants, resolving the long-term waste management issue, and other open-quotes enabling conditions.close quotes GE is participating in this national effort and GE's family of advanced nuclear power plants feature two reactor designs, developed on a common technology base, aimed at providing a new generation of nuclear plants to provide safe, clean, economical electricity to the world's utilities in the 1990s and beyond. Together, the large-size (1300 MWe) Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) and the small-size (600 MWe) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) are innovative, near-term candidates for expanding electrical generating capacity in the US and worldwide. Both possess the features necessary to do so safety, reliably, and economically

  17. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly construction for liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors is described in which the sub-assemblies carry a smaller proportion of parasitic material than do conventional sub-assemblies. (U.K.)

  18. Nuclear reactor (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first French plutonium-making reactors G1, G2 and G3 built at Marcoule research center are linked to a power plant. The G1 electrical output does not offset the energy needed for operating this reactor. On the contrary, reactors G2 and G3 will each generate a net power of 25 to 30 MW, which will go into the EDF grid. This power is relatively small, but the information obtained from operation is great and will be helpful for starting up the power reactor EDF1, EDF2 and EDF3. The paper describes how, previous to any starting-up operation, the tests performed, especially those concerned with the power plant and the pressure vessel, have helped to bring the commissioning date closer. (author)

  19. BWR type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To simplify the structure of an emergency core cooling system while suppressing the flow out of coolants upon rapture accidents in a coolant recycling device of BWR type reactors. Constitution: Recirculation pumps are located at a position higher than the reactor core in a pressure vessel, and the lower plenum is bisected vertically by a partition plate. Further, a gas-liquid separator is surrounded with a wall and the water level at the outer side of the wall is made higher than the water level in the inside of the wall. In this structure, coolants are introduced from the upper chamber in the lower plenum into the reactor core, and the steams generated in the reactor core are separated in the gas-liquid separator, whereby the separated liquid is introduced as coolants by way of the inner chamber into the lower chamber of the lower plenum and further sent by way of the outer chamber into the reactor core. Consequently, idle rotation of the recycling pumps due to the flow-in of saturated water is prevented and loss of coolants in the reactor core can also be prevented upon raptures in the pipeway and the driving section of the pump connected to the pressure vessel and in the bottom of the pressure vessel. (Horiuchi, T.)

  20. Starter culture production in fluidized bed reactor with a flocculent strain ofL. plantarum

    OpenAIRE

    Barreto, M.T.O.; Melo, E. P.; Carrondo, M J T

    1989-01-01

    A lactic starter culture of a flocculentLactobacillus plantarum was produced in a fluidized bed reactor with higher cell volumetric productivities than in a continuous stirred tank reactor. The fluidized bed reactor was operated at optimised parameters obtained in batch reactor performed with and without pH control.

  1. Waste tyre pyrolysis: modelling of a moving bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylón, E; Fernández-Colino, A; Murillo, R; Grasa, G; Navarro, M V; García, T; Mastral, A M

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes the development of a new model for waste tyre pyrolysis in a moving bed reactor. This model comprises three different sub-models: a kinetic sub-model that predicts solid conversion in terms of reaction time and temperature, a heat transfer sub-model that calculates the temperature profile inside the particle and the energy flux from the surroundings to the tyre particles and, finally, a hydrodynamic model that predicts the solid flow pattern inside the reactor. These three sub-models have been integrated in order to develop a comprehensive reactor model. Experimental results were obtained in a continuous moving bed reactor and used to validate model predictions, with good approximation achieved between the experimental and simulated results. In addition, a parametric study of the model was carried out, which showed that tyre particle heating is clearly faster than average particle residence time inside the reactor. Therefore, this fast particle heating together with fast reaction kinetics enables total solid conversion to be achieved in this system in accordance with the predictive model. PMID:20510597

  2. TREATMENT OF POME BY PILOT PLANT ANAEROBIC FLUIDISED BED REACTOR

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Al-Mamun; Azni Idris

    2010-01-01

    A pilot scale anaerobic fluidised bed reactor (AnFBR) of 2000 L capacity was studied to determine its performance to treat palm oil mill effluent (POME). The pilot plant was operated at ambient temperature with diluted POME as substrate. It took 17 days for the start-up of the reactor with pre-seeded sand media. The AnFBR was capable to remove a large portion of organics at relatively shorter retention time. Maximum and minimum COD removal efficiency of 85% and 65% were attained at a ...

  3. Thorium and plutonium utilisation in pebble-bed modular reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorium and plutonium utilisation in a high temperature gas-cooled pebble-bed reactor is investigated with the aim to predict the economic value of vast thorium reserves in Turkey. A pebble-bed reactor of the type designed by PBMR Pty. of South Africa is taken as the investigated system. The equilibrium core of a PBMR is considered and neutronics analyses of such a core are performed through the use of the SCALE-4.4 computer code system KENOV.a module. Various cross-section libraries are used to calculate the criticality of the core. Burn-up calculations of the core are performed by coupling the KENOV.a module with the ORIGEN-S module. Calculations are carried out for various U-Th, U-Pu-Th and U-Pu combinations. The results are preliminary in nature and the work is currently proceeding as planned. (author)

  4. Pebble bed reactor with a feeding device for absorber materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description of a second shutdown device for pebble bed reactors with small absorber pebbles, which, if required, can be let off a storage tank and regularly trickle through a dispersion cone into the pebble bed. In the normal state the storage tank is in a low position with its outlet being obstructed by absorber pebbles filling a cylinder in which slides a piston which is firmly connected with the storage tank. By giving pressure over a line a piston in a pneumatic cylinder can be moved which lifts the storage tank. The cylinder is emptied by lifting the piston and the outlet is released. The level of the storage tank is measured by means of a probe. The whole device is installed in the prestressed concrets ceiling of the reactor. The device is proposed to be set into motion for a short moment from time to time in order to prove its operatability. (orig.)

  5. Cleaning of porous filters in fossilized bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report are established the optimum working conditions of a filter cleaning system by blow back. For this purpose it was determined in the first place the blow back air rate necessary to have a good cleaning. The reasons for which it was not possible until now to control the pressure in a fluidized bed calcination reactor are analyzed and a criteria is established to calculate the optimum floe necessary to clean efficiently a porous by this procedures. (Author)

  6. Development of the Packed Bed Reactor ISS Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Martin O.; Bruzas, Anthony E.; Rame, Enrique; Motil, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Packed bed reactors are compact, require minimum power and maintenance to operate, and are highly reliable. These features make this technology a leading candidate as a potential unit operation in support of long duration human space exploration. On earth, this type of reactor accounts for approximately 80% of all the reactors used in the chemical process industry today. Development of this technology for space exploration is truly crosscutting with many other potential applications (e.g., in-situ chemical processing of planetary materials and transport of nutrients through soil). NASA is developing an ISS experiment to address this technology with particular focus on water reclamation and air revitalization. Earlier research and development efforts funded by NASA have resulted in two hydrodynamic models which require validation with appropriate instrumentation in an extended microgravity environment. The first model developed by Motil et al., (2003) is based on a modified Ergun equation. This model was demonstrated at moderate gas and liquid flow rates, but extension to the lower flow rates expected in many advanced life support systems must be validated. The other model, developed by Guo et al., (2004) is based on Darcy s (1856) law for two-phase flow. This model has been validated for a narrow range of flow parameters indirectly (without full instrumentation) and included test points where the flow was not fully developed. The flight experiment presented will be designed with removable test sections to test the hydrodynamic models. The experiment will provide flexibility to test additional beds with different types of packing in the future. One initial test bed is based on the VRA (Volatile Removal Assembly), a packed bed reactor currently on ISS whose behavior in micro-gravity is not fully understood. Improving the performance of this system through an accurate model will increase our ability to purify water in the space environment.

  7. Innovative designs of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The world development scenarios predict at least a 2.5 time increase in the global consumption of primary energy in the first half of the twenty-first century. Much of this growth can be provided by the nuclear power which possesses important advantages over other energy technologies. However, the large deployment of nuclear sources may take place only when the new generation of reactors appears on the market and will be free of the shortcomings found in the existing nuclear power installations. The public will be more inclined to accept nuclear plants that have better economics; higher safety; more efficient management of the radioactive waste; lower risk of nuclear weapons proliferation, and provided that the focus is made on the energy option free of ∇e2 generation. Currently, the future of nuclear power is trusted to the technology based on fast reactors and closed fuel cycle. The latter implies reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel of the nuclear plants and re-use of plutonium produced in power reactors

  8. Fluidization Characteristics of a Prototype Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. ABERUAGBA

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The fluidization characteristics of a prototype-fluidized bed laboratory reactor were understudied in order to investigate the suitable conditions at which the dehydrogenation reaction of butane could be carried out. To achieve this, a reactor with an effective volume of 1100ml was fabricated and coupled with temperature and pressure accessories.Zeolites were obtained from the market and clay obtained from different sources and pre-treated was used as catalyst. Airflow at high velocity between 3000-7000ml/hr was used as the fluidising medium to obtain the bed characteristics while butane gas was used to obtain the dehydrogenation kinetics.The temperature of the reactor system was varied between 353K and 413K while maintaining constant pressure of 1.5 105 N/m2 through a manifold gauge and a constant catalyst weight. Various methods such as pressure fluctuations, visual observations, and bed expansion were used to determine the transition velocity at which fluidization begins. It was observed that this depends on factors such as mean particle size, particle size distribution, and column diameter.The minimum fluidizing velocity obtained for zeolite was 0.0133m/s and 0.0102m/s for treated clay materials both for a particle size of 250μm. The conversion of butane over the catalysts showed an increase in both cases with a maximum at 0.9813 at 413K. This decreases as the reaction progresses.

  9. Neutronic features of pebble-bed reactors for transmutation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pebble-bed reactors offer very appealing characteristics for radioactivity confinement and for withstanding thermal transients. Besides that, pebble-bed reactors have a peculiar degree of freedom in the radius of the active core of the pebble (where the fuel is located) as compared to the outer radius of the pebble, which has a coating of pure graphite. By varying the aforementioned radius, very different types of neutron spectra can be formed, which in turn gives very different values of the average cross sections that govern the isotopic composition evolution, and particularly the elimination of the most relevant transuranics. Preliminary conclusions of this work show that there is a very broad design window for exploiting the transmutation capabilities of pebble-bed reactors in a scenario of inherent safety features. A 99,9% elimination of Pu-239 associated to a 99% elimination of Pu-240 and Pu-241 can be reached, with some increment of the Pu-242 contents (which is extremely long-lived, less radio-toxic and decays into the natural nuclide U-238). Am and Cm are also transmuted to a significant level, although some residual higher A actinides will remain. (authors)

  10. Neutrino physics with nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a lecture given at the Gif Summer School held in 1992 in Montpellier. It contains three chapters. These are devoted to neutrino oscillations, to the nuclear reactors used as neutrino sources, and to the experiments performed with neutrinos from nuclear reactors, respectively. The first chapter offers a theoretical frame, the second discusses the investigation capabilities of nuclear reactors as neutrino sources while the last one describes the experimental aspects. These aspects are related to the neutrino flux measurement and the flavor oscillation, the search for neutrino oscillation, the neutrino scattering on electrons, the neutrino decay, the coherent neutrino scattering on nuclei and the electron neutrino-electron antineutrino oscillations implied by the Majorana nature of neutrinos. In concluding the author points to the possible ways of refining these extremely subtle experiments, which will be approached in the near future. 117 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs

  11. AREVA's nuclear reactors portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reasonable assumption for the estimated new build market for the next 25 years is over 340 GWe net. The number of prospect countries is growing almost each day. To address this new build market, AREVA is developing a comprehensive portfolio of reactors intended to meet a wide range of power requirements and of technology choices. The EPR reactor is the flagship of the fleet. Intended for large power requirements, the four first EPRs are being built in Finland, France and China. Other countries and customers are in view, citing just two examples: the Usa where the U.S. EPR has been selected as the technology of choice by several U.S utilities; and the United Kingdom where the Generic Design Acceptance process of the EPR design submitted by AREVA and EDF is well under way, and where there is a strong will to have a plant on line in 2017. For medium power ranges, the AREVA portfolio includes a boiling water reactor and a pressurized water reactor which both offer all of the advantages of an advanced plant design, with excellent safety performance and competitive power generation cost: -) KERENA (1250+ MWe), developed in collaboration with several European utilities, and in particular with Eon; -) ATMEA 1 (1100+ MWe), a 3-loop evolutionary PWR which is being developed by AREVA and Mitsubishi. AREVA is also preparing the future and is deeply involved into Gen IV concepts. It has developed the ANTARES modular HTR reactor (pre-conceptual design completed) and is building upon its vast Sodium Fast Reactor experience to take part into the development of the next prototype. (author)

  12. 21 CFR 892.1350 - Nuclear scanning bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nuclear scanning bed. 892.1350 Section 892.1350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1350 Nuclear scanning bed. (a)...

  13. Nuclear reactor downcomer flow deflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Altman, David A.; Singleton, Norman R.

    2011-02-15

    A nuclear reactor having a coolant flow deflector secured to a reactor core barrel in line with a coolant inlet nozzle. The flow deflector redirects incoming coolant down an annulus between the core barrel and the reactor vessel. The deflector has a main body with a front side facing the fluid inlet nozzle and a rear side facing the core barrel. The rear side of the main body has at least one protrusion secured to the core barrel so that a gap exists between the rear side of the main body adjacent the protrusion and the core barrel. Preferably, the protrusion is a relief that circumscribes the rear side of the main body.

  14. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a container of a BWR type reactor, spray water is stored in a pedestal cavity. A perforated hole is formed on the side wall of the pedestal, and a stirrer is disposed in the pedestal cavity to stir the stored spray water. During reactor operation, the door on the side wall of the pedestal is closed to prevent discharge of fission products to the dry well when a severe accident should occur. During periodical inspection for the plant, the door is opened to enable an operator to access to the inside of the pedestal. When a molten reactor core should drop to the pedestal cavity, fission products generated from the failed reactor core left in a pressure vessel pass through the spray water in the pedestal cavity. Then, most of the fission products are held in the spray water by a scrubbing effect when they pass through the spray water. In addition, the stored spray water is stirred by the stirrer to enhance the scrubbing effect thereby enabling to further decrease the amount of the fission products discharged to the dry well. (N.H.)

  15. Nuclear reactor constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of constructing a radiation shielding plug for use in the roof of the coolant containment vault of liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors is described. The construction allows relative movement of that part of service cables and pipes which are carried by the fixed roof and that part which is carried by the rotatable plug. (U.K.)

  16. Optimization of OTTO Fuel Management in Pebble-Bed Reactors Using Particle Swarm Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pebble-Bed nuclear reactors feature highly flexible in-core fuel management capabilities due to on-line fueling and thermo-mechanical robust fuel design. Fuel pebbles with various fissile and fertile materials can be loaded into the reactor core at different rates. The fuel pebbles may be recirculated in the core several times until reaching their target burnup, or reach their target burnup in single pass through the core (OTTO- Once-Through-Then-Out fueling Scheme). Pebble-bed reactors have relatively efficient neutron economy since they operate with low excess reactivity and hence minimize the use of neutron poisons and control rods. Moreover, the fuel pebble robust design permits high burnup levels (up to 140000 MWD/THM). The flexibility of the fuel management operations allows enhancing fuel utilization. Traditionally fuel cycle design decisions were made using expert opinions and parametric studies. In this work, we have used the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm to optimize fuel utilization of pebble-bed reactors running OTTO fuel management. Optimization was carried out also for cores with Th232 as fertile material. Preliminary calculations were performed for a large core with 2 radial fuel loading zones. Results of the optimal fuel utilization performed for cores with UO2 fuel and cores with (Th- U)O2. Future work will include optimization of cores fuelled with separate seed (U) and blanket (Th) fuel pebbles and with advanced modular core configuration, like the PBMR400

  17. Nuclear reactors and disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From a brief analysis of the perspectives of nuclear weapons arsenals reduction, a rational use of the energetic potential of the ogives and the authentic destruction of its warlike power is proposed. The fissionable material conversion contained in the nuclear fuel ogives for peaceful uses should be part of the disarmament agreements. This paper pretends to give an approximate idea on the resources re assignation implicancies. (Author)

  18. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upon reactor accident, hydrogen and oxygen are generated by water-zirconium reaction and radiolysis of water, which are accumulated in the reactor. If the concentration of hydrogen and oxygen exceeds a burning limit, there is a possibility of hydrogen burning to cause a danger of deteriorating the integrity of the reactor container and the equipments therein. The limit for the occurrence of the detonation is determined by a relationship between the scale of a detonation cell and the size of the container, and if the scale is greater than the container, the detonation does not occur. The scale of the cell is determined by a gas combustion rate and, if the combustion reaction is suppressed, detonation does not occur even in a large container. Then, an appropriate diluent is added to increase heat capacity of a gas mixture to thereby suppress the temperature elevation of the gas. Incombustible gases having a great heat capacity are preferred for the diluent, and CO2 is used. As the concentration of the CO2 gas to be added is increased, the detonation cell is made greater. Thus, occurrence of detonation due to combustion of the accumulated hydrogen can be prevented. (N.H.)

  19. Light-water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work gives basic information on light-water reactors which is advanced enough for the reader to become familiar with the essential objectives and aspects of their design, their operation and their insertion in the industrial, economic and human environment. In view of the capital role of electric energy in the modern economy a significant place is given to electron-nuclear power stations, particularly those of the type adopted for the French programme. The work includes sixteen chapters. The first chapter relates the history and presents the various applications of light water reactors. The second refers to the general elementary knowledge of reactor physics. The third chapter deals with the high power light-water nuclear power station and thereby introduces the ensuing chapters which, up to and including chapter 13, are devoted to the components and the various aspects of the operation of power stations, in particular safety and the relationship with the environment. Chapter 14 provides information on the reactors adapted to applications other than the generation of electricity on an industrial scale. Chapter 15 shows the extent of the industrial effort devoted to light-water reactors and chapter 16 indicates the paths along which the present work is preparing the future of these reactors. The various chapters have been written to allow for separate consultation. An index of the main technical terms and a bibliography complete the work

  20. Proceedings of the ANS/ASME/NRC international topical meeting on nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics: LMFBR and HTGR advanced reactor concepts and analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning the thermal-hydraulics of LMFBR type reactors; mathematical methods in nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics; heat transfer in gas-cooled reactors; and thermal-hydraulics of pebble-bed reactors. Two papers have been previously abstracted and input to the data base

  1. Health requirements for nuclear reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The health prerequisites established for the qualification of nuclear reactor operators according to CNEN-NE-1.01 Guidelines Licensing of nuclear reactor operators, CNEN-12/79 Resolution, are described. (M.A.)

  2. Gaseous fuel nuclear reactor research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenk, F. C.; Thom, K.

    1975-01-01

    Gaseous-fuel nuclear reactors are described; their distinguishing feature is the use of fissile fuels in a gaseous or plasma state, thereby breaking the barrier of temperature imposed by solid-fuel elements. This property creates a reactor heat source that may be able to heat the propellant of a rocket engine to 10,000 or 20,000 K. At this temperature level, gas-core reactors would provide the breakthrough in propulsion needed to open the entire solar system to manned and unmanned spacecraft. The possibility of fuel recycling makes possible efficiencies of up to 65% and nuclear safety at reduced cost, as well as high-thrust propulsion capabilities with specific impulse up to 5000 sec.

  3. Instrumentation for nuclear reactor control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This lecture is concerned with engineers and technicians not specialized in nuclear reactor control. The different methods of measurement used are briefly reviewed: current or pulse measurement, and Campbell system; the electronic networks are described and a part is devoted to the cables connecting detectors and electronic assemblies

  4. Nuclear Reactors and Technology; (USA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on EDB and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to EDB, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user's needs.

  5. Coating particles by chemical vapor deposition in fluidized bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique to deposit a thin, adherent, uniformly dispersed coating onto the individual particles in a batch of granular or powdered material is described. We have been able to apply successfully a number of coatings to a variety of particulate materials using a fluidized-bed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. By means of this technique we used tri-isobutylaluminum to apply adherent coatings of aluminum on powdered mica and powdered nickel. The powdered mica was also coated with titanium in a fluidized bed reactor in which titanium precursors were generated in situ by the reaction between HCl and metallic titanium. Post treatment of the titanium coated mica with ammonia produced agglomerates coated with TiN. These systems demonstrate the potential utility of the fluidized bed reactor for depositing a variety of coatings onto metallic and non-metallic dispersed materials. Preparation of such coated powders is likely to be valuable in a variety of industrial applications, such as the manufacture of composite structures. (orig.)

  6. Nuclear reactor effluent monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minns, J.L.; Essig, T.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Radiological environmental monitoring and effluent monitoring at nuclear power plants is important both for normal operations, as well as in the event of an accident. During normal operations, environmental monitoring verifies the effectiveness of in-plant measures for controlling the release of radioactive materials in the plant. Following an accident, it would be an additional mechanism for estimating doses to members of the general public. This paper identifies the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory basis for requiring radiological environmental and effluent monitoring, licensee conditions for effluent and environmental monitoring, NRC independent oversight activities, and NRC`s program results.

  7. Water cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the reactor operating with supercritical pressure and temperature part of the water flowing through the moderator tubes is deflected at the outlet and mixed with a residual partial flow of the coolant fed into the core as well as passed along the fuel rods in opposite direction. By special guiding of the flow downward through the guide tubes of the control rods insertion of the control rods is simplified because of reduced frictional forces. By this means it is also achieved to design less critical the control rod cooling with respect to flow rate control and operating behavior in case of a scram. (orig.)

  8. Nuclear reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plant consists mainly of a steam-raising unit and a steam turbine with high pressure and low pressure stages. There is at least one superheater or intermediate superheater between the steam-raising unit and the low pressure stage. In order to improve the plant efficiency, a high temperature reactor is provided as a source of heat for the superheater or intermediate superheater, which supplies the superheater heat with an energy efficiency of over 60%. This increases the overall net efficiency from 33% to over 36%. (orig.)

  9. Decommissioning of Salaspils nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In May 1995, the Latvian Government decided to shut down the Research Reactor Salaspils (SRR) and to dispense with nuclear energy in future. The reactor has been out of operation since July 1998. A conceptual study for the decommissioning of SRR has been carried out by Noell-KRC-Energie- und Umwelttechnik GmbH from 1998-1999. he Latvian Government decided on 26 October 1999 to start the direct dismantling to 'green field' in 2001. The results of decommissioning and dismantling performed in 1999-2001 are presented and discussed. The main efforts were devoted to collecting and conditioning 'historical' radioactive waste from different storages outside and inside the reactor hall. All radioactive material more than 20 tons were conditioned in concrete containers for disposal in the radioactive waste depository 'Radons' in the Baldone site. Personal protective and radiation measurement equipment was upgraded significantly. All non-radioactive equipment and material outside the reactor buildings were free-released and dismantled for reuse or conventional disposal. Weakly contaminated material from the reactor hall was collected and removed for free-release measurements. The technology of dismantling of the reactor's systems, i.e. second cooling circuit, zero power reactors and equipment, is discussed in the paper. (author)

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Fluidized Bed Polymerization Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong Fan

    2006-08-09

    Fluidized beds (FB) reactors are widely used in the polymerization industry due to their superior heat- and mass-transfer characteristics. Nevertheless, problems associated with local overheating of polymer particles and excessive agglomeration leading to FB reactors defluidization still persist and limit the range of operating temperatures that can be safely achieved in plant-scale reactors. Many people have been worked on the modeling of FB polymerization reactors, and quite a few models are available in the open literature, such as the well-mixed model developed by McAuley, Talbot, and Harris (1994), the constant bubble size model (Choi and Ray, 1985) and the heterogeneous three phase model (Fernandes and Lona, 2002). Most these research works focus on the kinetic aspects, but from industrial viewpoint, the behavior of FB reactors should be modeled by considering the particle and fluid dynamics in the reactor. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a powerful tool for understanding the effect of fluid dynamics on chemical reactor performance. For single-phase flows, CFD models for turbulent reacting flows are now well understood and routinely applied to investigate complex flows with detailed chemistry. For multiphase flows, the state-of-the-art in CFD models is changing rapidly and it is now possible to predict reasonably well the flow characteristics of gas-solid FB reactors with mono-dispersed, non-cohesive solids. This thesis is organized into seven chapters. In Chapter 2, an overview of fluidized bed polymerization reactors is given, and a simplified two-site kinetic mechanism are discussed. Some basic theories used in our work are given in detail in Chapter 3. First, the governing equations and other constitutive equations for the multi-fluid model are summarized, and the kinetic theory for describing the solid stress tensor is discussed. The detailed derivation of DQMOM for the population balance equation is given as the second section. In this section

  11. Development of Research Reactor Simulator and Its Application to Dynamic Test-bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kee Choon; Park, Jae Chang; Lee, Seung Wook; Bang, Dane; Bae, Sung Won [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    We developed HANARO and the Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) real-time simulator for operating staff training. The main purpose of this simulator is operator training, but we modified this simulator as a dynamic test-bed to test the reactor regulating system in HANARO or JRTR before installation. The simulator configuration is divided into hardware and software. The simulator hardware consists of a host computer, 6 operator stations, a network switch, and a large display panel. The simulator software is divided into three major parts: a mathematical modeling module, which executes the plant dynamic modeling program in real-time, an instructor station module that manages user instructions, and a human machine interface (HMI) module. The developed research reactors are installed in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute nuclear training center for reactor operator training. To use the simulator as a dynamic test-bed, the reactor regulating system modeling software of the simulator was replaced by a hardware controller and the simulator and target controller were interfaced with a hard-wired and network-based interface.

  12. Development of Research Reactor Simulator and Its Application to Dynamic Test-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed HANARO and the Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) real-time simulator for operating staff training. The main purpose of this simulator is operator training, but we modified this simulator as a dynamic test-bed to test the reactor regulating system in HANARO or JRTR before installation. The simulator configuration is divided into hardware and software. The simulator hardware consists of a host computer, 6 operator stations, a network switch, and a large display panel. The simulator software is divided into three major parts: a mathematical modeling module, which executes the plant dynamic modeling program in real-time, an instructor station module that manages user instructions, and a human machine interface (HMI) module. The developed research reactors are installed in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute nuclear training center for reactor operator training. To use the simulator as a dynamic test-bed, the reactor regulating system modeling software of the simulator was replaced by a hardware controller and the simulator and target controller were interfaced with a hard-wired and network-based interface

  13. TREATMENT OF POME BY PILOT PLANT ANAEROBIC FLUIDISED BED REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al-Mamun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A pilot scale anaerobic fluidised bed reactor (AnFBR of 2000 L capacity was studied to determine its performance to treat palm oil mill effluent (POME. The pilot plant was operated at ambient temperature with diluted POME as substrate. It took 17 days for the start-up of the reactor with pre-seeded sand media. The AnFBR was capable to remove a large portion of organics at relatively shorter retention time. Maximum and minimum COD removal efficiency of 85% and 65% were attained at a loading rate of 4.0 and 13.8 kgCOD/m3.d. BOD and TSS removal rates varied within the range of 64% - 91% and 68% - 89%, respectively. The AnFBR exhibited low sludge production with lower sludge volume indices (SVI. Maximum and minimum effluent indices for the effluent were 35 mL/g and 11 mL/g, respectively. Low SVI values indicated that, anaerobic fluidised bed reactors generate less sludge with fast settling properties. Promising performance at ambient temperature and for detention time shorter than the present practices supported the possibility of AnFBR to treat POME to meet the new requirement set by the DOE Malaysia.

  14. The modular pebble bed high temperature gas reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modular High Temperature Reactor power plants are characterized by the fact that standardized reactor units - modules -, each with a thermal power rating of 200-250 MW, can be interconnected to yield power plants in a broad power range. Provided that modular power plants are competitive, there is a variety of applications, e.g.: principal initial applications in the generation of electricity for a wide range of utility grid and plant sizes; co-generation of process steam and electricity, or district heat and electricity, for industrial or municipal consumers; and, in the long term, direct use of nuclear heat for process purposes e.g. gasifying coal, reforming methane etc. An essential condition for reasonably low capital costs is a simple design, taking into account the inherent safety features of small HTR's, e.g. the elimination of separate, redundant cooling systems for decay heat removal. Moreover, the safety concept must be simple, in order to minimize the engineering effort for the nuclear licensing procedure. Further, key reactor safety features should be convincingly demonstrated by full-scale test at an affordable cost, to provide a basis for standardized licensing of replicated reactors (the License-By-Test approach). In addition, the systems and structures within the nuclear envelope must be isolated such that the non-nuclear portion of the plant can be constructed as conventional power plant systems and structures. The Modular HTGR is designed to meet these conditions for safe, economical nuclear power

  15. Modularity of the MIT Pebble Bed Reactor for use by the commercial power industry

    OpenAIRE

    Hanlon-Hyssong, Jaime E.

    2008-01-01

    CIVINS The Modular Pebble Bed Reactor is a small high temperature helium cooled reactor that is being considered for both electric power and hydrogen production. Pebble bed reactors are being developed in South Africa, China and the US. To make smaller 120 Mwe reactors economically competitive with larger 1500 Mwe traditional light water reactors changes in the way these plants are built are needed. Economies of production need to be sufficiently large to compete with economies of sca...

  16. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelock, C.W.; Baumeister, E.B.

    1961-09-01

    A reactor fuel element utilizing fissionable fuel materials in plate form is described. This fuel element consists of bundles of fuel-bearing plates. The bundles are stacked inside of a tube which forms the shell of the fuel element. The plates each have longitudinal fins running parallel to the direction of coolant flow, and interspersed among and parallel to the fins are ribs which position the plates relative to each other and to the fuel element shell. The plate bundles are held together by thin bands or wires. The ex tended surface increases the heat transfer capabilities of a fuel element by a factor of 3 or more over those of a simple flat plate.

  17. Utilization of nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Report on an IAEA interregional training course, Budapest, Hungary, 5-30 November 1979. The course was attended by 19 participants from 16 Member States. Among the 28 training courses which the International Atomic Energy Agency organized within its 1979 programme of technical assistance was the Interregional Training Course on the Utilization of Nuclear Research Reactors. This course was held at the Nuclear Training Reactor (a low-power pool-type reactor) of the Technical University, Budapest, Hungary, from 5 to 30 November 1979 and it was complemented by a one-week Study Tour to the Nuclear Research Centre in Rossendorf near Dresden, German Democratic Republic. The training course was very successful, with 19 participants attending from 16 Member States - Bangladesh, Bolivia, Czechoslovakia, Ecuador, Egypt, India, Iraq, Korean Democratic People's Republic, Morocco, Peru, Philippines, Spain, Thailand, Turkey, Vietnam and Yugoslavia. Selected invited lecturers were recruited from the USA and Finland, as well as local scientists from Hungarian institutions. During the past two decades or so, many research reactors have been put into operation around the world, and the demand for well qualified personnel to run and fully utilize these facilities has increased accordingly. Several developing countries have already acquired small- and medium-size research reactors mainly for isotope production, research in various fields, and training, while others are presently at different stages of planning and installation. Through different sources of information, such as requests to the IAEA for fellowship awards and experts, it became apparent that many research reactors and their associated facilities are not being utilized to their full potential in many of the developing countries. One reason for this is the lack of a sufficient number of trained professionals who are well acquainted with all the capabilities that a research reactor can offer, both in research and

  18. Economic analysis of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents several methods for estimating the power costs of nuclear reactors. When based on a consistent set of economic assumptions, total power costs may be useful in comparing reactor alternatives. The principal items contributing to the total power costs of a nuclear power plant are: (1) capital costs, (2) fuel cycle costs, (3) operation and maintenance costs, and (4) income taxes and fixed charges. There is a large variation in capital costs and fuel expenses among different reactor types. For example, the standard once-through LWR has relatively low capital costs; however, the fuel costs may be very high if U3O8 is expensive. In contrast, the FBR has relatively high capital costs but low fuel expenses. Thus, the distribution of expenses varies significantly between these two reactors. In order to compare power costs, expenses and revenues associated with each reactor may be spread over the lifetime of the plant. A single annual cost, often called a levelized cost, may be obtained by the methods described. Levelized power costs may then be used as a basis for economic comparisons. The paper discusses each of the power cost components. An exact expression for total levelized power costs is derived. Approximate techniques of estimating power costs will be presented

  19. Nuclear reactor fuelling machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The refuelling machine described comprises a rotatable support structure having a guide tube attached to it by a parellel linkage mechanism, whereby the guide tube can be displaced sideways from the support structure. A gripper unit is housed within the guide tube for gripping the end of a fuel assembly or other reactor component and has means for maintenance in the engaging condition during travel of the unit along the guide tube, except for a small portion of the travel at one end of the guide tube, where the inner surface of the guide tube is shaped so as to maintain the gripper unit in a disengaging condition. The gripper unit has a rotatable head, means for moving it linearly within the guide tube so that a component carried by the unit can be housed in the guide tube, and means for rotating the head of the unit through 1800 relative to its body, to effect rotation of a component carried by the unit. The means for rotating the head of the gripper unit comprises ring and pinion gearing, operable through a series of rotatable shafts interconnected by universal couplings. The reason for provision for 1800 rotation is that due to the variation in the neutron flux across the reactor core the side of a fuel assembly towards the outside of the core will be subjected to a lower neutron flux and therefore will grow less than the side of the fuel assembly towards the inside of the core. This can lead to bowing and possible jamming of the fuel assemblies. Full constructional details are given. See also BP 1112384. (U.K.)

  20. Hydrodynamic Studies on a Trickle Bed Reactor for Foaming Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Bansal

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamic studies of trickle bed reactors (TBRs are essential for the design and prediction of their performance. The hydrodynamic characteristics involving pressure drop and dynamic liquid saturation are greatly affected by the physical properties of the liquids. In the present study experiments have been carried out in a concurrent downflow air - liquid trickle bed reactor to investigate the dynamic liquid saturation and pressure drop for the water (non-foaming and 3% polyethylene glycol and 4% polyethylene glycol foaming liquids in the gas continuous regime (GCF and foaming pulsing regime (FP. In the GCF regime the dynamic liquid saturation was found to increase with increase in liquid flow rate for non-foaming and foaming liquids. While for 3% and 4% polyethylene glycol solutions the severe foaming was observed in the high interaction regime and the regime is referred to as foaming pulsing (FP regime. The decrease in dynamic liquid saturation followed by a sharp rise in the pressure drop was observed during transition from gas GCF to FP regime. However in the FP regime, a dip in the dynamic liquid saturation was observed. The pressure drop for foaming liquids is observed to be manifolds higher compared to non-foaming liquid in the GCF regime. ©2010 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 16th January 2010, Revised: 10th February 2010, Accepted: 21st Feberuary 2010[How to Cite: R. Gupta, A. Bansal. (2010. Hydrodynamic Studies on a Trickle Bed Reactor for Foaming Liquids. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 5 (1: 31-37. doi:10.9767/bcrec.5.1.775.31-37][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.5.1.775.31-37 ][Cited by: Scopus 1 |

  1. Experimental and theoretical investigation of anaerobic fluidized bed biofilm reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fuentes

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of anaerobic fluidized bed reactors (AFBRs. The bioreactors are modeled as dynamic three-phase systems. Biochemical transformations are assumed to occur only in the fluidized bed zone. The biofilm process model is coupled to the system hydrodynamic model through the biofilm detachment rate; which is assumed to be a first-order function of the energy dissipation parameter and a second order function of biofilm thickness. Non-active biomass is considered to be particulate material subject to hydrolysis. The model includes the anaerobic conversion for complex substrate degradation and kinetic parameters selected from the literature. The experimental set-up consisted of two mesophilic (36±1ºC lab-scale AFBRs (R1 and R2 loaded with sand as inert support for biofilm development. The reactor start-up policy was based on gradual increments in the organic loading rate (OLR, over a four month period. Step-type disturbances were applied on the inlet (glucose and acetic acid substrate concentration (chemical oxygen demand (COD from 0.85 to 2.66 g L-1 and on the feed flow rate (from 3.2 up to 6.0 L d-1 considering the maximum efficiency as the reactor loading rate switching. The predicted and measured responses of the total and soluble COD, volatile fatty acid (VFA concentrations, biogas production rate and pH were investigated. Regarding hydrodynamic and fluidization aspects, variations of the bed expansion due to disturbances in the inlet flow rate and the biofilm growth were measured. As rate coefficients for the biofilm detachment model, empirical values of 3.73⋅10(4 and 0.75⋅10(4 s² kg-1 m-1 for R1 and R2, respectively, were estimated.

  2. Characterization of Biofilm in 200W Fluidized Bed Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Michelle H.; Saurey, Sabrina D.; Lee, Brady D.; Parker, Kent E.; Eisenhauer, Emalee ER; Cordova, Elsa A.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.

    2014-09-29

    Contaminated groundwater beneath the 200 West Area at the Hanford Site in Southeast Washington is currently being treated using a pump and treat system to remove organics, inorganics, radionuclides, and metals. A granular activated carbon-based fluidized bed reactor (FBR) has been added to remove nitrate, hexavalent chromium and carbon tetrachloride. Initial analytical results indicated the microorganisms effectively reduced many of the contaminants to less than cleanup levels. However shortly thereafter operational upsets of the FBR include carbon carry over, over production of microbial extracellular polymeric substance (biofilm) materials, and over production of hydrogen sulfide. As a result detailed investigations were undertaken to understand the functional diversity and activity of the microbial community present in the FBR over time. Molecular analyses including terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses were performed on the microbial community extracted from the biofilm within the bed and from the inoculum, to determine functional dynamics of the FBR bed over time and following operational changes. Findings from these analyses indicated: 1) the microbial community within the bed was completely different than community used for inoculation, and was likely from the groundwater; 2) analyses early in the testing showed an FBR community dominated by a few Curvibacter and Flavobacterium species; 3) the final sample taken indicated that the microbial community in the FBR bed had become more diverse; and 4) qPCR analyses indicated that bacteria involved in nitrogen cycling, including denitrifiers and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria, were dominant in the bed. These results indicate that molecular tools can be powerful for determining functional diversity within FBR type reactors. Coupled with micronutrient, influent and effluent chemistry evaluations, a more

  3. PEBBED ANALYSIS OF HOT SPOTS IN PEBBLE-BED REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Hans D. Gougar; William K. Terry; Frederik Reitsma; Wessel Joubert

    2005-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory’s PEBBED code and simple probability considerations are used to estimate the likelihood and consequences of the accumulation of highly reactive pebbles in the region of peak power in a pebble-bed reactor. The PEBBED code is briefly described, and the logic of the probability calculations is presented in detail. The results of the calculations appear to show that hot-spot formation produces only moderate increases in peak accident temperatures, and no increases at all in normal operating temperatures.

  4. Glucose isomerization in simulated moving bed reactor by Glucose isomerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Alberto Borges da Silva

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out on the production of high-fructose syrup by Simulated Moving Bed (SMB technology. A mathematical model and numerical methodology were used to predict the behavior and performance of the simulated moving bed reactors and to verify some important aspects for application of this technology in the isomerization process. The developed algorithm used the strategy that considered equivalences between simulated moving bed reactors and true moving bed reactors. The kinetic parameters of the enzymatic reaction were obtained experimentally using discontinuous reactors by the Lineweaver-Burk technique. Mass transfer effects in the reaction conversion using the immobilized enzyme glucose isomerase were investigated. In the SMB reactive system, the operational variable flow rate of feed stream was evaluated to determine its influence on system performance. Results showed that there were some flow rate values at which greater purities could be obtained.Neste trabalho a tecnologia de Leito Móvel Simulado (LMS reativo é aplicada no processo de isomerização da glicose visando à produção de xarope concentrado de frutose. É apresentada a modelagem matemática e uma metodologia numérica para predizer o comportamento e o desempenho de unidades reativas de leito móvel simulado para verificar alguns aspectos importantes para o emprego desta tecnologia no processo de isomerização. O algoritmo desenvolvido utiliza a abordagem que considera as equivalências entre as unidades reativas de leito móvel simulado e leito móvel verdadeiro. Parâmetros cinéticos da reação enzimática são obtidos experimentalmente usando reatores em batelada pela técnica Lineweaver-Burk. Efeitos da transferência de massa na conversão de reação usando a enzima imobilizada glicose isomerase são verificados. No sistema reativo de LMS, a variável operacional vazão da corrente de alimentação é avaliada para conhecer o efeito de sua influência no

  5. Advanced Core Design And Fuel Management For Pebble-Bed Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans D. Gougar; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; William K. Terry

    2004-10-01

    A method for designing and optimizing recirculating pebble-bed reactor cores is presented. At the heart of the method is a new reactor physics computer code, PEBBED, which accurately and efficiently computes the neutronic and material properties of the asymptotic (equilibrium) fuel cycle. This core state is shown to be unique for a given core geometry, power level, discharge burnup, and fuel circulation policy. Fuel circulation in the pebble-bed can be described in terms of a few well?defined parameters and expressed as a recirculation matrix. The implementation of a few heat?transfer relations suitable for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors allows for the rapid estimation of thermal properties critical for safe operation. Thus, modeling and design optimization of a given pebble-bed core can be performed quickly and efficiently via the manipulation of a limited number key parameters. Automation of the optimization process is achieved by manipulation of these parameters using a genetic algorithm. The end result is an economical, passively safe, proliferation-resistant nuclear power plant.

  6. Liquid-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen can be added to nuclear reactors with a liquid hydrogen-containing coolant on the suction side of a high pressure pump in the purification system. According to the invention this is performed by means of a liquid jet condenser which uses the coolant as liquid and which is preferably charged from the pressure side of the high pressure pump and conveys the liquid to a mixer connected in series with the high pressure pump. The invention is to be used especially in pressurized water reactors. (orig./PW)

  7. Liquid-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen can be added to nuclear reactors with a liquid hydrogen-containing coolant on the suction side of a high pressure pump in the purification system. According to the invention this is performed by means of a liquid jet condenser which uses the coolant as liquid and which is preferably charged from the pressure side of the high pressure pump and conveys the liquid to a mixer connected in series with the high pressure pump. The invention is to be used especially in pressurized water reactors. (orig.)

  8. Recycling device of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a recycling device of a nuclear reactor, a coolant recycling system is disposed by using an outer loop, while a branched connection pipe is connected to a feed water jet pump driving system. Further, the coolant recycling system is constituted with a remaining-heat removing system having a heat exchanger. The connection pipe branched from the downstream of the heat exchanger is connected to the suction side of the jet pump driving pump. Even when feedwater is not returned or returned only insufficiently from a condensate/feedwater system, such as in a case of reactor start up, since sufficient jet pump driving water can be ensured, reactor power can be controlled by controlling the reactor core flow rate by the driving water, to improve the operationability. Further, the burden on control rods can be decreased to improve reliability compared with the case of controlling the power only by the operation of the control rods. Further, since the recycling flow rate of coolants in the reactor core can be ensured sufficiently, occurrence of temperature difference between the upper and the lower portions of a pressure vessel can be prevented effectively, to improve reactor integrity. (N.H.)

  9. Advanced pebble bed high temperature reactor with central graphite column for future applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design evaluations of the advanced pebble bed high temperature reactor, AHTR, with central graphite column are given. This reactor, as a nuclear heat source, is suitable for coal refinement as well as for electricity generation with closed gas turbine primary helium circuit. With this design of the central graphite column, it is possible to limit the core temperatures under the required value of about 1600deg C in case of accident conditions, even with higher thermal power and higher core inlet and outlet temperatures. The designs of core internals are described. The after heat removal system is integrated in the prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessel, which is based on the principals of natural convection. Research work is being carried out, whereby the sphencal fuel elements are coated with a layer of silicon carbide, to improve the corrosion resistance as well as the effectiveness of the fission products barrier. (orig.)

  10. Nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Buhl feels that nuclear-energy issues are too complex to be understood as single topics, and can only be understood in relationship to broader issues. In fact, goals and risks associated with all energy options must be seen as interrelated with other broad issues, and it should be understood that there are presently no clearcut criteria to ensure that the best decisions are made. The technical community is responsible for helping the public to understand the basic incompatibility of hard and soft technologies and that there is no risk-free energy source. Four principles are outlined for assessing the risks of various energy technologies: (1) take a holistic view; (2) compare the risk with the unit energy output; (3) compare the risk with those of everyday activities; and (4) identify unusual risks associated with a particular option. Dr. Buhl refers to the study conducted by Dr. Inhaber of Canada who used this approach and concluded that nuclear power and natural gas have the lowest overall risk

  11. Liquid cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A construction is described for a liquid metal cooled fast reactor, in which the core is supported in a pool of liquid coolant, wherein a catchment tray is provided for any debris falling from the core. The tray comprises a complex of open top collecting vessels with central support struts, the vessels being spaced apart and arranged in layers in a lattice pitch. The lattice pitches of the vessels in each layer are off-set to the lattice pitches of the vessels in the other layers, so that upper vessels partially overlap lower vessels, and the support struts extend through interspaces defined by the vessels in off-set pitch to a common supporting sub-structure. The complex of vessels offers a complete catchment area for falling debris, whilst being pervious to liquid coolant circulating upwardly by convection. The collecting vessels preferably comprise conical dishes and are arranged in triangular lattice pitch in each layer, and the complex of vessels comprises three layers. Alternatively the collecting vessels may be rectilinear and arranged on a square lattice. The catchment tray may comprise two or more such complexes in stacked array. (U.K.)

  12. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gas containing vessel has a water pool which is in communication with a dry well containing a reactor pressure vessel by way of a communication pipe is disposed. A capacity of a gas phase portion of the gas containing chamber, a capacity of the dry well, a water depth of a bent tube communicating the dry well with a pressure suppression pool of a pressure suppression chamber and a water depth of the communication pipe are determined so as to satisfy specific conditions. Since the water depth of the communication pipe is less than the water depth of the bent tube, incondensible gases and steams in the dry well flow into the water pool of the gas containing chamber at the initial stage of loss of coolant accident. Subsequently, steams in the dry well flow into the pressure suppression pool of the pressure suppression chamber by way of the bent tube. Accordingly, since the incondensible gases in the dry well do not flow into the pressure suppression chamber, pool swelling phenomenon in the pressure suppression chamber is not caused even if the water depth of the bent tube which leads to the pressure suppression chamber is great. Further, pressure increase due to transfer of the incondensible gases is decreased. (I.N.)

  13. Pebble Bed Reactors Design Optimization Methods and their Application to the Pebble Bed Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Anselmo Tomas, Jr.

    The Fluoride salt cooled High temperature Reactor (FHR) is a class of advanced nuclear reactors that combine the robust coated particle fuel form from high temperature gas cooled reactors, direct reactor auxillary cooling system (DRACS) passive decay removal of liquid metal fast reactors, and the transparent, high volumetric heat capacitance liquid fluoride salt working fluids---flibe (33%7Li2F-67%BeF)---from molten salt reactors. This combination of fuel and coolant enables FHRs to operate in a high-temperature low-pressure design space that has beneficial safety and economic implications. In 2012, UC Berkeley was charged with developing a pre-conceptual design of a commercial prototype FHR---the Pebble Bed- Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)---as part of the Nuclear Energy University Programs' (NEUP) integrated research project. The Mark 1 design of the PB-FHR (Mk1 PB-FHR) is 236 MWt flibe cooled pebble bed nuclear heat source that drives an open-air Brayton combine-cycle power conversion system. The PB-FHR's pebble bed consists of a 19.8% enriched uranium fuel core surrounded by an inert graphite pebble reflector that shields the outer solid graphite reflector, core barrel and reactor vessel. The fuel reaches an average burnup of 178000 MWt-d/MT. The Mk1 PB-FHR exhibits strong negative temperature reactivity feedback from the fuel, graphite moderator and the flibe coolant but a small positive temperature reactivity feedback of the inner reflector and from the outer graphite pebble reflector. A novel neutronics and depletion methodology---the multiple burnup state methodology was developed for an accurate and efficient search for the equilibrium composition of an arbitrary continuously refueled pebble bed reactor core. The Burnup Equilibrium Analysis Utility (BEAU) computer program was developed to implement this methodology. BEAU was successfully benchmarked against published results generated with existing equilibrium depletion codes VSOP

  14. Three dimensional diffusion calculations of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the three dimensional calculation of nuclear reactors using the code TRITON. The purposes of the work were to perform three-dimensional computations of the core of the Soreq nuclear reactor and of the power reactor ZION and to validate the TRITON code. Possible applications of the TRITON code in Soreq reactor calculations and in power reactor research are suggested. (H.K.)

  15. Production of radionuclides in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Given is a short review on the production of radionuclides which was performed in the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences by using the nuclear reactor RA. Regarding the considerations of the possible re-starting of this reactor its use for the production of medical radionuclides should be taken into account. Listed are some of the important medical radionuclides routinely produced in nuclear reactors in the world and discussed the conditions for their obtaining in the reactor RA. (author)

  16. Exploring new coolants for nuclear breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breeder reactors are considered a unique tool for fully exploiting natural nuclear resources. In current Light Water Reactors (LWR), only 0.5% of the primary energy contained in the nuclei removed from a mine is converted into useful heat. The rest remains in the depleted uranium or spent fuel. The need to improve resource-efficiency has stimulated interest in Fast-Reactor-based fuel cycles, which can exploit a much higher fraction of the energy content of mined uranium by burning U-238, mainly after conversion into Pu-239. Thorium fuel cycles also offer several potential advantages over a uranium fuel cycle. The coolant initially selected for most of the FBR programs launched in the 1960s was sodium, which is still considered the best candidate for these reactors. However, Na-cooled FBRs have a positive void reactivity coefficient. Among other factors, this fundamental drawback has resulted in the canceled deployment of these reactors. Therefore, it seems reasonable to explore new options for breeder coolants. In this paper, a proposal is presented for a new molten salt (F2Be) coolant that could overcome the safety issues related to the positive void reactivity coefficient of molten metal coolants. Although it is a very innovative proposal that would require an extensive R and D program, this paper presents the very appealing properties of this salt when using a specific type of fuel that is similar to that of pebble bed reactors. The F2Be concept was studied over a typical MOX composition and extended to a thorium-based cycle. The general analysis took into account the requirements for criticality (opening the option of hybrid subcritical systems); the requirements for breeding; and the safety requirement of having a negative coolant void reactivity coefficient. A design window was found in the definition of a F2Be cooled reactor where the safety requirement was met, unlike for molten metal-cooled reactors, which always have positive void reactivity coefficients

  17. Actinide transmutation in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report has also been published as a PhD thesis. It discusses the reduction of the transuranics part of nuclear waste. Requirements and criteria for efficient burning of transuranics are developed. It is found that a large reduction of transuranics produced per unit of energy is possible when the losses in reprocessing are small and when special transuranics burner reactors are used at the end of the nuclear era to reduce the transuranics inventory. Two special burner reactors have been studied in this thesis. In chapter 3, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor is discussed. A method has been developed to optimize the burning capability while complying to constraints imposed on the design for safety, reliability, and economics. An oxide fueled and metallic fueled ALMR have been compared for safety and transuranics burning. Concluded is that the burning capability is the same, but that the higher thermal conductivity of the metallic fuel has a positive effect on safety. In search for a more effective waste transmuter, a modified Molten Salt Reactor was designed for this study. The continuous refueling capability and the molten salt fuel make a safe design possible without uranium as fuel. A four times faster reduction of the transuranics is possible with this reactor type. The amount of transuranics can be halved every 10 years. The most important conclusion of this work is that it is of utmost importance in the study of waste transmutation that a high burning is obtained with a safe design. In future work, safety should be the highest priority in the design process of burner reactors. (orig.)

  18. Electrochemistry of Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project developed a comprehensive mathematical and simulation model for calculating thermal hydraulic, electrochemical, and corrosion parameters, viz. temperature, fluid flow velocity, pH, corrosion potential, hydrogen injection, oxygen contamination, stress corrosion cracking, crack growth rate, and other important quantities in the coolant circuits of water-cooled nuclear power plants, including both Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The model is being used to assess the three major operational problems in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), which include mass transport, activity transport, and the axial offset anomaly, and provide a powerful tool for predicting the accumulation of SCC damage in BWR primary coolant circuits as a function of operating history. Another achievement of the project is the development of a simulation tool to serve both as a training tool for plant operators and as an engineering test-bed to evaluate new equipment and operating strategies (normal operation, cold shut down and others). The development and implementation of the model allows us to estimate the activity transport or ''radiation fields'' around the primary loop and the vessel, as a function of the operating parameters and the water chemistry

  19. Electrochemistry of Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, Dgiby; Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna; Pitt, Jonathan

    2006-08-08

    This project developed a comprehensive mathematical and simulation model for calculating thermal hydraulic, electrochemical, and corrosion parameters, viz. temperature, fluid flow velocity, pH, corrosion potential, hydrogen injection, oxygen contamination, stress corrosion cracking, crack growth rate, and other important quantities in the coolant circuits of water-cooled nuclear power plants, including both Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The model is being used to assess the three major operational problems in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), which include mass transport, activity transport, and the axial offset anomaly, and provide a powerful tool for predicting the accumulation of SCC damage in BWR primary coolant circuits as a function of operating history. Another achievement of the project is the development of a simulation tool to serve both as a training tool for plant operators and as an engineering test-bed to evaluate new equipment and operating strategies (normal operation, cold shut down and others). The development and implementation of the model allows us to estimate the activity transport or "radiation fields" around the primary loop and the vessel, as a function of the operating parameters and the water chemistry.

  20. Reactors for nuclear electric propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propulsion is the key to space exploitation and power is the key to propulsion. This paper examines the role of nuclear fission reactors as the primary power source for high specific impulse electric propulsion systems for space missions of the 1980s and 1990s. Particular mission applications include transfer to and a reusable orbital transfer vehicle from low-Earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit, outer planet exploration and reconnaissance missions, and as a versatile space tug supporting lunar resource development. Nuclear electric propulsion is examined as an indispensable component in space activities of the next two decades

  1. Fast Pyrolysis of Agricultural Wastes in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. H.; Chen, H. P.; Yang, H. P.; Dai, X. M.; Zhang, S. H.

    Solid biomass can be converted into liquid fuel through fast pyrolysis, which is convenient to be stored and transported with potential to be used as a fossil oil substitute. In China, agricultural wastes are the main biomass materials, whose pyrolysis process has not been researched adequately compared to forestry wastes. As the representative agricultural wastes in China, peanut shell and maize stalk were involved in this paper and pine wood sawdust was considered for comparing the different pyrolysis behaviors of agricultural wastes and forestry wastes. Fast pyrolysis experiments were carried out in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor. The bio-oil yieldsof peanut shell and maize stalk were obviously lower than that ofpine sawdust. Compared with pine sawdust, the char yields of peanut shell and maize stalk were higher but the heating value of uncondensable gaswas lower. This means that the bio-oil cost will be higher for agricultural wastes if taking the conventional pyrolysis technique. And the characteristic and component analysis resultsof bio-oil revealed that the quality of bio-oil from agricultural wastes, especially maize stalk, was worse than that from pine wood. Therefore, it is important to take some methods to improve the quality of bio-oilfrom agricultural wastes, which should promote the exploitation of Chinese biomass resources through fast pyrolysis in afluidized bed reactor.

  2. Studies on air ingress for pebble bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) has been considered a critical event for helium-cooled pebbled bed reactors. Following helium depressurization, it is anticipated that unless countermeasures are taken air will enter the core through the break and then by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and graphite pebbles. Thus, without any mitigating features a LOCA will lead to an air ingress event. The INEEL is studying such an event with two well-respected light water reactor transient response codes: RELAP5/ATHENA and MELCOR. To study the degree of graphite oxidation occurring due to an air ingress event, a MELCOR model of a reference pebble bed design was constructed. A modified version of MELCOR developed at INEEL, which includes graphite oxidation capabilities, and molecular diffusion of air into helium was used for these calculations. Results show that the lower reflector graphite consumes all of the oxygen before reaching the core. The results also show a long time delay between the time that the depressurization phase of the accident is over and the time that natural circulation air through the core occurs. (author)

  3. Nuclear reactors in remote earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Same basic geological principles along with other facts, have allowed us to establish the existence in the remote past (Between 2.5 and 4 x 10''9 years ago) of the uranium deposits and/or uranium mineralized volumes, which be-have as nuclear reactors. A simplified neutronic diffusion model have allowed us to describe the main characteristics of such systems. The obtained results indicate that this phenomenon was a rather frequent fact. (Author) 7 refs

  4. Gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gas temperature of a hot gas loop in gas-cooled nuclear reactor plants shall be able to be modified without influencing the gas temperature of the other loops. If necessary, it should be possible to stop the loop. This is possible by means of a mixer which is places below the heat absorbing component in the hot channel and which is connected to a cold gas line. (orig.)

  5. Dynamics and transient stability of a pebble bed reactor during start up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, B.; Pain, C.C.; Eaton, M.D.; Ziver, A.K.; Goddard, A.J.H. [Applied Modelling and Computation Group, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Dept. of Earth Science and Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Oliveira, C.R.E. de [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Program, The George W Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2005-07-01

    A design of a modular pebble bed reactor (PBR) is being developed for construction in South Africa. The design of this PBR is simulated in the FETCH nuclear criticality model. FETCH solves the neutron transport equations coupled to fluid dynamics and has been used in simulations of fluidized bed reactors. In the neutronics module of FETCH steady state neutronic calculations are performed to obtain the starting conditions for the subsequent calculation of transient behaviour. These include fuel temperature and control rod position. Neutron flux and the initial surplus reactivity are also calculated. Each step change in a simulated start-up is initiated by an excess reactivity which produces more severe transients than would be encountered in normal operation. The variations of several parameters with time are recorded, for example, temperature at various points in the reactor, temperature of the hottest pebble and fission rate. Spatial profiles are recorded at regular time intervals, including temperatures, power density, gas velocity and gas pressure. The stability of the reactor is demonstrated.

  6. A Safe Solution to World Energy Supply - the Very High Temperature Pebble Bed Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the energy hungry world there is a solution which has the potential to resolve most of the present energy needs, with almost zero pollution and high thermal efficiency. The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) can produce Hydrogen for automotive needs to replace the polluting gas and oil; it can produce electricity at very high efficiency with almost no pollution, and provide clean process heat for the industry and the energy needed for desalination plants to provide fresh water. In the present study it is shown that choosing the Pebble Bed concept for the VHTR is not only a very effective way to supply all the energy needs, it is also one of the safest nuclear reactor concept. Depending on the fuel cycle chosen, it is possible to reduce significantly the TRU waste normally produced in light water reactors and thus further reduce the environmental concerns of long living FP. A conceptual 600MWt High Temperature Pebble Bed reactor is proposed, and its safety characteristics are analyzed by simulating various hypothetical accidents, using the DSNP simulation system

  7. Improving hydrolysis of food waste in a leach bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This paper assesses leaching of food waste in a two phase digestion system. • Leaching is assessed with and without an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). • Without the UASB, low pH reduces hydrolysis, while increased flows increase leaching. • Inclusion of the UASB increases pH to optimal levels and greatly improves leaching. • The optimal conditions are suggested as low flow with connection to the UASB. - Abstract: This paper examines the rate of degradation of food waste in a leach bed reactor (LBR) under four different operating conditions. The effects of leachate recirculation at a low and high flow rate are examined with and without connection to an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). Two dilution rates of the effective volume of the leach bed reactors were investigated: 1 and 6 dilutions per LBR per day. The increase in dilution rate from 1 to 6 improved the destruction of volatile solids without connection to the UASB. However connection to the UASB greatly improved the destruction of volatile solids (by almost 60%) at the low recirculation rate of 1 dilution per day. The increase in volatile solids destruction with connection to the UASB was attributed to an increase in leachate pH and buffering capacity provided by recirculated effluent from the UASB to the leach beds. The destruction of volatile solids for both the low and high dilution rates was similar with connection to the UASB, giving 82% and 88% volatile solids destruction respectively. This suggests that the most efficient leaching condition is 1 dilution per day with connection to the UASB

  8. Pebble bed modular reactor safeguards: developing new approaches and implementing safeguards by design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beddingfield, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Durst, Philip [INL; Bean, Robert [INL

    2010-01-01

    The design of the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) does not fit or seem appropriate to the IAEA safeguards approach under the categories of light water reactor (LWR), on-load refueled reactor (OLR, i.e. CANDU), or Other (prismatic HTGR) because the fuel is in a bulk form, rather than discrete items. Because the nuclear fuel is a collection of nuclear material inserted in tennis-ball sized spheres containing structural and moderating material and a PBMR core will contain a bulk load on the order of 500,000 spheres, it could be classified as a 'Bulk-Fuel Reactor.' Hence, the IAEA should develop unique safeguards criteria. In a multi-lab DOE study, it was found that an optimized blend of: (i) developing techniques to verify the plutonium content in spent fuel pebbles, (ii) improving burn-up computer codes for PBMR spent fuel to provide better understanding of the core and spent fuel makeup, and (iii) utilizing bulk verification techniques for PBMR spent fuel storage bins should be combined with the historic IAEA and South African approaches of containment and surveillance to verify and maintain continuity of knowledge of PBMR fuel. For all of these techniques to work the design of the reactor will need to accommodate safeguards and material accountancy measures to a far greater extent than has thus far been the case. The implementation of Safeguards-by-Design as the PBMR design progresses provides an approach to meets these safeguards and accountancy needs.

  9. Semi-dry flue gas desulfurization using Ca(OH)2 in a fluidized bed reactor with bed materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of present work is to reduce sulfur dioxide emission from power plant for the environment protection. The fluidized bed (FB) was used as the reactor with bed materials in a new semi-dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process to achieve high desulfurization efficiency (>98%). Fine powder of Ca(OH)2 as sorbent and water were continuously fed separately to the bed reactor where bed materials (2 mm glass beads) were fluidized vigorously with flue gas (flow 720 Nm3/ hr) using bench scale plant of stainless steel column. We have investigated different effects of water injection flow rate, Ca/ S molar ratio and weight of bed materials on SO2 removal. The increments in the Ca/ S molar ratio and water injection flow rate have been resulted higher desulfurization efficiency with certain disadvantages such as higher sorbent cost and lower temperature of the treated flue gas, respectively. (author)

  10. Pebble bed modular reactors versus other generation technologies. Costs and challenges for South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    South Africa is Africa's major economy, with plans to double its electricity generation capacity by 2026. South Africa has spent almost two decades developing a nuclear reactor known as a Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR), which could provide substantial benefits to the electricity grid but was recently mothballed due to high costs. This work estimates the lifecycle financial costs of South African PBMRs, then compares these costs to those of five other generation options: coal, nuclear as pressurized water reactors (PWRs), wind, and solar as photovoltaics (PV) or concentrating solar power (CSP). Each technology is evaluated with low, base case, and high assumptions for capital costs, construction time, and interest rates. Decommissioning costs, project lifetime, capacity factors, and sensitivity to carbon price are also considered. PBMR could be cost competitive with coal under certain low cost conditions, even without a carbon price. However, international lending practices and other factors suggest that a high capital cost, high interest rate nuclear plant is likely to be competing with a low capital cost, low interest rate coal plant in a market where cost recovery is challenging. PBMR could potentially become more competitive if low rate international loans were available to nuclear projects or became unavailable to coal projects. (author)

  11. Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program. Interim report. Safety and licensing evaluaion of German Pebble Bed Reactor concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-09-01

    The Pebble Bed Gas Cooled Reactor, as developed in the Federal Republic of Germany, was reviewed from a United States Safety and Licensing perspective. The primary concepts considered were the steam cycle electric generating pebble bed (HTR-K) and the process heat pebble bed (PNP), although generic consideration of the direct cycle gas turbine pebble bed (HHT) was included. The study examines potential U.S. licensing issues and offers some suggestions as to required development areas.

  12. Preliminary neutronic design of high burnup OTTO cycle pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pebble bed type High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is among the interesting nuclear reactor designs in terms of safety and flexibility for co-generation applications. In addition, the strong inherent safety characteristics of the pebble bed reactor (PBR) which is based on natural mechanisms improve the simplicity of the PBR design, in particular for the Once-Through-Then-Out (OTTO) cycle PBR design. One of the important challenges of the OTTO cycle PBR design, and nuclear reactor design in general, is improving the nuclear fuel utilization which is shown by attaining a higher burnup value. This study performed a preliminary neutronic design study of a 200 MWt OTTO cycle PBR with high burnup while fulfilling the safety criteria of the PBR design.The safety criteria of the design was represented by the per-fuel-pebble maximum power generation of 4.5 kW/pebble. The maximum burnup value was also limited by the tested maximum burnup value which maintained the integrity of the pebble fuel. Parametric surveys were performed to obtain the optimized parameters used in this study, which are the fuel enrichment, per-pebble heavy metal (HM) loading, and the average axial speed of the fuel. An optimum design with burnup value of 131.1 MWd/Kg-HM was achieved in this study which is much higher compare to the burnup of the reference design HTR-MODUL and a previously proposed OTTO-cycle PBR design. This optimum design uses 17% U-235 enrichment with 4 g HM-loading per fuel pebble. (author)

  13. Preliminary Neutronic Design of High Burnup OTTO Cycle Pebble Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Setiadipura

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The pebble bed type High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR is among the interesting nuclear reactor designs in terms of safety and flexibility for co-generation applications. In addition, the strong inherent safety characteristics of the pebble bed reactor (PBR which is based on natural mechanisms improve the simplicity of the PBR design, in particular for the Once-Through-Then-Out (OTTO cycle PBR design. One of the important challenges of the OTTO cycle PBR design, and nuclear reactor design in general, is improving the nuclear fuel utilization which is shown by attaining a higher burnup value. This study performed a preliminary neutronic design study of a 200 MWt OTTO cycle PBR with high burnup while fulfilling the safety criteria of the PBR design.The safety criteria of the design was represented by the per-fuel-pebble maximum power generation of 4.5 kW/pebble. The maximum burnup value was also limited by the tested maximum burnup value which maintained the integrity of the pebble fuel. Parametric surveys were performed to obtain the optimized parameters used in this study, which are the fuel enrichment, per-pebble heavy metal (HM loading, and the average axial speed of the fuel. An optimum design with burnup value of 131.1 MWd/Kg-HM was achieved in this study which is much higher compare to the burnup of the reference design HTR-MODUL and a previously proposed OTTO-cycle PBR design. This optimum design uses 17% U-235 enrichment with 4 g HM-loading per fuel pebble

  14. A Pebble-Bed Breed-and-Burn Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, Ehud [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The primary objective of this project is to use three-dimensional fuel shuffling in order to reduce the minimum peak radiation damage of ~550 dpa present Breed-and-Burn (B&B) fast nuclear reactor cores designs (they feature 2-D fuel shuffling) call for to as close as possible to the presently accepted value of 200 dpa thereby enabling earlier commercialization of B&B reactors which could make substantial contribution to energy sustainability and economic stability without need for fuel recycling. Another objective is increasing the average discharge burnup for the same peak discharge burnup thereby (1) increasing the fuel utilization of 2-D shuffled B&B reactors and (2) reducing the reprocessing capacity required to support a given capacity of FRs that are to recycle fuel.

  15. A Pebble-Bed Breed-and-Burn Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this project is to use three-dimensional fuel shuffling in order to reduce the minimum peak radiation damage of ~550 dpa present Breed-and-Burn (B&B) fast nuclear reactor cores designs (they feature 2-D fuel shuffling) call for to as close as possible to the presently accepted value of 200 dpa thereby enabling earlier commercialization of B&B reactors which could make substantial contribution to energy sustainability and economic stability without need for fuel recycling. Another objective is increasing the average discharge burnup for the same peak discharge burnup thereby (1) increasing the fuel utilization of 2-D shuffled B&B reactors and (2) reducing the reprocessing capacity required to support a given capacity of FRs that are to recycle fuel.

  16. Neutronic behavior of Thorium based fuel cycles in a pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorium is a potentially valuable energy source since it is about three to four times as abundant as Uranium. It is also a widely distributed natural resource readily accessible in many countries. Therefore, Thorium fuels can complement Uranium fuels and ensure long term sustainability of nuclear power. This paper shows the main advantages of the use of a Pebble Bed critical nuclear reactor using a variety of fuel cycles with Thorium (Th+U233, Th+Pu239 and Th+U). the parameters related to the neutronic behavior like deep burn, nuclear fuel breeding, Minor Actinide stockpile, power density profiles and other are used to compare the fuel cycles. also a thermo mechanical study of the irradiated TRISO fuel particle is presented. (Author)

  17. Research nuclear reactor operation management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some aspects of reactor operation management are highlighted. The main mission of the operational staff at a testing reactor is to operate it safely and efficiently, to ensure proper conditions for different research programs implying the use of the reactor. For reaching this aim, there were settled down operating plans for every objective, and procedure and working instructions for staff training were established, both for the start-up and for the safe operation of the reactor. Damages during operation or special situations which can arise, at stop, start-up, maintenance procedures were thoroughly considered. While the technical skill is considered to be the most important quality of the staff, the organising capacity is a must in the operation of any nuclear facility. Staff training aims at gaining both theoretical and practical experience based on standards about staff quality at each work level. 'Plow' sheet has to be carefully done, setting clear the decision responsibility for each person so that everyone's own technical level to be coupled to the problems which implies his responsibility. Possible events which may arise in operation, e.g., criticality, irradiation, contamination, and which do not arise in other fields, have to be carefully studied. One stresses that the management based on technical and scientific arguments have to cover through technical, economical and nuclear safety requirements a series of interlinked subprograms. Every such subprograms is subject to some peculiar demands by the help of which the entire activity field is coordinated. Hence for any subprogram there are established the objectives to be achieved, the applicable regulations, well-defined responsibilities, training of the personnel involved, the material and documentation basis required and activity planning. The following up of positive or negative responses generated by experiments and the information synthesis close the management scope. Important management aspects

  18. Approach to development of high flux research reactor with pebble-bed core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The research nuclear reactor of a basin-type IRT with the designed power of 1 MW was put into operation in 'Sosny' settlement not far from Minsk-city in the Republic of Belarus in 1962. In 1971 after its modernization the power was increased up to 4 MW and maximum density of neutron flux in the core was: Thermal 5·1013 neutr./cm2.s Fast (E>0.8 MeV) 2·1013 neutr./cm2.s The reactor has been used for carrying out investigations in the field of solid-state physics, radiation construction materials, radiobiology, gaseous chemically reacting coolants and others. After the Chernobyl NPP accident, in the former USSR the requirements on safety of nuclear reactors have become sufficiently stricter. As to some parameters these requirements became the same as for reactors of nuclear power plants. In this connection the reactor in 'Sosny' settlement did not answer these new requirements by a number of performances such as seismicity of building, efficiency of control and protection system, corrosion in the reactor vessel and others, and it was shutdown in 1987 and its decommissioning was performed during 1988-1999. At the Joint Institute of Power and Nuclear Research -'SOSNY' have been carried out investigations on feasibility of creation of the research reactor with pebble-bed core. The concept of such reactor supposes using the following technical approaches: - Using as fuel the brought sphere micro fuel elements with the diameter of 500-750 mkm to an industrial level; - Organization of reactor operation in the regime with minimum possible fueling with 235U; - Implementation of hydraulic loading - unloading of micro fuel elements with the frequency of one or several days. Physical calculations of the core were carried out with the help of MCU-RFFI program based on the Monte-Carlo method. Two configurations of the pebble-bed core in the high flux reactor have been considered. The first configuration is the core with a neutron trap and an annular fuel layer formed

  19. Nuclear reactors Monitoring using neutrinos detectors1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the feasibility to use antineutrinos detectors for monitoring of nuclear reactors. Using a simple model of fission shower with two components, we illustrate how the numbers of antineutrinos detected at a distance L from the reactor depend on the composition of the nuclear combustible and how it could be used for nuclear safeguards policy.

  20. Exporting apocalypse: CANDU reactors and nuclear proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author believes that the peaceful use of nuclear technology leads inevitably to the production of nuclear weapons, and that CANDU reactors are being bought by countries that are likely to build bombs. He states that exports of reactors and nuclear materials cannot be defended and must be stopped

  1. Effects of Spatial Variations in Packing Fraction on Reactor Physics Parameters in Pebble-Bed Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The well-known spatial variation of packing fraction near the outer boundary of a pebble-bed reactor core is cited. The ramifications of this variation are explored with the MCNP computer code. It is found that the variation has negligible effects on the global reactor physics parameters extracted from the MCNP calculations for use in analysis by diffusion-theory codes, but for local reaction rates the effects of the variation are naturally important. Included is some preliminary work in using first-order perturbation theory for estimating the effect of the spatial variation of packing fraction on the core eigenvalue and the fision density distribution

  2. Effects of Spatial Variations in Packing Fraction of Reactor Physics Parameters in Pebble-Bed Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The well-known spatial variation of packing fraction near the outer boundary of a pebble-bed reactor core is cited. The ramifications of this variation are explored with the MCNP computer code. It is found that the variation has negligible effects on the global reactor physics parameters extracted from the MCNP calculations for use in analysis by diffusion-theory codes, but for local reaction rates the effects of the variation are naturally important. Included is some preliminary work in using first-order perturbation theory for estimating the effect of the spatial variation of packing fraction on the core eigenvalue and the fission density distribution

  3. Effects of Spatial Variations in Packing Fraction on Reactor Physics Parameters in Pebble-Bed Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William K. Terry; A. M. Ougouag; Farzad Rahnema; Michael Scott McKinley

    2003-04-01

    The well-known spatial variation of packing fraction near the outer boundary of a pebble-bed reactor core is cited. The ramifications of this variation are explored with the MCNP computer code. It is found that the variation has negligible effects on the global reactor physics parameters extracted from the MCNP calculations for use in analysis by diffusion-theory codes, but for local reaction rates the effects of the variation are naturally important. Included is some preliminary work in using first-order perturbation theory for estimating the effect of the spatial variation of packing fraction on the core eigenvalue and the fision density distribution.

  4. Catalytic Pyrolysis of Oak via Pyroprobe and Bench Scale, Packed Bed Pyrolysis Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pyrolytic conversion of oak sawdust at 500°C in flowing He over eight proprietary catalysts is described and compared to the control bed material, quartz sand. The reactions were conducted and compared in two reactors, an analytical, ug-scale pyroprobe reactor and a bench, g-scale packed bed re...

  5. Celebrating 40 years anaerobic sludge bed reactors for industrial wastewater treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Lier, J.B.; Van der Zee, F.P.; Frijters, C.T.M.J.; Ersahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    In the last 40 years, anaerobic sludge bed reactor technology evolved from localized lab-scale trials to worldwide successful implementations at a variety of industries. High-rate sludge bed reactors are characterized by a very small foot print and high applicable volumetric loading rates. Best perf

  6. Nuclear reactors appointment book Uruguay at the moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This essay have included among its chapters Energy and development, fuels, Nuclear Energy, types of Nuclear Reactors, main objections against Power Nuclear Reactors, other Reactors proposals, legal framework and Nuclear safety in Uruguay

  7. Seismic Design of Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In case the requirement of design is against natural phenomena, it is important to grasp the detailed characteristics of the natural phenomena for the proper design, and as the grasp is more strict and accurate, the design of high adaptability or durability to the requirement can be done. The aseismatic design of nuclear reactors is similar to it, and the decision of the magnitude of supposed earthquakes is important. The aseismatic design of nuclear power stations in Japan has been carried out in conformity with the national guideline for examining the aseismatic design. The aseismatic design of nuclear reactors is carried out in the order of the survey of geological features, ground and earthquakes, the determination of the input magnitude and characteristics of earthquakes, the formation of simulated earthquake waves, the analysis of the response of buildings and structures to earthquakes, and structural analysis. The decision of input earthquakes is done by the detailed historical earthquake data based on local features and the survey of geological features and ground. The determination of earthquake input, the analysis of earthquake response and structural analysis, and the other features of the aseismatic design are explained. (K.I.)

  8. Comments on nuclear reactor safety in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chalk River Technicians and Technologists Union representing 500 technical employees at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories of AECL submit comments on nuclear reactor safety to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review. Issues identified by the Review Commissioner are addressed from the perspective of both a labour organization and experience in the nuclear R and D field. In general, Local 1568 believes Ontario's CANDU nuclear reactors are not only safe but also essential to the continued economic prosperity of the province

  9. Pebble bed reactor with one-zone core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The claim deals with measures to differentiate the flow rate and to remove spherical fuel elements in the core of a pebble bed reactor. Hence the vertical rate of the fuel elements in the border region is for example twice as much as in the centre. A central funnel-shaped outlet on the floor of the core container over which a conical body is placed with its peak pointing upwards, or also the forming of several outlets can be used to adjust to a certain exit rate for the fuel elements. The main target of the invention is a radially extensively constant coolant outlet temperature at the outlet of the core which determines the effectiveness of the connected heat exchanger and thus contributes to economy. (orig./PW)

  10. Simulation of the pebble bed modular reactor natural air convection passive heat removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooling of the Pebble Bed Nuclear Reactor under evaluation in South Africa is primarily effected by the flow of helium through the cavity which contains the nuclear fuel. However, apart from this, a certain amount of heat flows from the reactor cavity, through the graphite barrel and reactor vessel to the containment building and ultimately to the environment During normal operation this passive heat loss represents approximately 1MW for a 100MW reactor and constitutes an undesirable loss of power. In the event of a shutdown or loss of main coolant, however, this passive heat removal is relied upon to remove the decay heat from the core. A study was initiated to simulate the process of this heat removal to provide an indication of the maximum vessel temperature and power transfers after shutdown. However, there is a lack of precise data indicating values for thermal conductivity, heat transfer coefficients, heat capacities or even densities. This paper describes the assumptions made and the manner in which these data were estimated so as to provide what is hoped to be a reasonably accurate estimate of the behaviour of the passive heat removal process. (author)

  11. Thermofluid effect on energy storage in fluidized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoudi, Nadjiba; El Ganaoui, Mohammed; Moummi, Abdelhafid

    2016-05-01

    The development of innovative systems of heat storage is imperative to improve the efficiency of the existing systems used in the thermal solar energy applications. Several techniques were developed and realized in this context. The technology of the sand fluidized bed (sandTES) offers a promising alternative to the current state-of-the-art of the heat storage systems, such as fixed bed using a storage materials, as sand, ceramic, and stones, etc. Indeed, the use of the fluidization technique allows an effective heat transfer to the solid particles. With the sand, an important capacity of storage is obtained by an economic and ecological material [N. Mahfoudi, A. Moummi, M. El Ganaoui, Appl. Mech. Mater. 621, 214 (2014); N. Mahfoudi, A. Khachkouch, A. Moummi B. Benhaoua, M. El Ganaoui, Mech. Ind. 16, 411 (2015); N. Mahfoudi, A. Moummi, M. El Ganaoui, F. Mnasri, K.M. Aboudou, 3e Colloque internationale Francophone d"énergétique et mécanique, Comores, 2014, p. 91]. This paper presents a CFD simulation of the hydrodynamics and the thermal transient behavior of a fluidized bed reactor of sand, to determine the characteristics of storage. The simulation shows a symmetry breaking that occurs and gave way to chaotic transient generation of bubble formation after 3 s. Furthermore, the predicted average temperature of the solid phase (sand) increases gradually versus the time with a gain of 1 °C in an interval of 10 s. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage (ICOME 2015) - Elected submissions", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  12. Continuous thermophilic biohydrogen production in packed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Continuous H2 production in whole cell immobilized system was compared with CSTR. • Suitability of environment friendly support matrix for immobilization of whole cells was explored. • Pack bed reactor showed higher stability as compared to CSTR at lower HRTs. • Flow cytometry study showed the influence of recycle ratio on viability of cells. • Novel approach to find out the effect of NADH/NAD+ ratio during H2 production. - Abstract: The present research work deals with the performance of packed bed reactor for continuous H2 production using cane molasses as a carbon source. Maximum H2 production rate of 1.7 L L−1 h−1 was observed at a dilution rate and recycle ratio of 0.8 h−1 and 0.6, respectively which was corresponding to the lowest NADH/NAD+ ratio. This suggests that the utilization of NADH pool for H2 and metabolite production might lead to decrement in NADH/NAD+ ratio. Thus NADH/NAD+ ratio show inverse relation with hydrogen production. The substrate degradation kinetics was investigated as a function of flow rate considering the external film diffusion model. At a flow rate of 245 mL h−1, the contribution of external film mass transfer coefficient and first order substrate degradation constant were 55.4% and 44.6% respectively. Recycle ratio of 0.6 improved the hydrogen production rates by 9%. The viable cell count was directly proportional to the recycle ratio (within the range 0.1–0.6). Taguchi design showed the significant influence of the feed pH on continuous H2 production followed by dilution rate and recycle ratio. Thus environmentally friendly and cheaper solid matrix like coconut coir could be efficiently used for thermophilic continuous hydrogen production

  13. Artificial intelligence in nuclear reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of four real fuzzy control applications at the MIT research reactor in the US, the FUGEN heavy water reactor in Japan, the BR1 research reactor in Belgium, and a TRIGA Mark III reactor in Mexico will be examined through a SWOT analysis (strengths, weakness, opportunities, and threats). Special attention will be paid to the current cooperation between the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK·CEN) and the Mexican Nuclear Centre (ININ) on AI-based intelligent control for nuclear reactor operation under the partial support of the National Council for Science and Technology of Mexico (CONACYT). (authors)

  14. Molten salts in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collection of references dealing with the physicochemical studies of fused salts, in particular the alkali and alkali earth halides. Numerous binary, ternary and quaternary systems of these halides with those of uranium and thorium are examined, and the physical properties, density, viscosity, vapour pressure etc... going from the halides to the mixtures are also considered. References relating to the corrosion of materials by these salts are included and the treatment of the salts with a view to recuperation after irradiation in a nuclear reactor is discussed. (author)

  15. Internal structure for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The description is given of an internal structure for a nuclear reactor of the type having inside a presssure vessel a core composed of a number of fuel assemblies and a number of mobile control components. It includes a bottom grid integral with the vessel on which are secured the fuel assemblies, an intermediate grid located above the assemblies and also integral with the vessel, an upper grid located at the upper part of the vessel and integral with it and multiple vertical maintenance devices, extending between the upper and intermediate grids

  16. Particle bed reactor propulsion vehicle performance and characteristics as an orbital transfer rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The particle bed reactor designed for 100 to 300 MW power output using hydrogen as a coolant is capable of specific impulses up to 1000 seconds as a nuclear rocket. A single space shuttle compatible vehicle can perform extensive missions from LEO to 3 times GEO and return with multi-ton payloads. The use of hydrogen to directly cool particulate reactor fuel results in a compact, lightweight rocket vehicle, whose duration of usefulness is dependent only upon hydrogen resupply availability. The LEO to GEO mission had a payload capability of 15.4 metric tons with 3.4 meters of shuttle bay. To increase the volume limitation of the shuttle bay, the use of ammonia in the initial boost phase from LEO is used to give greater payload volume with a small decrease in payload mass, 8.7 meters and 12.7 m-tons. 5 refs., 15 figs

  17. Autonomous Control of Space Nuclear Reactors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nuclear reactors to support future robotic and manned missions impose new and innovative technological requirements for their control and protection...

  18. The application problems of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latvia is surrounded by closely located nuclear reactors. In a distance of 1000 km from Latvia there are 62 working and 12 suspended high power nuclear reactors. Near the borders of Latvia, in the 3 km range four countries are exploiting 12 nuclear reactors, whose reliability and safe operation is always arousing profound interest in our community. On estimating the prospects of Latvian energetics we can conclude that at the beginning of the next century it will be extremely complicated task to supply our country with electricity and heat without nuclear reactors. This is due to lack of the domestic energy resources and to the necessity of reducing harmful pollutions of TECs. (authors)

  19. Nuclear reactor built, being built, or planned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1990. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE, from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations, from US and foreign embassies, and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book is divided into three major sections: Section 1 consists of a reactor locator map and reactor tables; Section 2 includes nuclear reactors that are operating, being built, or planned; and Section 3 includes reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. Sections 2 and 3 contain the following classification of reactors: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly

  20. Transmutation of plutonium in pebble bed type high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pebble bed type High Temperature Reactor (HTR) has been studied as a uranium-free burner of reactor grade plutonium. In a parametric study, the plutonium loading per pebble as well as the type and size of the coated particles (CPs) have been varied to determine the plutonium consumption, the final plutonium burnup, the k∞ and the temperature coefficients as a function of burnup. The plutonium loading per pebble is bounded between 1 and 3 gr Pu per pebble. The upper limit is imposed by the maximal allowable fast fluence for the CPs. A higher plutonium loading requires a longer irradiation time to reach a desired burnup, so that the CPs are exposed to a higher fast fluence. The lower limit is determined by the temperature coefficients, which become less negative with increasing moderator-actinide ratio. A burnup of about 600 MWd/kgHM can be reached. With the HTR's high efficiency of 40%, a plutonium supply of 1520 kg/GWea is achieved. The discharges of plutonium and minor actinides are then 450 and 110 kg/GWea, respectively. (author)

  1. Moving bed biofilm reactor technology: process applications, design, and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, James P; Boltz, Joshua P

    2011-06-01

    The moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) can operate as a 2- (anoxic) or 3-(aerobic) phase system with buoyant free-moving plastic biofilm carriers. These systems can be used for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment, aquaculture, potable water denitrification, and, in roughing, secondary, tertiary, and sidestream applications. The system includes a submerged biofilm reactor and liquid-solids separation unit. The MBBR process benefits include the following: (1) capacity to meet treatment objectives similar to activated sludge systems with respect to carbon-oxidation and nitrogen removal, but requires a smaller tank volume than a clarifier-coupled activated sludge system; (2) biomass retention is clarifier-independent and solids loading to the liquid-solids separation unit is reduced significantly when compared with activated sludge systems; (3) the MBBR is a continuous-flow process that does not require a special operational cycle for biofilm thickness, L(F), control (e.g., biologically active filter backwashing); and (4) liquid-solids separation can be achieved with a variety of processes, including conventional and compact high-rate processes. Information related to system design is fragmented and poorly documented. This paper seeks to address this issue by summarizing state-of-the art MBBR design procedures and providing the reader with an overview of some commercially available systems and their components. PMID:21751715

  2. Solid particle mixing in a continuously operated fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittmann, K.; Wippern, D.; Schlingmann, H.; Helmrich, H.; Schuegerl, K.

    1983-01-01

    In a bench-scale fluidized bed reactor, 20 cm in dia., residence time distribution of solid particles (d/sub p/ = 137 ..mu..m) were measured by the radionuclide technique sodium carbonate (/sup 24/Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) in the absence and in the presence of the chemical reaction sodium bicarbonate (2NaHCO/sub 3/) ..-->.. Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ + CO/sub 2/ + H/sub 2/O. The residence time distributions were evaluated by a backflow cascade model by nonlinear optimization. The radial and longitudinal concentration profiles of NaHCO/sub 3/ in the emulsion phase of the reactor were measured during steady-state operation. The solid is well-mixed. The connection of the measured bubble properties with the longitudinal solid dispersion coefficient and the use of the Haines-King-Woodburn model allows one to calculate the solid dispersion coefficient in the bubble-free emulsion phase. 6 figures, 5 tables.

  3. New advanced small and medium nuclear power reactors: possible nuclear power plants for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years interest has increased in small and medium sized nuclear power reactors for generating electricity and process heat. This interest has been driven by a desire to reduce capital costs, construction times and interest during construction, service remote sites and ease integration into small grids. The IAEA has recommended that the term 'small' be applied to reactors with a net electrical output less than 300 MWe and the term 'medium' to 300-700 MWe. A large amount of experience has been gained over 50 years in the design, construction and operation of small and medium nuclear power reactors. Historically, 100% of commercial reactors were in these categories in 1951-1960, reducing to 21% in 1991-2000. The technologies involved include pressurised water reactors, boiling water reactors, high temperature gas-cooled reactors, liquid metal reactors and molten salt reactors. Details will be provided of two of the most promising new designs, the South African Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) of about 110 MWe, and the IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) reactor of about 335 MWe. Their construction costs are estimated to be about US$l,000/kWe with a generating cost for the PBMR of about US1.6c/kWh. These costs are lower than estimated for the latest designs of large reactors such as the European Pressurised Reactor (EPR) designed for 1,600 MWe for use in Europe in the next decade. It is concluded that a small or medium nuclear power reactor system built in modules to follow an increasing demand could be attractive for generating low cost electricity in many Australian states and reduce problems arising from air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from burning fossil fuels

  4. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reference is made to liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors of the 'pool' type. In such reactors the core, the heat exchangers, and the coolant circulating pumps are submerged in a pool of liquid metal. In operation of the reactor it is necessary to be able to locate and identify components submerged in the pool, and before moving rotating shields in the roof of the pool-containing vault it is necessary to ensure that all the normally suspended absorber rods have been inserted in the core and released from their suspensions. Television cameras are unsuitable for use in the opaque liquid metal but ultrasound in the megahertz range has been used to give a television screen kind of display. There is some difficulty, however, in transmitting ultrasound signals from a transducer into the pool of coolant because the transducer must be protected from the high temperature environment of the coolant. This difficulty has been partially overcome, however, by transmitting the signals by way of a wave guide extending from the transducer into the coolant pool. Such a wave guide may comprise a column of liquid metal within a dip tube. The column of liquid coolant is uninterrupted by a supporting diaphragm. Such a system is here described. (U.K.)

  5. Development of a thermal–hydraulic analysis code for the Pebble Bed Water-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Main design features of the PBWR were put forward. ► Thermal–hydraullics analysis code for the PBWR was developed and verified. ► Key thermal–hydraullics parameters were calculated in normal operation. ► The PBWR has a great pressure loss but an excellent heat transfer characteristic. ► Maximum fuel temperature and MDNBR are in conformity with safety criterion. - Abstract: The Pebble Bed Water-cooled Reactor (PBWR) is a water-moderated water-cooled pebble bed reactor in which millions of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) coated micro-fuel elements (MFE) pile in each assembly. Light water is used as coolant that flows from bottom to top in the assembly while the moderator water flows in the reverse direction out of the assembly. Steady-state thermal–hydraullic analysis code for the PBWR will provide a set of thermal hydraulic parameters of the primary loop so that heat transported out of the core can match with the heat generated by the core for a safe operation of the reactor. The key parameters of the core including the void fraction, pressure drop, heat transfer coefficients, the temperature distribution and the Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR) is calculated for the core in normal operation. The code can calculate for liquid region, water-steam two phase region and superheated steam region. The results show that the maximum fuel temperature is much lower than the design limitation and the flow distribution can meet the cooling requirement in the reactor core. As a new type of nuclear reactor, the main design features with a sufficient safety margin were also put forward in this paper.

  6. Decommissioning of nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decision-making process involving the decommissioning of the British graphite-moderated, gas-cooled Magnox power stations is complex. There are timing, engineering, waste disposal, cost and lost generation capacity factors and the ultimate uptake of radiation dose to consider and, bearing on all of these, the overall decision of when and how to proceed with decommissioning may be heavily weighed by political and public tolerance dimensions. These factors and dimensions are briefly reviewed with reference to the ageing Magnox nuclear power stations, of which Berkeley and Hunterston A are now closed down and undergoing the first stages of decommissioning and Trawsfynydd, although still considered as available capacity, has had both reactors closed down since February 1991 and is awaiting substantiation and acceptance of a revised reactor pressure vessel safety case. Although the other first-generation Magnox power station at Hinkley Point, Bradwell, Dungeness and Sizewell are operational, it is most doubtful that these stations will be able to eke out a generating function for much longer. It is concluded that the British nuclear industry has adopted a policy of deferred decommissioning, that is delaying the process of complete dismantlement of the radioactive components and assemblies for at least one hundred years following close-down of the plant. (Author)

  7. Neutronic modeling of pebble bed reactors in APOLLO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis we develop a new iterative homogenization technique for pebble bed reactors, based on a 'macro-stochastic' transport approximation in the collision probability method. A model has been developed to deal with the stochastic distribution of pebbles with different burnup in the core, considering spectral differences in homogenization and depletion calculations. This is generally not done in the codes presently used for pebble bed analyses, where a pebble with average isotopic composition is considered to perform the cell calculation. Also an iterative core calculation scheme has been set up, where the low-order RZ SN full-core calculation computes the entering currents in the spectrum zones subdividing the core. These currents, together with the core keff, are then used as surface source in the fine-group heterogeneous calculation of the multi-pebble geometries. The developed method has been verified using reference Monte Carlo simulations of a simplified PBMR- 400 model. The pebbles in this model are individually positioned and have different randomly assigned burnup values. The APOLLO2 developed method matches the reference core keff within ± 100 pcm, with relative differences on the production shape factors within ± 4%, and maximum discrepancy of 3% at the hotspot. Moreover, the first criticality experiment of the HTR-10 reactor was used to perform a first validation of the developed model. The computed critical number of pebbles to be loaded in the core is very close to the experimental value of 16890, only 77 pebbles less. A method to calculate the equilibrium reactor state was also developed and applied to analyze the simplified PBMR-400 model loaded with different fuel types (UO2, Pu, Pu + MA). The potential of the APOLLO2 method to compute different fluxes for the different pebble types of a multi-pebble geometry was used to evaluate the bias committed by the average composition pebble approximation. Thanks to a 'compensation of error', this

  8. Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors, establishes reactor safety requirements to assure that reactors are sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that adequately protects health and safety and is in accordance with uniform standards, guides, and codes which are consistent with those applied to comparable licensed reactors. This document identifies nuclear safety criteria applied to NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] licensed reactors. The titles of the chapters and sections of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.70, Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Rev. 3, are used as the format for compiling the NRC criteria applied to the various areas of nuclear safety addressed in a safety analysis report for a nuclear reactor. In each section the criteria are compiled in four groups: (1) Code of Federal Regulations, (2) US NRC Regulatory Guides, SRP Branch Technical Positions and Appendices, (3) Codes and Standards, and (4) Supplemental Information. The degree of application of these criteria to a DOE-owned reactor, consistent with their application to comparable licensed reactors, must be determined by the DOE and DOE contractor

  9. The fluidized bed reactor with a prepolymerization system and its influence on polymer physicochemical characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    F. A. N. Fernandes; L. M. F. Lona

    2003-01-01

    This work addresses the influence of a prepolymerization system on the behavior of the fluidized bed reactor used for polyethylene production. Its influence on the polymer's physicochemical characteristics and production was also studied. The results indicate that the use of prepolymerized catalyst particles results in milder temperatures in the fluidized bed reactor, thus avoiding the formation of hot spots, melting of the polymer particle and reactor shutdown. Productivity can be enhanced d...

  10. Pebble Bed Reactor Plant screening evaluation. Volume 1. Overall plant and reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report consists of three volumes which describe the design concepts and screening evaluation for a 3000 MW/sub t/ Pebble Bed Reactor Multiplex Plant (PBR-MX). The Multiplex plant produces both electricity and transportable chemical energy via the thermochemical pipeline (TCP). The evaluation was limited to a direct cycle plant which has the steam generators and steam reformers in the primary circuit. Volume 1 reports the overall plant and reactor system. Core scoping studies were performed which evaluated the effects of annular and cyclindrical core configurations, radial blanket zones, burnup, and ball heavy metal loadings. The reactor system, including the PCRV, was investigated for both the annular and cylindrical core configurations

  11. Safeguards Challenges for Pebble-Bed Reactors (PBRs):Peoples Republic of China (PRC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, Charles W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Moses, David Lewis [ORNL

    2009-11-01

    The Peoples Republic of China (PRC) is operating the HTR-10 pebble-bed reactor (PBR) and is in the process of building a prototype PBR plant with two modular reactors (250-MW(t) per reactor) feeding steam to a single turbine-generator. It is likely to be the first modular hightemperature reactor to be ready for commercial deployment in the world because it is a highpriority project for the PRC. The plant design features multiple modular reactors feeding steam to a single turbine generator where the number of modules determines the plant output. The design and commercialization strategy are based on PRC strengths: (1) a rapidly growing electric market that will support low-cost mass production of modular reactor units and (2) a balance of plant system based on economics of scale that uses the same mass-produced turbine-generator systems used in PRC coal plants. If successful, in addition to supplying the PRC market, this strategy could enable China to be the leading exporter of nuclear reactors to developing countries. The modular characteristics of the reactor match much of the need elsewhere in the world. PBRs have major safety advantages and a radically different fuel. The fuel, not the plant systems, is the primary safety system to prevent and mitigate the release of radionuclides under accident conditions. The fuel consists of small (6-cm) pebbles (spheres) containing coatedparticle fuel in a graphitized carbon matrix. The fuel loading per pebble is small (~9 grams of low-enriched uranium) and hundreds of thousands of pebbles are required to fuel a nuclear plant. The uranium concentration in the fuel is an order of magnitude less than in traditional nuclear fuels. These characteristics make the fuel significantly less attractive for illicit use (weapons production or dirty bomb); but, its unusual physical form may require changes in the tools used for safeguards. This report describes PBRs, what is different, and the safeguards challenges. A series of

  12. Passively safe nuclear reactors: Issues and impact on fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modular reactors with passive safety features may be an attractive option for the next generation of nuclear power plants. The motivation behind this approach is explained, and several alternative reactor designs are introduced for further discussion. Some specific issues are addressed concerning one of the alternative concepts - the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). Issues of on-line refueling and reactivity margin are discussed, and a study of burnable poison is proposed. The FUPAR computer code is described, which can be utilized with the existing VSOP code to create a probabilistic description of the pebble bed for core analysis and fuel studies. The authors conclude that the MHTGR offers substantial promise when compared with other passively safe reactor concepts

  13. Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a compilation and source list of nuclear safety criteria that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) applies to licensed reactors; it can be used by DOE and DOE contractors to identify NRC criteria to be evaluated for application to the DOE reactors under their cognizance. The criteria listed are those that are applied to the areas of nuclear safety addressed in the safety analysis report of a licensed reactor. They are derived from federal regulations, USNRC regulatory guides, Standard Review Plan (SRP) branch technical positions and appendices, and industry codes and standards

  14. Proliferation Resistant Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global appetite for fission power is projected to grow dramatically this century, and for good reason. Despite considerable research to identify new sources of energy, fission remains the most plentiful and practical alternative to fossil fuels. The environmental challenges of fossil fuel have made the fission power option increasingly attractive, particularly as we are forced to rely on reserves in ecologically fragile or politically unstable corners of the globe. Caught between a globally eroding fossil fuel reserve as well as the uncertainty and considerable costs in the development of fusion power, most of the world will most likely come to rely on fission power for at least the remainder of the 21st century. Despite inevitable growth, fission power faces enduring challenges in sustainability and security. One of fission power's greatest hurdles to universal acceptance is the risk of potential misuse for nefarious purposes of fissionable byproducts in spent fuel, such as plutonium. With this issue in mind, we have discussed intrinsic concepts in this report that are motivated by the premise that the utility, desirability, and applicability of nuclear materials can be reduced. In a general sense, the intrinsic solutions aim to reduce or eliminate the quantity of existing weapons usable material; avoid production of new weapons-usable material through enrichment, breeding, extraction; or employ engineering solutions to make the fuel cycle less useful or more difficult for producing weapons-usable material. By their nature, these schemes require modifications to existing fuel cycles. As such, the concomitants of these modifications require engagement from the nuclear reactor and fuel-design community to fully assess their effects. Unfortunately, active pursuit of any scheme that could further complicate the spread of domestic nuclear power will probably be understandably unpopular. Nevertheless, the nonproliferation and counterterrorism issues are paramount, and

  15. Steady-state thermal-hydraulic of pebble bed blanket on hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives thermal-hydraulic studies of pebble bed blanket on Hybrid Reactor. The concept of whole pebble bed blanket and the cooling methods are presented. The thermal-hydraulic characteristics of pebble bed are summarized. The theoretical model and code for solving heat transfer and flowing are presented. By using this code the calculation and analysis of thermal hydraulic of pebble bed Blanket of Hybrid Reactor are also given. In order to improve the flexibility, safety and economy, the authors select pebble beds not only to breed Tritium, but also to breed fission material and to multiply neutron. 5 MPa Helium is used as coolant and 0.05 MPa-0.1 MPa Helium is used as Purge gas. The heat transfer mechanisms of pebble bed are very complicated which include conduction, convection and radiation. In order to study the thermal-hydraulic of the bed, the authors just simply consider it as homogeneous and continuous binary phase medium as that used in the porous medium at the condition that the size of the bed is much greater than that of the balls. The coolant or the purge gas flowing through the bed is just considered existing a cooling source in the bed. It also significantly influences the effective conductivity's of the bed. Porous fraction, the main factor of the bed depends on the geometry position and parameters. From this model, one can obtain the thermal-hydraulic governing equations of the bed

  16. Sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming in fluidized bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, Kim

    2006-10-15

    Hydrogen is considered to be an important potential energy carrier; however, its advantages are unlikely to be realized unless efficient means can be found to produce it without generation of CO{sub 2}. Sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming (SE-SMR) represent a novel, energy-efficient hydrogen production route with in situ CO{sub 2} capture, shifting the reforming and water gas shift reactions beyond their conventional thermodynamic limits. The use of fluidized bed reactors for SE-SMR has been investigated. Arctic dolomite, a calcium-based natural sorbent, was chosen as the primary CO{sub 2}-acceptor in this study due to high absorption capacity, relatively high reaction rate and low cost. An experimental investigation was conducted in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor of diameter 0.1 m, which was operated cyclically and batch wise, alternating between reforming/carbonation conditions and higher-temperature calcination conditions. Hydrogen concentrations of >98 mole% on a dry basis were reached at 600 C and 1 atm, for superficial gas velocities in the range of {approx}0.03-0.1 m/s. Multiple reforming-regeneration cycles showed that the hydrogen concentration remained at {approx}98 mole% after four cycles. The total production time was reduced with an increasing number of cycles due to loss of CO{sub 2}-uptake capacity of the dolomite, but the reaction rates of steam reforming and carbonation seemed to be unaffected for the conditions investigated. A modified shrinking core model was applied for deriving carbonation kinetics of Arctic dolomite, using experimental data from a novel thermo gravimetric reactor. An apparent activation energy of 32.6 kj/mole was found from parameter fitting, which is in good agreement with previous reported results. The derived rate expression was able to predict experimental conversion up to {approx}30% very well, whereas the prediction of higher conversion levels was poorer. However, the residence time of sorbent in a continuous

  17. Flow visualization techniques in nuclear reactors, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat energy generated in nuclear reactors is transferred by coolants to utilizing systems such as electric power and process industries etc. Therefore, heat removal characteristics of nuclear reactors depends on flow conditions of coolants in a reactor core and in cooling systems. In order to make clear flow patterns of these coolants, the flow visualization method is often applied prior to actual measurements of pressure, velocity and so on. This paper describes basic techniques for flow visualization especially in nuclear reactor, and gives applied examples of this technique. (author)

  18. Problems of nuclear reactor safety. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of the 9. Topical Meeting 'Problems of nuclear reactor safety' are presented. Papers include results of studies and developments associated with methods of calculation and complex computerized simulation for stationary and transient processes in nuclear power plants. Main problems of reactor safety are discussed as well as rector accidents on operating NPP's are analyzed

  19. Nuclear reactor simulator for a teaching laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosilov, A.N. (Moscow Engineering Physics Inst. (USSR))

    A nuclear reactor simulator is described which has been developed by the Department of Automatics and Telemechanics of the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute to provide students with an insight into, and familiarity with the characteristics of a nuclear reactor and its systems through evaluation, manipulation and experimentation.

  20. Stable hydrogen production by methane steam reforming in a two zone fluidized bed reactor: Experimental assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Moreno, L.; Soler, J.; Herguido, J.; Menéndez, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Two Zone Fluidized Bed Reactor concept is proposed for hydrogen production via the steam reforming of methane (SRM) including integrated catalyst regeneration. In order to study the effect of the contact mode, the oxidative SRM has been carried out over a Ni/Al2O3 catalyst using a fixed bed reactor (fBR), a conventional fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) and the proposed two-zone fluidized bed reactor (TZFBR). The technical feasibility of these reactors has been studied experimentally, investigating their performance (CH4 conversion, CO and H2 selectivity, and H2 global yield) and stability under different operating conditions. Coke generation in the process has been verified by several techniques. A stable performance was obtained in the TZFBR, where coke formation was counteracted with continuous catalyst regeneration. The viability of the TZFBR for carrying out this process with a valuable global yield to hydrogen is demonstrated.

  1. Nitrification of industrial and domestic saline wastewaters in moving bed biofilm reactor and sequencing batch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrification of saline wastewaters was investigated in bench-scale moving-bed biofilm reactors (MBBR). Wastewater from a chemical industry and domestic sewage, both treated by the activated sludge process, were fed to moving-bed reactors. The industrial wastewater contained 8000 mg Cl-/L and the salinity of the treated sewage was gradually increased until that level. Residual substances present in the treated industrial wastewater had a strong inhibitory effect on the nitrification process. Assays to determine inhibitory effects were performed with the industrial wastewater, which was submitted to ozonation and carbon adsorption pretreatments. The latter treatment was effective for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal and improved nitrification efficiency. Nitrification percentage of the treated domestic sewage was higher than 90% for all tested chloride concentrations up to 8000 mg/L. Results obtained in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) were consistent with those attained in the MBBR systems, allowing tertiary nitrification and providing adequate conditions for adaptation of nitrifying microorganisms even under stressing and inhibitory conditions.

  2. Acacia: A small scale power plant with pebble bed cartridge reactor and indirect Brayton cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For markets other than large-scale electricity production a 60 MWth, 23 MWe (max.) nuclear plant design with an indirect Brayton cycle is proposed for application on the short to medium term. The reactor will be cooled by helium, whereas for the secondary cycle nitrogen is proposed as a heat carrier. In this way, a conventional air based gas turbine can be applied, while at the same time excluding the scenario of air ingress in the reactor core through a heat exchanger leak. Two variations of cycle design will be discussed: co-generation and maximized electricity production. The cogeneration mode will be elaborated for the application of seawater desalination. The reactor core geometry is annular with a central graphite reflector region, creating an optimal location for burnable poison. Optimization calculations on burnable poison distribution show that burnup of fuel and poison are balancing each other into a fairly constant reactivity behaviour during the entire core lifetime. Also, the two most important safety transient scenarios for pebble bed reactors, Pressurised and Depressurised Loss Of Forced Cooling, will be discussed. It will be shown that the maximum fuel temperatures will stay below the level where fuel damage starts for any point in time. (author)

  3. Nuclear reactor fuel rod spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spacer for positioning at least the four corner fuel rods in a tubular flow channel of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The spacer comprises a support member having four side bands interconnected by four corner bands to form a unitary structure. Each of the side bands has a L-shaped lobe adjacent to each of its ends with one leg of each lobe extending to the adjacent end of its side band. Each of the corner bands is narrower than the side bands and is offset so as to be spaced from the lobe. One leg of each lobe is positioned to engage the tubular flow channel to maintain proper spacing between the flow channel and the adjacent corner fuel rod and to improve the thermal-hydraulic performance of the spacer

  4. Nuclear reactor internals alignment configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Singleton, Norman R.

    2009-11-10

    An alignment system that employs jacking block assemblies and alignment posts around the periphery of the top plate of a nuclear reactor lower internals core shroud to align an upper core plate with the lower internals and the core shroud with the core barrel. The distal ends of the alignment posts are chamfered and are closely received within notches machined in the upper core plate at spaced locations around the outer circumference of the upper core plate. The jacking block assemblies are used to center the core shroud in the core barrel and the alignment posts assure the proper orientation of the upper core plate. The alignment posts may alternately be formed in the upper core plate and the notches may be formed in top plate.

  5. Emergency cooling system for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upon loss of coolant in a nuclear reactor as when a coolant supply or return line breaks, or both lines break, borated liquid coolant from an emergency source is supplied in an amount to absorb heat being generated in the reactor even after the control rods have been inserted. The liquid coolant flows from pressurized storage vessels outside the reactor to an internal manifold from which it is distributed to unused control rod guide thimbles in the reactor fuel assemblies. (author)

  6. Thermal-hydraulic transient analysis of a packed particle bed reactor fuel element

    OpenAIRE

    Casey, William Emerson

    1990-01-01

    Title as it appears in the M.I.T. Graduate List, Jun. 4, 1990: Transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of a packed particle bed reactor fuel element A model which describes the thermal-hydraulic behavior of a packed particle bed reactor fuel element is developed and compared to a reference standard. The model represents a step toward a thermal-hydraulic module for a real-time, autonomous reactor powder controller. The general configuration of the fuel element is a bed of small (diameter about...

  7. Noise thermometry in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since in nuclear reactors the measuring sensor cannot be easily replaced, the value of the sensor resistance, as well as the selection of transmission lines with respect to good transmission characteristics of the whole arrangement and minimizing the correlative error terms, must already be optimized when designing a noise thermometer arrangement. The TRARAU computer program was developed for this purpose enabling the influences of the lines to be computed by taking into consideration all the effects occurring through the lines, such as transmission errors and correlative error terms. In order to check the accuracy of the TRARAU computer program a series of laboratory measurements were implemented enabling both the pure transmission behaviour of the line arrangement with respect to the measuring signal to be detected, as well as the overall line error. In all cases this resulted in a very good agreement of the measured values with the computed values. The transmission behaviour of noise thermometer arrangements occuring in practice were studied with the example of two reactor experiments. In both cases it was possible to demonstrate successfully the potential of the computer program TRARAU. As the parametric studies have shown, optimum matching over unlimited band widths is not feasible in principle. By reducing the upper band limit, however, the line error can practically always be kept sufficiently small. With good matching larger band widths can also be used. (orig./HP)

  8. Nuclear reactor safety research in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : The paper summarizes activities being implemented by the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan in support of safe operation of nuclear reactors; shows its crucial efforts and further road map in this line. As is known, the world community considers nuclear reactor safety as one of the urgent research areas. Kazakhstan has been pursuing studies in support of nuclear energy safety since early 80s. The findings allow to coordinate available computational methods and design new ones while validating new NPP Projects and making analysis for reactor installations available

  9. Raising distillate selectivity and catalyst life time in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis by using a novel dual-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a novel dual bed reactor Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was studied by using two diff rent cobalt catalysts. An alkali-promoted cobalt catalyst was used in the first bed of a fixed-bed reactor followed by a Raiment promoted cobalt catalyst in the second bed. The activity, product selectivity and accelerated deactivation of the system were assessed and compared with a conventional single bed reactor system. The methane selectivity in the dual-bed reactor was about 18.9% less compared to that of the single-bed reactor. The C5+ selectivity for the dual-bed reactor was 10.9% higher than that of the single-bed reactor. Accelerated deactivation of the catalysts in the dual-bed reactor was 42% lower than that of the single-bed reactor. It was revealed that the amount of catalysts activity recovery after regeneration at 400degC in the dual-bed system is higher than that of the single-bed system

  10. Packed bed reactor treatment of liquid hazardous and mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are developing thermal-based packed bed reactor (PBR) technology as an alternative to incineration for treatment of hazardous organic liquid wastes. The waste streams targeted by this technology are machining fluids contaminated with chlorocarbons and/or chlorofluorocarbons and low levels of plutonium or tritium The PBR offers several distinct advantages including simplistic design, rugged construction, ambient pressure processing, economical operations, as well as ease of scalability and maintainability. In this paper, we provide a description of the apparatus as well as test results using prepared mixtures of machining oils/emulsions with trichloroethylene (TCE), carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), trichloroethane (TCA), and Freon TF. The current treatment system is configured as a two stage device with the PBR (1st stage) coupled to a silent discharge plasma (SDP) cell. The SDP serves as a second stage for further treatment of the gaseous effluent from the PBR. One of the primary advantages of this two stage system is that its suitability for closed loop operation where radioactive components are well contained and even CO2 is not released to the environment

  11. Daddy, What's a Nuclear Reactor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No matter what we think of the nuclear industry, it is part of mankind's heritage. The decommissioning process is slowly making facilities associated with this industry disappear and not enough is being done to preserve the information for future generations. This paper provides some food for thought and provides a possible way forward. Industrial archaeology is an ever expanding branch of archaeology that is dedicated to preserving, interpreting and documenting our industrial past and heritage. Normally it begins with analyzing an old building or ruins and trying to determine what was done, how it was done and what changes might have occurred during its operation. We have a unique opportunity to document all of these issues and provide them before the nuclear facility disappears. Entombment is an acceptable decommissioning strategy; however we would have to change our concept of entombment. It is proposed that a number of nuclear facilities be entombed or preserved for future generations to appreciate. This would include a number of different types of facilities such as different types of nuclear power and research reactors, a reprocessing plant, part of an enrichment plant and a fuel manufacturing plant. One of the main issues that would require resolution would be that of maintaining information of the location of the buried facility and the information about its operation and structure, and passing this information on to future generations. This can be done, but a system would have to be established prior to burial of the facility so that no information would be lost. In general, our current set of requirements and laws may need to be re-examined and modified to take into account these new situations. As an alternative, and to compliment the above proposal, it is recommended that a study and documentation of the nuclear industry be considered as part of twentieth century industrial archaeology. This study should not only include the power and fuel cycle

  12. Nuclear reactor philosophy and criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power plant safety criteria and principles developed in Canada are directed towards minimizing the chance of failure of the fuel and preventing or reducing to an acceptably low level the escape of fission products should fuel failure occur. Safety criteria and practices are set forth in the Reactor Siting Guide, which is based upon the concept of defence in depth. The Guide specifies that design and construction shall follow the best applicable code, standard or practice; the total of all serious process system failures shall not exceed one in three years; special safety systems are to be physically and functionally separate from process systems and each other; and safety systems shall be testable, with unavailability less than 10-3. Doses to the most exposed member of the public due to normal operation, serious process failures, and dual failures are specified. Licensees are also required to consider the effects of extreme conditions due to airplane crashes, explosions, turbine disintegration, pipe burst, and natural disasters. Safety requirements are changing as nuclear power plant designs evolve and in response to social and economic pressures

  13. Modeling-based optimization of a fixed-bed industrial reactor for oxidative dehydrogenation of propane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Darvishi; Razieh Davand; Farhad Khorasheh; Moslem Fattahi

    2016-01-01

    An industrial scale propylene production via oxidative dehydrogenation of propane (ODHP) in multi-tubular re-actors was modeled. Multi-tubular fixed-bed reactor used for ODHP process, employing 10000 of smal diameter tubes immersed in a shel through a proper coolant flows. Herein, a theory-based pseudo-homogeneous model to describe the operation of a fixed bed reactor for the ODHP to correspondence olefin over V2O5/γ-Al2O3 catalyst was presented. Steady state one dimensional model has been developed to identify the operation parameters and to describe the propane and oxygen conversions, gas process and coolant temperatures, as well as other pa-rameters affecting the reactor performance such as pressure. Furthermore, the applied model showed that a double-bed multitubular reactor with intermediate air injection scheme was superior to a single-bed design due to the increasing of propylene selectivity while operating under lower oxygen partial pressures resulting in propane conversion of about 37.3%. The optimized length of the reactor needed to reach 100%conversion of the oxygen was theoretically determined. For the single-bed reactor the optimized length of 11.96 m including 0.5 m of inert section at the entrance region and for the double-bed reactor design the optimized lengths of 5.72 m for the first and 7.32 m for the second reactor were calculated. Ultimately, the use of a distributed oxygen feed with limited number of injection points indicated a significant improvement on the reactor performance in terms of propane conversion and propylene selectivity. Besides, this concept could overcome the reactor run-away temperature problem and enabled operations at the wider range of conditions to obtain enhanced propyl-ene production in an industrial scale reactor.

  14. Requirements of coolants in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study discussed the purposes and types of coolants in nuclear reactors to generate electricity. The major systems and components associated with nuclear reactors are cooling system. There are two major cooling systems utilized to convert the heat generated in the fuel into electrical power. The primary system transfers the heat from the fuel to the steam generator, where the secondary system begins. The steam formed in the steam generator is transferred by the secondary system to the main turbine generator, where it s converted into electricity after passing through the low pressure turbine. There are various coolants used in nuclear reactors-light water, heavy water and liquid metal. The two major types of water-cooled reactors are pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water reactors (BWR) but pressurized water reactors are more in the world. Also discusses this study the reactors and impact of the major nuclear accidents, in the April 1986 disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine was the product operators, and in the March 2011 at the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan was the product of earthquake of magnitude 9.0, the accidents caused the largest uncontrolled radioactive release into the environment.(Author)

  15. Generation III reactors - the nuclear renaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Pressurized Reactor - GEN III+, the PWR type reactor, remains the world's first and currently being built power reactor everywhere. ATMEA1, a new 1,100 MWe pressurized water reactor combines state-of-the art- technology from AREVA and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries to meet the challenges of the nuclear renaissance. Thus, the next evolutionary design of Generation III reactors will be deployed over many decades and will represent a large part of the worldwide fleet throughout the 21st century. Generation III reactors will equip the future NPPs ensuring improved safety and reliability, with passive safety systems and a very low probability for core melt. The Generation III Reactors as 'The Nuclear Renaissance' is presented in the paper. (author)

  16. Proliferation Resistant Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, L W; Moody, K J; Bradley, K S; Lorenzana, H E

    2011-02-18

    Global appetite for fission power is projected to grow dramatically this century, and for good reason. Despite considerable research to identify new sources of energy, fission remains the most plentiful and practical alternative to fossil fuels. The environmental challenges of fossil fuel have made the fission power option increasingly attractive, particularly as we are forced to rely on reserves in ecologically fragile or politically unstable corners of the globe. Caught between a globally eroding fossil fuel reserve as well as the uncertainty and considerable costs in the development of fusion power, most of the world will most likely come to rely on fission power for at least the remainder of the 21st century. Despite inevitable growth, fission power faces enduring challenges in sustainability and security. One of fission power's greatest hurdles to universal acceptance is the risk of potential misuse for nefarious purposes of fissionable byproducts in spent fuel, such as plutonium. With this issue in mind, we have discussed intrinsic concepts in this report that are motivated by the premise that the utility, desirability, and applicability of nuclear materials can be reduced. In a general sense, the intrinsic solutions aim to reduce or eliminate the quantity of existing weapons usable material; avoid production of new weapons-usable material through enrichment, breeding, extraction; or employ engineering solutions to make the fuel cycle less useful or more difficult for producing weapons-usable material. By their nature, these schemes require modifications to existing fuel cycles. As such, the concomitants of these modifications require engagement from the nuclear reactor and fuel-design community to fully assess their effects. Unfortunately, active pursuit of any scheme that could further complicate the spread of domestic nuclear power will probably be understandably unpopular. Nevertheless, the nonproliferation and counterterrorism issues are paramount

  17. Nuclear waste management, reactor decommisioning, nuclear liability and public attitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with several issues that are frequently raised by the public in any discussion of nuclear energy, and explores some aspects of public attitudes towards nuclear-related activities. The characteristics of the three types of waste associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, i.e. mine/mill tailings, reactor wastes and nuclear fuel wastes, are defined, and the methods currently being proposed for their safe handling and disposal are outlined. The activities associated with reactor decommissioning are also described, as well as the Canadian approach to nuclear liability. The costs associated with nuclear waste management, reactor decommissioning and nuclear liability are also discussed. Finally, the issue of public attitudes towards nuclear energy is addressed. It is concluded that a simple and comprehensive information program is needed to overcome many of the misconceptions that exist about nuclear energy and to provide the public with a more balanced information base on which to make decisions

  18. Treatment of domestic wastewater in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor followed by moving bed biofilm reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tawfik, A.; El-Gohary, F.; Temmink, B.G.

    2010-01-01

    The performance of a laboratory-scale sewage treatment system composed of an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) at a temperature of (22-35 A degrees C) was evaluated. The entire treatment system was operated at different hydraulic retention times

  19. The fluidized bed reactor with a prepolymerization system and its influence on polymer physicochemical characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes F.A.N.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the influence of a prepolymerization system on the behavior of the fluidized bed reactor used for polyethylene production. Its influence on the polymer's physicochemical characteristics and production was also studied. The results indicate that the use of prepolymerized catalyst particles results in milder temperatures in the fluidized bed reactor, thus avoiding the formation of hot spots, melting of the polymer particle and reactor shutdown. Productivity can be enhanced depending on the operational conditions used in the prepolymerization reactor.

  20. Nuclear reactor kinetics and plant control

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2013-01-01

    Understanding time-dependent behaviors of nuclear reactors and the methods of their control is essential to the operation and safety of nuclear power plants. This book provides graduate students, researchers, and engineers in nuclear engineering comprehensive information on both the fundamental theory of nuclear reactor kinetics and control and the state-of-the-art practice in actual plants, as well as the idea of how to bridge the two. The first part focuses on understanding fundamental nuclear kinetics. It introduces delayed neutrons, fission chain reactions, point kinetics theory, reactivit

  1. Nuclear reactor steam depressurization valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes improvement in a nuclear reactor plant, an improved steam depressurization valve positioned intermediate along a steam discharge pipe for controlling the venting of steam pressure from the reactor through the pipe. The improvement comprises: a housing including a domed cover forming a chamber and having a partition plate dividing the chamber into a fluid pressure activation compartment and a steam flow control compartment, the valve housing being provided with an inlet connection and an outlet connection in the steam flow control compartment, and a fluid duct in communication with a source of fluid pressure for operating the valve; a valve set mounted within the fluid flow control compartment comprising a cylindrical section surrounding the inlet connection with one end adjoining the connection and having a radially projecting flange at the other end with a contoured extended valve sealing flange provided with an annular valve sealing member, and a valve cylinder traversing the partition plate and reciprocally movable within an opening in the partition plate with one terminal and extending into the fluid pressure activation compartment and the other terminal end extending into the steam flow control compartment coaxially aligned with the valve seat surrounding the inlet connection, the valve cylinder being surrounded by two bellow fluid seals and provided with guides to inhibit lateral movement, an end of the valve cylinder extending into the fluid flow control compartment having a radially projecting flange substantially conterminous with the valve seat flange and having a contoured surface facing and complimentary to the contoured valve seating surface whereby the two contoured valve surfaces can meet in matching relationship, thus providing a pressure actuated reciprocatable valve member for making closing contact with the valve seat and withdrawing therefrom for opening fluid flow through the valve

  2. Fluidized bed as a solid precursor delivery system in a chemical vapor deposition reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Vahlas, Constantin; Caussat, Brigitte; Senocq, François; Gladfelter, Wayne L.; Sarantopoulos, Christos; Toro, David; Moersch, Tyler

    2005-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using precursors that are solids at operating temperatures and pressures, presents challenges due to their relatively low vapor pressures. In addition, the sublimation rates of solid state precursors in fixed bed reactors vary with particle and bed morphology. In a recent patent application, the use of fluidized bed (FB) technology has been proposed to provide high, reliable, and reproducible flux of such precursors in CVD processes. In the present contribution...

  3. Complex nonlinear behaviour of a fixed bed reactor with reactant recycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recke, Bodil; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    The fixed bed reactor with reactant recycle investigated in this paper can exhibit periodic solutions. These solutions bifurcate from the steady state in a Hopf bifurcation. The Hopf bifurcation encountered at the lowest value of the inlet concentration turns the steady state unstable and marks the......,that the dynamic behaviour of a fixed bed reactor with reactant recycle is much more complex than previously reported....

  4. A novel approach for harnessing biofilm communities in moving bed biofilm reactors for industrial wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lemire, Joe A.; Marc A Demeter; Iain George; Howard Ceri; Turner, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) are an effective biotechnology for treating industrial wastewater. Biomass retention on moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) carriers (biofilm support materials), allows for the ease-of-operation and high treatment capacity of MBBR systems. Optimization of MBBR systems has largely focused on aspects of carrier design, while little attention has been paid to enhancing strategies for harnessing microbial biomass. Previously, our research group demonstrated that ...

  5. ASME initiatives for the support of new nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With all the advances in nuclear power in the past years, the ASME Board on Nuclear Codes and Standards (BNCS) is investigating what it can do to prepare for anew generation of plants. The ASME BNCS has developed a Task Group to identify the needs of developers of new reactor designs. The goal of: this task group is to encourage the leadership of experts working on new reactor designs to communicate with code committees their requirements to ensure that all the appropriate needs relating to new reactor development are being addressed within the ASME codes and standards committee structures: New plant designs include the following types of reactors: advanced boiling water, advanced pressurized water, gas-cooled fast-spectrum, pebble bed modular, and high temperature gas-cooled. Many of these designs incorporate features that are not addressed by current nuclear codes and standards. Theses features include non-metallic materials, and configurations not amenable to current in-service inspection requirements. ASME would like to have the codes and standards in place for these designs during their development process, not only to apply a standard, but also to enhance acceptance of these new designs by users and regulators. The ASME BNCS is approaching the challenge by meeting with new reactor developers worldwide at their locations to discuss codes and standards needs. This paper will summarize initiatives already underway to address development of requirements for materials such as high temperature metallic materials, nuclear graphite, ceramics, carbon composites, and passive non-metallic components. Initiatives related to the use of probabilistic methods in design to support new reactors will also be discussed along with efforts to use risk-informed methods to develop inservice inspection requirements to support gas-cooled reactors. (authors)

  6. Proliferation resistance features in nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The presentation gives an overview of the fundamental principles of non-proliferation of nuclear materials and technologies in the process of designing the nuclear reactors. The nuclear power engineering includes the activities involving the risk of proliferation of nuclear weapons (such as separation of uranium isotopes (enrichment), long-term storage of irradiated fuel, reprocessing of irradiated fuel by means of separation of plutonium and/or uranium wherefrom, storage of separated fissile materials). Proliferation resistance can be defined as the characteristic of a given nuclear power system which would prevent change-over or unauthorized production and use of the nuclear materials or technologies intended to possession of nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosives. The basic principles of non-proliferation as formulated in the frame of IAEA-sponsored international project INPRO have been analyzed for their relevance in designing the innovative nuclear power systems based on lead-cooled fast reactors. (author)

  7. Proliferation resistance features in nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a review of the main principles for technologies and materials protection from unauthorized proliferation and application to be considered in nuclear reactors designing. Nuclear power features certain operations sensitive to nuclear weapons proliferation (such as separation of uranium isotopes (enrichment), long storage of spent fuel, processing of spent fuel, plutonium and/or uranium recovery from spent fuel, storage of recovered fissile materials). Proliferation resistance is defined as a nuclear energy system characteristic that impedes the diversion or undeclared production of nuclear material, or misuse of technology with the purpose of acquiring nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices. The basic principles of non-proliferation established in the INPRO international project sponsored by IAEA have been discussed as implemented for designing of the innovative nuclear energy systems based on fast lead-cooled nuclear reactors

  8. Fluidized bed bio reactor sewage treatment system and wastewater quality at Kudankulam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the availability of fresh water becoming exiguous in certain coastal belts, it has become imperative to manage water resources in a resourceful and judicious manner. The focus has also shifted to minimum or zero tolerance from existing waste treatment plants so as not to contaminate or pollute the already shrinking drinking water resources. Many of the modern waste treatment approaches are already aiming at zero discharge with a view to conserving the ecological balance and to protect the rich bio diversity, flora and fauna. This paper describes one such domestic sewage treatment system called fluidized bed bio reactor operating in the residential colony and plant site area of Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project. Wastewater quality of the resulting effluent water is also discussed. (author)

  9. Biodegradation of TBP in a packed bed reactor using pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tributyl phosphate (TBP), is an organophosphorus compound widely used as a solvent for the extraction of uranium and plutonium, from other radionuclides, in nuclear fuel processing. Several strains from contaminated sites were isolated and screened for their ability to degrade this organophosphorus compound. The most active strain identified as Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes could degrade 290μM of TBP and utilized it as a sole source of carbon and energy. Agarose immobilized cell systems were developed for the biodegradation of TBP. A packed bed reactor was constructed and operated for biological TBP removal. Degradation rates for repeated operations increased for successive batches indicating that cells grow better and get adapted to the reaction conditions over time. (author)

  10. Development of a trickle bed reactor of electro-Fenton process for wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Yangming [Key Laboratory of Reservoir Aquatic Environment, Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing 401122 (China); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Hong, E-mail: liuhong@cigit.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Reservoir Aquatic Environment, Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing 401122 (China); Shen, Zhemin, E-mail: zmshen@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wang, Wenhua [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • An electrochemical trickle bed reactor was composed of C-PTFE-coated graphite chips. • The trickle bed reactor had a high H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production rate in a dilute electrolyte. • An azo dye was effectively decomposed by the electro-Fenton process in the reactor. -- Abstract: To avoid electrolyte leakage and gas bubbles in the electro-Fenton (E-Fenton) reactors using a gas diffusion cathode, we developed a trickle bed cathode by coating a layer composed of carbon black and polytetrafluoroethylene (C-PTFE) onto graphite chips instead of carbon cloth. The trickle bed cathode was optimized by single-factor and orthogonal experiments, in which carbon black, PTFE, and a surfactant were considered as the determinant of the performance of graphite chips. In the reactor assembled by the trickle bed cathode, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was generated with a current of 0.3 A and a current efficiency of 60%. This performance was attributed to the fine distribution of electrolyte and air, as well as the effective oxygen transfer from the gas phase to the electrolyte–cathode interface. In terms of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation and current efficiency, the developed trickle bed reactor had a performance comparable to that of the conventional E-Fenton reactor using a gas diffusion cathode. Further, 123 mg L{sup −1} of reactive brilliant red X-3B in aqueous solution was decomposed in the optimized trickle bed reactor as E-Fenton reactor. The decolorization ratio reached 97% within 20 min, and the mineralization reached 87% within 3 h.

  11. Production of specific-structured lipids by enzymatic interesterification in a pilot continuous enzyme bed reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xuebing; Balchen, Steen; Høy, Carl-Erik; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    1998-01-01

    , water dependence, production efficiency and other basic features of the process were performed. The extent of acyl migration (defined as a side reaction) occurring in the present enzyme bed reactor was compared to that in a pilot batch reactor. The continuous enzyme bed reactor was better than the batch......Production of specific-structured lipids (interesterified lipids with a specific structure) by enzymatic interesterification was carried out in a continuous enzyme bed pilot scale reactor. Commercial immobilized lipase (Lipozyme IM) was used and investigations of acyl migration, pressure drop...... reactor in minimizing acyl migration. Generally the former produced about one fourth the acyl migration produced by the latter at a similar extent of incorporation. Pressure drop and production efficiency were evaluated in order to obtain a suitable yield in one reaction step. High incorporation was...

  12. Calculation models for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of different parameters of nuclear reactors requires neutron transport calculations. Due to complicity of geometry and material composition of the reactor core, neutron calculations were performed for simplified models of the real arrangement. In frame of the present work two models were used for calculations. First, an elementary cell model was used to prepare cross section data set for a homogenized-core reactor model. The homogenized-core reactor model was then used to perform neutron transport calculation. The nuclear reactor is a tank-shaped thermal reactor. The semi-cylindrical core arrangement consists of aluminum made fuel bundles immersed in water which acts as a moderator as well as a coolant. Each fuel bundle consists of aluminum cladded fuel rods arranged in square lattices. (author)

  13. Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Nuclear Power Plant Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Management of spent nuclear fuel from Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) reactor had been studied to anticipate program of NPP operation in Indonesia. In this paper the quantity of generated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is predicted based on the national electrical demand, power grade and type of reactor. Data was estimated using Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) NPP type 1.000 MWe and the SNF management overview base on the experiences of some countries that have NPP. There are four strategy nuclear fuel cycle which can be developed i.e: direct disposal, reprocessing, DUPlC (Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel In Candu) and wait and see. There are four alternative for SNF management i.e : storage at the reactor building (AR), away from reactor (AFR) using wet centralized storage, dry centralized storage AFR and prepare for reprocessing facility. For the Indonesian case, centralized facility of the wet type is recommended for PWR or BWR spent fuel. (author)

  14. Nuclear data needs for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear design of fusion reactor components (e.g., first wall, blanket, shield, magnet, limiter, divertor, etc.) requires an accurate prediction of the radiation field, the radiation damage parameters, and the activation analysis. The fusion nucleonics for these tasks are reviewed with special attention to point out nuclear data needs and deficiencies which effect the design process. The main areas included in this review are tritium breeding analyses, nuclear heating calculations, radiation damage in reactor components, shield designs, and results of uncertainty analyses as applied to fusion reactor studies. Design choices and reactor parameters that impact the neutronics performance of the blanket are discussed with emphasis on the tritium breeding ratio. Nuclear data required for kerma factors, shielding analysis, and radiation damage are discussed. Improvements in the evaluated data libraries are described to overcome the existing problems

  15. Autonomous Control of Space Nuclear Reactors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nuclear reactors to support future lunar and Mars robotic and manned missions impose new and innovative technological requirements for their control and protection...

  16. A swivelling transfer device for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention relates to a swivelling transfer device for fuel-assemblies. According to the invention, the device comprises, within a protective enclosure, a swivelling system comprising two sets of rails rotatable about an axis and so arranged that the lower and thereof penetrates into the extensions of the extremities of ramps dipped into the reactor and into a storage enclosure. This can apply to the transfer of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies, in particular for reactors of the molten sodium fast neutron type

  17. Nuclear data requirements for fusion reactor shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear data requirements for experimental, demonstration and commercial fusion reactors are reviewed. Particular emphasis is given to the shield as well as major reactor components of concern to the nuclear performance. The nuclear data requirements are defined as a result of analyzing four key areas. These are the most likely candidate materials, energy range, types of needed nuclear data, and the required accuracy in the data. Deducing the latter from the target goals for the accuracy in prediction is also discussed. A specific proposal of measurements is recommended. Priorities for acquisition of data are also assigned. (author)

  18. Nuclear data requirements for fusion reactor nucleonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear data requirements for fusion reactor nucleonics are reviewed and the present status of data are assessed. The discussion is divided into broad categories dealing with data for Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT), D-T Fusion Reactors, Alternate Fuel Cycles and the Evaluated Data Files that are available or would be available in the near future

  19. Nuclear reactor vessels with sealable rotatable covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor installations have a rotating cover with an annular blade or skirt which clips into an annular trough of mercury and forms a gas seal. The design is such that abnormal pressure occurring in the reactor vessel is balanced by an increase in level of the mercury. Also applicable to irradiated fuel storage. (U.K.)

  20. Reactor Physics and the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Minhaj Ahmed

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Questions regarding the feasibility of fusion power are examined, taking into account fuel cycles and breeding reactions, energy balance and reactor conditions, approaches to fusion, magnetic confinement, magneto hydro dynamic instabilities, micro instabilities, and the main technological problems which have to be solved. Basic processes and balances in fusion reactors are considered along with some aspects of the neutronics in fusion reactors, the physics of neutral beam heating, plasma heating by relativistic electrons, radiofrequency heating of fusion plasmas, adiabatic compression and ignition of fusion reactors, dynamics and control of fusion reactors, and aspects of thermal efficiency and waste heat. Attention is also given to fission-fusion hybrid systems, inertial-confinement fusion systems, the radiological aspects of fusion reactors, design considerations of fusion reactors, and a comparative study of the approaches to fusion power. The nuclear fuel cycle, also called nuclear fuel chain, is the progression of nuclear fuel through a series of differing stages. It consists of steps in the front end, which are the preparation of the fuel, steps in the service period in which the fuel is used during reactor operation, and steps in the back end, which are necessary to safely manage, contain, and either reprocess or dispose of spent nuclear fuel. If spent fuel is not reprocessed, the fuel cycle is referred to as an open fuel cycle (or a once-through fuel cycle; if the spent fuel is reprocessed, it is referred to as a closed fuel cycle..

  1. Problems of nuclear reactor safety. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theses of proceedings of the 9 Topical Meeting on problems of nuclear power plant safety are presented. Reports include results of neutron-physical experiments carried out for reactor safety justification. Concepts of advanced reactors with improved safety are considered. Results of researches on fuel cycles are given too

  2. Nuclear reactor fuel elements charging tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assist the loading of nuclear reactor fuel elements in a reactor core, positioning blocks with a pyramidal upper face charged to guide the fuel element leg are placed on the lower core plate. A carrier equipped with means of controlled displacement permits movement of the blocks over the lower core plate

  3. Large Scale Weather Control Using Nuclear Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Singh-Modgil, M

    2002-01-01

    It is pointed out that controlled release of thermal energy from fission type nuclear reactors can be used to alter weather patterns over significantly large geographical regions. (1) Nuclear heat creates a low pressure region, which can be used to draw moist air from oceans, onto deserts. (2) Creation of low pressure zones over oceans using Nuclear heat can lead to Controlled Cyclone Creation (CCC).(3) Nuclear heat can also be used to melt glaciers and control water flow in rivers.

  4. Optical techniques for nuclear reactor inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical inspection techniques available and relevant to the various stages of the life cycle of a nuclear reactor are briefly reviewed. Experience in the three main types of nuclear reactor of interest to the CEGB, Magnox, AGR and PWR, is discussed. Conventional optical systems and stereoscopic viewing systems are described together with specialized and novel techniques, mainly Marchwood Engineering Laboratory's developments, which have proved valuable in tackling a variety of inspection problems. (U.K.)

  5. RA Research nuclear reactor - Annual report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annual report concerning the project 'RA research nuclear reactor' for 1987, financed by the Serbian ministry of science is divided into two parts. First part is concerned with RA reactor operation and maintenance, which is the task of the Division for reactor engineering of the Institute for multidisciplinary studies and RA reactor engineering. Second part deals with radiation protection activities at the RA reactor which is the responsibility of the Institute for radiation protection. Scientific council of the Institute for multidisciplinary studies and RA reactor engineering has stated that this report describes adequately the activity and tasks fulfilled at the RA reactor in 1989. The scope and the quality of the work done were considered successful both concerning the maintenance and reconstruction, as well as radiation protection activities

  6. Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

    2013-03-19

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

  7. Materials for generation-IV nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials science and materials development are key issues for the implementation of innovative reactor systems such as those defined in the framework of the Generation IV. Six systems have been selected for Generation IV consideration: gas-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, molten salt-cooled reactor, sodium-cooled fast reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and very high temperature reactor. The structural materials need to resist much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses and extremely corrosive environment, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. For this reason, the first consideration in the development of Generation-IV concepts is selection and deployment of materials that operate successfully in the aggressive operating environments expected in the Gen-IV concepts. This paper summarizes the Gen-IV operating environments and describes the various candidate materials under consideration for use in different structural applications. (author)

  8. Research nuclear reactor RA - Annual Report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annual report concerning the project 'RA research nuclear reactor' for 1989, financed by the Serbian ministry of science is divided into two parts. First part is concerned with RA reactor operation and maintenance, which is the task of the Division for reactor engineering of the Institute for multidisciplinary studies and RA reactor engineering. Second part deals with radiation protection activities at the RA reactor which is the responsibility of the Institute for radiation protection. Scientific council of the Institute for multidisciplinary studies and RA reactor engineering has stated that this report describes adequately the activity and tasks fulfilled at the RA reactor in 1989. The scope and the quality of the work done were considered successful both concerning the maintenance and reconstruction, as well as radiation protection activities

  9. Progress in the Development of the Modular Pebble-Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review article summarizes recent progress by students and faculty at U.C. Berkeley working on the development of the Pebble-Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR). The 410-MWe PBAHTR is a liquid salt cooled reactor that operates at near atmospheric pressure and high power density (20 to 30 MW/m3, compared to 4.8 MW/m3 for helium cooled reactors). Operating with a core inlet temperature of 600 deg. C and outlet temperature of 704 deg. C, the PB-AHTR uses well understood materials of construction including Alloy 800H with Hastelloy N cladding for the reactor vessel and primary loop components, and graphite for core and reflector structures. Recent work by the NE 170 senior design class has developed physical arrangements for the major reactor and power conversion components, along with the structural design for the reactor building and turbine hall featuring seismic base isolation, design for aircraft crash protection, shielding analysis, and design of a multiple-zone ventilation and containment system to provide effective control of radioactive and chemical contamination. The resulting total building volume is 260 m3/MWe, compared to 343 m3/MWe to 486 m3/MWe for current large (1150 to 1600 MWe) LWR designs. These results suggest the potential for significant reductions in construction time and cost. Neutronics studies have verified the capability to design the PB-AHTR with negative fuel and coolant temperature reactivity coefficients, for both LEU and deep-burn TRU fuels. Depletion analysis was also performed to identify optimal core designs to maximize fuel utilization. The additional moderation provided by the coolant simplifies design to achieve optimal moderation, and the spent fuel volume is approximately half that of helium cooled reactors. In collaboration with the Czech Nuclear Research Institute, initial zero-power critical tests were performed to validate PB-AHTR neutronics models. Liquid salts are unique among candidate reactor coolants due

  10. Nuclear data needs for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear data, i.e., the numerical information about every nuclide - especially those representing the probabilities of various nuclear interactions and of radioactivity - of interest in a nuclear fission reactor are among the most essential inputs to be known a priori, to the best possible accuracy, for the design of nuclear reactor. The nuclides of interest cover not just (1) the fuel nuclides, the containers, the coolant, the moderator (if any), etc., that are initially inserted, but also (2) the actinides, the fission products, etc. that would be produced from the moment the reactor goes into operation and (3) the decay products that are produced even while the reactor is shutdown. The nuclide-list is known to cover a few hundreds. The neutron-nuclear interaction cross-section data, required for a few tens of reactions, very sensitively depend on the nuclide species and the neutron energy. Hence the data requirement significantly varies between thermal and fast reactors. The present talk is intended to touch upon the kinds and forms of nuclear data needed in the design and analysis of fast reactors. The recent variants available in the databases and some inter-comparison results will also be presented. (author)

  11. Model description and kinetic parameter analysis of MTBE biodegradation in a packed bed reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waul, Christopher Kevin; Arvin, Erik; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2008-01-01

    A dynamic modeling approach was used to estimate in-situ model parameters, which describe the degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in a laboratory packed bed reactor. The measured dynamic response of MTBE pulses injected at the reactor's inlet was analyzed by least squares and parameter ...

  12. Discharge Characteristics of Series Surface/Packed-Bed Discharge Reactor Diven by Bipolar Pulsed Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian; Jiang, Nan; Li, Jie; Shang, Kefeng; Lu, Na; Wu, Yan; Mizuno, Akira

    2016-03-01

    The discharge characteristics of the series surface/packed-bed discharge (SSPBD) reactor driven by bipolar pulse power were systemically investigated in this study. In order to evaluate the advantages of the SSPBD reactor, it was compared with traditional surface discharge (SD) reactor and packed-bed discharge (PBD) reactor in terms of the discharge voltage, discharge current, and ozone formation. The SSPBD reactor exhibited a faster rising time and lower tail voltage than the SD and PBD reactors. The distribution of the active species generated in different discharge regions of the SSPBD reactor was analyzed by optical emission spectra and ozone analysis. It was found that the packed-bed discharge region (3.5 mg/L), rather than the surface discharge region (1.3 mg/L) in the SSPBD reactor played a more important role in ozone generation. The optical emission spectroscopy analysis indicated that more intense peaks of the active species (e.g. N2 and OI) in the optical emission spectra were observed in the packed-bed region. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51177007), the Joint Funds of National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. U1462105), and Dalian University of Technology Fundamental Research Fund of China (No. DUT15RC(3)030)

  13. Metal supplementation to anaerobic granular sludge bed reactors: an environmental engineering approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez Fermoso, F.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research is the optimization of essential metal dosing in upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors used for methanogenic wastewater treatment. Optimization of essential metal dosing in UASB reactors is a compromise between achieving the maximal biological activity of the bio

  14. Dispersed plug flow model for upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactors with focus on granular sludge dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalyuzhnyi, S.V.; Fedorovich, V.V.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    A new approach to model upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB)-reactors, referred to as a one-dimensional dispersed plug flow model, was developed. This model focusses on the granular sludge dynamics along the reactor height, based on the balance between dispersion, sedimentation and convection using on

  15. Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fast-acting nuclear reactor control device is described for controlling a safety control rod within the core of a nuclear reactor, the reactor controlled by a reactor control system, the device comprising: a safety control rod drive shaft and an electromagnetic clutch co-axial with the drive shaft operatively connected to the safety control rod for driving and positioning the safety control rod within or without the reactor core during reactor operation, the safety rod being oriented in a substantially vertical position to allow the rod to fall into the reactor core under the influence of gravity during shutdown of the reactor; the safety control rod drive shaft further operatively connected to a hydraulic pump such that operation of the drive shaft simultaneously drives and positions the safety control rod and operates the hydraulic pump such that a hydraulic fluid is forced into an accumulator, filling the accumulator with oil for the storage and supply of primary potential energy for safety control rod insertion such that the release of potential energy in the accumulator causes hydraulic fluid to flow through the hydraulic pump, converting the hydraulic pump to a hydraulic motor having speed and power capable of full length insertion and high speed driving of the safety control rod into the reactor core; a solenoid valve interposed between the hydraulic pump and the accumulator, said solenoid valve being a normally open valve, actuated to close when the safety control rod is out of the reactor during reactor operation; and further wherein said solenoid opens in response to a signal from the reactor control system calling for shutdown of the reactor and rapid insertion of the safety control rod into the reactor core, such that the opening of the solenoid releases the potential energy in the accumulator to place the safety control rod in a safe shutdown position

  16. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Zohuri, Bahman

    2015-01-01

    This text covers the fundamentals of thermodynamics required to understand electrical power generation systems and the application of these principles to nuclear reactor power plant systems. It is not a traditional general thermodynamics text, per se, but a practical thermodynamics volume intended to explain the fundamentals and apply them to the challenges facing actual nuclear power plants systems, where thermal hydraulics comes to play.  Written in a lucid, straight-forward style while retaining scientific rigor, the content is accessible to upper division undergraduate students and aimed at practicing engineers in nuclear power facilities and engineering scientists and technicians in industry, academic research groups, and national laboratories. The book is also a valuable resource for students and faculty in various engineering programs concerned with nuclear reactors. This book also: Provides extensive coverage of thermal hydraulics with thermodynamics in nuclear reactors, beginning with fundamental ...

  17. Computerized reactor monitor and control for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of a computerized process control system developed by Transelektro-KFKI-Videoton (Hangary) for a twenty-year-old research reactor in Budapest and or a new one in Tajura (Libya) is given. The paper describes the computer hardware (R-10) and the implemented software (PROCESS-24K) as well as their applications at nuclear reactors. The computer program provides for man-machine communication, data acquisition and processing, trend and alarm analysis, the control of the reactor power, reactor physical calculations and additional operational functions. The reliability and the possible further development of the computerized systems which are suitable for application at reactors of different design are also discussed. (Sz.J.)

  18. Distance to realization of nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently the research and development of nuclear fusion have progressed conspicuously, and reached the point of attaining the critical condition. In this paper, it is attempted to forecast how long does it take to realize a final nuclear fusion power reactor (a demonstration reactor). The research and development of nuclear fusion have two important meanings. One is it is a promising means for ensuring an energy source for the future in Japan. Another is it has been brought up to the present status as the large scale project research maintaining the creativity and originality without requiring the introduction of technology from foreign countries. Hereafter, it is necessary to bring it up large as the Japanese basic technology. The research and development of nuclear fusion has advanced steadily, producing many physical knowledges and technical development. The principle and present status of nuclear fusion are explained. Now, an experimental fusion reactor is investigated as the next step. A large helical system project was started as 7-year project from 1990. The start of the operation of a prototype nuclear fusion power reactor is assumed in 2026, and that of a demonstration reactor is assumed in 2040. The investment for nuclear fusion and the extending effect are discussed. (K.I.)

  19. Temperature response to reactant concentration perturbations in a packed-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unsteady-state operations are known to enhance the performance of some packed-bed reactor systems. However, negative effects of this type of operation should not be neglected. Temperature excursions developed during transients may accelerate some deactivation mechanisms, reducing catalyst lifetime and selectivity. Temperature response to perturbations in reactant concentration was studied for CO oxidation over Pt/Al2O3, in a packed-bed reactor. Experiments were conducted in the CO concentration range for which multiple steady states are observed. Temperature and concentration profiles in the packed-bed reactor at steady state were found to depend on the dynamic history of the reactor prior to the steady-state condition. (author)

  20. Metal supplementation to anaerobic granular sludge bed reactors: an environmental engineering approach

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez Fermoso, F.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research is the optimization of essential metal dosing in upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors used for methanogenic wastewater treatment. Optimization of essential metal dosing in UASB reactors is a compromise between achieving the maximal biological activity of the biomass present in the reactor, while minimizing the costs of the supplied metal and the metal losses into the environment. The fate of metals in the anaerobic granular sludge is studied. The boundary...

  1. The study on fuel effect in discharge pipe of pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simulation method of fuel loading in discharge pipe of pebble bed reactor is introduced. As an exemplary application case, the effect of fuel elements in the discharge pipe on reactor physics and thermohydraulic properties is calculated and analysed by CHTRP code in HTR-10 MW. The calculation gives the power and temperature distribution in the area of the discharge pipe, very useful for further analysis of reactor physics and safety

  2. Nuclear data usage for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the department of research reactor, many neutronics calculations have been performed to construct, to operate and to modify research reactors of JAERI with several kinds of nuclear data libraries. This paper presents latest two neutronic analyses on research reactors. First one is design work of a low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for JRR-4 (Japan Research Reactor No.4). The other is design of a uranium silicon dispersion type (silicide) fuel of JRR-3M (Japan Research Reactor No.3 Modified). Before starting the design work, to estimate the accuracy of computer code and calculation method, experimental data are calculated with several nuclear data libraries. From both cases of calculations, it is confirmed that JENDL-3.2 gives about 1 %Δk/k higher excess reactivity than JENDL-3.1. (author)

  3. Small reactors and the 'second nuclear era'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Predictions of the nuclear industry's demise are premature and distort both history and politics. The industry is reemerging in a form commensurate with the priorities of those people and nations controlling the global forces of production. The current lull in plant orders is due primarily to the world recession and to factors related specifically to reactor size. Traditional economies of scale for nuclear plants have been greatly exaggerated. Reactor vendors and governments in Great Britain, France, West Germany, Japan, the United States, Sweden, Canada, and the Soviet Union are developing small reactors for both domestic applications and export to the Third World. The prefabricated, factory-assembled plants under 500 MWe may alleviate many of the existing socioeconomic constraints on nuclear manufacturing, construction, and operation. In the industrialized world, small reactors could furnish a qualitatively new energy option for utilities. But developing nations hold the largest potential market for small reactors due to the modest size of their electrical systems. These units could double or triple the market potential for nuclear power in this century. Small reactors will both qualitatively and quantitatively change the nature of nuclear technology transfers, offering unique advantages and problems vis-a-vis conventional arrangements. (author)

  4. Flow distribution of pebble bed high temperature gas cooled reactors using large eddy simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is one of the renewed reactor designs to play a role in nuclear power generation. This reactor design concepts is currently under consideration and development worldwide. Since the HTGR concept offers inherent safety, has a very flexible fuel cycle with capability to achieve high burnup levels, and provides good thermal efficiency of power plant, it can be considered for further development and improvement as a reactor concept of generation IV. The combination of coated particle fuel, inert helium gas as coolant and graphite moderated reactor makes it possible to operate at high temperature yielding a high efficiency. In this study the simulation of turbulent transport for the gas through the gaps of the spherical fuel elements (fuel pebbles) will be performed. This will help in understanding the highly three-dimensional, complex flow phenomena in pebble bed caused by flow curvature. Under these conditions, heat transfer in both laminar and turbulent flows varies noticeably around curved surfaces. Curved flows would be present in the presence of contiguous curved surfaces. In the case of a laminar flow and of an appreciable effect of thermogravitional forces, the Nusselt (Nu) number depends significantly on the curvature shape of the surface. It changes with order of 10 times. The flow passages through the gap between the fuel balls have concave and convex configurations. Here the action of the centrifugal forces manifests itself differently on convex and concave parts of the flow path (suppression or stimulation of turbulence). The flow of this type has distinctive features. In such flow there is a pressure gradient, which strongly affects the boundary layer behavior. The transition from a laminar to turbulent flow around this curved flow occurs at deferent Reynolds (Re) numbers. Consequently, noncircular curved flows as in the pebble-bed situation, in detailed local sense, is interesting to be investigated. To the

  5. Nuclear Power from Fission Reactors. An Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Technical Information Center.

    The purpose of this booklet is to provide a basic understanding of nuclear fission energy and different fission reaction concepts. Topics discussed are: energy use and production, current uses of fuels, oil and gas consumption, alternative energy sources, fossil fuel plants, nuclear plants, boiling water and pressurized water reactors, the light…

  6. U.S. Nuclear Power Reactor Plant Status

    Data.gov (United States)

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission — Demographic data on U.S. commercial nuclear power reactors, including: plant name/unit number, docket number, location, licensee, reactor/containment type, nuclear...

  7. Safety review, assessment and inspection on research reactors, experimental reactors, nuclear heating reactors and critical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1998, the NNSA organized to complete the nuclear safety review on the test loop in-reactor operation of the High-flux Engineering Experimental Reactor (HFEER) and the re-operation of the China Pulsed Reactor and the Uranium-water Criticality Facility. The NNSA conducted the nuclear safety review on the CP application of the China Experimental Fast Reactor (CEFR) and the siting of China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR), and carried out the construction supervision on HTR-10, and dealt with the event about the technological tube breakage of HWRR and other events

  8. Closed Brayton cycle power system with a high temperature pellet bed reactor heat source for NEP applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capitalizing on past and future development of high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) technology, a low mass 15 MWe closed gas turbine cycle power system using a pellet bed reactor heating helium working fluid is proposed for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) applications. Although the design of this directly coupled system architecture, comprising the reactor/power system/space radiator subsystems, is presented in conceptual form, sufficient detail is included to permit an assessment of overall system performance and mass. Furthermore, an attempt is made to show how tailoring of the main subsystem design characteristics can be utilized to achieve synergistic system level advantages that can lead to improved reliability and enhanced system life while reducing the number of parasitic load driven peripheral subsystems

  9. Beneficiation of pulverized coal combustion fly ash in fluidised bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammarota, A.; Chirone, R.; Solimene, R.; Urciuolo, M. [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione - C.N.R., P.le V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy)

    2008-07-15

    The paper addresses the thermal treatment of pulverized coal combustion fly ash belonging to the group C of Geldart powder classification in unconventional configurations of fluidised bed reactors. A sound-assisted fluidised bed combustor operated at 850 and 750 C, and a fluidised bed combustor characterized by a conical geometry, operated at 850 C, are the two lab-scale reactors tested. Combustion experiments have been carried out at different air excesses, ranging between 10% and 170%, and in the case of the conical fluidization column with different bed inventory. Both tested configurations have been proved to be efficient to reduce the carbon content initially present in the fly ash of 11%{sub w}, to a very low level, generally smaller than 1%{sub w}. Both the fly ash residence time in the reactor and the air excess strongly influenced the reactor performance. Residence times of 3-4 min and 10-60 min have been estimated for experiments carried out with the sound-assisted fluidised bed combustor and with the conical fluidised bed combustor, respectively. Regarding the possibility of a concurrent reduction of unburned carbon in the ash and of a particle size separation of the beneficiated material, on the basis of the obtained experimental data, the sound-assisted fluidised bed combustor is not able to separate the broad particle size distribution of the fly ash in different outlet solid streams. The use of a conical fluidised bed combustor is promising to realize an efficient separation of the inlet broad particle size distribution of the fly ash fed to the reactor into narrower outlet solid streams extracted from different locations: combustor exit, top and bottom of the bed. In this framework a hydrodynamic characterization of binary mixtures in a conical fluidised bed column carried out at ambient and high temperature (850 C) has demonstrated that the operating conditions of the conical fluidised bed combustor can be chosen on the basis of a compromise

  10. Cold nuclear fusion reactor and nuclear fusion rocket

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Zhenqiang

    2013-01-01

    "Nuclear restraint inertial guidance directly hit the cold nuclear fusion reactor and ion speed dc transformer" [1], referred to as "cold fusion reactor" invention patents, Chinese Patent Application No. CN: 200910129632.7 [2]. The invention is characterized in that: at room temperature under vacuum conditions, specific combinations of the installation space of the electromagnetic field, based on light nuclei intrinsic magnetic moment and the electric field, the first two strings of the nucle...

  11. News on the natural nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data characterizing conditions of occurrence and the status of a natural nuclear reactor the remnants of which are discovered in the ore open pit of the Oklo deposit (Gabon) are presented. Transport of alkali earth elements (Rb, Sr, Cs and Ba) as well as Pd, Ag, Cd and Te isotopes near the reactor was investigated. Reactor criticality arose, probably, during or soon after U deposition. The reactor has ceased after 500000 years of operation; the energy of about 15 GW x year was generated. Approximately 80 t of uranium (12 tons of sup(235)U) were utilized during reactor operation. Approximately 10 tons of fission products and 4 tons of sup(239)Pu were formed. Reactor operation was periodical, multiply repeated. Water migrating over sandstone pores was not only a moderator but a self-regulator as well

  12. Desalination of seawater with nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 40 % of the world population is concerned with water scarcity. This article reviews the different techniques of desalination: distillation (MED and MSF), reverse osmosis (RO), and electrodialysis (ED). The use of nuclear energy rests on several arguments: 1) it is economically efficient compared to fossil energy. 2) nuclear reactors provide heat covering a broad range of temperature, which allows the implementation of all the desalination techniques. 3) the heat normally lost at the heat sink could be used for desalination. And 4) nuclear is respectful of the environment. The feedback experience concerning nuclear desalination is estimated to about 100 reactor-years, it is sufficient to allow the understanding of all the physical and technological processes involved. In Japan, 8 PWR-type reactors are coupled to MED, MSF, and RO desalination techniques, the water produced is used locally mainly for feeding steam generators. (A.C.)

  13. Desalination of seawater with nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 40 % of the world population is concerned with water scarcity. This article reviews the different techniques of desalination: distillation (MED and MSF), reverse osmosis (RO), and electrodialysis (ED). The use of nuclear energy rests on several arguments: 1) it is economically efficient compared to fossil energy; 2) nuclear reactors provide heat covering a broad range of temperature, which allows the implementation of all the desalination techniques; 3) the heat normally lost at the heat sink could be used for desalination; and 4) nuclear is respectful of the environment. The feedback experience concerning nuclear desalination is estimated to about 100 reactor-years, it is sufficient to allow the understanding of all the physical and technological processes involved. In Japan, 8 PWR-type reactors are coupled to MED, MSF, and RO desalination techniques, the water produced is used locally mainly for feeding steam generators. (A.C.)

  14. Nuclear data needs for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear design of fusion components (e.g., first wall, blanket, shield, magnet, limiter, divertor, etc.) requires an accurate prediction of the radiation field, the radiation damage parameters, and the activation analysis. The fusion nucleonics for these tasks are reviewed with special attention to point out nuclear data needs and deficiencies which effect the design process. The main areas included in this review are tritium breeding analyses, nuclear heating calculations, radiation damage in reactor components, shield designs, and results of uncertainty analyses as applied to fusion reactor studies. Design choices and reactor parameters that impact the neutronics performance of the blanket are discussed with emphasis on the tritium breeding ratio. Nuclear data required for kerma factors, shielding analysis, and radiation damage are discussed. Improvements in the evaluated data libraries are described to overcome the existing problems. 84 refs., 11 figs., 9 tabs

  15. Elemental mercury vapor capture by powdered activated carbon in a fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrizio Scala; Riccardo Chirone; Amedeo Lancia [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione - CNR, Napoli (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    A bubbling fluidized bed of inert material was used to increase the activated carbon residence time in the reaction zone and to improve its performance for mercury vapor capture. Elemental mercury capture experiments were conducted at 100{sup o}C in a purposely designed 65 mm ID lab-scale pyrex reactor, that could be operated both in the fluidized bed and in the entrained bed configurations. Commercial powdered activated carbon was pneumatically injected in the reactor and mercury concentration at the outlet was monitored continuously. Experiments were carried out at different inert particle sizes, bed masses, fluidization velocities and carbon feed rates. Experimental results showed that the presence of a bubbling fluidized bed led to an increase of the mercury capture efficiency and, in turn, of the activated carbon utilization. This was explained by the enhanced activated carbon loading and gas-solid contact time that establishes in the reaction zone, because of the large surface area available for activated carbon adhesion/deposition in the fluidized bed. Transient mercury concentration profiles at the bed outlet during the runs were used to discriminate between the controlling phenomena in the process. Experimental data have been analyzed in the light of a phenomenological framework that takes into account the presence of both free and adhered carbon in the reactor as well as mercury saturation of the adsorbent. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Particle-bed gas-cooled fast reactor (PB-GCFR) design. Project final technical report (Sept 2001 - Aug 2003)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this project is to develop a conceptual design of a particle-bed, gas-cooled fast reactor (PB-GCFR) core that meets the advanced reactor concept and enhanced proliferation-resistant goals of the US Department of Energy's NERI program. The key innovation of this project is the application of a fast neutron spectrum environment to enhance both the passive safety and transmutation characteristics of the advanced particle-bed and pebble-bed reactor designs. The PB-GCFR design is expected to produce a high-efficiency system with a low unit cost. It is anticipated that the fast neutron spectrum would permit small-sized units (∼ 150 MWe) that can be built quickly and packaged into modular units, and whose production can be readily expanded as the demand grows. Such a system could be deployed globally. The goals of this two-year project are as follows: (1) design a reactor core that meets the future needs of the nuclear industry, by being passively safe with reduced need for engineered safety systems. This will entail an innovative core design incorporating new fuel form and type; (2) employ a proliferation-resistant fuel design and fuel cycle. This will be supported by a long-life core design that is refueled infrequently, and hence, reduces the potential for fuel diversion; (3) incorporate design features that permit use of the system as an efficient transmuter that could be employed for burning separated plutonium fuel or recycled LWR transuranic fuel, should the need arise; and (4) evaluate the fuel cycle for waste minimization and for the possibility of direct fuel disposal. The application of particle-bed fuel provides the promise of extremely high burnup and fission-product protection barriers that may permit direct disposal

  17. The preliminary analysis on the steady-state and kinetic features of the molten salt pebble-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel design concept of molten salt pebble-bed reactor with an ultra-simplified integral primary circuit called 'Nuclear Hot Spring' has been proposed, featured by horizontal coolant flow in a deep pool pebble-bed reactor, providing 'natural safety' features with natural circulation under full power operation and less expensive primary circuit arrangement. In this work, the steady-state physical properties of the equilibrium state of the molten salt pebble-bed reactor are calculated by using the VSOP code, and the steady-state thermo-hydraulic analysis is carried out based on the approximation of absolutely horizontal flow of the coolant through the core. A new concept of 2-dimensional, both axial and radial, multi-pass on-line fuelling scheme is presented. The result reveals that the radial multi-pass scheme provides more flattened power distribution and safer temperature distribution than the one-pass scheme. A parametric analysis is made corresponding to different pebble diameters, the key parameter of the core resistance and the temperature at the pebble center. It is verified that within a wide range of pebble diameters, the maximum pebble center temperatures are far below the safety limit of the fuel, and the core resistance is considerably less than the buoyant force, indicating that the natural circulation under full power operation is achievable and the ultra-simplified integral primary circuit without any pump is possible. For the kinetic properties, it is verified that the negative temperature coefficient is achieved in sufficient under-moderated condition through the preliminary analysis on the temperature coefficients of fuel, coolant and moderator. The requirement of reactivity compensation at the shutdown stages of the operation period is calculated for the further studies on the reactivity control. The molten salt pebble-bed reactor with horizontal coolant flow can provide enhanced safety and economical features. (authors)

  18. Modeling of realistic pebble bed reactor geometries using the Serpent Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The explicit stochastic geometry model in Serpent is documented. • A pebble bed criticality benchmark was calculated demonstrating the geometry model. • Stochastic pebble configurations were obtained from discrete element simulations. • Results deviate from experiments but are in line with example calculations. - Abstract: This paper documents the models available in Serpent for high temperature reactor (HTR) calculations. It is supplemented by a calculation example of ASTRA critical pebble bed experiments. In the pebble bed reactor modeling, different methods have been used to model the double heterogeneity problem occurring in pebble bed reactor calculations. A solution was sought to avoid unphysical simplifications in the pebble bed modeling and the stochastic geometry modeling features available in the Monte Carlo code Serpent were applied for exact placement of pebbles and fuel particles. Randomly packed pebble beds were produced in discrete element method (DEM) simulations and fuel particles were positioned randomly inside the pebbles. Pebbles and particles are located using a Cartesian search mesh, which provides necessary computational efficiency. Serpent uses Woodcock delta-tracking which provides efficient neutron tracking in the complicated geometries. This detailed pebble bed modeling approach was tested by calculating the ASTRA criticality benchmark experiment done at the Kurchatov Institute in 2004. The calculation results are in line with the sample calculations provided with the benchmark documentation. The material library selected for the calculations has a major effect on the results. The difference in graphite absorption cross section is considered the cause of this result. The model added in Serpent is very efficient with a calculation time slightly higher than with a regular lattice approximation. It is demonstrated that Serpent can be used for pebble bed reactor calculations with minimal geometric approximations as it

  19. A particle-bed gas-cooled fast reactor core design for waste minimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The issue of waste minimization in advanced reactor systems has been investigated using the Particle-Bed Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (PB-GCFR) design being developed and funded under the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (USDOE NERI) Programme. Results indicate that for the given core power density and constraint on the maximum TRU enrichment allowable, the lowest amount of radio-toxic transuranics to be processed and hence sent to the repository is obtained for long-life core designs. Calculations were additionally done to investigate long-life core designs using LWR spent fuel TRU and recycle TRU, and different feed, matrix and reflector materials. The recycled TRU and LWR spent TRU fuels give similar core behaviours, because of the fast spectrum environment which does not significantly degrade the TRU composition. Using light elements as reflector material was found to be unattractive because of power peaking problems and large reactivity swings. The application of a lead reflector gave the longest cycle length and lowest TRU processing requirement. Materials compatibility and performance issues require additional investigation. (author)

  20. Features of a subcritical nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The keff was calculated using six factor formula and MCNP code. • Both methods agree when the reactor is loaded from 800 to 1900 kg. • With the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra and doses were estimated. • The Ambient dose was measured outside the subcritical assembly. - Abstract: A subcritical nuclear reactor is a device where the nuclear-fission chain reaction is initiated and maintained using an external neutron source. It is a valuable educational and research tool where in a safe way many reactor parameters can be measured. Here, we have used the six-factor formula to calculate the effective multiplication factor of a subcritical nuclear reactor Nuclear Chicago model 9000. Using the MCNP5 code, a three-dimensional model of the subcritical reactor was developed to estimate the effective multiplication factor, the neutron spectra, and the total and thermal neutron fluences along the radial and axial axis. The MCNP5 results of the effective multiplication factor were compared with those obtained from the six-factor formula. The effective dose and the Ambient dose equivalent, at three sites outside the reactor, were estimated; the Ambient dose equivalent was also measured and compared with the calculated values

  1. Modeling for Anaerobic Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B. Y. M.; Pfeffer, J. T.

    1989-06-01

    The specific objectives of this research were: 1. to develop an equilibrium model for chemical aspects of anaerobic reactors; 2. to modify the equilibrium model for non-equilibrium conditions; 3. to incorporate the existing biofilm models into the models above to study the biological and chemical behavior of the fixed-film anaerobic reactors; 4. to experimentally verify the validity of these models; 5. to investigate the biomass-holding ability of difference packing materials for establishing reactor design criteria.

  2. Feedback of reactor operating data to nuclear methods development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems in obtaining power reactor data for reliable nuclear methods development and the major sources of power reactor data for this purpose are reviewed. Specific examples of the use of power reactor data in nuclear methods development are discussed. The paper concludes with recommendations on the key elements of an effective program to use power reactor data in nuclear methods development

  3. Nuclear waste repository transparency technology test bed demonstrations at WIPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, has stated that one of the nuclear waste legacy issues is ''The challenge of managing the fuel cycle's back end and assuring the safe use of nuclear power.'' Waste management (i.e., the back end) is a domestic and international issue that must be addressed. A key tool in gaining acceptance of nuclear waste repository technologies is transparency. Transparency provides information to outside parties for independent assessment of safety, security, and legitimate use of materials. Transparency is a combination of technologies and processes that apply to all elements of the development, operation, and closure of a repository system. A test bed for nuclear repository transparency technologies has been proposed to develop a broad-based set of concepts and strategies for transparency monitoring of nuclear materials at the back end of the fuel/weapons cycle. WIPP is the world's first complete geologic repository system for nuclear materials at the back end of the cycle. While it is understood that WIPP does not currently require this type of transparency, this repository has been proposed as realistic demonstration site to generate and test ideas, methods, and technologies about what transparency may entail at the back end of the nuclear materials cycle, and which could be applicable to other international repository developments. An integrated set of transparency demonstrations was developed and deployed during the summer, and fall of 1999 as a proof-of-concept of the repository transparency technology concept. These demonstrations also provided valuable experience and insight into the implementation of future transparency technology development and application. These demonstrations included: Container Monitoring Rocky Flats to WIPP; Underground Container Monitoring; Real-Time Radiation and Environmental Monitoring; Integrated level of confidence in the system and information provided. As the world's only operating deep geologic

  4. Optimally moderated nuclear fission reactor and fuel source therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Terry, William K.; Gougar, Hans D.

    2008-07-22

    An improved nuclear fission reactor of the continuous fueling type involves determining an asymptotic equilibrium state for the nuclear fission reactor and providing the reactor with a moderator-to-fuel ratio that is optimally moderated for the asymptotic equilibrium state of the nuclear fission reactor; the fuel-to-moderator ratio allowing the nuclear fission reactor to be substantially continuously operated in an optimally moderated state.

  5. Thermal denitrification of evaporators concentrates in reactor with fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the treatments of liquid wastes coming from the Marcoule reprocessing plant, the study of a thermal denitrification process for evaporator concentrates has been chosen by the CEA/CEN Cadarache: the fluidized-bed calcination. This work presents the study of a calcination pilot-plant for wastes with a very high sodium nitrate content. After a reactional analysis carried out in a thermobalance on samples which are representative of the fluidized-bed compounds, the perfecting of many of the plant parameters - such as the solution injection system - was carried out on a scale-model at first. Then, it was verified on the pilot-plant, and some experiments have been carried out. A mathematical model for the particle growth inside the fluidized-bed is proposed. (author). 179 refs., 65 figs., 23 tabs

  6. Design of a nuclear reactor cooperative controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the development of a fuzzy logic controller software package and explores the feasibility of its use in nuclear reactor operation. The controller complements reactor operator actions, and the operators can override the controller decisions. Techniques of providing learning capability to the controller are also being investigated to improve the reasoning and control skill of the controller. The fuzzy logic controller is implemented in C language and its overall structure is shown. The heart of the systems consists of a fuzzifier, a rule interpreter, and a defuzzifier. The controller is designed as a stand-alone package that can be interfaced to a simulated model of a nuclear reactor. Since no model is an accurate representation of the actual process being modeled, some tuning must be performed to use the controller in an actual reactor. This is accomplished using the learning feature of the controller

  7. Pebble bed reactor fiscal year 1980: review summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on high-temperature reactor development is presented concerning reactor operating experience; core performance assessment; core control and shutdown; reflector and core support; maintenance and availability; safety aspects of PBR and prismatic comparison; PCRV dimensions; and fuel reprocessing cost estimate

  8. Styrene recovery from polystyrene by flash pyrolysis in a conical spouted bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artetxe, Maite; Lopez, Gartzen; Amutio, Maider; Barbarias, Itsaso; Arregi, Aitor; Aguado, Roberto; Bilbao, Javier; Olazar, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Continuous pyrolysis of polystyrene has been studied in a conical spouted bed reactor with the main aim of enhancing styrene monomer recovery. Thermal degradation in a thermogravimetric analyser was conducted as a preliminary study in order to apply this information in the pyrolysis in the conical spouted bed reactor. The effects of temperature and gas flow rate in the conical spouted bed reactor on product yield and composition have been determined in the 450-600°C range by using a spouting velocity from 1.25 to 3.5 times the minimum one. Styrene yield is strongly influenced by both temperature and gas flow rate, with the maximum yield being 70.6 wt% at 500°C and a gas velocity twice the minimum one. PMID:26077230

  9. Conceptual design of a passively safe thorium breeder Pebble Bed Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This work proposes three possible designs for a thorium Pebble Bed Reactor. • A high-conversion PBR (CR > 0.96), passively safe and within practical constraints. • A thorium breeder PBR (220 cm core) in practical regime, but not passively safe. • A passively safe breeder, requiring higher fuel reprocessing and recycling rates. - Abstract: More sustainable nuclear power generation might be achieved by combining the passive safety and high temperature applications of the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) design with the resource availability and favourable waste characteristics of the thorium fuel cycle. It has already been known that breeding can be achieved with the thorium fuel cycle inside a Pebble Bed Reactor if reprocessing is performed. This is also demonstrated in this work for a cylindrical core with a central driver zone, with 3 g heavy metal pebbles for enhanced fission, surrounded by a breeder zone containing 30 g thorium pebbles, for enhanced conversion. The main question of the present work is whether it is also possible to combine passive safety and breeding, within a practical operating regime, inside a thorium Pebble Bed Reactor. Therefore, the influence of several fuel design, core design and operational parameters upon the conversion ratio and passive safety is evaluated. A Depressurized Loss of Forced Cooling (DLOFC) is considered the worst safety scenario that can occur within a PBR. So, the response to a DLOFC with and without scram is evaluated for several breeder PBR designs using a coupled DALTON/THERMIX code scheme. With scram it is purely a heat transfer problem (THERMIX) demonstrating the decay heat removal capability of the design. In case control rods cannot be inserted, the temperature feedback of the core should also be able to counterbalance the reactivity insertion by the decaying xenon without fuel temperatures exceeding 1600 °C. Results show that high conversion ratios (CR > 0.96) and passive safety can be combined in

  10. Water shielding nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor container of the present invention contains a reactor pressure vessel, and has double steel plate walls endurable to elevated inner pressure and keeping airtightness, and shielding water is filled inside from a water injection port. It is endurable to a great inner pressure satisfactorily and keep airtightness by the two spaced relatively thin steel plates. It exhibits radiation shielding effect by filling water substantially the same as that of a conventional reactor container made of iron reinforced concretes. Then, it is no more necessary to use concretes for the construction of the reactor container, which shortens the term of the construction, and saves the construction cost. In addition, a cooling effect for the reactor container is provided. Syphons are disposed contiguously to a water injection port and the top end of the syphon is immersed in an equipment temporarily storage pool, and further, pipelines are connected to the double steel plate walls or the syphons for supplying shielding water to enhance the cooling effect. (N.H.)

  11. Nuclear reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When occurrence of earthquakes is judged in a BWR type reactor, the power is decreased by inserting a portion of control rods, reducing a speed of recycling pumps, stopping recycling pumps, increasing the opening degree of a main steam control valve and opening a main steam relief valve. The reactor scram can be avoided by bypassing neutron flux high signal, settling a filter to neutron flux signals and setting a reactor scram set value by neutron flux signals, for example, to 120%. There is constituted an interlock for performing reactor scram when both of a neutron flux high signal and a signal outputted if a surface heat flux corresponding signal formed by applying calculation to the neutron flux high signal exceeds a set value are valid, to avoid unnecessary reactor scram. As a measuring means, not only an acceleration meter in the power plant, but also acceleration meters at remote places, acceleration meters or displacement meters for various kinds of equipments in the power plant are used, and when signals from them exceed set values, earthquake judgement is conducted. (N.H.)

  12. Carbon Shale Combustion in the Fluidized Bed Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Olek Małgorzata; Kandefer Stanisław; Kaniowski Wiesław; Żukowski Witold; Baron Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the possibilities of coal shale combustion in furnaces with bubbling fluidized bed. Coal shale can be autothermally combusted in the fluidized bed, despite the low calorie value and high ash content of fuel. Established concentrations of CO (500 ppm) and VOC (30 mg/m3) have indicated a high conversion degree of combustible material during combustion process. Average concentrations of SO2 and NOx in the flue gas were higher than this received from the ...

  13. Experimental investigation on single-phase pressure losses in nuclear debris beds: Identification of flow regimes and effective diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Single-phase pressure drops versus flow rates in particle beds are measured. • Conditions are representative of the reflooding of a nuclear fuel debris bed. • Darcy, weak inertial, strong inertial and weak turbulent regimes are observed. • A Darcy–Forchheimer law is found to be a good approximation in this domain. • A predictive correlation is derived from new experimental data. - Abstract: During a severe nuclear power plant accident, the degradation of the reactor core can lead to the formation of debris beds. The main accident management procedure consists in injecting water inside the reactor vessel. Nevertheless, large uncertainties remain regarding the coolability of such debris beds. Motivated by the reduction of these uncertainties, experiments have been conducted on the CALIDE facility in order to investigate single-phase pressure losses in representative debris beds. In this paper, these results are presented and analyzed in order to identify a simple single-phase flow pressure loss correlation for debris-bed-like particle beds in reflooding conditions, which cover Darcean to Weakly Turbulent flow regimes. The first part of this work is dedicated to study macro-scale pressure losses generated by debris-bed-like particle beds, i.e., high sphericity (>80%) particle beds with relatively small size dispersion (from 1 mm to 10 mm). A Darcy–Forchheimer law, involving the sum of a linear term and a quadratic deviation, with respect to filtration velocity, has been found to be relevant to describe this behavior in Darcy, Strong Inertial and Weak Turbulent regimes. It has also been observed that, in a restricted domain (Re = 15 to Re = 30) between Darcy and Weak Inertial regimes, deviation is better described by a cubic term, which corresponds to the so-called Weak Inertial regime. The second part of this work aims at identifying expressions for coefficients of linear and quadratic terms in Darcy–Forchheimer law, in order to obtain a

  14. Experimental investigation on single-phase pressure losses in nuclear debris beds: Identification of flow regimes and effective diameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clavier, R., E-mail: remi.clavier@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) – PSN-RES/SEREX/LE2M, Cadarache bât. 327, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Chikhi, N., E-mail: nourdine.chikhi@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) – PSN-RES/SEREX/LE2M, Cadarache bât. 327, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Fichot, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) – PSN-RES/SAG/LEPC, Cadarache bât. 700, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Quintard, M. [Université de Toulouse – INPT – UPS – Institut de Mécanique des Fluides de Toulouse (IMFT), Allée Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS – IMFT, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Single-phase pressure drops versus flow rates in particle beds are measured. • Conditions are representative of the reflooding of a nuclear fuel debris bed. • Darcy, weak inertial, strong inertial and weak turbulent regimes are observed. • A Darcy–Forchheimer law is found to be a good approximation in this domain. • A predictive correlation is derived from new experimental data. - Abstract: During a severe nuclear power plant accident, the degradation of the reactor core can lead to the formation of debris beds. The main accident management procedure consists in injecting water inside the reactor vessel. Nevertheless, large uncertainties remain regarding the coolability of such debris beds. Motivated by the reduction of these uncertainties, experiments have been conducted on the CALIDE facility in order to investigate single-phase pressure losses in representative debris beds. In this paper, these results are presented and analyzed in order to identify a simple single-phase flow pressure loss correlation for debris-bed-like particle beds in reflooding conditions, which cover Darcean to Weakly Turbulent flow regimes. The first part of this work is dedicated to study macro-scale pressure losses generated by debris-bed-like particle beds, i.e., high sphericity (>80%) particle beds with relatively small size dispersion (from 1 mm to 10 mm). A Darcy–Forchheimer law, involving the sum of a linear term and a quadratic deviation, with respect to filtration velocity, has been found to be relevant to describe this behavior in Darcy, Strong Inertial and Weak Turbulent regimes. It has also been observed that, in a restricted domain (Re = 15 to Re = 30) between Darcy and Weak Inertial regimes, deviation is better described by a cubic term, which corresponds to the so-called Weak Inertial regime. The second part of this work aims at identifying expressions for coefficients of linear and quadratic terms in Darcy–Forchheimer law, in order to obtain a

  15. Introduction to the neutron kinetics of nuclear power reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Tyror, J G; Grant, P J

    2013-01-01

    An Introduction to the Neutron Kinetics of Nuclear Power Reactors introduces the reader to the neutron kinetics of nuclear power reactors. Topics covered include the neutron physics of reactor kinetics, feedback effects, water-moderated reactors, fast reactors, and methods of plant control. The reactor transients following faults are also discussed, along with the use of computers in the study of power reactor kinetics. This book is comprised of eight chapters and begins with an overview of the reactor physics characteristics of a nuclear power reactor and their influence on system design and

  16. Transient modelling of sulphur-iodine cycle thermochemical hydrogen generation coupled to pebble bed modular reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A transient control volume model of the sulphur iodine (S-I) and Westinghouse hybrid sulphur (HyS) cycles is presented. These cycles are some of the leading candidates for hydrogen generation using a high temperature heat source. The control volume models presented here are based on a heat and mass balance in each reaction chamber coupled to the relevant reaction kinetics. The chemical kinetics expressions are extracted from a relevant literature review. Two assumptions regarding reaction chamber pressure are identified, namely a constant pressure condition and a differential form of ideal gas law. The HyS model is based on an application of the Nernst equation. This application of the Nernst equation suggests that in the HyS cycle the hydrogen generation rate is directly proportional to the SO2 production rate. The observed chemical kinetic response time of the sulphuric acid decomposition section is on the order of 30 seconds, whereas the response time of the hydrogen iodide decomposition section is on the order of 500 seconds. It is concluded that the decomposition of hydrogen iodide (HI) is the rate limiting step of the entire S-I cycle. High temperature nuclear reactors are ideal candidates for use as a driving heat source for both the S-I and HyS cycle. The pebble bed modular reactor is a type of very high temperature reactor (VHTR ) suitable for nuclear hydrogen generation. A methodology for coupling of the S-I or HyS cycle to a pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR) via an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) is developed. A 2-D THERMIX heat transfer model of a PBMR-268 is presented, and this model is coupled to a point kinetics model. The point kinetics model was developed to meet the same specifications as the RELAP5 point kinetics module. A steady-state integration of the S-I and HyS cycle models to the PBMR 268 heat transfer model is performed. The integration assumes that 100% of the heat energy from the PBMR-268 is deposited into the chemical plant via the

  17. Nuclear reactor fissile isotopes antineutrino spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Sinev, V.

    2012-01-01

    Positron spectrum from inverse beta decay reaction on proton was measured in 1988-1990 as a result of neutrino exploration experiment. The measured spectrum has the largest statistics and lowest energy threshold between other neutrino experiments made that time at nuclear reactors. On base of the positron spectrum the standard antineutrino spectrum for typical reactor fuel composition was restored. In presented analysis the partial spectra forming this standard spectrum were extracted using s...

  18. The safety of Ontario's nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Select Committee of the Legislature of Ontario was established to examine the affairs of Ontario Hydro, the provincial electrical utility. Extensive public hearings were held on several topics including the safety of nuclear power reactors operating in Ontario. The Committee found that these reactors are acceptably safe. Many of the 24 recommendations in this report deal with the licensing process and public access to information. (O.T.)

  19. Nuclear Research Center IRT reactor dynamics calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main features of the code DIRT, for dynamical calculations are described in the paper. With the results obtained by the program, an analysis of the dynamic behaviour of the Research Reactor IRT of the Nuclear Research Center (CIN) is performed. Different transitories were considered such as variation of the system reactivity, coolant inlet temperature variation and also variations of the coolant velocity through the reactor core. 3 refs

  20. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor construction is described comprising a reactor core submerged in a pool of liquid metal coolant contained in a vessel which is housed in a concrete containment vault, the roof structure of the vault having thermal insulation comprising a series of super-imposed spaced plates, with baffles disposed so as to restrict convectional flow of metal vapour through the interspaces of the plates and between the uppermost plate or plates and the vault roof structure. (author)

  1. Thermo-catalytic pyrolysis of waste polyethylene bottles in a packed bed reactor with different bed materials and catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Thermo-catalytic pyrolysis of waste polyethylene bottles was investigated. • The highest yield of liquid (82%) was obtained over a cement powder bed. • Acidic catalysts narrowed the carbon chain length of the paraffins to C10–C28. • Combination of cement bed with HBeta catalyst gave the highest yield of liquid. • Significant yield of aromatics was obtained mainly naphthalene and D-limonene. - Abstract: Plastic waste is an increasing economic and environmental problem as such there is a great need to process this waste and reduce its environmental impact. In this work, the pyrolysis of high density polyethylene (HDPE) waste products was investigated using both thermal and catalytic cracking techniques. The experimental work was carried out using packed bed reactor operating under an inert atmosphere at 450 °C. Different reactor bed materials, including sand, cement and white clay were used to enhance the thermal cracking of HDPE. In addition, the catalytic effect of sodium hydroxide, HUSY and HBeta zeolite catalysts on the degradation of HDPE waste was also investigated. The reactor beds were found to significantly alter the yield as well as the product composition. Products such as paraffins (⩽C44), olefins (⩽C22), aromatics (⩽C14) and alcohols (C16 and C17) were obtained at varying rates. The highest yield of liquid (82%) was obtained over a cement powder bed with a paraffin yield of 58%. The yield of paraffins and olefins followed separate paths, for paraffins it was found to increase in the order or Cement > White clay > Silica Sand, whereas for the olefins it was in the reverse order Silica Sand > White clay > Cement. The results obtained in this work exhibited a higher P/O ratio than expected, where the amount of generated paraffins was greater than 60% in most cases. Less olefin was generated as a consequence. This indicates that the product generated is more suited to be used as a fuel rather than as a chemical feedstock. The

  2. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignatiev, V. [ed.; Feinberg, O.; Morozov, A. [Russian Research Centre `Kurchatov Institute`, Moscow (Russian Federation); Devell, L. [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1995-07-01

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary.

  3. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary

  4. Equipments for use in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent nickel from leaching into nuclear reactor coolants thereby suppress the generation of cobalt 58 due to activation. Constitution: Equipments for use in nuclear reactor cores such as control rod covering tubes, control rod sheaths, feedwater heater tubes, etc. are constituted with ferrite type stainless steels not containing nickel and containing more than 10 wt% chromium incorporated as the basic element with nitrogen at a level higher than the impurity content. While the ferrite type materials have been used for the pressure vessel, there has been a problem in view of the embrittlement under irradiation when used as the equipments in nuclear reactor cores. However, it has been found that the embrittlement under irradiation can be improved by the incorporation of nitrogen in excess of the impurity level. Accordingly, the material of the present invention can suppress the generation of cobalt 58, provide corrosion resistance and avoid embrittlement under irradiation. (Takahashi, M.)

  5. Nuclear reactor safety in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear reactor safety in the USA has emphasized a defense-in-depth approach to protecting the public from reactor accidents. This approach was severely tested by the Three Mile Island accident and was found to be effective in safeguarding the public health and safety. However, the economic impact of the TMI accident was very large. Consequently, more attention is now being given to plant protection as well as public-health protection in reactor-safety studies. Sophisticated computer simulations at Los Alamos are making major contributions in this area. In terms of public risk, nuclear power plants compare favorably with other large-scale alternatives to electricity generation. Unfortunately, there is a large gulf between the real risks of nuclear power and the present public perception of these risks

  6. Device for nuclear reactor control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The device for power height distribution control in channel-type uranium-graphite reactor cores is described. The device is a water filled vertical channel positioned in the reactor core. The device consists of a controlling rod, displacer in a form of a throttle and gas cavity and discharge throttle. The rod is fixed in upper position with an electromagnet. By shifting a displacer and changing flow rate established are the required height and position of a controlling liquid column. In the emergency protection, a drive shifts the displacer under core space or the displacer drops under the action of its own weight at electromagnet clutch doenergyzation whereas the channel is filled by liquid. The application of the suggested device permits to improve economic and operating characteristics of reactors

  7. Nuclear reactor fuel element splitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for removing nuclear fuel from a clad fuel element. The fuel element is power driven past laser beams which simultaneously cut the cladding lengthwise into at least two longitudinal pieces. The axially cut lengths of cladding are then separated, causing the nuclear fuel contained therein to drop into a receptacle for later disposition. The cut lengths of cladding comprise nuclear waste which is disposed of in a suitable manner. 6 claims, 10 drawing figures

  8. Energy recovery by gasification of agricultural and forestry wastes in fluidized bed reactors and in moving bed reactors with internal recycle of pyrolysis gas; process development and reactor modelling. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aarsen, F.G. van den; Susanto, H.; Beenackers, A.A.C.M.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1986-01-01

    A modified co-current moving gasifier bed has been developed which substantially reduces product gas tar content compared to conventional down draft gasifiers and allows for a better scale-up of the reactor. These improvements have been realized by installing an ejector in the air inlet which sucks the pyrolysis gases into the gasifying air stream and allows for subsequent combustion of the pyrolysis products in a separate combustor. In relation to the modelling of a fluidized bed biomass gasifier, we studied the fast pyrolysis of beech wood particles and the char-carbondioxide gasification kinetics in a bench scale fluidized bed reactor. A 30 cm diameter fluidized bed biomass gasifier has been constructed and the reactor performance on wood and rice husks has been studied. Those experiments (at 50 kg biomass/hr) revealed that a good gas quality is produced if the reactor is operated above 800/sup 0/ C, in the co-current mode (bottomfeed). Ongoing research is on mass transfer and flow behaviour in the fluidized bed reactor; a mathematical model of the fluidized bed gasifier is under development.

  9. 78 FR 64028 - Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... COMMISSION Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... regulatory guide (RG) 1.184 ``Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Reactors.'' This guide describes a method NRC... decommissioning process for nuclear power reactors. The revision takes advantage of the 13 years...

  10. Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor Project: Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program FY 2002 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew; Dolan, Thomas James; Miller, Gregory Kent; Moore, Richard Leroy; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Oh, Chang H; Gougar, Hans D

    2002-11-01

    This report documents the results of our research in FY-02 on pebble-bed reactor technology under our Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled the Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor. The MPBR is an advanced reactor concept that can meet the energy and environmental needs of future generations under DOE’s Generation IV initiative. Our work is focused in three areas: neutronics, core design and fuel cycle; reactor safety and thermal hydraulics; and fuel performance.

  11. Batch Tests To Determine Activity Distribution and Kinetic Parameters for Acetate Utilization in Expanded-Bed Anaerobic Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Peter; Suidan, Makram T.

    1990-01-01

    Batch tests to measure maximum acetate utilization rates were used to determine the distribution of acetate utilizers in expanded-bed sand and expanded-bed granular activated carbon (GAC) reactors. The reactors were fed a mixture of acetate and 3-ethylphenol, and they contained the same predominant aceticlastic methanogen, Methanothrix sp. Batch tests were performed both on the entire reactor contents and with media removed from the reactors. Results indicated that activity was evenly distrib...

  12. Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

    2010-09-01

    The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a ”standard,” UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge

  13. Nuclear reactors with auxiliary boiler circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gas-cooled nuclear reactor has a main circulatory system for the gaseous coolant incorporating one or more main energy converting units, such as gas turbines, and an auxiliary circulatory system for the gaseous coolant incorporating at least one steam generating boiler arranged to be heated by the coolant after its passage through the reactor core to provide steam for driving an auxiliary steam turbine, such an arrangement providing a simplified start-up procedure also providing emergency duties associated with long term heat removal on reactor shut down

  14. IAEA role in nuclear reactor safety standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1981 the electricity generation by nuclear power plants all over the world reached 8% of total production. It can be expected that at the turn of century up to 25% of electric power will be provided by means of nuclear fuel burning. In connection with NPP total number growth, their attraction to large population centres, widening of the atomic energy application areas, the importance of nuclearreactor safety problems can only increase. The safety measures have usually the structure of sequential barriers: for accident preventing, for protection from accidents, for accident localization. NPP safety is a complex problem having scientific, engineering, juridical, social and political aspects. Since these problems have an international importance, IAEA should actively work on their solving. Practically all the topics of nuclear power development and nuclear reactor s;fety lie within the activity area of the Department of nuclear power and safety, its sections: of nuclear safety, nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle. In 1974 a decision was made in IAEA about initiation of work on development of an international nuclear safety standards system (NUSS Programme). These activities are divided into five major branches: a government organization for nuclear safety regulations; site selection for NPP; NPP desing; operation, start of operation and decommissioning; quality provision for NPP. The report presents a list of documents, comprising the NUSS Programme. The complection of all the works within the scope of the Programme is planned for 1985. After 1985 the start of development of fast neutron reactor and fuel cycle enterprise safety standards is planned

  15. Investigation of Anaerobic Fluidized Bed Reactor Aerobic Mov-ing Bed Bio Reactor (AFBR/MMBR System for Treatment of Currant Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Jafari

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anaerobic treatment methods are more suitable for the treatment of concentrated wastewater streams, offer lower operating costs, the production of usable biogas product. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of an Anaerobic Fluidized Bed Reactor (AFBR-Aerobic Moving Bed Bio Reactor (MBBR in series arrangement to treat Currant wastewater.Methods: The bed materials of AFBR were cylindrical particles made of PVC with a diameter of 2-2.3 mm, particle density of 1250 kg/m3.The volume of all bed materials was 1.7 liter which expanded to 2.46 liters in fluidized situation. In MBBR, support media was composed of 1.5 liters Bee-Cell 2000 having porosity of 87% and specific surface area of 650m2/m3.Results: When system operated at 35 ºC, chemical oxygen demand (COD removal efficiencies were achieved to 98% and 81.6% for organic loading rates (OLR of 9.4 and 24.2 g COD/l.d, and hydraulic retention times (HRT of 48 and 18 h, in average COD concentration feeding of 18.4 g/l, respectively.Conclusion: The contribution of AFBR in total COD removal efficiency at an organic loading rate (OLR of 9.4 g COD/l.d was 95%, and gradually decreased to 76.5% in OLR of 24.2 g COD/l.d. Also with increasing in organic loading rate the contribution of aerobic reactor in removing COD gradually decreased. In this system, the anaerobic reactor played the most important role in the removal of COD, and the aerobic MBBR was actually needed to polish the anaerobic treated wastewate

  16. Burnup performance of OTTO cycle pebble bed reactors with ROX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A 300 MWt Small Pebble Bed Reactor with Rock-like oxide fuel is proposed. • Using ROX fuel can achieve high discharged burnup of spent fuel. • High geological stability can be expected in direct disposal of the spent ROX fuel. • The Pebble Bed Reactor with ROX fuel can be critical at steady state operation. • All the reactor designs have a negative temperature coefficient. - Abstract: A pebble bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (PBR) with rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel was designed to achieve high discharged burnup and improve the integrity of the spent fuel in geological disposal. The MCPBR code with a JENDL-4.0 library, which developed the analysis of the Once-Through-Then-Out (OTTO) cycle in PBR, was used to perform the criticality and burnup analysis. Burnup calculations for eight cases were carried out for both ROX fuel and a UO2 fuel reactor with different heavy-metal loading conditions. The effective multiplication factor of all cases approximately equalled unity in the equilibrium condition. The ROX fuel reactor showed lower FIFA than the UO2 fuel reactor at the same heavy-metal loading, about 5–15%. However, the power peaking factor and maximum power per fuel ball in the ROX fuel core were lower than that of UO2 fuel core. This effect makes it possible to compensate for the lower-FIFA disadvantage in a ROX fuel core. All reactor designs had a negative temperature coefficient that is needed for the passive safety features of a pebble bed reactor

  17. JPL in-house fluidized bed reactor research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, N. K.

    1985-01-01

    The progress in the in-house program on the silane fluidized-bed system is reported. A seed-particle cleaning procedure was developed to obtain material purity near the level required to produce a semiconductor-grade product. The liner-seal design was consistently proven to withstand heating/cooling cycles in all of the experimental runs.

  18. Styrene biofiltration in a trickle-bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Novak

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The biological treatment of styrene waste gas in a trickle-bed filter (TBF was investigated. The bioreactor consisted of a two-part glass cylinder (ID 150 mm filled with 25 mm polypropylene Pall rings serving as packing material. The bed height was 1m. Although the laboratory temperature was maintained at 22 ºC, the water temperature in the trickle-bed filter was slightly lower (about 18 ºC.The main aim of our study was to observe the effect of empty-bed residence time (EBRT on bioreactor performance at a constant pollutant concentration over an extended time period. The bioreactor was inoculated with a mixed microbial consortium isolated from a styrene-degrading biofilter that had been running for the previous two years. After three weeks of acclimation period, the bioreactor was loaded with styrene (100 mg.m-3. EBRT was in the range of 53 s to 13 s. A maximum elimination capacity (EC of 11.3 gC.m-3.h-1 was reached at an organic loading (OL rate of 18.6 gC.m-3.h-1.

  19. Gasification of Coal and PET in Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pohořelý, Michael; Vosecký, Martin; Kameníková, Petra; Punčochář, Miroslav; Skoblia, Sergej; Staf, M.; Vošta, J.; Koutský, B.; Svoboda, Karel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 85, 17-18 (2006), s. 2458-2468. ISSN 0016-2361 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/04/0829 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : fludized bed * gasification * plastic waste Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.358, year: 2006

  20. Local AREA networks in advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report assesses Local Area Network Communications with a view to their application in advanced nuclear reactor control and protection systems. Attention is focussed on commercially available techniques and systems for achieving the high reliability and availability required. A basis for evaluating network characteristics in terms of broadband or baseband type, medium, topology, node structure and access method is established. The reliability and availability of networks is then discussed. Several commercial networks are briefly assessed and a distinction made between general purpose networks and those suitable for process control. The communications requirements of nuclear reactor control and protection systems are compared with the facilities provided by current technology

  1. Methods in nuclear reactors calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies are made of the neutron transport equation corresponding to the the real and virtual reactors, as well as the starting hypotheses. Methods are developed to solve the transport equation in slab geometry, and Pl; Bl; Ml; Sn and discrete ordinates approximations. (Author)

  2. Nuclear safety. Concerns about the nuclear power reactors in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1976, the Soviet Union and Cuba concluded an agreement to construct two 440-megawatt nuclear power reactors near Cienfuegos on the south central coast of Cuba, about 180 miles south of Key West, Florida. The construction of these reactors, which began around 1983, was a high priority for Cuba because of its heavy dependence on imported oil. Cuba is estimated to need an electrical generation capacity of 3,000 megawatts by the end of the decade. When completed, the first reactor unit would provide a significant percentage (estimated at over 15 percent) of Cuba's need for electricity. It is uncertain when Cuba's nuclear power reactors will become operational. On September 5, 1992, Fidel Castro announced the suspension of construction at both of Cuba's reactors because Cuba could not meet the financial terms set by the Russian government to complete the reactors. Cuban officials had initially planned to start up the first of the two nuclear reactors by the end of 1993. However, before the September 5 announcement, it was estimated that this reactor would not be operational until late 1995 or early 1996. The civil construction (such as floors and walls) of the first reactor is currently estimated to be about 90 percent to 97 percent complete, but only about 37 percent of the reactor equipment (such as pipes, pumps, and motors) has been installed. The civil construction of the second reactor is about 20 percent to 30 percent complete. No information was available about the status of equipment for the second reactor. According to former Cuban nuclear power and electrical engineers and a technician, all of whom worked at the reactor site and have recently emigrated from Cuba, Cuba's nuclear power program suffers from poor construction practices and inadequate training for future reactor operators. One former official has alleged, for example, that the first reactor containment structure, which is designed to prevent the accidental release of radioactive material into

  3. Air gasification of rice husk in bubbling fluidized bed reactor with bed heating by conventional charcoal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makwana, J P; Joshi, Asim Kumar; Athawale, Gaurav; Singh, Dharminder; Mohanty, Pravakar

    2015-02-01

    An experimental study of air gasification of rice husk was conducted in a bench-scale fluidized bed gasifier (FBG) having 210 mm diameter and 1600 mm height. Heating of sand bed material was performed using conventional charcoal fuel. Different operating conditions like bed temperature, feeding rate and equivalence ratio (ER) varied in the range of 750-850 °C, 25-31.3 kg/h, and 0.3-0.38, respectively. Flow rate of air was kept constant (37 m(3)/h) during FBG experiments. The carbon conversion efficiencies (CCE), cold gas efficiency, and thermal efficiency were evaluated, where maximum CCE was found as 91%. By increasing ER, the carbon conversion efficiency was decreased. Drastic reduction in electric consumption for initial heating of gasifier bed with charcoal compared to ceramic heater was ∼45%. Hence rice husk is found as a potential candidate to use directly (without any processing) in FBG as an alternative renewable energy source from agricultural field. PMID:25446789

  4. Modeling of a fluidized bed reactor for the ethylene-propylene copolymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Guillermo Cadavid Estrada

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model for the ethylene - propylene copolymerization with a Ziegler - Natta catalyst in a gas phase fludized bed reactor is presented. The model includes a two active site kinetic model with spontaneous transfer reactions and site deactivation. Also, it is studied and simulated the growth of a polymeric particle which is exposed to an outside atmosphere (monomers concentrations and temperature that represent the emulsion phase conditions of the reactor. Particle growth model is the basis for the study of the sizes distribution into the reactor. Two phase model of Kunii-Levenspiel is the basis for the modelling and simulation of the fluid bed reactor, the models developed consider two extreme cases for the gas mixed grade in emulsion phase (perfectly mixed and plug flow. The solution of the models includes mass (for the two monomers and energy balances, coupled with the particle growth and residence time distribution models.

  5. Advanced nuclear reactor systems - an Indian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Indian nuclear power programme envisages use of closed nuclear fuel cycle and thorium utilisation as its mainstay for its sustainable growth. The current levels of deployment of nuclear energy in India need to be multiplied nearly hundred fold to reach levels of electricity generation that would facilitate the country to achieve energy independence as well as a developed status. The Indian thorium based nuclear energy systems are being developed to achieve sustainability in respect of fuel resource along with enhanced safety and reduced waste generation. Advanced Heavy Water Reactor and its variants have been designed to meet these objectives. The Indian High Temperature Reactor programme also envisages use of thorium-based fuel with advanced levels of passive safety features. (author)

  6. Proposed chemical plant initiated accident scenarios in a sulphur-iodine cycle plant coupled to a pebble bed modular reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the sulphur-iodine (S-I) cycle nuclear hydrogen generation scheme the chemical plant acts as the heat sink for the very high temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR). Thus, any accident which occurs in the chemical plant must feedback to the nuclear reactor. There are many different types of accidents which can occur in a chemical plant. These accidents include intra-reactor piping failure, inter-reactor piping failure, reaction chamber failure and heat exchanger failure. Since the chemical plant acts as the heat sink for the nuclear reactor, any of these accidents induce a loss-of-heat-sink accident in the nuclear reactor. In this paper, several chemical plant initiated accident scenarios are presented. The following accident scenarios are proposed: i) failure of the Bunsen chemical reactor; ii) product flow failure from either the H2SO4 decomposition section or HI decomposition section; iii) reactant flow failure from either the H2SO4 decomposition section or HI decomposition section; iv) rupture of a reaction chamber. Qualitative analysis of these accident scenarios indicates that each result in either partial or total loss of heat sink accidents for the nuclear reactor. These scenarios are reduced to two types: i) discharge rate limited accidents; ii) discontinuous reaction chamber accidents. A discharge rate limited rupture of the SO3 decomposition section of the SI cycle is proposed and modelled. Since SO3 decomposition occurs in the gaseous phase, critical flow out of the rupture is calculated assuming ideal gas behaviour. The accident scenario is modelled using a fully transient control volume model of the S-I cycle coupled to a THERMIX model of a 268 MW pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR-268) and a point kinetics model. The Bird, Stewart and Lightfoot source model for choked gas flows from a pressurised chamber was utilised as a discharge rate model. A discharge coefficient of 0.62 was assumed. Feedback due to the rupture is observed in the nuclear reactor

  7. Simultaneous nitrification-denitrification and phosphorus removal in a fixed bed sequencing batch reactor (FBSBR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimi, Yousef, E-mail: you.rahimi@gmail.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Graduate Faculty of Environment, University of Tehran, No. 25 Qods St., Enghelab Ave, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Torabian, Ali, E-mail: atorabi@ut.ac.ir [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Graduate Faculty of Environment, University of Tehran, No. 25 Qods St., Enghelab Ave, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehrdadi, Naser, E-mail: mehrdadi@ut.ac.ir [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Graduate Faculty of Environment, University of Tehran, No. 25 Qods St., Enghelab Ave, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahmoradi, Behzad, E-mail: bshahmorady@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Science, University of Mysore, MGM-06 Mysore (India)

    2011-01-30

    Research highlights: {yields} Sludge production in FSBR reactor is 20-30% less than SBR reactor. {yields} FSBR reactor showed more nutrient removal rate than SBR reactor. {yields} FSBR reactor showed less VSS/TSS ratio than SBR reactor. - Abstract: Biological nutrient removal (BNR) was investigated in a fixed bed sequencing batch reactor (FBSBR) in which instead of activated sludge polypropylene carriers were used. The FBSBR performance on carbon and nitrogen removal at different loading rates was significant. COD, TN, and phosphorus removal efficiencies were at range of 90-96%, 60-88%, and 76-90% respectively while these values at SBR reactor were 85-95%, 38-60%, and 20-79% respectively. These results show that the simultaneous nitrification-denitrification (SND) is significantly higher than conventional SBR reactor. The higher total phosphorus (TP) removal in FBSBR correlates with oxygen gradient in biofilm layer. The influence of fixed media on biomass production yield was assessed by monitoring the MLSS concentrations versus COD removal for both reactors and results revealed that the sludge production yield (Y{sub obs}) is significantly less in FBSBR reactors compared with SBR reactor. The FBSBR was more efficient in SND and phosphorus removal. Moreover, it produced less excess sludge but higher in nutrient content and stabilization ratio (less VSS/TSS ratio).

  8. Simultaneous nitrification-denitrification and phosphorus removal in a fixed bed sequencing batch reactor (FBSBR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Sludge production in FSBR reactor is 20-30% less than SBR reactor. → FSBR reactor showed more nutrient removal rate than SBR reactor. → FSBR reactor showed less VSS/TSS ratio than SBR reactor. - Abstract: Biological nutrient removal (BNR) was investigated in a fixed bed sequencing batch reactor (FBSBR) in which instead of activated sludge polypropylene carriers were used. The FBSBR performance on carbon and nitrogen removal at different loading rates was significant. COD, TN, and phosphorus removal efficiencies were at range of 90-96%, 60-88%, and 76-90% respectively while these values at SBR reactor were 85-95%, 38-60%, and 20-79% respectively. These results show that the simultaneous nitrification-denitrification (SND) is significantly higher than conventional SBR reactor. The higher total phosphorus (TP) removal in FBSBR correlates with oxygen gradient in biofilm layer. The influence of fixed media on biomass production yield was assessed by monitoring the MLSS concentrations versus COD removal for both reactors and results revealed that the sludge production yield (Yobs) is significantly less in FBSBR reactors compared with SBR reactor. The FBSBR was more efficient in SND and phosphorus removal. Moreover, it produced less excess sludge but higher in nutrient content and stabilization ratio (less VSS/TSS ratio).

  9. Role of Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor and Sequencing Batch Reactor in Biological Degradation of Formaldehyde Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ayati

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays formaldehyde is used as raw material in many industries. It has also disinfection applications in some public places. Due to its toxicity for microorganisms, chemical or anaerobic biological methods are applied for treating wastewater containing formaldehyde.In this research, formaldehyde removal efficiencies of aerobic biological treatment systems including moving bed biofilm (MMBR and sequencing batch reactors (SBR were investigated. During all experiments, the efficiency of SBR was more than MBBR, but the difference was not significant statistically. According to the results, the best efficiencies were obtained for influent formaldehyde COD of 200 mg/L in MBBR and SBR which were 93% and 99.4%, respectively. The systems were also capable to treat higher formaldehyde concentrations (up to 2500 mg/L with lower removal efficiency. The reaction kinetics followed the Stover-Kincannon second order model. The gram-positive and gram-negative bacillus and coccus as well as the gram-positive binary bacillus were found to be the most dominant species. The results of 13C-NMR analysis have shown that formaldehyde and urea were converted into N-{[(aminocarbonyl amino] methyl}urea and the residual formaldehyde was polymerized at room temperature.

  10. Reference Neutron Radiographs of Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    Reference neutron radiographs of nuclear reactor fuel were produced by the Euraton Neutron Radiography Working Group and published in 1984 by the Reidel Publishing Company. In this collection a classification is given of the various neutron radiographic findings, that can occur in different parts of pelletized, annular and vibro-conpacted nuclear fuel pins. Those parts of the pins are shown where changes of appearance differ from those for the parts as fabricated. Also radiographs of those as...

  11. Nuclear data for fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting was organized in four sessions and four working groups devoted to the following topics: Requirements of nuclear data for fusion reactor technology (6 papers); Status of experimental and theoretical investigations of microscopic nuclear data (10 papers); Status of existing libraries for fusion neutronic calculations (5 papers); and Status of integral experiments and benchmark tests (6 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  12. Fluidized bed reactor for polyethylene production. The influence of polyethylene prepolymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.A.N. Fernandes

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the influence of the prepolymerization of the catalyst particle on the fluidized bed reactor for polyethylene production. The influence of prepolymerization on the temperature and concentration gradients throughout the reactor was studied. The results obtained through simulations confirm industrial observations of the advantages of prepolymerization and extend these observation, showing the viable operational conditions for different superficial gas velocities and gas feeding temperatures as a function of the degree of prepolymerization.

  13. Design of a power conversion system for an indirect cycle, helium cooled pebble bed reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A design is presented for the turbomachinery for an indirect cycle, closed, helium cooled modular pebble bed reactor system. The design makes use of current technology and will operate with an overall efficiency of 45%. The design uses an intermediate heat exchanger which isolated the reactor cycle from the turbomachinery. This design excludes radioactive fission products from the turbomachinery. This minimizes the probability of an air ingress accident and greatly simplifies maintenance. (author)

  14. Influence of dissolved oxygen in nitrification kinetics in a circulating bed reactor

    OpenAIRE

    V. Lazarova; R. Nogueira; J. Manem; Melo, L. F.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of dissolved oxygen concentration in nitrification kinetics was studied in a new biofilm reactor, the circulating bed reactor (CBR). The study was carried out partly at laboratory scale with synthetic water containing inorganic carbon and nitrogen compounds, and partly at pilot scale for secondary and tertiary nitrification of municipal wastewater. The experimental results showed that, either the ammonia or the oxygen concentration could be limiting for the nitrification rate...

  15. Generic Investigations on Transport Theory Modelling of High Temperature Reactors of Pebble Bed Type

    OpenAIRE

    Sureda Sureda, Antonio Jaime

    2008-01-01

    The GRS (Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit = Company for Plant and Reactor Safety) maintains and further develops the code system DORT-TD/HERMIX-DIREKT, which is a complex tool for the simulation of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics transients and accident scenarios of high-temperature gas cooled reactors of pebble bed type. With this tool, GRS takes part in the international benchmark activity "OECD/NEA PBMR400 Transient Benchmark”, which aims at the simulation of transient...

  16. Chemical Looping Reactor System Design : Double Loop Circulating Fluidized Bed (DLCFB)

    OpenAIRE

    Bischi, Aldo

    2012-01-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is continuously gaining more importance among the carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies. It is an unmixed combustion process which takes place in two steps. An effective way to realize CLC is to use two interconnected fluidized beds and a metallic powder circulating among them, acting as oxygen carrier. The metallic powder oxidizes at high temperature in one of the two reactors, the air reactor (AR). It reacts in a highly exothermic reaction with the ...

  17. Fluidized bed reactor for polyethylene production. The influence of polyethylene prepolymerization

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes F.A.N.; Lona L.M.F.

    2000-01-01

    This work addresses the influence of the prepolymerization of the catalyst particle on the fluidized bed reactor for polyethylene production. The influence of prepolymerization on the temperature and concentration gradients throughout the reactor was studied. The results obtained through simulations confirm industrial observations of the advantages of prepolymerization and extend these observation, showing the viable operational conditions for different superficial gas velocities and gas feed...

  18. Simulation for Supporting Scale-Up of a Fluidized Bed Reactor for Advanced Water Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Farhana Tisa; Abdul Aziz Abdul Raman; Wan Mohd Ashri Wan Daud

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of fluidized bed reactor (FBR) was accomplished for treating wastewater using Fenton reaction, which is an advanced oxidation process (AOP). The simulation was performed to determine characteristics of FBR performance, concentration profile of the contaminants, and various prominent hydrodynamic properties (e.g., Reynolds number, velocity, and pressure) in the reactor. Simulation was implemented for 2.8 L working volume using hydrodynamic correlations, continuous equation, and simp...

  19. Carbon Shale Combustion in the Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olek Małgorzata

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to present the possibilities of coal shale combustion in furnaces with bubbling fluidized bed. Coal shale can be autothermally combusted in the fluidized bed, despite the low calorie value and high ash content of fuel. Established concentrations of CO (500 ppm and VOC (30 mg/m3 have indicated a high conversion degree of combustible material during combustion process. Average concentrations of SO2 and NOx in the flue gas were higher than this received from the combustion of high quality hard coal, 600 ppm and 500 ppm, respectively. Optional reduction of SO2 and NOx emission may require the installation of flue gas desulphurization and de-NOx systems.

  20. Radiation shield for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reusable radiation shield for use in a reactor installation comprises a thin-walled, flexible and resilient container, made of plastic or elastomeric material, containing a hydrogenous fluid with boron compounds in solution. The container can be filled and drained in position and the fluid can be recirculated if required. When not in use the container can be folded and stored in a small space. The invention relates to a shield to span the top of the annular space between a reactor vessel and the primary shield. For this purpose a continuous toroidal container or a series of discrete segments is used. Other forms can be employed for different purposes, e.g. mattress- or blanket-like forms can be draped over potential sources of radiation or suspended from a mobile carrier and placed between a worker and a radiation source. (author)

  1. Nuclear reactor alignment plate configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, David A; Forsyth, David R; Smith, Richard E; Singleton, Norman R

    2014-01-28

    An alignment plate that is attached to a core barrel of a pressurized water reactor and fits within slots within a top plate of a lower core shroud and upper core plate to maintain lateral alignment of the reactor internals. The alignment plate is connected to the core barrel through two vertically-spaced dowel pins that extend from the outside surface of the core barrel through a reinforcement pad and into corresponding holes in the alignment plate. Additionally, threaded fasteners are inserted around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad and into the alignment plate to further secure the alignment plate to the core barrel. A fillet weld also is deposited around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad. To accomodate thermal growth between the alignment plate and the core barrel, a gap is left above, below and at both sides of one of the dowel pins in the alignment plate holes through with the dowel pins pass.

  2. Experimental, kinetic and numerical modeling of hydrogen production by catalytic reforming of crude ethanol over a commercial catalyst in packed bed tubular reactor and packed bed membrane reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The demand for hydrogen energy has increased tremendously in recent years essentially because of the increase in the word energy consumption as well as recent developments in fuel cell technologies. The energy information administration has projected that world energy consumption will increase by 59% over the next two decades, from 1999 to 2020, in which the largest share is still dominated by fossil fuels (oil, natural gas and coal). Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions resulting from the combustion of these fossil fuels currently are estimated to account for three-fourth of human-caused CO2 emissions worldwide. Greenhouse gas emission, including CO2, should be limited, as recommended at the Kyoto Conference, Japan, in December 1997. In this regard, hydrogen (H2) has a significant future potential as an alternative fuel that can solve the problems of CO2 emissions as well as the emissions of other air contaminants. One of the techniques to produce hydrogen is by reforming of hydrocarbons or biomass. Crude ethanol (a form of biomass, which essentially is fermentation broth) is easy to produce, is free of sulphur, has low toxicity, and is also safe to handle, transport and store. In addition, crude ethanol consists of oxygenated hydrocarbons, such as ethanol, lactic acid, glycerol, and maltose. These oxygenated hydrocarbons can be reformed completely to H2 and CO2, the latter of which could be separated from H2 by membrane technology. This provides for CO2 capture for eventual storage or destruction. In the case of using crude ethanol, this will result in negative CO2, emissions. In this paper, we conducted experimental work on production of hydrogen by the catalytic reforming of crude ethanol over a commercial promoted Ni-based catalyst in a packed bed tubular reactor as well as a packed bed membrane reactor. As well, a rigorous numerical model was developed to simulate this process in both the catalytic packed bed tubular reactor and packed bed membrane reactor. The

  3. Neutronics of nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review, prepared on the occasion of 25th ETAN Conference describes the research activities in the field of neutronics which started in 1947. A number of researchers in Yugoslav Institutes was engaged in development of neutronics theory and calculation methods related to power reactors since 1960. To illustrate the activities of Yugoslav authors, this review contains the list of the most important relevant papers published in international journals

  4. Mathematical model of processes of reactor with gasified fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An original scheme of steam generator with gasifying fluidized bed has been presented as a possible solution for reconstruction of furnace with pulverized burning of coal. The method is effective when applied in combination with desulfurization for the purpose of reducing the CO2 emissions level. A mathematical model has been developed, which determines the correlation primary (fluidizing) and (burning out) secondary air with sufficient for the practice accuracy

  5. Sludge combustion in fluidized bed reactors at laboratory scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combustion of a dried sewage sludge in laboratory scale fluidized bed has been studied in Naples by the Istituto di ricerche sulla combustione (Irc) in the framework of a National project named Thermal Process with Energy Recovery to be used in laboratory and pre-pilot scale apparatus. The attention has been focused on emissions of unreacted carbon as elutriated fines, on the emissions of pollutant gases and on the assessment of the inventory of fly- and bottom ashes. The combustion behaviour of sewage sludge has been compared with those of a market available Tyre Derived Fuel (TDF) and a biomass from Mediterranean area (Robinia Pseudoacacia) and with that of a South African bituminous coal. Stationary combustion tests were carried out at 8500 C by feeding particles in the size range 0-1 mm into a bed of silica sand without any sorbent addition. The fluidized bed combustor has been operated, at a superficial gas velocity of 0.4 m/s and different excesses of air ranging between 14 and 98%. Relatively high combustion efficiency, larger than 98.9% has been obtained in experiments carried out with sewage sludge and excess of air larger than 20%. These values, are comparable with those obtained in previously experimental activity carried out under similar operative conditions with a South Africa Bituminous coal (97-98%). It is larger than those obtained by using a Tyre Derived Fuel (89-90%) and the Robinia Pseudoacacia Biomass (93-93%). The relative importance of carbon fines elutriation, CO emissions and volatile bypassing the bed in determining the loss of combustion efficiency has been evaluated for the different fuels tested

  6. Gasification of wood in a fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, L.C. de; Marti, T.; Frankenhaeuser, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    A first series of gasification experiments with our fluidized bed gasifier was performed using clean sawdust as fuel. The installation and the analytical systems were tested in a parametric study in which gasification temperature and equivalence ratio were varied. The data acquired will serve to establish the differences between the gasification of clean wood and the gasification of Altholz (scrapwood) and wood/plastics mixtures. (author) 1 fig., 3 tabs., 5 refs.

  7. Actinide transmutation in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optimization method is developed to maximize the burning capability of the ALMR while complying with all constraints imposed on the design for reliability and safety. This method leads to a maximal transuranics enrichment, which is being limited by constraints on reactivity. The enrichment can be raised by using the neutrons less efficiently by increasing leakage from the fuel. With the developed optimization method, a metallic and an oxide fueled ALMR were optimized. Both reactors perform equally well considering the burning of transuranics. However, metallic fuel has a much higher heat conductivity coefficient, which in general leads to better safety characteristics. In search of a more effective waste transmuter, a modified Molten Salt Reactor was designed. A MSR operates on a liquid fuel salt which makes continuous refueling possible, eliminating the issue of the burnup reactivity loss. Also, a prompt negative reactivity feedback is possible for an overmoderated reactor design, even when the Doppler coefficient is positive, due to the fuel expansion with fuel temperature increase. Furthermore, the molten salt fuel can be reprocessed based on a reduction process which is not sensitive to the short-lived spontaneously fissioning actinides. (orig./HP)

  8. Nuclear fusion reactor material data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The working conditions for the materials to be used for nuclear fusion reactors are many sided, complicated and harsh. The existing experimental results can not be employed directly for reactor design. In such a case, it is insufficient to simply accumulate the experimental data on the specific properties of specific materials, and it is necessary to predict the material behaviour in the reactor system by rearranging those data in accordance with the purpose. When extreme characteristics are frequently pursued, wide insight is necessary regarding from the fundamental theory to the testing of practical equipment. In the development of nuclear fusion reactor materials, it is especially important to satisfy the condition that the design purpose of the system for selecting the optimum materials should be fully understood. A new material engineering approach has become necessary, in which a barrier existing so far between materials and the design is removed. From this viewpoint, the specifications, present status and design and development of material data base presently under development, the use of the data base made for trial, and the interface of material development and nuclear fusion reactor design, are described. In this data base, most of the data handle literature data, and the event data base mainly composed of experimental data is very few, similarly to other fields. Data modification will be necessary to respond the questions of users. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  9. Nuclear reactors - the inevitable energy option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The demand for energy in India is sure to rise year after year. Every possible energy source needs to be utilized to its fullest potential to bridge the gap between the demand and supply of electricity. Even while deciding the energy option, the availability of natural resources for future generation and effect of environment for the energy option chosen are to be taken care of. Out of the non conventional sources of electricity, nuclear electricity has greatest potential. Robust and safe energy option has to be harnessed to its potential. We have to bring down the cost of electricity. Even among nuclear reactors, electricity through Fast Breeder Reactors has greater potential. The Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor is a trend setter for moving into an era of electricity generation in the country. The paper brings details of the safety features, accomplishments of the technical challenges and the efforts on hand to reduce the unit energy cost by Nuclear Reactors. The paper also touches upon advantages, environmental impact of Fast Breeder Reactors for this abundant energy resources. Paper will also give a glimpse on technological challenges in design, construction and the preservation. (author)

  10. Deposition reactors for solar grade silicon: A comparative thermal analysis of a Siemens reactor and a fluidized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, A.; Filtvedt, W. O.; Lindholm, D.; Ramachandran, P. A.; Rodríguez, A.; del Cañizo, C.

    2015-12-01

    Polysilicon production costs contribute approximately to 25-33% of the overall cost of the solar panels and a similar fraction of the total energy invested in their fabrication. Understanding the energy losses and the behaviour of process temperature is an essential requirement as one moves forward to design and build large scale polysilicon manufacturing plants. In this paper we present thermal models for two processes for poly production, viz., the Siemens process using trichlorosilane (TCS) as precursor and the fluid bed process using silane (monosilane, MS). We validate the models with some experimental measurements on prototype laboratory reactors relating the temperature profiles to product quality. A model sensitivity analysis is also performed, and the effects of some key parameters such as reactor wall emissivity and gas distributor temperature, on temperature distribution and product quality are examined. The information presented in this paper is useful for further understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of both deposition technologies, and will help in optimal temperature profiling of these systems aiming at lowering production costs without compromising the solar cell quality.

  11. Design of Complex Systems to Achieve Passive Safety: Natural Circulation Cooling of Liquid Salt Pebble Bed Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlat, Raluca Olga

    This dissertation treats system design, modeling of transient system response, and characterization of individual phenomena and demonstrates a framework for integration of these three activities early in the design process of a complex engineered system. A system analysis framework for prioritization of experiments, modeling, and development of detailed design is proposed. Two fundamental topics in thermal-hydraulics are discussed, which illustrate the integration of modeling and experimentation with nuclear reactor design and safety analysis: thermal-hydraulic modeling of heat generating pebble bed cores, and scaled experiments for natural circulation heat removal with Boussinesq liquids. The case studies used in this dissertation are derived from the design and safety analysis of a pebble bed fluoride salt cooled high temperature nuclear reactor (PB-FHR), currently under development in the United States at the university and national laboratories level. In the context of the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) methodology, new tools and approaches are proposed and demonstrated here, which are specifically relevant to technology in the early stages of development, and to analysis of passive safety features. A system decomposition approach is proposed. Definition of system functional requirements complements identification and compilation of the current knowledge base for the behavior of the system. Two new graphical tools are developed for ranking of phenomena importance: a phenomena ranking map, and a phenomena identification and ranking matrix (PIRM). The functional requirements established through this methodology were used for the design and optimization of the reactor core, and for the transient analysis and design of the passive natural circulation driven decay heat removal system for the PB-FHR. A numerical modeling approach for heat-generating porous media, with multi-dimensional fluid flow is presented. The application of this modeling

  12. COMPARISON OF PHENOL REMOVAL IN ANAEROBIC FLUIDIZED BED REACTORS WITH SAND AND GAC MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Yazdanbakhsh; A.R. Mesdaghinia; A. Torabian; M. Shariat

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study two identical anaerobic completely mixed fluidized bed reactors with GAC and sand media were employed for COD & phenol removal. At loading rate of 1.6 g phenol L-1d-1, the efficiency of phenol removal in GAC & sand reactors were 97.7% & 74%, respectively. At high loading rate of phenol (6.09 g phenol I: 1d1 the efficiency of phenol removal in GAC reactor was better than 95%. In GAC reactor, the main mechanism for phenol removal at steady state condition was biological process; this was concluded through balance of gas production and COD removal. Better efficiency of GAC reactor comparing with sand reactor was because of resistance to fluctuations, higher surface for biomass growth and adsorption capacity of activated carbon.

  13. The siting of UK nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choosing a suitable site for a nuclear power station requires the consideration and balancing of several factors. Some ‘physical’ site characteristics, such as the local climate and the potential for seismic activity, will be generic to all reactors designs, while others, such as the availability of cooling water, the area of land required and geological conditions capable of sustaining the weight of the reactor and other buildings will to an extent be dependent on the particular design of reactor chosen (or alternatively the reactor design chosen may to an extent be dependent on the characteristics of an available site). However, one particularly interesting tension is a human and demographic one. On the one hand it is beneficial to place nuclear stations close to centres of population, to reduce transmission losses and other costs (including to the local environment) of transporting electricity over large distances from generator to consumer. On the other it is advantageous to place nuclear stations some distance away from such population centres in order to minimise the potential human consequences of a major release of radioactive materials in the (extremely unlikely) event of a major nuclear accident, not only in terms of direct exposure but also concerning the management of emergency planning, notably evacuation. This paper considers the emergence of policies aimed at managing this tension in the UK. In the first phase of nuclear development (roughly speaking 1945–1965) there was a highly cautious attitude, with installations being placed in remote rural locations with very low population density. The second phase (1965–1985) saw a more relaxed approach, allowing the development of AGR nuclear power stations (which with concrete pressure vessels were regarded as significantly safer) closer to population centres (in ‘semi-urban’ locations, notably at Hartlepool and Heysham). In the third phase (1985–2005) there was very little new nuclear

  14. Power Nuclear Reactors: technology and innovation for development in future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference is about some historicals task of the fission technology as well as many types of Nuclear Reactors. Enrichment of fuel, wastes, research reactors and power reactors, a brief advertisment about Uruguay electric siystem and power generation, energetic worldwide, proliferation, safety reactors, incidents, accidents, Three-Mile Island accident, Chernobil accident, damages, risks, classification and description of Power reactors steam generation, nuclear reactor cooling systems, future view

  15. Nuclear reactor spring strip grid spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved and novel grid spacer for maintaining the fuel rods of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly in substantially parallel array is described. The invention provides for spring strips to maintain the fuel elements in their desired orientation which have more positive alignment than previous types while allowing greater flexibility to counterbalance the effects of differential thermal expansion. (UK)

  16. Inspecting fuel pellets for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved method of controlling the inspection, sorting and classifying of nuclear reactor fuel pellets, including a mechanical handling system and a computer controlled data processing system, is described. Having investigated the diameter, length, surface flaws and weights of the pellets, they are sorted accordingly and the relevant data are stored. (U.K.)

  17. Current Abstracts Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bales, J.D.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1993-01-01

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  18. Mounting impellors of nuclear reactor pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A coolant pump for a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor construction is described which has its impellor hub mounted on the drive shaft with an annular clearance. A drive coupling is effected by a plurality of cylindrical keys disposed parallel to the longitudinal axes of the hub and shaft and equally spaced in the clearance between them. (author)

  19. ETRR-2 nuclear reactor: Facility specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report provides technical details on the ETRR-2 nuclear reactor core and immediate structure for analysis purposes. The goal of the report is to provide sufficient geometric and material data to build a computational neutronic model of the facility. (author)

  20. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly spacer grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Designs of nuclear reactor fuel assembly spacer grids for supporting and spacing fuel elements are described which do not utilize resilient grid plate protrusions in the peripheral band but retain the advantages inherent in the combination resilient and rigid protrusion cells. (U.K.)

  1. Refueling machine for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved refuelling machine for inserting and removing fuel assemblies from a nuclear reactor is described which has been designed to increase the reliability of such machines. The system incorporates features which enable the refuelling operation to be performed more efficiently and economically. (U.K.)

  2. Nuclear heating in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear heating rates are estimated with multiplying neutron and gamma-ray fluxes by nuclear heating constants of KERMA factors. The gamma-ray KERMA factors can be given exactly by the value of gamma-ray energy deposition of (incident gamma-ray energy) - (outgoing gamma-ray energy). On the other hand there are two methods to calculating the neutron KERMA factors. One is a direct method and the other an energy balance method. In the direct method the neutron KERMA factors are given by kinematics. The uncertainties in KERMA factors by this method are considered the same as those in nuclear data of 20-30%. The KERMA factors by the energy balance method have several ten per cent uncertainties, because of deduction between large values each other. In fact since all nuclear data are not always consistent with each other and have uncertainties, we had better apply the direct method. In considering decay heat of short half life nuclides into KERMA factors, there are some problems such as application to shorter pulse operation than the half life of the nuclides. It is emphasized that nuclear heat and decay heat should be separately treated. (author)

  3. From field to factory-Taking advantage of shop manufacturing for the pebble bed modular reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The move of nuclear plant construction from the field to the factory for small, advanced pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR) designs has significant benefits compared to traditional light water reactor (LWR) field oriented designs. The use of modular factory construction techniques has a growing economic benefit over time through well-established process learning applications. This paper addresses the basic PBMR design objectives and commercialization model that drive this approach; provides a brief technical description of the PBMR design and layout with representative CAD views and discusses derived figures of merit highlighting the relative simplicity of PBMR compared to a modern LWR. The discussion emphasizes that more of PBMR can be built in the factory due to the simple design of a direct helium Brayton cycle compared to an indirect LWR steam cycle with its associated equipment. For the PBMR design there are fewer and less cumbersome auxiliary and safety systems with their attendant support requirements. Additionally, the labor force economic efficiency for nuclear projects is better in the factory than in the field, including consideration of labor costs and nuclear quality programs. Industrial learning is better in the factory because of the more controlled environment, mechanization optimization opportunities and because of the more stable labor force compared to the field. Supply chain benefits are more readily achievable with strategic contracts for module suppliers. Although building a nuclear power plant is not a typical high volume manufacturing process, for the PBMR-type of plant, with its high degree of standardization and relatively small, simplified design, the shift to factory work has a significant impact on overall project cost due to earlier identification and better coordination of parallel construction paths. This is in stark contrast to the construction of a large LWR in the past. Finally, the PBMR modular plant concept continues at the

  4. Operation and utilizations of Dalat nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reconstructed Dalat nuclear research reactor was commissioned in March 1984 and up to September 1988 more than 6200 hours of operation at nominal power have been recorded. The major utilizations of the reactor include radioisotope production, activation analysis, nuclear data research and training. A brief review of the utilizations of the reactor is presented. Some aspects of reactor safety are also discussed. (author)

  5. Ultrasonic flaw detection device in nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Yoshishige; Takabayashi, Jun-ichi

    1996-02-02

    Flaws on an outer circumferential surface of a shroud at inner side than jet pumps in a nuclear reactor are simply and reliably detected using ultrasonic waves. Ultrasonic waves are irradiated to the shroud which surrounds a reactor core at the inner side and has a plurality of jet pumps at the outer side at predetermined distances. An ultrasonic wave probe which detects flaws based on reflecting waves is suspended using a suspending rope. A jet nozzle is attached to a probe-attaching portion and water is jetted out to reactor water to move the probe-attaching portion in the reactor. Then, flaws can be detected easily and reliably using ultrasonic waves even at a narrow gap at the inner side of each jet pump. (N.H.).

  6. Ultrasonic flaw detection device in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flaws on an outer circumferential surface of a shroud at inner side than jet pumps in a nuclear reactor are simply and reliably detected using ultrasonic waves. Ultrasonic waves are irradiated to the shroud which surrounds a reactor core at the inner side and has a plurality of jet pumps at the outer side at predetermined distances. An ultrasonic wave probe which detects flaws based on reflecting waves is suspended using a suspending rope. A jet nozzle is attached to a probe-attaching portion and water is jetted out to reactor water to move the probe-attaching portion in the reactor. Then, flaws can be detected easily and reliably using ultrasonic waves even at a narrow gap at the inner side of each jet pump. (N.H.)

  7. Core design of NPP Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) type using computer code MCNP-5 for beginning of life (BOL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The core design of Nuclear Power Plant for Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) type with 70 MWe capacity power in Beginning of Life (BOL) has been performed. The aim of this analysis, to know percent enrichment, temperature distribution and safety value by negative temperature coefficient at type PBMR if reactor power become lower equal to 70 MWe. This analysis was expected become one part of overview project development the power plant with 10.000 MWe of total capacity, spread evenly in territory of Indonesia especially to support of smelter industries. The results showed that, effective multiplication factor (keff) with power 70 MWe critical condition at enrichment 5,626 % is 1,00031±0, 00087, based on enrichment result, a value of the temperature coefficient reactivity is 10,0006 pcm/K. Based on the results of these studies, it can be concluded that the PBMR 70 MWe design is theoretically safe. (author)

  8. Space nuclear reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Requirements for electrical and propulsion power for space are expected to increase dramatically in the 1980s. Nuclear power is probably the only source for some deep space missions and a major competitor for many orbital missions, especially those at geosynchronous orbit. Because of the potential requirements, a technology program on space nuclear power plant components has been initiated by the Department of Energy. The missions that are foreseen, the current power plant concept, the technology program plan, and early key results are described

  9. Safety review, assessment and inspection on research reactors, experimental reactors and nuclear heating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NNSA and its regional office step further strengthened the regulation on the safety of in-service research reactors in 1996. A lot of work has been done on the supervision of safe in rectifying the review and assessment of modified items, the review of operational documents, the treatment of accidents, the establishment of the system for operational experience feedback, daily and routine inspection on nuclear safety. The internal management of the operating organization on nuclear safety was further strengthened, nuclear safety culture was further enhanced, the promotion in nuclear safety and the safety situation for in-service research reactors were improved

  10. Safety review, assessment and inspection on research reactors, experimental reactors, nuclear heating reactors and critical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NNSA organized mainly in 1999 to complete the verification loop in core of the high flux experimental reactor with the 2000 kW fuel elements, the re-starting of China Pulsed Reactor, review and assessment on nuclear safety for the restarting of the Uranium-water critical Facility and treat the fracture event with the fuel tubes in the HWRR

  11. Titanium-based coatings on copper by chemical vapor deposition in fluidized bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium, TiN and TiOx coatings were deposited on copper and Cu-Ni alloys by chemical vapor deposition in fluidized bed reactors. These coatings provide the copper with a tenfold increase in corrosion resistance in chloride aqueous environments, as determined by a.c. impedance studies. (orig.)

  12. ANALYSIS OF AN AEROBIC FLUIDIZED BED REACTOR DEGRADING MTBE AND BTEX AT REDUCED EBCTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the biodegradation of MTBE and BTEX using a fluidized bed reactor (FBR) with granular activated carbon (GAC) as a biological attachment medium. Batch experiments were run to analyze the MTBE and TBA degradation kinetics of the culture ...

  13. Use of nuclear reactors for seawater desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) status report on desalination, including nuclear desalination, was issued nearly 2 decades ago. The impending water crisis in many parts of the world, and especially in the Middle East, makes it appropriate to provide an updated report as a basis for consideration of future activities. This report provides a state-of-the-art review of desalination and pertinent nuclear reactor technology. Information is included on fresh water needs and costs, environmental risks associated with alternatives for water production, and data regarding the technical and economic characteristics of immediately available desalination systems, as well as compatible nuclear technology. 68 refs, 60 figs, 11 tabs

  14. Renewable lower reflector structure for a high temperature pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The description is given of a renewable lower reflector structure for a high temperature pebble bed reactor of the type comprising a cylindrical or prismatic graphite vessel wrapped in concrete and terminating at its lower end with a conical or pyramidal bottom fitted with a central aperture allowing the pebbles to be discharged by gravity. This structure includes a bed of several layers of protective graphite pebbles on the bottom and, fitted vertically so as to be removable along the centre line of the central aperture through the reflector and the concrete, a graphite block drilled in its centre to allow the discharge of the fuel pebbles and the protective pebbles. The graphite block rises above the level of the central aperture by an extent corresponding to the thickness of the bed when the reactor is working

  15. CFD Simulation of Pilot HDS Trickle-Bed Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Tukač, V.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study is to compare experimental measurement obtained by RTD method with result of computational model. The goal of this work is to evaluate influence of dilution extent on operation of pilot test reactor and to forecast interaction between intrinsic reaction kinetic, hydrodynamics and mass transfer.

  16. Reactor Structure Materials: Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress and achievements in 1999 in SCK-CEN's programme on applied and fundamental nuclear fuel research in 1999 are reported. Particular emphasis is on thermochemical fuel research, the modelling of fission gas release in LWR fuel as well as on integral experiments

  17. Chlorination of commercial molybdenite concentrate in a fluidized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, K. U.; Sathiyamoorthy, D.; Bose, D. K.; Sundaresan, M.; Gupta, C. K.

    1987-06-01

    Studies on recovery of molybdenum from commercial grade molybdenite using the technique of fluidized bed chlorination in the presence of oxygen are presented. Molybdenum recovery above 99 pct at a chlorine utilization efficiency of 84 pct has been achieved for a fluidizing gas flow-rate of 3 L/min of the gases Cl2, O2, and N2 mixed in the proportion of 2∶5∶23, respectively, at 300 °C. The investigations on kinetics showed that the overall oxychlorination reaction is controlled by chemical reaction and is of first order with respect to particle surface area.

  18. Radiation protection in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: People are exposed to ionizing radiation in many different forms: cosmic rays that penetrate earth atmosphere or radiation from soil and mineral resources are natural forms of ionizing radiation. Other forms are produced artificially using radioactive materials for various beneficial applications in medicine, industry and other fields. The greatest concerns about ionizing radiation are tied to its potential health effects and a system of radiation protection has been developed to protect people from harmful radiation. The promotion of radiation protection is one of the International Atomic Energy Agency main activities. Radiation protection concerns the protection of workers, members of public, and patients undergoing diagnosis and therapy against the harmful effects of ionizing radiation. The report covers the responsibility of radiation protection officer in Egypt Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2) in Inshas - Egypt, also presents the protection against ionizing radiation from external sources, including types of radiation, sources of radiation (natural - artificial), and measuring units of dose equivalent rate. Also covers the biological effects of ionizing radiation, personal monitoring and radiation survey instruments and safe transport of radioactive materials. The report describes the Egypt Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2), the survey instruments used, also presents the results obtained and gave a relations between different categories of data. (author)

  19. Conversion enhancement of tubular fixed-bed reactor for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis using static mixer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Phavanee Narataruksa; Sabaithip Tungkamani; Karn Pana-Suppamassadu; Phongsak Keeratiwintakorn; Siriluck Nivitchanyong; Piyapong Hunpinyo; Hussanai Sukkathanyawat; Prayut Jiamrittiwong; Visarut Nopparat

    2012-01-01

    Recently,Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) has become an interesting technology because of its potential role in producing biofuels via Biomassto-Liquids (BTL) processes.In Fischer-Tropsch (FT) section,biomass-derived syngas,mainly composed of a mixture of carbon monoxide (CO)and hydrogen (H2),is converted into various forms of hydrocarbon products over a catalyst at specified temperature and pressure.Fixed-bed reactors are typically used for these processes as conventional FT reactors.The fixed-bed or packed-bed type reactor has its drawbacks,which are heat transfer limitation,i.e.a hot spot problem involved highly exothermic characteristics of FT reaction,and mass transfer limitation due to the condensation of liquid hydrocarbon products occurred on catalyst surface.This work is initiated to develop a new chemical reactor design in which a better distribution of gaseous reactants and hydrocarbon products could be achieved,and led to higher throughput and conversion.The main goal of the research is the enhancement of a fixed-bed reactor,focusing on the application of KenicsTM static mixer insertion in the tubular packed-bed reactor.Two FTS experiments were carried out using two reactors i.e.,with and without static mixer insertion within catalytic beds.The modeled syngas used was a mixed gas composed of H2/CO in 2 ∶ 1 molar ratio that was fed at the rate of 30 mL(STP)·min-1 (GHSV ≈ 136 mL·g-1cat·h-1) into the fixed Ru supported aluminum catalyst bed of weight 13.3 g.The reaction was carried out at 180 ℃ and atmospheric pressure continuously for 36 h for both experiments.Both transient and steady-state conversions (in terms of time on stream) were reported.The results revealed that the steady-state CO conversion for the case using the static mixer was approximately 3.5 times higher than that of the case without static mixer.In both cases,the values of chain growth probability of hydrocarbon products (α) for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were 0.92 and 0.89 for

  20. Perspective of nuclear energy and advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future nuclear energy growth will be the result of the contributions of every single plant being constructed or projected at present as it is connected to the grid. As per IAEA, there exists presently 34 nuclear power plants under construction 81 with the necessary permits and funding and 223 proposed, which are plants seriously pursuing permits and financing. This means that in a few decades the number of nuclear power plants in operation will have doubled. This growth rate is characterised by the incorporation of new countries to the nuclear club and the gradually increasing importance of Asian countries. During this expansive phase, generation III and III+designs are or will be used. These designs incorporate the experience from operating plants, and introduce innovations on rationalization design efficiency and safety, with emphasis on passive safety features. In a posterior phase, generation IV designs, presently under development, will be employed. Generation IV consists of several types of reactors (fast reactors, very high temperature reactors, etc), which will improve further sustain ability, economy, safety and reliability concepts. The described situation seems to lead to a renaissance of the nuclear energy to levels hardly thinkable several years ago. (Author)