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Sample records for bed methane cbm

  1. Coal bed methane: current status and outlook - Panorama 2008; CBM: bilan et perspectives - Panorama 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    In many parts of the world, there is growing interest in coal bed methane (CBM), which has been exploited for years in the United States. One reason is undoubtedly that some new gas producing countries, including India and China, are seeking to limit the level of their gas dependence. Another is the need to control greenhouse gas emissions, especially using mechanisms set up under the Kyoto Protocol. Finally, the increase in gas prices on international markets also encourages this trend.

  2. 3D Geological Modeling of CoalBed Methane (CBM) Resources in the Taldykuduk Block Karaganda Coal Basin, Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Raman; Kiponievich Ogay, Evgeniy; Royer, Jean-Jacques; Zhapbasbayev, Uzak; Panfilova, Irina

    2015-04-01

    Coal Bed Methane (CBM) is gas stored in coal layers. It can be extracted from wells after hydraulic fracturing and/or solvent injection, and secondary recovery techniques such as CO2 injection. Karaganda Basin is a very favorable candidate region to develop CBM production for the following reasons: (i) Huge gas potential; (ii) Available technologies for extracting and commercializing the gas produced by CBM methods; (iii) Experience in degassing during underground mining operations for safety reasons; (iv) Local needs in energy for producing electricity for the industrial and domestic market. The objectives of this work are to model the Taldykuduk block coal layers and their properties focusing on Coal Bed Methane production. It is motivated by the availability of large coal bed methane resources in Karaganda coal basin which includes 4 300 Bm3 equivalent 2 billion tons of coal (B = billion = 109) with gas content 15-25 m3/t of coal (for comparison San Juan basin (USA) has production in a double porosity model considering two domains: the matrix (m) and the fracture (f) for which the initial and boundary conditions are different. The resulting comprehensive 3D models had helped in better understanding the tectonic structures of the region, especially the relationships between the fault systems.

  3. Methodology for the exploration of coal bed methane (CBM in Colombia coal basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E. Mariño

    2013-07-01

    additional equipment have been adapted and improved in the UPTC by Geological Engineering research group during the last years. These CBM guides have been written following the current knowledge on CBM and propose additional recommendations for making the sampling and gas measuring more reliable and supportive of the CBM exploration projects that are taking place in the different coal basins in Colombia.

  4. Coal Bed Methane Primer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

    2005-05-25

    During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of

  5. The potential for coalbed methane (CBM) development in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-09-01

    This report presents fiscal and regulatory recommendations of the coalbed methane (CBM) Advisory Committee which consists of representatives from Alberta's oil and gas industry who participated in a study to determine the potential for coalbed methane development in the province. CBM is a natural gas produced as a by-product of the coal formation process. This study examined the CBM reserve base in Alberta along with the necessary steps and strategies required to develop it. There is increased interest in natural gas from Alberta's coal resources because of the forecast for reasonable natural gas prices coupled with an increase in energy demand. The remaining established natural gas reserves are estimated at 43 trillion cubic feet and unconventional supplies of natural gas will be needed by 2008 to meet this increasing demand. The recoverable reserves of CBM are estimated to be between 0 and 135 trillion cubic feet. This report discussed the following mitigation strategies suggested by industry that may applicable to CBM development in Alberta: (1) potential technical mitigation strategies, (2) potential land access and tenure strategies, (3) potential water disposal and diversion mitigation strategies, (4) potential non-technical mitigation strategies, and (5) potential economic mitigation strategies. The study concluded that since no two CBM basins are the same, it is necessary to have good baseline resource inventory data. It was also noted that evolving management, drilling and completion techniques will continue to enhance the economic understanding of Alberta's extensive coal beds. It was suggested that lessons from CBM development in the United States can be useful for development in Alberta since there are currently no publicly recognized commercial production of CBM in Alberta. 24 refs., 6 tabs., 25 figs

  6. Studi Awal Desain LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas Plant Dari Coal Bed Methane (CBM Dengan Kapasitas Feed 40 MMSCFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Fahmi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dalam penelitian ini telah dilakukan perancangan Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG Plant dari CBM degan kapasitas feed 40 MMSCFD dan waktu operasi 24 jam/hari dan 330 hari/tahun. Perancangan LNG plant dari CBM ini bertujuan untuk membantu usaha Negara dalam melakukan diversifikasi energi untuk mengatasi krisis energi. Salah satu contoh diversifikasi energi adalah mengganti bahan bakar pembangkit listrik High Speed Diesel (HSD menjadi LNG yang harganya relative lebih murah. Penelitian ini didasarkan pada simulasi dengan Aspen HYSYS, dimana terdapat batasan penelitian yakni gas alam yang dicairkan dengan cara didinginkan pada temperatur sekitar -161.3oC dan pada tekanan 1.06 bar. Tujuan pabrik LNG ini adalah Provinsi Bali hal ini dikarenakan elektrifikasi daerah tersebut cukup rendah. Dengan konsumsi minyak HSD yang tinggi tetapi elektrifikasi yang rendah maka diperlukan sumber energi alternatif untuk meningkatkan daya yang dihasilkan dan area distribusi sehingga tingkat elektrifikasi akan menjadi lebih tinggi. Pabrik LNG ini didirikan di Muara Enim, Sumatera Selatan pada tahun 2016. Penentuan lokasi pabrik berorientasi pada ketersediaan sumber bahan baku CBM. Menurut data DITJEN MIGAS Muara enim memiliki potensi CBM sebesar 0.5 TCF. Potensi sebesar ini dapat digunakan selama 60 tahun dengan kapasitas feed LNG plant sebesar 40 MMSCFD Proses pembuatan LNG dari gas alam ini menggunakan Proses On-Shore LNG menggunakan beberapa rangkaian proses yaitu : Unit Penghilang CO2 dan H2S : menggunakan Amine Cycle, Unit Dehidrasi : menggunakan molecular sieve, Unit Refrigeran dan Pencairan : menggunakan MCR Coldbox Sumber dana investasi berasal dari modal sendiri sebesar 20 % biaya investasi dan pinjaman jangka pendek sebesar 80 % biaya investasi dengan bunga sebesar 12 % per tahun. Dari analisa perhitungan ekonomi didapat hasil-hasil sebagai berikut : Investasi : 163,557 MUSD, Internal Rate of Return : 25.66 %, POT : 3.26 tahun, BEP : 58.86 %, NPV 10 year   :120

  7. Coal bed methane: current status and outlook - Panorama 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    In many parts of the world, there is growing interest in coal bed methane (CBM), which has been exploited for years in the United States. One reason is undoubtedly that some new gas producing countries, including India and China, are seeking to limit the level of their gas dependence. Another is the need to control greenhouse gas emissions, especially using mechanisms set up under the Kyoto Protocol. Finally, the increase in gas prices on international markets also encourages this trend

  8. Fluid-bed methane proposed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    The first full scale plant for the production of methane from organic waste could be built in the next few years believes M.J. Nyns of the University of Louvain, Belgium, utilizing either expanded bed or fluidised bed systems, with more than one stage, in a continuous flow arrangement. Up to 8.0 m cubed gas/m cubed digester/day could be produced with residence times reduced to 34 hours.

  9. Sage-Grouse and Coal-Bed Methane: Can They Coexist within the Powder River Basin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Concerns are growing regarding the availability of sustainable energy sources due to a rapidly growing human population and a better understanding of climate change. In recent years, the United States has focused much attention on developing domestic energy sources, which include coal-bed methane (CBM). There are vast deposits of the natural gas…

  10. In situ and Enriched Microbial Community Composition and Function Associated with Coal Bed Methane from Powder River Basin Coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, Elliott; Davis, Katherine; Varonka, Matthew; Orem, William; Fields, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Coal bed methane (CBM) is a relatively clean source of energy but current CBM production techniques have not sustained long-term production or produced enough methane to remain economically practical with lower natural gas prices. Enhancement of the in situ microbial community that actively generates CBM with the addition of specific nutrients could potentially sustain development. CBM production more than doubled from native microbial populations from Powder River Basin (PRB) coal beds, when yeast extract and several individual components of yeast extract (proteins and amino acids) were added to laboratory microcosms. Microbial populations capable of hydrogenotrophic (hydrogen production/utilization) methanogenesis were detected in situ and under non-stimulated conditions. Stimulation with yeast extract caused a shift in the community to microorganisms capable of acetoclastic (acetate production/utilization) methanogenesis. Previous isotope analysis from CBM production wells indicated a similar microbial community shift as observed in stimulation experiments: hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was found throughout the PRB, but acetoclastic methanogenesis dominated major recharge areas. In conjunction, a high proportion of cyanobacterial and algal SSU rRNA gene sequences were detected in a CBM well within a major recharge area, suggesting that these phototrophic organisms naturally stimulate methane production. In laboratory studies, adding phototrophic (algal) biomass stimulated CBM production by PRB microorganisms similarly to yeast extract (~40μg methane increase per gram of coal). Analysis of the British thermal unit (BTU) content of coal from long-term incubations indicated >99.5% of BTU content remained after CBM stimulation with either algae or yeast extract. Biomimicry of in situ algal CBM stimulation could lead to technologies that utilize coupled biological systems (photosynthesis and methane production) that sustainably enhance CBM production and generate

  11. Casing drilling TM : a viable technology for coal bed methane?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madell, G.; Muqeem, M. [Tesco Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    This paper highlighted the experience that Tesco has gained by drilling more than 30 wells using only casings as the drill stem, suggesting that such technology could be advantageous for Coal Bed Methane (CBM) exploration and development. Tesco has manufactured a mobile and compact hydraulic drilling rig that is ideal to meet the great demand for CBM development in Canada. The Casing Drilling TM system, when used in conjunction with the drilling rig, could be very effective and efficient for exploration and development of CBM reserves which typically require extensive coring. Continuous coring while drilling ahead and wire line retrieval can offer time savings and quick core recovery of large diameter core required for exploration core desorption tests. The proposed system may also have the potential to core or drill typically tight gas sands or coal beds under balanced with air or foam. This would reduce drilling fluid damage while finding gas at the same time. Compared to conventional drill pipes, Casing Drilling TM could also be effective with water production from shallow sands because of the smaller annual clearance which requires less air volumes to lift any produced water. 8 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs.

  12. Microbially-Enhanced Coal Bed Methane: Strategies for Increased Biogenic Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, K.; Barhart, E. P.; Schweitzer, H. D.; Cunningham, A. B.; Gerlach, R.; Hiebert, R.; Fields, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Coal is the largest fossil fuel resource in the United States. Most of this coal is deep in the subsurface making it costly and potentially dangerous to extract. However, in many of these deep coal seams, methane, the main component of natural gas, has been discovered and successfully harvested. Coal bed methane (CBM) currently accounts for approximately 7.5% of the natural gas produced in the U.S. Combustion of natural gas produces substantially less CO2 and toxic emissions (e.g. heavy metals) than combustion of coal or oil thereby making it a cleaner energy source. In the large coal seams of the Powder River Basin (PRB) in southeast Montana and northeast Wyoming, CBM is produced almost entirely by biogenic processes. The in situ conversion of coal to CBM by the native microbial community is of particular interest for present and future natural gas sources as it provides the potential to harvest energy from coal seams with lesser environmental impacts than mining and burning coal. Research at Montana State University has shown the potential for enhancing the subsurface microbial processes that produce CBM. Long-term batch enrichments have investigated the methane enhancement potential of yeast extract as well as algal and cyanobacterial biomass additions with increased methane production observed with all three additions when compared to no addition. Future work includes quantification of CBM enhancement and normalization of additions. This presentation addresses the options thus far investigated for increasing CBM production and the next steps for developing the enhanced in situ conversion of coal to CBM.

  13. Methylotrophic methanogenesis governs the biogenic coal bed methane formation in Eastern Ordos Basin, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Hongguang; Yu, Zhisheng; Liu, Ruyin [Graduate Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). College of Resources and Environment; Zhang, Hongxun [Graduate Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). College of Resources and Environment; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences; Zhong, Qiding; Xiong, Zhenghe [China National Research Institute of Food and Fermentation Industries, Beijing (China). Food Analysis using Isotope Technology Lab

    2012-12-15

    To identify the methanogenic pathways present in a deep coal bed methane (CBM) reservoir associated with Eastern Ordos Basin in China, a series of geochemical and microbiological studies was performed using gas and water samples produced from the Liulin CBM reservoir. The composition and stable isotopic ratios of CBM implied a mixed biogenic and thermogenic origin of the methane. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed the dominance of the methylotrophic methanogen Methanolobus in the water produced. The high potential of methane production by methylotrophic methanogens was found in the enrichments using the water samples amended with methanol and incubated at 25 and 35 C. Methylotrophic methanogens were the dominant archaea in both enrichments as shown by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that fermentative, sulfate-reducing, and nitrate-reducing bacteria inhabiting the water produced were a factor in coal biodegradation to fuel methanogens. These results suggested that past and ongoing biodegradation of coal by methylotrophic methanogens and syntrophic bacteria, as well as thermogenic CBM production, contributed to the Liulin CBM reserves associated with the Eastern Ordos Basin. (orig.)

  14. Thermodynamic Analysis on of Skid-Mounted Coal-bed Methane Liquefaction Device using Cryogenic Turbo-Expander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuangtao; Niu, Lu; Zeng, Qiang; Li, Xiaojiang; Lou, Fang; Chen, Liang; Hou, Yu

    2017-12-01

    Coal-bed methane (CBM) reserves are rich in Sinkiang of China, and liquefaction is a critical step for the CBM exploration and utilization. Different from other CBM gas fields in China, CBM distribution in Sinkiang is widespread but scattered, and the pressure, flow-rate and nitrogen content of CBM feed vary significantly. The skid-mounted liquefaction device is suggested as an efficient and economical way to recover methane. Turbo-expander is one of the most important parts which generates the cooling capacity for the cryogenic liquefaction system. Using turbo-expander, more cooling capacity and higher liquefied fraction can be achieved. In this study, skid-mounted CBM liquefaction processes based on Claude cycle are established. Cryogenic turbo-expander with high expansion ratio is employed to improve the efficiency of CBM liquefaction process. The unit power consumption per liquefaction mole flow-rate for CBM feed gas is used as the object function for process optimization, compressor discharge pressure, flow ratio of feed gas to turbo-expander and nitrogen friction are analyzed, and optimum operation range of the liquefaction processes are obtained.

  15. The relative contribution of methanotrophs to microbial communities and carbon cycling in soil overlying a coal-bed methane seep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Christopher T.; Slater, Gregory F.; Dias, Robert F.; Carr, Stephanie A.; Reddy, Christopher M.; Schmidt, Raleigh; Mandernack, Kevin W.

    2013-01-01

    Seepage of coal-bed methane (CBM) through soils is a potential source of atmospheric CH4 and also a likely source of ancient (i.e. 14C-dead) carbon to soil microbial communities. Natural abundance 13C and 14C compositions of bacterial membrane phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and soil gas CO2 and CH4 were used to assess the incorporation of CBM-derived carbon into methanotrophs and other members of the soil microbial community. Concentrations of type I and type II methanotroph PLFA biomarkers (16:1ω8c and 18:1ω8c, respectively) were elevated in CBM-impacted soils compared with a control site. Comparison of PLFA and 16s rDNA data suggested type I and II methanotroph populations were well estimated and overestimated by their PLFA biomarkers, respectively. The δ13C values of PLFAs common in type I and II methanotrophs were as negative as −67‰ and consistent with the assimilation of CBM. PLFAs more indicative of nonmethanotrophic bacteria had δ13C values that were intermediate indicating assimilation of both plant- and CBM-derived carbon. Δ14C values of select PLFAs (−351 to −936‰) indicated similar patterns of CBM assimilation by methanotrophs and nonmethanotrophs and were used to estimate that 35–91% of carbon assimilated by nonmethanotrophs was derived from CBM depending on time of sampling and soil depth.

  16. Analysis of flammability limits for the liquefaction process of oxygen-bearing coal-bed methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Q.Y.; Wang, L.; Ju, Y.L.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A novel liquefaction and distillation process is designed for oxygen bearing coal-bed methane. → Oxygen contained in coal-bed methane is removed in distillation process. → Flammability limits are analyzed for the whole operation process. → We find explosion hazard may exist in distillation tower. → Effective measures are proposed to ensure the operation safety in distillation tower. - Abstract: A novel liquefaction and distillation process has been proposed and designed for the typical oxygen-bearing coal-bed methane (CBM), in which the impurities of the oxygen and nitrogen components are removed in the distillation column. The flammability limit theory combining with HYSYS simulation results are employed to analyze and calculate the flammability limits and the results indicate that no flammability hazard exists in the stages of compression, liquefaction and throttling. However, flammability hazard exists at the top the distillation column because the methane mole fraction decreases to the value below the upper flammability limit (UFL). The safety measures of initially removing oxygen content from the feed gas combining with the control of the bottom flowrate (flowrate of the liquid product at column bottom) are proposed to ensure the operation safety of the liquefaction process. The results reveal that the operation safety of the whole process can be guaranteed, together with high methane recovery rate and high purity of the liquid product. The applicability of the liquefaction process has also been analyzed in this paper. The simulation results can offer references for the separation of oxygen from CBM, the analysis of flammability limits and the safety measures for the whole process.

  17. The quality of microorganism on coal bed methane processing with various livestock waste in laboratory scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlina, E. T.; Kurnani, Tb. B. A.; Hidayati, Y. A.; Rahmah, K. N.; Joni, I. M.; Harlia, E.

    2018-02-01

    Coal-bed Methane (CBM) is a form of natural gas extracted from coal and has been developed as future energy source. Organic materials are required as nutrition source for methanogenic microbes. The addition of cattle waste in the formation of CBM on coal media can be utilized as organic materials as well as methanogenic microbe sources. This research covered study of total amount of anaerobic microbes, methane production, protozoa, fungi and endoparasites. Descriptive approach is conducted for this study. Media used for culturing methanogens is Nutrient Agar in powder form and Lactose Broth with the addition of rumen fluid. The technique for counting microbes is through Total Plate Count in anaerobic Hungate tube, methane was analyzed using Gas Chromatography (GC), while identification of protozoa, fungi and endoparasites based on its morphology is conducted before and after anaerobic fermentation process. Incubation period is 30 days. The results showed that growth of anaerobic microbes from dairy cattle waste i.e. biogas sludge is 3.57×103 CFU/ml and fresh feces is 3.38 × 104 CFU/ml, growth of anaerobic microbes from beef cattle waste i.e. biogas sludge is 7.0 × 105 CFU/ml; fresh feces is 7.5 x 104 CFU/ml; and rumen contents of about 1.33 × 108 CFU/ml. Methane production in dairy cattle waste in sludge and fresh feces amounted to 10.57% and 2.39%, respectively. Methane production in beef cattle waste in sludge accounted for 5.95%; in fresh feces it is about 0.41%; and rumen contents of 4.92%. Decreasing of protozoa during fermentation to 84.27%, dominated by Eimeria sp. Decreasing of fungi to 16%, dominated by A. Niger, A. Flavus, A. Fumigatus and Monilia sitophila. Decreasing of endoparasitic worms to 15%, dominated by Strongylus sp. and Fasciola sp. The growth of anaerobic microbes and methane production indicated that dairy cattle waste and beef cattle waste have potential as source of methanogenic microbes, meanwhile the decreasing amount of protozoa

  18. Candidate for solar power: a novel desalination technology for coal bed methane produced water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattler, Allan; Hanley, Charles; Hightower, Michael; Wright, Emily; Wallace, Sam; Pohl, Phillip; Donahe, Ryan; Andelman, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory and field developments are underway to use solar energy to power a desalination technology - capacitive deionization - for water produced by remote Coal Bed Methane (CBM) natural gas wells. Due to the physical remoteness of many CBM wells throughout the Southwestern U>S> as shown in Figure 1, this approach may offer promise. This promise is not only from its effectiveness in removing salt from CBM water and allowing it to be utilized for various applications, but also for its potentially lower energy consumption compared Figure 1: Candidate remote well sites for planned field implementation of new PV-powered desalination process: (a) Raton Basin and (b) San Juan Basin, New Mexico to other technologies, such as reverse osmosis. This coupled with the remoteness (Figure 1) of thousands these wells, makes them more feasible for use with photovoltaic (solar, electric, PV) systems. Concurrent laboratory activities are providing information about the effectiveness of this technology and of the attender energy requirements of this technology under various produced water qualities and water reuse applications, such as salinity concentrations and water flows. These parameters are being used to drive the design of integrated PV-powered desalination systems. Full-scale field implementations are planned, with data collection and analysis designed to optimize the system design for practical remote applications. Earlier laboratory (and very recent laboratory) studies of capacitive deionization have shown promise at common CBM salinity levels. The technology may require less energy. be less susceptible to fouling and is more compact than equivalent reverse osmosis (RO) systems. The technology uses positively and negatively charged electrodes to attract charged ions in a liquid, such as dissolved salts, metals, and some organics, to the electrodes. This concentrates the ions at the electrodes and reduced the ion concentrations in the liquid. This paper discusses the

  19. Damage Effects and Fractal Characteristics of Coal Pore Structure during Liquid CO2 Injection into a Coal Bed for E-CBM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ma

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Pore structure has a significant influence on coal-bed methane (CBM enhancement. Injecting liquid CO2 into coal seams is an effective way to increase CBM recovery. However, there has been insufficient research regarding the damage effects and fractal characteristics of pore structure at low temperature induced by injecting liquid CO2 into coal samples. Therefore, the methods of low-pressure nitrogen adsorption-desorption (LP-N2-Ad and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP were used to investigate the damage effects and fractal characteristics of pore structure with full aperture as the specimens were frozen by liquid CO2. The adsorption isotherms revealed that the tested coal samples belonged to type B, indicating that they contained many bottle and narrow-slit shaped pores. The average pore diameter (APD; average growth rate of 18.20%, specific surface area (SSA; average growth rate of 7.38%, and total pore volume (TPV; average growth rate of 18.26% increased after the specimens were infiltrated by liquid CO2, which indicated the generation of new pores and the transformation of original pores. Fractal dimensions D1 (average of 2.58 and D2 (average of 2.90 of treated coal samples were both larger the raw coal (D1, average of 2.55 and D2, average of 2.87, which indicated that the treated specimens had more rough pore surfaces and complex internal pore structures than the raw coal samples. The seepage capacity was increased because D4 (average of 2.91 of the treated specimens was also higher than the raw specimens (D4, average of 2.86. The grey relational coefficient between the fractal dimension and pore structure parameters demonstrated that the SSA, APD, and porosity positively influenced the fractal features of the coal samples, whereas the TPV and permeability exerted negative influences.

  20. Seismic modelling of coal bed methane strata, Willow Creek, Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, S.E.; Mayer, R.; Lawton, D.C.; Langenberg, W. [Consortium for Research in Elastic Wave Exploration Seismology, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    The purpose is to determine the feasibility of applying high- resolution reflection seismic surveying to coalbed methane (CBM) exploration and development. Numerical reflection seismic methods are examined for measuring the mapping continuity and coherence of coal zones. Numerical modelling of a coal zone in Upper Cretaceous sediments near Willow Creek, Alberta indicates that seismic data that is predominantly of 100 Hz is required to map the coal zone and lateral facies variations within the deposit. For resolution of individual coal seams, a central frequency >150 Hz would be needed. 26 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Green Algae from Coal Bed Methane Ponds as a Source of Fertilizer for Economically Important Plants of Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunsakin, O. R.; Apple, M. E.; Zhou, X.; Peyton, B.

    2016-12-01

    The Tongue River Basin of northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana is the location of natural gas reserves and coal bed methane (CBM) acreage. Although the water that emanates from CBM extraction varies with site, it is generally of higher quality than the waters produced by conventional oil and gas wells, in part because it is low in volatile organic compounds. However, since CBM water contains dissolved solids, including sodium (Na), bicarbonate (HCO3) and chloride (Cl) ions, the water must be treated before it can be discharged into the river or wetlands, or used for stock ponds or irrigation. Several ponds have been constructed to serve as a holding facility for CBM water. Algae from the CBM ponds of the Tongue River Basin have the potential to be utilized as fertilizer on economically important plants of Montana. Two very important crop plants of Montana are wheat, Triticum aestivum, and potatoes, Solanum tuberosum. To explore this potential, isolates of unicellular green algae (Chlorella sp.) from the CBM ponds were cultured in aerated vessels with Bold's Basic Growth Medium and natural and/or supplemental light. Algal biomass was condensed in and collected from a valved funnel, after which cell density was determined via light microscopy and a hemacytometer. Algal/water slurries with known nutrient contents were added to seedlings of hard winter wheat, T.aestivum, grown in a greenhouse for three months before harves. When compared to wheat provided with just water, or with water and a commercially available fertilizer, the wheat fertilized with algae had a higher chlorophyll content, more tillers (side shoots), and a higher ratio of influorescences (groups of flowers) per stem. In a related experiment, Ranger Russet seed potatoes, S. tuberosum were given just water, water and Hoagland's nutrient solution, or water with algae in order to compare aboveground growth and potato production among the treatments. The results of this study suggest that

  2. Theoretical comparison of packed bed and fluidized bed membrane reactors for methane reforming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallucci, F.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    In this theoretical work the performance of different membrane reactor concepts, both fluidized bed and packed bed membrane reactors, has been compared for ultra-pure hydrogen production via methane reforming. Using detailed theoretical models, the required membrane area to reach a given conversion

  3. Comparison of packed bed and fluidized bed membrane reactors for methane reforming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallucci, F.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the performance of different membrane reactor concepts, both fluidized bed and packed bed membrane reactors, have been compared for the reforming of methane for the production of ultra-pure hydrogen. Using detailed theoretical models, the required membrane area to reach a given

  4. Enhanced coal bed methane production and sequestration of CO2 in unmineable coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locke, James [CONSOL Energy Inc., South Park, PA (United States); Winschel, Richard [CONSOL Energy Inc., South Park, PA (United States)

    2005-03-01

    The Marshall County Project was undertaken by CONSOL Energy Inc. (CONSOL) with partial funding from the U. S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Carbon Storage Program (CSP). The project, initiated in October 2001, was conducted to evaluate opportunities for carbon dioxide CO2 sequestration in an unmineable coal seam in the Northern Appalachian Basin with simultaneous enhanced coal bed methane recovery. This report details the final results from the project that established a pilot test in Marshall County, West Virginia, USA, where a series of coal bed methane (CBM) production wells were developed in an unmineable coal seam (Upper Freeport (UF)) and the overlying mineable Pittsburgh (PIT) seam. The initial wells were drilled beginning in 2003, using slant-hole drilling procedures with a single production leg, in a down-dip orientation that provided limited success. Improved well design, implemented in the remaining wells, allowed for greater CBM production. The nearly-square-shaped project area was bounded by the perimeter production wells in the UF and PIT seams encompassing an area of 206 acres. Two CBM wells were drilled into the UF at the center of the project site, and these were later converted to serve as CO2 injection wells through which, 20,000 short tons of CO2 were planned to be injected at a maximum rate of 27 tons per day. A CO2 injection system comprised of a 50-ton liquid CO2 storage tank, a cryogenic pump, and vaporization system was installed in the center of the site and, after obtaining a Class II underground injection permit (UIC) permit from the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (WVDEP), CO2 injection, through the two center wells, into the UF was initiated in September 2009. Numerous complications limited CO2 injection continuity, but CO2 was injected until breakthrough was encountered in September 2013, at which point the project had achieved an injection total of 4,968 tons of CO2. During the injection and post

  5. Evaluation of coal bed methane potential of coal seams of Sawang ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This analysis shows that the maximum methane gas adsorbed in the coal sample CG-81 is 17 m3/t (Std. daf), at maximum pressure of 5.92 MPa ... vast coal reserves are ideal reservoirs for the gen- eration and accumulation of CBM. ... of gases in coal seams, such as, compression as free gas in the pore spaces, condensed ...

  6. Enhanced Coal Bed Methane Recovery and CO2 Sequestration in the Powder River Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric P. Robertson

    2010-06-01

    Unminable coal beds are potentially large storage reservoirs for the sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 and offer the benefit of enhanced methane production, which can offset some of the costs associated with CO2 sequestration. The objective of this report is to provide a final topical report on enhanced coal bed methane recovery and CO2 sequestration to the U.S. Department of Energy in fulfillment of a Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership milestone. This report summarizes work done at Idaho National Laboratory in support of Phase II of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership. Research that elucidates the interaction of CO2 and coal is discussed with work centering on the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana. Sorption-induced strain, also referred to as coal swelling/shrinkage, was investigated. A new method of obtaining sorption-induced strain was developed that greatly decreases the time necessary for data collection and increases the reliability of the strain data. As coal permeability is a strong function of sorption-induced strain, common permeability models were used to fit measured permeability data, but were found inadequate. A new permeability model was developed that can be directly applied to coal permeability data obtained under laboratory stress conditions, which are different than field stress conditions. The coal permeability model can be used to obtain critical coal parameters that can be applied in field models. An economic feasibility study of CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming was done. Economic analyses of CO2 injection options are compared. Results show that injecting flue gas to recover methane from CBM fields is marginally economical; however, this method will not significantly contribute to the need to sequester large quantities of CO2. Separating CO2 from flue gas and injecting it into the unminable coal zones of the Powder River Basin seam is currently uneconomical, but can

  7. CBM sealing system and its relationship with CBM enrichment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonglin Ouyang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is of great significance to study the controlling effect of sealing systems on CBM enrichment in coalbed methane (CBM exploration and development. In this paper, the relationships between CBM enrichment and geological elements were analyzed. The geological elements include sealing layers (e.g. regional cap rock, regional floor, and immediate roof and floor, later structural adjustment and strata production status. It is shown that CBM tends to enrich in the areas where regional mudstone cap rocks and floors are distributed stably, structures are uplifted and inversed slightly after the hydrocarbon accumulation period and the strata is gentle in a balanced state. Then, the concept of sealing system was put forward based on the worldwide CBM exploration and development practices over the years. A sealing system refers to a geological unit composed of a lateral stable zone and cap rock which prevents gas from migrating upward and downward. In a sealing system, CBM can get enriched and coal-measure gas can also be accumulated. Finally, three gas reservoir types (i.e., sandwich-type CBM reservoir, associated CBM-sandstone gas reservoir and coal-derived sandstone gas reservoir were identified based on the configuration relationships between elements of the CBM (or coal-measure gas sealing system. It is recommended to change the exploration ideas from simple CBM exploration to 3D CBM and coal-measure gas exploration. In addition, an evaluation index system of CBM (or coal-measure gas geological selection was established. It is pointed out that good application effects may be realized if the stereoscopic CBM and coal-measure gas exploration is applied in the Junggar Basin and the eastern margin of the Ordos Basin.

  8. Potential water-quality effects of coal-bed methane production water discharged along the upper Tongue River, Wyoming and Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, Stacy M.; Nimick, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Water quality in the upper Tongue River from Monarch, Wyoming, downstream to just upstream from the Tongue River Reservoir in Montana potentially could be affected by discharge of coal-bed methane (CBM) production water (hereinafter referred to as CBM discharge). CBM discharge typically contains high concentrations of sodium and other ions that could increase dissolved-solids (salt) concentrations, specific conductance (SC), and sodium-adsorption ratio (SAR) in the river. Increased inputs of sodium and other ions have the potential to alter the river's suitability for agricultural irrigation and aquatic ecosystems. Data from two large tributaries, Goose Creek and Prairie Dog Creek, indicate that these tributaries were large contributors to the increase in SC and SAR in the Tongue River. However, water-quality data were not available for most of the smaller inflows, such as small tributaries, irrigation-return flows, and CBM discharges. Thus, effects of these inflows on the water quality of the Tongue River were not well documented. Effects of these small inflows might be subtle and difficult to determine without more extensive data collection to describe spatial patterns. Therefore, synoptic water-quality sampling trips were conducted in September 2005 and April 2006 to provide a spatially detailed profile of the downstream changes in water quality in this reach of the Tongue River. The purpose of this report is to describe these downstream changes in water quality and to estimate the potential water-quality effects of CBM discharge in the upper Tongue River. Specific conductance of the Tongue River through the study reach increased from 420 to 625 microsiemens per centimeter (.μS/cm; or 49 percent) in the downstream direction in September 2005 and from 373 to 543 .μS/cm (46 percent) in April 2006. Large increases (12 to 24 percent) were measured immediately downstream from Goose Creek and Prairie Dog Creek during both sampling trips. Increases attributed to

  9. Trials and tribulations of a new regulation: coal bed methane water well testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lintott, D.; Swyngedouw, C.; Schneider, E. [Norwest Labs, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Lintott, D.; Swyngedouw, C.; Schneider, E. [Bodycote Testing Group, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    As of January 2006, coalbed methane (CBM) activity in Alberta was at 3600 producing wells with the potential for 25,000 to 50,000 wells. Coalbed methane risks and regulations were discussed. Regulatory initiatives, politics of coalbed methane, and a regulatory timeline was provided and the trials of a new regulation were presented. Other topics of discussion included: methane sampling and analysis; dissolved methane in water; gas isotopes; routine water potability; microbiology testing; and, sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB)/iron-related bacteria (IRB) method validation. The results of the microbial testing were presented. Although relatively few positive coliforms in wells were analyzed, most wells demonstrated positive presence for iron and sulfate bacteria. It was recommended that further research be conducted to evaluate the water sulfide concentration/turbidity, along with other parameters with presence and concentration of SRB and IRB bacteria as an indication of poor water quality. refs., tabs.

  10. Coal-bed methane water effects on dill and essential oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumping water from coal seams decreases the pressure in the seam and in turn releases trapped methane; this is the most common and economic way of methane extraction. The water that is pumped out is known as coal-bed methane water (CBMW), which is high in sodium and other salts. In past 25 years, th...

  11. Seal evaluation and confinement screening criteria for beneficial carbon dioxide storage with enhanced coal bed methane recovery in the Pocahontas Basin, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, R.P.; Eriksson, K.A.; Ripepi, N.; Eble, C.; Greb, S.F.

    2012-01-01

    The geological storage of carbon dioxide in Appalachian basin coal seams is one possible sink for sequestration of greenhouse gases, with the added benefit of enhanced-coal bed methane (ECBM) recovery. The Pocahontas Basin (part of the central Appalachian Basin) of southwestern Virginia is a major coal bed methane (CBM) province with production mostly from coal beds in the Lower Pennsylvanian Pocahontas and New River formations. As part of the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's Phase II research program, a CO 2-injection demonstration well was installed into Lower Pennsylvanian coal bed-methane producing strata in southwest Virginia. Samples of siliciclastic lithologies above coal beds in this Oakwood Field well, and from several other cores in the Nora Field were taken to establish a baseline of the basic confinement properties of overlying strata to test seal competency at local and regional scales.Strata above CBM-producing coal beds in the Pocahontas and New River formations consist of dark-gray shales; silty gray shales; heterolithic siltstones, sandstones, and shales; lithic sandstones, and quartzose sandstones. Standard measurements of porosity, permeability and petrography were used to evaluate potential leakage hazards and any possible secondary storage potential for typical lithologies. Both lithic- and quartz-rich sandstones exhibit only minor porosity, with generally low permeability (Member. Analyses of 1500 geophysical logs in southwest Virginia indicate that this unit is moderately thick (>50ft, 15m), laterally continuous (>3000km 2), and a homogenous shale, which coarsens upward into siltstone and sandstone, or is truncated by sandstone. Calculations from two mercury injection capillary porosimetry tests of the shale indicate that a displacement entry pressure of 207psi (1427kPa) would generate an estimated seal capacity of 1365ft (416m) of CO 2 before buoyant leakage. Scanning electron microscopy indicates a microfabric of narrow

  12. Experiment and modeling of low-concentration methane catalytic combustion in a fluidized bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhongqing; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Li; Guo, Mingnv; Ran, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The catalytic combustion of 0.15~3 vol. % low concentration methane in a fluidized bed was studied. • A mathematical model was proposed on the basis of gas–solid flow theory. • A comparative analysis of the established model with plug flow, mixed flow and K-L models was carried out. • The axial methane profile along fluidized bed was predicted by using the mathematical model. • The bed temperature has greater impact on methane conversion than fluidized velocity. - Abstract: This study undertakes a theoretical analysis and an experimental investigation into the characteristics of low-concentration methane catalytic combustion in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor using 0.5 wt.% Pd/Al_2O_3 as catalytic particles. A mathematical model is established based on gas–solid flow theory and is used to study the effects of bed temperature and fluidized velocity on methane catalytic combustion, and predict the dimensionless methane concentration axial profile in reactor. It is shown that methane conversion increases with bed temperature, but decreases with increasing fluidized velocity. These theoretical results are found to correlate well with the experimental measurement, with a deviation within 5%. A comparative analysis of the developed model with plug flow, mixed flow and K-L models is also carried out, and this further verifies that the established model better reflects the characteristics of low-concentration methane catalytic combustion in a bubbling fluidized bed. Using this reaction model, it was found that the difference in methane conversion between dense and freeboard zones gradually increases with bed temperature; the dense zone reaction levels off at 650 °C, thereby minimizing the difference between the dense and freeboard regions to around 15%. With an increase in bed temperature, the dimensionless methane concentration in the dense zone decreases exponentially, while in the splash zone, it varies from an exponential decay to a slow

  13. Coal-bed methane water: effects on soil properties and camelina productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Every year the production of coal-bed natural gas in the Powder River Basin results in the discharge of large amounts of coal-bed methane water (CBMW) in Wyoming; however, no sustainable disposal methods for CBMW are currently available. A greenhouse study was conducted to evaluate the potential to ...

  14. Attribute Synthetic Evaluation Model for the CBM Recoverability and Its Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-gang Xia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The coal-bed methane (CBM recoverability is the basic premise of CBM development practice; in order to effectively evaluate the CBM recoverability, the attribute synthetic evaluation model is established based on the theory and method of attribute mathematics. Firstly, five indexes are chosen to evaluate the recoverability through analyzing the influence factors of CBM, including seam thickness, gas saturation, permeability, reservoir pressure gradient, and hydrogeological conditions. Secondly, the attribute measurement functions of each index are constructed based on the attribute mathematics theory, and the calculation methods of the single index attribute measurement and the synthetic attribute measurement also are provided. Meanwhile, the weight of each index is given with the method of similar number and similar weight; the evaluation results also are determined by the confidence criterion reliability code. At last, according to the application results of the model in some coal target area of Fuxin and Hancheng mine, the evaluation results are basically consistent with the actual situation, which proves that the evaluation model can be used in the CBM recoverability prediction, and an effective method of the CBM recoverability evaluation is also provided.

  15. Sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming in fluidized bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, Kim

    2006-10-15

    Hydrogen is considered to be an important potential energy carrier; however, its advantages are unlikely to be realized unless efficient means can be found to produce it without generation of CO{sub 2}. Sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming (SE-SMR) represent a novel, energy-efficient hydrogen production route with in situ CO{sub 2} capture, shifting the reforming and water gas shift reactions beyond their conventional thermodynamic limits. The use of fluidized bed reactors for SE-SMR has been investigated. Arctic dolomite, a calcium-based natural sorbent, was chosen as the primary CO{sub 2}-acceptor in this study due to high absorption capacity, relatively high reaction rate and low cost. An experimental investigation was conducted in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor of diameter 0.1 m, which was operated cyclically and batch wise, alternating between reforming/carbonation conditions and higher-temperature calcination conditions. Hydrogen concentrations of >98 mole% on a dry basis were reached at 600 C and 1 atm, for superficial gas velocities in the range of {approx}0.03-0.1 m/s. Multiple reforming-regeneration cycles showed that the hydrogen concentration remained at {approx}98 mole% after four cycles. The total production time was reduced with an increasing number of cycles due to loss of CO{sub 2}-uptake capacity of the dolomite, but the reaction rates of steam reforming and carbonation seemed to be unaffected for the conditions investigated. A modified shrinking core model was applied for deriving carbonation kinetics of Arctic dolomite, using experimental data from a novel thermo gravimetric reactor. An apparent activation energy of 32.6 kj/mole was found from parameter fitting, which is in good agreement with previous reported results. The derived rate expression was able to predict experimental conversion up to {approx}30% very well, whereas the prediction of higher conversion levels was poorer. However, the residence time of sorbent in a continuous

  16. Influence of operating pressure on the biological hydrogen methanation in trickle-bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Timo; Lindner, Jonas; Bär, Katharina; Mörs, Friedemann; Graf, Frank; Lemmer, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of pressures up to 9bar absolute on the productivity of trickle-bed reactors for biological methanation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide, experiments were carried out in a continuously operated experimental plant with three identical reactors. The pressure increase promises a longer residence time and improved mass transfer of H 2 due to higher gas partial pressures. The study covers effects of different pressures on important parameters like gas hourly space velocity, methane formation rate, conversion rates and product gas quality. The methane content of 64.13±3.81vol-% at 1.5bar could be increased up to 86.51±0.49vol-% by raising the pressure to 9bar. Methane formation rates of up to 4.28±0.26m 3 m -3 d -1 were achieved. Thus, pressure increase could significantly improve reactor performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Chemical Looping Combustion of Hematite Ore with Methane and Steam in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Bayham

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemical looping combustion is considered an indirect method of oxidizing a carbonaceous fuel, utilizing a metal oxide oxygen carrier to provide oxygen to the fuel. The advantage is the significantly reduced energy penalty for separating out the CO2 for reuse or sequestration in a carbon-constrained world. One of the major issues with chemical looping combustion is the cost of the oxygen carrier. Hematite ore is a proposed oxygen carrier due to its high strength and resistance to mechanical attrition, but its reactivity is rather poor compared to tailored oxygen carriers. This problem is further exacerbated by methane cracking, the subsequent deposition of carbon and the inability to transfer oxygen at a sufficient rate from the core of the particle to the surface for fuel conversion to CO2. Oxygen needs to be readily available at the surface to prevent methane cracking. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate the use of steam to overcome this issue and improve the conversion of the natural gas to CO2, as well as to provide data for computational fluid dynamics (CFD validation. The steam will gasify the deposited carbon to promote the methane conversion. This work studies the performance of hematite ore with methane and steam mixtures in a 5 cm fluidized bed up to approximately 140 kPa. Results show an increased conversion of methane in the presence of steam (from 20–45% without steam to 60–95% up to a certain point, where performance decreases. Adding steam allows the methane conversion to carbon dioxide to be similar to the overall methane conversion; it also helped to prevent carbon accumulation from occurring on the particle. In general, the addition of steam to the feed gas increased the methane conversion. Furthermore, the addition of steam caused the steam methane reforming reaction to form more hydrogen and carbon monoxide at higher steam and methane concentrations, which was not completely converted at higher concentrations and

  18. Final Scientific/Technical Report for project “Increasing the Rate and Extent of Microbial Coal to Methane Conversion through Optimization of Microbial Activity, Thermodynamics, and Reactive Transport”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Matthew [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2018-01-17

    Currently, coal bed methane (CBM) wells have a limited lifetime since the rate of methane removal via the installed wells is much faster than the in situ methane production rates. Along with water issues created by large amounts of CBM production water, the short life span of CBM wells is a huge deterrent to the environmental and economic feasibility of CBM production. The process of biogenic methanogenesis can be enhanced via the stimulation of the associated microbial communities that can convert the organic fractions of coal to methane. This process is termed Microbially-Enhanced Coal Bed Methane (MECBM). However, the rates of methane production are still limited and long incubation times are necessary. We hypothesized that the elucidation of chemical and biological parameters that limited MECBM together with thermodynamic considerations would inform strategies to optimize the process under flow conditions. We incorporated microbiological, physicochemical, and engineering processes to develop a more sustainable CBM production scheme with native coal and native microorganisms. The proposed combination of microbial ecology and physiology as well as optimized engineering principles minimized key constraints that impact microbial coal conversion to methane under environmentally relevant conditions. The combined approach for bench-scale tests resulted in more effective and less environmentally burdensome coal-dependent methane production with the potential for H2O and CO2 management.

  19. Dry reforming of methane with CO2 on an electron-activated iron catalytic bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Raynald; Lavoie, Jean-Michel

    2011-12-01

    A preliminary experimental investigation of dry reforming of methane with carbon dioxide, that has been performed on an iron bed activated with an electric current is reported. Operating conditions for the reaction included temperature ranging from 700 to 800° C and pressure close to 1 atm. The reaction, involving an excess of pure methane and carbon dioxide, was performed with and without addition of water vapour, provided by hot water saturation of the gaseous feed. According to syngas compositions, the electron flow has a dramatic effect on the conversion of both methane and carbon dioxide. It was shown also that hot water saturation of the CO(2) and CH(4) mixture allowed very good conversion, giving a syngas with a composition very close to what was expected from equilibrium calculations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. High performance biological methanation in a thermophilic anaerobic trickle bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strübing, Dietmar; Huber, Bettina; Lebuhn, Michael; Drewes, Jörg E; Koch, Konrad

    2017-12-01

    In order to enhance energy efficiency of biological methanation of CO 2 and H 2 , this study investigated the performance of a thermophilic (55°C) anaerobic trickle bed reactor (ATBR) (58.1L) at ambient pressure. With a methane production rate of up to 15.4m 3 CH4 /(m 3 trickle bed ·d) at methane concentrations above 98%, the ATBR can easily compete with the performance of other mixed culture methanation reactors. Control of pH and nutrient supply turned out to be crucial for stable operation and was affected significantly by dilution due to metabolic water production, especially during demand-orientated operation. Considering practical applications, inoculation with digested sludge, containing a diverse biocenosis, showed high adaptive capacity due to intrinsic biological diversity. However, no macroscopic biofilm formation was observed at thermophilic conditions even after 313days of operation. The applied approach illustrates the high potential of thermophilic ATBRs as a very efficient energy conversion and storage technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Experimental Simulation of Methane Hydrate Extraction at High Pressure Conditions: Influence of the Sediment Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo, J. R.; Park, J.; Luzi, G.; Williams, M.; Rauh, C.; Wierschem, A.; Delgado, A.

    2017-10-01

    Being a clean alternative to other fossil fuels, Methane Hydrate (MH) is currently considered as one of the most important potential sources for hydrocarbon fuels [1]. In addition, the high energy density of MH and its stability at higher temperatures as compared to LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) makes MH a potential greener method for energy transportation. At the same time, the low thermodynamic stability of MH strongly questions the future exploitation of gas hydrate deposits, turning its extraction into a possible geohazard [2]. Fluctuations in pressure, temperature, salinity, degree of saturation or sediment bed properties may cause methane gas release from the water lattice. We experimentally study the influence of the sediment bed geometry during formation-dissociation of MH. For this purpose, MH is synthesized within regular substrates in a 93 cm3 high pressure vessel. The regular substrates are triangular and quadratic arrangements of identical glass spheres with a diameter of 2 and 5 mm, respectively. MH formation within regular substrate reduces the possibility of spontaneous nucleation to a unique geometrical configuration. This fact permits us to characterize the kinetics of MH formation-dissociation as a function of the sediment bed geometry. Preliminary experimental results reveal a strong dependence of MH formation on the geometry of the regular substrate. For instance, under the same pressure and temperature, the kinetics of MH production is found to change by a factor 3 solely depending on the substrate symmetry, i.e. triangular or quadratic.

  2. Effect of Different Operating Temperatures on the Biological Hydrogen Methanation in Trickle Bed Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lemmer

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available To improve the reactor efficiency, this study investigated the influence of temperature on the biological hydrogen methanation (BHM in trickle-bed reactors (TBR. Rising temperatures increase the metabolic activity of methanogenic microorganisms, thus leading to higher reactor specific methane formation rates (MFR. In order to quantify the potential for improved performance, experiments with four different operating temperatures ranging from 40 to 55 °C were carried out. Methane content increased from 88.29 ± 2.12 vol % at 40 °C to 94.99 ± 0.81 vol % at 55 °C with a stable biological process. Furthermore, a reactor specific methane formation rate (MFR of up to 8.85 ± 0.45 m3 m−3 d−1 was achieved. It could be shown that the microorganisms were able to adapt to higher temperatures within hours. The tests showed that TBR performance with regard to BHM can be significantly increased by increasing the operating temperature.

  3. Reuse of Produced Water from CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery, Coal-Bed Methane, and Mine Pool Water by Coal-Based Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knutson, Chad [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Dastgheib, Seyed A. [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Yang, Yaning [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Ashraf, Ali [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Duckworth, Cole [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Sinata, Priscilla [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Sugiyono, Ivan [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Shannon, Mark A. [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Werth, Charles J. [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Power generation in the Illinois Basin is expected to increase by as much as 30% by the year 2030, and this would increase the cooling water consumption in the region by approximately 40%. This project investigated the potential use of produced water from CO2 enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) operations; coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery; and active and abandoned underground coal mines for power plant cooling in the Illinois Basin. Specific objectives of this project were: (1) to characterize the quantity, quality, and geographic distribution of produced water in the Illinois Basin; (2) to evaluate treatment options so that produced water may be used beneficially at power plants; and (3) to perform a techno-economic analysis of the treatment and transportation of produced water to thermoelectric power plants in the Illinois Basin. Current produced water availability within the basin is not large, but potential flow rates up to 257 million liters per day (68 million gallons per day (MGD)) are possible if CO2-enhanced oil recovery and coal bed methane recovery are implemented on a large scale. Produced water samples taken during the project tend to have dissolved solids concentrations between 10 and 100 g/L, and water from coal beds tends to have lower TDS values than water from oil fields. Current pretreatment and desalination technologies including filtration, adsorption, reverse osmosis (RO), and distillation can be used to treat produced water to a high quality level, with estimated costs ranging from $2.6 to $10.5 per cubic meter ($10 to $40 per 1000 gallons). Because of the distances between produced water sources and power plants, transportation costs tend to be greater than treatment costs. An optimization algorithm was developed to determine the lowest cost pipe network connecting sources and sinks. Total water costs increased with flow rate up to 26 million liters per day (7 MGD), and the range was from $4 to $16 per cubic meter

  4. Optimal scheduling for enhanced coal bed methane production through CO2 injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yuping; Zheng, Qipeng P.; Fan, Neng; Aminian, Kashy

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel deterministic optimization model for CO 2 -ECBM production scheduling. • Maximize the total profit from both sales of natural gas and CO 2 credits trading in the carbon market. • A stochastic model incorporating uncertainties and dynamics of NG price and CO 2 credit. - Abstract: Enhanced coal bed methane production with CO 2 injection (CO 2 -ECBM) is an effective technology for accessing the natural gas embedded in the traditionally unmineable coal seams. The revenue via this production process is generated not only by the sales of coal bed methane, but also by trading CO 2 credits in the carbon market. As the technology of CO 2 -ECBM becomes mature, its commercialization opportunities are also springing up. This paper proposes applicable mathematical models for CO 2 -ECBM production and compares the impacts of their production schedules on the total profit. A novel basic deterministic model for CO 2 -ECBM production including the technical and chemical details is proposed and then a multistage stochastic programming model is formulated in order to address uncertainties of natural gas price and CO 2 credit. Both models are nonlinear programming problems, which are solved by commercial nonlinear programming software BARON via GAMS. Numerical experiments show the benefits (e.g., expected profit gain) of using stochastic models versus deterministic models

  5. Geology and coal-bed methane resources of the northern San Juan Basin, Colorado and New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassett, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    This guidebook is the first of its kind: A focused look at coal-bed methane in a large Rocky Mountain Laramide basin. The papers in this volume cover every aspect of coal-bed methane in the San Juan Basin, including: The geology, environments of deposition, and geometry of the coal beds that contain the resource; the origin and migration history of the gas; basin-wide resource estimates; the engineering aspects of getting the gas out of the ground; the marketing and economics of producing coal-bed methane in the San Juan Basin; the legal ownership of the gas; state regulations governing well spacing and field rules; disposal of produced water; and land and mineral ownership patterns in the northern part of the basin. Also included are detailed papers on all of the major coal-bed methane fields in the basin, and in a paper on the history of Fruitland gas production, a discussion of most of the not-so-major fields. A small section of the book deals with geophysical methods, as yet still experimental, for surface detection of underground hydrocarbon resources. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  6. Comparative study between fluidized bed and fixed bed reactors in methane reforming with CO2 and O2 to produce syngas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Qiangshan; Lou Hui; Mo Liuye; Zheng Xiaoming

    2006-01-01

    Reforming of methane with carbon dioxide and oxygen was investigated over Ni/MgO-SiO 2 catalysts using fixed bed and fluidized bed reactors. The conversions of CH 4 and CO 2 in a fluidized bed reactor were close to thermodynamic equilibrium. The activity and stability of the catalyst in the fixed bed reactor were lower than that in the fluidized bed reactor due to carbon deposition and nickel sintering. TGA and TEM techniques were used to characterize the spent catalysts. The results showed that a lot of whisker carbon was found on the catalyst in the rear of the fixed bed reactor, and no deposited carbon was observed on the catalysts in the fluidized bed reactor after reaction. It is suggested that this phenomenon is related to a permanent circulation of catalyst particles between the oxygen rich and oxygen free zones. That is, fluidization of the catalysts in the fluidized bed reactor favors inhibiting deposited carbon and thermal uniformity in the reactor

  7. Electrodialysis reversal: Process and cost approximations for treating coal-bed methane waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajtar, E.T.; Bagley, D.M. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Brackish waters with total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations less than 10,000 mg/L are extracted from coal-beds in the Wyoming Powder River basin to facilitate the production of coal-bed methane. These waters frequently require treatment before disposal or use. Electrodialysis reversal (EDR) has not yet been used to treat these waters but this technology should be suitable. The question is whether EDR would be cost-effective. The purpose of this work, then, was to develop models for predicting the cost of EDR for brackish waters. These models, developed from data available in the literature, were found to predict actual EDR costs as a function of TDS removal, influent flow rate, chemical rejection efficiency, water recovery, electricity use, and labor cost within 10% of reported values. The total amortized cost for removing 1,000 mg/L of TDS from 10,000 m{sup 3}/day of influent assuming no concentrate disposal costs was predicted to range from $0.23/m{sup 3} to $0.85/m{sup 3} and was highly dependent on capital cost and facility life. Concentrate disposal costs significantly affected total treatment cost, providing a total treatment cost range from $0.38/m{sup 3} to $6.38/m{sup 3}, depending on concentrate disposal cost and water recovery. Pilot demonstrations of EDR in the Powder River basin should be conducted to determine the achievable water recovery when treating these waters.

  8. Seismic applications in CBM exploration and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, S.E.; Lawton, D.C. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    This Power Point presentation reviewed seismic methods, coal seam seismology, seismology and coalbed methane (CBM) development, and time-lapse seismic imaging with reference to numerical modelling and physical testing. The issue of resolution versus detection in various seismic methods was discussed. The thinnest resolvable beds are usually about 1.0 m thick. Coal zones with thin seams can be mapped using seismic reflection, but individual seams are difficult to resolve in field data. In terms of coal seismology, it was noted that seismic surveys make it possible to identify seam thickness, field geometry, subsurface structuring and facies changes. Facies model make it possible to determine the depositional environment, coal type, coal quality and lateral continuity. Some successes in coal seismology include the Cedar Hill and Ferron fields in the San Juan Basin. Numerical modelling methods include digital dipole compressional sonic and density well logs through Ardley Coal Zone, P-wave synthetic seismograms generated in SYNTH (MATLAB), and the alteration of density/velocity values to create new seismograms. Another numerical method is to take the difference between original and altered seismograms. It was shown that dewatering causes a decrease in velocity of about 20 per cent, and a 15 per cent decrease in density. Changes as small as 5 per cent in reservoir properties can be successfully imaged. It was concluded that the identification of dewatered zones allow for optimal positioning of development wells. Further physical testing will involve wet and dry p-wave velocities, s-wave velocities will be tested, and velocities will be measured under pressure. 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  9. Impacts of Coal Seam Gas (Coal Bed Methane) Extraction on Water Resources in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, David

    2017-04-01

    While extraction of methane from shale gas deposits has been the principal source of the recent expansion of the industry in the United States, in Australia extraction of methane from coal bed methane deposits (termed 'coal seam gas' in Australia) has been the focus to date. The two sources of methane share many of the same characteristics including the potential requirement for hydraulic fracturing. However, as coal seam gas deposits generally occur at shallower depths than shale gas, the potential impacts of extraction on surface and groundwater resources may be of even greater concern. In Australia, an Independent Expert Scientific Committee (IESC) has been established to provide scientific advice to federal and state government regulators on the impact that coal seam gas and large coal mining developments may have on water resources. This advice is provided to enable decisions to be informed by the best available science about the potential water-related impacts associated with these developments. To support this advice, the Australian Government Department of the Environment has implemented a programme of research termed 'bioregional assessments' to investigate these potential impacts. A bioregional assessment is defined as a scientific analysis of the ecology, hydrology, geology and hydrogeology of a bioregion with explicit assessment of the potential direct, indirect and cumulative impacts of coal seam gas and large coal mining development on water resources. These bioregional assessments are currently being carried out across large portions of eastern Australia underlain by coal reserves. Further details of the programme and results to date can be found at http://www.bioregionalassessments.gov.au. The bioregional assessment programme has modelled the impacts of coal seam gas development on surface and groundwater resources in three regions of eastern Australia, namely the Clarence-Moreton, Gloucester, and Namoi regions. This presentation will discuss the

  10. The CBM RICH project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Becker, K.-H. [University Wuppertal (Germany); Belogurov, S. [ITEP Moscow (Russian Federation); Boldyreva, N. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Chernogorov, A. [ITEP Moscow (Russian Federation); Deveaux, C. [University Gießen (Germany); Dobyrn, V. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Dürr, M. [University Gießen (Germany); Eom, J. [Pusan National University (Korea, Republic of); Eschke, J. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Höhne, C. [University Gießen (Germany); Kampert, K.-H. [University Wuppertal (Germany); Kleipa, V. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Kochenda, L. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Kolb, B. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Kopfer, J. [University Wuppertal (Germany); Kravtsov, P. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Lebedev, S.; Lebedeva, E. [University Gießen (Germany); Leonova, E. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); and others

    2014-12-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment will study the properties of super dense nuclear matter by means of heavy ion collisions at the future FAIR facility. An integral detector component is a large Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector with CO{sub 2} gas radiator, which will mainly serve for electron identification and pion suppression necessary to access rare dileptonic probes like e{sup +}e{sup −} decays of light vector mesons or J/Ψ. We describe the design of this future RICH detector and focus on results obtained by building a CBM RICH detector prototype tested at CERN-PS.

  11. Potential for CO2 sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane production in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Hamelinck, C.N.; Schreurs, H.; Faaij, A.P.C.; Ruijg, G.J.; Jansen, Daan; Pagnier, H.; Bergen, F. van; Wolf, K.-H.; Barzandji, O.; Bruining, H.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the technical and economic feasibility of using CO2 for the enhanced production of coal bed methane (ECBM) in the Netherlands. This concept could lead to both CO2 storage by adsorbing CO2 in deep coal layers that are not suitable for mining, as well as production of methane. For every two molecules of CO2 injected, roughly one molecule of methane is produced. The work included an investigation of the potential CBM reserves in the Dutch underground and the related CO2 s...

  12. The CBM RICH project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Akishin, P. [Laboratory of Information Technologies, Joint Institute for Nuclear research (JINR-LIT), Dubna (Russian Federation); Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42097 Wuppertal (Germany); Belogurov, S. [SSC RF ITEP, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bendarouach, J. [Institute of Physics II and Institute of Applied Physics, Justus Liebig University Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Boldyreva, N. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute” B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188300 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Chernogorov, A. [SSC RF ITEP, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation); Deveaux, C. [Institute of Physics II and Institute of Applied Physics, Justus Liebig University Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Dobyrn, V. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute” B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188300 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Dürr, M. [Institute of Physics II and Institute of Applied Physics, Justus Liebig University Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Eschke, J. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Förtsch, J. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42097 Wuppertal (Germany); Heep, J.; Höhne, C. [Institute of Physics II and Institute of Applied Physics, Justus Liebig University Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Kampert, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42097 Wuppertal (Germany); and others

    2017-02-11

    The CBM RICH detector is an integral component of the future CBM experiment at FAIR, providing efficient electron identification and pion suppression necessary for the measurement of rare dileptonic probes in heavy ion collisions. The RICH design is based on CO{sub 2} gas as radiator, a segmented spherical glass focussing mirror with Al+MgF{sub 2} reflective coating, and Multianode Photomultipliers for efficient Cherenkov photon detection. Hamamatsu H12700 MAPMTs have recently been selected as photon sensors, following an extensive sensor evaluation, including irradiation tests to ensure sufficient radiation hardness of the MAPMTs. A brief overview of the detector design and concept is given, results on the radiation hardness of the photon sensors are shown, and the development of a FPGA-TDC based readout chain is discussed.

  13. Sequestration and Enhanced Coal Bed Methane: Tanquary Farms Test Site, Wabash County, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frailey, Scott; Parris, Thomas; Damico, James; Okwen, Roland; McKaskle, Ray; Monson, Charles; Goodwin, Jonathan; Beck, E; Berger, Peter; Butsch, Robert; Garner, Damon; Grube, John; Hackley, Keith; Hinton, Jessica; Iranmanesh, Abbas; Korose, Christopher; Mehnert, Edward; Monson, Charles; Roy, William; Sargent, Steven; Wimmer, Bracken

    2012-05-01

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) carried out a pilot project to test storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the Springfield Coal Member of the Carbondale Formation (Pennsylvanian System), in order to gauge the potential for large-scale CO{sub 2} sequestration and/or enhanced coal bed methane recovery from Illinois Basin coal beds. The pilot was conducted at the Tanquary Farms site in Wabash County, southeastern Illinois. A four-well design an injection well and three monitoring wells was developed and implemented, based on numerical modeling and permeability estimates from literature and field data. Coal cores were taken during the drilling process and were characterized in detail in the lab. Adsorption isotherms indicated that at least three molecules of CO{sub 2} can be stored for each displaced methane (CH{sub 4}) molecule. Microporosity contributes significantly to total porosity. Coal characteristics that affect sequestration potential vary laterally between wells at the site and vertically within a given seam, highlighting the importance of thorough characterization of injection site coals to best predict CO{sub 2} storage capacity. Injection of CO{sub 2} gas took place from June 25, 2008, to January 13, 2009. A continuous injection period ran from July 21, 2008, to December 23, 2008, but injection was suspended several times during this period due to equipment failures and other interruptions. Injection equipment and procedures were adjusted in response to these problems. Approximately 92.3 tonnes (101.7 tons) of CO{sub 2} were injected over the duration of the project, at an average rate of 0.93 tonne (1.02 tons) per day, and a mode injection rate of 0.6-0.7 tonne/day (0.66-0.77 ton/day). A Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) program was set up to detect CO{sub 2 leakage. Atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels were monitored as were indirect indicators of CO{sub 2} leakage such as plant stress, changes in gas composition at

  14. CBM RICH geometry optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Tariq; Hoehne, Claudia [II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen Univ. (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR complex will investigate the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at high baryon density and moderate temperatures in A+A collisions from 2-11 AGeV (SIS100) beam energy. The main electron identification detector in the CBM experiment will be a RICH detector with a CO{sub 2} gaseous-radiator, focusing spherical glass mirrors, and MAPMT photo-detectors being placed on a PMT-plane. The RICH detector is located directly behind the CBM dipole magnet. As the final magnet geometry is now available, some changes in the RICH geometry become necessary. In order to guarantee a magnetic field of 1 mT at maximum in the PMT plane for effective operation of the MAPMTs, two measures have to be taken: The PMT plane is moved outwards of the stray field by tilting the mirrors by 10 degrees and shielding boxes have been designed. In this contribution the results of the geometry optimization procedure are presented.

  15. Northern Cheyenne Reservation Coal Bed Natural Resource Assessment and Analysis of Produced Water Disposal Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaochang Wo; David A. Lopez; Jason Whiteman Sr.; Bruce A. Reynolds

    2004-07-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) development in the Powder River Basin (PRB) is currently one of the most active gas plays in the United States. Monthly production in 2002 reached about 26 BCF in the Wyoming portion of the basin. Coalbed methane reserves for the Wyoming portion of the basin are approximately 25 trillion cubic feet (TCF). Although coal beds in the Powder River Basin extend well into Montana, including the area of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, the only CBM development in Montana is the CX Field, operated by the Fidelity Exploration, near the Wyoming border. The Northern Cheyenne Reservation is located on the northwest flank of the PRB in Montana with a total land of 445,000 acres. The Reservation consists of five districts, Lame Deer, Busby, Ashland, Birney, and Muddy Cluster and has a population of 4,470 according to the 2000 Census. The CBM resource represents a significant potential asset to the Northern Cheyenne Indian Tribe. Methane gas in coal beds is trapped by hydrodynamic pressure. Because the production of CBM involves the dewatering of coalbed to allow the release of methane gas from the coal matrix, the relatively large volume of the co-produced water and its potential environmental impacts are the primary concerns for the Tribe. Presented in this report is a study conducted by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology (MBMG) in partnership with the Northern Cheyenne Tribe to assess the Tribe’s CBM resources and evaluate applicable water handling options. The project was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the Native American Initiative of the National Petroleum Technology Office, under contract DEAC07- 99ID13727. Matching funds were granted by the MBMG in supporting the work of geologic study and mapping conducted at MBMG.

  16. Circulating fluidized bed reformer-regenerator system for hydrogen production from methane. Paper no. IGEC-1-092

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, P.; Elnashaie, S.S.E.H.

    2005-01-01

    Steam reforming is presently the principal route for large-scale hydrogen production from natural gas. This paper proposes a novel concept of a reactor-regenerator type circulating fluidized bed (Prasad and Elnashaie, 2002) for efficient production of hydrogen. Carbon is optimally allowed to form on the catalyst in the reactor section through methane cracking and Boudouard coking reactions, and the deactivated catalyst is regenerated in the regenerator by burning off the carbon. This concept of carbon formation and burning cannot be used in a fixed bed configuration but is possible in the proposed novel Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) configuration, which employs a reactor-regenerator type of configuration. Allowing both carbon formation and steam reforming to occur simultaneously by introducing steam as part of the feed, gives more than 3 moles hydrogen per mole of methane at almost zero energy consumption. The steam can be fed as water at room temperature, and the hot catalyst returning from the regenerator can be used to vaporize it into steam. This route is the most efficient from both hydrogen yield and energy consumption points of view. This CFB configuration exhibits the bifurcation behavior and the present paper reports an investigation of its static bifurcation characteristics through a rigorous mathematical model. (author)

  17. Use of black oil simulator for coal bed methane reservoir model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonwa, R.; Enachescu, C.; Rohs, S. [Golder Associates GmbH, Celle (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    This paper starts from the work done by Seidle et al. (1990) and other authors on the topic of coal degasification and develops a more accurate representative naturally fractured CBM-reservoir by using a Discrete Fracture Network modeling approach. For this issue we firstly calibrate the reservoir simulator tNAVIGATOR by showing his ability to reproduce the work done by Seidle et al. and secondly generate a DFN model using FracMan in accordance with the distribution and orientation of the cleats. tNavigator was then used to simulate multiphase flow through the DFN- Model. (orig.)

  18. Key technology for treating slack coal blockage in CBM recovery: A case study from multi-lateral horizontal wells in the Qinshui Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the nature of coal bed, slack coal production is inevitable in gas recovery sby water drainage. When coalbed methane (CBM wells are reentered after low energy exploitation and shut-in, the negative effect of slack coal production on productivity of CBM is irreversible. In this paper, the CBM occurrence characteristics and multi-lateral horizontal well trajectory in the Qinshui Basin, Shanxi Province, were analyzed. In the multi-lateral horizontal wells, the expected gas production rate could not be reached and the production rate after shut-in maintenance could not restore to the level before shut-in. The reason for these issues is that migration pathways in the reservoirs are blocked by slack coal deposits, while formation water and slack coal deposit accumulated at the troughs of horizontal sections enlarge the resistance for gas to flow into the bottom hole. Furthermore, three key technologies to deal with slack coal blockage were proposed. Firstly, CBM horizontal well trajectory should follow the principle of keeping the wellbores smooth and updip instead of being “wavy”, on the premise of guaranteeing CBM drilling rate. Secondly, the cavities of production wells, as an important part of multi-lateral horizontal wells, are capable of settling sand, and can be used for gas–liquid–solid separation. And thirdly, a tree-like horizontal well with its main hole set on stable seam top or floor, provides a stable well flushing passage for coal powder. This research provides a useful attempt in solving the problem of slack coal production in gas recovery by water drainage.

  19. Evaluation of Phytoremediation of Coal Bed Methane Product Water and Waters of Quality Similar to that Associated with Coal Bed Methane Reserves of the Powder River Basin, Montana and Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Bauder

    2008-09-30

    when water supplies sourced from coalbed methane extraction are plentiful. Constructed wetlands, planted to native, salt tolerant species demonstrated potential to utilize substantial volumes of coalbed methane product water, although plant community transitions to mono-culture and limited diversity communities is a likely consequence over time. Additionally, selected, cultured forage quality barley varieties and native plant species such as Quail bush, 4-wing saltbush, and seaside barley are capable of sustainable, high quality livestock forage production, when irrigated with coalbed methane product water sourced from the Powder River Basin. A consequence of long-term plant water use which was enumerated is elevated salinity and sodicity concentrations within soil and shallow alluvial groundwater into which coalbed methane product water might drain. The most significant conclusion of these investigations was the understanding that phytoremediation is not a viable, effective technique for management of coalbed methane product water under the present circumstances of produced water within the Powder River Basin. Phytoremediation is likely an effective approach to sodium and salt removal from salt-impaired sites after product water discharges are discontinued and site reclamation is desired. Coalbed methane product water of the Powder River Basin is most frequently impaired with respect to beneficial use quality by elevated sodicity, a water quality constituent which can cause swelling, slaking, and dispersion of smectite-dominated clay soils, such as commonly occurring within the Powder River Basin. To address this issue, a commercial-scale fluid-bed, cationic resin exchange treatment process and prototype operating treatment plant was developed and beta-tested by Drake Water Technologies under subcontract to this award. Drake Water Technologies secured U.S. Patent No. 7,368,059-B2, 'Method for removal of benevolent cations from contaminated water', a beta

  20. Dewatering CBM's bad image : improved technologies and improved economics are helping CBM industry emerge from the shadows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collison, M.

    2009-01-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) is an emerging source of energy with a resource base in the foothills of British Columbia and Alberta, the grasslands of east-central Alberta, and the east coast of Canada. This paper described the new royalty framework that should stimulate recovery of methane from low-volume shallow coal seams in the Horseshoe Canyon formation. Under the new structure, royalties are sensitive to low-productivity wells as well as prices. There is also a revised program for deep drilling that will help CBM operators using multi-leg horizontal drilling techniques. Calgary-based Trident Resources Corporation launched the one and only deep wet coal project in Alberta in 2005 near Fort Assiniboine. The company also announced that it had reached 650,000 metres of horizontal and multilateral horizontal drilling in the first commercial Mannville CBM gas field in Canada. In an effort to address issues regarding the CBM sector's bad environmental reputation, the Alberta Department of Energy created a CBM Multi-stakeholder Advisory Committee (MAC) to protect water resources, enhance information and knowledge, minimize surface impacts, and improve communication consultation. Progress has been made in enhanced water well testing and analysis; initiation of a groundwater inventory project; completion of updates to the base of groundwater protection database; and improved access to information with stakeholders and the public. Production of natural gas from coal can also be enhanced by injecting carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). Depending on the local geology, CO 2 injection can increase methane production from 30 to 300 per cent for the equivalent land surface disturbance. However, the technology is not yet commercial because of the prohibitive cost of high-purity CO 2 . Pilot studies in China will allow participants to evaluate the commercial prospects of the technology for global applications. 2 figs

  1. Method of cutting steeply falling coal beds. [Bacteria, which only grow on methane, are injected into the coal bed and form low viscosity polysaccharides: as a result the coal collapses into the haulage gallery and is hauled away

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gretsinger, B Ye; Chernyshenko, D V; Levin, A D; Malashenko, Yu R; Shinkovskiy, V A; Shurova, Z P; Volkov, V I

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to reduce outlays for collapse and output of coal by creating artificial cavities of sliding along the coal bed in the surrounding rocks. This goal is achieved because in the well drilled in the bed for the entire height of the level, a suspension of cells of methane-oxidizing microorganisms is injected. The methane-oxidizing microorganisms used are, for example, the thermophilic culture Methylococcus thermophilus of strains ShP which grow at 45-65/sup 0/ C, or the mesophilic culture Methanomonas rubna of strains 15 Sh growing at 20-37/sup 0/ C. As a result of the vital activity of these cultures, polysaccharides are formed with viscosity of 5-7 and 3-4 St respectively. The mine pressure disrupts the blocks between the wells, and the outline section of the steeply dropping coal bed, being destroyed, slides on the products of vital activity of the microorganisms to the haulage gallery. Then the coal drops on cross cuts to the field gallery through which it is transported. Studies established that the only coal substrate which is suitable for growth of these microorganism cultures is methane. The synthesis of one g of absolutely dry substance of these microorganism requires 1.78 g of methane and 4.7 g of oxygen. The cultures are resistant to hydrostatic pressure from 20 to 150 atm and short-term pressure of gradient drops which occur during injection of the cellular suspension into the coal bed. They are filtered through the coal with preservation of the oxidizing and reproductive properties and are cultivated on the methane contained in the bed and form considerable number of exopolysaccarides. The polysaccarides weaken the bond between the bed and the surrounding rocks and serve as a unique lubricant promoting the sliding towards the haulage gallery of the coal blocks destroyed by mine pressure.

  2. Production performance laws of vertical wells by volume fracturing in CBM reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liehui Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Volume fracturing technology has been widely applied in the development of coalbed methane (CBM reservoirs. As for the stimulated reservoir volume (SRV created by volume fracturing, the seepage laws of fluids are described more accurately and rationally in the rectangular composite model than in the traditional radial composite model. However, the rectangular composite model considering SRV cannot be solved using the analytical or semi-analytical function method, and its solution from the linear flow model has larger errors. In view of this, SRV areas of CBM reservoirs were described by means of dual-medium model in this paper. The complex CBM migration mechanisms were investigated comprehensively, including adsorption, desorption, diffusion and seepage. A well testing model for rectangular composite fracturing wells in CBM reservoirs based on unsteady-state diffusion was built and solved using the boundary element method combined with Laplace transformation, Stehfest numerical inversion and computer programming technology. Thus, production performance laws of CBM reservoirs were clarified. The flow regimes of typical well testing curves were divided and the effects on change laws of production performance from the boundary size of gas reservoirs, permeability of volume fractured areas, adsorption gas content, reservoir permeability and SRV size were analyzed. Eventually, CBM reservoirs after the volume fracturing stimulation were described more accurately and rationally. This study provides a theoretical basis for a better understanding of the CBM migration laws and an approach to evaluating and developing CBM reservoirs efficiently and rationally.

  3. Design of adiabatic fixed-bed reactors for the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas. Application to production of methanol and hydrogen-for-fuel-cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smet, de C.R.H.; Croon, de M.H.J.M.; Berger, R.J.; Marin, G.B.M.M.; Schouten, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Adiabatic fixed-bed reactors for the catalytic partial oxidn. (CPO) of methane to synthesis gas were designed at conditions suitable for the prodn. of methanol and hydrogen-for-fuel-cells. A steady-state, one-dimensional heterogeneous reactor model was applied in the simulations. Intra-particle

  4. Biothane process. Methane-producing treatment of wastewaters in a granular sludge bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulenger, P; Vesprille, B

    1982-01-01

    The Biothane-UASB (upflow anaerobic sludge blanket) process, an anaerobic fermentation system with 2 granular sludge beds, effectively treats wastewaters from cheese and starch manufacture and is suitable for other industrial effluents, such as sugar beet alcohol distillation wastewaters and biosynthesis wases.

  5. CBM progress report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, N.; Rami, F.; Roehrich, D.; Stroth, J.; Wessels, J.; Zaitsev, Yu

    2008-02-15

    This report documents the activities within the CBM project in 2007. Significant progress has been made in the optimization of the simulation software, the layout and development of detectors, the design of front-end electronics, and the concepts for data acquisition. The simulation and analysis routines have been completely integrated into the software framework (FAIRoot and CBMroot), and can be used now easily by users outside GSI. A breakthrough has been achieved in the development of fast algorithms for track and vertex reconstruction which have been improved in speed by a factor of 10{sup 5}. These fast routines permit to perform high-statistics simulations for detailed detector layout optimization. Full event reconstruction based on realistic detector properties and particle multiplicities as given by microscopic transport models are routinely used in the feasibility studies. A version of the Silicon Tracking System is now implemented in the simulation software comprising 8 detector layers based on microstrip technology only, including the readout cables, and the mechanical detector structure. The studies of open charm detection have been extended to D{sub s}{sup +} and {lambda}{sub c}, taking into account a realistic layout of the Silicon Pixel Microvertex detector. The identification of electrons has been optimized by improved ring recognition algorithms and transition radiation simulations. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector has been redesigned, resulting in a reduction by a factor of two in mirror size and number of readout channels without reducing the pion rejection capability. The muon detection system has been optimized with respect to the number of detector layers. The muon simulations take into account detector inefficiencies and a segmentation of the muon chambers into pads according to a nominal occupancy of 5% for central Au+Au collisions. Studies for a dimuon trigger show promising results. Radiation dose simulations using the FLUKA

  6. CBM progress report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, N.; Rami, F.; Roehrich, D.; Stroth, J.; Wessels, J.; Zaitsev, Yu

    2008-02-01

    This report documents the activities within the CBM project in 2007. Significant progress has been made in the optimization of the simulation software, the layout and development of detectors, the design of front-end electronics, and the concepts for data acquisition. The simulation and analysis routines have been completely integrated into the software framework (FAIRoot and CBMroot), and can be used now easily by users outside GSI. A breakthrough has been achieved in the development of fast algorithms for track and vertex reconstruction which have been improved in speed by a factor of 10 5 . These fast routines permit to perform high-statistics simulations for detailed detector layout optimization. Full event reconstruction based on realistic detector properties and particle multiplicities as given by microscopic transport models are routinely used in the feasibility studies. A version of the Silicon Tracking System is now implemented in the simulation software comprising 8 detector layers based on microstrip technology only, including the readout cables, and the mechanical detector structure. The studies of open charm detection have been extended to D s + and Λ c , taking into account a realistic layout of the Silicon Pixel Microvertex detector. The identification of electrons has been optimized by improved ring recognition algorithms and transition radiation simulations. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector has been redesigned, resulting in a reduction by a factor of two in mirror size and number of readout channels without reducing the pion rejection capability. The muon detection system has been optimized with respect to the number of detector layers. The muon simulations take into account detector inefficiencies and a segmentation of the muon chambers into pads according to a nominal occupancy of 5% for central Au+Au collisions. Studies for a dimuon trigger show promising results. Radiation dose simulations using the FLUKA transport code have been

  7. Electron identification capabilities of CBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, Semen [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR facility at Darmstadt will measure dileptons emitted from the hot and dense phase in heavy-ion collisions. In case of an electron measurement, a high purity of identified electrons is required in order to suppress the background. Electron identification in CBM will be performed by a RICH and TRD detectors. In this contribution we will present routines which have been developed for electron identification in CBM. A RICH ring recognition algorithm based on the Hough Transform has been implemented. An ellipse fitting algorithm has been elaborated because most of the CBM RICH rings have elliptic shapes, moreover, it helps to improve ring-track matching and electron identification procedures. An Artificial Neural Network can be used in order to suppress fake rings. The electron identification in RICH is substantially improved by the use of TRD information for which 3 different algorithms are implemented. Results of primary electron identification are presented. All developed algorithms were tested on large statistics of simulated events and are included into the CBM software framework for common use.

  8. Hydrogeochemistry and coal-associated bacterial populations from a methanogenic coal bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, Elliott P.; Weeks, Edwin P.; Jones, Elizabeth J.P.; Ritter, Daniel J.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Clark, Arthur C.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Cunningham, Alfred B.; Vinson, David S.; Orem, William H.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    Biogenic coalbed methane (CBM), a microbially-generated source of natural gas trapped within coal beds, is an important energy resource in many countries. Specific bacterial populations and enzymes involved in coal degradation, the potential rate-limiting step of CBM formation, are relatively unknown. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has established a field site, (Birney test site), in an undeveloped area of the Powder River Basin (PRB), with four wells completed in the Flowers-Goodale coal bed, one in the overlying sandstone formation, and four in overlying and underlying coal beds (Knoblach, Nance, and Terret). The nine wells were positioned to characterize the hydraulic conductivity of the Flowers-Goodale coal bed and were selectively cored to investigate the hydrogeochemistry and microbiology associated with CBM production at the Birney test site. Aquifer-test results indicated the Flowers-Goodale coal bed, in a zone from about 112 to 120 m below land surface at the test site, had very low hydraulic conductivity (0.005 m/d) compared to other PRB coal beds examined. Consistent with microbial methanogenesis, groundwater in the coal bed and overlying sandstone contain dissolved methane (46 mg/L average) with low δ13C values (−67‰ average), high alkalinity values (22 meq/kg average), relatively positive δ13C-DIC values (4‰ average), and no detectable higher chain hydrocarbons, NO3−, or SO42−. Bioassay methane production was greatest at the upper interface of the Flowers-Goodale coal bed near the overlying sandstone. Pyrotag analysis identified Aeribacillus as a dominant in situbacterial community member in the coal near the sandstone and statistical analysis indicated Actinobacteria predominated coal core samples compared to claystone or sandstone cores. These bacteria, which previously have been correlated with hydrocarbon-containing environments such as oil reservoirs, have demonstrated the ability to produce biosurfactants to break down

  9. Economic evaluation of coalbed methane production in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Dongkun; Dai Youjin

    2009-01-01

    Roaring natural gas demand, energy security and environment protection concerns coupled with stringent emission reduction requirement have made China's abundant coalbed methane (CBM) resource an increasingly valuable energy source. However, not all of China's CBM resource is economic to develop under current technological condition and economic situation. In order to locate the CBM resource with economic viability to develop in China, economic evaluation of CBM production is conducted by applying net present value (NPV) method. The results indicate that more than half of CBM resource in China is economic to develop. It shows that CBM price, production rate and operating costs are the three major factors with most impact on the economic viability of the CBM development in target areas in China. The result also demonstrates that the economic limit production is roughly 1200 cubic meters per day. These economic evaluation results provide important information for both CBM companies and China government.

  10. Development and linearization of generalized material balance equation for coal bed methane reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penuela, G; Ordonez R, A; Bejarano, A

    1998-01-01

    A generalized material balance equation was presented at the Escuela de Petroleos de la Universidad Industrial de Santander for coal seam gas reservoirs based on Walsh's method, who worked in an analogous approach for oil and gas conventional reservoirs (Walsh, 1995). Our equation was based on twelve similar assumptions itemized by Walsh for his generalized expression for conventional reservoirs it was started from the same volume balance consideration and was finally reorganized like Walsh (1994) did. Because it is not expressed in terms of traditional (P/Z) plots, as proposed by King (1990), it allows to perform a lot of quantitative and qualitative analyses. It was also demonstrated that the existent equations are only particular cases of the generalized expression evaluated under certain restrictions. This equation is applicable to coal seam gas reservoirs in saturated, equilibrium and under saturated conditions, and to any type of coal beds without restriction on especial values of the constant diffusion

  11. Cultivation-independent analysis of archaeal and bacterial communities of the formation water in an Indian coal bed to enhance biotransformation of coal into methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Durgesh Narain; Kumar, Ashok; Tripathi, Anil Kumar [Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India). School of Biotechnolgy; Sarbhai, Munish Prasad [Oil and Natural Gas Commission, Ahmedabad (India). Inst. of Reservoir Studies

    2012-02-15

    Biogenic origin of the significant proportion of coal bed methane has indicated the role of microbial communities in methanogenesis. By using cultivation-independent approach, we have analysed the archaeal and bacterial community present in the formation water of an Indian coal bed at 600-700 m depth to understand their role in methanogenesis. Presence of methanogens in the formation water was inferred by epifluorescence microscopy and PCR amplification of mcrA gene. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene clone library from the formation water metagenome was dominated by methanogens showing similarity to Methanobacterium, Methanothermobacter and Methanolinea whereas the clones of bacterial 16S rRNA gene library were closely related to Azonexus, Azospira, Dechloromonas and Thauera. Thus, microbial community of the formation water consisted of predominantly hydrogenotrophic methanogens and the proteobacteria capable of nitrogen fixation, nitrate reduction and polyaromatic compound degradation. Methanogenic potential of the microbial community present in the formation water was elucidated by the production of methane in the enrichment culture, which contained 16S rRNA gene sequences showing close relatedness to the genus Methanobacterium. Microcosm using formation water as medium as well as a source of inoculum and coal as carbon source produced significant amount of methane which increased considerably by the addition of nitrite. The dominance of Diaphorobacter sp. in nitrite amended microcosm indicated their important role in supporting methanogenesis in the coal bed. This is the first study indicating existence of methanogenic and bacterial community in an Indian coal bed that is capable of in situ biotransformation of coal into methane. (orig.)

  12. Axial Changes of Catalyst Structure and Temperature in a Fixed-Bed Microreactor During Noble Metal Catalysed Partial Oxidation of Methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannemann, S.; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Kimmerle, B.

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic partial oxidation of methane (CPO) over flame-made 2.5%Rh-2.5%Pt/Al2O3 and 2.5%Rh/Al2O3 in 6%CH4/3%O-2/He shows the potential of in situ studies using miniaturized fixed-bed reactors, the importance of spatially resolved studies and its combination with infrared thermography and on-...

  13. Research on control system of truck-mounted rig for coalbed methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hejian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The coal-bed methane (CBM as a kind energy is clean and efficient, also it can become a security risk in mining process if it could not get out of the coal seam. In view of the current large-scale exploitation of coal-bed methane resources, the development of drilling rig for CBM drilling is needed. The parameters and structures were introduced in the paper. The rig uses a highly integrated approach that integrates the required functions on the chassis of the vehicle to meet the needs of rapid installation and transportation. Drilling control system uses hydraulic control and electro-hydraulic control dual control mode, can achieve short-range and remote control operations. The control system include security circuits and electric control system. Through the field trial, it is shown that the rig can meet the construction of the majority of coalbed methane drilling in the country and the performance is stable and the operation is simple.

  14. Conceptual considerations for CBM databases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akishina, E. P.; Aleksandrov, E. I.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Filozova, I. A.; Ivanov, V. V.; Zrelov, P. V. [Lab. of Information Technologies, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Friese, V.; Mueller, W. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    We consider a concept of databases for the Cm experiment. For this purpose, an analysis of the databases for large experiments at the LHC at CERN has been performed. Special features of various DBMS utilized in physical experiments, including relational and object-oriented DBMS as the most applicable ones for the tasks of these experiments, were analyzed. A set of databases for the CBM experiment, DBMS for their developments as well as use cases for the considered databases are suggested.

  15. Conceptual considerations for CBM databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akishina, E.P.; Aleksandrov, E.I.; Aleksandrov, I.N.; Filozova, I.A.; Ivanov, V.V.; Zrelov, P.V.; Friese, V.; Mueller, W.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a concept of databases for the Cm experiment. For this purpose, an analysis of the databases for large experiments at the LHC at CERN has been performed. Special features of various DBMS utilized in physical experiments, including relational and object-oriented DBMS as the most applicable ones for the tasks of these experiments, were analyzed. A set of databases for the CBM experiment, DBMS for their developments as well as use cases for the considered databases are suggested.

  16. Status of the CBM experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heuser Johann M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM experiment at the Facility for Anti-Proton and Ion Research (FAIR will explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at highest net baryon densities and moderate temperatures. The CBM physics program will be started with beams delivered by the SIS 100 synchrotron, providing energies from 2 to 11 GeV/nucleon for heavy nuclei, up to 14 GeV/nucleon for light nuclei, and 29 GeV for protons. The highest net baryon densities will be explored with ion beams up to 45 GeV/nucleon energy delivered by SIS 300 in the next stage of FAIR. Collision rates up to 107 per second are required to produce very rare probes with unprecedented statistics in this energy range. Their signatures are complex. These conditions call for detector systems designed to meet the extreme requirements in terms of rate capability, momentum and spatial resolution, and a novel DAQ and trigger concept which is not limited by latency but by throughput. The article discusses the development status of the CBM sub-systems for charged particle tracking, vertex detection, electron/muon identification, hadron/time-of-flight measurement, electromagnetic and zero-degree calorimetry, in terms of prototypes and expected physics performance. The concept and development status of CBM’s central detector, the Silicon Tracking System STS are presented in somewhat more detail.

  17. Utilization of coalbed methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavson, J.B. [Gustavson Associates Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Substantial progress has been made in capturing coalbed methane (CBM gas), which constitutes a valuable source of clean burning energy. It is of importance to study the various potential uses of coalbed methane and to understand the various technologies required, as well as their economics and any institutional constraints. In industrialised countries, the uses of coalbed methane are almost solely dependent on microeconomics; coalbed methane must compete for a market against natural gas and other energy sources - and frequently, coalbed methane is not competitive against other energy sources. In developing countries, on the other hand, particularly where other sources of energy are in short supply, coalbed methane economics yield positive results. Here, constraints to development of CBM utilization are mainly lack of technology and investment capital. Sociological aspects such as attitude and cultural habits, may also have a strong negative influence. This paper outlines the economics of coalbed methane utilization, particularly its competition with natural gas, and touches upon the many different uses to which coalbed methane may be applied. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Mathematical Modelling of Catalytic Fixed-Bed Reactor for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane over Rh/Al2O3 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    New Pei Yee

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional mathematical model was developed to simulate the performance of catalytic fixed bedreactor for carbon dioxide reforming of methane over Rh/Al2O3 catalyst at atmospheric pressure. The reactionsinvolved in the system are carbon dioxide reforming of methane (CORM and reverse water gas shiftreaction (RWGS. The profiles of CH4 and CO2 conversions, CO and H2 yields, molar flow rate and molefraction of all species as well as reactor temperature along the axial bed of catalyst were simulated. In addition,the effects of different reactor temperature on the reactor performance were also studied. The modelscan also be applied to analyze the performances of lab-scale micro reactor as well as pilot-plant scale reactorwith certain modifications and model verification with experimental data. © 2008 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Received: 20 August 2008; Accepted: 25 September 2008][How to Cite: N.A.S. Amin, I. Istadi, N.P. Yee. (2008. Mathematical Modelling of Catalytic Fixed-Bed Reactor for Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane over Rh/Al2O3 Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 3 (1-3: 21-29. doi:10.9767/bcrec.3.1-3.19.21-29

  19. Enhanced microbial coalbed methane generation: A review of research, commercial activity, and remaining challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Daniel J.; Vinson, David S.; Barnhart, Elliott P.; Akob, Denise M.; Fields, Matthew W.; Cunningham, Al B.; Orem, William H.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.

    2015-01-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) makes up a significant portion of the world’s natural gas resources. The discovery that approximately 20% of natural gas is microbial in origin has led to interest in microbially enhanced CBM (MECoM), which involves stimulating microorganisms to produce additional CBM from existing production wells. This paper reviews current laboratory and field research on understanding processes and reservoir conditions which are essential for microbial CBM generation, the progress of efforts to stimulate microbial methane generation in coal beds, and key remaining knowledge gaps. Research has been primarily focused on identifying microbial communities present in areas of CBM generation and attempting to determine their function, in-situ reservoir conditions that are most favorable for microbial CBM generation, and geochemical indicators of metabolic pathways of methanogenesis (i.e., acetoclastic or hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis). Meanwhile, researchers at universities, government agencies, and companies have focused on four primary MECoM strategies: 1) microbial stimulation (i.e., addition of nutrients to stimulate native microbes); 2) microbial augmentation (i.e., addition of microbes not native to or abundant in the reservoir of interest); 3) physically increasing microbial access to coal and distribution of amendments; and 4) chemically increasing the bioavailability of coal organics. Most companies interested in MECoM have pursued microbial stimulation: Luca Technologies, Inc., successfully completed a pilot scale field test of their stimulation strategy, while two others, Ciris Energy and Next Fuel, Inc., have undertaken smaller scale field tests. Several key knowledge gaps remain that need to be addressed before MECoM strategies can be implemented commercially. Little is known about the bacterial community responsible for coal biodegradation and how these microorganisms may be stimulated to enhance microbial methanogenesis. In addition, research

  20. Coalbed-methane reservoir simulation: an evolving science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bybee, K.

    2004-04-01

    Correctly determining what to model in a coalbed-methane (CBM) reservoir simulation is almost as daunting a task as the simulation work itself. The full-length paper discusses how the exploitation and development of coalbed resources throughout the world are changing and how CBM reservoir simulation is changing as well.

  1. Coalbed Methane prospect of Jamalganj Coalfield Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imam, M. Badrul; Rahman, M.; Akhtar, Syed Humayun

    2002-01-01

    Five major Gondwana coalfields have been discovered in the half-graben type basins in the subsurface in the Precambrian platform area of the Northwest Bangladesh. The Jamalganj coalfields with an estimated reserve of about 1053 millions tons of coal, has seven coal seams in the depth range between 640 to 1158m below the ground surface. Compared to the other coalfields of the area, with coal occurring at 150 to 500m depth, Jamalganj coal is considered to be too deep to be exploited by conventional underground or open pit mining. Instead, developing coal bed methane from Jamalganj coalfield may be considered as a viable option for its exploitation. The positive factors of Jamalganj coal bed methane development include high net thickness of coal with at least one very thick (40m+) and widely developed seam, coal seam burial depth within optimum range, large coal reserves, indication of significant gas content from drilling data, and poor permeability in the rocks above and surrounding the coal layers. The thickest seam III can be primary target for CBM development especially where it combines with seam IV in the eastern part of coalfield. However, there are a number of unknown factors like actual gas content of coal, permeability, and in-seam pressure that need to be evaluated before deciding the viability of the project. An initial attempt to collect these base line data should include drilling test well or wells in the primary target area where seam III is most thick and widely developed. (author)

  2. Methanation of CO2 on Ni/Al2O3 in a Structured Fixed-Bed Reactor—A Scale-Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Türks

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to the ongoing change of energy supply, the availability of a reliable high-capacity storage technology becomes increasingly important. While conventional large-scale facilities are either limited in capacity respective supply time or their extension potential is little (e.g., pumped storage power stations, decentralized units could contribute to energy transition. The concepts of PtX (power-to-X storage technologies and in particular PtG (power-to-gas aim at fixation of electric power in chemical compounds. CO2 hydrogenation (methanation is the foundation of the PtG idea as H2 (via electrolysis and CO2 are easily accessible. Methane produced in this way, often called substitute natural gas (SNG, is a promising solution since it can be stored in the existing gas grid, tanks or underground cavern storages. Methanation is characterized by a strong exothermic heat of reaction which has to be handled safely. This work aims at getting rid of extreme temperature hot-spots in a tube reactor by configuring the catalyst bed structure. Proof of concept studies began with a small tube reactor (V = 12.5 cm3 with a commercial 18 wt % Ni/Al2O3 catalyst. Later, a double-jacket tube reactor was built (V = 452 cm3, reaching a production rate of 50 L/h SNG. The proposed approach not only improves the heat management and process safety, but also increases the specific productivity and stability of the catalyst remarkably.

  3. CBM collaboration : PTAC bringing companies together to jumpstart complex well technology advance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.

    2008-03-15

    This article discussed a joint industry project (JIP) established by the Petroleum Technology Alliance Canada (PTAC) to develop technology applications for coalbed methane (CBM) complexes. A minimum of 8 companies will be needed to initiate the JIP when changes to the royalty regime by the Alberta government are expected to take place. It is expected that the CBM JIP will develop and transfer best practices for optimized CBM exploitation through the use of non-vertical well technology. Three tasks have also been outlined for the project's first year: (1) the creation of a website with public and private access modules; (2) the development of a library of detailed well histories that document field experiences; and (3) launching studies into coal fines-contaminated production streams. The development of horizontal drilling techniques is expected to result in improved environmental benefits due to accelerated production procedures and improved pad configurations. The well history library will act as a primary field data source. It is estimated that approximately 20 trillion cubic feet of CBM reserves are available for recovery using known technologies. However, the development of new technologies is expected to result in an estimated 200 Tcf of recoverable CBM reserves. 1 fig.

  4. Drilling and Testing the DOI041A Coalbed Methane Well, Fort Yukon, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Arthur; Barker, Charles E.; Weeks, Edwin P.

    2009-01-01

    The need for affordable energy sources is acute in rural communities of Alaska where costly diesel fuel must be delivered by barge or plane for power generation. Additionally, the transport, transfer, and storage of fuel pose great difficulty in these regions. Although small-scale energy development in remote Arctic locations presents unique challenges, identifying and developing economic, local sources of energy remains a high priority for state and local government. Many areas in rural Alaska contain widespread coal resources that may contain significant amounts of coalbed methane (CBM) that, when extracted, could be used for power generation. However, in many of these areas, little is known concerning the properties that control CBM occurrence and production, including coal bed geometry, coalbed gas content and saturation, reservoir permeability and pressure, and water chemistry. Therefore, drilling and testing to collect these data are required to accurately assess the viability of CBM as a potential energy source in most locations. In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Bureau of Land Management (BLM), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Alaska Department of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (DGGS), the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), the Doyon Native Corporation, and the village of Fort Yukon, organized and funded the drilling of a well at Fort Yukon, Alaska to test coal beds for CBM developmental potential. Fort Yukon is a town of about 600 people and is composed mostly of Gwich'in Athabascan Native Americans. It is located near the center of the Yukon Flats Basin, approximately 145 mi northeast of Fairbanks.

  5. British Columbia's new coalbed methane royalty regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinski, D.

    2002-01-01

    The British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines is promoting the development of the coalbed methane (CBM) industry in the province in order to make CBM a viable and competitive investment option for industry. It is establishing a regulatory and fiscal regime for CBM development. Issues of concern regarding CBM development include water production, gas production rates, well numbers, and marginal economics. The features of the CBM royalty regime include a new producer cost of service allowance, the creation of a CBM royalty tax bank to collect excess PCOS allowances, and a royalty tax credit for wells drilled by the end of February, 2004. The marginal well adjustment factor threshold has been raised from 180 mcf per day to 600 mcf per day for CBM only. It was noted that royalties will probably not be payable for several years following the first commercial well because royalties are very depending on capital and operating costs, local infrastructure and price. Royalty regimes cannot save CBM from low gas prices, poor resources or economics. 2 figs

  6. Composition and Structure of Microalgae Indicated in Raman and Hyperspectral Spectra and Scanning Electron Microscopy: from Cyanobacteria to Isolates from Coal-bed Methane Water Ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Zhou, Z.; Apple, M. E.; Spangler, L.

    2017-12-01

    Microalgae can be used for many potential applications for human's benefits. These potential applications included biofuel production from microalgae, biofiltering to cleaning water, chemical extraction as nutrients, etc. However, exploration for such applications is still in the early stages. For instance, many species and strains of microalgae have been investigated for their lipid content and growing conditions for efficient productions of lipids, but no specific species have yet been chosen as a fuel source for commercial production because of the huge biodiversity and subsequently a wide range of species that can potentially be exploited for biodiesel production, the great variability between species in their fuel precursor producing capabilities. Numerous coal-bed methane water ponds were established in the world as a consequence of coal-bed methane production from deep coal seams. Microalgae were isolated from such ponds and potentially these ponds can be used as venues for algal production. In this study, we characterized chemical composition and structure of the Cyanobacteria Anabaena cylindrica (UTEX # 1611) and isolates from coal-bed methane ponds Nannochloropsis gaditana and PW95 using Laser Raman Spectroscopy (LRS), hyperspectral spectra, and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The objective is to seek bio-indicators for potential applications of these microalgae species. For instance, indicator of rich content lips shows the great potential for biofuel production. Fig.1 shows an example of the Raman spectra of the three species in desiccated form. The spectral peaks were isolated and the corresponding composition was identified. The insert at the right hand of the Raman spectrum of each species is the micrograph of the cell morphology under a microscope. The Raman spectra of cells in aquatic solutions were also obtained and compared with the desiccated form. The hyperspectral reflectances of the three species show quite different characteristics and

  7. Detector performance tests for the CBM TRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, Martin [Institut fuer Kernphysik, WWU Muenster (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is a fixed target heavy-ion experiment at the future FAIR accelerator facility. The CBM Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) is one of the key detectors to provide electron identification and charged particle tracking. With the construction phase of the detector nearing, we will present results of the detector obtained with a close to final prototype. These results were achieved in measurements at CERN PS in 2014 and SPS in 2015.

  8. Selection of strategic replacement areas for CBM exploration and development in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longyi Shao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available At present, the increase in proved reserves and production of coalbed methane (CBM in China depends mainly on several CBM bases in the southern Qinshui Basin and in the eastern margin of the Ordos Basin. Therefore, it is urgent to find new batches of exploration and development strategic replacement areas. For this purpose, we investigated the resources, reservoir properties, preservation conditions, and development conditions of CBM in China, and put forward eight general factors and four critical factors that can be used in establishing selection criteria of strategic replacement areas for affecting the CBM exploration and development in China. The eight general factors are resource abundance, coalbed thickness, gas content, original permeability, burial depth, hydrogeological conditions, coalbed depositional environment, and landforms, and the four critical factors include genetic type, stability type, later reservoir reformation, and damage degree of coal structure. Comparison shows that the low-rank coal area in the northwestern area, the northeastern medium-low rank coal area, and the southwestern medium-high rank and structurally-complex coal area are the major replacement areas for CBM following the northern area of China. Key factors affecting CBM enrichment in each of the three key areas, respectively, are: a genetic type and stability of coal seams, b genetic type and reconstruction of the reservoir by volcanic intrusion, and c stability of coal seams and damage degree of coal structure. Based on these factors, a system for selection and evaluation of strategic replacement areas for CBM development was established. Fifteen blocks in the above three areas were evaluated by using multi-layered fuzzy mathematics, selecting eight favorable areas and seven relatively favorable areas that contain 1.8 trillion m3 of predicted CBM geological resources. The eight favorable areas include the Wucaiwan-Dajing coal exploration area in the Zhundong

  9. The Development of a Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow Sensor Applicable to CBM Wellbore Annulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuan; Wen, Guojun; Han, Lei; Wu, Xiaoming

    2016-11-18

    The measurement of wellbore annulus gas-liquid two-phase flow in CBM (coalbed methane) wells is of great significance for reasonably developing gas drainage and extraction processes, estimating CBM output, judging the operating conditions of CBM wells and analyzing stratum conditions. Hence, a specially designed sensor is urgently needed for real-time measurement of gas-liquid two-phase flow in CBM wellbore annulus. Existing flow sensors fail to meet the requirements of the operating conditions of CBM wellbore annulus due to such factors as an inapplicable measurement principle, larger size, poor sealability, high installation accuracy, and higher requirements for fluid media. Therefore, based on the principle of a target flowmeter, this paper designs a new two-phase flow sensor that can identify and automatically calibrate different flow patterns of two-phase flows. Upon the successful development of the new flow sensor, lab and field tests were carried out, and the results show that the newly designed sensor, with a measurement accuracy of ±2.5%, can adapt to the operating conditions of CBM wells and is reliable for long-term work.

  10. The Development of a Gas–Liquid Two-Phase Flow Sensor Applicable to CBM Wellbore Annulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Wu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of wellbore annulus gas–liquid two-phase flow in CBM (coalbed methane wells is of great significance for reasonably developing gas drainage and extraction processes, estimating CBM output, judging the operating conditions of CBM wells and analyzing stratum conditions. Hence, a specially designed sensor is urgently needed for real-time measurement of gas–liquid two-phase flow in CBM wellbore annulus. Existing flow sensors fail to meet the requirements of the operating conditions of CBM wellbore annulus due to such factors as an inapplicable measurement principle, larger size, poor sealability, high installation accuracy, and higher requirements for fluid media. Therefore, based on the principle of a target flowmeter, this paper designs a new two-phase flow sensor that can identify and automatically calibrate different flow patterns of two-phase flows. Upon the successful development of the new flow sensor, lab and field tests were carried out, and the results show that the newly designed sensor, with a measurement accuracy of ±2.5%, can adapt to the operating conditions of CBM wells and is reliable for long-term work.

  11. The Development of a Gas–Liquid Two-Phase Flow Sensor Applicable to CBM Wellbore Annulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuan; Wen, Guojun; Han, Lei; Wu, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of wellbore annulus gas–liquid two-phase flow in CBM (coalbed methane) wells is of great significance for reasonably developing gas drainage and extraction processes, estimating CBM output, judging the operating conditions of CBM wells and analyzing stratum conditions. Hence, a specially designed sensor is urgently needed for real-time measurement of gas–liquid two-phase flow in CBM wellbore annulus. Existing flow sensors fail to meet the requirements of the operating conditions of CBM wellbore annulus due to such factors as an inapplicable measurement principle, larger size, poor sealability, high installation accuracy, and higher requirements for fluid media. Therefore, based on the principle of a target flowmeter, this paper designs a new two-phase flow sensor that can identify and automatically calibrate different flow patterns of two-phase flows. Upon the successful development of the new flow sensor, lab and field tests were carried out, and the results show that the newly designed sensor, with a measurement accuracy of ±2.5%, can adapt to the operating conditions of CBM wells and is reliable for long-term work. PMID:27869708

  12. A novel continuous process for synthesis of carbon nanotubes using iron floating catalyst and MgO particles for CVD of methane in a fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghsoodi, Sarah; Khodadadi, Abasali [Catalysis and Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mortazavi, Yadollah, E-mail: mortazav@ut.ac.ir [Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, University of Tehran, POB 11365-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    A novel continuous process is used for production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane on iron floating catalyst in situ deposited on MgO in a fluidized bed reactor. In the hot zone of the reactor, sublimed ferrocene vapors were contacted with MgO powder fluidized by methane feed to produce Fe/MgO catalyst in situ. An annular tube was used to enhance the ferrocene and MgO contacting efficiency. Multi-wall as well as single-wall CNTs was grown on the Fe/MgO catalyst while falling down the reactor. The CNTs were continuously collected at the bottom of the reactor, only when MgO powder was used. The annular tube enhanced the contacting efficiency and improved both the quality and quantity of CNTs. The SEM and TEM micrographs of the products reveal that the CNTs are mostly entangled bundles with diameters of about 10-20 nm. Raman spectra show that the CNTs have low amount of amorphous/defected carbon with I{sub G}/I{sub D} ratios as high as 10.2 for synthesis at 900 deg. C. The RBM Raman peaks indicate formation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) of 1.0-1.2 nm diameter.

  13. A new clan of CBM families based on bioinformatics of starch-binding domains from families CBM20 and CBM21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marhovic, M.; Svensson, Birte; MacGregor, E. A.

    2005-01-01

    many nonamylolytic proteins have been recognized as possessing sequence segments that exhibit similarities with the experimentally observed CBM20 and CBM21. These facts have stimulated interest in carrying out a rigorous bioinformatics analysis of the two CBM families. The present analysis showed...

  14. Dry reforming of methane via plasma-catalysis: influence of the catalyst nature supported on alumina in a packed-bed DBD configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, L.; Ozkan, A.; Genty, E.; Visart de Bocarmé, T.; Reniers, F.

    2018-06-01

    These days, the consideration of CO2 as a feedstock has become the subject of more interest. The reutilization of CO2 is already possible via cold plasma techniques operating at atmospheric pressure. A promising technology is the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). In most cases DBDs exhibit a low energy efficiency for CO2 conversion. However, several routes can be used to increase this efficiency and hence, the product formation. One of these routes is the packed-bed DBD configuration with porous beads inside the gap of the DBD, which also allows the coupling of plasma with catalysis. Catalysts can be introduced in such a configuration to exploit the synergistic effect between plasma and catalytically active surfaces, leading to a more efficient process. In this article, the dry reforming of methane (DRM) is studied, which aims to convert both CO2 and CH4, another greenhouse gas, at the same time. The conversions and energy costs of the DRM process are investigated and compared in both the packed-bed DBD configurations containing catalysts (Co, Cu or Ni) and the classical DBD. The change in filamentary behavior is studied in detail and correlated with the obtained conversions using gas chromatography, mass spectrometry and using an oscilloscope. A characterization of the catalysts on the beads is also carried out. Both the CO2 and CH4 conversions are clearly increased with the plasma-catalysis. Moreover, CH4 conversions as high as 90% can be obtained in certain conditions with copper catalysts.

  15. The CBM first-level event selector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuveland, Jan de; Lindenstruth, Volker [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The CBM experiment currently under construction at GSI/FAIR is designed to study QCD predictions at high baryon densities. The CBM First-Level Event Selector (FLES) is the central event selection system of the experiment. Designed as a high-performance computer cluster, its task is an online analysis of the physics data including full event reconstruction at an incoming data rate exceeding 1 TByte/s. The CBM detector systems are free-running and self-triggered, delivering time-stamped data streams. As there is no inherent event separation, traditional approaches for global event building and event selection are not directly applicable. Instead of event building, the FLES combines the data from approximately 1000 input links to self-contained, overlapping processing intervals and distributes them to compute nodes. It employs a high-bandwidth InfiniBand network as well as dedicated custom FPGA input boards providing time-addressed access to buffered data. Subsequently, specialized event selection algorithms analyze these processing intervals in 4-D, identify events, and select those relevant for storage depending on the chosen CBM setup and selection scenario. This presentation outlines the design of the CBM First-level Event Selector and summarizes the results from first prototype systems.

  16. Component database development for the CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akishina, E.P.; Alexandrov, E.I.; Alexandrov, I.N.; Filozova, I.A.; Ivanov, V.V.; Friese, V.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the implementation of the component database for the CBM experiment. The considered database is designed to effectively manage a large number of components for different CBM detectors during their manufacture, installation and operation. This database contains information about the production company, quality indicators, including test results, information on the whereabouts of the component and its status. A functional model, a design of the database schema, a description of tables and catalogs as well as a graphical user interface system are shown. [ru

  17. Coalbed methane accumulation and dissipation patterns: A Case study of the Junggar Basin, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Fu, Xuehai; Yang, Xuesong; Ge, Yanyan; Quan, Fangkai

    2018-07-01

    The Junggar Basin is a potential replacement area of coalbed methane (CBM) development in China. To improve the efficiency of CBM exploration, we investigated CBM accumulation and dissipation patterns of coal profiles located in the northwestern, southern, eastern, and central Junggar Basin based on the following criteria: burial depth, hydrogeological zone, CBM origin, CBM phase, and CBM migration type. We identified four types of CBM accumulation patterns: (1) a self-sourcing CBM pattern containing adsorbed gas of biogenic origin from shallow-depth coal within a weak runoff zone; (2) an endogenic migration pattern containing adsorbed gas of thermogenic origin from the medium and deep coals within a stagnant zone; (3) an exogenic migration pattern containing adsorbed gas of thermogenic origin from deep coal within a stagnant zone; and (4) an exogenic migration pattern containing adsorbed and free gas of thermogenic origin from ultra-deep coal within a stagnant zone. We also identified two types of CBM dissipation patterns: (1) shallow-depth coal within a runoff zone with mixed origin CBM; and (2) shallow and medium-deep coal seams with mixed origin CBM. CBM migration in low-rank coals was more substantial than that adsorbed in high-rank coal. CBM in shallow coal could easily escape, in the absence of closed structures or hydrogeological seals. CBM reservoirs occurred in deep coal where oversaturated gas may accumulate. Future exploration should focus on gas-water sealing structures in shallow coalbeds. CBM that occurred in adsorbed and free phases and other unconventional natural gas dominated by free gas in the coal stratum should be co-explored and co-developed.

  18. The future of water quality and the regulatory environment for the oil sands and coalbed methane development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasperski, K.; Mikula, R.

    2004-01-01

    The use of consolidated tailings in recent years for the surface mined oil sands bitumen extraction process has resulted in major improvements in water consumption because materials are transported more efficiently in a slurry form. Water storage requirements will be reduced as the cost of handling tailings in the conventional manner becomes clearer. Future improvements may be in the form of mine face sand rejection, more advanced tailings treatment, or the use of clays for continuous reclamation. Sand filtering or stacking technologies can improve tailings properties and reduce the amount of water needed per unit of bitumen. It was noted that although the technologies will minimize land disturbance and fresh water consumption, water chemistries will be driven to the point where extraction recovery is impaired and water treatment will be required. The volumes and quality of water that is pumped out to produce coalbed methane (CBM) was also discussed with reference to the origin of water in coal beds, water resource depletion, water disposal, direct land applications, and surface evaporation. The Alberta Energy and Utilities Board and Alberta Environment are responsible for regulating CBM water issues in the province, including water disposal from CBM production. 41 refs., 6 tabs., 8 figs

  19. Coalbed methane and salmon : assessing the risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendling, G.; Vadgama, J.; Holmes, R.

    2008-05-01

    The harmful environmental impacts from coalbed methane (CBM) development on land, water and wildlife have all been well documented based on experience in the United States and elsewhere. However, proposals to develop CBM resources in the headwaters region of northwest British Columbia raise a new issue regarding the impacts of CBM extraction on salmon. In order to begin addressing this knowledge gap and provide essential information for communities, this report presented an assessment of the risks of CBM development on salmon, with a specific focus on a tenure held by Shell Canada Limited in the Klappan region of Northwest British Columbia. The report provided a general overview of the CBM extraction process and of the environmental impacts typically associated with commercial-scale production. The Klappan Tenure location and geology were described along with the significance of its CBM reserves. The report also addressed the question of salmon presence within the tenure, drawing on existing field research to identify streams where coho, chinook and sockeye salmon have been observed. The report also contained assessments of potential risks associated with the two primary impact pathways, notably runoff and erosion effects arising from land disturbance, and stream flow and temperature effects arising from groundwater extraction. The report provided a brief overview of additional CBM-related impacts which could have indirect effects on salmon. Last, the report considered factors external to the Klappan project which could influence the nature and severity of impacts on salmon, including climate change; inadequate regulations; and cumulative impacts. It was concluded that CBM development should not occur without social license. Communities need to be empowered to decide whether or not they support CBM extraction in their area before development proceeds. 73 refs., 3 tabs., 26 figs

  20. Strangeness Prospects with the CBM Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friese, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The CBM experiment will study strongly interacting matter at high net-baryon densities with nuclear collisions up to 45A GeV beam energy at the future FAIR facility. With interaction rates unprecedented in heavy-ion collisions, CBM will give access also to extremely rare probes and thus to the early stage of the collisions, in search for the first-order phase transition from confined to deconfined matter and the QCD critical point. The CBM physics programme will be started with beams delivered by the SIS-100 synchrotron, providing energies from 2 to 11 GeV/nucleon for heavy nuclei, up to 14 GeV/nucleon for light nuclei, and 30 GeV for protons. The highest net baryon densities will be explored with ion beams up to 45 GeV/nucleon energy delivered by SIS-300 in a later stage of the FAIR project.After several years of preparation, the CBM experiment now enters the realisation phase. In this article, we report on the current status of the system developments and the expected physics performance for strange and charmed observables, as well as on the roadmap towards the first data taking. (paper)

  1. Organic geochemical investigation and coal-bed methane characteristics of the Guasare coals (Paso Diablo mine, western Venezuela)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, K.; Martinez, M.; Hackley, P.; Marquez, G.; Garban, G.; Esteves, I.; Escobar, M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to carry out a geochemical study of channel samples collected from six coal beds in the Marcelina Formation (Zulia State, western Venezuela) and to determine experimentally the gas content of the coals from the Paso Diablo mine. Organic geochemical analyses by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and isotopic analyses on-line in coalbed gas samples were performed. The results suggest that the Guasare coals were deposited in a continental environment under highly dysoxic and low salinity conditions. The non-detection of 18??(H)-oleanane does not preclude that the organic facies that gave rise to the coals were dominated by angiosperms. In addition, the presence of the sesquiterpenoid cadalene may indicate the subordinate contribution of gymnosperms (conifers) in the Paleocene Guasare mire. The average coalbed gas content obtained was 0.6 cm3/g. ??13C and D values indicate that thermogenic gas is prevalent in the studied coals. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  2. British Columbia's new coalbed methane royalty regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molinski, D. [British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines, Victoria, BC (Canada). Energy and Minerals Div.

    2002-07-01

    The British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines is promoting the development of the coalbed methane (CBM) industry in the province in order to make CBM a viable and competitive investment option for industry. It is establishing a regulatory and fiscal regime for CBM development. Issues of concern regarding CBM development include water production, gas production rates, well numbers, and marginal economics. The features of the CBM royalty regime include a new producer cost of service allowance, the creation of a CBM royalty tax bank to collect excess PCOS allowances, and a royalty tax credit for wells drilled by the end of February, 2004. The marginal well adjustment factor threshold has been raised from 180 mcf per day to 600 mcf per day for CBM only. It was noted that royalties will probably not be payable for several years following the first commercial well because royalties are very depending on capital and operating costs, local infrastructure and price. Royalty regimes cannot save CBM from low gas prices, poor resources or economics. 2 figs.

  3. Ring recognition in the CBM RICH detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, S.; Ososkov, G.; Hoehne, C.

    2007-01-01

    Two algorithms of ring recognition, a standalone ring finder (using only RICH information) and an algorithm based on the information from vertex tracks are described. The fake ring problem and its solution using a set of two-dimensional cuts or an artificial neural network are discussed. Results of a comparative study are given. All developed algorithms were tested on large statistics of simulated events and were then included into the CBM framework for common use

  4. Status of the CBM micro vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koziel, Michal [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-MVD-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The fixed-target experiment CBM at FAIR will explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter in the regime of highest net baryon densities with numerous probes, among them open charm. For the reconstruction of open charm hadrons with the CBM experiment a Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) with an excellent spatial resolution of the secondary decay vertex is required. Hence, a material budget of a few 0.1% X0 is mandatory for the individual detector stations positioned downstream in close vicinity to the target. To reduce multiple scattering, the MVD operates in vacuum, which poses challenging requirements on both, the power dissipation of the sensors and the integration concept. Here one should mention the selection of high-performance materials providing the mechanical support and cooling for the 0.05 mm thin sensors, establishing the sensor quality assessment procedures as well as defining the sensor integration. In addition, a substantial progress with respect to sensor development will be reported, mainly to the studies on their radiation hardness. Also, the 2nd generation of the sensor control and read-out based on TRBv3 standard has been commissioned. In this contribution we highlight several activities that have been successfully accomplished, which enable us to define the start version of the CBM MVD.

  5. Techno-economic analysis of sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming in a fixed bed reactor network integrated with fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diglio, Giuseppe; Hanak, Dawid P.; Bareschino, Piero; Mancusi, Erasmo; Pepe, Francesco; Montagnaro, Fabio; Manovic, Vasilije

    2017-10-01

    Sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming (SE-SMR) is a promising alternative for H2 production with inherent CO2 capture. This study evaluates the techno-economic performance of SE-SMR in a network of fixed beds and its integration with a solid oxide fuel cell (SE-SMR-SOFC) for power generation. The analysis revealed that both proposed systems are characterised by better economic performance than the reference systems. In particular, for SE-SMR the levelised cost of hydrogen is 1.6 €ṡkg-1 and the cost of CO2 avoided is 29.9 €ṡtCO2-1 (2.4 €ṡkg-1 and 50 €ṡtCO2-1, respectively, for SMR with CO2 capture) while for SE-SMR-SOFC the levelised cost of electricity is 0.078 €ṡkWh-1 and the cost of CO2 avoided is 36.9 €ṡtCO2-1 (0.080 €ṡkWh-1 and 80 €ṡtCO2-1, respectively, for natural gas-fired power plant with carbon capture). The sensitivity analysis showed that the specific cost of fuel and the capital cost of fuel cell mainly affect the economic performance of SE-SMR and SE-SMR-SOFC, respectively. The daily revenue of the SE-SMR-SOFC system is higher than that of the natural gas-fired power plant if the difference between the carbon tax and the CO2 transport and storage cost is > 6 €ṡtCO2-1.

  6. China coalbed methane summary : on the edge of commercial development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J. [Far East Energy Co., Houston, TX (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Total coalbed methane (CBM) resources in China are estimated at 30 to 35 trillion cubic metres. China also produces nearly 1 billion tons of coal per year, and is considered to be one of the largest emitters of methane in the world. Methane emissions from coal mining are estimated at 8 to 10 billion cubic metres per year. CBM is only in the early stages of development in China, with 210 drilled CBM wells. The China United Coalbed Methane Co. was formed in 1996 as the state company responsible for CBM development. With exclusive rights for exploration, development and production of CBM, the company has signed 19 CBM contracts with foreign companies for a total foreign investment of $90 million U.S. The multinational companies involved include Amoco, Arco, Phillips-Conoco, and Chevron-Texaco. Far East Energy Co. is one of the many independent companies involved with CBM development in China. Exploration and development has been concentrated in Shanxi, Shaanxi, Henan, Hebei, Liaoning, Heilongjiang, and Anhui provinces. The coal deposits vary in age, structural complexity and rank, with the most of the CBM potential located in the Carboniferous, Permian and Jurassic age coals. This paper briefly described the unique coal basin geology within the north and south regions of China with reference to the tectonic events and marine transgressions that led to coal deposition. A history of CBM exploration was included along with licensing requirements. This paper also described the involvement of Far East Energy Company in CBM development in the Yunnan Province, Panjiang coal mining areas, and Qinshui Basin. Petro China, Shell, ExxonMobil and Gazprom are working on a joint venture to construct a 3,800 km pipeline to bring the CBM to markets. The West-East Gas Pipeline Project will weave its wave through the Tarim Basin, the Ordos Basin, the North China Basin, and the Bohai Gulf Basin. If approved, this joint venture would be the second largest modern engineering project in

  7. CBM Resources/reserves classification and evaluation based on PRMS rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, Guifang; Yuan, Ruie; Wang, Zuoqian; Lan, Jun; Zhao, Jian; Xia, Mingjun; Cai, Dechao; Yi, Yanjing

    2018-02-01

    This paper introduces a set of definitions and classification requirements for coalbed methane (CBM) resources/reserves, based on Petroleum Resources Management System (PRMS). The basic CBM classification criterions of 1P, 2P, 3P and contingent resources are put forward from the following aspects: ownership, project maturity, drilling requirements, testing requirements, economic requirements, infrastructure and market, timing of production and development, and so on. The volumetric method is used to evaluate the OGIP, with focuses on analyses of key parameters and principles of the parameter selection, such as net thickness, ash and water content, coal rank and composition, coal density, cleat volume and saturation and absorbed gas content etc. A dynamic method is used to assess the reserves and recovery efficiency. Since the differences in rock and fluid properties, displacement mechanism, completion and operating practices and wellbore type resulted in different production curve characteristics, the factors affecting production behavior, the dewatering period, pressure build-up and interference effects were analyzed. The conclusion and results that the paper achieved can be used as important references for reasonable assessment of CBM resources/reserves.

  8. Development of the geometry database for the CBM experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akishina, E. P.; Alexandrov, E. I.; Alexandrov, I. N.; Filozova, I. A.; Friese, V.; Ivanov, V. V.

    2018-01-01

    The paper describes the current state of the Geometry Database (Geometry DB) for the CBM experiment. The main purpose of this database is to provide convenient tools for: (1) managing the geometry modules; (2) assembling various versions of the CBM setup as a combination of geometry modules and additional files. The CBM users of the Geometry DB may use both GUI (Graphical User Interface) and API (Application Programming Interface) tools for working with it.

  9. Goals and status of the CBM experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senger P.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the heavy-ion collision program at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR in Darmstadt (Germany is to explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter in the region of the highest baryon densities. The CBM research program addresses fundamental aspects of QCD such as the equation-of-state of highly compressed baryonic matter, the deconfinement phase transition and its critical endpoint, chiral symmetry restoration at high baryon densities, and the in-medium properties of hadrons. The corresponding key observables comprise low-mass vector mesons decaying into lepton pairs which serve as penetrating probes, hidden and open charm produced at threshold beam energies, (multi- strange particles, and global features like collective flow and event-by-event fluctuations. The experimental task is to identify both hadrons and leptons and to detect rare probes in a heavy-ion environment. The experimental challenge is to select rare events in nucleus-nucleus collisions with charged particle multiplicities of about 1000 per central event at reaction rates of up to 10 MHz. Such measurements require fast and radiation hard detectors, fast and selftriggered read-out electronics, a high-speed data acquisition system, and online event selection based on full track reconstruction. The layout of the CBM detector system and the results of feasibility studies will be presented. More than 400 scientists from 50 institutions and 15 countries actually participate in the realization of the CBM experiment which represents a major international effort in future heavy-ion physics.

  10. Coalbed methane: Clean energy for the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A.-J.; Johnston, S.; Boyer, C.; Lambert, S.W.; Bustos, O.A.; Pashin, J.C.; Wray, A.

    2009-01-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) has the potential to emerge as a significant clean energy resource. It also has the potential to replace other diminishing hydrocarbon reserves. The latest developments in technologies and methodologies are playing a key role in harnessing this unconventional resource. Some of these developments include adaptations of existing technologies used in conventional oil and gas generations, while others include new applications designed specifically to address coal's unique properties. Completion techniques have been developed that cause less damage to the production mechanisms of coal seams, such as those occurring during cementing operations. Stimulation fluids have also been engineered specifically to enhance CBM production. Deep coal deposits that remain inaccessible by conventional mining operations offer CBM development opportunities.

  11. Technology spurs growth of U.S. coalbed methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, S.H.; Kuuskraa, J.A.; Schraufnagel, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, more than $2 billion in capital investments and continued technological advances have harnessed an entirely new source of natural gas -- coalbed methane (CBM). From its roots as an experimental coal mine degasification method, the CBM industry today has grown into significant component of US natural gas supply. This report, the second of a four part series assessing unconventional gas development in the US, examines the state of the CBM industry following the 1992 expiration of the Sec. 29 Nonconventional Fuels Tax Credit. Parts of the industry believed that CBM was largely a tax credit play that would die out once supports were removed. Now that several years have passed, however, it is becoming clear that the CBM industry has legs sturdy enough to carry it into the 21st century without special tax breaks. This article presents the post 1992 drilling and production data, coupled with detailed assessments of specific CBM projects, which together paint a portrait of a CBM industry that overall continues to thrive without tax credits, thanks to improving E and P technology and continued identification of favorable reservoir settings

  12. Pathways of 3-biofules (hydrogen, ethanol and methane) production from petrochemical industry wastewater via anaerobic packed bed baffled reactor inoculated with mixed culture bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elreedy, Ahmed; Tawfik, Ahmed; Enitan, Abimbola; Kumari, Sheena; Bux, Faizal

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Bio-energy production from MEG contaminated wastewater via AnPBBR, was assessed. • Maximum concurrent H_2 and CH_4 production of 6.57 and 3.57 L/d were obtained. • Maximum ethanol generation of 237.13 mg/L was observed at a HRT of 9 h. • At OLRs up to 4 gCOD/L/d, MEG biodegradability of 71–98% was achieved. • AnPBBR economically achieved shorter payback period (6.25 y), compared to ABR. - Abstract: Simultaneous production of 3-biofuels (hydrogen, ethanol and methane) as by-products of the biodegradation of petrochemical wastewater containing MEG via anaerobic packed bed baffled reactor (AnPBBR), was extensively investigated. A four-chambered reactor supported by polyurethane sheets, was operated at a constant hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 36 h and different organic loading rates (OLRs) of 0.67, 1, 2 and 4 gCOD/L/d. The maximum specific H_2 and CH_4 production rates of 438.07 ± 43.02 and 237.80 ± 21.67 ml/L/d were respectively achieved at OLR of 4 gCOD/L/d. The residual bio-ethanol significantly increased from 57.15 ± 2.31 to 240.19 ± 34.69 mg/L at increasing the OLR from 0.67 to 4 gCOD/L/d, respectively. The maximum MEG biodegradability of 98% was attained at the lowest OLR. Compartment-wise profiles revealed that the maximum H_2 and ethanol production were achieved at HRT of 9 h (1st compartment), while the CH_4 production was peaked at HRTs of 27 and 36 h (last two compartments). Kinetic studies using Stover–Kincannon and completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) in series models were successfully applied to the AnPBBR overall and compartment-to-compartment performance, respectively. The economic evaluation strongly revealed the potentials of using AnPBBR for simultaneous treatment and bio-energy production from petrochemical wastewater as compared to the classical anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR). Microbial analysis using Illumina MiSeq sequencing showed a diversity of bacterial community in AnPBBR. Proteobacteria (36

  13. Decision-Making Accuracy of CBM Progress-Monitoring Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, John M.; Wells, Craig S.; Marcotte, Amanda M.; Solomon, Benjamin G.

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the diagnostic accuracy associated with decision making as is typically conducted with curriculum-based measurement (CBM) approaches to progress monitoring. Using previously published estimates of the standard errors of estimate associated with CBM, 20,000 progress-monitoring data sets were simulated to model student reading…

  14. Control software for the CBM readout chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loizeau, Pierre-Alain [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment, which will be built at FAIR, will use free-streaming readout electronics to acquire high-statistics data-sets of physics probes in fixed target heavy-ion collisions. Since no simple signatures suitable for a hardware trigger are available for most of them, reconstruction and selection of the interesting collisions will be done in software, in a computer farm called First Level Event Selector (FLES). The raw data coming from the detectors is pre-processed, pre-calibrated and aggregated in a FPGA based layer called Data Preprocessing Boards (DPB). IPbus will be used to communicate with the DPBs and through them with the elements of the readout chain closer to detectors. A slow control environment based on this software is developed by CBM to configure in an efficient way the DPBs as well as the Front-End Electronics and monitor their performances. This contribution presents the layout planned for the slow control software, its first implementation and corresponding test results.

  15. Deep subsurface drip irrigation using coal-bed sodic water: part I. water and solute movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern, Carleton R.; Breit, George N.; Healy, Richard W.; Zupancic, John W.; Hammack, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Water co-produced with coal-bed methane (CBM) in the semi-arid Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana commonly has relatively low salinity and high sodium adsorption ratios that can degrade soil permeability where used for irrigation. Nevertheless, a desire to derive beneficial use from the water and a need to dispose of large volumes of it have motivated the design of a deep subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) system capable of utilizing that water. Drip tubing is buried 92 cm deep and irrigates at a relatively constant rate year-round, while evapotranspiration by the alfalfa and grass crops grown is seasonal. We use field data from two sites and computer simulations of unsaturated flow to understand water and solute movements in the SDI fields. Combined irrigation and precipitation exceed potential evapotranspiration by 300-480 mm annually. Initially, excess water contributes to increased storage in the unsaturated zone, and then drainage causes cyclical rises in the water table beneath the fields. Native chloride and nitrate below 200 cm depth are leached by the drainage. Some CBM water moves upward from the drip tubing, drawn by drier conditions above. Chloride from CBM water accumulates there as root uptake removes the water. Year over year accumulations indicated by computer simulations illustrate that infiltration of precipitation water from the surface only partially leaches such accumulations away. Field data show that 7% and 27% of added chloride has accumulated above the drip tubing in an alfalfa and grass field, respectively, following 6 years of irrigation. Maximum chloride concentrations in the alfalfa field are around 45 cm depth but reach the surface in parts of the grass field, illustrating differences driven by crop physiology. Deep SDI offers a means of utilizing marginal quality irrigation waters and managing the accumulation of their associated solutes in the crop rooting zone.

  16. O potencial de geração CBM (Coalbed Methane na jazida Sul Catarinense: 1. Características petrográficas e químicas das camadas de carvão da Formação Rio Bonito, Permiano da Bacia do Paraná

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila dos Santos Lourenzi

    Full Text Available Atualmente, o CBM representa uma importante fonte de energia alternativa. A mais importante sucessão sedimentar portadora de carvão no Brasil ocorre na Bacia do Paraná, com as maiores reservas localizadas nas jazidas do RS e de SC. Este trabalho tem por objetivo analisar as características químicas e petrográficas das camadas de carvão de três poços, realizados recentemente na jazida Sul Catarinense (SC nos municípios de Treviso e Araranguá, com o intuito de avaliar a capacidade de geração de gás metano associado. Foram coletadas amostras de sete camadas de carvão (Barro Branco, Irapuá, A, Bonito Superior, Bonito Inferior, Pré-Bonito Superior e Pré-Bonito Inferior da Formação Rio Bonito que foram submetidas à análise petrográfica e química. O litotipo carvão fosco bandado (BD predominou no CBM-SC-2012, e carvão fosco (D, no CBM-SC-2013. Os resultados petrográficos indicaram valores de 0,60 a 1,26 Rrandom (%, classificando o carvão segundo o rank desde betuminoso alto volátil C até betuminoso médio volátil. A análise de macerais mostra variação na composição das camadas, com predomínio de vitrinita e inertinita. Quanto à análise imediata, as amostras variaram de 34,93 a 65,70% em peso de cinza. O poder calorífico varia de 1858,0 a 5074,8 cal/g. O conteúdo de carbono varia de 4,15 a 65,81%, e o enxofre, de 0,22 a 12,43%. De acordo com os parâmetros analisados, as camadas Barro Branco e Irapuá apresentam as condições necessárias para geração e armazenagem de gás natural, enquanto a camada Bonito apresenta baixo potencial devido ao alto conteúdo de matéria mineral.

  17. Research on the Conductivity-Based Detection Principles of Bubbles in Two-Phase Flows and the Design of a Bubble Sensor for CBM Wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuan; Wen, Guojun; Han, Lei; Wu, Xiaoming

    2016-09-17

    The parameters of gas-liquid two-phase flow bubbles in field coalbed methane (CBM) wells are of great significance for analyzing coalbed methane output, judging faults in CBM wells, and developing gas drainage and extraction processes, which stimulates an urgent need for detecting bubble parameters for CBM wells in the field. However, existing bubble detectors cannot meet the requirements of the working environments of CBM wells. Therefore, this paper reports findings on the principles of measuring the flow pattern, velocity, and volume of two-phase flow bubbles based on conductivity, from which a new bubble sensor was designed. The structural parameters and other parameters of the sensor were then computed, the "water film phenomenon" produced by the sensor was analyzed, and the appropriate materials for making the sensor were tested and selected. After the sensor was successfully devised, laboratory tests and field tests were performed, and the test results indicated that the sensor was highly reliable and could detect the flow patterns of two-phase flows, as well as the quantities, velocities, and volumes of bubbles. With a velocity measurement error of ±5% and a volume measurement error of ±7%, the sensor can meet the requirements of field use. Finally, the characteristics and deficiencies of the bubble sensor are summarized based on an analysis of the measurement errors and a comparison of existing bubble-measuring devices and the designed sensor.

  18. Research on the Conductivity-Based Detection Principles of Bubbles in Two-Phase Flows and the Design of a Bubble Sensor for CBM Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The parameters of gas-liquid two-phase flow bubbles in field coalbed methane (CBM wells are of great significance for analyzing coalbed methane output, judging faults in CBM wells, and developing gas drainage and extraction processes, which stimulates an urgent need for detecting bubble parameters for CBM wells in the field. However, existing bubble detectors cannot meet the requirements of the working environments of CBM wells. Therefore, this paper reports findings on the principles of measuring the flow pattern, velocity, and volume of two-phase flow bubbles based on conductivity, from which a new bubble sensor was designed. The structural parameters and other parameters of the sensor were then computed, the “water film phenomenon” produced by the sensor was analyzed, and the appropriate materials for making the sensor were tested and selected. After the sensor was successfully devised, laboratory tests and field tests were performed, and the test results indicated that the sensor was highly reliable and could detect the flow patterns of two-phase flows, as well as the quantities, velocities, and volumes of bubbles. With a velocity measurement error of ±5% and a volume measurement error of ±7%, the sensor can meet the requirements of field use. Finally, the characteristics and deficiencies of the bubble sensor are summarized based on an analysis of the measurement errors and a comparison of existing bubble-measuring devices and the designed sensor.

  19. Research on the Conductivity-Based Detection Principles of Bubbles in Two-Phase Flows and the Design of a Bubble Sensor for CBM Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuan; Wen, Guojun; Han, Lei; Wu, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    The parameters of gas-liquid two-phase flow bubbles in field coalbed methane (CBM) wells are of great significance for analyzing coalbed methane output, judging faults in CBM wells, and developing gas drainage and extraction processes, which stimulates an urgent need for detecting bubble parameters for CBM wells in the field. However, existing bubble detectors cannot meet the requirements of the working environments of CBM wells. Therefore, this paper reports findings on the principles of measuring the flow pattern, velocity, and volume of two-phase flow bubbles based on conductivity, from which a new bubble sensor was designed. The structural parameters and other parameters of the sensor were then computed, the “water film phenomenon” produced by the sensor was analyzed, and the appropriate materials for making the sensor were tested and selected. After the sensor was successfully devised, laboratory tests and field tests were performed, and the test results indicated that the sensor was highly reliable and could detect the flow patterns of two-phase flows, as well as the quantities, velocities, and volumes of bubbles. With a velocity measurement error of ±5% and a volume measurement error of ±7%, the sensor can meet the requirements of field use. Finally, the characteristics and deficiencies of the bubble sensor are summarized based on an analysis of the measurement errors and a comparison of existing bubble-measuring devices and the designed sensor. PMID:27649206

  20. Influence of biogenic gas production on coalbed methane recovery index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Guo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In investigating the effect of biogenic gas production on the recovery of coalbed methane (CBM, coal samples spanning different ranks were applied in the microbial-functioned simulation experiments for biogenic methane production. Based on the biogenic methane yield, testing of pore structures, and the isothermal adsorption data of coals used before and after the simulation experiments, several key parameters related to the recovery of CBM, including recovery rate, gas saturation and ratio of critical desorption pressure to reservoir pressure, etc., were calculated and the corresponding variations were further analyzed. The results show that one of the significant functions of microbial communities on coal is possibly to weaken its affinity for methane gas, especially with the advance of coal ranks; and that by enhancing the pore system of coal, which can be evidenced by the increase of porosity and permeability, the samples collected from Qianqiu (Yima in Henan and Shaqu (Liulin in Shanxi coal mines all see a notable increase in the critical desorption pressure, gas saturation and recovery rate, as compared to the moderate changes of that of Guandi (Xishan in Shanxi coal sample. It is concluded that the significance of enhanced biogenic gas is not only in the increase of CBM resources and the improvement of CBM recoverability, but in serving as an engineering reference for domestic coalbed biogenic gas production.

  1. Overview of DAQ developments for the CBM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emschermann, David [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment (CBM) at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is a a fixed-target setup operating at very high interaction rates up to 10 MHz. The high rate capability can be achieved with fast and radiation hard detectors equipped with free-streaming readout electronics. A high-speed data acquisition (DAQ) system will forward data volumes of up to 1 TB/s from the CBM cave to the first level event selector (FLES), located 400 m apart. This presentation showcases recent developments of DAQ components for CBM. We highlight the anticipated DAQ setup for beam tests scheduled for the end of 2015.

  2. Alcoholic fermentation process and methane formation unit with biomass in fixed bed; Processo de fermentacao alcoolica e fermentador de metanizacao com biomassa em leito fixo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilleri, Claude [Societe Generale de Techniques Nouvelles (France)

    1986-01-01

    The pollution, measured from Biochemical Oxygen Demand, is constituted primary of organic carbon. The pollution abatement is made traditionally by thr reduction of this carbon by an aerobic way. Were made some tries in order to recover this carbon as an energy source and the methane formation process arises like the most attractive alternative 2 figs.

  3. Superconducting dipole magnet for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurilkin P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The scientific goal of the CBM (Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment at FAIR (Darmstadt is to explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at highest baryon densities. The physics program of the CBM experiment is complimentary to the programs to be realized at MPD and BMN facilities at NICA and will start with beam derived by the SIS100 synchrotron. The 5.15 MJ superconducting dipole magnet will be used in the silicon tracking system of the CBM detector. The magnet will provide a magnetic field integral of 1 Tm which is required to obtain a momentum resolution of 1% for the track reconstruction. The results of the development of dipole magnet of the CBM experiment are presented.

  4. Electron identification capabilities of the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehne, Claudia; Kisel, Ivan [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Lebedev, Semen [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Laboratory of Information Technologies, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Ososkov, Gennady [Laboratory of Information Technologies, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR facility at Darmstadt will measure dileptons emitted from the hot and dense phase in heavy-ion collisions. In case of an electron measurement, a high purity of identified electrons is required in order to suppress the background. Electron identification in CBM will be performed by a RICH and TRD detectors. In this contribution, methods which have been developed for the electron identification in CBM are presented. A fast and efficient RICH ring recognition algorithm based on the Hough Transform has been implemented. An ellipse fitting algorithm has been elaborated because most of the CBM RICH rings have elliptic shapes. An Artificial Neural Network can be used in order to suppress fake rings. The electron identification in RICH is substantially improved by the use of TRD detectors for which several different algorithms for electron identification are implemented. Results of electron identification and pion suppression are presented.

  5. Non-technical constraints on CBM develoment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, R.M. [IEA Coal Research, London (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    Non-technical issues affecting the development of coalbed methane are considered. These include infrastructure, economics and legal issues. In the USA the 1980 tax credit proved to be an important stimulus. Problems concerning ownership of resources may have hindered development. 36 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Extension of the Parana Basin to offshore Brazil: Implications for coalbed methane evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holz, M.; Kalkreuth, W.; Rolim, S.B.A. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2010-05-15

    Coalbed methane (CBM) is a worldwide exploration target of the petroleum industry. In Brazil, the most important coal-bearing succession is associated with the Permian Rio Bonito Formation of the Parana Basin. The gas-prone areas are located at the southeastern margin of the Parana Basin and possibly in the offshore region of the northern part of the Pelotas Basin. Coalfields end abruptly at the present day shoreline, a result of rifting of Gondwana and the evolution of the South Atlantic Ocean. All geologic indicators suggest that in pre-rift times the coal seams extended further eastwards, probably now lying deeply buried below the sedimentary succession of the Pelotas Basin. The present paper discusses structural, stratigraphic, seismic and aeromagenetic data that support the preservation of continental crust beneath ocean sediment. If the coal beds had similar lateral extent to known onshore coals, and coal beds extended across the projected extension of the Parana basin, and there was a conservative 5 m of cumulative coal thickness, then a potential methane volume can be estimated for this newly inferred resource. Average onshore coal gas content is 32 scf/ton (1.00 m(3)/ton). If this is similar in the offshore coal deposits, then the hypothetical methane volume in the offshore area could be in excess of 1.9 x 10(12) scf (56 x 10(9) m(3)). Metamorphism from dikes associated with rifting are potential complicating factors in these deposits, and since no borehole reaching the deep-lying strata in the offshore area are available, this is a hypothetical gas resource with a certain level of uncertainty which should be tested in the future by drilling a deep borehole.

  7. Problems in the development of high-rank CBM horizontal wells in the Fanzhuang–Zhengzhuang Block in the Qinshui Basin and countermeasures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongping Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Coal reservoirs in the Qinshui Basin are characterized by high thermal evolution degree, low permeability, low reservoir pressure, lower gas saturation and strong heterogeneity, so its coalbed methane (CBM development is quite difficult. In this paper, the development practice of high-rank CBM horizontal wells in the Fanzhuang–Zhengzhuang Block was analyzed in terms of geological and engineering factors to clarify the productivity influencing factors, suitable geological conditions and potential tapping countermeasures of multi-lateral horizontal wells. It is shown that the reasons for the low development efficiency of multi-lateral horizontal wells are divided into three types. The first one is geological factor, such as encountering low CBM content areas or faults. The second is engineering factor, such as drilling fluid plugging, drilling collapse, drainage collapse and dust coal blockage. The third is the combination of both factors. It is concluded that encountering low CBM content areas and faults, collapse and blockage are the main reasons for the low production of multi-lateral horizontal wells in the Zhengzhuang–Fanzhuang Block, with the CBM content higher than 20 m3/t, the ratio of critical desorption pressure and reservoir pressure higher than 0.7 and vitrinite reflectance (Ro higher than 3.8. The prerequisite for an open-hole horizontal well in this area to produce CBM at a high rate is that the well lies in the tensile stress zone. Finally, the countermeasures to tap the potential of some inefficient wells were put forward. First, the inefficient wells which are blocked with dust coal or collapsed in the later stage should be stimulated based on classifications. And second, it is necessary to explore new types of horizontal wells so as to deal with borehole collapse and continue the operation in the later stage by using tree-like roof horizontal wells, single-lateral horizontal wells with casing or screen completion and fish

  8. Coalbed methane-produced water quality and its management options in Raniganj Basin, West Bengal, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendhe, Vinod Atmaram; Mishra, Subhashree; Varma, Atul Kumar; Singh, Awanindra Pratap

    2017-06-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) recovery is associated with production of large quantity of groundwater. The coal seams are depressurized by pumping of water for regular and consistent gas production. Usually, CBM operators need to pump >10 m3 of water per day from one well, which depends on the aquifer characteristics, drainage and recharge pattern. In India, 32 CBM blocks have been awarded for exploration and production, out of which six blocks are commercially producing methane gas at 0.5 million metric standard cubic feet per day. Large amount of water is being produced from CBM producing blocks, but no specific information or data are available for geochemical properties of CBM-produced water and its suitable disposal or utilization options for better management. CBM operators are in infancy and searching for the suitable solutions for optimal management of produced water. CBM- and mine-produced water needs to be handled considering its physical and geochemical assessment, because it may have environmental as well as long-term impact on aquifer. Investigations were carried out to evaluate geochemical and hydrogeological conditions of CBM blocks in Raniganj Basin. Totally, 15 water samples from CBM well head and nine water samples from mine disposal head were collected from Raniganj Basin. The chemical signature of produced water reveals high sodium and bicarbonate concentrations with low calcium and magnesium, and very low sulphate in CBM water. It is comprehend that CBM water is mainly of Na-HCO3 type and coal mine water is of Ca-Mg-SO4 and HCO3-Cl-SO4 type. The comparative studies are also carried out for CBM- and mine-produced water considering the geochemical properties, aquifer type, depth of occurrence and lithological formations. Suitable options like impounding, reverse osmosis, irrigation and industrial use after prerequisite treatments are suggested. However, use of this huge volume of CBM- and mine-produced water for irrigation or other beneficial purposes

  9. Potential for CO2 sequestration and Enhanced Coalbed Methane production in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamelinck, C.N.; Faaij, A.P.C.; Ruijg, G.J.; Jansen, D.; Pagnier, H.; Van Bergen, F.; Wolf, K.H.; Barzandji, O.; Bruining, H.; Schreurs, H.

    2001-03-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of ECBM (Enhanced Coal Bed Methane) in the Netherlands are explored. The potential and the economic performance are worked out for several ECBM recovery concepts and technological issues are outlined. The research includes the following main activities: Inventory of CO2 sources in the Netherlands and techno-economic analysis of CO2 removal and transport. Several scenarios for CO2 transport of different capacities and distances will be assessed. ECBM production locations are determined by analysis of coal reserves and their characteristics. Four potential areas are assessed: one in eastern Gelderland, two in Limburg and one in Zeeland. Description of ECBM theory and production technology resulting in a time dependent model for ECBM production and CO2 injection. Selection and description of various ECBM production/CO2 sequestration systems. Systems considered include direct delivery of methane to the natural gas grid, production of power (on various scales) and hydrogen. Information from the location assessment is combined with modelling results. Costs of CO2 sequestration are calculated for various scales and configurations. Evaluation of main uncertainties, environmental impacts and sensitivity analyses. Comparison of CBM production systems with reference systems and exploration of potential implementation schemes in the Dutch context. 72 refs

  10. A Comparison between Model Base Hardconstrain, Bandlimited, and Sparse-Spike Seismic Inversion: New Insights for CBM Reservoir Modelling on Muara Enim Formation, South Sumatra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Noor, Faris; Adipta, Agra

    2018-03-01

    Coal Bed Methane (CBM) as a newly developed resource in Indonesia is one of the alternatives to relieve Indonesia’s dependencies on conventional energies. Coal resource of Muara Enim Formation is known as one of the prolific reservoirs in South Sumatra Basin. Seismic inversion and well analysis are done to determine the coal seam characteristics of Muara Enim Formation. This research uses three inversion methods, which are: model base hard- constrain, bandlimited, and sparse-spike inversion. Each type of seismic inversion has its own advantages to display the coal seam and its characteristic. Interpretation result from the analysis data shows that the Muara Enim coal seam has 20 (API) gamma ray value, 1 (gr/cc) – 1.4 (gr/cc) from density log, and low AI cutoff value range between 5000-6400 (m/s)*(g/cc). The distribution of coal seam is laterally thinning northwest to southeast. Coal seam is seen biasedly on model base hard constraint inversion and discontinued on band-limited inversion which isn’t similar to the geological model. The appropriate AI inversion is sparse spike inversion which has 0.884757 value from cross plot inversion as the best correlation value among the chosen inversion methods. Sparse Spike inversion its self-has high amplitude as a proper tool to identify coal seam continuity which commonly appears as a thin layer. Cross-sectional sparse spike inversion shows that there are possible new boreholes in CDP 3662-3722, CDP 3586-3622, and CDP 4004-4148 which is seen in seismic data as a thick coal seam.

  11. METHOD FOR PRODUCING ISOTOPIC METHANES AND PARTIALLY HALOGENATED DERIVATIVES THEROF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazer, J.W.

    1959-08-18

    A method is given for producing isotopic methanes and/ or partially halogenated derivatives. Lithium hydride, deuteride, or tritide is reacted with a halogenated methane or with a halogenated methane in combination with free halogen. The process is conveniently carried out by passing a halogenated methane preferably at low pressures or in an admixture with an inert gas through a fixed bed of finely divided lithium hydride heated initially to temperatures of 100 to 200 deg C depending upon the halogenated methane used.

  12. Requirements for the Silicon Tracking System of CBM at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuser, Johann M.; Deveaux, M.; Muentz, C.; Stroth, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt will systematically study dense baryonic matter created in collisions of intense heavy-ion beams with nuclear targets. The research addresses current questions of strong-interaction physics as confinement in normal nuclear matter, chiral symmetry restoration in deconfined matter at high temperatures and densities, and the search for the critical end-point of the phase boundary. With beams of ions as heavy as Au and U, energies up to 45GeV/nucleon and intensities up to 10 12 ions per pulse, FAIR will enable CBM to probe the phase diagram of quantum chromo dynamics (QCD) in a region poorly known, while being complementary to current and future research programmes at RHIC and LHC. The CBM experiment is planned as a fixed-target spectrometer optimized for the detection of rare probes. Among these are open charm and low-mass vector mesons, important observables for the initial energetic and dense phase of the collisions. The experimental concept and challenge is to accomplish charged particle tracking in the high-multiplicity, high-radiation collision environment. This will be realized exclusively with a silicon tracking detector system installed in a strong magnetic dipole field directly behind the target. Key to the physics of CBM and benchmark for the tracking is the reconstruction of short-lived charmed mesons that puts high demands on the silicon detectors. The article presents a conceptual design of the CBM experiment with emphasis on the silicon tracking system. Requirements for silicon microstrip and pixel detectors and their arrangement in the tracker are discussed in relation to important physics observables addressed by CBM

  13. The Predictive Validity of CBM Writing Indices for Eighth-Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Janelle M.; Watkins, Marley W.

    2011-01-01

    Curriculum-based measurement (CBM) is an alternative to traditional assessment techniques. Technical work has begun to identify CBM writing indices that are psychometrically sound for monitoring older students' writing proficiency. This study examined the predictive validity of CBM writing indices in a sample of 447 eighth-grade students.…

  14. The starch-binding domain family CBM41 - an in silico analysis of evolutionary relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janeček, Štefan; Majzlová, Katarína; Svensson, Birte

    2017-01-01

    Within the CAZy database, there are 81 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) families. A CBM represents a non-catalytic domain in a modular arrangement of glycoside hydrolases (GHs). The present in silico study has been focused on starch-binding domains from the family CBM41 that are usually part...

  15. Experimental and numerical study of radial lateral fracturing for coalbed methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Xuan; Li, Gensheng; Huang, Zhongwei; Liang, Yuesong; Xu, Zhengming; Jin, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Drilling ultra-short radius horizontal laterals in a vertical well and then operating hydraulic fracturing (radial lateral fracturing, abbreviated as RLF) is proposed as a prospective novel method to increase the single-well productivity for coalbed methane (CBM) development. The objective of this article is to find the best fracture network profile RLF can generate and what kind of formation is suitable for this fracturing technique. Experiments using a true tri-axial fracturing simulation system are designed to analyse the influence of different lateral length, count and azimuth on the fracturing initiation and propagation. A numerical simulation is also carried out to study the sensitivity of the coal integrity and in situ stress state on the fracture initiation type. Our work shows that: the best effect of RLF is achieved when it initiates from the bedding plane where the laterals lie and forms a fracture network with one main horizontal fracture connecting multiple vertical fractures; the breakdown and injection pressure will be decreased by increasing the lateral length and count; increasing the lateral length can enlarge the horizontal fracture area; the optimal lateral design for horizontal initiation is four laterals with the phase of 90° and each lateral is at 45° from the horizontal stress; RLF is suitable for the intact coal seams in which cracks or cleats are not well developed and the overburden stress should be close to or less than the maximum horizontal stress. This paper will provide the experimental support and theoretical bases for CBM RLF design. (paper)

  16. Standard for baseline water-well testing for coalbed methane/natural gas in coal operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-04-01

    Interest in developing coalbed methane (CBM) is increasing with the decline of conventional natural gas reserves. In Alberta, where CBM is in the early stages of development, the drilling, production and operational rules for CBM are the same as those that apply to natural gas. The government of Alberta is presently examining the rules and regulations that apply to CBM to determine if they are appropriate for responsible development and balanced with environmental protection. CBM development has the potential to affect water aquifers and water supply. As such, a new standard has been developed by Alberta Environment in collaboration with the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board which requires that companies involved in the development of shallow CBM must offer to test rural Albertan's water wells prior to drilling. The companies will submit baseline groundwater data to both Alberta Environment and the landowner. The broader application of groundwater testing will also support Alberta Environment's objective of mapping all groundwater resources in the province. This new standard will help achieve continued protection of provincial groundwater resources and Albertan's groundwater supplies. It will also facilitate responsible CBM development and the government's Water for Life strategy. This document explained the protocols for testing, sampling and analyzing groundwater. The standard provides scientific information to support achievement of the outcomes as well as a regulatory basis for water well testing and baseline data collection prior to CBM development. If a landowner registers a complaint regarding a perceived change in well water quantity and quality after CBM development, then the developers must retest the water well to address the landowner's concerns. The tests evaluate water well capacity, water quality, routine potability and analysis for water quality parameters, including major ionic constituents, bacteriological analysis and presence or absence of gas

  17. Experimental Study on Methane Desorption from Lumpy Coal under the Action of Hydraulic and Thermal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Moisture and thermal are the key factors for influencing methane desorption during CBM exploitation. Using high-pressure water injection technology into coalbed, new fractures and pathways are formed to transport methane. A phenomenon of water-inhibiting gas flow existed. This study is focused on various water pressures impacted on gas-adsorbed coal samples, and then the desorption capacity could be revealed under different conditions. And the results are shown that methane desorption capacity was decreased with the increase in water pressure at room temperature and the downtrend would be steady until water pressure was large enough. Heating could promote gas desorption capacity effectively, with the increasing of water injection pressures, and the promotion of thermal on desorption became more obvious. These results are expected to provide a clearer understanding of theoretical efficiency of heat water or steam injection into coalbed, and they can provide some theoretical and experimental guidance on CBM production and methane control.

  18. Reactor kinetics revisited: a coefficient based model (CBM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratemi, W.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a nuclear reactor kinetics model based on Guelph expansion coefficients calculation ( Coefficients Based Model, CBM), for n groups of delayed neutrons is developed. The accompanying characteristic equation is a polynomial form of the Inhour equation with the same coefficients of the CBM- kinetics model. Those coefficients depend on Universal abc- values which are dependent on the type of the fuel fueling a nuclear reactor. Furthermore, such coefficients are linearly dependent on the inserted reactivity. In this paper, the Universal abc- values have been presented symbolically, for the first time, as well as with their numerical values for U-235 fueled reactors for one, two, three, and six groups of delayed neutrons. Simulation studies for constant and variable reactivity insertions are made for the CBM kinetics model, and a comparison of results, with numerical solutions of classical kinetics models for one, two, three, and six groups of delayed neutrons are presented. The results show good agreements, especially for single step insertion of reactivity, with the advantage of the CBM- solution of not encountering the stiffness problem accompanying the numerical solutions of the classical kinetics model. (author)

  19. Internal monitoring of GBTx emulator using IPbus for CBM experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Swagata; Zabolotny, Wojciech; Sau, Suman; Chkrabarti, Amlan; Saini, Jogender; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Pal, Sushanta Kumar

    2015-09-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is a part of the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt at GSI. In CBM experiment a precisely time synchronized fault tolerant self-triggered electronics is required for Data Acquisition (DAQ) system in CBM experiments which can support high data rate (up to several TB/s). As a part of the implementation of the DAQ system of Muon Chamber (MUCH) which is one of the important detectors in CBM experiment, a FPGA based Gigabit Transceiver (GBTx) emulator is implemented. Readout chain for MUCH consists of XYTER chips (Front end electronics) which will be directly connected to detector, GBTx emulator, Data Processing Board (DPB) and First level event selector board (FLIB) with backend software interface. GBTx emulator will be connected with the XYTER emulator through LVDS (Low Voltage Differential Signalling) line in the front end and in the back end it is connected with DPB through 4.8 Gbps optical link. IPBus over Ethernet is used for internal monitoring of the registers within the GBTx. In IPbus implementation User Datagram Protocol (UDP) stack is used in transport layer of OSI model so that GBTx can be controlled remotely. A Python script is used at computer side to drive IPbus controller.

  20. easyCBM Norms. 2014 Edition. Technical Report #1409

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saven, Jessica L.; Tindal, Gerald; Irvin, P. Shawn; Farley, Dan; Alonzo, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Previous norms for the easyCBM assessment system were computed using scores from all students who took each measure for every grade and benchmark season (fall, winter, and spring). During the 2013-­14 school year, new national norms were developed to more accurately (proportionately) represent reading and mathematics performance by two variables:…

  1. What does the CBM-maze test measure?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijselaar, M.M.L.; Kendeou, P.; de Jong, P.F.; van den Broek, P.W.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we identified the code-related (decoding, fluency) and language comprehension (vocabulary, listening comprehension) demands of the CBM-Maze test, a formative assessment, and compared them to those of the Gates–MacGinitie test, a standardized summative assessment. The demands of these

  2. Status and first Results of the CBM TRD Prototype Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arend, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of decay products from rare particles in the CBM experiment defines the requirements for the used detector systems. This report describes the approaches for the Transition Radiation Detector to fulfil these requirements and presents the current status of the prototype development. First results from beam tests with these prototypes are discussed.

  3. Minimal disturbance : Ensign's ADR-1000-CT rig aimed at CBM market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, P.

    2005-01-01

    Ensign Resource Services Group Inc. has recently designed a light, mobile rig aimed at Western Canada's coalbed methane (CBM) market. With a 1000 metre depth rating, the automated ADR-1000-CT rig can drill with either jointed pipe or 3 and a half-inch coil. Tractor units are used to move the rig to avoid the extra traffic generated by third-party trucks. The rig's self-levelling capability creates less environmental disturbance. Each component works on sites with as much as 2 metres difference in elevation, which reduces the need for earth-moving equipment. As drilling moves closer to farms and acreages, minimal environmental disturbance is crucial to the CBM industry. The rig won a 2005 Alberta government award for innovations in workplace health and safety as the design eliminates many of the tasks where injuries occur on conventional rigs. On conventional rigs, drill-strings are suspended from a travelling block which is suspended from the crown of a large, heavy derrick. With the ADR, hydraulic cylinders bear the weight of the drill string, and the derrick serves mainly to guide the top drive. When drilling only with jointed pipe, the coiled-tubing reel is a separate load so that drilling crews don't have to transport it around on programs requiring only jointed pipe. If coil is needed, the reel can be trucked to the site and plugged in to the rest of the rig. Tubing is expected to last 3 times as long as on a regular coiled-tubing rig, as the reel is positioned directly over the rotary table. The rigs have been used for various drilling projects and have performed satisfactorily with high penetration rates due to their large mud pumps. It was concluded that the ADR-1000-CT rig's hydraulic self-levelling capability and agility are helpful features when drilling in a minimal disturbance environment. 3 figs

  4. Effects of Adding Corn Dried Distiller Grains with Solubles (DDGS to the Dairy Cow Diet and Effects of Bedding in Dairy Cow Slurry on Fugitive Methane Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel I. Massé

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The specific objectives of this experiment were to investigate the effects of adding 10% or 30% corn dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS to the dairy cow diet and the effects of bedding type (wood shavings, straw or peat moss in dairy slurry on fugitive CH4 emissions. The addition of DDGS10 to the dairy cow diet significantly increased (29% the daily amount of fat excreted in slurry compared to the control diet. The inclusion of DDGS30 in the diet increased the daily amounts of excreted DM, volatile solids (VS, fat, neutral detergent fiber (NDF, acid detergent fiber (ADF and hemicellulose by 18%, 18%, 70%, 30%, 15% and 53%, respectively, compared to the control diet. During the storage experiment, daily fugitive CH4 emissions showed a significant increase of 15% (p < 0.05 for the slurry resulting from the corn DDGS30 diet. The addition of wood shavings and straw did not have a significant effect on daily fugitive CH4 emissions relative to the control diet, whereas the addition of peat moss caused a significant increase of 27% (p < 0.05 in fugitive CH4 emissions.

  5. Effects of Adding Corn Dried Distiller Grains with Solubles (DDGS) to the Dairy Cow Diet and Effects of Bedding in Dairy Cow Slurry on Fugitive Methane Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massé, Daniel I; Jarret, Guillaume; Benchaar, Chaouki; Hassanat, Fadi

    2014-12-09

    The specific objectives of this experiment were to investigate the effects of adding 10% or 30% corn dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) to the dairy cow diet and the effects of bedding type (wood shavings, straw or peat moss) in dairy slurry on fugitive CH₄ emissions. The addition of DDGS10 to the dairy cow diet significantly increased (29%) the daily amount of fat excreted in slurry compared to the control diet. The inclusion of DDGS30 in the diet increased the daily amounts of excreted DM, volatile solids (VS), fat, neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF) and hemicellulose by 18%, 18%, 70%, 30%, 15% and 53%, respectively, compared to the control diet. During the storage experiment, daily fugitive CH₄ emissions showed a significant increase of 15% (p < 0.05) for the slurry resulting from the corn DDGS30 diet. The addition of wood shavings and straw did not have a significant effect on daily fugitive CH₄ emissions relative to the control diet, whereas the addition of peat moss caused a significant increase of 27% (p < 0.05) in fugitive CH₄ emissions.

  6. The Development and Test of a Sensor for Measurement of the Working Level of Gas–Liquid Two-Phase Flow in a Coalbed Methane Wellbore Annulus

    OpenAIRE

    Chuan Wu; Huafeng Ding; Lei Han

    2018-01-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) is one kind of clean-burning gas and has been valued as a new form of energy that will be used widely in the near future. When producing CBM, the working level within a CBM wellbore annulus needs to be monitored to dynamically adjust the gas drainage and extraction processes. However, the existing method of measuring the working level does not meet the needs of accurate adjustment, so we designed a new sensor for this purpose. The principle of our sensor is a liquid pres...

  7. Gaining momentum : advanced multilateral technology touted as key to unlocking Manville CBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.

    2006-01-01

    A new technology developed by a Louisiana-based company called Gardes Energy Services Inc. may be used to develop Canada's Manville coalbed methane (CBM) play. Two Canadian companies have recently agreed to test the patented technology in the Manville play, which has a permeability of only 3 to 4 millidarcies in shallower Manville targets and less than 1 millidarcy in deeper targets. The technology entails the drilling of multiple, radial wells with lateral branches. The 2-string dual injection drilling technique allows non-damaging underbalanced drilling of multiple lateral branches in each seam when combined with the patented Upstock process. The Upstock is then lowered to the lowest seam on a carrier string to redirect the drilling assembly into the first coal seam. Drilling fluid is pumped down the drillstring, activating the drilling assembly's mud motor and guidance system. Injection rates are adjusted according to downhole measurement-while drilling pressure sensors to maintain underbalanced drilling. Continuous circulation through the concentric casing system eliminates the potentially damaging surging that occurs in conventional drilling. By reorienting the bent housing on the drilling motor, branch laterals are added in each coal seam. Once completed, the drilling assembly is pulled, the Upstock is lifted on the carrier string to the next seam of interest, and the process is repeated. The dual annulus process lowers the equivalent circulating density below that of the formation pressure, preventing drilling fluid from invading and damaging the formation. Formation water is typically used as the drilling fluid. Once drilling is completed, an electric submersible pump (ESP) is lowered on tubing to the sump area and water is pumped to surface, allowing the methane to desorb and be produced through perforations into and up the inner annulus. The technique reduces the environmental impact of drilling, as 1 area can be used to drain an area the equivalent of 16

  8. Proceedings of the Canadian Institute's conference on fundamentals of coalbed methane and shale gas : comprehensive overviews of leading project management strategies, effective techniques, new regulations, and key measurements for success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Forecasts have indicated that despite some uncertainties in Coalbed methane (CBM) technology and concerns over the environmental effects of CBM production, the CBM industry is expected to grow rapidly over the next decade. This conference reviewed a variety of CBM project management strategies adopted by Canadian companies, ranging from initial site assessment through to commercial production. Pipeline and infrastructure requirements for the CBM industry were reviewed, and an overview of CBM regulations was provided. Exploration techniques and recommended practices for CBM hydraulic fracturing were presented. It was noted that in addition to environmental concerns over surface water discharge of CBM produced water, subsurface management issues are being increasingly scrutinized by environmentalists. Various commercialization strategies for CBM production were also reviewed, including well spacing management techniques; infrastructure demands and capitalized costs. Factors to ensure cost-effective high volume production in the shale gas industry were also reviewed. Of the 23 presentations given at this conference, 8 were catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  9. Feasibility study for a muon detector for the CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, Dipanwita; Lebedev, Andrey; Kiseleva, Anna; Ryzhinskiy, Mikhail; Kryshen, Evgeny

    2009-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR accelerator facility at GSI, Darmstadt is being designed to investigate heavy ion collisions in fixed target mode at beam energies from 10 - 45 A GeV. The major goal is to explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high baryon densities and at moderate temperatures. One of the proposed key observables is the measurement of charmonium via the dilepton decay channel. As leptons leave the initially produced hot and dense fireball without further interactions, they are excellent probes to study in-medium properties of vector mesons. In this contribution we will present detailed feasibility studies for a di-muon measurement in CBM

  10. Selected event reconstruction algorithms for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, Semen; Höhne, Claudia; Lebedev, Andrey; Ososkov, Gennady

    2014-01-01

    Development of fast and efficient event reconstruction algorithms is an important and challenging task in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR facility. The event reconstruction algorithms have to process terabytes of input data produced in particle collisions. In this contribution, several event reconstruction algorithms are presented. Optimization of the algorithms in the following CBM detectors are discussed: Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector, Transition Radiation Detectors (TRD) and Muon Chamber (MUCH). The ring reconstruction algorithm in the RICH is discussed. In TRD and MUCH track reconstruction algorithms are based on track following and Kalman Filter methods. All algorithms were significantly optimized to achieve maximum speed up and minimum memory consumption. Obtained results showed that a significant speed up factor for all algorithms was achieved and the reconstruction efficiency stays at high level.

  11. Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevent, identify, and treat bed bug infestations using EPA’s step-by-step guides, based on IPM principles. Find pesticides approved for bed bug control, check out the information clearinghouse, and dispel bed bug myths.

  12. CBM first-level event selector input interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutter, Dirk [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The CBM First-level Event Selector (FLES) is the central event selection system of the upcoming CBM experiment at FAIR. Designed as a high-performance computing cluster, its task is an online analysis of the physics data at a total data rate exceeding 1 TByte/s. To allow efficient event selection, the FLES performs timeslice building, which combines the data from all given input links to self-contained, overlapping processing intervals and distributes them to compute nodes. Partitioning the input data streams into specialized containers allows to perform this task very efficiently. The FLES Input Interface defines the linkage between FEE and FLES data transport framework. Utilizing a custom FPGA board, it receives data via optical links, prepares them for subsequent timeslice building, and transfers the data via DMA to the PC's memory. An accompanying HDL module implements the front-end logic interface and FLES link protocol in the front-end FPGAs. Prototypes of all Input Interface components have been implemented and integrated into the FLES framework. In contrast to earlier prototypes, which included components to work without a FPGA layer between FLES and FEE, the structure matches the foreseen final setup. This allows the implementation and evaluation of the final CBM read-out chain. An overview of the FLES Input Interface as well as studies on system integration and system start-up are presented.

  13. The CBM first-level event selector input interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutter, Dirk; Lindenstruth, Volker [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The CBM First-level Event Selector (FLES) is the central event selection system of the upcoming CBM experiment at FAIR. Designed as a high-performance computing cluster, its task is an online analysis of the physics data at a total data rate exceeding 1 TByte/s. To allow efficient event selection, the FLES has to combine the data from all given input links to self-contained, overlapping processing intervals and distribute them to compute nodes. This task can be performed efficiently by partitioning the detector data streams into specialized containers. The FLES Interface Board (FLIB), implemented as a custom FPGA board, receives these containers via optical links, prepares them for subsequent interval building, and transfers the data via DMA to the PC's memory. A prototype of the FLIB has been implemented. The inclusion of features foreseen for other parts of the CBM read-out chain allows the evaluation of the interval building concept. Performance studies demonstrated high read-out bandwidth with low overhead. In addition, the FLIB has been used successfully as a readout device in test-beams and lab setups. An overview of the FLES Interface Board as well as results from latest studies is presented.

  14. Development of an alignment system for the CBM rich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehne, Claudia; Mahmoud, Tariq; Bendarouach, Jordan [Justus Liebig University, Giessen (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR complex will investigate the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at high baryon density and moderate temperatures in A+A collisions from 4-35 AGeV. One of the key detector components required for the CBM physics program is the RICH detector, which is developed for efficient and clean electron identification and pion suppression. Main detector components are a CO{sub 2} gaseous radiator, MAPMT or MCP photo-detectors and spherical glass mirror tiles, used as focusing elements, with spectral reflectivity down to the UV range. An important aspect to guarantee a stable operation of the RICH detector is the alignment and continuous monitor of the mirrors. CLAM (Continuous Line Alignment Monitoring), an alignment procedure developed by the COMPASS experiment, is planned to be used also for the RICH mirror system. A smaller-scale version has been implemented in the CBM RICH prototype detector and tested at the Cern PS/T9 beamline in November 2014. Using a grid and target dots made of retro-reflective material, it is possible to align the mirrors and monitor their displacements over time by analyzing and applying mathematical calculations on photographic images of the grid and targets reflected on the mirrors. The concept, first data and results of image processing are presented and discussed.

  15. Report on investigations in fiscal 2000 on the basic investigation on promotion of joint implementation. Project to utilize coal bed methane gas for power generation in Poland; 2000 nendo kyodo jisshi nado suishin kiso chosa hokokusho. Poland tanko methane gas hatsuden riyo keikaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Having the Mining Industry Restructuring Public Corporation located in the city of Katowice, Poland as the counterpart, a feasibility study has been executed on a project to utilize coal bed gas for power generation. Selected for the study are the 'Budryk coal mine' owned by KWK 'Budryk' Coal Company and the 'Pniowek coal mine' owned by Jastrzebie Coal Company. Since the Pniowek coal mine can utilize the whole quantity of recovered methane by 2001, the Budryk coal mine was selected as the object of the project. As a result of the trial calculation on the economy when the new gas power plant is installed in the Budryk coal mine, the energy substitution effect was found to equal to a power amount at transmission terminal of 6 MWh/year. Furthermore, when proliferation effect is taken into consideration, an enormous effect can be expected if new coal mines are developed and the existing cola mines will go further deeper, because the Silesian coal mine presently has the coal resource quantity of 57 billion tons and the annual gas discharge quantity of 750 million m{sup 3}. Therefore, if the technologies to recover, manage and utilize the gas are established at the Budryk coal mine, a large effect leading to an aspiration would be expected under the current situation of the structural reorganization under which the Polish coal companies are placed. (NEDO)

  16. Quantification of Concentration of Microalgae Anabaena Cylindrica, Coal-bed Methane Water Isolates Nannochloropsis Gaditana and PW-95 in Aquatic Solutions through Hyperspectral Reflectance Measurement and Analytical Model Establishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Z.; Zhou, X.; Apple, M. E.; Spangler, L.

    2017-12-01

    Three species of microalgae, Anabaena cylindrica (UTEX # 1611), coal-bed methane water isolates Nannochloropsis gaditana and PW-95 were cultured for the measurements of their hyperspectral profiles in different concentrations. The hyperspectral data were measured by an Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) spectroradiomter with the spectral resolution of 1 nanometer over the wavelength ranges from 350nm to 1050 nm for samples of microalgae of different concentration. Concentration of microalgae was measured using a Hemocytometer under microscope. The objective of this study is to establish the relation between spectral reflectance and micro-algal concentration so that microalgae concentration can be measured remotely by space- or airborne hyperspectral or multispectral sensors. Two types of analytical models, linear reflectance-concentration model and Lamber-Beer reflectance-concentration model, were established for each species. For linear modeling, the wavelength with the maximum correlation coefficient between the reflectance and concentrations of algae was located and then selected for each species of algae. The results of the linear models for each species are shown in Fig.1(a), in which Refl_1, Refl_2, and Refl_3 represent the reflectance of Anabaena, N. Gaditana, and PW-95 respectively. C1, C2, and C3 represent the Concentrations of Anabaena, N. Gaditana, and PW-95 respectively. The Lamber-Beer models were based on the Lambert-Beer Law, which states that the intensity of light propagating in a substance dissolved in a fully transmitting solvent is directly proportional to the concentration of the substance and the path length of the light through the solution. Thus, for the Lamber-Beer modeling, a wavelength with large absorption in red band was selected for each species. The results of Lambert-Beer models for each species are shown in Fig.1(b). Based on the Lamber-Beer models, the absorption coefficient for the three different species will be quantified.

  17. Study of the characteristics of gas electron multipliers for the FAIR experiment CBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, S.; Abuhoza, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Hehner, J.; Schmidt, C.J.; Traeger, M.; Schmidt, H.R.; Colafranceschi, S.; Marinov, A.; Sharma, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany will use proton and heavy ion beams to study matter at extreme conditions. The CBM experiment at FAIR is designed to explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high baryon densities. With CBM we will enter a new era of nuclear matter research by measuring rare diagnostic probes never observed before at FAIR energies, and thus CBM has a unique discovery potential. This will only be possible with the application of advanced instrumentation, including highly segmented and fast gaseous detectors

  18. Online Event Reconstruction in the CBM Experiment at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akishina, Valentina; Kisel, Ivan

    2018-02-01

    Targeting for rare observables, the CBM experiment will operate at high interaction rates of up to 10 MHz, which is unprecedented in heavy-ion experiments so far. It requires a novel free-streaming readout system and a new concept of data processing. The huge data rates of the CBM experiment will be reduced online to the recordable rate before saving the data to the mass storage. Full collision reconstruction and selection will be performed online in a dedicated processor farm. In order to make an efficient event selection online a clean sample of particles has to be provided by the reconstruction package called First Level Event Selection (FLES). The FLES reconstruction and selection package consists of several modules: track finding, track fitting, event building, short-lived particles finding, and event selection. Since detector measurements contain also time information, the event building is done at all stages of the reconstruction process. The input data are distributed within the FLES farm in a form of time-slices. A time-slice is reconstructed in parallel between processor cores. After all tracks of the whole time-slice are found and fitted, they are collected into clusters of tracks originated from common primary vertices, which then are fitted, thus identifying the interaction points. Secondary tracks are associated with primary vertices according to their estimated production time. After that short-lived particles are found and the full event building process is finished. The last stage of the FLES package is a selection of events according to the requested trigger signatures. The event reconstruction procedure and the results of its application to simulated collisions in the CBM detector setup are presented and discussed in detail.

  19. Hadron azimuthal correlations to be studied at CBM setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozdnyakov, V.; Vertogradova, Yu.

    2008-01-01

    An opportunity of studying hadron azimuthal correlations with the CBM detector (GSI, Germany) is considered. The results include the full simulation of the UrQMD events together with a simplified consideration of the calorimeter near the beam-pipe. The expectations of the correlations are presented. The centrality determination is considered via both the charged particles detected in the tracking system and the energy deposited in the calorimeter. The segmentation of the calorimeter is discussed from the point of view of the determination accuracy of the reaction plane

  20. Thin and reliable connectivity for the CBM-MVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaus, Philipp [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-MVD-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The CBM Micro Vertex Detector requires reliable connectivity to its ∝ 300 CMOS Monolithic Pixel Sensors (CPS). This includes stable powering but also reliable data transmission and fault tolerance. Another requirement is to keep the material budget to a minimum as the cables will be partially in the acceptance of the micro vertex detector. This contribution will summarize our current efforts to reduce the material budget of the readout cables while ensuring reliable connectivity. Our latest prototype of the second station of the MVD (named PRESTO) was studied to obtain the presented results.

  1. Raptor nest-site use in relation to the proximity of coalbed methane development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlile, J.D.; Sanders, Lindsey E.; Chalfoun, Anna D.; Gerow, K.G.

    2018-01-01

    Raptor nest–site use in relation to the proximity of coalbed–methane development. Energy development such as coalbed–methane (CBM) extraction is a major land use with largely unknown consequences for many animal species. Some raptor species may be especially vulnerable to habitat changes due to energy development given their ecological requirements and population trajectories. Using 12,977 observations of 3,074 nests of 12 raptor species across nine years (2003–2011) in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA, we evaluated relationships between raptor nest–site use and CBM development. Our objectives were to determine temporal trends in nest–use rates, and whether nest–site use was related to the proximity of CBM development. Across the study area, nest–use rates varied across species and years in a non–linear fashion. We developed a novel randomization test to assess differences in use between nests at developed and undeveloped sites, while controlling for annual variation in nest–site use. Red–tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia), and long–eared owls (Asio otus) used nests in undeveloped areas more than nests in developed areas (i.e. nests near CBM development). Differences between development groups were equivocal for the remaining nine species; however, we caution that we likely had lower statistical power to detect differences for rarer species. Our findings suggest potential avoidance of nesting in areas near CBM development by some species and reveal that CBM effects may be fairly consistent across distances between 400–2,415 m from wells. Future work should consider habitat preferences and fitness outcomes, and control for other key factors such as local prey availability, raptor densities, and weather.

  2. Optimisation of selection cuts for MUCH detector of CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, M.; Ahmad, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2015-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is one of the future research program scheduled at FAIR, Darmstadt Germany. The aim of the planned experiment is to explore the Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) phase diagram in the regions of high baryonic densities and moderate temperatures in the beam energy range of 10-45 AGeV. This approach is complementary to the studies of matter at high temperatures and low net baryon densities performed at RHIC and LHC. CBM will also search for the critical point, the first order deconfinement phase transition from the hadronic matter to the partonic matter and the study of equation-of-state of dense baryonic matter. Comprehensive scan of observables, beam energies and collision systems is realised. The observables include: low mass dilepton pairs, charmonia and open charm, collective flow of rare and bulk particles, correlations and fluctuations etc. Low yield measurements of rare probes, like charmonium and low mass vector mesons, have to be performed at very high reaction rates ∼10 MHz. These conditions demand for fast and radiation hard detectors and associated fast electronics, readout and online event reconstruction. Low material budget is required with in the detector acceptance to avoid multiple scattering which would limit high precision measurements

  3. The read-out chain of the CBM STS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, Joerg; Emschermann, David [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR will explore the QCD phase diagram at high baryon densities during nucleus-nucleus collisions in a fixed target setup. Its physics goals require interaction rates up to 10 MHz, which can be exploited with fast and radiation hard detectors equipped with free-streaming front-end and readout electronics, connected to a common Data Aquisition (DAQ) system to forward data to the First Level Event Selector (FLES). The core component of the CBM DAQ system is the Data Processing Board (DPB) implementing three important functionalities: - The incoming data via multiple lower-speed, short distance links is preprocessed, concentrated and forwarded to the FLES via higher-speed, long distance links. - The DPBs provide an interface for the Detector Control System (DCS) to configure readout and front-end electronics (FEE). - As part of the Timing and Fast Control (TFC) system the DPBs ensure transmission of the reference clock and synchronous commands necessary to synchronize the FEE. This contribution presents the readout and DAQ chain on the example of the core subdetector, the Silicon Tracking System (STS).

  4. Studies on high performance Timeslice building on the CBM FLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Helvi [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    In contrast to already existing high energy physics experiments the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment collects all data untriggered. The First-level Event Selector (FLES), which denotes a high performance computer cluster, processes the very high incoming data rate of 1 TByte/s and performs a full online event reconstruction. For this task it needs to access the raw detector data in time intervals referred to as Timeslices. In order to construct the Timeslices, the FLES Timeslice building has to combine data from all input links and distribute them via a high-performance network to the compute nodes. For fast data transfer the Infiniband network has proven to be appropriate. One option to address the network is using Infiniband (RDMA) Verbs directly and potentially making best use of Infiniband. However, it is a very low-level implementation relying on the hardware and neglecting other possible network technologies in the future. Another approach is to apply a high-level API like MPI which is independent of the underlying hardware and suitable for less error prone software development. I present the given possibilities and show the results of benchmarks ran on high-performance computing clusters. The solutions are evaluated regarding the Timeslice building in CBM.

  5. The silicon tracking system of the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singla, Minni [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment, one of the major scientific pillars at FAIR, will explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at the highest net-baryon densities in nucleus-nucleus collisions with interaction rates up to 10 MHz. The Silicon Tracking System is the central detector system of the CBM experiment. Its task is to perform track reconstruction and momentum determination for all charged particles created in beam-target collisions at SIS 100 and SIS 300 beam energies. The technical challenges to meet are a high granularity matching the high track densities, a fast self-triggering read-out coping with high interaction rates, and a low mass to yield high momentum resolution of Δp/p=1%. The detector system acceptance covers polar angles between 2.5 and 25 degrees and will be operated in the 1 T field of a superconducting dipole magnet. We introduce the concept of the STS, being comprised of eight tracking stations employing ∝1300 double-sided silicon microstrip sensors on modular structures that keep the read-out electronics outside the physics aperture. Ultra-thin-multiline micro-cables will be used to bridge the distance between the microstrip sensors and the readout electronics. Infrastructure such as power lines and cooling plates will be placed at the periphery of the stations. The status of the STS development is summarized in the presentation, including an overview on sensors, read-out electronics, prototypes, and system integration.

  6. The silicon tracking system of the CBM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balog, Tomas [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR will explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at the highest net-baryon densities in nucleus-nucleus collisions with interaction rates up to 10 MHz. As the core tracking detector of CBM the Silicon Tracking System (STS) will be installed in the gap of the 1 T super conducting dipole magnet for reconstruction of charged particle trajectories and its momenta. The requirement on momentum resolution, Δp/p=1%, can only be achieved with an ultra-low material budget, imposing particular restrictions on the location of 2.5 million channel front-end electronics dissipating 40 KW in the fiducial volume of about 2 m{sup 3}. The concept of the STS is based on a modular structure containing 300 μm thick double-sided silicon microstrip sensors read out through ultra-thin multi-line micro-cables with fast self-triggering electronics. As central building blocks the modules consisting of each a sensor, micro-cable and front-end electronics will be mounted with lightweight carbon fiber support structures onto 8 detector stations. At the station periphery infrastructure such as power and cooling lines will be placed. The status of the STS development is summarized in the presentation, including an overview on sensors, read-out electronics, prototypes, and system integration.

  7. The transition radiation detector of the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, Cyrano [Institut fuer Kernphysik, WWU Muenster (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is a fixed target heavy-ion experiment at the future FAIR accelerator facility. The CBM Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) is one of the key detectors to provide electron identification above momenta of 1 GeV/c and charged particle tracking. Due its capability to identify charged particles via their specific energy loss, the TRD in addition will provide valuable information for the measurement of fragments. These requirements can be fulfilled with a XeCO{sub 2} based Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (MWPC) detector in combination with an adequate radiator. The default MWPC is composed of a symmetric amplification area of 7 mm thickness, followed by a 5 mm drift region to enhance the TR-photon absorption probability in the active gas volume. This geometry provides also efficient and fast signal creation, as well as read-out, of the order of 200 μs per charged particle track. The performance of this detector is maximized by reducing the material budget between the radiator and gas volume to a minimum. The full detector at SIS100 will be composed of 200 modules in 2 sizes. To limit cost and production time the number of various module types is limited to 6 types and 4 types of Front End Board (FEB) flavors are required. An overview of the design and performance of the TRD detector is given.

  8. Three-dimensional audio-magnetotelluric sounding in monitoring coalbed methane reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nan; Zhao, Shanshan; Hui, Jian; Qin, Qiming

    2017-03-01

    Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) sounding is widely employed in rapid resistivity delineation of objective geometry in near surface exploration. According to reservoir patterns and electrical parameters obtained in Qinshui Basin, China, two-dimensional and three-dimensional synthetic "objective anomaly" models were designed and inverted with the availability of a modular system for electromagnetic inversion (ModEM). The results revealed that 3-D full impedance inversion yielded the subsurface models closest to synthetic models. One or more conductive targets were correctly recovered. Therefore, conductive aquifers in the study area, including hydrous coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs, were suggested to be the interpretation signs for reservoir characterization. With the aim of dynamic monitoring of CBM reservoirs, the AMT surveys in continuous years (June 2013-May 2015) were carried out. 3-D inversion results demonstrated that conductive anomalies accumulated around the producing reservoirs at the corresponding depths if CBM reservoirs were in high water production rates. In contrast, smaller conductive anomalies were generally identical with rapid gas production or stopping production of reservoirs. These analyses were in accordance with actual production history of CBM wells. The dynamic traces of conductive anomalies revealed that reservoir water migrated deep or converged in axial parts and wings of folds, which contributed significantly to formations of CBM traps. Then the well spacing scenario was also evaluated based on the dynamic production analysis. Wells distributed near closed faults or flat folds, rather than open faults, had CBM production potential to ascertain stable gas production. Therefore, three-dimensional AMT sounding becomes an attractive option with the ability of dynamic monitoring of CBM reservoirs, and lays a solid foundation of quantitative evaluation of reservoir parameters.

  9. Present state of condition based maintenance (CBM) and its future problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Satoshi; Nogami, Takeki; Sugiyama, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    New inspection system of the nuclear power plant will be introduced from 2008. In this feature, eleven experts from electric utilities, venders and academia described their views or activities about Condition Based Maintenance (CBM) with a new inspection system attracting attention. These are titled as 'Electric utilities view on CBM and its technology', Deployment results of developed CBM technologies', 'Valve diagnostic analysis support system with wireless technology applied', 'Portable vibration checker', 'Tribology diagnosis with no overhaul', 'Infrared thermograph diagnosis', 'Pipewall thinning inspection and management' and, in addition, the US trend and also the development trend of the CBM advancement technology in the vender and university. CBM technology will be introduced step-by-step and contribute to establish reliability based maintenance. (T. Tanaka)

  10. Agricultural methanization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    After having briefly outlined the interest of the development of methanization of agricultural by-products in the context of struggle against climate change, and noticed that France is only now developing this sector as some other countries already did, this publication describes the methanization process also called anaerobic digestion, which produces a digestate and biogas. Advantages for the agriculture sector are outlined, as well as drawbacks and recommendations (required specific technical abilities, an attention to the use of energetic crops, an improved economic balance which still depends on public subsidies, competition in the field of waste processing). Actions undertaken by the ADEME are briefly evoked

  11. The universal read-out controller for CBM at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manz, Sebastian; Abel, Norbert; Gebelein, Jano [Kirchhoff-Institut fuer Physik, Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2011-07-01

    Since 2007 we design and develop the firmware for the read-out controller (ROC) for data acquisition of the CBM detector at FAIR. While our first implementation solely focused on the nXYTER chip, today we are also designing and implementing readout logic for the GET4 chip which is supposed to be part of the time of flight (TOF) detector. Furthermore, we fully support both Ethernet and Optical transport as two transparent solutions. This addresses the different requirements of a laboratory setup and the final detector setup respectively. The usage of a strict modularization of the Read Out Controller firmware enables us to provide an Universal ROC where front-end specific logic and transport logic can be combined in a very flexible way. Fault tolerance techniques are only required for some of those modules and hence are only implemented there.

  12. A first level trigger approach for the CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinle, Christian Alexander

    2012-01-01

    In view of the very heavy CBM experiment constraints on the first level trigger, no conventional trigger is obviously applicable. Hence a fast trigger algorithm with the goal of realization in reconfigurable hardware had to be developed to fulfil all requirements of the experiment. In this connection the general Hough transform, which is already utilized in several other experiments, is used as a basis. This approach constitutes further a global method for tracking, which transforms all particle interaction points with the detector stations by means of a defined formula into a parameter space corresponding to the momentum of the particle tracks. This formula is of course developed especially for the given environment of CBM and defines thus the core of the applied three dimensional Hough transform. As the main focus of attention is furthermore on the realization of the needed data throughput, the necessary complex formula calculations give reason to outsource predefined formula results in look-up tables. This circumstance offers then collaterally the possibility to utilize any other sufficiently precise method like Runge-Kutta of fourth order for example to compute these look-up tables, because this computation can be evidently done offline without any effect on the Hough transform's processing speed. For algorithm simulation purposes the CBMROOT framework provides the module 'track', which is written in the programming language C++. This module includes many analyses for the determination of algorithm parameters, which can be even executed automatically to some extent. In addition to this, there are of course also analyses for the measurement of the algorithm's quality as well as for the individual rating of each partial step of the algorithm. Consequently the milestone of a customizable level one tracking algorithm, which can be used without any specific knowledge, is now obtained. Besides this, the investigated concepts are explicitly considered in the

  13. Quality assurance database for the CBM silicon tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lymanets, Anton [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Silicon Tracking System is a main tracking device of the CBM Experiment at FAIR. Its construction includes production, quality assurance and assembly of large number of components, e.g., 106 carbon fiber support structures, 1300 silicon microstrip sensors, 16.6k readout chips, analog microcables, etc. Detector construction is distributed over several production and assembly sites and calls for a database that would be extensible and allow tracing the components, integrating the test data, monitoring the component statuses and data flow. A possible implementation of the above-mentioned requirements is being developed at GSI (Darmstadt) based on the FAIR DB Virtual Database Library that provides connectivity to common SQL-Database engines (PostgreSQL, Oracle, etc.). Data structure, database architecture as well as status of implementation are discussed.

  14. Simulation and reconstruction of free-streaming data in CBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friese, Volker

    2011-01-01

    The CBM experiment will investigate heavy-ion reactions at the FAIR facility at unprecedented interaction rates. This implies a novel read-out and data acquisition concept with self-triggered front-end electronics and free-streaming data. Event association must be performed in software on-line, and may require four-dimensional reconstruction routines. In order to study the problem of event association and to develop proper algorithms, simulations must be performed which go beyond the normal event-by-event processing as available from most experimental simulation frameworks. In this article, we discuss the challenges and concepts for the reconstruction of such free-streaming data and present first steps for a time-based simulation which is necessary for the development and validation of the reconstruction algorithms, and which requires modifications to the current software framework FAIRROOT as well as to the data model.

  15. A first level trigger approach for the CBM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinle, Christian Alexander

    2012-07-01

    In view of the very heavy CBM experiment constraints on the first level trigger, no conventional trigger is obviously applicable. Hence a fast trigger algorithm with the goal of realization in reconfigurable hardware had to be developed to fulfil all requirements of the experiment. In this connection the general Hough transform, which is already utilized in several other experiments, is used as a basis. This approach constitutes further a global method for tracking, which transforms all particle interaction points with the detector stations by means of a defined formula into a parameter space corresponding to the momentum of the particle tracks. This formula is of course developed especially for the given environment of CBM and defines thus the core of the applied three dimensional Hough transform. As the main focus of attention is furthermore on the realization of the needed data throughput, the necessary complex formula calculations give reason to outsource predefined formula results in look-up tables. This circumstance offers then collaterally the possibility to utilize any other sufficiently precise method like Runge-Kutta of fourth order for example to compute these look-up tables, because this computation can be evidently done offline without any effect on the Hough transform's processing speed. For algorithm simulation purposes the CBMROOT framework provides the module 'track', which is written in the programming language C++. This module includes many analyses for the determination of algorithm parameters, which can be even executed automatically to some extent. In addition to this, there are of course also analyses for the measurement of the algorithm's quality as well as for the individual rating of each partial step of the algorithm. Consequently the milestone of a customizable level one tracking algorithm, which can be used without any specific knowledge, is now obtained. Besides this, the investigated concepts are explicitly considered in the

  16. A first level trigger approach for the CBM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinle, Christian Alexander

    2012-07-01

    In view of the very heavy CBM experiment constraints on the first level trigger, no conventional trigger is obviously applicable. Hence a fast trigger algorithm with the goal of realization in reconfigurable hardware had to be developed to fulfil all requirements of the experiment. In this connection the general Hough transform, which is already utilized in several other experiments, is used as a basis. This approach constitutes further a global method for tracking, which transforms all particle interaction points with the detector stations by means of a defined formula into a parameter space corresponding to the momentum of the particle tracks. This formula is of course developed especially for the given environment of CBM and defines thus the core of the applied three dimensional Hough transform. As the main focus of attention is furthermore on the realization of the needed data throughput, the necessary complex formula calculations give reason to outsource predefined formula results in look-up tables. This circumstance offers then collaterally the possibility to utilize any other sufficiently precise method like Runge-Kutta of fourth order for example to compute these look-up tables, because this computation can be evidently done offline without any effect on the Hough transform's processing speed. For algorithm simulation purposes the CBMROOT framework provides the module 'track', which is written in the programming language C++. This module includes many analyses for the determination of algorithm parameters, which can be even executed automatically to some extent. In addition to this, there are of course also analyses for the measurement of the algorithm's quality as well as for the individual rating of each partial step of the algorithm. Consequently the milestone of a customizable level one tracking algorithm, which can be used without any specific knowledge, is now obtained. Besides this, the investigated concepts are explicitly

  17. CBM First-level Event Selector Input Interface Demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Dirk; de Cuveland, Jan; Lindenstruth, Volker

    2017-10-01

    CBM is a heavy-ion experiment at the future FAIR facility in Darmstadt, Germany. Featuring self-triggered front-end electronics and free-streaming read-out, event selection will exclusively be done by the First Level Event Selector (FLES). Designed as an HPC cluster with several hundred nodes its task is an online analysis and selection of the physics data at a total input data rate exceeding 1 TByte/s. To allow efficient event selection, the FLES performs timeslice building, which combines the data from all given input links to self-contained, potentially overlapping processing intervals and distributes them to compute nodes. Partitioning the input data streams into specialized containers allows performing this task very efficiently. The FLES Input Interface defines the linkage between the FEE and the FLES data transport framework. A custom FPGA PCIe board, the FLES Interface Board (FLIB), is used to receive data via optical links and transfer them via DMA to the host’s memory. The current prototype of the FLIB features a Kintex-7 FPGA and provides up to eight 10 GBit/s optical links. A custom FPGA design has been developed for this board. DMA transfers and data structures are optimized for subsequent timeslice building. Index tables generated by the FPGA enable fast random access to the written data containers. In addition the DMA target buffers can directly serve as InfiniBand RDMA source buffers without copying the data. The usage of POSIX shared memory for these buffers allows data access from multiple processes. An accompanying HDL module has been developed to integrate the FLES link into the front-end FPGA designs. It implements the front-end logic interface as well as the link protocol. Prototypes of all Input Interface components have been implemented and integrated into the FLES test framework. This allows the implementation and evaluation of the foreseen CBM read-out chain.

  18. Landfill Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfill methane (CH4) accounts for approximately 1.3% (0.6 Gt) of global anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions relative to total emissions from all sectors of about 49 Gt CO2-eq yr-1. For countries with a history of controlled landfilling, landfills can be one of the larger national sources of ant...

  19. SAES St 909 pilot scale methane cracking tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J. E.; Sessions, H. T.

    2008-01-01

    Pilot scale (0.5 kg) SAES St 909 methane cracking tests were conducted for potential tritium process applications. Up to 1400 hours tests were done at 700 deg.C, 202.7 kPa (1520 torr) with a 0.03 sLPM feed of methane plus impurities, in a 20 vol% hydrogen, balance helium, stream. Carbon dioxide gettered by St 909 can be equated to an equivalent amount of methane gettered, but equating nitrogen to an equivalent amount of methane was nitrogen feed composition dependent. A decreased hydrogen feed increased methane getter rates while a 30 deg.C drop in one furnace zone increased methane emissions by over a factor of 30. The impact of gettered nitrogen can be somewhat minimized if nitrogen feed to the bed has been stopped and sufficient time given to recover the methane cracking rate. (authors)

  20. Multicomponent seismic applications in coalbed methane development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, D.; Trend, S. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    2004-07-01

    Seismic applications for coalbed methane (CBM) development are used to address the following challenges: lateral continuity of coal zones; vertical continuity of coal seams; permeability of cleats and fractures; coal quality and gas content; wet versus dry coal zones; and, monitoring storage of greenhouse gases. This paper presented a brief description of existing seismic programs, including 2-D and 3-D surface seismic surveys; multicomponent seismic surveys; vertical seismic profiles; cross-well seismic surveys; and, time-lapse seismic surveys. A comparative evaluation of their use in the Horseshoe Canyon Formation and the Ardley Formation was presented. The study showed that variations in reservoir properties resulting from gas production and dewatering can be effectively imaged using seismic surveys. Seismic surveys are useful in reservoir management, monitoring sweep efficiency during enhanced natural gas from coal (NGC) production, monitoring disposal of produced water and verifying storage of carbon dioxide for carbon credits. tabs., figs.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary diffraction studies of CBM3b of cellobiohydrolase 9A from Clostridium thermocellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jindou, Sadanari [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, Tel Aviv University 69978 (Israel); Petkun, Svetlana [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, Tel Aviv University 69978 (Israel); The Daniella Rich Institute for Structural Biology, Tel Aviv University 69978 (Israel); Shimon, Linda [Department of Chemical Research Support, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Bayer, Edward A. [Department of Biological Chemistry, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Lamed, Raphael; Frolow, Felix, E-mail: mbfrolow@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, Tel Aviv University 69978 (Israel); The Daniella Rich Institute for Structural Biology, Tel Aviv University 69978 (Israel)

    2007-12-01

    The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the CBM3b module of cellobiohydrolase 9A from C. thermocellum is described. The crystals diffract to 2.68 Å. Family 3 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM3s) are associated with the scaffoldin subunit of the multi-enzyme cellulosome complex and with the family 9 glycoside hydrolases, which are multimodular enzymes that act on plant cell-wall polysaccharides, notably cellulose. Here, the crystallization of CBM3b from cellobiohydrolase 9A is reported. The crystals are tetragonal and belong to space group P4{sub 1} or P4{sub 3}. X-ray diffraction data for CBM3b have been collected to 2.68 Å resolution on beamline ID14-4 at the ESRF.

  2. Quench calculations for the superconducting dipole magnet of CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurilkin, P.; Akishin, P.; Bychkov, A.; Gusakov, Yu.; Ladygin, V.; Malakhov, A.; Shabunov, A.; Toral, F.; Floch, E.; Moritz, G.; Ramakers, H.; Senger, P.; Szwangruber, P.

    2016-01-01

    The scientific mission of the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is the study of the nuclear matter properties at the high baryon densities in heavy ion collisions at the Facility of Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. The 5.15 MJ superconducting dipole magnet will be used in the silicon tracking system of the CBM detector. It will provide a magnetic field integral of 1 Tm which is required to obtain a momentum resolution of 1% for the track reconstruction. This paper presents quench modeling and evaluation of candidate protection schemes for the CBM dipole magnet. Two quench programs based on finite-difference method were used in simulation. One of them is currently used at GSI, and the other based on CIEMAT (Madrid, Spain) was modified to perform quench calculation for the CBM magnet. (paper)

  3. Pentagonal dodecahedron methane hydrate cage and methanol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    methane hydrate in sea bed near continental margin and underneath of permafrost ... clathrate structure,6,7 IR spectroscopy analysis of vibra- tional form of guest .... Hydrogen (H71) of the hydroxyl group of methanol is found to have formed ...

  4. The Silicon Tracking System of the CBM Experiment at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuser, Johann M.

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR will conduct a systematic research program to explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at highest net baryon densities and moderate temperatures. These conditions are to be created in collisions of heavy-ion beams with nuclear targets in the projectile beam energy range of 2 to 45 GeV/nucleon, initially coming from the SIS 100 synchrotron (up to 14 GeV/nucleon) and in a next step from SIS 300 enabling studies at the highest net baryon densities. Collision rates up to 107 per second are required to produce very rare probes with unprecedented statistics in this energy range. Their signatures are complex. These conditions call for detector systems designed to meet the extreme requirements in terms of rate capability, momentum and spatial resolution, and a novel data acquisition and trigger concept which is not limited by latency but by throughput. In the paper we describe the concept and development status of CBM's central detector, the Silicon Tracking System (STS). The detector realizes a large, highly granular and redundant detector system with fast read-out, and lays specific emphasis on low material budget in its physics aperture to achieve for charged particle tracks a momentum resolution of δp/p ≈ 1% at p > 1 GeV/c, at >95% track reconstruction efficiency. The detector employs 1220 highly segmented double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors of 300 µm thickness, mounted into 896 modular structures of various types that are aggregated on 106 low-mass carbon fiber ladders of different sizes that build up the tracking stations. The read-out electronics with its supply and cooling infrastructure is arranged at the periphery of the ladders, and provides a total channel count of 1.8 million. The signal transmission from the silicon sensors to the electronics is realized through ultra-thin multi-line aluminum-polyimide cables of up to half a meter length. The electronics generates a free

  5. The silicon tracking system of the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuser, Johann M.

    2015-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR will conduct a systematic research program to explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at highest net baryon densities and moderate temperatures. These conditions are to be created in collisions of heavy-ion beams with nuclear targets in the projectile beam energy range of 2 to 45 GeV/nucleon, initially coming from the SIS 100 synchrotron (up to 14 GeV/nucleon) and in a next step from SIS 300 enabling studies at the highest net baryon densities. Collision rates up to 10"7 per second are required to produce very rare probes with unprecedented statistics in this energy range. Their signatures are complex. These conditions call for detector systems designed to meet the extreme requirements in terms of rate capability, momentum and spatial resolution, and a novel data acquisition and trigger concept which is not limited by latency but by throughput. In the paper we describe the concept and development status of CBM's central detector, the Silicon Tracking System (STS). The detector realizes a large, highly granular and redundant detector system with fast read-out, and lays specific emphasis on low material budget in its physics aperture to achieve for charged particle tracks a momentum resolution of δp/p≈1% at p > 1 GeV/c, at >95% track reconstruction efficiency. The detector employs 1220 highly segmented double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors of 300 μm thickness, mounted into 896 modular structures of various types that are aggregated on 106 low-mass carbon fiber ladders of different sizes that build up the tracking stations. The read-out electronics with its supply and cooling infrastructure is arranged at the periphery of the ladders, and provides a total channel count of 1.8 million. The signal transmission from the silicon sensors to the electronics is realized through ultra-thin multi-line aluminum-polyimide cables of up to half a meter length. The electronics generates a free

  6. Cerebral CBM1 neuron contributes to synaptic modulation appearing during rejection of seaweed in Aplysia kurodai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narusuye, Kenji; Nagahama, Tatsumi

    2002-11-01

    The Japanese species Aplysia kurodai feeds well on Ulva but rejects Gelidium with distinctive rhythmic patterned movements of the jaws and radula. We have previously shown that the patterned jaw movements during the rejection of Gelidium might be caused by long-lasting suppression of the monosynaptic transmission from the multiaction MA neurons to the jaw-closing (JC) motor neurons in the buccal ganglia and that the modulation might be directly produced by some cerebral neurons. In the present paper, we have identified a pair of catecholaminergic neurons (CBM1) in bilateral cerebral M clusters. The CBM1, probably equivalent to CBI-1 in A. californica, simultaneously produced monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in the MA and JC neurons. Firing of the CBM1 reduced the size of the inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in the JC neuron, evoked by the MA spikes, for >100 s. Moreover, the application of dopamine mimicked the CBM1 modulatory effects and pretreatment with a D1 antagonist, SCH23390, blocked the modulatory effects induced by dopamine. It could also largely block the modulatory effects induced by the CBM1 firing. These results suggest that the CBM1 may directly modulate the synaptic transmission by releasing dopamine. Moreover, we explored the CBM1 spike activity induced by taste stimulation of the animal lips with seaweed extracts by the use of calcium imaging. The calcium-sensitive dye, Calcium Green-1, was iontophoretically loaded into a cell body of the CBM1 using a microelectrode. Application of either Ulva or Gelidium extract to the lips increased the fluorescence intensity, but the Gelidium extract always induced a larger change in fluorescence compared with the Ulva extract, although the solution used induced the maximum spike responses of the CBM1 for each of the seaweed extracts. When the firing frequency of the CBM1 activity after taste stimulation was estimated, the Gelidium extract induced a spike activity of ~30 spikes

  7. Development of Cognitive Bias Modification (CBM) Tools to Promote Adjustment during Reintegration following Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    a meta-analysis. Child development 73 (3), 916-934. Owen, J.M., 2011. Transdiagnostic cognitive processes in high trait anger. Clinical Psychology ...Award Number: W81XWH-13-2-0001 TITLE: : Development of Cognitive Bias Modification (CBM) Tools to Promote Adjustment during Reintegration...DATES COVERED 15-OCT-2012 TO 14-OCT-2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of Cognitive Bias Modification (CBM) Tools to Promote Adjustment during

  8. Methane production from coal by a single methanogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, S.; Mayumi, D.; Mochimaru, H.; Tamaki, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yoshioka, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Kamagata, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Previous geochemical studies indicate that biogenic methane greatly contributes to the formation of coalbed methane (CBM). It is unclear, however, what part of coal is used for the methane production and what types of microbes mediate the process. Here we hypothesized that methylotrophic methanogens use methoxylated aromatic compounds (MACs) derived from lignin. We incubated 11 species of methanogens belonging to order Methanosarcinales with 7 types of MACs. Two strains of methanogens, i.e., Methermicoccus shengliensis AmaM and ZC-1, produced methane from the MACs. In fact, these methanogens used over 30 types of commercially available MACs in addition to methanol and methylamines. To date, it is widely believed that methanogens use very limited number of small compounds such as hydrogen plus carbon dioxide, acetate, and methanol, and only three methanogenic pathways are recognized accordingly. Here, in contrast, two Methermicoccus strains used many types of MACs. We therefore propose this "methoxydotrophic" process as the fourth methanogenic pathway. Incubation of AmaM with 2-methoxybenzoate resulted in methanogenesis associated with the stoichiometric production of 2-hydroxybenzoate. Incubation with 2-methoxy-[7-13C] benzoate and with [13C] bicarbonate indicated that two thirds of methane carbon derived from the methoxy group and one third from CO2. Furthermore, incubation with [2-13C] acetate resulted in significant increases of 13C in both methane and CO2. These results suggest the occurrence of O-demethylation, CO2 reduction and acetyl-CoA metabolism in the methoxydotrophic methanogenesis. Furthermore, incubation of AmaM with lignite, subbituminous or bituminous coals in the bicarbonate-buffered media revealed that AmaM produced methane directly from coals via the methoxydotrophic pathway. Although 4 types of MACs were detected in the coal media in addition to methanol and methylamines, their total concentrations were too low to account for the methane

  9. Drainage feature about coalbed methane wells in different hydrogeological conditions in Fanzhuaug area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Xiao-ming; LIN Ran; WANG Yan-bin

    2012-01-01

    It is aa important guarantee to enhance the production of coalbed methane (CBM) and reduce the project investment by finding out the drainage feature about CBM wells in different hydrogeological conditions.Based on the CBM exploration and development data on the Fanzhuang block in southeast Qinshui Basin and combined with the seepage principle and lithology on the roof and the bottom coalbed,the mathematical model of integrated permeability was established.By permeability experiments of the different lithologies on the roof and the floor within the 20 m range combined with the log curves,the integrated permeability of different lithological combinations were obtained.The starting pressure gradient and permeability of the roof and the floor for different lithologies was tested by "differential pressure-flow method".The relationships between the starting pressure gradient and the integrated permeability were obtained.The critical distance of limestone water penetrating into coal reservoirs was calculated.According to the drainage feature of CBM wells combined with the drainage data of some CBM wells,the results show that,when limestone water can penetrate into coal reservoirs,the daily water production is high and the daily gas production is low although there is no gas at the beginning of the drainage process,the CBM wells stop discharging water within 6 months after the gas began to come out,and the gas production is steadily improved.When limestone water can not penetrate into coal reservoirs,the daily water production is low and the daily gas production is high at the beginning of the drainage process,and it almost stops discharging water after some time when the gas come out,the daily gas production increases,and the cumulative water production is much lower.

  10. Water quality changes as a result of coalbed methane development in a Rocky mountain watershed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.; Melesse, A.M.; McClain, M.E.; Yang, W. [Tarleton State University, Stephenville, TX (USA)

    2007-12-15

    Coalbed methane (CBM) development raises serious environmental concerns. In response, concerted efforts have been made to collect chemistry, salinity, and sodicity data on CBM produced water. However, little information on changes of stream water quality resulting from directly and/or indirectly received CBM produced water is available in the literature. The objective of this study was to examine changes in stream water quality, particularly sodicity and salinity, due to CBM development in the Powder River watershed, which is located in the Rocky Mountain Region and traverses the states of Wyoming and Montana. To this end, a retrospective analysis of water quality trends and patterns was conducted using data collected from as early as 1946 up to and including 2002 at four U.S. Geological Survey gauging stations along the Powder River. Trend analysis was conducted using linear regression and Seasonal Kendall tests, whereas, Tukey's test for multiple comparisons was used to detect changes in the spatial pattern. The results indicated that the CBM development adversely affected the water quality in the Powder River. First, the development elevated the stream sodicity, as indicated by a significant increase trend of the sodium adsorption ratio. Second, the development tended to shrink the water quality differences among the three downstream stations but to widen the differences between these stations and the farthest upstream station. In contrast, the development had only a minor influence on stream salinity. Hence, the CBM development is likely an important factor that can be managed to lower the stream sodicity. The management may need to take into account that the effects of the CBMdevelopment were different from one location to another along the Powder River.

  11. Coalbed Methane Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coalbed Methane Outreach Program, voluntary program seeking to reduce methane emissions from coal mining activities. CMOP promotes profitable recovery/use of coal mine methane (CMM), addressing barriers to using CMM instead of emitting it to atmosphere.

  12. Track reconstruction algorithms for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, Andrey; Hoehne, Claudia; Kisel, Ivan; Ososkov, Gennady

    2010-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR accelerator complex at Darmstadt is being designed for a comprehensive measurement of hadron and lepton production in heavy-ion collisions from 8-45 AGeV beam energy, producing events with large track multiplicity and high hit density. The setup consists of several detectors including as tracking detectors the silicon tracking system (STS), the muon detector (MUCH) or alternatively a set of Transition Radiation Detectors (TRD). In this contribution, the status of the track reconstruction software including track finding, fitting and propagation is presented for the MUCH and TRD detectors. The track propagation algorithm takes into account an inhomogeneous magnetic field and includes accurate calculation of multiple scattering and energy losses in the detector material. Track parameters and covariance matrices are estimated using the Kalman filter method and a Kalman filter modification by assigning weights to hits and using simulated annealing. Three different track finder algorithms based on track following have been developed which either allow for track branches, just select nearest hits or use the mentioned weighting method. The track reconstruction efficiency for central Au+Au collisions at 25 AGeV beam energy using events from the UrQMD model is at the level of 93-95% for both detectors.

  13. The Silicon Tracking System of the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teklishyn Maksym

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Silicon Tracking System (STS is the central detector in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM experiment at FAIR. Operating in the 1Tm dipole magnetic field, the STS will enable pile-up free detection and momentum measurement of the charged particles originating from beam-target nuclear interactions at rates up to 10 MHz. The STS consists of 8 tracking stations based on double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors equipped with fast, self-triggering read-out electronics. With about two million read-out channels, the STS will deliver a high-rate stream of time-stamped data that is transferred to a computing farm for on-line event determination and analysis. The functional building block is a detector module consisting of a sensor, micro-cables and two front-end electronics boards. In this contribution, the development status of the STS components and the system integration is discussed and an outlook on the detector construction is given.

  14. 4D Cellular Automaton Track Finder in the CBM Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akishina, Valentina; Kisel, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The CBM experiment (FAIR/GSI, Darmstadt, Germany) will focus on the measurement of rare probes at interaction rates up to 10MHz with data flow of up to 1 TB/s. It requires a novel read-out and data-acquisition concept with self-triggered electronics and free-streaming data. In this case resolving different collisions is a non-trivial task and event building must be performed in software online. That requires full online event reconstruction and selection not only in space, but also in time, so-called 4D event building and selection. This is a task of the First-Level Event Selection (FLES). The FLES reconstruction and selection package consists of several modules: track finding, track fitting, short-lived particles finding, event building and event selection. The Cellular Automaton (CA) track finder algorithm was adapted towards time-based reconstruction. In this article, we describe in detail the modification done to the algorithm, as well as the performance of the developed time-based CA approach

  15. Online 4-dimensional event reconstruction in the CBM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akishina, Valentina [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kisel, Ivan [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The heavy-ion experiment CBM will focus on the measurement of rare probes at interaction rates up to 10 MHz with data flow of up to 1 TB/s. The free-running data acquisition, delivering a stream of untriggered detector data, requires full event reconstruction and selection to be performed online not only in space, but also in time. The First-Level Event Selection package consists of several modules: track finding, track fitting, short-lived particles finding, event building and event selection. For track reconstruction the Cellular Automaton (CA) method is used, which allows to reconstruct tracks with high efficiency in a time-slice and perform event building. The time-based CA track finder allows to resolve tracks from a time-slice in event-corresponding groups. The algorithm is intrinsically local and the implementation is both vectorized and parallelized between CPU cores. The CA track finder shows a strong scalability on many-core systems. The speed-up factor of 10.6 on a CPU with 10 hyper-threaded physical cores was achieved.

  16. Methane release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Swiss Gas Industry has carried out a systematic, technical estimate of methane release from the complete supply chain from production to consumption for the years 1992/1993. The result of this survey provided a conservative value, amounting to 0.9% of the Swiss domestic output. A continuation of the study taking into account new findings with regard to emission factors and the effect of the climate is now available, which provides a value of 0.8% for the target year of 1996. These results show that the renovation of the network has brought about lower losses in the local gas supplies, particularly for the grey cast iron pipelines. (author)

  17. Coalbed methane produced water in China: status and environmental issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yanjun; Tang, Dazhen; Xu, Hao; Li, Yong; Gao, Lijun

    2014-01-01

    As one of the unconventional natural gas family members, coalbed methane (CBM) receives great attention throughout the world. The major associated problem of CBM production is the management of produced water. In the USA, Canada, and Australia, much research has been done on the effects and management of coalbed methane produced water (CMPW). However, in China, the environmental effects of CMPW were overlooked. The quantity and the quality of CMPW both vary enormously between coal basins or stratigraphic units in China. The unit produced water volume of CBM wells in China ranges from 10 to 271,280 L/well/day, and the concentration of total dissolved solids (TDS) ranges from 691 to 93,898 mg/L. Most pH values of CMPW are more than 7.0, showing the alkaline feature, and the Na-HCO3 and Na-HCO3-Cl are typical types of CMPW in China. Treatment and utilization of CMPW in China lag far behind the USA and Australia, and CMPW is mainly managed by surface impoundments and evaporation. Currently, the core environmental issues associated with CMPW in China are that the potential environmental problems of CMPW have not been given enough attention, and relevant regulations as well as environmental impact assessment (EIA) guidelines for CMPW are still lacking. Other potential issues in China includes (1) water quality monitoring issues for CMPW with special components in special areas, (2) groundwater level decline issues associated with the dewatering process, and (3) potential environmental issues of groundwater pollution associated with hydraulic fracturing.

  18. Coalbed methane multi-stakeholder advisory committee recommendations : progress update : year 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-11-01

    The coalbed methane (CBM) multi-stakeholder advisory committee (MAC) was formed in 2003 to address public concerns related to CBM development in Alberta. This progress update discussed activities and recommendations made by the MAC, with particular reference to the following 4 main areas: (1) protecting water resources, (2) enhancing information and knowledge, (3) minimizing surface impacts, and (4) communication and consultation. A second MAC was formed by members from environmental organizations, landowners, the energy industry, and government agencies in 2006 to review progress on the implementation of the recommendations. Members of the committee agree that significant progress has been achieved in relation to the recommendations made by the original MAC. A large number of new directives, guidelines, processes and best management practices have been established, or are currently under development. Approximately 19,000 CBM wells have been developed since the MAC was established in 2003. It was concluded that ongoing work related to the recommendations will ensure that CBM in Alberta continues to be developed in a responsible manner. 1 tab.

  19. Coalbed methane : evaluating pipeline and infrastructure requirements to get gas to market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, B.

    2005-01-01

    This Power Point presentation evaluated pipeline and infrastructure requirements for the economic production of coalbed methane (CBM) gas. Reports have suggested that capital costs for CBM production can be minimized by leveraging existing oil and gas infrastructure. By using existing plant facilities, CBM producers can then tie in to existing gathering systems and negotiate third party fees, which are less costly than building new pipelines. Many CBM wells can be spaced at an equal distance to third party gathering systems and regulated transmission meter stations and pipelines. Facility cost sharing, and contracts with pipeline companies for compression can also lower initial infrastructure costs. However, transmission pressures and direct connect options for local distribution should always be considered during negotiations. The use of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) commingling services was also recommended. A map of the North American gas network was provided, as well as details of Alberta gas transmission and coal pipeline overlays. Maps of various coal zones in Alberta were provided, as well as a map of North American pipelines. refs., tabs., figs

  20. Time-based MRPC detector response simulations for the CBM time-of-flight system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Christian; Herrmann, Norbert [Physikalisches Institut und Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The design goal of the future Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is to measure rare probes of dense strongly interacting matter with an unprecedented accuracy. Target interaction rates of up to 10 MHz need to be processed by the detector. The time-of-flight (TOF) wall of CBM which should provide hadron identification at particle fluxes of up to a few tens of kHz/cm{sup 2} is composed of high-resolution timing multi-gap resistive plate chambers (MRPCs). Due to the self-triggered digitization and readout scheme of CBM comprising online event reconstruction preparatory Monte Carlo (MC) transport and response simulations including the MRPC array need to be carried out in a time-based fashion. While in an event-based simulation mode interference between MC tracks in a detector volume owing to rate effects or electronics dead time is confined to a single event, time-based response simulations need to take into account track pile-up and interference across events. A proposed time-based digitizer class for CBM-TOF within the CbmRoot software framework is presented.

  1. Determination of coalbed methane potential and gas adsorption capacity in Western Kentucky coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardon, S.M.; Takacs, K.G.; Hower, J.C.; Eble, C.F.; Mastalerz, Maria

    2006-01-01

    The Illinois Basin has not been developed for Coalbed Methane (CBM) production. It is imperative to determine both gas content and other parameters for the Kentucky portion of the Illinois Basin if exploration is to progress and production is to occur in this area. This research is part of a larger project being conducted by the Kentucky Geological Survey to evaluate the CBM production of Pennsylvanian-age western Kentucky coals in Ohio, Webster, and Union counties using methane adsorption isotherms, direct gas desorption measurements, and chemical analyses of coal and gas. This research will investigate relationships between CBM potential and petrographic, surface area, pore size, and gas adsorption isotherm analyses of the coals. Maceral and reflectance analyses are being conducted at the Center for Applied Energy Research. At the Indiana Geological Survey, the surface area and pore size of the coals will be analyzed using a Micrometrics ASAP 2020, and the CO2 isotherm analyses will be conducted using a volumetric adsorption apparatus in a water temperature bath. The aforementioned analyses will be used to determine site specific correlations for the Kentucky part of the Illinois Basin. The data collected will be compared with previous work in the Illinois Basin and will be correlated with data and structural features in the basin. Gas composition and carbon and hydrogen isotopic data suggest mostly thermogenic origin of coalbed gas in coals from Webster and Union Counties, Kentucky, in contrast to the dominantly biogenic character of coalbed gas in Ohio County, Kentucky.

  2. Characterization of a novel theme C glycoside hydrolase family 9 cellulase and its CBM-chimeric enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Cheng-Jie; Huang, Ming-Yue; Pang, Hao; Zhao, Jing; Wu, Chao-Xing; Feng, Jia-Xun

    2017-07-01

    In bacterial cellulase systems, glycoside hydrolase family 9 (GH9) cellulases are generally regarded as the major cellulose-degrading factors besides GH48 exoglucanase. In this study, umcel9A, which was cloned from uncultured microorganisms from compost, with the encoded protein being theme C GH9 cellulase, was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the biochemical properties of the purified enzyme were characterized. Hydrolysis of carboxylmethylcellulose (CMC) by Umcel9A led to the decreased viscosity of CMC solution and production of reducing sugars. Interestingly, cellobiose was the major product when cellulosic materials were hydrolyzed by Umcel9A. Six representative carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) from different CBM families (CBM1, CBM2, CBM3, CBM4, CBM10, and CBM72) were fused with Umcel9A at the natural terminal position, resulting in significant enhancement of the binding capacity of the chimeric enzymes toward four different insoluble celluloses as compared with that of Umcel9A. Catalytic activity of the chimeric enzymes against insoluble celluloses, including phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose (PASC), alkali-pretreated sugarcane bagasse (ASB), filter paper powder (FPP), and Avicel, was higher than that of Umcel9A, except for Umcel9A-CBM3. In these chimeric enzymes, CBM4-Umcel9A exhibited the highest activity toward the four tested insoluble celluloses and displayed 4.2-, 3.0-, 2.4-, and 6.6-fold enhanced activity toward PASC, ASB, FPP, and Avicel, respectively, when compared with that of Umcel9A. CBM4-Umcel9A also showed highest V max and catalytic efficiency (k cat /K M ) against PASC. Construction of chimeric enzymes may have potential applications in biocatalytic processes and provides insight into the evolution of the molecular architecture of catalytic module and CBM in GH9 cellulases.

  3. A novel method for estimating methane emissions from underground coal mines: The Yanma coal mine, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhong-Min; Chen, Zhi-Jian; Pan, Jie-Nan; Niu, Qing-He

    2017-12-01

    As the world's largest coal producer and consumer, China accounts for a relatively high proportion of methane emissions from coal mines. Several estimation methods had been established for the coal mine methane (CMM) emission. However, with large regional differences, various reservoir formation types of coalbed methane (CBM) and due to the complicated geological conditions in China, these methods may be deficient or unsuitable for all the mining areas (e.g. Jiaozuo mining area). By combing the CMM emission characteristics and considering the actual situation of methane emissions from underground coal mine, we found that the methane pre-drainage is a crucial reason creating inaccurate evaluating results for most estimation methods. What makes it so essential is the extensive pre-drainage quantity and its irrelevance with annual coal production. Accordingly, the methane releases were divided into two categories: methane pre-drainage and methane release during mining. On this basis, a pioneering method for estimating CMM emissions was proposed. Taking the Yanma coal mine in the Jiaozuo mining area as a study case, the evaluation method of the pre-drainage methane quantity was established after the correlation analysis between the pre-drainage rate and time. Thereafter, the mining activity influence factor (MAIF) was first introduced to reflect the methane release from the coal and rock seams around where affected by mining activity, and the buried depth was adopted as the predictor of the estimation for future methane emissions. It was verified in the six coal mines of Jiaozuo coalfield (2011) that the new estimation method has the minimum errors of 12.11%, 9.23%, 5.77%, -5.20%, -8.75% and 4.92% respectively comparing with other methods. This paper gives a further insight and proposes a more accurate evaluation method for the CMM emissions, especially for the coal seams with low permeability and strong tectonic deformation in methane outburst coal mines.

  4. Performance of high-rate TRD prototypes for the CBM experiment in test beam and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein-Boesing, Melanie [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The goal of the future Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is to explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high baryon densities not covered by other experiments. Among other detectors, it will employ a Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) for tracking of charged particles and electron identification. To meet the demands for tracking and for electron identification at large particle densities and very high interaction rates, high efficiency TRD prototypes have been developed. These prototypes with double-sided pad plane electrodes based on Multiwire Proportional Chambers (MWPC) have been tested at GSI and implemented in the simulation framework of CBM. Results of the performance in a test beam and in simulations are shown. In addition, we present a study of the performance of CBM for electron identification and dilepton reconstruction with this new detector layout.

  5. A solution for the inner area of CBM-TOF with pad-MRPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y. [Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Huang, X.J., E-mail: huangxj12@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lyu, P.F.; Han, D.; Xie, B.; Li, Y.J. [Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Herrmann, N.; Deppner, I.; Loizeau, P.; Simon, C. [Physikalisches Institute, University Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Frühauf, J.; Kiš, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fr Schwerionenforschung, GSI, Damstadt (Germany)

    2017-02-11

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment has decided to use the Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers(MRPC) technology to build its Time-Of-Flight (TOF) wall. CBM-TOF requires a rate capability over 20 kHz/cm{sup 2} for inner region. A 10-gap pad-MRPC assembled with low resistive glass is designed to construct this area. The prototypes, which consist of 10×0.22 mm gas gaps and 2×8 20 mm×20 mm readout pads, require fewer electronic channels compared to the strip design. A timing resolution of around 60 ps and an efficiency above 98% were obtained in a cosmic test and a beam test taken in 2014 October GSI beam time. The results show that the real-size prototypes fulfill the requirements of the CBM-TOF.

  6. Time-based Reconstruction of Free-streaming Data in CBM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akishina, Valentina; Kisel, Ivan; Vassiliev, Iouri; Zyzak, Maksym

    2018-02-01

    Traditional latency-limited trigger architectures typical for conventional experiments are inapplicable for the CBM experiment. Instead, CBM will ship and collect time-stamped data into a readout buffer in a form of a time-slice of a certain length and deliver it to a large computer farm, where online event reconstruction and selection will be performed. Grouping measurements into physical collisions must be performed in software and requires reconstruction not only in space, but also in time, the so-called 4-dimensional track reconstruction and event building. The tracks, reconstructed with 4D Cellular Automaton track finder, are combined into event-corresponding clusters according to the estimated time in the target position and the errors, obtained with the Kalman Filter method. The reconstructed events are given as inputs to the KF Particle Finder package for short-lived particle reconstruction. The results of time-based reconstruction of simulated collisions in CBM are presented and discussed in details.

  7. Fast reconstruction of multi-strange hyperons in the CBM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassiliev, Iouri [GSI, Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The main goal of the CBM experiment is to study the behaviour of nuclear matter at very high baryonic density in which the transition to a deconfined and chirally restored phase is expected to happen. One of the promissing signatures of this new state is the enhanced production of multi-strange particles, therefore the reconstruction of multi-strange hyperons is essential for the understanding of the heavy ion collision dynamics. Another experimental challenge of the CBM experiment is online selection of open charm particles via the displaced vertex of the hadronic decay, Charmonium and low mass vector mesons in the environment of a heavy-ion collision. This task requires fast and efficient track reconstruction algorithms, primary vertex finder and particles finder. Results of feasibility studies of the multi-strange hyperons in the CBM experiment are presented.

  8. Methanation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, Marko; Busch, Günter

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The biologic methanation of exclusively gases like hydrogen and carbon dioxide is feasible. • Electrical energy can be stored in the established gas grid by conversion to methane. • The quality of produced biogas is very high (c CH4 = 98 vol%). • The conversion rate is depending on H 2 -flow rate. - Abstract: A new method for the methanation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide is presented. In a novel anaerobic trickle-bed reactor, biochemical catalyzed methanation at mesophilic temperatures and ambient pressure can be realized. The conversion of gaseous substrates by immobilized hydrogenotrophic methanogens is a unique feature of this reactor type. The already patented reactor produces biogas which has a very high quality (c CH4 = 97.9 vol%). Therefore, the storage of biogas in the existing natural gas grid is possible without extensive purification. The specific methane production was measured with P = 1.17 Nm CH4 3 /(m R 3 d). It is conceivable to realize the process at sites that generate solar or wind energy and sites subject to the conditions for hydrogen electrolysis (or other methods of hydrogen production). The combination with conventional biogas plants under hydrogen addition to methane enrichment is possible as well. The process enables the coupling of various renewable energy sources

  9. Making the Good Even Better: Feedback from easyCBM Focus Groups, School Year 2009/2010. Technical Report # 1001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald; Lai, Cheng-Fei

    2010-01-01

    This technical report provides a summary of feedback from teachers, administrators, and support personnel who used the easyCBM progress monitoring and benchmark assessment system during school year 2009/2010. Data were gathered from semi-structured focus groups conducted during the 2010 easyCBM August Institute at the University of Oregon. Results…

  10. Evaluation of geological conditions for coalbed methane occurrence based on 3D seismic information: a case study in Fowa region, Xinjing coal mine, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juanjuan; Li, Fanjia; Hu, Mingshun; Zhang, Wei; Pan, Dongming

    2017-04-01

    The research on geological conditions of coalbed methane (CBM) occurrence is of great significance for predicting the high abundance CBM rich region and gas outburst risk area pre-warning. The No. 3 coal seam, in Yangquan coalfield of Qinshui basin, is the research target studied by 3D seismic exploration technique. The geological factors which affect CBM occurrence are interpreted based on the 3D seismic information. First, the geological structure (faults, folds, and collapse columns) is found out by the 3D seismic structural interpretation and the information of buried depth and thickness of the coal seam is calculated by the seismic horizons. Second, 3D elastic impedance (EI) and natural gamma attribute volumes are generated by prestack EI inversion and multi-attribute probabilistic neural network (PNN) inversion techniques which reflect the information of coal structure types and lithology of the roof and floor. Then, the information of metamorphic degree of seam and hydrogeology conditions can be obtained by the geological data. Consequently, geological conditions of CBM occurrence in No. 3 coal seam are evaluated which will provide scientific reference for high abundance CBM rich region prediction and gas outburst risk area pre-warning.

  11. CBM Maze-Scores as Indicators of Reading Level and Growth for Seventh-Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Siuman; Espin, Christine A.; Stevenson, Claire E.

    2018-01-01

    The technical adequacy of CBM maze-scores as indicators of reading level and growth for seventh-grade secondary-school students was examined. Participants were 452 Dutch students who completed weekly maze measures over a period of 23 weeks. Criterion measures were school level, dyslexia status, scores and growth on a standardized reading test.…

  12. The Alignment of easyCBM[R] Math Measures to Curriculum Standards. Technical Report #1002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nese, Joseph F. T.; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald; Alonzo, Julie

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the alignment of the easyCBM[R] mathematics benchmark and progress monitoring measures to the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics "Curriculum Focal Points" (NCTM, 2006). Based on Webb's alignment model (1997, 2002), we collected expert judgments on individual math items across a sampling of forms…

  13. Local Normative Data on easyCBM[R] Reading and Mathematics: Fall 2009. Technical Report # 0918

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindal, Gerald; Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We developed equivalent, alternate forms of easyCBM[R] in reading (n=20 forms) and mathematics (n=13 forms) with different skills reflective of the National Reading Panel (NRP) and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), respectively. We then took three forms to use as screening measures in the fall, winter, and spring so educators…

  14. Event reconstruction for the CBM-RICH prototype beamtest data in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Akishin, P.; Becker, K.-H.; Belogurov, S.; Bendarouach, J.; Boldyreva, N.; Deveaux, C.; Dobyrn, V.; Dürr, M.; Eschke, J.; Förtsch, J.; Heep, J.; Höhne, C.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kochenda, L.; Kopfer, J.; Kravtsov, P.; Kres, I.; Lebedev, S.; Lebedeva, E.; Leonova, E.; Linev, S.; Mahmoud, T.; Michel, J.; Miftakhov, N.; Niebur, W.; Ovcharenko, E.; Patel, V.; Pauly, C.; Pfeifer, D.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Reinecke, S.; Riabov, Y.; Roshchin, E.; Samsonov, V.; Schetinin, V.; Tarasenkova, O.; Traxler, M.; Ugur, C.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Vznuzdaev, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR facility will investigate the QCD phase diagram at high net baryon densities and moderate temperatures in A+A collisions from 2 to 11 AGeV (SIS100). Electron identification in CBM will be performed by a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector and Transition Radiation Detectors (TRD). A real size prototype of the RICH detector was tested together with other CBM groups at the CERN PS/T9 beam line in 2014. For the first time the data format used the FLESnet protocol from CBM delivering free streaming data. The analysis was fully performed within the CBMROOT framework. In this contribution the data analysis and the event reconstruction methods which were used for obtained data are discussed. Rings were reconstructed using an algorithm based on the Hough Transform method and their parameters were derived with high accuracy by circle and ellipse fitting procedures. We present results of the application of the presented algorithms. In particular we compare results with and without Wavelength shifting (WLS) coating.

  15. CBM maze-scores as indicators of reading level and growth for seventh-grade students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chung, S.; Espin, C.A.; Stevenson, C.E.

    The technical adequacy of CBM maze-scores as indicators of reading level and growth for seventh-grade secondary-school students was examined. Participants were 452 Dutch students who completed weekly maze measures over a period of 23 weeks. Criterion measures were school level, dyslexia status,

  16. Aligning PHM, SHM and CBM by understanding the physical system failure behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinga, Tiedo; Loendersloot, Richard; Bregon, A.; Daigle, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    In this work the three disciplines of condition based maintenance (CBM), structural health monitoring (SHM) and prognostics and health management (PHM) are described and the characteristics of the disciplines are compared. The three approaches are then demonstrated using three different case studies

  17. On-line reconstruction algorithms for the CBM and ALICE experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunov, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents various algorithms which have been developed for on-line event reconstruction in the CBM experiment at GSI, Darmstadt and the ALICE experiment at CERN, Geneve. Despite the fact that the experiments are different - CBM is a fixed target experiment with forward geometry, while ALICE has a typical collider geometry - they share common aspects when reconstruction is concerned. The thesis describes: - general modifications to the Kalman filter method, which allows one to accelerate, to improve, and to simplify existing fit algorithms; - developed algorithms for track fit in CBM and ALICE experiment, including a new method for track extrapolation in non-homogeneous magnetic field. - developed algorithms for primary and secondary vertex fit in the both experiments. In particular, a new method of reconstruction of decayed particles is presented. - developed parallel algorithm for the on-line tracking in the CBM experiment. - developed parallel algorithm for the on-line tracking in High Level Trigger of the ALICE experiment. - the realisation of the track finders on modern hardware, such as SIMD CPU registers and GPU accelerators. All the presented methods have been developed by or with the direct participation of the author.

  18. The Development of CBM Vocabulary Measures: Grade 5. Technical Report #1212

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of vocabulary assessments intended for use with students in grades two through eight. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring and benchmark/screening assessment system, were developed in 2010 and administered to approximately 1200…

  19. The Development of CBM Vocabulary Measures: Grade 7. Technical Report #1214

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of vocabulary assessments intended for use with students in grades two through eight. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring and benchmark/screening assessment system, were developed in 2010 and administered to approximately 1200…

  20. The Development of CBM Vocabulary Measures: Grade 6. Technical Report # 1213

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of vocabulary assessments intended for use with students in grades two through eight. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring and benchmark/screening assessment system, were developed in 2010 and administered to approximately 1200…

  1. The Development of CBM Vocabulary Measures: Grade 3. Technical Report #1210

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of vocabulary assessments intended for use with students in grades two through eight. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring and benchmark/screening assessment system, were developed in 2010 and administered to approximately 1200…

  2. The Development of CBM Vocabulary Measures: Grade 4. Technical Report #1211

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of vocabulary assessments intended for use with students in grades two through eight. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring and benchmark/screening assessment system, were developed in 2010 and administered to approximately 1200…

  3. Technical Adequacy of the easyCBM Grade 2 Reading Measures. Technical Report #1004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamgochian, Elisa; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Nese, Joseph F. T.; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Saez, Leilani; Anderson, Daniel; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    In this technical report, we provide reliability and validity evidence for the easyCBM[R] Reading measures for grade 2 (word and passage reading fluency and multiple choice reading comprehension). Evidence for reliability includes internal consistency and item invariance. Evidence for validity includes concurrent, predictive, and construct…

  4. Analyzing the Reliability of the easyCBM Reading Comprehension Measures: Grade 2. Technical Report #1201

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cheng-Fei; Irvin, P. Shawn; Alonzo, Julie; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we present the results of a reliability study of the second-grade multiple choice reading comprehension measures available on the easyCBM learning system conducted in the spring of 2011. Analyses include split-half reliability, alternate form reliability, person and item reliability as derived from Rasch analysis,…

  5. Analyzing the Reliability of the easyCBM Reading Comprehension Measures: Grade 3. Technical Report #1202

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cheng-Fei; Irvin, P. Shawn; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we present the results of a reliability study of the third-grade multiple choice reading comprehension measures available on the easyCBM learning system conducted in the spring of 2011. Analyses include split-half reliability, alternate form reliability, person and item reliability as derived from Rasch analysis,…

  6. The Development of CBM Vocabulary Measures: Grade 8. Technical Report #1215

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of vocabulary assessments intended for use with students in grades two through eight. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring and benchmark/screening assessment system, were developed in 2010 and administered to approximately 1200…

  7. Analyzing the Reliability of the easyCBM Reading Comprehension Measures: Grade 5. Technical Report #1204

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Irvin, P. Shawn; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we present the results of a reliability study of the fifth-grade multiple choice reading comprehension measures available on the easyCBM learning system conducted in the spring of 2011. Analyses include split-half reliability, alternate form reliability, person and item reliability as derived from Rasch analysis,…

  8. The Development of the easyCBM CCSS Reading Assessments: Grade 3. Technical Report #1221

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we document the development and piloting of easyCBM reading measures aligned to the Common Core State Standards, designed for use in screening students at risk for reading difficulty and monitoring their progress as they develop reading skills. The measures, which assess students' ability to respond to…

  9. Analyzing the Reliability of the easyCBM Reading Comprehension Measures: Grade 4. Technical Report #1203

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Irvin, P. Shawn; Alonzo, Julie; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we present the results of a reliability study of the fourth-grade multiple choice reading comprehension measures available on the easyCBM learning system conducted in the spring of 2011. Analyses include split-half reliability, alternate form reliability, person and item reliability as derived from Rasch analysis,…

  10. Analyzing the Reliability of the easyCBM Reading Comprehension Measures: Grade 6. Technical Report #1205

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvin, P. Shawn; Alonzo, Julie; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we present the results of a reliability study of the sixth-grade multiple choice reading comprehension measures available on the easyCBM learning system conducted in the spring of 2011. Analyses include split-half reliability, alternate form reliability, person and item reliability as derived from Rasch analysis,…

  11. The Development of CBM Vocabulary Measures: Grade 2. Technical Report #1209

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of vocabulary assessments intended for use with students in grades two through eight. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring and benchmark/screening assessment system, were developed in 2010 and administered to approximately 1200…

  12. Analyzing the Reliability of the easyCBM Reading Comprehension Measures: Grade 7. Technical Report #1206

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvin, P. Shawn; Alonzo, Julie; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we present the results of a reliability study of the seventh-grade multiple choice reading comprehension measures available on the easyCBM learning system conducted in the spring of 2011. Analyses include split-half reliability, alternate form reliability, person and item reliability as derived from Rasch analysis,…

  13. Highly parallel algorithm for high pT physics at FAIR-CBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fueloep, A; Vesztergombi, G

    2010-01-01

    The limitations of presently available data on p T range are discussed and planned future upgrades are outlined. Special attention is given to the FAIR-CBM experiment as a unique high luminosity facility for future continuation of the measurements at very high p T with emphasis on the so-called mosaic trigger system to use the highly parallel online algorithm.

  14. Global Methane Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Global Methane Initiative promotes cost-effective, near-term methane recovery through partnerships between developed and developing countries, with participation from the private sector, development banks, and nongovernmental organizations.

  15. Methane productivity of manure, straw and solid fractions of manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, H.B.; Sommer, S.G.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2004-01-01

    are in the same range (282-301 m(3) CH4 LU-1). Pre-treatment of manure by separation is a way of making fractions of the manure that have a higher gas potential per volume. Theoretical methane potential and biodegradability of three types of fractions deriving from manure separation were tested. The volumetric...... methane yield of straw was found to be higher than the yield from total manure and the solid fractions of manure, due to the higher VS content, and hence the use of straw as bedding material will increase the volumetric as well as the livestock-based methane productivity....

  16. Event reconstruction in the RICH detector of the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamczewski, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Belogurov, S.; Boldyreva, N.; Chernogorov, A.; Deveaux, C.; Dobyrn, V.; Dürr, M.; Eom, J.; Eschke, J.; Höhne, C.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kleipa, V.; Kochenda, L.; Kolb, B.; Kopfer, J.; Kravtsov, P.; Lebedev, S.; Lebedeva, E.; Leonova, E.

    2014-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR facility will investigate the QCD phase diagram at high net-baryon densities and moderate temperatures. One of the key signatures will be di-leptons emitted from the hot and dense phase in heavy-ion collisions. Measuring di-electrons, a high purity of identified electrons is required in order to suppress the background. Electron identification in CBM will be performed by a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector and Transition Radiation Detectors (TRD). In order to access the foreseen rare probes, the detector and the data acquisition have to handle interaction rates up to 10 MHz. Therefore, the development of fast and efficient event reconstruction algorithms is an important and challenging task in CBM. In this contribution event reconstruction and electron identification algorithms in the RICH detector are presented. So far they have been developed on simulated data but could already be tested on real data from a RICH prototype testbeam experiment at the CERN-PS. Efficient and fast ring recognition algorithms in the CBM-RICH are based on the Hough Transform method. Due to optical distortions of the rings, an ellipse fitting algorithm was elaborated to improve the ring radius resolution. An efficient algorithm based on the Artificial Neural Network was implemented for electron identification in RICH. All algorithms were significantly optimized to achieve maximum speed and minimum memory consumption. - Highlights: • Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector will serve for electron identification in CBM. • We present efficient ring recognition algorithm based on the Hough Transform method. • Developed algorithms were significantly optimized to achieve maximum speed up. • Electron identification algorithm in RICH based on the Artificial Neural Network. • Developed algorithms were successfully tested on real data from the RICH prototype

  17. Event reconstruction in the RICH detector of the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczewski, J. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Becker, K.-H. [University Wuppertal (Germany); Belogurov, S. [ITEP Moscow (Russian Federation); Boldyreva, N. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Chernogorov, A. [ITEP Moscow (Russian Federation); Deveaux, C. [University Gießen (Germany); Dobyrn, V. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Dürr, M. [University Gießen (Germany); Eom, J. [Pusan National University (Korea, Republic of); Eschke, J. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Höhne, C. [University Gießen (Germany); Kampert, K.-H. [University Wuppertal (Germany); Kleipa, V. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Kochenda, L. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Kolb, B. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Kopfer, J. [University Wuppertal (Germany); Kravtsov, P. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Lebedev, S., E-mail: s.lebedev@gsi.de [University Gießen (Germany); Lebedeva, E. [University Gießen (Germany); Leonova, E. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); and others

    2014-12-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR facility will investigate the QCD phase diagram at high net-baryon densities and moderate temperatures. One of the key signatures will be di-leptons emitted from the hot and dense phase in heavy-ion collisions. Measuring di-electrons, a high purity of identified electrons is required in order to suppress the background. Electron identification in CBM will be performed by a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector and Transition Radiation Detectors (TRD). In order to access the foreseen rare probes, the detector and the data acquisition have to handle interaction rates up to 10 MHz. Therefore, the development of fast and efficient event reconstruction algorithms is an important and challenging task in CBM. In this contribution event reconstruction and electron identification algorithms in the RICH detector are presented. So far they have been developed on simulated data but could already be tested on real data from a RICH prototype testbeam experiment at the CERN-PS. Efficient and fast ring recognition algorithms in the CBM-RICH are based on the Hough Transform method. Due to optical distortions of the rings, an ellipse fitting algorithm was elaborated to improve the ring radius resolution. An efficient algorithm based on the Artificial Neural Network was implemented for electron identification in RICH. All algorithms were significantly optimized to achieve maximum speed and minimum memory consumption. - Highlights: • Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector will serve for electron identification in CBM. • We present efficient ring recognition algorithm based on the Hough Transform method. • Developed algorithms were significantly optimized to achieve maximum speed up. • Electron identification algorithm in RICH based on the Artificial Neural Network. • Developed algorithms were successfully tested on real data from the RICH prototype.

  18. Oscillatory Behavior during the Catalytic Partial Oxidation of Methane: Following Dynamic Structural Changes of Palladium Using the QEXAFS Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoetzel, Jan; Frahm, Ronald; Kimmerle, Bertram

    2012-01-01

    oxidation of methane, the catalyst reduced from the end to the beginning of the catalyst bed and oxidized again toward the end as soon as the entire catalyst bed was reduced. On an entirely oxidized catalyst bed, only total oxidation of methane was observed and consumed the oxygen until the conditions...... of the Pd particles at increasing age of the catalyst was observed, which leads to a lower oscillation frequency. Effects of particle size, oven temperature, and oxygen/methane ratio on the oscillation behavior were studied in detail. The deactivation period (reoxidation of Pd) was much less influenced...... by the oven temperature than the ignition behavior of the catalytic partial oxidation of methane. This indicates that deactivation is caused by an autoreduction of the palladium at the beginning of the catalyst bed due to the high temperature achieved by total oxidation of methane....

  19. Shallow groundwater and soil chemistry response to 3 years of subsurface drip irrigation using coalbed-methane-produced water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bern, C. R.; Boehlke, A. R.; Engle, M. A.; Geboy, N. J.; Schroeder, K. T.; Zupancic, J. W.

    2013-10-04

    Disposal of produced waters, pumped to the surface as part of coalbed methane (CBM) development, is a significant environmental issue in the Wyoming portion of the Powder River Basin, USA. High sodium adsorption ratios (SAR) of the waters could degrade agricultural land, especially if directly applied to the soil surface. One method of disposing of CBM water, while deriving beneficial use, is subsurface drip irrigation (SDI), where acidified CBM waters are applied to alfalfa fields year-round via tubing buried 0.92 m deep. Effects of the method were studied on an alluvial terrace with a relatively shallow depth to water table (~3 m). Excess irrigation water caused the water table to rise, even temporarily reaching the depth of drip tubing. The rise corresponded to increased salinity in some monitoring wells. Three factors appeared to drive increased groundwater salinity: (1) CBM solutes, concentrated by evapotranspiration; (2) gypsum dissolution, apparently enhanced by cation exchange; and (3) dissolution of native Na–Mg–SO{sub 4} salts more soluble than gypsum. Irrigation with high SAR (24) water has increased soil saturated paste SAR up to 15 near the drip tubing. Importantly though, little change in SAR has occurred at the surface.

  20. Shallow groundwater and soil chemistry response to 3 years of subsurface drip irrigation using coalbed-methane-produced water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern, Carleton R.; Boehlke, Adam R.; Engle, Mark A.; Geboy, Nicholas J.; Schroeder, K.T.; Zupancic, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    Disposal of produced waters, pumped to the surface as part of coalbed methane (CBM) development, is a significant environmental issue in the Wyoming portion of the Powder River Basin, USA. High sodium adsorption ratios (SAR) of the waters could degrade agricultural land, especially if directly applied to the soil surface. One method of disposing of CBM water, while deriving beneficial use, is subsurface drip irrigation (SDI), where acidified CBM waters are applied to alfalfa fields year-round via tubing buried 0.92 m deep. Effects of the method were studied on an alluvial terrace with a relatively shallow depth to water table (∼3 m). Excess irrigation water caused the water table to rise, even temporarily reaching the depth of drip tubing. The rise corresponded to increased salinity in some monitoring wells. Three factors appeared to drive increased groundwater salinity: (1) CBM solutes, concentrated by evapotranspiration; (2) gypsum dissolution, apparently enhanced by cation exchange; and (3) dissolution of native Na–Mg–SO4 salts more soluble than gypsum. Irrigation with high SAR (∼24) water has increased soil saturated paste SAR up to 15 near the drip tubing. Importantly though, little change in SAR has occurred at the surface.

  1. Potential for CO2 sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane production in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamelinck, C.N.; Schreurs, H.; Faaij, A.P.C.; Ruijg, G.J.; Jansen, Daan; Pagnier, H.; Bergen, F. van; Wolf, K.-H.; Barzandji, O.; Bruining, H.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the technical and economic feasibility of using CO2 for the enhanced production of coal bed methane (ECBM) in the Netherlands. This concept could lead to both CO2 storage by adsorbing CO2 in deep coal layers that are not suitable for mining, as well as production of methane.

  2. Responses of cerebral GABA-containing CBM neuron to taste stimulation with seaweed extracts in Aplysia kurodai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narusuye, Kenji; Kinugawa, Aiko; Nagahama, Tatsumi

    2005-11-01

    Aplysia kurodai distributed along Japan feeds well on Ulva pertusa but rejects Gelidium amansii with distinctive patterned movements of the jaws and radula. On the ventral side of the cerebral M cluster, four cell bodies of higher order neurons that send axons to the buccal ganglia are distributed (CBM neurons). We have previously shown that the dopaminergic CBM1 modulates basic feeding circuits in the buccal ganglia for rejection by firing at higher frequency after application of the aversive taste of seaweed such as Gelidium amansii. In the present experiments immunohistochemical techniques showed that the CBM3 exhibited gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-like immunoreactivity. The CBM3 may be equivalent to the CBI-3 involved in changing the motor programs from rejection to ingestion in Aplysia californica. The responses of the CBM3 to taste stimulation of the lips with seaweed extracts were investigated by the use of calcium imaging. The calcium-sensitive dye, Calcium Green-1, was iontophoretically introduced into a cell body of the CBM3 using a microelectrode. Application of Ulva pertusa or Gelidium amansii extract induced different changes in fluorescence in the CBM3 cell body, indicating that taste of Ulva pertusa initially induced longer-lasting continuous spike responses at slightly higher frequency compared with that of Gelidium amansii. Considering a role of the CBM3 in the pattern selection, these results suggest that elongation of the initial firing response may be a major factor for the CBM3 to switch the buccal motor programs from rejection to ingestion after application of different tastes of seaweeds in Aplysia kurodai. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Cleansing, methanation is democratizing; Depollution, la methanisation se democratise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aumond, N.

    2005-06-01

    The French company Naskeo is developing a biological treatment method for small industrial pollutant sources. With a treatment capacity of 36 kg COD (chemical oxygen demand) per m{sup 3} and per day, this process is two times more efficient than todays commercialized anaerobic stations. The method involves the classical methanation process and uses the Provae technology developed by the national institute of agronomical research (Inra), which combines the fixed bed and fluidized bed technologies. Short paper. (J.S.)

  4. MP CBM-Z V1.0: design for a new CBM-Z gas-phase chemical mechanism architecture for next generation processors

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hui; Lin, Junmin; Wu, Qizhong; Chen, Huansheng; Tang, Xiao; Wang, Zifa; Chen, Xueshun; Cheng, Huaqiong; Wang, Lanning

    2018-01-01

    Precise and rapid air quality simulation and forecasting are limited by the computation performance of the air quality model, and the gas-phase chemistry module is the most time-consuming function in the air quality model. In this study, we designed a new framework for the widely used Carbon Bond Mechanism Z (CBM-Z) gas-phase chemical kinetics kernel to adapt the Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) technology in the next-generation processors for improving its calculation performance. The...

  5. Non-oxidative conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons over ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SOURABH MISHRA

    2017-09-27

    Sep 27, 2017 ... ... in the Design and Development of Catalysts and their Applications ... of methane (natural gas) into transportable chemicals ... molybdenum (Mo) catalyst under non-oxidative condi- ... Micromeritics ASAP 2010 apparatus at liquid nitrogen tem- ... fixed-bed tubular reactor (500 mm length & 15 mm ID) at.

  6. Distributions of energy losses of electrons and pions in the CBM TRD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akishina, E.P.; Akishina, T.P.; Ivanov, V.V.; Denisova, O.Yu.

    2007-01-01

    The distributions of energy losses of electrons and pions in the TRD detector of the CBM experiment are considered. We analyze the measurements of the energy deposits in one-layer TRD prototype obtained during the test beam (GSI, Darmstadt, February 2006) and Monte Carlo simulations for the n-layered TRD realized with the help of GEANT in frames of the CBM ROOT. We show that 1) energy losses both for real measurements and GEANT simulations are approximated with a high accuracy by a log-normal distribution for π and a weighted sum of two log-normal distributions for e; 2) GEANT simulations noticeably differ from real measurements and, as a result, we have a significant loss in the efficiency of the e/π identification. A procedure to control and correct the process of the energy deposit of electrons in the TRD is developed

  7. Performance study of the anisotropic flow and reaction plane reconstruction in the CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhaylov, V; Kugler, A; Kushpil, V; Tlustý, P; Selyuzhenkov, I

    2016-01-01

    The Projectile Spectator Detector (PSD) is a subsystem of the CBM experiment at the future FAIR facility designed to determine centrality and reaction plane orientation in the heavy-ion collisions. It will be done by measurement of the energy distribution of the heavy nucleons and nuclei fragments emitted close to the beam rapidity in forward direction. For the anticipated beam energies of FAIR SIS100 and SIS300 accelerators, different event generators (iQMD, UrQMD, DCM-QGSM, LA-QGSM and HSD) were used for the study of directed and elliptic proton flow in Au+Au collisions. Produced particles were transported with the GEANT4 Monte-Carlo using the CBM detector geometry. Performance of the reaction plane determination is shown for different PSD setups to demonstrate effects of the detector granularity and magnetic field. Simulation results are compared with the FOPI, AGS E877, E895 and STAR experimental data. (paper)

  8. Controlling Bottom Hole Flowing Pressure Within a Specific Range for Efficient Coalbed Methane Drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Zhi-Yin; Hu, Ai-Mei; Zhai, Yu-Yang

    2013-11-01

    The stress state of coal surrounding a coalbed methane (CBM) production well is affected by the bottom hole flowing pressure (BHFP). The permeability of coal shows a marked change under compression. The BHFP must be restricted to a specific range to favor higher permeability in the surrounding coal and thus higher productivity of the well. A new method to determine this specific range is proposed in this paper. Coal has a rather low tensile strength, which induces tensile failure and rock disintegration. The deformation of coal samples under compression has four main stages: compaction, elastic deformation, strain hardening, and strain softening. Permeability is optimal when the coal samples are in the strain softening stage. The three critical values of BHFP, namely, p wmin, p wmid, and p wupper, which correspond to the occurrence of tensile failure, the start of strain softening, and the beginning of plastic deformation, respectively, are derived from theoretical principles. The permeability of coal is in an optimal state when the BHFP is between p wmin and p wmid. The BHFP should be confined to this specific range for the efficient drainage of CBM wells. This method was applied to field operations in three wells in the Hancheng CBM field in China. A comprehensive analysis of drainage data and of the BHFP indicates that the new method is effective and offers significant improvement to current practices.

  9. Development of a silicon tracking and vertex detection system for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuser, Johann M.

    2007-01-01

    The compressed baryonic matter (CBM) experiment is a fixed-target heavy-ion spectrometer planned at the future international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI. The CBM research program will explore the phase diagram of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) in the region of high baryon chemical potentials, in other words nuclear matter at extreme densities. Matter of such forms is believed to exist in the interior of neutron stars and in the cores of certain types of supernovae. In the laboratory, the dense nuclear medium is created in collisions of heavy-ion beams with nuclear targets. With beam intensities of up to 10 12 ions per pulse, beam energies up to 45 GeV/nucleon, and high availability the SIS-300 synchrotron of FAIR will offer unique opportunities for this research. The CBM detector will identify hadrons and leptons in nuclear collisions with up to 1000 charged particles at event rates up to 10 MHz. The experiment will be optimized in particular for the detection of rare probes, like hadronic decays of D mesons and leptonic decays of light vector mesons, that can yield information on the initial dense phase of the collisions. The challenge is to accomplish in this environment high-resolution charged particle tracking, momentum measurement and secondary vertex selection with a silicon tracking and vertex detection system, the central component of the CBM detector. The system requirements include a very low material budget, radiation tolerant sensors with high spatial resolution, and a fast readout compatible with high-level-only triggers. The paper discusses the concept of the silicon detection system, the optimization of its layout, and the R and D on micro-strip and pixel sensors as well as front-end electronics for the building blocks of the detector stations

  10. Ring recognition and electron identification in the RICH detector of the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, S; Hoehne, C; Ososkov, G

    2010-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR facility at Darmstadt will measure dileptons emitted from the hot and dense phase in heavy-ion collisions. In case of an electron measurement, a high purity of identified electrons is required in order to suppress the background. Electron identification in CBM will be performed by a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector and Transition Radiation Detectors (TRD). In this contribution we will present algorithms and software which have been developed for electron identification in CBM. Efficient and fast ring recognition in the RICH detector is based on the Hough Transform method which has been accelerated considerably compared to a standard implementation. Ring quality selection is done using an Artificial Neural Network which also has been used for electron identification. Due to optical distortions ellipse fitting and radius corre ction routines are used for improved ring radius resolution. These methods allow for a high purity and efficiency of reconstructed electron rings. For momenta above 2 GeV/c the ring reconstruction efficiency for electrons embedded in central Au+Au collisions at 25 AGeV beam energy is 95% resulting in an electron identification efficiency of 90% at a pion suppression factor of 500. Including information from the TRD a pion suppression of 10 4 is reached at 80% efficiency. The developed algorithm is very robust to a high ring density environment. Current work focusses on detector layout studies in order to optimize the detector setup while keeping a high performance. All developed algorithms were tested on large statistics of simulated events and are included into the CBM software framework for common use.

  11. The prototype readout chain for CBM using the AFCK board and its software components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizeau, Pierre-Alain; Emscherman, David; Lehnert, Jörg; Müller, Walter F. J.; Yang, Junfeng

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a prototype for the readout chain of the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment using the AFCK FPGA board as Data Processing Board (DPB). The components of the readout chain are described, followed by some test setups, all based on different flavors of AFCK-DPB. Details about the functional blocks in the different versions of the DPB firmware are given, followed by a description of the corresponding software elements.

  12. Doses from radioactive methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, A.W.; Kendall, G.M.; Fell, T.P.; Harrison, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    A possible radiation hazard arises from exposure to methane labelled with either a 3 H or a 14 C nuclide. This radioactive methane could be released from a variety of sources, e.g. land burial sites containing radioactive waste. Standard assumptions adopted for vapours would not apply to an inert alkane like methane. This paper discusses mechanisms by which radioactive methane would irradiate tissues and provides estimates of doses. Data on skin thickness and metabolism of methane are discussed with reference to these mechanisms. It is found that doses are dominated by dose from the small fraction of methane which is inhaled and metabolised. This component of dose has been calculated under rather conservative assumptions. (author)

  13. A First-level Event Selector for the CBM Experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuveland, J de; Lindenstruth, V

    2011-01-01

    The CBM experiment at the upcoming FAIR accelerator aims to create highest baryon densities in nucleus-nucleus collisions and to explore the properties of super-dense nuclear matter. Event rates of 10 MHz are needed for high-statistics measurements of rare probes, while event selection requires complex global triggers like secondary vertex search. To meet these demands, the CBM experiment uses self-triggered detector front-ends and a data push readout architecture. The First-level Event Selector (FLES) is the central physics selection system in CBM. It receives all hits and performs online event selection on the 1 TByte/s input data stream. The event selection process requires high-throughput event building and full event reconstruction using fast, vectorized track reconstruction algorithms. The current FLES architecture foresees a scalable high-performance computer. To achieve the high throughput and computation efficiency, all available computing devices will have to be used, in particular FPGAs at the first stages of the system and heterogeneous many-core architectures such as CPUs for efficient track reconstruction. A high-throughput network infrastructure and flow control in the system are other key aspects. In this paper, we present the foreseen architecture of the First-level Event Selector.

  14. Fast parallel ring recognition algorithm in the RICH detector of the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM)experiment at the future FAIR facility at Darmstadt will measure dileptons emitted from the hot and dense phase in heavy ion collisions. In case of an electron measurement, a high purity of identified electrons is required in order to suppress the background. Electron identification in CBM will be performed by a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector and Transition Radiation Detector (TRD). Very fast data reconstruction is extremely important for CBM because of the huge amount of data which has to be handled. In this contribution, a parallelized ring recognition algorithm is presented. Modern CPUs have two features, which enable parallel programming. First, the SSE technology allows using the SIMD execution model. Second, multicore CPUs enable the use of multithreading. Both features have been implemented in the ring reconstruction of the RICH detector. A considerable speedup factor from 357 to 2.5 ms/event has been achieved including preceding code optimization for Intel Xeon X5550 processors at 2.67 GHz

  15. Towards self-triggered digitization and data readout in the CBM time-of-flight system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Christian; Herrmann, Norbert [Physikalisches Institut und Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The design goal of the future Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is to measure rare probes of dense strongly interacting matter with an unprecedented accuracy. Target interaction rates of up to 10 MHz for heavy systems like Au+Au and the need to identify experimental signatures of probes like multi-strange hyperons in the online data stream place challenging demands on the experiment's data acquisition system. Each detector subsystem in CBM implements a self-triggered digitization and readout chain fitted to the respective front-end electronics sending continuous data streams to a high-performance computing farm called the First-Level Event Selector (FLES). Here, events are reconstructed online to identify the physically most interesting ones as only a fraction of the enormous data rate (up to 1 TB/s) can be stored permanently for later offline analysis. The time-of-flight (TOF) wall of CBM is composed of high-resolution timing multi-gap resistive plate chambers (MRPCs) which are estimated to deliver signal rates of up to 500 kHz per electronics channel. Prototypical readout schemes currently under test which are able to transport this high payload are presented, and an outline towards inclusion in the FLES network is given.

  16. Measurements of the mirror surface homogeneity in the CBM-RICH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedeva, Elena; Hoehne, Claudia [II. Physikalisches Institut, JLU Giessen (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) complex will investigate the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at high baryon densities and moderate temperatures in A+A collisions from 2-11 AGeV (SIS100) beam energy. One of the key detector components required for the CBM physics program is the RICH (Ring Imaging CHerenkov) detector, which is developed for efficient and clean electron identification and pion suppression. The CBM-RICH detector is being planned with gaseous radiator and in a standard projective geometry with focusing mirror elements and photon detector planes. One of the important criteria for the selection of appropriate mirrors is their optical surface quality (surface homogeneity). It defines the imaging quality of projected Cherenkov rings, and directly effects the ring finding and fitting performance. The global homogeneity has been tested with the D0 measurement. Local deformations e.g. by the mirror holding structure can be investigated with the Ronchi test and Shack-Hartmann method from which first results are discussed in this contribution.

  17. Measurement of rare probes with the silicon tracking system of the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuser, Johann; Friese, Volker

    2014-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR will explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at highest net baryon densities and moderate temperatures. The CBM physics program will be started with beams delivered by the SIS 100 synchrotron, providing energies from 2 to 14 GeV/nucleon for heavy nuclei, up to 14 GeV/nucleon for light nuclei, and 29 GeV for protons. The highest net baryon densities will be explored with ion beams up to 45 GeV/nucleon energy delivered by SIS 300 in the next stage of FAIR. Collision rates up to 10 7 per second are required to produce very rare probes with unprecedented statistics in this energy range. Their signatures are complex. These conditions call for detector systems designed to meet the extreme requirements in terms of rate capability, momentum and spatial resolution, and a novel DAQ and trigger concept which is not limited by latency but by throughput. In this paper we outline the concepts of CBM's central detector, the Silicon Tracking System, and of the First-Level Event Selector, a dedicated computing farm to reduce on-line the raw data volume by up to three orders of magnitude to a recordable rate. Progress with the development of detector and software algorithms are discussed and examples of performance studies on the reconstruction of rare probes at SIS 100 and SIS 300 energies given

  18. Direct Activation Of Methane

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie; Sun, Miao; Caps, Valerie; Pelletier, Jeremie; Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2013-01-01

    Heteropolyacids (HPAs) can activate methane at ambient temperature (e.g., 20.degree. C.) and atmospheric pressure, and transform methane to acetic acid, in the absence of any noble metal such as Pd). The HPAs can be, for example, those with Keggin

  19. Methane and Climate Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reay, D.; Smith, P.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2010-01-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and is estimated to be responsible for approximately one-fifth of man-made global warming. Per kilogram, it is 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide over a 100-year time horizon -- and global warming is likely to enhance methane release from a number of

  20. Successful engagement: CBM's holistic approach to the work in the area of ear care, deafness, hard of hearing and deafblindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesni, Sian; Santana-Hernández, Diego

    2014-09-01

    CBM is an international Christian development organisation, committed to improving the quality of life of persons with disabilities in disadvantaged societies. CBM aims at achieving this in partnership with local organisations and in cooperation with stakeholders at regional and international levels. This article aims at sharing CBM's holistic approach for successful engagement in the work area of ear care, deafness, hard of hearing and deafblindness. Review of CBM supporting documents, including strategies, position papers, technical guidelines, criteria of success and information related to partners, centres of excellence and model projects. Description of how partner programmes use participatory methods of planning and implementation, involving persons with disabilities and the community. Recommendations on how to develop national or sub-national strategies to impact the lives, and advocate with governments for the rights and inclusion, of persons with disabilities. CBM's holistic approach to work in the area of ear care; deafness; hard of hearing and deafblindness includes intervention at all levels of health care provision, Education, CBR and Audiological, Speech Therapy and other interdisciplinary services. This article presents CBM's core principles and shares specific strategic planning and results, together with lessons learnt while searching a sustainable engagement for field work. Rehabilitation, in its widest conception, should be approached as a multidisciplinary strategy, and developed in close cooperation with other local, national and international agencies. CBM is positioned in a strategic point from where it can play a key role in the facilitation of an international forum for agencies and stakeholders to reach a consensus to decrease the burden of ear disease and hearing loss, through early intervention and re/habilitation.

  1. Development and test of a free-streaming readout chain for the CBM time of flight wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loizeau, Pierre-Alain

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents the development and test of a free-streaming readout chain for the Time of Flight (TOF) Wall of the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment. In order to contribute to the exploration of the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter, CBM aims at the measurement of rare probes, whose yields and phase space distributions are significantly influenced by their environment. Many of the possible signals, of which the antiprotons was investigated within this thesis, require an excellent Particle Identification (PID) and a new readout paradigm called free-streaming. In CBM, the PID for charged particles is provided by a TOF wall based on Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPC). Within the thesis, a central component of the TOF readout chain, the free-streaming ASIC-TDC, was evaluated and pushed from the prototype level to a close to final design, for which it could be demonstrated that it fulfill all the CBM requirements: resolution, rate capability and stability. Additionally, the CBM TOF software in the CBMROOT software framework was reorganized to merge the processing and analysis of real and simulated data. A data unpacker and a realistic digitizer were implemented with a common output data format. The digitizer was used to estimate the data rates and number of components in a free-streaming readout chain for the full wall.

  2. Conceptual design of a cold methane moderator system for the European Spallation Source (ESS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnert-Wiemer, H.

    2002-02-01

    As part of the work for the target station of the planned European spallation source (ESS) the Central Department of Technology at the Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH is also concerned with the moderators, particular attention being given to the development of cold methane moderators. This report discusses the technical feasibility of solid methane moderators. Methods to tailor the neutron output by adding absorption materials (decouplers or poisons) are not considered here, neither are composite moderators. Based on the given target-moderator-reflector assembly of the ESS project a concept for the ESS cold methane moderators has been developed and is being examined at the Forschungszentrum Juelich. According to this moderator concept the moderator is a fixed bed of small spheres, which makes moderator container filling homogeneous and reproducible. Since spheres form a defined packed bed, cooling of the moderator bed by H 2 is reliable. The process of filling the moderator container and of removing the pellets is batchwise to ensure complete removal of the pellets, so that no spent methane pellets accumulate in the system. For removal of the moderator spheres the fixed bed in the moderator container is fluidized with subsequent hydraulic transport of the pellets. The spent methane pellets are separated from the transport fluid and the methane is released over the stack or purified and reused. Depending on the kind and amount of the radioactive isotopes present these may have to be separated and stored. (orig.)

  3. Mechanics of coalbed methane production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creel, J C; Rollins, J B [Crawley, Gillespie and Associates, Inc. (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    Understanding the behaviour of coalbed methane reservoirs and the mechanics of production is crucial to successful management of coalbed methane resources and projects. This paper discusses the effects of coal properties and coalbed methane reservoir characteristics on gas production rates and recoveries with a review of completion techniques for coalbed methane wells. 4 refs., 17 figs.

  4. Design of large size segmented GEM foils and Drift PCB for CBM MUCH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, J.; Dubey, A.K.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2016-01-01

    Triple GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier), sector shaped detectors will be used for Muon tracking in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at Anti-proton Ion Research (FAIR) facility at Darmstadt, Germany. The sizes of the detectors modules in the Muon Chambers (MUCH) are of the order of 1 meter with active area of about 75cms. Progressive pad geometry is chosen for the readout from these detectors. In construction of these chambers, three GEM foils are stacked on top of each other in a 3/2/2/2 gap configuration. The GEM foils are double layered copper clad 50μm thin Kapton foil. Each GEM foil has millions of holes on it. Foils of large surface area are prone to damages due to discharges owing to the high capacitance of the foil. Hence, these foils have their top surfaces divided into segments of about 100 sq.cm. Further segmentation may be necessary when there are high rate requirements, as in the case of CBM. For the GEM foils of CBM MUCH, a 24 segment layout has been adopted. Short-circuit in any of the GEM-holes will make entire foil un-usable. To reduce such occurrences, segment to segment isolation using opto-coupler in series with the GEM-foil segments has been introduced. Hence, a novel design for GEM chamber drift-PCB and foils has been made. In this scheme, each segment is powered and controlled individually. At the same time, the design takes into account, the space constraints, not only in x-y plane, but also in the z, due to compact assembly of MUCH detector layers

  5. Quality assurance tests of the CBM silicon tracking system sensors with an infrared laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teklishyn, Maksym [FAIR GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); KINR, Kyiv (Ukraine); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Double-sided 300 μm thick silicon microstrip sensors are planned to be used in the Silicon Tracking System (STS) of the future CBM experiment. Different tools, including an infrared laser, are used to induce charge in the sensor medium to study the sensor response. We use present installation to develop a procedure for the sensor quality assurance during mass production. The precise positioning of the laser spot allows to make a clear judgment about the sensor interstrip gap response which provides information about the charge distribution inside the sensor medium. Results are compared with the model estimations.

  6. Fast reconstruction of trajectories of charged muons recorded by the MUCH detector in the CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablyazimov, T.O.; Ivanov, V.V.

    2017-01-01

    The CBM experiment is currently being developed in GSI (Darmstadt, Germany) at the FAIR accelerator complex by an international collaboration including JINR. One of the main goals of the experiment is a research of charmonium production process in nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies. The registration of such decays as J/ψ → μ"+μ"− is planned to be carried out in real time. The current paper presents an algorithm suitable for fast reconstruction of trajectories of charged muons from J/ψ decays recorded by the MUCH detector. [ru

  7. Methane monitoring from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, C.; Alpers, M.; Millet, B.; Ehret, G.; Flamant, P.

    2017-11-01

    Methane is one of the strongest anthropogenic greenhouse gases. It contributes by its radiative forcing significantly to the global warming. For a better understanding of climate changes, it is necessary to apply precise space-based measurement techniques in order to obtain a global view on the complex processes that control the methane concentration in the atmosphere. The MERLIN mission is a joint French-German cooperation, on a micro satellite mission for space-based measurement of spatial and temporal gradients of atmospheric methane columns on a global scale. MERLIN will be the first Integrated Path Differential Absorption LIDAR for greenhouse gas monitoring from space. In contrast to passive methane missions, the LIDAR instrument allows measurements at alllatitudes, all-seasons and during night.

  8. Methane prediction in collieries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Creedy, DP

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of the project was to assess the current status of research on methane emission prediction for collieries in South Africa in comparison with methods used and advances achieved elsewhere in the world....

  9. Practice Hospital Bed Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Practice Hospital Bed Safety Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... It depends on the complexity of the bed." Safety Tips CDRH offers the following safety tips for ...

  10. Bed Bugs and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bed bugs have long been a pest – feeding on blood, causing itchy bites and generally irritating their human hosts. They are successful hitchhikers, and can move from an infested site to furniture, bedding, baggage, boxes, and clothing.

  11. Phytoremediation of Atmospheric Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    REPORT Phytoremediation of Atmospheric Methane 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We have transformed a plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, with the...298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 31-Mar-2012 Phytoremediation of Atmospheric Methane Report Title ABSTRACT We have transformed a...DD882) Scientific Progress See attachment Technology Transfer 1    Final Report for DARPA project W911NF1010027  Phytoremediation  of Atmospheric

  12. Terrestrial plant methane production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Bruhn, Dan; Møller, Ian M.

    We evaluate all experimental work published on the phenomenon of aerobic methane (CH4) generation in terrestrial plants. We conclude that the phenomenon is true. Four stimulating factors have been observed to induce aerobic plant CH4 production, i.e. cutting injuries, increasing temperature...... the aerobic methane emission in plants. Future work is needed for establishing the relative contribution of several proven potential CH4 precursors in plant material....

  13. Methanation of Carbon Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Daniel Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere has been linked to global warming. Carbon dioxide's (CO2) one of the most abundant greenhouse gases. Natural gas, mainly methane, is the cleanest fossil fuel for electricity production helping meet the United States ever growing energy needs. The methanation of CO2 has the potential to address both of these problems if a catalyst can be developed that meets the activity, economic and environmental requirements to industrialize the process. ...

  14. CBM Reading, Mathematics, and Written Expression at the Secondary Level: Examining Latent Composite Relations Among Indices and Unique Predictions With a State Achievement Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codding, Robin S; Petscher, Yaacov; Truckenmiller, Adrea

    2015-05-01

    A paucity of research has examined the utility of curriculum-based measurement (CBM) for data-based decision making at the secondary level. As schools move to multitiered systems of service delivery, it is conceivable that multiple screening measures will be used that address various academic subject areas. The value of including different CBM indices measures is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to (a) examine the relationship among a variety of reading, writing, and mathematics CBM indices administered to 249 seventh-grade students; (b) investigate amount and patterns of growth; and (c) examine predictive validity to a high-stakes state test using latent factor analysis and multiple indicator growth models. Results indicated strong correspondence among CBM types for fall static scores but weak relationships among slopes. Different patterns of growth were yielded for CBM writing than for CBM reading and mathematics. Findings from this study suggested that although reading, mathematics, and writing CBM were independently and moderately related to both English Language Arts and Math test scores, reading was the strongest predictor when all 3 CBM constructs were considered jointly.

  15. easyCBM CCSS Math Item Scaling and Test Form Revision (2012-2013): Grades 6-8. Technical Report #1313

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daniel; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this technical report is to document the piloting and scaling of new easyCBM mathematics test items aligned with the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and to describe the process used to revise and supplement the 2012 research version easyCBM CCSS math tests in Grades 6-8. For all operational 2012 research version test forms (10…

  16. Extraction of moments of net-particle event-by-event fluctuations in the CBM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vovchenko, Volodymyr [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Taras Shevchenko University, Kyiv (Ukraine); Kisel, Ivan [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The future CBM experiment at FAIR will employ high intensity beams and large acceptance detectors in order to study the properties of the strongly interacting matter produced in heavy-ion collisions at high baryon densities. The search for the conjectured critical point of QCD is one the important tasks. It is predicted from statistical physics that higher moments of event-by-event fluctuations are very sensitive to the proximity of the critical point. This argument is explicitly demonstrated with the van der Waals equation of state. Thus, it was suggested that higher moments of fluctuations of conserved charges can be used as probes for the critical behavior. The statistical convergence of cumulants of different order is explored. The extraction of scaled variance, skewness, and kurtosis of proton distribution from simulated UrQMD events is performed and the efficiency correction described by binomial distribution is accounted for. The validity of this correction is tested with different modelings of the CBM detector response: from binomial distribution with fluctuating event-by-event efficiency to a full-scale GEANT simulation. The obtained results indicate that a more elaborate efficiency correction is needed in order to accurately reconstruct moments of higher orders.

  17. An improved detector response simulation for the CBM silicon tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malygina, Hanna [Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); Friese, Volker [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment(CBM) at FAIR is designed to explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high net-baryon densities. The central detector component the Silicon Tracking System (STS) is build from double-sided micro-strip sensors. To achieve realistic simulations the response of the silicon strip sensors should be precisely included in the digitizer which simulates a complete chain of physical processes caused by charged particles traversing the detector, from charge creation in silicon to a digital output signal. The new version of the STS digitizer comprises in addition non-uniform energy loss distributions (according to the Urban theory), thermal diffusion and charge redistribution over the read-out channels due to interstrip capacitances. The improved response simulation was tested with parameters reproducing the anticipated running conditions of the CBM experiment. Two different method for cluster finding were used. The results for hit position residuals, cluster size distribution, as well as for some other parameters of reconstruction quality are presented. The achieved advance is assessed by a comparison with the previous, simpler version of the STS detector response simulation.

  18. Performance of centrality determination in heavy-ion collisions with CBM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klochkov, Viktor; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The goal of the CBM experiment at FAIR is to investigate the properties of compressed baryonic matter. The measurement of physics observables in heavy-ion collisions requires information about event geometry. A magnitude of the impact parameter, which is among the most important parameters to describe collision geometry, cannot be measured directly in experiment. One can estimate it by measuring produced particle's multiplicities or energy of the spectator fragments. Typically, the collisions are divided into centrality classes which corresponds to the ranges of impact parameter with e.g. centrality class 0-5% corresponds to most central events, and 95-100% to the most peripheral collisions. Sensitivity to the range of impact parameters with the Silicon Tracking System (STS) and Projectile Spectator Detector (PSD) to select centrality classes in the CBM experiment will be presented. The STS is measuring the multiplicity of the particles produced in the nuclei overlap zone and different areas of the PSD are sensitive to both spectator fragments and produced particles. Supported by the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung.

  19. Challenges for secondary vertex reconstruction in CBM at SIS100 and SIS300 at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lymanets, A.; Kotynia, A.; Heuser, J.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The CBM experiment at FAIR will explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of highest baryon densities. In contrast to other experimental programs in the same energy domain, CBM will be able to explore rare probes such as charm and dileptons due to its capability of running at interaction rates as high as 10 MHz. In order to cope with the related experimental challenges detailed simulations studies as well as extensive R and D activities on the detector and readout systems are ongoing. In this contribution, the challenges of open charm measurement in pA collisions, e.g. already at SIS100, and in AA collisions at SIS300 will be investigated. In order to extract open charm decays from the large background of produced charged particles, secondary vertex reconstruction with a precision of less than 0.1 mm is required. The involved tracking and reconstruction procedures have to be fast in order to allow their implementation already on the trigger level. Prerequisite for this are ultra-low mass, fast and radiation tolerant silicon detectors. These two aspects of a finally successful measurement, hardware development and reconstruction routines, are being developed in close contact to each other and their status is demonstrated in this talk. (author)

  20. Mechanical integration of the detector components for the CBM silicon tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasylyev, Oleg; Niebur, Wolfgang [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment (CBM) at FAIR is designed to explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high net-baryon densities. The central detector component, the Silicon Tracking System (STS) is based on double-sided micro-strip sensors. In order to achieve the physics performance, the detector mechanical structures should be developed taking into account the requirements of the CBM experiments: low material budget, high radiation environment, interaction rates, aperture for the silicon tracking, detector segmentation and mounting precision. A functional plan of the STS and its surrounding structural components is being worked out from which the STS system shape is derived and the power and cooling needs, the connector space requirements, life span of components and installation/repair aspects are determined. The mechanical integration is at the point of finalizing the design stage and moving towards production readiness. This contribution shows the current processing state of the following engineering tasks: construction space definition, carbon ladder shape and manufacturability, beam-pipe feedthrough structure, prototype construction, cable routing and modeling of the electronic components.

  1. Quality assurance of the silicon microstrip sensors for the CBM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panasenko, Iaroslav [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Institute for Nuclear Research, Kiev (Ukraine); Larionov, Pavel [University of Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The CBM experiment at FAIR will investigate the properties of nuclear matter at extreme conditions created in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. Its core detector - the Silicon Tracking System (STS) - will determine the momentum of charged particles from beam-target interactions. The track multiplicity will reach up to 700 within the detector aperture covering the polar angle 2.5 and 25 . High track density as well as stringent requirements to the momentum resolution (∝1%) require a system with high channel granularity and low material budget. The STS will be constructed of about 1200 double-sided silicon microstrip sensors with 58 μm pitch and a total area of ∝4 m{sup 2} with all together 2.1 million channels will be read out. In this talk the quality assurance of double-sided silicon microstrip sensors is discussed. This includes both visual and electrical characterization. For this purpose dedicated equipment has been set up in the clean rooms of the GSI Detector Laboratory and at Tuebingen University. Results of the electrical characterization of prototype microstrip sensors CBM06 are presented.

  2. Development and test of the readout system for the CBM-MVD prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milanovic, Borislav; Neuman, Bertram; Wiebusch, Michael; Amar-Youcef, Samir; Froehlich, Ingo; Stroth, Joachim [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Collaboration: CRESST-Collaboration; CBM-MVD Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The CBM Experiment at FAIR aims towards better understanding of the QCD phase-diagram and in-medium properties of matter under high densities. In order to enhance the detection of rare probes via their secondary decay vertices and to support the primary tracking system, the CBM Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) is foreseen. Recently, the MVD Prototype has been developed at the IKF in Frankfurt. The module contains one quarter of the first MVD station featuring four prototype-sensors MIMOSA-26 AHR thinned down to 50 μ m. The prototype has been tested at the CERN SPS accelerator with high energetic pions in November 2012. This contribution discusses the stability and scalability of the DAQ, slow-control and monitoring routines during the beamtime, as well as sensor behavior under high load of up to 700 000 particles per second. The readout system partially uses hardware from the HADES detector which will also run at FAIR. Readout rates of 98 MB/s at the limit of gigabit ethernet have been achieved showing no sign of data loss or corruption.

  3. Read-out concepts for FPGA-based sub-systems within the CBM detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, Jan [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment (CBM) to be built at FAIR consists of several individual sub-detectors. Some are based on custom ASICs as front-ends. Others employ FPGA based modules where extensive slow control features can be implemented to ease the recording of data and to allow for fast detection of any kind of error condition. Being designed as a free-running data acquisition, the demands also include a synchronized read-out, i.e. distribution of a common clock signal to all modules. To reduce the complexity of wiring, this is to be done sharing the same optical fibers as the data transport. During the past years, TrbNet has been designed and is used in various experiments, initially for the HADES experiment at FAIR. This protocol can now serve as a platform for the CBM read-out. In several steps, synchronous links with deterministic latency, as well as a free-streaming data transport can be included. At the same time, modifications to improve bandwidth and provide compatibility to the CERN GBTx links used for ASIC based sub-systems are to be developed. This contribution shows the planned steps as well as the current status of development.

  4. Concept and design of an alignment monitoring system for the CBM RICH mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendarouach, Jordan [Justus Liebig University (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) complex will investigate the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at high baryon density and moderate temperatures in A+A collisions from 2-11 AGeV (SIS100) beam energy. One of the key detector components required for this CBM physics program is the RICH (Ring Imaging CHerenkov) detector, developed for efficient and clean electron identification and pion suppression. The detector consists of about 80 spherical glass mirror tiles, distributed over two sphere parts. An important aspect to guarantee a stable operation of the RICH detector is the alignment of the mirrors. A method originally developed and inspired by the HERA-B experiment uses recorded data to assess mirror alignment of the RICH mirror system. Measurements of Cherenkov distances and angles on the PMT plane may reveal potential misalignments of the considered tile. If mirror misalignment is revealed, it can be subsequently included and rectified by correction routines, which should mostly increase ring reconstruction as well as ring-track matching efficiencies. Results of this alignment method based on simulated events, reproducing potential mirror misalignments, its limits and first correction routines are presented.

  5. Optimisation of beam-pipe shielding for MUCH detector of CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.; Farooq, M.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is one of the major scientific pillars of FAIR. The main goal of the experiment is to explore the Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) phase diagram in the regions of high baryonic densities and moderate temperatures in the beam energy range of 10-45 AGeV. This includes also the search for the critical point, the first order deconfinement phase transition from the hadronic matter to the partonic matter and the study of equation-of-state of dense baryonic matter. The CBM research program comprises a comprehensive scan of observables, beam energies and collision systems. The observables includes low-mass dilepton pairs, charmonia and open charm, but also collective flow of rare and bulk particles, correlations and fluctuations. Some of the particles under study have low cross-sections (like charm) or small branching ratios (like low-mass vector mesons). Therefore, in order to compensate for the low yield the measurements have to be performed at very high reaction rates of up to about 10 MHz. These conditions demand for fast and radiation hard detectors and associated fast electronics, readout and online event reconstruction. Low material budget is required with in the detector acceptance to avoid multiple scattering which would limit high-precision measurements

  6. CBM Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablyazimov, T.; Abuhoza, A.; Adak, R.; Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Adamczyk, M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, F.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad, S.; Akindinov, A.; Akishin, P.; Akishina, E.; Akishina, T.; Akishina, V.; Al-Turany, M.; Alexandrov, E.; Alexandrov, I.; Amar-Youcef, S.; Anđelić, M.; Andreeva, O.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anisimov, Yu.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arend, A.; Argintaru, D.; Atkin, E.; Avdeev, S.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Baban, V.; Bach, M.; Badura, E.; Baginyan, S.; Balle, T.; Balog, T.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Banerjee, P.; Baranova, N.; Barczyk, T.; Bartoş, D.; Bashir, S.; Basrak, Z.; Baszczyk, M.; Batenkov, O.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baznat, M.; Becker, K.-H.; Bel, T.; Belogurov, S.; Bendarouach, J.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdermann, E.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berendes, R.; Bergmann, C.; Bertini, D.; Bertini, O.; Beşliu, C.; Bezshyyko, O.; Bhaduri, P. P.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Bhattacharyya, T. K.; Biswas, S.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bocharov, Yu.; Böttger, S.; Borysova, M.; Breitner, T.; Brüning, U.; Brzychczyk, J.; Bubak, A.; Büsching, H.; Bychkov, A.; Byszuk, A.; Cai, Xu; Cãlin, M.; Cao, Ping; Čaplar, R.; Caragheorgheopol, G.; Carević, I.; Cătănescu, V.; Chakrabarti, A.; Chatterji, S.; Chattopadhyay, Sanatan; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chen, Hongfang; Cheng, Jianping; Chepurnov, V.; Chernenko, S.; Chernogorov, A.; Choi, Kyung-Eon; Ciobanu, M. I.; Claus, G.; Constantin, F.; Covlea, V.; Csanád, M.; D'Ascenzo, N.; Das, S.; Davkov, K.; Davkov, V.; de Cuveland, J.; Debnath, B.; Dementiev, D.; Deng, Zhi; Deppe, H.; Deppner, I.; Derenovskaya, O.; Deveaux, C. A.; Deveaux, M.; Dey, K.; Dey, M.; Dillenseger, P.; Dobyrn, V.; Doering, D.; Dorokhov, A.; Drozd, A.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubnichka, S.; Dubnichkova, A.; Dürr, M.; Dulinski, W.; Dutka, L.; Dželalija, M.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Eremin, V.; Eşanu, T.; Eschke, J.; Eschweiler, D.; Eum, Jongsik; Fan, Huanhuan; Fateev, O.; Filozova, I.; Finogeev, D.; Fischer, P.; Flemming, H.; Frankenfeld, U.; Friese, V.; Friske, E.; Fröhlich, I.; Frühauf, J.; Fülöp, Á.; Gajda, J.; Galatyuk, T.; Galkin, A.; Galkin, V.; Gangopadhyay, G.; García Chávez, C.; Gašparić, I.; Gebelein, J.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Goffe, M.; Golinka-Bezshyyko, L.; Golovatyuk, V.; Golovnya, S.; Golovtsov, V.; Golubeva, M.; Golubkov, D.; Gómez Ramírez, A.; Gorbunov, S.; Gorokhov, S.; Gottschalk, D.; Gryboś, P.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Guber, F.; Gudima, K.; Gupta, A.; Gusakov, Yu.; Haldar, A.; Haldar, S.; Hartmann, H.; Hehner, J.; Heidel, K.; Heine, N.; Hellbär, E.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrmann, N.; Heß, B.; Heuser, J. M.; Himmi, A.; Höhne, C.; Holzmann, R.; Huang, Guangming; Huang, Xinjie; Hutsch, J.; Hutter, D.; Iakovleva, E.; Ierusalimov, A.; Ilgenfritz, E.-M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, Valery; Ivanov, Victor; Ivanov, Vladimir; Ivashkin, A.; Jaaskelainen, K.; Jahan, H.; Jain, V.; Jakovlev, V.; Janson, T.; Jipa, A.; Kadenko, I.; Kämpfer, B.; Kalcher, S.; Kalinin, V.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, Tae Im; Kaptur, E.; Karabowicz, R.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karmanov, D.; Karnaukhov, V.; Karpechev, E.; Kasiński, K.; Kasprowicz, G.; Kaur, M.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Kekelidze, G.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Khasanov, F.; Khvorostukhin, A.; Kirakosyan, V.; Kirejczyk, M.; Kiryakov, A.; Kiš, M.; Kisel, I.; Kisel, P.; Kiselev, S.; Kiss, A.; Kiss, T.; Klaus, P.; Kłeczek, R.; Klein-Bösing, Ch.; Kleipa, V.; Kmon, P.; Koch, K.; Kochenda, L.; Koczoń, P.; König, W.; Kohn, M.; Kolb, B. W.; Kolosova, A.; Komkov, B.; Kopfer, J. M.; Korolev, M.; Korolko, I.; Kotte, R.; Kotynia, A.; Kovalchuk, A.; Kowalski, S.; Koziel, M.; Kozlov, G.; Kravtsov, P.; Krebs, E.; Kreidl, C.; Kresan, D.; Kretschmar, G.; Kretz, M.; Krieger, M.; Kryshen, E.; Kucewicz, W.; Kudin, L.; Kugler, A.; Kulakov, I.; Kunkel, J.; Kurepin, A.; Kurilkin, P.; Kushpil, V.; Kyva, V.; Ladygin, V.; Lara, C.; Larionov, P.; Laso Garcia, A.; Lavrik, E.; Lazanu, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lebedev, S.; Lebedeva, E.; Lehnert, J.; Lehrbach, J.; Lemke, F.; Li, Cheng; Li, Jin; Li, Qiyan; Li, Yuanjing; Li, Yulan; Lindenstruth, V.; Linev, S.; Linnik, B.; Litvinenko, E.; Liu, Feng; Lobanov, I.; Lobanova, E.; Löchner, S.; Loizeau, P.-A.; Lucio Martínez, J. A.; Lymanets, A.; Maevskaya, A.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Mahmoud, T.; Maj, P.; Majka, Z.; Malakhov, A.; Malankin, E.; Malkevich, D.; Malyatina, O.; Malygina, H.; Mandal, S.; Manko, V.; Manz, S.; Marin, V.; Marin Garcia, A. M.; Markert, J.; Masciocchi, S.; Matulewicz, T.; Merkin, M.; Mialkovski, V.; Michel, J.; Miftakhov, N.; Mikhailov, K.; Mikhaylov, V.; Milanović, B.; Militsija, V.; Mir, M. F.; Miskowiec, D.; Morhardt, T.; Müller, W. F. J.; Müntz, C.; Murin, Yu.; Najman, R.; Naumann, L.; Nayak, T.; Nedosekin, A.; Neumann, B.; Niebur, W.; Nikulin, V.; Normanov, D.; Nüssle, M.; Oancea, A.; Oh, Kunsu; Onishchuk, Y.; Osipov, D.; Ososkov, G.; Ossetski, D.; Otfinowski, P.; Ovcharenko, E.; Pal, S.; Panasenko, I.; Panda, N. R.; Parzhitskiy, S.; Pauly, C.; Peng, Haiping; Peric, I.; Peshekhonov, D.; Peshekhonov, V.; Petráček, V.; Petriş, M.; Petrovici, A.; Petrovici, M.; Petrovskiy, A.; Petukhov, O.; Piasecki, K.; Pieper, J.; Pietraszko, J.; Płaneta, R.; Plekhanov, E.; Plotnikov, V.; Plujko, V.; Pluta, J.; Poliakov, V.; Polozov, P.; Pop, A.; Popov, V.; Pospisil, V.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Pouryamout, J.; Poźniak, K.; Prakash, A.; Prokudin, M.; Pshenichnov, I.; Pugach, M.; Pugatch, V.; Querchfeld, S.; Radulescu, L.; Raha, S.; Raja, W.; Rami, F.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Raportirenko, A.; Rautenberg, J.; Rauza, J.; Ray, R.; Razin, S.; Reichelt, P.; Reinecke, S.; Reshetin, A.; Ristea, C.; Ristea, O.; Roether, F.; Romaniuk, R.; Rost, A.; Rostchin, E.; Rostovtseva, I.; Roy, A.; Rożynek, J.; Ryabov, Yu.; Rykalin, V.; Sadovsky, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Samanta, S.; Sambyal, S. S.; Samsonov, V.; Sánchez Rosado, J.; Sau, S.; Saveliev, V.; Schatral, S.; Schiaua, C.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schmidt, K.; Schweda, K.; Scurtu, A.; Seck, F.; Seddiki, S.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Semennikov, A.; Senger, A.; Senger, P.; Shabunov, A.; Shao, Ming; Sharma, M. K.; Shumeiko, N.; Shumikhin, V.; Sikora, B.; Simakov, A.; Simon, C.; Simons, C.; Singaraju, R. N.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singhal, V.; Siwek-Wilczyńska, K.; Škoda, L.; Skwira-Chalot, I.; Som, I.; Song, Jihye; Sorokin, I.; Sosin, Z.; Soyk, D.; Staszel, P.; Stavinskiy, A.; Stephan, E.; Storozhyk, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Strohauer, S.; Stroth, J.; Sturm, C.; Sultanov, R.; Sun, Yongjie; Svoboda, O.; Szczygieł, R.; Talukdar, R.; Tang, Zebo; Tanha, M.; Tarasiuk, J.; Tarassenkova, O.; Târzilă, M.-G.; Tiflov, V.; Tischler, T.; Tlustý, P.; Toia, A.; Tolyhi, T.; Topil'skaya, N.; Trageser, C.; Trivedy, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tsyupa, Yu.; Turowiecki, A.; Uhlig, F.; Usenko, E.; Valin, I.; Vasiliev, T.; Vassiliev, I.; Verbitskaya, E.; Verhoeven, W.; Veshikov, A.; Visinka, R.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Volkov, S.; Volkov, Yu.; Vorobiev, A.; Voronin, A.; Vovchenko, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Vznuzdaev, M.; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yaping; Yi, Wang; Wendisch, C.; Wessels, J. P.; Wiebusch, M.; Wiechula, J.; Wiedemann, B.; Wielanek, D.; Wieloch, A.; Winckler, N.; Winter, M.; Wiśniewski, K.; Wohlfeld, D.; Wolf, Gy.; Sanguk, Won; Wüstenfeld, J.; Xiang, Changzhou; Nu, Xu; Yi, Jun-Gyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yue, Qian; Yuldashev, B.; Yushmanov, I.; Zabołotny, W.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Zanevsky, Yu.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, Ya Peng; Zhang, Yifei; Zhou, Daicui; Zhu, Xianglei; Zinchenko, A.; Zipper, W.; Żoładź, M.; Zrelov, P.; Zryuev, V.; Zumbruch, P.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-11-01

    We acknowledge support by the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7) of the European Commission through projects AIDA, CRISP and HadronPhysics3; the Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung, Germany, through the grants 05P09PXFC5, 05P12PXFCE, 05P12RFFC7, 05P12RFFCM, 05P12RFFCP, 05P12RGFCG,05P12RGGHM, 05P12VHFCE, 05P12VHFCF, 05PRVHFC7, and 06HD9123I; the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Germany, grant GRK 1039; the Hessian Loewe Initiative through the Helmholtz International Center for FAIR (HIC4FAIR); the Helmholtz Graduate School HIRe; the Helmholtz Research School H-QM; the GSI Helmholzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung mbH, Germany, through F&E cooperations with Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen and Bergische Universität Wuppertal (WKAMPE1012); the Department of Science and Technology, Government of India; the Department of Atomic Energy, Government of India; the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Government of India; the University Grants Commission, Government of India; the Indo-FAIR Co-ordination Centre, Bose Institute, Kolkata, India; the Strategic Grants POSDRU/89/1.5/S/58852 and PN-II-ID-PCE-IDEI 34/05.10.2011, Romania; the NASR/CAPACITATI-Modul III, Romania, contract nr. 179EU; the NASR/NUCLEU Project PN09370103, Romania; the FAIR Russia Research Center (FRRC), Russia; and the Federal Agency for Atomic Research (Rosatom), Russia.

  7. Development of a transition radiation detector and reconstruction of photon conversions in the CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein-Boesing, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the development of a Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) for the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. In addition, the usage of the TRD in the measurement of direct photons is investigated. CBM will be a fixed-target heavy-ion experiment, which investigates collisions in the beam energy range of 5-35 AGeV and aims to investigate the regime of high baryon densities where the phase transition is expected to be of first order. It will be a multipurpose experiment with the ability to measure leptons, hadrons, and photons. Therein, a TRD will provide the electron identification and - together with a Silicon Tracking System (STS) - the tracking of charged particles. In conjunction with a ring imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector and a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement, the TRD is to provide a sufficient electron identification for the measurements of charmonium and low-mass vector mesons. For the TRD, the required pion suppression is a factor of about 100 at 90% electron efficiency, and the position resolution has to be of the order of 300 to 500 um. Moreover, the material budget in terms of radiation length has to be kept at a minimum in order to minimize multiple scattering and conversions which would limit the precise measurement in following TRD stations and other detectors. The largest and up to now unrivaled challenge for the TRD design is that both (PID and tracking) have to be fulfilled in the context of very high particle rates (event rates of up to 10MHz are envisaged) and at the same time large charged-particle multiplicities of up to 600 per event in the CBM detector acceptance. Small prototypes of the TRD based on multiwire proportional chambers (MWPC) with pad readout were developed and tested. The tracking performance and the electron-pion separation were determined for particle rates of up to 200 kHz/cm 2 . The TRD layout and the detector responses

  8. Development of a transition radiation detector and reconstruction of photon conversions in the CBM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein-Boesing, Melanie

    2009-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the development of a Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) for the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. In addition, the usage of the TRD in the measurement of direct photons is investigated. CBM will be a fixed-target heavy-ion experiment, which investigates collisions in the beam energy range of 5-35 AGeV and aims to investigate the regime of high baryon densities where the phase transition is expected to be of first order. It will be a multipurpose experiment with the ability to measure leptons, hadrons, and photons. Therein, a TRD will provide the electron identification and - together with a Silicon Tracking System (STS) - the tracking of charged particles. In conjunction with a ring imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector and a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement, the TRD is to provide a sufficient electron identification for the measurements of charmonium and low-mass vector mesons. For the TRD, the required pion suppression is a factor of about 100 at 90% electron efficiency, and the position resolution has to be of the order of 300 to 500 um. Moreover, the material budget in terms of radiation length has to be kept at a minimum in order to minimize multiple scattering and conversions which would limit the precise measurement in following TRD stations and other detectors. The largest and up to now unrivaled challenge for the TRD design is that both (PID and tracking) have to be fulfilled in the context of very high particle rates (event rates of up to 10MHz are envisaged) and at the same time large charged-particle multiplicities of up to 600 per event in the CBM detector acceptance. Small prototypes of the TRD based on multiwire proportional chambers (MWPC) with pad readout were developed and tested. The tracking performance and the electron-pion separation were determined for particle rates of up to 200 kHz/cm{sup 2}. The TRD layout and the detector

  9. Design and performance studies of the micro-vertex-detector for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amar-Youcef, Samir

    2012-01-01

    The CBM experiment is a fixed target experiment to be installed at the future accelerator facility at GSI/FAIR. It will investigate the properties of nuclear matter at extreme conditions and its underlying strong interaction. The research of the CBM experiment, which focuses on the regime of highest net-baryon densities and moderate temperatures, is complementary to this of the experiments at RHIC/BNL (STAR) and LHC/CERN (ALICE), which mainly focuses on the regime of high energy and zero net-baryon densities. The corresponding conditions in the CBM experiment can be produced in heavy-ion collisions at beam energies between 10 and 40 AGeV. Heavy particles, as e.g. charm carrying particles, could be sensitive to the properties of the medium in the early phase of the collision. However due to the short lifetime of open charm particles, they can only be reconstructed via their decay products and the corresponding track topology. Consequently in order to reconstruct the decay vertex with a high accuracy an ultrathin detector system with excellent spatial resolution is required. For the precise vertexing a microvertex detector (MVD) is envisaged, which has to be located directly behind the target and has to operate in the vacuum. Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) are the most promising candidates for the underlying sensor technology for the MVD of the CBM experiment. In the context of this thesis first attempts haven been initiated in order to integrate mechanically MAPS sensors into an ultra-thin detector dedicated to the CBM experiment. The mechanical integration necessarily needs to contain the MAPS sensors, electrical services and a support structure to cool and mount the sensors. As, apart from the intrinsic properties of the sensor, the support structures contribute notably to the specific functions and properties of the detector, particular care has to be taken during its development. Its implementation is not meant to push already the limits, rather it is

  10. Design and performance studies of the micro-vertex-detector for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amar-Youcef, Samir

    2012-04-12

    The CBM experiment is a fixed target experiment to be installed at the future accelerator facility at GSI/FAIR. It will investigate the properties of nuclear matter at extreme conditions and its underlying strong interaction. The research of the CBM experiment, which focuses on the regime of highest net-baryon densities and moderate temperatures, is complementary to this of the experiments at RHIC/BNL (STAR) and LHC/CERN (ALICE), which mainly focuses on the regime of high energy and zero net-baryon densities. The corresponding conditions in the CBM experiment can be produced in heavy-ion collisions at beam energies between 10 and 40 AGeV. Heavy particles, as e.g. charm carrying particles, could be sensitive to the properties of the medium in the early phase of the collision. However due to the short lifetime of open charm particles, they can only be reconstructed via their decay products and the corresponding track topology. Consequently in order to reconstruct the decay vertex with a high accuracy an ultrathin detector system with excellent spatial resolution is required. For the precise vertexing a microvertex detector (MVD) is envisaged, which has to be located directly behind the target and has to operate in the vacuum. Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) are the most promising candidates for the underlying sensor technology for the MVD of the CBM experiment. In the context of this thesis first attempts haven been initiated in order to integrate mechanically MAPS sensors into an ultra-thin detector dedicated to the CBM experiment. The mechanical integration necessarily needs to contain the MAPS sensors, electrical services and a support structure to cool and mount the sensors. As, apart from the intrinsic properties of the sensor, the support structures contribute notably to the specific functions and properties of the detector, particular care has to be taken during its development. Its implementation is not meant to push already the limits, rather it is

  11. Methane production from coal seams and CO2 uptake capability of the Mecsek mountain range, Hungary; Die Methangewinnung aus Kohlefloezen und das CO{sub 2}-Aufnahmevermoegen des Mecsek-Gebirges in Ungarn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, Z.N. [Univ. Miskolc (Hungary); Lakatos, I. [Forschungsinstitut der angewandten Chemie (Hungary); Foeldessy, J.; Toth, J.; Fodor, B.; Csecsei, T. [Ungarischer Geologischer Dienst, Rotaqua KFT (Hungary)

    2006-06-15

    Methane from the Mecsek mountain range coal seams is of vast economic importance. Modified geological models focusing on zones of enhanced permeability may be useful in the development of practicable winning technologies. High gas volumes are assumed in stowed material, which may be recovered by a simple technology. There is a power station in the vicinity which produces waste gases that may be used for injection, so the Mecsek region offers promising conditions for CO2 CBM production. The same power plant is also a potential consumer of the recovered methane. (orig.)

  12. Conceptual design of a cold methane moderator system for the European Spallation Source (ESS)

    CERN Document Server

    Barnert-Wiemer, H

    2002-01-01

    As part of the work for the target station of the planned European spallation source (ESS) the Central Department of Technology at the Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH is also concerned with the moderators, particular attention being given to the development of cold methane moderators. This report discusses the technical feasibility of solid methane moderators. Methods to tailor the neutron output by adding absorption materials (decouplers or poisons) are not considered here, neither are composite moderators. Based on the given target-moderator-reflector assembly of the ESS project a concept for the ESS cold methane moderators has been developed and is being examined at the Forschungszentrum Juelich. According to this moderator concept the moderator is a fixed bed of small spheres, which makes moderator container filling homogeneous and reproducible. Since spheres form a defined packed bed, cooling of the moderator bed by H sub 2 is reliable. The process of filling the moderator container and of removing the pe...

  13. Coalbed methane and tight gas no longer unconventional resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatens, M.

    2006-01-01

    Unconventional gas refers to natural gas contained in difficult-to-produce formations that require special drilling and completion techniques to achieve commercial production. It includes tight gas, coal seams, organic shales, and gas hydrates. Canada's vast unconventional gas resource is becoming an increasingly important part of the country's gas supply. The emergence of unconventional gas production in Canada over the past several years has made the unconventional increasingly conventional in terms of industry activity. It was suggested that in order to realize the potential for unconventional gas in Canada, all stakeholders should engage to ensure the development is environmentally responsible. Unconventional gas accounts for nearly one third of U.S. gas production. It also accounts for nearly 5 Bcf per day and growing. The impetus to this sudden growth has been the gradual and increasing contribution of tight sands and limes to Canadian production, which accounts for more than 4 Bcf per day. Coalbed methane (CBM) is at 0.5 Bcf per day and growing. In response to expectations that CBM will reach 2 to 3 Bcf per day over the next 2 decades, Canadian producers are placing more emphasis on unconventional resource plays, including organic shales and gas hydrates. As such, significant growth of unconventional gas is anticipated. This growth will be facilitated by the adoption of U.S..-developed technologies and new Canadian technologies. It was suggested that research and development will be key to unlocking the unconventional gas potential. It was also suggested that the already existing, strong regulatory structure should continue in order to accommodate this growth in a sustainable manner. figs

  14. Noise considerations in the development of coalbed methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGagne, D.C. [Noise Solutions Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada); Burke, D. [Energy Resources Conservation Board, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Since coalbed methane (CBM) development remains a secure option for meeting energy demands, industry will need to deal effectively with noise to reduce landowner concerns. This paper presented lessons learned and case histories for the successful approach to noise solutions accepted by regulatory agencies and industry clients. The complexities of acoustical engineering practices were discussed along with the most significant points to meeting regulatory requirements for environmental noise as stated in the Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERCB) Directive 038. The focus of the paper was on the management of environmental noise that will affect nearby residents. Noise is generally viewed as one of a number of general biological stressors. Although there is no health risk from short term exposure to noise, excessive exposure to noise might be considered a health risk as noise may contribute to the development of stress related conditions. Sleep disturbance is the most significant contributor to a stress response due to annoyance from industrial noise. This presentation demonstrated that environmental noise can be managed efficiently and in a cost effective manner. Noise control technology allows companies to meet nearly any level of noise control necessary to be in compliance with regulations. The following are commonly used in CBM operations: noise impact assessments; engine exhaust silencers; cooler silencers; acoustical buildings; building ventilation; and landscape friendly buildings. It was concluded that companies that invest in state of the art noise control combined with a stakeholder consultation program that respects the community's needs and concerns will be able to operate harmoniously with both regulators and community residents. 49 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  15. Modeling and simulation of CO methanation process for renewable electricity storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Er-rbib, Hanaâ; Bouallou, Chakib

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a new approach of converting renewable electricity into methane via syngas (a mixture of CO and H 2 ) and CO methanation is presented. Surplus of electricity is used to electrolyze H 2 O and CO 2 to H 2 and CO by using a SOEC (Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cell). Syngas produced is then converted into methane. When high consumption peaks appear, methane is used to produce electricity. The main conversion step in this process is CO methanation. A modeling of catalytic fixed bed methanation reactor and a design of methanation unit composed of multistage adiabatic reactors are carried out using Aspen plus™ software. The model was validated by comparing the simulated results of gas composition (CH 4 , CO, CO 2 and H 2 ) with industrial data. In addition, the effects of recycle ratio on adiabatic reactor stages, outlet temperature, and H 2 and CO conversions are carefully investigated. It is found that for storing 10 MW of renewable electricity, methanation unit is composed of three adiabatic reactors with recycle loop and intermediate cooling at 553 K and 1.5 MPa. The methanation unit generates 3778.6 kg/h of steam at 523.2 K and 1 MPa (13.67 MW). - Highlights: • A catalytic fixed bed reactor of CO methanation was modeled. • The maximum relative error of the methanation reactor model is 12%. • For 10 MW storage of renewable electricity, three adiabatic reactors are required. • The recycle ratio affects the reactor outlet temperature and CO conversion

  16. Coalbed methane: new frontier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, S.

    2003-02-01

    There are large numbers of stacked coal seams permeated with methane or natural gas in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin, and approximately 20 coalbed methane pilot projects are operating in the area, and brief descriptions of some of them were provided. Coalbed methane reserves have a long life cycle. A definition of coalbed methane can be a permeability challenged reservoir. It is not uncommon for coalbed methane wells to flow water for periods varying from 2 to 6 months after completion before the production of natural gas. A made-in-Canada technological solution is being developed by CDX Canada Inc., along with its American parent company. The techniques used by CDX are a marriage between coal mining techniques and oil and gas techniques. A brief description of coalification was provided. Nexen is participating in the production of gas from an Upper Mannville coal at 1 000-metres depth in a nine-well pilot project. The Alberta Foothills are considered prime exploration area since older coal is carried close to the surface by thrusting. CDX Canada uses cavitation completion in vertical wells. Cavitation consists in setting the casing above the coal seam and drilling ahead under balanced. The design of wells for coalbed methane gas is based on rock and fluid mechanics. Hydraulic fracturing completions is also used, as are tiltmeters. An enhanced coalbed methane recovery pilot project is being conducted by the Alberta Research Council at Fenn-Big Valley, located in central Alberta. It injects carbon dioxide, which shows great potential for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. 1 figs.

  17. In-beam test of the RPC architecture foreseen to be used for the CBM-TOF inner wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petriş, M.; Bartoş, D.; Petrovici, M.; Rădulescu, L.; Simion, V.; Deppner, I.; Herrmann, N.; Simon, C.; Frühauf, J.; Kiš, M.; Loizeau, P.-A.

    2018-05-01

    The Time Of Flight (TOF) subsystem is one of the main detectors of the CBM experiment. The TOF wall in conjunction with Silicon Tracking System (STS) is foreseen to identify charged hadrons, i.e. pions, kaons and protons, with a full azimuthal coverage at 2.50 - 250 polar angles. A system time resolution of at least 80 ps, including all contributions, such as electronics jitter and the resolution of the time reference system, is required. Such a performance should be maintained up to a counting rate larger than 30 kHz/cm2 at the most inner region of TOF wall. Our R&D activity has been focused on the development of two-dimensional position sensitive Multi-gap Resistive Plate Counter (MRPC) prototypes for the forward region of the CBM-TOF subdetector, the most demanding zone in terms of granularity and counting rate. The in-beam tests using secondary particles produced in 30 GeV/u Pb ion collisions on a Pb target at SPS - CERN aimed to test the performance of these prototypes in conditions similar to the ones expected at SIS100 at FAIR. The performance of the prototypes is studied in conditions of exposure of the whole active area of the chamber to high multiplicity of reaction products. The results show that this type of MRPC fulfill the challenging requirements of the CBM-TOF wall. Therefore, such an architecture is recommended as basic solution for CBM-TOF inner zone.

  18. The Development and Scaling of the easyCBM CCSS Middle School Mathematics Measures. Technical Report #1207

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daniel; Irvin, P. Shawn; Patarapichayatham, Chalie; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In the following technical report, we describe the development and scaling of the easyCBM CCSS middle school mathematics measures, designed for use within a response to intervention framework. All items were developed in collaboration with experienced middle school mathematics teachers and were written to align with the Common Core State…

  19. Experimental evaluation of methane dry reforming process on a membrane reactor to hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Fabiano S.A.; Benachour, Mohand; Abreu, Cesar A.M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. of Chemical Engineering], Email: f.aruda@yahoo.com.br

    2010-07-01

    In a fixed bed membrane reactor evaluations of methane-carbon dioxide reforming over a Ni/{gamma}- Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst were performed at 773 K, 823 K and 873 K. A to convert natural gas into syngas a fixed-bed reactor associate with a selective membrane was employed, where the operating procedures allowed to shift the chemical equilibrium of the reaction in the direction of the products of the process. Operations under hydrogen permeation, at 873 K, promoted the increase of methane conversion, circa 83%, and doubled the yield of hydrogen production, when compared with operations where no hydrogen permeation occurred. (author)

  20. Cyclic process for producing methane from carbon monoxide with heat removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Albert C.; Yang, Chang-lee

    1982-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are converted to methane by a cyclic, essentially two-step process in which said carbon monoxide is disproportionated to form carbon dioxide and active surface carbon deposited on the surface of a catalyst, and said carbon is reacted with steam to form product methane and by-product carbon dioxide. The exothermic heat of reaction generated in each step is effectively removed during each complete cycle so as to avoid a build up of heat from cycle-to-cycle, with particularly advantageous techniques being employed for fixed bed, tubular and fluidized bed reactor operations.

  1. Cyclic process for producing methane in a tubular reactor with effective heat removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Albert C.; Yang, Chang-Lee

    1986-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are converted to methane by a cyclic, essentially two-step process in which said carbon monoxide is disproportionated to form carbon dioxide and active surface carbon deposited on the surface of a catalyst, and said carbon is reacted with steam to form product methane and by-product carbon dioxide. The exothermic heat of reaction generated in each step is effectively removed during each complete cycle so as to avoid a build up of heat from cycle-to-cycle, with particularly advantageous techniques being employed for fixed bed, tubular and fluidized bed reactor operations.

  2. Volatiles combustion in fluidized beds. Technical progress report, 4 March 1993--3 June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesketh, R.P.

    1993-09-01

    The goal of this project is to investigate the conditions in which volatiles will burn within both the dense and freeboard regions of fluidized beds. Experiments using a fluidized bed operated at incipient fluidization will be performed to characterize the effect of particle surface area, initial fuel concentration, and particle type on the inhibition of volatiles within a fluidized bed. The work conducted during the period 4 March, 1993 through 3 June, 1993 is reported in this technical progress report. The work during this time period consists primarily of the startup and trouble shooting of the fluidized bed reactor and gas phase modeling of methane and propane.

  3. Methane of the coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasquez, H.

    1997-01-01

    In the transformation process of the vegetable material to the coal (Carbonization), the products that are generated include CH 4, CO2, N2 and H2. The methane is generated by two mechanisms: below 50 centigrade degree, as product of microbial decomposition, the methanogenic is generated; and above 50 centigrade degree, due to the effects of the buried and increase of the range of the coal, the thermogenic methane is detachment, as a result of the catagenic. The generated methane is stored in the internal surfaces of the coal, macro and micro pores and in the natural fractures. The presence of accumulations of gas of the coal has been known in the entire world by many years, but only as something undesirable for its danger in the mining exploitation of the coal

  4. Catalytic aromatization of methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, James J; Hutchings, Graham

    2014-02-07

    Recent developments in natural gas production technology have led to lower prices for methane and renewed interest in converting methane to higher value products. Processes such as those based on syngas from methane reforming are being investigated. Another option is methane aromatization, which produces benzene and hydrogen: 6CH4(g) → C6H6(g) + 9H2(g) ΔG°(r) = +433 kJ mol(-1) ΔH°(r) = +531 kJ mol(-1). Thermodynamic calculations for this reaction show that benzene formation is insignificant below ∼600 °C, and that the formation of solid carbon [C(s)] is thermodynamically favored at temperatures above ∼300 °C. Benzene formation is insignificant at all temperatures up to 1000 °C when C(s) is included in the calculation of equilibrium composition. Interestingly, the thermodynamic limitation on benzene formation can be minimized by the addition of alkanes/alkenes to the methane feed. By far the most widely studied catalysts for this reaction are Mo/HZSM-5 and Mo/MCM-22. Benzene selectivities are generally between 60 and 80% at methane conversions of ∼10%, corresponding to net benzene yields of less than 10%. Major byproducts include lower molecular weight hydrocarbons and higher molecular weight substituted aromatics. However, carbon formation is inevitable, but the experimental findings show this can be kinetically limited by the use of H2 or oxidants in the feed, including CO2 or steam. A number of reactor configurations involving regeneration of the carbon-containing catalyst have been developed with the goal of minimizing the cost of regeneration of the catalyst once deactivated by carbon deposition. In this tutorial review we discuss the thermodynamics of this process, the catalysts used and the potential reactor configurations that can be applied.

  5. Direct Activation Of Methane

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie

    2013-07-15

    Heteropolyacids (HPAs) can activate methane at ambient temperature (e.g., 20.degree. C.) and atmospheric pressure, and transform methane to acetic acid, in the absence of any noble metal such as Pd). The HPAs can be, for example, those with Keggin structure: H.sub.4SiW.sub.12O.sub.40, H.sub.3PW.sub.12O.sub.40, H.sub.4SiMo.sub.12O.sub.40, or H.sub.3PMo.sub.12O.sub.40, can be when supported on silica.

  6. Methanization - Technical sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastide, Guillaume

    2015-02-01

    This document explains fundamentals of methanization such as biological reactions and conditions suitable for biogas production (temperature, pH, anaerobic medium, and so on). It also proposes an overview of available techniques, of the present regulation, of environmental impacts, and of costs and profitability of methanization installations. Examples of installations are provided, as well as a set of questions and answers. Perspectives of development are finally discussed in terms of sector development potential, of regulatory evolution, of new perspectives for gas valorisation, of need of acquisition of reference data due to the relatively low number of existing installations, and of research and development

  7. Australian methane fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Estimates are provided for the amount of methane emitted annually into the atmosphere in Australia for a variety of sources. The sources considered are coal mining, landfill, motor vehicles, natural gas suply system, rice paddies, bushfires, termites, wetland and animals. This assessment indicates that the major sources of methane are natural or agricultural in nature and therefore offer little scope for reduction. Nevertheless the remainder are not trival and reduction of these fluxes could play a significant part in any Australian action on the greenhouse problem. 19 refs., 7 tabs., 1 fig

  8. A viable on-chip FPGA configuration memory scrubbing approach for CBM-ToF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oancea, Andrei-Dumitru; Stuellein, Christian; Manz, Sebastian; Gebelein, Jano; Kebschull, Udo [Infrastruktur und Rechnersysteme in der Informationsverarbeitung (IRI), Goethe-Universitaet, Senckenberganlage 31, 60325 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The ToF Detector of the CBM Experiment will be equipped with FPGA-based read-out boards (ROBs). These ROBs will be operated in a radiation environment, and therefore need a mitigation mechanism against soft errors in the SRAM-based configuration memories of the FPGAs. The proposed approach combines intrinsic on-chip single upset correction with extrinsic selective frame scrubbing for multiple-bit upsets. The slow control is realized using the GBT-SCA, which is capable of handling interrupts. This enables the new approach of event-driven configuration frame correction. While conventional blind scrubbing leads to a continuous load on the control path, the selective frame scrubbing reduces this load to a minimum. For verification purposes, radiation tests with a proton beam were performed at COSY, Juelich. The occurred soft errors were classified into single and multiple- bit upsets, enabling an estimation of the rate at which extrinsic intervention is necessary.

  9. Optical quality assurance procedures for the sensors of CBM STS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrik, Evgeny [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR aims to study the properties of nuclear matter at high net-baryon densities. The Silicon Tracking System (STS) is the key detector to reconstruct charged particle tracks created in heavy-ion interactions. In order to assure the quality of about 1300 silicon sensors, highly efficient and highly automated procedures need to be developed. In this contribution we report on a microscope camera based optical inspection system, used to scan along the individual sensors to recognize and classify sensor defects. Examples of these defects are: photo-resist residues, top metallization layer lithography defects, surface scratches. In order to separate and classify these defects various image-processing algorithms are used, including: pattern recognition, object classification etc.

  10. Study of low-mass readout cables for the CBM Silicon Tracking System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singla, Minni [Goethe Univ. Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The study of thin multi-line readout cables will be reported. The application is the Silicon Tracking System (STS) of the fixed-target heavy-ion experiment Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM), under design at the forthcoming accelerator centre FAIR in Germany. These cables will bridge the distance between the microstrip sensors and the signal processing electronics placed at the periphery of the silicon tracking stations. Finite element simulations (using the TCAD package RAPHAEL) have been used to optimize the cables towards minimum possible Equivalent Noise Charge (ENC). Various trace geometries and trace materials have been explored. SPICE modelling has been implemented in Sentaurus Device to study the transmission loss in the cables. The simulations have been validated with measurements. Charge loss in cables of different lengths was determined by injecting charge pulses of known amplitude. An optimized cable design is reported yielding minimum ENC, material budget and transmission loss.

  11. Electron/pion identification in the CBM TRD using a multilayer perceptron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akishina, E.P.; Akishina, T.P.; Ivanov, V.V.; Maevskaya, A.I.; Afanas'ev, O.A.

    2008-01-01

    The problem of electron/pion identification in the CBM experiment based on the measurements of energy losses and transition radiation in the TRD detector is discussed. A possibility to solve such a problem by applying an artificial neural network (ANN) is considered. As input information for the network we used both the samples of energy losses of pions or electrons in the TRD absorbers and the 'clever' variable obtained on the basis of the original data. We show that usage of this new variable permits one to reach a reliable level of particle recognition no longer than after 10-20 training epochs; there are practically no fluctuations against the trend, and the needed level of pions suppression is obtained under the condition of a minimal loss of electrons

  12. Operation of a steam hydro-gasifier in a fluidized bed reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Chan Seung; Norbeck, Joseph N.

    2008-01-01

    Carbonaceous material, which can comprise municipal waste, biomass, wood, coal, or a natural or synthetic polymer, is converted to a stream of methane and carbon monoxide rich gas by heating the carbonaceous material in a fluidized bed reactor using hydrogen, as fluidizing medium, and using steam, under reducing conditions at a temperature and pressure sufficient to generate a stream of methane and carbon monoxide rich gas but at a temperature low enough and/or at a pressure high enough to en...

  13. Microbial diversity of western Canadian subsurface coal beds and methanogenic coal enrichment cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, Tara J.; Foght, Julia M. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Budwill, Karen [Carbon and Energy Management, Alberta Innovates-Technology Futures, 250 Karl Clark Road, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2010-05-01

    Coalbed methane is an unconventional fuel source associated with certain coal seams. Biogenic methane can comprise a significant portion of the gas found in coal seams, yet the role of microbes in methanogenesis in situ is uncertain. The purpose of this study was to detect and identify major bacterial and archaeal species associated with coal sampled from sub-bituminous methane-producing coal beds in western Canada, and to examine the potential for methane biogenesis from coal. Enrichment cultures of coal samples were established to determine how nutrient amendment influenced the microbial community and methane production in the laboratory. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed using DNA extracted and amplified from uncultured coal samples and from methanogenic coal enrichment cultures. Libraries were screened using restriction fragment length polymorphism, and representative clones were sequenced. Most (> 50%) of the bacterial sequences amplified from uncultured coal samples were affiliated with Proteobacteria that exhibit nitrate reduction, nitrogen fixation and/or hydrogen utilization activities, including Pseudomonas, Thauera and Acidovorax spp., whereas enrichment cultures were dominated by Bacteroidetes, Clostridia and/or Lactobacillales. Archaeal 16S rRNA genes could not be amplified from uncultured coal, suggesting that methanogens are present in coal below the detection levels of our methods. However, enrichment cultures established with coal inocula produced significant volumes of methane and the archaeal clone libraries were dominated by sequences closely affiliated with Methanosarcina spp. Enrichment cultures incubated with coal plus organic nutrients produced more methane than either nutrient or coal supplements alone, implying that competent methanogenic consortia exist in coal beds but that nutrient limitations restrict their activity in situ. This report adds to the scant literature on coal bed microbiology and suggests how microbes may be

  14. Lagrangian Approach to Study Catalytic Fluidized Bed Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madi, Hossein; Hossein Madi Team; Marcelo Kaufman Rechulski Collaboration; Christian Ludwig Collaboration; Tilman Schildhauer Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Lagrangian approach of fluidized bed reactors is a method, which simulates the movement of catalyst particles (caused by the fluidization) by changing the gas composition around them. Application of such an investigation is in the analysis of the state of catalysts and surface reactions under quasi-operando conditions. The hydrodynamics of catalyst particles within a fluidized bed reactor was studied to improve a Lagrangian approach. A fluidized bed methanation employed in the production of Synthetic Natural Gas from wood was chosen as the case study. The Lagrangian perspective was modified and improved to include different particle circulation patterns, which were investigated through this study. Experiments were designed to evaluate the concepts of the model. The results indicate that the setup is able to perform the designed experiments and a good agreement between the simulation and the experimental results were observed. It has been shown that fluidized bed reactors, as opposed to fixed beds, can be used to avoid the deactivation of the methanation catalyst due to carbon deposits. Carbon deposition on the catalysts tested with the Lagrangian approach was investigated by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) analysis of ex-situ catalyst samples. This investigation was done to identify the effects of particles velocity and their circulation patterns on the amount and type of deposited carbon on the catalyst surface. Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne(EPFL), Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI)

  15. Clock and trigger distribution for CBM-TOF quality evaluation of RPC super module detector assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.; Huang, X.; Cao, P.; Wang, J.; An, Q.

    2018-03-01

    RPC Super module (SM) detector assemblies are used for charged hadron identification in the Time-of-Flight (TOF) spectrometer at the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment. Each SM contains several multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPCs) and provides up to 320 electronic channels in total for high-precision time measurements. Time resolution of the Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) is required to be better than 20 ps. During mass production, the quality of each SM needs to be evaluated. In order to meet the requirements, the system clock signal as well as the trigger signal should be distributed precisely and synchronously to all electronics modules within the evaluation readout system. In this paper, a hierarchical clock and trigger distribution method is proposed for the quality evaluation of CBM-TOF SM detectors. In a first stage, the master clock and trigger module (CTM) allocated in a 6U PXI chassis distributes the clock and trigger signals to the slave CTM in the same chassis. In a second stage, the slave CTM transmits the clock and trigger signals to the TDC readout module (TRM) through one optical link. In a third stage, the TRM distributes the clock and trigger signals synchronously to 10 individual TDC boards. Laboratory test results show that the clock jitter at the third stage is less than 4 ps (RMS) and the trigger transmission latency from the master CTM to the TDC is about 272 ns with 11 ps (RMS) jitter. The overall performance complies well with the required specifications.

  16. Fluid-bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G.; Schoebotham, N.

    1981-02-01

    In Energy Equipment Company's two-stage fluidized bed system, partial combustion in a fluidized bed is followed by burn-off of the generated gases above the bed. The system can be retrofitted to existing boilers, and can burn small, high ash coal efficiently. It has advantages when used as a hot gas generator for process drying. Tests on a boiler at a Cadbury Schweppes plant are reported.

  17. Fluidised bed combustion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    Fluidized bed combustion systems that facilitates the maintenance of the depth of the bed are described. A discharge pipe projects upwardly into the bed so that bed material can flow into its upper end and escape downwardly. The end of the pipe is surrounded by an enclosure and air is discharged into the enclosure so that material will enter the pipe from within the enclosure and have been cooled in the enclosure by the air discharged into it. The walls of the enclosure may themselves be cooled

  18. Treatment of Simulated Coalbed Methane Produced Water Using Direct Contact Membrane Distillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Wan Cho

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Expolitation of coalbed methane (CBM involves production of a massive amount saline water that needs to be properly managed for environmental protection. In this study, direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD was utilized for treatment of CBM-produced water to remove saline components in the water. Simulated CBM waters containing varying concentrations of NaCl (1, 20, and 500 mM and NaHCO3 (1 and 25 mM were used as feed solutions under two transmembrane temperatures (Δ40 and 60 °C. In short-term distillation (~360 min, DCMD systems showed good performance with nearly 100% removal of salts for all solutes concentrations at both temperatures. The permeate flux increased with the feed temperature, but at a given temperature, it remained fairly stable throughout the whole operation. A gradual decline in permeate flux was observed at Δ60 °C at high NaHCO3 concentration (25 mM. In long-term distillation (5400 min, the presence of 25 mM NaHCO3 further decreased the flux to 25%–35% of the initial value toward the end of the operation, likely due to membrane fouling by deposition of Ca-carbonate minerals on the pore openings. Furthermore, pore wetting by the scalants occurred at the end of the experiment, and it increased the distillate conducitivity to 110 µS·cm−1. The precipitates formed on the surface were dominantly CaCO3 crystals, identified as aragonite.

  19. Permafrost slowly exhales methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Elizabeth M.

    2018-04-01

    Permafrost soils store vast quantities of organic matter that are vulnerable to decomposition under a warming climate. Recent research finds that methane release from thawing permafrost may outpace carbon dioxide as a major contributor to global warming over the next century.

  20. Methane pellet moderator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, C.A.; Schechter, D.E.; Carpenter, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    A methane pellet moderator assembly consisting of a pelletizer, a helium cooled sub-cooling tunnel, a liquid helium cooled cryogenic pellet storage hopper and a 1.5L moderator cell has been constructed for the purpose demonstrating a system for use in high-power spallation sources. (orig.)

  1. Methane emissions from grasslands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol - van Dasselaar, van den A.

    1998-01-01

    Introduction

    Methane (CH 4 ) is an important greenhouse gas. The concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has been increasing since pre-industrial times, mainly due to human activities. This increase gives concern,

  2. Direct Aromaization of Methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Marcelin

    1997-01-15

    The thermal decomposition of methane offers significant potential as a means of producing higher unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons when the extent of reaction is limited. Work in the literature previous to this project had shown that cooling the product and reacting gases as the reaction proceeds would significantly reduce or eliminate the formation of solid carbon or heavier (Clo+) materials. This project studied the effect and optimization of the quenching process as a means of increasing the amount of value added products during the pyrolysis of methane. A reactor was designed to rapidly quench the free-radical combustion reaction so as to maximize the yield of aromatics. The use of free-radical generators and catalysts were studied as a means of lowering the reaction temperature. A lower reaction temperature would have the benefits of more rapid quenching as well as a more feasible commercial process due to savings realized in energy and material of construction costs. It was the goal of the project to identify promising routes from methane to higher hydrocarbons based on the pyrolysis of methane.

  3. Methane emissions from natural wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, J.L. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States); Burke, R.A. Jr. [Environmental Protection Agency, Athens, GA (United States). Environmental Research Lab.

    1993-09-01

    Analyses of air trapped in polar ice cores in conjunction with recent atmospheric measurements, indicate that the atmospheric methane concentration increased by about 250% during the past two or three hundred years (Rasmussen and Khalil, 1984). Because methane is a potent ``greenhouse`` gas, the increasing concentrations are expected to contribute to global warning (Dickinson and Cicerone, 1986). The timing of the methane increase suggests that it is related to the rapid growth of the human population and associated industrialization and agricultural development. The specific causes of the atmospheric methane concentration increase are not well known, but may relate to either increases in methane sources, decreases in the strengths of the sinks, or both.

  4. Fluidized bed anaerobic biodegration of food industry wastewaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toldra, F.; Flors, A.; Lequerica, J.L.; Valles, S.

    1987-01-01

    Anaerobic fluidized bed reactors were used to reduce the COD of low-strength food industry wastewaters. Soluble organic removal efficiencies of 75%, 80% and 50% were obtained for hog slaughterhouse, dairy and brewery wastewaters, respectively, at 35 degrees C and 8 hours hydraulic retention time. Removal efficiencies decreased with decreasing temperature (35 degrees C to 20 degrees C); no detrimental effect of temperature was observed when treating the slaughterhouse wastewater. Methane production rate was only relevant on brewery wastewater treatment. (Refs. 17).

  5. An advanced cold moderator using solid methane pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, C.A.; Carpenter, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports developments of the pellet formation and transport technologies required for producing a liquid helium or hydrogen cooled methane pellet moderator. The Phase I US DOE SBIR project, already completed, demonstrated the production of 3 mm transparent pellets of frozen methane and ammonia and transport of the pellets into a 40 cc observation cell cooled with liquid helium. The methane pellets, formed at 72 K, stuck together during the loading of the cell. Ammonia pellets did not stick and fell readily under vibration into a packed bed with a 60% fill fraction. A 60% fill fraction should produce a very significant increase in long-wavelength neutron production and advantages in shorter pulse widths as compared to a liquid hydrogen moderator. The work also demonstrated a method of rapidly changing the pellets in the moderator cell. The Phase II project, just now underway, will develop a full-scale pellet source and transport system with a 1.5 L 'moderator' cell. The Phase II effort will also produce an apparatus to sub-cool the methane pellets to below 20 K, which should prevent the methane pellets from sticking together. In addition to results of the phase I experiments, the presentation includes a short video of the pellets, and a description of plans for the Phase II project. (author)

  6. Fluidized bed incinerator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, D.L.; Johnson, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    A fluidized bed incinerator is being developed for burning rad contaminated solid and liquid waste materials. In situ neutralization of acid gases by the bed material, catalytic afterburning, and gas filtration are used to produce a clean flue gas without the use of aqueous scrubbing

  7. Making effective use of rod pumping systems in coalbed methane applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crivello, A. [eProduction Solutions Inc., Kingwood, TX (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The advantages of optimizing coalbed methane (CBM) operations are increased production, reduced expenses, improved efficiency, and better inventory. The author discussed the CBM production cycle and the possible artificial lift options, including electric submersible pump (ESP), plunger lift, primary coolant pump (PCP), and reciprocating rod lift. The presentation focused on the rod lift, as it represents a low to moderate capital expenditure, has good system efficiency, an excellent fluid volume range, an excellent salvage value, excellent familiarity with equipment, and has readily available parts and service. The major disadvantage of the rod lift is that the fixed operating range does not adapt to changing reservoir characteristics. A comparison between the rod pump controller and the variable speed drive was presented. The well can be operated at or near the pumped off condition with variable speed drives with rod pumping intelligence. The author provided a closer examination of the variable frequency drive and the vector flux drive. The presentation also included a discussion of prime movers, drive and inclinometer, gearbox loading, rod load limiter, and dynamometer cards. Three case studies were presented: CSW1, CSW2, and CSW3. It was concluded that wells must be kept pumping, and that a Flux Vector Drive should be used along with an NEMA B motor and properly sized pumping unit and pump. tabs., figs.

  8. U.S. Geological Survey and Bureau of Land Management Cooperative Coalbed Methane Project in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Evidence that earthquakes threaten the Mississippi, Ohio, and Wabash River valleys of the Central United States abounds. In fact, several of the largest historical earthquakes to strike the continental United States occurred in the winter of 1811-1812 along the New Madrid seismic zone, which stretches from just west of Memphis, Tenn., into southern Illinois (fig. 1). Several times in the past century, moderate earthquakes have been widely felt in the Wabash Valley seismic zone along the southern border of Illinois and Indiana (fig. 1). Throughout the region, between 150 and 200 earthquakes are recorded annually by a network of monitoring instruments, although most are too small to be felt by people. Geologic evidence for prehistoric earthquakes throughout the region has been mounting since the late 1970s. But how significant is the threat? How likely are large earthquakes and, more importantly, what is the chance that the shaking they cause will be damaging?The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Wyoming Reservoir Management Group and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a cooperative project in 1999 to collect technical and analytical data on coalbed methane (CBM) resources and quality of the water produced from coalbeds in the Wyoming part of the Powder River Basin. The agencies have complementary but divergent goals and these kinds of data are essential to accomplish their respective resource evaluation and management tasks. The project also addresses the general public need for information pertaining to Powder River Basin CBM resources and development. BLM needs, which relate primarily to the management of CBM resources, include improved gas content and gas in-place estimates for reservoir characterization and resource/reserve assessment, evaluation, and utilization. USGS goals include a basinwide assessment of CBM resources, an improved understanding of the nature and origin of coalbed gases and formation waters, and the development of predictive

  9. Integration of the Shuttle RMS/CBM Positioning Virtual Environment Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    Constructing the International Space Station, or other structures, in space presents a number of problems. In particular, payload restrictions for the Space Shuttle and other launch mechanisms prohibit assembly of large space-based structures on Earth. Instead, a number of smaller modules must be boosted into orbit separately and then assembled to form the final structure. The assembly process is difficult, as docking interfaces such as Common Berthing Mechanisms (CBMS) must be precisely positioned relative to each other to be within the "capture envelope" (approximately +/- 1 inch and +/- 0.3 degrees from the nominal position) and attach properly. In the case of the Space Station, the docking mechanisms are to be positioned robotically by an astronaut using the 55-foot-long Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robot arm. Unfortunately, direct visual or video observation of the placement process is difficult or impossible in many scenarios. One method that has been tested for aligning the CBMs uses a boresighted camera mounted on one CBM to view a standard target on the opposing CBM. While this method might be sufficient to achieve proper positioning with considerable effort, it does not provide a high level of confidence that the mechanisms have been placed within capture range of each other. It also does nothing to address the risk of inadvertent contact between the CBMS, which could result in RMS control software errors. In general, constraining the operator to a single viewpoint with few, if any, depth cues makes the task much more difficult than it would be if the target could be viewed in three-dimensional space from various viewpoints. The actual work area could be viewed by an astronaut during EVA; however, it would be extremely impractical to have an astronaut control the RMS while spacewalking. On the other hand, a view of the RMS and CBMs to be positioned in a virtual environment aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter or Space Station could provide similar benefits

  10. A readout system for the micro-vertex-detector demonstrator for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrader, Christoph

    2011-06-09

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter Experiment (CBM) is a fixed target heavy ion experiment currently in preparation at the future FAIR accelerator complex in Darmstadt. The CBM experiment focuses on the measurements of diagnostic probes of the early and dense phase of the fireball at beam energies from 8 up to 45 AGeV. As observables, rare hadronic, leptonic and photonic probes are used, including open charm. Open charm will be identified by reconstructing the secondary decay vertex of the corresponding short lived particles. As the central component for track reconstruction, a detector system based on silicon semiconductor detectors is planned. The first three stations of the Silicon Tracking System (STS) make up the so-called Micro-Vertex-Detector (MVD) operating in moderate vacuum. Because of the well-balanced compromise between an excellent spatial resolution (few {mu}m), low material budget ({proportional_to}50 {mu}m Si), adequate radiation tolerance and readout speed, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) based on CMOS technology are more suited than any other technology for the reconstruction of the secondary vertex in CBM. A new detector concept has to be developed. Two MVD-Demonstrator modules have been successfully tested with 120 GeV pions at the CERN-SPS. The main topic of this thesis is the development of a control and readout concept of several MVD-Demonstrator modules with a common data acquisition system. In order to achieve the required results a front-end electronics device has been developed which is capable of reading the analogue signals of two sensors on a ex-print cable. The high data rate of the MAPS sensors (1.2 Gbit per second and sensor by 50 MHz and 12 bit ADC resolution) requires a readout system which processes the data on-line in a pipeline to avoid dead times. In order to implement the pipeline processing an FPGA is used, which is located on an additional hardware platform. In order to integrate the MVD-Demonstrator readout board in the

  11. A readout system for the micro-vertex-detector demonstrator for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrader, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter Experiment (CBM) is a fixed target heavy ion experiment currently in preparation at the future FAIR accelerator complex in Darmstadt. The CBM experiment focuses on the measurements of diagnostic probes of the early and dense phase of the fireball at beam energies from 8 up to 45 AGeV. As observables, rare hadronic, leptonic and photonic probes are used, including open charm. Open charm will be identified by reconstructing the secondary decay vertex of the corresponding short lived particles. As the central component for track reconstruction, a detector system based on silicon semiconductor detectors is planned. The first three stations of the Silicon Tracking System (STS) make up the so-called Micro-Vertex-Detector (MVD) operating in moderate vacuum. Because of the well-balanced compromise between an excellent spatial resolution (few μm), low material budget (∝50 μm Si), adequate radiation tolerance and readout speed, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) based on CMOS technology are more suited than any other technology for the reconstruction of the secondary vertex in CBM. A new detector concept has to be developed. Two MVD-Demonstrator modules have been successfully tested with 120 GeV pions at the CERN-SPS. The main topic of this thesis is the development of a control and readout concept of several MVD-Demonstrator modules with a common data acquisition system. In order to achieve the required results a front-end electronics device has been developed which is capable of reading the analogue signals of two sensors on a ex-print cable. The high data rate of the MAPS sensors (1.2 Gbit per second and sensor by 50 MHz and 12 bit ADC resolution) requires a readout system which processes the data on-line in a pipeline to avoid dead times. In order to implement the pipeline processing an FPGA is used, which is located on an additional hardware platform. In order to integrate the MVD-Demonstrator readout board in the HADES data

  12. Methane cycling. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David T; Gruen, Danielle S; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C; Holden, James F; Hristov, Alexander N; Pohlman, John W; Morrill, Penny L; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B; Reeves, Eoghan P; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N; Ritter, Daniel J; Seewald, Jeffrey S; McIntosh, Jennifer C; Hemond, Harold F; Kubo, Michael D; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-04-24

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle, with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply substituted "clumped" isotopologues (for example, (13)CH3D) has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures. However, the effect of biological processes on methane's clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on (13)CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation-temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Methane from dairy waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-10-22

    This short article describes a facility which will incorporate features to allow for the recovery of the methane gas that is produced in the manufacture of cheese and spray-dried whey powder at the site. The dairy plant is expected to produce about 1,385 m/sup 3//day of methane which will supplement the operation of oil burners and replace the annual consumption of 4,000 bbl of heavy fuel oil. In addition, development of the treatment system would eliminate the consumption of 7,200 kWh/day of electrical energy that would otherwise be required to operate an aerobic disposal system. Total annual energy savings, when the project is fully operational in the spring of 1984, are expected to reach $321,000.

  14. Methanation: reality or fiction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The author discusses whether it is possible to partly replace oil and natural gas by electricity-based gas, i.e. to produce methane from water by electrolysis, or by using molecule cracking in dedicated nuclear reactors, and carbon dioxide. He outlines the benefits of this perspective in terms of reduction of imports, and of national electricity production optimisation. He also discusses the drawbacks: it will be difficult to produce the huge required quantity of CO 2 ; it will be even more difficult to produce the required quantity of electricity; the e-methane production cost is much higher than that of the currently imported natural gas. In appendix, the author discusses some key figures related to energy in France (consumption, shares, imports, crucial role of nuclear energy for the future)

  15. High temperature energy storage performances of methane reforming with carbon dioxide in a tubular packed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Jianfeng; Chen, Yuan; Ding, Jing; Wang, Weilong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy storage of methane reforming in a tubular packed reactor is investigated. • Thermochemical storage efficiency approaches maximum at optimal temperature. • Sensible heat and heat loss play important roles in the energy storage system. • The reaction and energy storage models of methane reforming reactor are established. • The simulated methane conversion and energy storage efficiency fit with experiments. - Abstract: High temperature heat transfer and energy storage performances of methane reforming with carbon dioxide in tubular packed reactor are investigated under different operating conditions. Experimental results show that the methane reforming in tubular packed reactor can efficiently store high temperature thermal energy, and the sensible heat and heat loss besides thermochemical energy storage play important role in the total energy storage process. When the operating temperature is increased, the thermochemical storage efficiency first increases for methane conversion rising and then decreases for heat loss rising. As the operating temperate is 800 °C, the methane conversion is 79.6%, and the thermochemical storage efficiency and total energy efficiency can be higher than 47% and 70%. According to the experimental system, the flow and reaction model of methane reforming is established using the laminar finite-rate model and Arrhenius expression, and the simulated methane conversion and energy storage efficiency fit with experimental data. Along the flow direction, the fluid temperature in the catalyst bed first decreases because of the endothermic reaction and then increases for the heat transfer from reactor wall. As a conclusion, the maximum thermochemical storage efficiency will be obtained under optimal operating temperature and optimal flow rate, and the total energy efficiency can be increased by the increase of bed conductivity and decrease of heat loss coefficient.

  16. Project identification for methane reduction options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses efforts directed at reduction in emission of methane to the atmosphere. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, which on a 20 year timeframe may present a similar problem to carbon dioxide. In addition, methane causes additional problems in the form of smog and its longer atmospheric lifetime. The author discusses strategies for reducing methane emission from several major sources. This includes landfill methane recovery, coalbed methane recovery, livestock methane reduction - in the form of ruminant methane reduction and manure methane recovery. The author presents examples of projects which have implemented these ideas, the economics of the projects, and additional gains which come from the projects.

  17. Conception and design of a control and monitoring system for the mirror alignment of the CBM RICH detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Akishin, P.; Becker, K.-H.; Belogurov, S.; Bendarouach, J.; Boldyreva, N.; Deveaux, C.; Dobyrn, V.; Dürr, M.; Eschke, J.; Förtsch, J.; Heep, J.; Höhne, C.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kochenda, L.; Kopfer, J.; Kravtsov, P.; Kres, I.; Lebedev, S.; Lebedeva, E.; Leonova, E.; Linev, S.; Mahmoud, T.; Michel, J.; Miftakhov, N.; Niebur, W.; Ovcharenko, E.; Patel, V.; Pauly, C.; Pfeifer, D.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Reinecke, S.; Riabov, Y.; Roshchin, E.; Samsonov, V.; Schetinin, V.; Tarasenkova, O.; Traxler, M.; Ugur, C.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Vznuzdaev, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) will investigate the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at high net-baryon density and moderate temperature in A+A collisions. One of the key detectors of CBM to explore this physics program is a Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector for electron identification. For a high performance of the RICH detector precise mirror alignment is essential. A three-step correction cycle has been developed, which will be discussed: First a qualitative, fast check of the mirror positions, second a quantitative determination of possible misalignments and third a software correction routine, allowing a proper functioning of the RICH under misalignment conditions.

  18. Systematic irradiation studies and quality assurance of silicon strip sensors for the CBM Silicon Tracking System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larionov, Pavel

    2016-10-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the upcoming Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is designed to investigate the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at neutron star core densities under laboratory conditions. This work is a contribution to the development of the main tracking detector of the CBM experiment - the Silicon Tracking System (STS), designed to provide the tracking and the momentum information for charged particles in a high multiplicity environment. The STS will be composed of about 900 highly segmented double-sided silicon strip sensors and is expected to face a harsh radiation environment up to 1 x 10 14 cm -2 in 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence after several years of operation. The two most limiting factors of the successful operation of the system are the radiation damage and the quality of produced silicon sensors. It is therefore of importance to ensure both the radiation tolerance of the STS sensors and their quality during the production phase. The first part of this work details the investigation of the radiation tolerance of the STS sensors. Series of irradiations of miniature sensors as well as full-size prototype sensors were performed with reactor neutrons and 23 MeV protons to a broad range of fluences, up to 2 x 10 14 n eq /cm 2 . The evolution of the main sensor characteristics (leakage current, full depletion voltage and charge collection) was extensively studied both as a function of accumulated fluence and time after irradiation. In particular, charge collection measurements of miniature sensors demonstrated the ability of the sensors to yield approx. 90% to 95% of the signal after irradiation up to the lifetime fluence, depending on the readout side. First results on the charge collection performance of irradiated full-size prototype sensors have been obtained, serving as an input data for further final signal-to-noise evaluation in the whole readout chain. Operational stability of these

  19. Systematic irradiation studies and quality assurance of silicon strip sensors for the CBM Silicon Tracking System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larionov, Pavel

    2016-10-15

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the upcoming Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is designed to investigate the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at neutron star core densities under laboratory conditions. This work is a contribution to the development of the main tracking detector of the CBM experiment - the Silicon Tracking System (STS), designed to provide the tracking and the momentum information for charged particles in a high multiplicity environment. The STS will be composed of about 900 highly segmented double-sided silicon strip sensors and is expected to face a harsh radiation environment up to 1 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} in 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence after several years of operation. The two most limiting factors of the successful operation of the system are the radiation damage and the quality of produced silicon sensors. It is therefore of importance to ensure both the radiation tolerance of the STS sensors and their quality during the production phase. The first part of this work details the investigation of the radiation tolerance of the STS sensors. Series of irradiations of miniature sensors as well as full-size prototype sensors were performed with reactor neutrons and 23 MeV protons to a broad range of fluences, up to 2 x 10{sup 14} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. The evolution of the main sensor characteristics (leakage current, full depletion voltage and charge collection) was extensively studied both as a function of accumulated fluence and time after irradiation. In particular, charge collection measurements of miniature sensors demonstrated the ability of the sensors to yield approx. 90% to 95% of the signal after irradiation up to the lifetime fluence, depending on the readout side. First results on the charge collection performance of irradiated full-size prototype sensors have been obtained, serving as an input data for further final signal-to-noise evaluation in the whole readout chain. Operational

  20. Anti-collapse mechanism of CBM fuzzy-ball drilling fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihui Zheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Although fuzzy-ball drilling fluid has been successfully applied in CBM well drilling, it is necessary to study its anti-collapse mechanism so that adjustable coalbed sealing effects, controllable sealing strength, rational sealing cost and controllable reservoir damage degree can be realized. In this paper, laboratory measurement was performed on the uniaxial compressive strength of the plungers of No. 3 coalbed in the Qinshui Basin and the inlet pressure of Ø38 mm coal plunger displacement. The strengths of coal plungers were tested and compared after 2% potassium chloride solution, low-solids polymer drilling fluid and fuzzy-ball drilling fluid were injected into the coal plungers respectively. It is shown that coal strength rises by 38.46% after the fuzzy-ball drilling fluid is injected (in three groups; and that no fuzzy-ball drilling fluid is lost at the displacement pressures of 20.73 and 21.46 MPa, nor 2% potassium chloride solution is leaked at such pressures of 24.79 and 25.64 MPa after the plunger was sealed by the fuzzy-ball drilling fluid. This indicates that the fuzzy-ball drilling fluid can increase the formation resistance to fluid. Indoor microscopic observation was conducted on the sealing process of the fuzzy-ball drilling fluid in sand packs with coal cuttings of three grain sizes (60–80, 80–100 and 100–120 mesh. It is shown that the leakage pathways of different sizes are sealed by the vesicles in the form of accumulation, stretch and blockage. And there are vesicles at the inlet ends of the flowing pathways in the shape of beaded blanket. The impact force of drilling tools on the sidewalls is absorbed by the vesicles due to their elasticity and tenacity, so the sidewall instability caused by drilling tools is relieved. It is concluded that the main anti-collapse mechanisms of the CBM fuzzy-ball drilling fluid are to raise the coal strength, increase the formation resistance to fluid, and buffer the impact of

  1. Photofragment imaging of methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, A.J.; Zare, R.N.; Chandler, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    The photolysis of methane is studied using photofragment imaging techniques. Our study reveals that the photolysis of methane proceeds via many different pathways. The photofragment imaging technique is used to resolve and characterize these various pathways and provides therefore unique insight into the dynamical processes that govern this photodissociation. The formation of H-atom photofragments following absorption of a Lyman-α photon, and H 2 photofragments following absorption of two ultraviolet photons (λ=210 endash 230 nm) are studied. The measured H-atom photofragment images reveal that a channel that produces fast H atoms concomitant with methyl fragments is dominant in the Lyman-α photolysis of methane. This channel leads to an anisotropic recoil of the fragments. A secondary channel is observed leading to the formation of somewhat slower H atoms, but an unique identification of this second channel is not possible from the data. At least part of these slower H atoms are formed via a channel that produces H atoms concomitant with CH and H 2 photofragments. The recoil of these slower H atoms appears to be isotropic. The measured, state-resolved H 2 (v,J), photofragment images reveal that two channels lead to H 2 photofragments from the two-photon photolysis of methane: a channel that leads to H 2 products concomitant with methylene fragments; and a channel that leads to H 2 products concomitant with CH and H fragments. H 2 (v,J) rotational and vibrational distributions are measured for each of these two channels separately. The H 2 products formed via the H 2 +CH 2 channel are rotationally and vibrationally highly excited, whereas those formed via the H 2 +CH+H channel are rotationally and vibrationally cooler. Rotational distributions of H 2 formed via the H 2 +CH+H channel are well reproduced by Boltzmann distributions. (Abstract Truncated)

  2. The Development and Test of a Sensor for Measurement of the Working Level of Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow in a Coalbed Methane Wellbore Annulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuan; Ding, Huafeng; Han, Lei

    2018-02-14

    Coalbed methane (CBM) is one kind of clean-burning gas and has been valued as a new form of energy that will be used widely in the near future. When producing CBM, the working level within a CBM wellbore annulus needs to be monitored to dynamically adjust the gas drainage and extraction processes. However, the existing method of measuring the working level does not meet the needs of accurate adjustment, so we designed a new sensor for this purpose. The principle of our sensor is a liquid pressure formula, i.e., the sensor monitors the two-phase flow patterns and obtains the mean density of the two-phase flow according to the pattern recognition result in the first step, and then combines the pressure data of the working level to calculate the working level using the liquid pressure formula. The sensor was tested in both the lab and on site, and the tests showed that the sensor's error was ±8% and that the sensor could function well in practical conditions and remain stable in the long term.

  3. The Development and Test of a Sensor for Measurement of the Working Level of Gas–Liquid Two-Phase Flow in a Coalbed Methane Wellbore Annulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Wu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Coalbed methane (CBM is one kind of clean-burning gas and has been valued as a new form of energy that will be used widely in the near future. When producing CBM, the working level within a CBM wellbore annulus needs to be monitored to dynamically adjust the gas drainage and extraction processes. However, the existing method of measuring the working level does not meet the needs of accurate adjustment, so we designed a new sensor for this purpose. The principle of our sensor is a liquid pressure formula, i.e., the sensor monitors the two-phase flow patterns and obtains the mean density of the two-phase flow according to the pattern recognition result in the first step, and then combines the pressure data of the working level to calculate the working level using the liquid pressure formula. The sensor was tested in both the lab and on site, and the tests showed that the sensor’s error was ±8% and that the sensor could function well in practical conditions and remain stable in the long term.

  4. The Development and Test of a Sensor for Measurement of the Working Level of Gas–Liquid Two-Phase Flow in a Coalbed Methane Wellbore Annulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuan; Ding, Huafeng; Han, Lei

    2018-01-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) is one kind of clean-burning gas and has been valued as a new form of energy that will be used widely in the near future. When producing CBM, the working level within a CBM wellbore annulus needs to be monitored to dynamically adjust the gas drainage and extraction processes. However, the existing method of measuring the working level does not meet the needs of accurate adjustment, so we designed a new sensor for this purpose. The principle of our sensor is a liquid pressure formula, i.e., the sensor monitors the two-phase flow patterns and obtains the mean density of the two-phase flow according to the pattern recognition result in the first step, and then combines the pressure data of the working level to calculate the working level using the liquid pressure formula. The sensor was tested in both the lab and on site, and the tests showed that the sensor’s error was ±8% and that the sensor could function well in practical conditions and remain stable in the long term. PMID:29443871

  5. Genomic selection for methane emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Haas, Yvette; Pryce, Jennie E; Wall, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is a growing area of international concern, and it is well established that the release of greenhouse gases (GHG) is a contributing factor. Of the various GHG produced by ruminants, enteric methane (CH4 ) is the most important contributor. One mitigation strategy is to reduce methane...... emission through genetic selection. Our first attempt used beef cattle and a GWAS to identify genes associated with several CH4 traits in Angus beef cattle. The Angus population consisted of 1020 animals with phenotypes on methane production (MeP), dry matter intake (DMI), and weight (WT). Additionally......, two new methane traits: residual genetic methane (RGM) and residual phenotypic methane (RPM) were calculated by adjusting CH4 for DMI and WT. Animals were genotyped using the 800k Illumina Bovine HD Array. Estimated heritabilities were 0.30, 0.19 and 0.15 for MeP, RGM and RPM respectively...

  6. Conception and design of a control and monitoring system for the mirror alignment of the CBM RICH detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendarouach, J

    2016-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) complex will investigate the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at high baryon density and moderate temperatures created in A+A collisions. For the SIS100 accelerator, the foreseen beam energy will range up to 11 AGeV for the heaviest nuclei. One of the key detector components required for the CBM physics program is the Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector, which is developed for efficient and clean electron identification and pion suppression. An important aspect to guarantee a stable operation of the RICH detector is the alignment of the mirrors. A qualitative alignment control procedure for the mirror system has been implemented in the CBM RICH prototype detector and tested under real conditions at the CERN PS/T9 beamline. Collected data and results of image processing are reviewed and discussed. In parallel a quantitative method using recorded data has also been employed to compute mirror displacements of the RICH mirrors. Results based on simulated events and the limits of the method are presented and discussed as well. If mirror misalignment is detected, it can be subsequently included and rectified by correction routines. A first correction routine is presented and a comparison between misaligned, corrected and ideal geometries is shown. (paper)

  7. Conception and design of a control and monitoring system for the mirror alignment of the CBM RICH detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendarouach, J.

    2016-08-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) complex will investigate the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at high baryon density and moderate temperatures created in A+A collisions. For the SIS100 accelerator, the foreseen beam energy will range up to 11 AGeV for the heaviest nuclei. One of the key detector components required for the CBM physics program is the Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector, which is developed for efficient and clean electron identification and pion suppression. An important aspect to guarantee a stable operation of the RICH detector is the alignment of the mirrors. A qualitative alignment control procedure for the mirror system has been implemented in the CBM RICH prototype detector and tested under real conditions at the CERN PS/T9 beamline. Collected data and results of image processing are reviewed and discussed. In parallel a quantitative method using recorded data has also been employed to compute mirror displacements of the RICH mirrors. Results based on simulated events and the limits of the method are presented and discussed as well. If mirror misalignment is detected, it can be subsequently included and rectified by correction routines. A first correction routine is presented and a comparison between misaligned, corrected and ideal geometries is shown.

  8. Anaerobic fluidized bed treatment of a tannery wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.J.; Li, C.T.; Shieh, W.K.

    1988-11-01

    The anaerobic fluidized bed system, in conjunction with neutralization and chemical coagulation/flocculation, was evaluated for treatment of a tannery wastewater produced from a chrome tanning operation. Neutralization with 1 N sulphuric acid was effective for removal of chromate, with complete removal achieved at pH=8.0. Chemical coagulation/flocculation with alum at a dosage of 200 mg/L was able to remove 97% of feed SS and 65% of feed grease. Evaluation of the performance of the anaerobic fluidized bed system indicated more than 75% of feed COD could be removed up to an F/M ratio of approximately 0.4 g COD/g TVS center dot day. The observed methane production rate was 0.221 of CH/sub 4/ produced per gram COD removed. The anaerobic fluidized bed system could provide an effective treatment of a pretreated tannery wastewater.

  9. Bed Bugs FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Europe. Bed bugs have been found in five-star hotels and resorts and their presence is not ... Health – Division of Parasitic Diseases Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs ...

  10. Bed Bug Information Clearinghouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Its purpose is to help states, communities, and consumers in efforts to prevent and control bed bug infestations. Currently includes only reviewed material from federal/state/local government agencies, extension services, and universities.

  11. Particle fuel bed tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.; Savino, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Gas-cooled reactors, using packed beds of small diameter coated fuel particles have been proposed for compact, high-power systems. The particulate fuel used in the tests was 800 microns in diameter, consisting of a thoria kernel coated with 200 microns of pyrocarbon. Typically, the bed of fuel particles was contained in a ceramic cylinder with porous metallic frits at each end. A dc voltage was applied to the metallic frits and the resulting electric current heated the bed. Heat was removed by passing coolant (helium or hydrogen) through the bed. Candidate frit materials, rhenium, nickel, zirconium carbide, and zirconium oxide were unaffected, while tungsten and tungsten-rhenium lost weight and strength. Zirconium-carbide particles were tested at 2000 K in H 2 for 12 hours with no visible reaction or weight loss

  12. Parallel 4-dimensional cellular automaton track finder for the CBM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akishina, Valentina [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); JINR Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kisel, Ivan [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The CBM experiment at FAIR will focus on the measurement of rare probes at interaction rates up to 10 MHz. The beam will provide free stream of particles, so that information about different collisions may overlap in time. It requires the full online event reconstruction not only in space, but also in time, so-called 4D (4-dimensional) event building. This is a task of the First-Level Event Selection (FLES) package. The FLES reconstruction package consists of several modules: track finding, track fitting, short-lived particles finding, event building and selection. The Silicon Tracking System (STS) time measurement information was included into the Cellular Automaton (CA) track finder algorithm. The 4D track finder algorithm speed (8.5 ms per event in a time-slice) and efficiency is comparable with the event-based analysis. The CA track finder was fully parallelised inside the time-slice. The parallel version achieves a speed-up factor of 10.6 while parallelising between 10 Intel Xeon physical cores with a hyper-threading. The first version of event building based on 4D track finder was implemented.

  13. Time-based Cellular Automaton track finder for the CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akishina, Valentina; Kisel, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The future heavy-ion experiment CBM (FAIR/GSI, Darmstadt, Germany) will focus on the measurement of rare probes at interaction rates up to 10 MHz with data flow of up to 1 TB/s. The beam will provide free stream of particles without bunch structure. That requires full online event reconstruction and selection not only in space, but also in time, so- called 4D event building and selection. This is a task of the First-Level Event Selection (FLES) package. The FLES reconstruction and selection package consists of several modules: track finding, track fitting, short-lived particles finding, event building and event selection. The input data are distributed within the FLES farm in a form of so-called time-slices, in which time length is proportional to a compute power of a processing node. A time-slice is reconstructed in parallel between cores within a CPU, thus minimising communication between CPUs. After all tracks of the whole time-slice are found and fitted, they are collected into clusters of tracks originated from common primary vertices. After that short-lived particles are found and the full event building process is finished. (paper)

  14. Track measurement in the high multiplicity environment at the CBM Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    In the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) Experiment at FAIR, the Silicon Tracking System (STS) will perform track reconstruction and momentum determination of the charged particles created in interactions of heavy-ion beams with nuclear targets. The STS will consist of 8 tracking layers located at distances between 30 cm and 100 cm downstream of the target inside the 1 Tm magnetic dipole field. An ultra-low material budget is required to achieve momentum resolution of the order of Δp/p = 1%. Therefore, the front-end electronics is placed outside the physics aperture. The active volume of the STS is built from 300 μm thick double-sided silicon microstrip sensors mounted onto lightweight carbon fiber support ladders. The sensors will be read out through ultra-thin micro-cables with fast self-triggering electronics at the periphery of the stations where also other infrastructure such as cooling can be placed. In this paper, the development status of the detector system, highlighting the overview of the STS layout, tracking algorithm and performance simulations are presented.

  15. Parallel 4-Dimensional Cellular Automaton Track Finder for the CBM Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akishina, Valentina; Kisel, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The CBM experiment (FAIR/GSI, Darmstadt, Germany) will focus on the measurement of rare probes at interaction rates up to 10 MHz with data flow of up to 1 TB/s. It requires a novel read-out and data-acquisition concept with self-triggered electronics and free-streaming data. In this case resolving different collisions is not a trivial task and event building must be performed in software online. That requires full online event reconstruction and selection not only in space, but also in time, so-called 4D event building and selection. This is a task of the First-Level Event Selection (FLES). The FLES reconstruction and selection package consists of several modules: track finding, track fitting, short-lived particles finding, event building and event selection. The Cellular Automaton (CA) track finder algorithm was adapted towards time-slice-based reconstruction and included into the CBMROOT framework. In this article, we describe the modification done to the algorithm, as well as the performance of the developed time-based approach. (paper)

  16. Determination of tolerances of mirror displacement and radiator gas impurity for the CBM RICH detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Becker, K.-H. [University Wuppertal (Germany); Belogurov, S. [ITEP Moscow (Russian Federation); Boldyreva, N. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Chernogorov, A. [ITEP Moscow (Russian Federation); Deveaux, C. [University Gießen (Germany); Dobyrn, V. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Dürr, M. [University Gießen (Germany); Eom, J. [Pusan National University (Korea, Republic of); Eschke, J. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Höhne, C. [University Gießen (Germany); Kampert, K.-H. [University Wuppertal (Germany); Kleipa, V. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Kochenda, L. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Kolb, B. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Kopfer, J. [University Wuppertal (Germany); Kravtsov, P. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Lebedev, S.; Lebedeva, E. [University Gießen (Germany); Leonova, E. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); and others

    2014-12-01

    The CBM experiment at the future FAIR facility will explore nuclear matter at high net-baryon densities. One of the key observables is di-leptons as they penetrate the created matter without further strong interactions. A gaseous RICH detector in a standard projective geometry using spherical mirrors is one of two detector elements for the required electron identification. The mirror system consists of about 72 trapezoidal mirror tiles. Any misalignment between the tiles relative to the nominal common spherical surface leads to reduction of the reconstruction efficiency of Cherenkov rings and deterioration of their resolution. To determine tolerances in mirror misalignment extensive simulation and measurement studies were carried out. Pure CO{sub 2} will be used as radiator gas. Gas contamination, mainly moisture and Oxygen, reduces the number of detected photons per ring and worsens the quality of reconstructed Cherenkov rings. Therefore a study was carried out to determine tolerances in radiator gas contamination. - Highlights: • Mirror misalignment leads to ring deformation in a RICH detector. • Radiator contamination leads to resolution deterioration of fitted rings. • To determine tolerances measurements and simulations were carried out. • Mirror displacements of up to 0.32 mm at any mirror side can be tolerated. • Oxygen (moisture) contamination of up to 1% (0.0011%) can be safely tolerated.

  17. Wavelength shifting films on multianode PMTs with UV-extended window for the CBM RICH detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Becker, K.-H. [University Wuppertal (Germany); Belogurov, S. [ITEP Moscow (Russian Federation); Boldyreva, N. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Chernogorov, A. [ITEP Moscow (Russian Federation); Deveaux, C. [University Gießen (Germany); Dobyrn, V. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Dürr, M., E-mail: Michael.Duerr@ap.physik.uni-giessen.de [University Gießen (Germany); Eom, J. [Pusan National University (Korea, Republic of); Eschke, J. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Höhne, C. [University Gießen (Germany); Kampert, K.-H. [University Wuppertal (Germany); Kleipa, V. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Kochenda, L. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Kolb, B. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Kopfer, J., E-mail: Jan.Kopfer@uni-wuppertal.de [University Wuppertal (Germany); Kravtsov, P. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Lebedev, S.; Lebedeva, E. [University Gießen (Germany); Leonova, E. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); and others

    2014-12-01

    Electron identification in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) will be performed using a gaseous RICH detector. Due to the UV transparency of the CO{sub 2} radiator, a high photon detection efficiency of the PMTs in use at small wavelengths is favourable. The use of wavelength shifting (WLS) films aims at increasing the integral quantum efficiency of the photon sensors. WLS films absorb UV photons and re-emit photons at longer wavelengths where the quantum efficiency of common photocathodes is higher. As photon sensors, multianode PMTs (MAPMTs) with bialkali or superbialkali photocathodes and UV-extended windows are envisaged. We present quantum efficiency measurements with and without WLS coating for different types of MAPMTs as well as results from a beam test at the CERN PS. An increased photon yield was observed when using WLS films. In addition, we discuss the effect of WLS films on the spatial resolution of MAPMTs. - Highlights: • Wavelength shifting (WLS) films were applied on MAPMTs with UV-window. • WLS films considerably enhance MAPMT quantum efficiency in the UV range. • In-beam tests with a RICH detector show an enhanced total photon yield by approx. 20%. • Yield enhancement depends on the MAPMT window and photocathode materials. • No significant effect of WLS films on ring sharpness was detected.

  18. Online Selection of J/ψ → μ+μ− Decays in the CBM Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ablyazimov T.O.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM experimental setup is currently being constructed at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR acceleration complex at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany by an international collaboration that includes a team from JINR. One of the main goals of this experiment is to study the charmonium production in high-energy nuclear collisions. The experiment will operate at extreme interaction rates of up to 10 MHz. The expected dataflow rate will be of the order of 1 TB/s, making it impossible to store all the raw data from detectors in long-term buffers. It will demand the selection of J/ψ → μ+μ− decays in real-time. This paper presents criteria for the fast and effective selection of signal events by using exclusively data on charged muon hits collected in the Muon Chamber (MUCH coordinate stations and describes the software implementing these criteria. The possibility of this software to solve the problem of the online selection J/ψ → μ+μ− decays is proven.

  19. Development of a CO{sub 2} cooling system for the CBM silicon tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Rosado, Jorge; Degirmenciler, Burak; Heuser, Johann; Sturm, Christian [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany); Lymanets, Anton; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf [Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The demanding requirements of current high-energy physics experiments curiously bring back the idea of using a well-known and present refrigerant in nature: CO{sub 2}. As an outcome of previous studies and effort made within the current upgrade programs of detectors like ATLAS or CMS, this refrigerant is the optimum solution. Due to its highest volumetric heat transfer coefficient, it fulfills the requirements in this kind of detectors such as reduction of mass budget and the use of smaller diameter for cooling pipes. A two-phase (evaporative) CO{sub 2} cooling system is taken as the first choice to extract the 42 kW dissipated by the electronics of the Silicon Tracking System, the central detector of the CBM experiment at FAIR that will be installed in the gap of the 1 T super-conducting dipole magnet in a confined volume of 2 m{sup 3}. As a step towards the final design of this a cooling system, a 1 kW cooling unit called TRACI-XL was conceived at GSI in cooperation with CERN. This scaled prototype allows gaining insight into the behavior of the full system with valuable conclusions in terms of thermodynamics, process engineering and automation.

  20. The KFParticle package for the fast particle reconstruction in ALICE and CBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zyzak, Maksym; Kisel, Ivan; Kulakov, Igor [Goethe Univ. Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Vassiliev, Iourii [Goethe Univ. Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Modern heavy-ion experiments operate with very high data rates and track multiplicities collecting petabytes of data, therefore the speed of the reconstruction algorithms is crucial both for the online and offline data analysis. The KFParticle package for short-lived particles reconstruction has been developed and is actively used both in the CBM and ALICE experiments. The package is based on the Kalman filter mathematics and has rich functionality. It is geometry independent and can be used in other experiments too. Almost all modern servers are equipped with many or multi-core processors, which contain SIMD modules. The KFParticle has been SIMDized, which gives the additional speedup factor of 3-5. KFParticle allows to reconstruct about 50 decay channels achieving speed of 1.5 ms per Au+Au mbias collisions at 25 AGeV on a single core. The package has been parallelized between cores and shows strong linear scalability on servers with up to 80 logical cores.

  1. CargoCBM – Feature Generation and Classification for a Condition Monitoring System for Freight Wagons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gericke, C; Hecht, M

    2012-01-01

    Despite the fact that rail freight transport is one of the most environmentally friendly matters of transport, its growth has been far behind the growth of freight transport in general. Studies showed that a competitive disadvantage is caused by a low availability of rolling stock, especially freight wagons. Changing from a time based to a condition based maintenance strategy is believed to decrease down times by at least one third. To make condition based maintenance for freight wagons possible the TU Berlin and five industry partners started the research project CargoCBM. One task in this project is to develop algorithms for the automatic on-board diagnosis of wheel flats. The focus of the work is on the process of feature generation and feature selection as well as the application of different classifiers to automatically evaluate the data. Based on the results of measured data, features were selected and tested with different classifiers. Thought advanced classifiers such as neural networks have been analysed in accordance to their classification accuracy. It can be shown that with carefully constructed and selected features comparatively simple classifiers can lead to excellent results.

  2. Development of radiation hard microstrip detectors for the CBM silicon tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterji, Sudeep [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Radiation damage in Silicon microstrip detectors is of the one main concerns for the development of the Silicon Tracking System (STS) in the planned Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR. The STS will consist of Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSD) having pitch around 60 {mu}m, width 20 {mu}m, stereo angle of {+-}7.5{sup 0} on n and p sides with double metallization on either side making it challenging to fabricate.We are using 3-dimensional TCAD simulation tools from SYNOPSYS to carry out process (using Sentaurus Process) and device (using Sentaurus Device) simulations.We have simulated the impact of radiation damage in DSSDs by changing the effective carrier concentration (N{sub eff}) with fluence using the Hamburg model. The change in minority carrier life time has been taken into account using the Kraners model and the Perugia trap model has been used to simulate the traps. We have also extracted macroscopic parameters like Coupling Capacitance, Interstrip Capacitance (both DC and AC), Interstrip Resistance of DSSDs using Mixed Mode simulation (using SPICE with Sentaurus Device) and studied the variation of these parameters with fluence. The simulation results have been compared to the experimental results. We also simulated transients by passing a Heavy Ion through a DSSD and studied the charge collection performance.

  3. The CBM first-level event selector, timeslice building and availability studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Helvi; Cuveland, Jan de; Lindenstruth, Volker [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is a fixed target high energy physics experiment collecting all produced data - no triggers are involved. This causes a very high data rate of 1 TByte/s. The First-level Event Selector (FLES) denotes a high performance computer cluster that will process all data and performs a full online event reconstruction. For this purpose the raw detector data is accessed in time intervals referred to as Timeslices. In the process of Timeslice building data from all input links are distributed via a high-performance Infiniband network to the compute nodes. In order to ensure that the FLES is available the whole time while the detectors are running fault tolerance is inevitable. The questions is how often are incidents going to occur (Mean Time between Failure MTBF) and how long will they pause Timeslice building and hence physics analysis (Mean Time to Repair MTTR). These two factors make up the availability of the FLES. I present a detailed analysis of possible sources of errors and their influence on the availability. Furthermore, I discuss the development of Timeslice building on the basis of MPI with respect to the availability of the FLES. I compare this approach to a low-level native Infiniband Verbs implementation combined with a socket-based error handling system.

  4. A Noncellulosomal Mannanase26E Contains a CBM59 in Clostridium cellulovorans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Yamamoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A multicomponent enzyme-complex prevents efficient degradation of the plant cell wall for biorefinery. In this study, the method of identifying glycoside hydrolases (GHs to degrade hemicelluloses was demonstrated. The competence of C. cellulovorans, which changes to be suitable for degradation of each carbon source, was used for the method. C. cellulovorans was cultivated into locust bean gum (LBG that is composed of galactomannan. The proteins produced by C. cellulovorans were separated into either fractions binding to crystalline cellulose or not. Proteins obtained from each fraction were further separated by SDS-PAGE and were stained with Coomassie Brilliant Blue and were detected for mannanase activity. The proteins having the enzymatic activity for LBG were cut out and were identified by mass spectrometry. As a result, four protein bands were classified into glycosyl hydrolase family 26 (GH26 mannanases. One of the identified mannanases, Man26E, contains a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM family 59, which binds to xylan, mannan, and Avicel. Although mannose and galactose are the same as a hexose, the expression patterns of the proteins from C. cellulovorans were quite different. More interestingly, zymogram for mannanase activity showed that Man26E was detected in only LBG medium.

  5. Bi-phase CO{sub 2} cooling of the CBM STS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrik, Evgeny [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment aims to study the properties of nuclear matter at high net-baryon densities. The Silicon Tracking System (STS) is the key detector to reconstruct charged particle tracks created in heavy-ion interactions. The foreseen interaction rate of up to 10 MHz requires radiation hard detectors as well as efficient cooling of the silicon sensors. To avoid thermal runaway the system must be kept at -5 C or below all the time. This is rather challenging because the overall thermal load in the 2 m{sup 3} STS enclosure is up to 40 kW. Because of these requirements liquid CO{sub 2} is used as a cooling agent as it is superior in terms of volumetric heat transfer coefficient compared to other agents. This contribution shows the thermal simulations and measurement results of the STS front-end electronic boxes as well as an overview of 1 kW TRACI-XL cooling plant developed at GSI and its use to perform thermal measurements of a fully heat loaded STS quarter station.

  6. Prototyping the read-out chain of the CBM Microvertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaus, P.; Wiebusch, M.; Amar-Youcef, S.; Deveaux, M.; Koziel, M.; Michel, J.; Milanovic, B.; Müntz, C.; Tischler, T.; Stroth, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) Experiment at the future FAIR (Darmstadt/Germany) will study the phase diagram of hadronic matter in the regime of highest net-baryon densities. The fixed target experiment will explore the nuclear fireballs created in violent heavy ion reactions with a rich number of probes. To reconstruct the decay topologies of open-charm particles as well as to track low-momentum particles, an ultra-light and precise Microvertex Detector (MVD) is required. The necessary performance in terms of spatial resolution, material budget and rate capability will be reached by equipping the MVD with highly granular, radiation-hard CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (CPS) developped at IPHC Strasbourg, which are operated in the target vacuum of the experiment. This contribution introduces the concept of the MVD and puts a focus on the latest results obtained from the R and D of the electronics and read-out chain of the device. Moreover, we briefly introduce the PRESTO project, which realises a prototype of a full size quadrant of an MVD detector station

  7. Fast parallel tracking algorithm for the muon detector of the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, A.; Hoehne, C.; Kisel', I.; Ososkov, G.

    2010-01-01

    Particle trajectory recognition is an important and challenging task in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR accelerator at Darmstadt. The tracking algorithms have to process terabytes of input data produced in particle collisions. Therefore, the speed of the tracking software is extremely important for data analysis. In this contribution, a fast parallel track reconstruction algorithm, which uses available features of modern processors is presented. These features comprise a SIMD instruction set (SSE) and multithreading. The first allows one to pack several data items into one register and to operate on all of them in parallel thus achieving more operations per cycle. The second feature enables the routines to exploit all available CPU cores and hardware threads. This parallel version of the tracking algorithm has been compared to the initial serial scalar version which uses a similar approach for tracking. A speed-upfactor of 487 was achieved (from 730 to 1.5 ms/event) for a computer with 2 x Intel Core 17 processors at 2.66 GHz

  8. Deriving the effective focal plane for the CBM-RICH detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kres, Ievgenii [Wuppertal University (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR complex will investigate the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at high baryon density and moderate temperatures in A+A collisions from 2-11 AGeV (SIS100). A central component of the proposed detector setup is a ring imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH) using CO2 as radiator gas, and a focussing optic with a large spherical mirror. In the present design, the optimal focal plane is approximated using four individual, flat detection surfaces. However, the exact shape and position of the ideal focal plane is subject to further optimization due to effects from tilting the focussing mirror and from momentum dependant deflection of the electron tracks in the magnetic stray field. In this talk, we present a new approach to derive the effective 3-dimensional shape of the focal plane based on a set of Monte Carlo simulations, comparing the ring sharpness at each point of a preliminary focal plane as function of z-position.

  9. Rotating bed reactor for CLC: Bed characteristics dependencies on internal gas mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Håkonsen, Silje Fosse; Grande, Carlos A.; Blom, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A mathematical model for the rotating CLC reactor has been developed. • The model reflects the gas distribution in the reactor during CLC operation. • Radial dispersion in the rotating bed is the main cause for internal gas mixing. • The model can be used to optimize the reactor design and particle characteristics. - Abstract: A newly designed continuous lab-scale rotating bed reactor for chemical looping combustion using CuO/Al 2 O 3 oxygen carrier spheres and methane as fuel gives around 90% CH 4 conversion and >90% CO 2 capture efficiency based on converted methane at 800 °C. However, from a series of experiments using a broad range of operating conditions potential CO 2 purities only in the range 20–65% were yielded, mostly due to nitrogen slip from the air side of the reactor into the effluent CO 2 stream. A mathematical model was developed intending to understand the air-mixing phenomena. The model clearly reflects the gas slippage tendencies observed when varying the process conditions such as rotation frequency, gas flow and the flow if inert gas in the two sectors dividing the air and fuel side of the reactor. Based on the results, it is believed that significant improvements can be made to reduce gas mixing in future modified and scaled-up reactor versions

  10. Coal-packed methane biofilter for mitigation of green house gas emissions from coal mine ventilation air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbri, Hendy; Gunawan, Cindy; Thomas, Torsten; Smith, Andrew; Scott, Jason; Rosche, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Methane emitted by coal mine ventilation air (MVA) is a significant greenhouse gas. A mitigation strategy is the oxidation of methane to carbon dioxide, which is approximately twenty-one times less effective at global warming than methane on a mass-basis. The low non-combustible methane concentrations at high MVA flow rates call for a catalytic strategy of oxidation. A laboratory-scale coal-packed biofilter was designed and partially removed methane from humidified air at flow rates between 0.2 and 2.4 L min-1 at 30°C with nutrient solution added every three days. Methane oxidation was catalysed by a complex community of naturally-occurring microorganisms, with the most abundant member being identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence as belonging to the methanotrophic genus Methylocystis. Additional inoculation with a laboratory-grown culture of Methylosinus sporium, as investigated in a parallel run, only enhanced methane consumption during the initial 12 weeks. The greatest level of methane removal of 27.2±0.66 g methane m-3 empty bed h-1 was attained for the non-inoculated system, which was equivalent to removing 19.7±2.9% methane from an inlet concentration of 1% v/v at an inlet gas flow rate of 1.6 L min-1 (2.4 min empty bed residence time). These results show that low-cost coal packing holds promising potential as a suitable growth surface and contains methanotrophic microorganisms for the catalytic oxidative removal of methane.

  11. Coal-Packed Methane Biofilter for Mitigation of Green House Gas Emissions from Coal Mine Ventilation Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbri, Hendy; Gunawan, Cindy; Thomas, Torsten; Smith, Andrew; Scott, Jason; Rosche, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Methane emitted by coal mine ventilation air (MVA) is a significant greenhouse gas. A mitigation strategy is the oxidation of methane to carbon dioxide, which is approximately twenty-one times less effective at global warming than methane on a mass-basis. The low non-combustible methane concentrations at high MVA flow rates call for a catalytic strategy of oxidation. A laboratory-scale coal-packed biofilter was designed and partially removed methane from humidified air at flow rates between 0.2 and 2.4 L min−1 at 30°C with nutrient solution added every three days. Methane oxidation was catalysed by a complex community of naturally-occurring microorganisms, with the most abundant member being identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence as belonging to the methanotrophic genus Methylocystis. Additional inoculation with a laboratory-grown culture of Methylosinus sporium, as investigated in a parallel run, only enhanced methane consumption during the initial 12 weeks. The greatest level of methane removal of 27.2±0.66 g methane m−3 empty bed h−1 was attained for the non-inoculated system, which was equivalent to removing 19.7±2.9% methane from an inlet concentration of 1% v/v at an inlet gas flow rate of 1.6 L min−1 (2.4 min empty bed residence time). These results show that low-cost coal packing holds promising potential as a suitable growth surface and contains methanotrophic microorganisms for the catalytic oxidative removal of methane. PMID:24743729

  12. Methanization of industrial liquid effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederic, S.; Lugardon, A.

    2007-01-01

    In a first part, this work deals with the theoretical aspects of the methanization of the industrial effluents; the associated reactional processes are detailed. The second part presents the technological criteria for choosing the methanization process in terms of the characteristics of the effluent to be treated. Some of the methanization processes are presented with their respective advantages and disadvantages. At last, is described the implementation of an industrial methanization unit. The size and the main choices are detailed: the anaerobic reactor, the control, the valorization aspects of the biogas produced. Some examples of industrial developments illustrate the different used options. (O.M.)

  13. Methane emissions from coal mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, C.M.; Kelafant, J.R.; Kuuskraa, V.A.; Manger, K.C.; Kruger, D.

    1990-09-01

    The report estimates global methane emissions from coal mining on a country specific basis, evaluates the technologies available to degasify coal seams and assesses the economics of recovering methane liberated during mining. 33 to 64 million tonnes were liberated in 1987 from coal mining, 75 per cent of which came from China, the USSR, Poland and the USA. Methane emissions from coal mining are likely to increase. Emission levels vary between surface and underground mines. The methane currently removed from underground mines for safety reasons could be used in a number of ways, which may be economically attractive. 55 refs., 19 figs., 24 tabs

  14. Predicting Hip Fracture Type With Cortical Bone Mapping (CBM) in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treece, Graham M; Gee, Andrew H; Tonkin, Carol; Ewing, Susan K; Cawthon, Peggy M; Black, Dennis M; Poole, Kenneth E S

    2015-11-01

    Hip fracture risk is known to be related to material properties of the proximal femur, but fracture prediction studies adding richer quantitative computed tomography (QCT) measures to dual-energy X-ray (DXA)-based methods have shown limited improvement. Fracture types have distinct relationships to predictors, but few studies have subdivided fracture into types, because this necessitates regional measurements and more fracture cases. This work makes use of cortical bone mapping (CBM) to accurately assess, with no prior anatomical presumptions, the distribution of properties related to fracture type. CBM uses QCT data to measure the cortical and trabecular properties, accurate even for thin cortices below the imaging resolution. The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study is a predictive case-cohort study of men over 65 years old: we analyze 99 fracture cases (44 trochanteric and 55 femoral neck) compared to a cohort of 308, randomly selected from 5994. To our knowledge, this is the largest QCT-based predictive hip fracture study to date, and the first to incorporate CBM analysis into fracture prediction. We show that both cortical mass surface density and endocortical trabecular BMD are significantly different in fracture cases versus cohort, in regions appropriate to fracture type. We incorporate these regions into predictive models using Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios, and logistic regression to estimate area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Adding CBM to DXA-based BMD leads to a small but significant (p fracture, with AUC increasing from 0.78 to 0.79, assessed using leave-one-out cross-validation. For specific fracture types, the improvement is more significant (p trochanteric fractures and 0.76 to 0.82 for femoral neck fractures. In contrast, adding DXA-based BMD to a CBM-based predictive model does not result in any significant improvement. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research

  15. Ammonia, total reduced sulfides, and greenhouse gases of pine chip and corn stover bedding packs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedding materials may affect air quality in livestock facilities. The objective of this study was to compare headspace concentrations of ammonia (NH3), total reduced sulfides (TRS), carbon dioxide (CO2),methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) when pine wood chips and corn stover were mixed in various...

  16. Two phases fermentative process for hydrogen and methane production from cassava wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aryane Mota Oliveira

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hydrogen and methane production was investigated in two phases of fermentative process. Objective: At the acidogenic phase, an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor was fed with cassava wastewater producing hydrogen. Methods: Expanded clay was used as a support material for biomass immobilization. The reactor was operated with HRT ranging from 8-1 h. Results: The best hydrogen yield production was 1.91 mol H2/mol glucose at HRT of 2 h. At the methanogenic phase, the acidogenic process effluent fed a fixed-bed reactor producing methane. Conclusion: Sururu (Mytella falcata shells was used as support acted as pH neutralizer in the fixed-bed reactor, yielding best (0.430±0.150 Lmethane/gCOD with 12h HRT phase.

  17. Liquid Methane Testing With a Large-Scale Spray Bar Thermodynamic Vent System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, L. J.; Bolshinskiy, L. G.; Hedayat, A.; Flachbart, R. H.; Sisco, J. D.; Schnell. A. R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center conducted liquid methane testing in November 2006 using the multipurpose hydrogen test bed outfitted with a spray bar thermodynamic vent system (TVS). The basic objective was to identify any unusual or unique thermodynamic characteristics associated with densified methane that should be considered in the design of space-based TVSs. Thirteen days of testing were performed with total tank heat loads ranging from 720 to 420 W at a fill level of approximately 90%. It was noted that as the fluid passed through the Joule-Thompson expansion, thermodynamic conditions consistent with the pervasive presence of metastability were indicated. This Technical Publication describes conditions that correspond with metastability and its detrimental effects on TVS performance. The observed conditions were primarily functions of methane densification and helium pressurization; therefore, assurance must be provided that metastable conditions have been circumvented in future applications of thermodynamic venting to in-space methane storage.

  18. Exploring the potential of fungi for methane abatement: Performance evaluation of a fungal-bacterial biofilter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrero, Raquel; López, Juan Carlos; Lehtinen, Iiro; Pérez, Rebeca; Quijano, Guillermo; Muñoz, Raúl

    2016-02-01

    Despite several fungal strains have been retrieved from methane-containing environments, the actual capacity and role of fungi on methane abatement is still unclear. The batch biodegradation tests here performed demonstrated the capacity of Graphium sp. to co-metabolically biodegrade methane and methanol. Moreover, the performance and microbiology of a fungal-bacterial compost biofilter treating methane at concentrations of ∼2% was evaluated at empty bed residence times of 40 and 20 min under different irrigation rates. The daily addition of 200 mL of mineral medium resulted in elimination capacities of 36.6 ± 0.7 g m(-3) h(-1) and removal efficiencies of ≈90% at the lowest residence time. The indigenous fungal community of the compost was predominant in the final microbial population and outcompeted the inoculated Graphium sp. during biofilter operation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Methane from wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, T. F.; Barreto, L.; Kypreos, S.; Stucki, S

    2005-07-15

    The role of wood-based energy technologies in the Swiss energy system in the long-term is examined using the energy-system Swiss MARKAL model. The Swiss MARKAL model is a 'bottom-up' energy-systems optimization model that allows a detailed representation of energy technologies. The model has been developed as a joint effort between the Energy Economics Group (EEG) at Paul Scherrer Institute PSI) and the University of Geneva and is currently used at PSI-EEG. Using the Swiss MARKAL model, this study examines the conditions under which wood-based energy technologies could play a role in the Swiss energy system, the most attractive pathways for their use and the policy measures that could support them. Given the involvement of PSI in the ECOGAS project, especial emphasis is put on the production of bio-SNG from wood via gasification and methanation of syngas and on hydrothermal gasification of woody biomass. Of specific interest as weIl is the fraction of fuel used in passenger cars that could be produced by locally harvested wood. The report is organized as follows: Section 2 presents a brief description of the MARKAL model. Section 3 describes the results of the base case scenario, which represents a plausible, 'middle-of-the-road' development of the Swiss energy system. Section 4 discusses results illustrating the conditions under which the wood-based methanation technology could become competitive in the Swiss energy market, the role of oil and gas prices, subsidies to methanation technologies and the introduction of a competing technology, namely the wood-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. FinaIly, section 5 outlines some conclusions from this analysis. (author)

  20. Methane from wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, T. F.; Barreto, L.; Kypreos, S.; Stucki, S.

    2005-07-01

    The role of wood-based energy technologies in the Swiss energy system in the long-term is examined using the energy-system Swiss MARKAL model. The Swiss MARKAL model is a 'bottom-up' energy-systems optimization model that allows a detailed representation of energy technologies. The model has been developed as a joint effort between the Energy Economics Group (EEG) at Paul Scherrer Institute PSI) and the University of Geneva and is currently used at PSI-EEG. Using the Swiss MARKAL model, this study examines the conditions under which wood-based energy technologies could play a role in the Swiss energy system, the most attractive pathways for their use and the policy measures that could support them. Given the involvement of PSI in the ECOGAS project, especial emphasis is put on the production of bio-SNG from wood via gasification and methanation of syngas and on hydrothermal gasification of woody biomass. Of specific interest as weIl is the fraction of fuel used in passenger cars that could be produced by locally harvested wood. The report is organized as follows: Section 2 presents a brief description of the MARKAL model. Section 3 describes the results of the base case scenario, which represents a plausible, 'middle-of-the-road' development of the Swiss energy system. Section 4 discusses results illustrating the conditions under which the wood-based methanation technology could become competitive in the Swiss energy market, the role of oil and gas prices, subsidies to methanation technologies and the introduction of a competing technology, namely the wood-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. FinaIly, section 5 outlines some conclusions from this analysis. (author)

  1. Process for producing ethane and/or ethylene from methane. Verfahren zur Herstellung von Ethan und bzw. oder Ethylen aus Methan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baerns, M.; Hinsen, W.

    1984-04-12

    According to the invention, methane is converted into hydrocarbons with oxygen with high selectivity. This is done in the presence of a catalyst fluidized in a fluidized bed - preferably lead oxide or a mixture of this with antimony oxide - at temperatures between 600 and 800/sup 0/C and at oxygen partial pressures preferably below 0.1-0.2 bar. The ratio of methane partial pressure to oxygen partial pressure should be greater than 2 to 5 if possible. The reactor is operated with gas feedback, in order to raise the selectivity even more.

  2. Kinetic Study of Nonequilibrium Plasma-Assisted Methane Steam Reforming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To develop a detailed reaction mechanism for plasma-assisted methane steam reforming, a comprehensive numerical and experimental study of effect laws on methane conversion and products yield is performed at different steam to methane molar ratio (S/C, residence time s, and reaction temperatures. A CHEMKIN-PRO software with sensitivity analysis module and path flux analysis module was used for simulations. A set of comparisons show that the developed reaction mechanism can accurately predict methane conversion and the trend of products yield in different operating conditions. Using the developed reaction mechanism in plasma-assisted kinetic model, the reaction path flux analysis was carried out. The result shows that CH3 recombination is the limiting reaction for CO production and O is the critical species for CO production. Adding 40 wt.% Ni/SiO2 in discharge region has significantly promoted the yield of H2, CO, or CO2 in dielectric packed bed (DPB reactor. Plasma catalytic hybrid reforming experiment verifies the reaction path flux analysis tentatively.

  3. Methanogenesis and methane genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, J.N.; Shref, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the pathways leading to methane biosynthesis is presented. The steps investigated to date by gene cloning and DNA sequencing procedures are identified and discussed. The primary structures of component C of methyl coenzyme M reductase encoded by mcr operons in different methanogens are compared. Experiments to detect the primary structure of the genes encoding F420 reducing hydrogenase (frhABG) and methyl hydrogen reducing hydrogenase (mvhDGA) in methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum strain H are compared with each other and with eubacterial hydrogenase encoding genes. A biotechnological use for hydrogenases from hypermorphillic archaebacteria is suggested. (author)

  4. Use of the theory of recognition of patterns in developing methane metering equipment for blow-out-dangerous mines. [Instrument recognizes rate of change of methane concentration and, if dangerous, shuts off electrical equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medvedev, V N

    1978-01-01

    In the most general form, the existing methane-metering equipment which issues command signals when the maximum permissible value of methane concentration has been reached can be viewed as a recognition system. The algorithm for operation on the principle of evaluating the degree of blow-out danger of the ore atmosphere stipulates the recognition of two situations: 1) ''not dangerous ''(methane concentration below maximum permissible value); 2) ''dangerous'' (disorders in technological process; methane concentration above maximum permissible value). This approach for constructing means for gas protection is optimal only for mines working beds which are not dangerous for sudden blow-outs. However, if we ''train'' the apparatus to recognize what was the reason for increase in methane concentration, ways are afforded for solving the problem of creating an effective methane-metering equipment for mines with sudden blow-outs. Gas-dynamic processes with sudden blow-outs can be distinguished from standard technological, in particular, according to the rate in increase in methane concentration. On this basis, functional plan is proposed for constructing the automatic gas protection for explosiondangerous mines which includes a primary measurement of methane concentration, block of concentration control, block of process recognition, block of command signals, block of information delay, block of measuring the rate of methane concentration, threshold device for the rate of increase in concentration.

  5. Raising distillate selectivity and catalyst life time in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis by using a novel dual-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavasoli, A.; Sadaghiani, K.; Khodadadi, A. A.; Mortazavi, Y.

    2007-01-01

    In a novel dual bed reactor Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was studied by using two diff rent cobalt catalysts. An alkali-promoted cobalt catalyst was used in the first bed of a fixed-bed reactor followed by a Raiment promoted cobalt catalyst in the second bed. The activity, product selectivity and accelerated deactivation of the system were assessed and compared with a conventional single bed reactor system. The methane selectivity in the dual-bed reactor was about 18.9% less compared to that of the single-bed reactor. The C 5+ selectivity for the dual-bed reactor was 10.9% higher than that of the single-bed reactor. Accelerated deactivation of the catalysts in the dual-bed reactor was 42% lower than that of the single-bed reactor. It was revealed that the amount of catalysts activity recovery after regeneration at 400 d eg C in the dual-bed system is higher than that of the single-bed system

  6. Reaction of methane with coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, K.; Batts, B.D.; Wilson, M.A.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Maa, P.S.; Long, M.A.; He, S.J.X.; Attala, M.I. [Macquarie University, Macquarie, NSW (Australia). School of Chemistry

    1997-10-01

    A study of the reactivities of Australian coals and one American coal with methane or methane-hydrogen mixtures, in the range 350-400{degree}C and a range of pressures (6.0-8.3 MPa, cold) is reported. The effects of aluminophosphates (AIPO) or zeolite catalysts, with and without exchanged metals, on reactivity have also been examined. Yields of dichloromethane extractable material are increased by using a methane rather than a nitrogen atmosphere and different catalysts assist dissolution to various extends. It appears that surface exchanged catalysts are effective, but incorporating metals during AIPO lattice formation is detrimental. Aluminium phosphate catalysts are unstable to water produced during coal conversion, but are still able to increase extraction yields. For the American coal, under methane-hydrogen and a copper exchanged zeolite, 51.5% conversion was obtained, with a product selectivity close to that obtained under hydrogen alone, and with only 2% hydrogen consumption. The conversion under methane-hydrogen was also to that obtained under hydrogen alone, while a linear dependence of conversion on proportion of methane would predict a 43% conversion under methane-hydrogen. This illustrates a synergistic effect of the methane-hydrogen atmosphere for coal liquefaction using this catalyst systems. 31 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Methane adsorption on activated carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perl, Andras; Koopman, Folkert; Jansen, Peter; de Rooij, Marietta; van Gemert, Wim

    2014-01-01

    Methane storage in adsorbed form is a promising way to effectively and safely store fuel for vehicular transportation or for any other potential application. In a solid adsorbent, nanometer wide pores can trap methane by van der Waals forces as high density fluid at low pressure and room

  8. Combustion of gases released from peat or biomass in fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raiko, R. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Energy and Process Engineering

    1996-12-01

    Temperature and gas concentration experiments have been conducted to determine at what temperature carbon monoxide, methane and propane begin to react within the particulate phase of a bubbling fluidized bed. The fluidized bed reactor used in these experiments was a stainless-steel tube with an internal diameter of 50 mm surrounded by an electric heater. Two different natural quartz sands were used (d{sub p} =0.35 mm and 0.6 mm). The bed height used varied between 100 and 260 mm (in unfluidized state). A porous plate distributor, made of kaowool, was used to avoid jets appearing at the distributor. The bed was operated at incipient fluidization (u = 5.9-9 cm/s). The bed temperatures used ranged from 600 deg C to 850 deg C. It was found that carbon monoxide, methane and propane react inside a fluidized bed, but often other conditions than temperature have a considerable effect on the rate of the reaction. The critical temperature was found to be 650 deg C for propane and carbon monoxide and 700 deg C for methane. With under-stoichiometric mixture of carbon monoxide and air the heat release can be over 2.5 MW/m{sup 3} when bed temperature is 650 deg C. According to these experiments it is obvious that the reaction mechanism for carbon monoxide oxidation inside a fluidized bed differs greatly from that of gas phase only. The results of our more than 1300 test runs show clearly the varying effects of the different bed materials. Even with the same bed material totally different results can be obtained. In order to elucidate the possible changes of particle surface, microscopic and porosimetric studies was conducted with both fresh bed particles and used bed particles. Also the effect of commonly used ingredients, like limestone and dolomite, was tested. A global model for carbon monoxide oxidation inside a fluidized bed was introduced. The model was tested against measured data from the laboratory-scale fluidized bed test rig. (Abstract Truncated)

  9. Pebble-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohnert, G.; Mueller-Frank, U.; Heil, J.

    1976-01-01

    A pebble-bed nuclear reactor of large power rating comprises a container having a funnel-shaped bottom forming a pebble run-out having a centrally positioned outlet. A bed of downwardly-flowing substantially spherical nuclear fuel pebbles is positioned in the container and forms a reactive nuclear core maintained by feeding unused pebbles to the bed's top surface while used or burned-out pebbles run out and discharge through the outlet. A substantially conical body with its apex pointing upwardly and its periphery spaced from the periphery of the container spreads the bottom of the bed outwardly to provide an annular flow down the funnel-shaped bottom forming the runout, to the discharge outlet. This provides a largely constant downward velocity of the spheres throughout the diameter of the bed throughout a substantial portion of the down travel, so that all spheres reach about the same burned-out condition when they leave the core, after a single pass through the core area

  10. Fluidised bed heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, D.E.; Healey, E.M.; Roberts, A.G.

    1974-01-01

    Problems that have arisen during the initial stages of development of fluidised bed boilers in which heat transfer surfaces are immersed in fluidised solids are discussed. The very high heat transfer coefficients that are obtained under these conditions can be exploited to reduce the total heat transfer surface to a fraction of that in normal boilers. However, with the high heat flux levels involved, tube stressing becomes more important and it is advantageous to use smaller diameter tubes. One of the initial problems was that the pumping power absorbed by the fluidised bed appeared to be high. The relative influence of the fluidising velocity (and the corresponding bed area), tube diameter, tube spacing, heat transfer coefficient and bed temperature on pumping power and overall cost was determined. This showed the importance of close tube packing and research was undertaken to see if this would adversely affect the heat transfer coefficient. Pressure operation also reduces the pumping power. Fouling and corrosion tests in beds burning coal suggest that higher temperatures could be reached reliably and cost studies show that, provided the better refractory metals are used, the cost of achieving higher temperatures is not unduly high. It now remains to demonstrate at large scale that the proposed systems are viable and that the methods incorporated to overcome start up and part lead running problems are satisfactory. The promising role of these heat transfer techniques in other applications is briefly discussed

  11. Aerated biofilters with multiple-level air injection configurations to enhance biological treatment of methane emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhzadeh, Hasti; Hettiaratchi, J Patrick A; Jayasinghe, Poornima; Kumar, Sunil

    2017-09-01

    Aiming to improve conventional methane biofilter performance, a multiple-level aeration biofilter design is proposed. Laboratory flow-through column experiments were conducted to evaluate three actively-aerated methane biofilter configurations. Columns were aerated at one, two, and three levels of the bed depth, with air introduced at flow rates calculated from methane oxidation reaction stoichiometry. Inlet methane loading rates were increased in five stages between 6 and 18mL/min. The effects of methane feeding rate, levels of aeration, and residence time on methane oxidation rates were determined. Samples collected after completion of flow-through experiments were used to determine methane oxidation kinetic parameters, V max , K m , and methanotrophic community distribution across biofilter columns. Results obtained from mixed variances analysis and response surfaces, as well as methanotrophic activity data, suggested that, biofilter column with two aeration levels has the most even performance over time, maintaining 85.1% average oxidation efficiency over 95days of experiments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Oxygen-Methane Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Tim

    2012-01-01

    An oxygen-methane thruster was conceived with integrated igniter/injector capable of nominal operation on either gaseous or liquid propellants. The thruster was designed to develop 100 lbf (approximately 445 N) thrust at vacuum conditions and use oxygen and methane as propellants. This continued development included refining the design of the thruster to minimize part count and manufacturing difficulties/cost, refining the modeling tools and capabilities that support system design and analysis, demonstrating the performance of the igniter and full thruster assembly with both gaseous and liquid propellants, and acquiring data from this testing in order to verify the design and operational parameters of the thruster. Thruster testing was conducted with gaseous propellants used for the igniter and thruster. The thruster was demonstrated to work with all types of propellant conditions, and provided the desired performance. Both the thruster and igniter were tested, as well as gaseous propellants, and found to provide the desired performance using the various propellant conditions. The engine also served as an injector testbed for MSFC-designed refractory combustion chambers made of rhenium.

  13. Search for interstellar methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knacke, R.F.; Kim, Y.H.; Noll, K.S.; Geballe, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers searched for interstellar methane in the spectra of infrared sources embedded in molecular clouds. New observations of several lines of the P and R branches of the nu 3 band of CH4 near 3.3 microns give column densities in the range N less than 1(-2) times 10 to the minus 16th power cm(-2). Resulting abundance ratios are (CH4)/(CO) less than 3.3 times 10 to the minus 2nd power toward GL961 in NGC 2244 and less than 2.4 times 10 to the minus 3rd power toward GL989 in the NGC 2264 molecular cloud. The limits, and those determined in earlier observations of BN in Orion and GL490, suggest that there is little methane in molecular clouds. The result agrees with predictions of chemical models. Exceptions could occur in clouds where oxygen may be depleted, for example by H2O freezing on grains. The present observations probably did not sample such regions

  14. Enhanced activity and stability of La-doped CeO2 monolithic catalysts for lean-oxygen methane combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenjun; Jin, Jianhui; Chen, Xiao; Li, Chuang; Wang, Tonghua; Tsang, Chi-Wing; Liang, Changhai

    2018-02-01

    Effective utilization of coal bed methane is very significant for energy utilization and environment protection. Catalytic combustion of methane is a promising way to eliminate trace amounts of oxygen in the coal bed methane and the key to this technology is the development of high-efficiency catalysts. Herein, we report a series of Ce 1-x La x O 2-δ (x = 0-0.8) monolithic catalysts for the catalytic combustion of methane, which are prepared by citric acid method. The structural characterization shows that the substitution of La enhance the oxygen vacancy concentration and reducibility of the supports and promote the migration of the surface oxygen, as a result improve the catalytic activity of CeO 2 . M-Ce 0.8 La 0.2 O 2-δ (monolithic catalyst, Ce 0.8 La 0.2 O 2-δ coated on cordierite honeycomb) exhibits outstanding activity for methane combustion, and the temperature for 10 and 90% methane conversion are 495 and 580 °C, respectively. Additionally, Ce 0.8 La 0.2 O 2-δ monolithic catalyst presents excellent stability at high temperature. These Ce 1-x La x O 2-δ monolithic materials with a small amount of La incorporation therefore show promises as highly efficient solid solution catalysts for lean-oxygen methane combustion. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  15. Clearance Analysis of Node 3 Aft CBM to the Stowed FGB Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Donn

    2014-01-01

    In early 2011, the ISS Vehicle Configuration Office began considering the relocation of the Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) to the aft facing Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) on Node 3 to open a berthing location for visiting vehicles on the Node 1 nadir CBM. In this position, computer-aided design (CAD) models indicated that the aft end of the PMM would be only a few inches from the stowed Functional Cargo Block (FGB) port solar array. To validate the CAD model clearance analysis, in the late summer of 2011 the Image Science and Analysis Group (ISAG) was asked to determine the true geometric relationship between the on-orbit aft facing Node 3 CBM and the FGB port solar array. The desired measurements could be computed easily by photogrammetric analysis if current imagery of the ISS hardware were obtained. Beginning in the fall of 2011, ISAG used the Dynamic Onboard Ubiquitous Graphics (DOUG) program to design a way to acquire imagery of the aft face of Node 3, the aft end-cone of Node 1, the port side of pressurized mating adapter 1 (PMA1), and the port side of the FGB out to the tip of the port solar array using cameras on the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS). This was complicated by the need to thread the SSRMS under the truss, past Node 3 and the Cupola, and into the space between the aft side of Node 3 and the FGB solar array to acquire more than 100 images from multiple positions. To minimize the number of SSRMS movements, the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) would be attached to the SSRMS. This would make it possible to park the SPDM in one position and acquire multiple images by changing the viewing orientation of the SPDM body cameras using the pan/tilt units on which the cameras are mounted. Using this implementation concept, ISAG identified four SSRMS/SPDM positions from which all of the needed imagery could be acquired. Based on a photogrammetric simulation, it was estimated that the location of the FGB solar array could be

  16. Methane production and methane consumption: a review of processes underlying wetland methane fluxes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, R.

    1998-01-01

    Potential rates of both methane production and methane consumption vary over three orders of magnitude and their distribution is skew. These rates are weakly correlated with ecosystem type, incubation temperature, in situ aeration, latitude, depth and distance to oxic/anoxic interface. Anaerobic

  17. Positive imagery cognitive bias modification (CBM) and internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) versus control CBM and iCBT for depression: study protocol for a parallel-group randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Alishia D; Blackwell, Simon E; Holmes, Emily A; Andrews, Gavin

    2013-10-29

    The current randomised controlled trial will evaluate the efficacy of an internet-delivered positive imagery cognitive bias modification (CBM) intervention for depression when compared with an active control condition and help establish the additive benefit of positive imagery CBM when delivered in combination with internet cognitive behavioural therapy for depression. Patients meeting diagnostic criteria for a current major depressive episode will be recruited through the research arm of a not-for-profit clinical and research unit in Australia. The minimum sample size for each group (α set at 0.05, power at 0.80) was identified as 29, but at least 10% more will be recruited to hedge against expected attrition. We will measure the impact of CBM on primary measures of depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory-second edition (BDI-II), Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9)) and interpretive bias (ambiguous scenarios test-depression), and on a secondary measure of psychological distress (Kessler-10 (K10)) following the 1-week CBM intervention. Secondary outcome measures of psychological distress (K10), as well as disability (WHO disability assessment schedule-II), repetitive negative thinking (repetitive thinking questionnaire), and anxiety (state trait anxiety inventory-trait version) will be evaluated following completion of the 11-week combined intervention, in addition to the BDI-II and PHQ9. Intent-to-treat marginal and mixed effect models using restricted maximum likelihood estimation will be used to evaluate the primary hypotheses. Clinically significant change will be defined as high-end state functioning (a BDI-II score reduction greater than the reliable change index score. Maintenance of gains will be assessed at 3-month follow-up. The current trial protocol has been approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee of St Vincent's Hospital and the University of New South Wales, Sydney. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12613000139774

  18. in Spouted Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronislaw Buczek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Samples of active coke, fresh and spent after cleaning flue gases from communal waste incinerators, were investigated. The outer layers of both coke particles were separately removed by comminution in a spouted bed. The samples of both active cokes were analysed by means of densities, mercury porosimetry, and adsorption technique. Remaining cores were examined to determine the degree of consumption of coke by the sorption of hazardous emissions (SO2, HCl, and heavy metals through its bed. Differences in contamination levels within the porous structure of the particles were estimated. The study demonstrated the effectiveness of commercial active coke in the cleaning of flue gases.

  19. The Safety of Hospital Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Pierre; Pooler, Charlotte; Merryweather, Andrew; Doig, Alexa K.; Bloswick, Donald

    2015-01-01

    To explore the safety of the standard and the low hospital bed, we report on a microanalysis of 15 patients’ ability to ingress, move about the bed, and egress. The 15 participants were purposefully selected with various disabilities. Bed conditions were randomized with side rails up or down and one low bed with side rails down. We explored the patients’ use of the side rails, bed height, ability to lift their legs onto the mattress, and ability to turn, egress, and walk back to the chair. The standard bed was too high for some participants, both for ingress and egress. Side rails were used by most participants when entering, turning in bed, and exiting. We recommend that side rails be reconsidered as a means to facilitate in-bed movement, ingress, and egress. Furthermore, single deck height settings for all patients are not optimal. Low beds as a safety measure must be re-evaluated. PMID:28462302

  20. Methane Recycling During Burial of Methane Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, K.; Flemings, P. B.

    2017-12-01

    We quantitatively investigate the integral processes of methane hydrate formation from local microbial methane generation, burial of methane hydrate with sedimentation, and methane recycling at the base of the hydrate stability zone (BHSZ) with a multiphase multicomponent numerical model. Methane recycling happens in cycles, and there is not a steady state. Each cycle starts with free gas accumulation from hydrate dissociation below the BHSZ. This free gas flows upward under buoyancy, elevates the hydrate saturation and capillary entry pressure at the BHSZ, and this prevents more free gas flowing in. Later as this layer with elevated hydrate saturation is buried and dissociated, the large amount of free gas newly released and accumulated below rapidly intrudes into the hydrate stability zone, drives rapid hydrate formation and creates three-phase (gas, liquid and hydrate) equilibrium above the BHSZ. The gas front retreats to below the BHSZ until all the free gas is depleted. The shallowest depth that the free gas reaches in one cycle moves toward seafloor as more and more methane is accumulated to the BHSZ with time. More methane is stored above the BHSZ in the form of concentrated hydrate in sediments with relatively uniform pore throat, and/or with greater compressibility. It is more difficult to initiate methane recycling in passive continental margins where the sedimentation rate is low, and in sediments with low organic matter content and/or methanogenesis reaction rate. The presence of a permeable layer can store methane for significant periods of time without recycling. In a 2D system where the seafloor dips rapidly, the updip gas flow along the BHSZ transports more methane toward topographic highs where methane gas and elevated hydrate saturation intrude deeper into the hydrate stability zone within one cycle. This could lead to intermittent gas venting at seafloor at the topographic highs. This study provides insights on many phenomenon associated with

  1. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  2. Titan's methane clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Romani, P. N.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Flasar, F. M.

    2010-04-01

    Measurements of the 12C/13C and D/H isotopic ratios in Titan's methane show intriguing differences from the values recorded in the giant planets. This implies that either (1) the atmosphere was differently endowed with material at the time of formation, or (2) evolutionary processes are at work in the moon's atmosphere - or some combination of the two. The Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer Instrument (GCMS) found 12CH4/13CH4 = 82 +/- 1 (Niemann et al. 2005), some 7% lower than the giant planets' value of 88 +/- 7 (Sada et al. 1996), which closely matches the terrestrial inorganic standard of 89. The Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) has previously reported 12CH4/13CH4 of 77 +/-3 based on nadir sounding, which we now revise upwards to 80 +/- 4 based on more accurate limb sounding. The CIRS and GCMS results are therefore in agreement about an overall enrichment in 13CH4 of ~10%. The value of D/H in Titan's CH4 has long been controversial: historical measurements have ranged from about 8-15 x 10-5 (e.g. Coustenis et al. 1989, Coustenis et al. 2003). A recent measurement based on CIRS limb data by Bezard et al. (2007) puts the D/H in CH4 at (13 +/- 1) x 10-5, very much greater than in Jupiter and Saturn, ~2 x 10-5 (Mahaffy et al. 1998, Fletcher et al. 2009). To add complexity, the 12C/13C and D/H vary among molecules in Titan atmosphere, typically showing enhancement in D but depletion in 13C in the daughter species (H2, C2H2, C2H6), relative to the photochemical progenitor, methane. Jennings et al. (2009) have sought to interpret the variance in carbon isotopes as a Kinetic Isotope Effect (KIE), whilst an explanation for the D/H in all molecules remains elusive (Cordier et al. 2008). In this presentation we argue that evolution of isotopic ratios in Titan's methane over time forms a ticking 'clock', somewhat analogous to isotopic ratios in geochronology. Under plausible assumptions about the initial values and subsequent replenishment, various

  3. Investigation of Adsorbed Gases Content in Coal Beds in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadadinovic, J.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the gas fraction in coal beds in Bosnia & Herzegovina has been performed systematically since 1988. Gas in coal beds can be present in free or adsorbed form, and dissolved in water. Methods of investigation are based on the direct approach, according to which the gas fraction is determined in the undisturbed coal bed.The quantity of the adsorbed and free gas in the coal bed is directly proportional to the gas pressure. Dependence is hyperbolic. The quantity of the free gas in mining conditions is being determined by measurement of the desorption index (Δp2. The desorption index for the Srednjobosanski coal basin ranges to 1571 Pa, and the free gas pressure in this coal basin amounts up to 3.75 MPa. The desorption index for coal beds in “Kreka” and “Banoviće” coal basins has negative values, which means that the free gas fraction within the coal beds is negligible, while separation of adsorbed gases is diffuse. The free gas pressure in the mentioned coal basins is below 0.1 MPa. Adsorbed gases within the coal are connected by physical adsorption according to Langmuir’s isothermal adsorption curve. Langmuir’s quantities, for coal bed conditions, ranges as follows: am from 0.826 to 9.52 m3 t–1 pcs, and b from 6.65 10–3 to 0.247 MPa–1. Adsorbed gas within Miocene coal beds contains methane in amounts of 1.49 m3 t–1 čus CH4 andcarbon(IVoxide in amounts of 0.15 m3 t–1 čus CO2. Adsorbed gas within Pliocene coal beds, without methane, dominant is content of carbon(IVoxide.The investigation of the gas content in coal beds of BiH conducted in this article reveal that the coal beds primarily contain methane, while others hydrocarbons such as ethane, ethene, propane, propene and butane are present sporadically in fraction below φ/10–6. Based on the investigation results conducted in this article, simple mathematical forms were obtained for quick calculation of the free gas quantity by measurement of the

  4. Technology of double casing tubes & a binary cycle system for hole cleaning for CBM multi-branch horizontal wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available At present, the aeration-assisted cutting-carrying technology is faced with complexities in the drilling of CBM multi-branch horizontal wells. For example, the aerating pressure is hardly maintained, and the borehole instability may happen. In view of these prominent problems, the technology of double casing tubes & a binary cycle system suitable for CBM multi-branch horizontal wells was developed according to the Venturi principle by means of parasitic tube insufflation which is used for well control simulation system. Then, a multiphase flow finite element model was established for the fluid-cutting particle system in this drilling condition. This technology was tested in field. Double-casing tubes cementing is adopted in this technology and a jet generator is installed at the bottom of the inner casing. In the process of drilling, the drilling fluid injected through double intermediate casing annulus is converted by the jet generator into a high-efficiency steering water jet, which, together with the water jet generated by the bit nozzle, increases the fluid returning rate in the inner annulus space. It is indicated from simulation results that the cutting-carrying effect is the best when the included angle between the nozzle of the jet generator and the vertical direction is 30°. Besides, the influential laws of cutting size, primary cycle volume, accessory cycle volume and drilling velocity on hole cleaning are figured out. It is concluded that this technology increases the flow rate of drilling fluid in annulus space, the returning rate of drilling fluid significantly and the cutting-carrying capacity. It is currently one of the effective hole cleaning technologies for CBM multi-branch horizontal wells where fresh water is taken as the drilling fluid.

  5. Apparatus for controlling fluidized beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmat, A.G.; Patel, J.G.

    1987-05-12

    An apparatus and process are disclosed for control and maintenance of fluidized beds under non-steady state conditions. An ash removal conduit is provided for removing solid particulates from a fluidized bed separate from an ash discharge conduit in the lower portion of the grate supporting such a bed. The apparatus and process of this invention is particularly suitable for use in ash agglomerating fluidized beds and provides control of the fluidized bed before ash agglomeration is initiated and during upset conditions resulting in stable, sinter-free fluidized bed maintenance. 2 figs.

  6. On electron and pion identification using a multilayer perceptron in the transition radiation detector of the CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akishina, T.P.; Denisova, O.Yu.; Ivanov, V.V.

    2009-01-01

    The problem of pion-electron identification based on their energy losses in the TRD is considered in the frame of the CBM experiment. For particles identification an artificial neural network (ANN) was used, a multilayer perceptron realized in JETNET and ROOT packages. It is demonstrated that, in order to get correct and comparable results, it is important to define the network structure correctly. The recommendations for such a selection are given. In order to achieve an acceptable level of pions suppression, the energy losses need to be transformed to more 'effective' variables. The dependency of ANN output threshold for a fixed portion of electron loss on the particle momentum is presented

  7. Fluidized bed calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheely, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    A unique way to convert radioactive scrap into useful nuclear fuel products was developed for the Department of Energy at Hanford. An advanced, fluidized bed calciner is used to convert metallic nitrate scrap or waste solutions into benign, solid and gaseous products. There are broad potential applications of this concept beyond those in the nuclear industry

  8. Nail Bed Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Nail Bed Injuries Email to a friend * required ...

  9. Bed Bug Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn the truth about bed bugs, such as how easy they are to see with the naked eye, their preferred habitat, whether they transmit diseases, their public health effects, and whether pesticides are the best way to deal with an infestation.

  10. Forecast fire damp emission in thin, steep coal bed; Prevision de Desprendimiento de Grisu en Capas Estrechas e Inclindas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    A model to forecast fire damp emission in thin, steep coal bed, mining in advance and backfill works, has been developed and validated. The model estimates the amount of methane released towards the works, including fire damp proceeding from the actually mined seam, as well as methane coming from adjacent seams layers, depending on easy-to find parameters. Methane coming from the mined seam is determined as a function of the methane concentration in the seam and methane from adjacent seams is assessed by the degassification degree. This parameter depends also on the distance to the mined seam. The influence volume of a thin, steep mined coal bed has been determined, in order to study which seams and layers release methane towards the works. The works to develop the methane emission model were done in a coal face on Maria seam, in San Antonio mine, belonging to HUNOSA. The validation works were carried out in 24 left south seam, in the belonging to Minas de Figaredo, S. A. (Author)

  11. Recent advances in methane activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huuska, M; Kataja, K [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Considerable work has been done in the research and development of methane conversion technologies. Although some promising conversion processes have been demonstrated, further advances in engineering and also in the chemistry are needed before these technologies become commercial. High-temperature processes, e.g. the oxidative coupling of methane, studied thoroughly during the last 15 years, suffer from severe theoretical yield limits and poor economics. In the long term, the most promising approaches seem to be the organometallic and, especially, the biomimetic activation of methane. (author) (22 refs.)

  12. Recent advances in methane activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huuska, M.; Kataja, K. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Considerable work has been done in the research and development of methane conversion technologies. Although some promising conversion processes have been demonstrated, further advances in engineering and also in the chemistry are needed before these technologies become commercial. High-temperature processes, e.g. the oxidative coupling of methane, studied thoroughly during the last 15 years, suffer from severe theoretical yield limits and poor economics. In the long term, the most promising approaches seem to be the organometallic and, especially, the biomimetic activation of methane. (author) (22 refs.)

  13. Methane hydroxylation: a biomimetic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilov, Aleksandr E; Shteinman, Al'bert A

    2012-01-01

    The review addresses direct methane oxidation — an important fundamental problem, which has attracted much attention of researchers in recent years. Analysis of the available results on biomimetic and bio-inspired methane oxygenation has demonstrated that assimilating of the experience of Nature on oxidation of methane and other alkanes significantly enriches the arsenal of chemistry and can radically change the character of the entire chemical production, as well as enables the solution of many material, energetic and environmental problems. The bibliography includes 310 references.

  14. Global Methane Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeburgh, W. S.

    2003-12-01

    Methane (CH4) has been studied as an atmospheric constituent for over 200 years. A 1776 letter from Alessandro Volta to Father Campi described the first experiments on flammable "air" released by shallow sediments in Lake Maggiore (Wolfe, 1996; King, 1992). The first quantitative measurements of CH4, both involving combustion and gravimetric determination of trapped oxidation products, were reported in French by Boussingault and Boussingault, 1864 and Gautier (1901), who reported CH4 concentrations of 10 ppmv and 0.28 ppmv (seashore) and 95 ppmv (Paris), respectively. The first modern measurements of atmospheric CH4 were the infrared absorption measurements of Migeotte (1948), who estimated an atmospheric concentration of 2.0 ppmv. Development of gas chromatography and the flame ionization detector in the 1950s led to observations of vertical CH4 distributions in the troposphere and stratosphere, and to establishment of time-series sampling programs in the late 1970s. Results from these sampling programs led to suggestions that the concentration of CH4, as that of CO2, was increasing in the atmosphere. The possible role of CH4 as a greenhouse gas stimulated further research on CH4 sources and sinks. Methane has also been of interest to microbiologists, but findings from microbiology have entered the larger context of the global CH4 budget only recently.Methane is the most abundant hydrocarbon in the atmosphere. It plays important roles in atmospheric chemistry and the radiative balance of the Earth. Stratospheric oxidation of CH4 provides a means of introducing water vapor above the tropopause. Methane reacts with atomic chlorine in the stratosphere, forming HCl, a reservoir species for chlorine. Some 90% of the CH4 entering the atmosphere is oxidized through reactions initiated by the OH radical. These reactions are discussed in more detail by Wofsy (1976) and Cicerone and Oremland (1988), and are important in controlling the oxidation state of the atmosphere

  15. Papers of a Canadian Institute conference : Unconventional gas symposium : Tight gas, gas shales, coalbed methane, gas hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This symposium provided an opportunity for participants to learn from gas industry leaders in both Canada and the United States, different strategies to cost-effectively develop unconventional gas resources. In particular, the representative from EnCana Corporation discussed the results of tight gas drilling in Northeastern British Columbia. The speaker for MGV Energy reported on the outcome of test drilling for coalbed methane (CBM) in Southern Alberta. The economic development of tight gas reservoirs in the United States Permian Basin was discussed by the speaker representing BP America Production Company. The role of unconventional gas in the North American natural gas supply and demand picture was dealt with by TransCanada PipeLines Limited and Canadian Gas Potential Committee. The trend for natural gas prices in North America was examined by Conoco Inc. The Geological Survey of Canada addressed the issue of gas hydrate potential in the Mackenzie Delta Mallik Field. In addition, one presentation by El Paso Production Company discussed the successful drilling for deep, tight gas and CBM in the United States. There were nine presentations at this symposium, of which three were indexed separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  16. 7 CFR 2902.15 - Bedding, bed linens, and towels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 2902.15 Bedding, bed linens, and towels. (a) Definition. (1) Bedding is that... minimum biobased content is 12 percent and shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in..., and silk are not qualifying biobased feedstocks for the purpose of determining the biobased content of...

  17. Ammonia, Total Reduced Sulfides, and Greenhouse Gases of Pine Chip and Corn Stover Bedding Packs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiehs, Mindy J; Brown-Brandl, Tami M; Parker, David B; Miller, Daniel N; Berry, Elaine D; Wells, James E

    2016-03-01

    Bedding materials may affect air quality in livestock facilities. Our objective in this study was to compare headspace concentrations of ammonia (NH), total reduced sulfides (TRS), carbon dioxide (CO), methane (CH), and nitrous oxide (NO) when pine wood chips ( spp.) and corn stover ( L.) were mixed in various ratios (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 60, 80, and 100% pine chips) and used as bedding with manure. Air samples were collected from the headspace of laboratory-scaled bedded manure packs weekly for 42 d. Ammonia concentrations were highest for bedded packs containing 0, 10, and 20% pine chips (equivalent to 501.7, 502.3, and 502.3 mg m, respectively) in the bedding mixture and were lowest when at least 80% pine chips were used as bedding (447.3 and 431.0 mg m, respectively for 80 and 100% pine chip bedding). The highest NH concentrations were observed at Day 28. The highest concentration of TRS was observed when 100% pine chips were used as bedding (11.4 µg m), with high concentrations occurring between Days 7 and 14, and again at Day 35. Greenhouse gases were largely unaffected by bedding material but CH and CO concentrations increased as the bedded packs aged and NO concentrations were highly variable throughout the incubation. We conclude that a mixture of bedding material that contains 30 to 40% pine chips may be the ideal combination to reduce both NH and TRS emissions. All gas concentrations increased as the bedded packs aged, suggesting that frequent cleaning of facilities would improve air quality in the barn, regardless of bedding materials used. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  18. VA National Bed Control System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA National Bed Control System records the levels of operating, unavailable and authorized beds at each VAMC, and it tracks requests for changes in these levels....

  19. Getting Rid of Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Directory Planning, Budget and Results Jobs and Internships Headquarters Offices Regional Offices Labs and Research Centers Bed ... to be careful in how you select a company. Related Information Collaborative Strategy on Bed Bugs - highlights ...

  20. Synthetic methane for power storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botta, G.; Barankin, Michael; Walspurger, S.

    2013-01-01

    With increased share of energy generated from variable renewable sources, storage becomes a critical issue to ensure constantly balanced supply/demand. Methane is a promising vector for energy storage and transport.

  1. Methane flux from boreal peatlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crill, P.; Bartlett, K.; Roulet, N.

    1992-01-01

    The peatlands in the boreal zone (roughly 45 deg - 60 degN) store a significant reservoir of carbon, much of which is potentially available for exchange with the atmosphere. The anaerobic conditions that cause these soils to accumulate carbon also makes wet, boreal peatlands significant sources of methane to the global troposphere. It is estimated that boreal wetlands contribute approximately 19.5 Tg methane per year. The data available on the magnitude of boreal methane emissions have rapidly accumulated in the past twenty years. This paper offers a short review of the flux measured (with range roughly 1 - 2000 mg methane/m2d), considers environmental controls of the flux and briefly discusses how climate change might affect future fluxes

  2. Enteric Methane Emission from Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henry; Theil, Peter Kappel; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2011-01-01

    per kg meat produced is increased (Fernández et al. 1983; Lekule et al. 1990). The present chapter will summarise our current knowledge concerning dietary and enteric fermentation that may influence the methane (CH4) emission in pigs. Enteric fermentation is the digestive process by which.......3 % of the worlds pig population. The main number of pigs is in Asia (59.6 %) where the main pig population stay in China (47.8 % of the worlds pig population). The objective of the chapter is therefore: To obtain a general overview of the pigs’ contribution to methane emission. Where is the pigs’ enteric gas...... produced and how is it measured. The variation in methane emission and factors affecting the emission. Possibility for reducing the enteric methane emission and the consequences....

  3. Methane-bomb natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    About 50% of the so-called 'greenhouse-effect' is not caused by CO 2 , but by more dangerous gases, among them is methane. Natural gas consists to about 98% of methane. In Austria result about 15% of the methane emissions from offtake, storage, transport (pipelines) and distribution from natural gas. A research study of the Research Centre Seibersdorf points out that between 2.5% and 3.6% of the employed natural gas in Austria emits. The impact of this emitted methane is about 29 times worse than the impact of CO 2 (caused for examples by petroleum burning). Nevertheless the Austrian CO 2 -commission states that an increasing use of natural gas would decrease the CO 2 -emissions - but this statement is suspected to be based on wrong assumptions. (blahsl)

  4. Methane emissions from MBT landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyer, K.-U., E-mail: heyer@ifas-hamburg.de; Hupe, K.; Stegmann, R.

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Compilation of methane generation potential of mechanical biological treated (MBT) municipal solid waste. • Impacts and kinetics of landfill gas production of MBT landfills, approach with differentiated half-lives. • Methane oxidation in the waste itself and in soil covers. • Estimation of methane emissions from MBT landfills in Germany. - Abstract: Within the scope of an investigation for the German Federal Environment Agency (“Umweltbundesamt”), the basics for the estimation of the methane emissions from the landfilling of mechanically and biologically treated waste (MBT) were developed. For this purpose, topical research including monitoring results regarding the gas balance at MBT landfills was evaluated. For waste treated to the required German standards, a methane formation potential of approximately 18–24 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/t of total dry solids may be expected. Monitoring results from MBT landfills show that a three-phase model with differentiated half-lives describes the degradation kinetics in the best way. This is due to the fact that during the first years of disposal, the anaerobic degradation processes still proceed relatively intensively. In addition in the long term (decades), a residual gas production at a low level is still to be expected. Most of the soils used in recultivation layer systems at German landfills show a relatively high methane oxidation capacity up to 5 l CH{sub 4}/(m{sup 2} h). However, measurements at MBT disposal sites indicate that the majority of the landfill gas (in particular at non-covered areas), leaves the landfill body via preferred gas emission zones (hot spots) without significant methane oxidation. Therefore, rather low methane oxidation factors are recommended for open and temporarily covered MBT landfills. Higher methane oxidation rates can be achieved when the soil/recultivation layer is adequately designed and operated. Based on the elaborated default values, the First Order Decay (FOD

  5. Methane gas from cow dung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-01-01

    The Khadi and Village Industries Commission offers a gobar gas (methane gas) production scheme. The gas plant, available in sizes of 60 to 3000 cu ft, requires only low maintenance expenditures. The cow dung, which is at present being wasted or burned as domestic fuel, can be used for manufacturing methane for fuel gas. The residue will be a good fertilizer for increasing food production. There are now about 4000 gobar gas plants in India.

  6. The Causes and Prevention Measures of Stuck Pump Phenomenon of Rod-pumped Well in CBM Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonggui, Mei

    2018-02-01

    In the process of CBM field exploitation, in order to realize the drainage equipment to work continuous stably, the article pays attention to study and solve the stuck pump problem, and aim of reducing reservoir damage and lowing production costs. Through coal particles stuck pump experiment and sediment composition analysis, we find out five primary cause of stuck pump phenomenon: sand from coal seam, sediment from ground, iron corrosion, iron scrap caused by eccentric wear, coal cake. According to stuck pump mechanism, the article puts forward 8 measures to prevent stuck pump phenomenon, and the measures are focused on technology optimization, operation management and drainage process control. After 7 years production practice, the yearly stuck pump rate has dropped from 8.9% to 1.2%, and the pump inspection period has prolonged 2 times. The experiment result shows that pure coal particles cannot cause stuck pump, but sand, scrap iron, and iron corrosion are the primary cause of stuck pump. The article study and design the new pipe string structure that the bottom of the pipe string is open. This kind of pipe string applied the sedimentation terminal velocity theory to solve the stuck pump phenomenon, and it can be widely used in CBM drainage development.

  7. Characterization of silicon microstrip sensors, front-end electronics, and prototype tracking detectors for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorokin, Iurii

    2013-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment will explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter in the region of high net baryonic densities. The matter at the extreme conditions will be studied in collisions of a heavy ion beam with a fixed heavy element target. The present work is devoted to the development of the main component of the CBM experiment - the Silicon Tracking System (STS). The STS has to enable reconstruction of up to 1000 charged particle tracks per nucleus-nucleus interaction at the rate of up to 10 MHz, provide a momentum resolution Δp/p of 1 %, and withstand the radiation load of up to 10 14 n eq /cm 2 (n eq -neutron equivalent). The STS will be based on double-sided silicon microstrip sensors, that will be arranged in 8 planes in the aperture of the dipole magnet. Selftriggering readout electronics will be located on the periphery of the detecting planes, and connected to the sensors with low mass microcables. In the stage of R and D, as well as in the stages of pre-series and series production, characterization of the sensors, of the front-end electronics, and of the complete detector modules has to be performed. In the present work the required techniques were developed, and the performance of the latest detector prototypes was evaluated. A particular attention is paid to evaluation of the signal amplitude, as it is one of the most important detector characteristics. Techniques for measuring the passive electrical characteristics of the sensors were developed. These include: the coupling and the interstrip capacitances, the interstrip resistance, the bias resistance, the strip leakage current, the bulk capacitance, and the bulk leakage current. The techniques will be applied for the quality assurance of the sensors during the pre-series and the series production. Extensive characterization of the prototype readout chip, n-XYTER, was performed. The register settings were optimized, and the dependence of the amplitude response on

  8. Characterization of silicon microstrip sensors, front-end electronics, and prototype tracking detectors for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorokin, Iurii

    2013-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment will explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter in the region of high net baryonic densities. The matter at the extreme conditions will be studied in collisions of a heavy ion beam with a fixed heavy element target. The present work is devoted to the development of the main component of the CBM experiment - the Silicon Tracking System (STS). The STS has to enable reconstruction of up to 1000 charged particle tracks per nucleus-nucleus interaction at the rate of up to 10 MHz, provide a momentum resolution Δp/p of 1 %, and withstand the radiation load of up to 10{sup 14} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} (n{sub eq}-neutron equivalent). The STS will be based on double-sided silicon microstrip sensors, that will be arranged in 8 planes in the aperture of the dipole magnet. Selftriggering readout electronics will be located on the periphery of the detecting planes, and connected to the sensors with low mass microcables. In the stage of R and D, as well as in the stages of pre-series and series production, characterization of the sensors, of the front-end electronics, and of the complete detector modules has to be performed. In the present work the required techniques were developed, and the performance of the latest detector prototypes was evaluated. A particular attention is paid to evaluation of the signal amplitude, as it is one of the most important detector characteristics. Techniques for measuring the passive electrical characteristics of the sensors were developed. These include: the coupling and the interstrip capacitances, the interstrip resistance, the bias resistance, the strip leakage current, the bulk capacitance, and the bulk leakage current. The techniques will be applied for the quality assurance of the sensors during the pre-series and the series production. Extensive characterization of the prototype readout chip, n-XYTER, was performed. The register settings were optimized, and the dependence of the

  9. Development of prototype components for the silicon tracking system of the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lymanets, Anton

    2013-06-26

    The CBM experiment at future accelerator facility FAIR will investigate the properties of nuclear matter under extreme conditions. The experimental programm is different from the heavy-ion experiments at RHIC (BNL) and LHC (CERN) that create nuclear matter at high temperatures. In contrast, the study of the QCD phase diagram in the region of the highest net baryon densities and moderate temperatures that is weakly explored will be performed with high precision. For this, collisions of different heavy-ion beams at the energies of 10-45 GeV/nucleon with nuclear target will be measured. The physics programme of the CBM experiment includes measurement of both rare probes and bulk observables that originate from various phases of a nucleus-nucleus collision. In particular, decay of particles with charm quarks can be registered by reconstructing the decay vertex detached from the primary interaction point by several hundreds of micrometers (e.g., decay length cτ=123 μm for D{sup 0} meson). For this, precise tracking and full event reconstruction with up to 600 charged particle tracks per event within acceptance are required. Other rare probes require operation at interaction rate of up to 10 MHz. The detector system that performs tracking has to provide high position resolution on the order of 10 μm, operate at high rates and have radiation tolerant design with low material budget. The Silicon Tracking System (STS) is being designed for charged-particle tracking in a magnetic field. The system consists of eight tracking station located in the aperture of a dipole magnet with 1 T field. For tracks with momentum above 1 GeV, momentum resolution of such a system is expected to be about 1%. In order to fulfill this task, thorough optimization of the detector design is required. In particular, minimal material budget has to be achieved. Production of a detector module requires research and development activities with respect to the module components and their integration

  10. Methane production from cheese whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, J Q; Liao, P H; Lo, K V

    1988-01-01

    Cheese whey was treated in a 17.5-litre laboratory-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor operated over a range of hydraulic retention times and organic loading rates. The reactor performance was determined in terms of methane production, volatile fatty acids conversion and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction. At a constant influent strength, the methane production rate decreased with decreasing hydraulic retention time. At constant hydraulic retention time the methane production rate increased as the influent strength was increased up to a concentration of 28.8 g COD litre/sup -1/. The methane production rate was similar for two influent concentrations studied at hydraulic retention times longer than 10 days. The effect of short hydraulic retention times on methane production rate was more pronounced for the higher influent concentration than for the lower influent concentration. The highest methane production rate of 9.57 litres CH/sub 4/ litre/sup -1/ feed day/sup -1/ was obtained at a loading rate of 5.96 g/sup -1/ COD litre/sup -1/ and an influent concentration of 28.8 g COD litre/sup -1/. A high treatment efficiency in terms of chemical oxygen demand reduction was obtained. In general, over 98% removal of chemical oxygen demand was achieved. The results indicated that anaerobic digestion of cheese whey using an upflow sludge blanket reactor could reduce pollution strength and produce energy for a cheese plant.

  11. The California Baseline Methane Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duren, R. M.; Thorpe, A. K.; Hopkins, F. M.; Rafiq, T.; Bue, B. D.; Prasad, K.; Mccubbin, I.; Miller, C. E.

    2017-12-01

    The California Baseline Methane Survey is the first systematic, statewide assessment of methane point source emissions. The objectives are to reduce uncertainty in the state's methane budget and to identify emission mitigation priorities for state and local agencies, utilities and facility owners. The project combines remote sensing of large areas with airborne imaging spectroscopy and spatially resolved bottom-up data sets to detect, quantify and attribute emissions from diverse sectors including agriculture, waste management, oil and gas production and the natural gas supply chain. Phase 1 of the project surveyed nearly 180,000 individual facilities and infrastructure components across California in 2016 - achieving completeness rates ranging from 20% to 100% per emission sector at < 5 meters spatial resolution. Additionally, intensive studies of key areas and sectors were performed to assess source persistence and variability at times scales ranging from minutes to months. Phase 2 of the project continues with additional data collection in Spring and Fall 2017. We describe the survey design and measurement, modeling and analysis methods. We present initial findings regarding the spatial, temporal and sectoral distribution of methane point source emissions in California and their estimated contribution to the state's total methane budget. We provide case-studies and lessons learned about key sectors including examples where super-emitters were identified and mitigated. We summarize challenges and recommendations for future methane research, inventories and mitigation guidance within and beyond California.

  12. Historical methane hydrate project review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Frye, Matt; Goldberg, Dave; Husebo, Jarle; Koh, Carolyn; Malone, Mitch; Shipp, Craig; Torres, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In 1995, U.S. Geological Survey made the first systematic assessment of the volume of natural gas stored in the hydrate accumulations of the United States. That study, along with numerous other studies, has shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world greatly exceeds the volume of known conventional gas resources. However, gas hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of gas hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various gas hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural gas hydrates, and (5) analyzing the effects of methane hydrate on drilling safety.Methane hydrates are naturally occurring crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid water-­‐lattice holds gas molecules in a cage-­‐like structure. The gas and water becomes a solid under specific temperature and pressure conditions within the Earth, called the hydrate stability zone. Other factors that control the presence of methane hydrate in nature include the source of the gas included within the hydrates, the physical and chemical controls on the migration of gas with a sedimentary basin containing methane hydrates, the availability of the water also included in the hydrate structure, and the presence of a suitable host sediment or “reservoir”. The geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrates have become collectively known as the “methane hydrate petroleum system”, which has become the focus of numerous hydrate research programs.Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated

  13. Geomechanics of bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serata, S.; Milnor, S.W.

    1979-01-01

    Creep data from the literature search is reinterpreted by SGI, resulting in a better understanding of the temperature and stress state dependence of the octahedral creep rate and the octahedral shear strength. The concept of a transition strength between the elastic and the plastic states is in agreement with the data. The elastic and rheological properties of salt are described, and a set of constitutive equations is presented. The dependence of material properties on parameters such as temperature is considered. Findings on the permeability of salt are summarized, and the in-situ behavior of openings in bedded salt is described based on extensive engineering experience. A stress measuring system utilizing a finite element computer code is discussed. Geological factors affecting the stability of salt openings are considered, and the Stress Control Technique for designing stable openings in bedded salt formations is explained

  14. Direct Quantification of Methane Emissions Across the Supply Chain: Identification of Mitigation Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darzi, M.; Johnson, D.; Heltzel, R.; Clark, N.

    2017-12-01

    Researchers at West Virginia University's Center for Alternative Fuels, Engines, and Emissions have recently participated in a variety of studies targeted at direction quantification of methane emissions from across the natural gas supply chain. These studies included assessing methane emissions from heavy-duty vehicles and their fuel stations, active unconventional well sites - during both development and production, natural gas compression and storage facilities, natural gas engines - both large and small, two- and four-stroke, and low-throughput equipment associated with coal bed methane wells. Engine emissions were sampled using conventional instruments such as Fourier transform infrared spectrometers and heated flame ionization detection analyzers. However, to accurately quantify a wide range of other sources beyond the tailpipe (both leaks and losses), a full flow sampling system was developed, which included an integrated cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer. Through these direct quantification efforts and analysis major sources of methane emissions were identified. Technological solutions and best practices exist or could be developed to reduce methane emissions by focusing on the "lowest-hanging fruit." For example, engine crankcases from across the supply chain should employ vent mitigation systems to reduce methane and other emissions. An overview of the direct quantification system and various campaign measurements results will be presented along with the identification of other targets for additional mitigation.

  15. Constraining the 2012-2014 growing season Alaskan methane budget using CARVE aircraft measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartery, S.; Chang, R. Y. W.; Commane, R.; Lindaas, J.; Miller, S. M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Karion, A.; Sweeney, C.; Miller, C. E.; Dinardo, S. J.; Steiner, N.; McDonald, K. C.; Watts, J. D.; Zona, D.; Oechel, W. C.; Kimball, J. S.; Henderson, J.; Mountain, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Soil in northen latitudes contains rich carbon stores which have been historically preserved via permafrost within the soil bed; however, recent surface warming in these regions is allowing deeper soil layers to thaw, influencing the net carbon exchange from these areas. Due to the extreme nature of its climate, these eco-regions remain poorly understood by most global models. In this study we analyze methane fluxes from Alaska using in situ aircraft observations from the 2012-2014 Carbon in Arctic Reservoir Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE). These observations are coupled with an atmospheric particle transport model which quantitatively links surface emissions to atmospheric observations to make regional methane emission estimates. The results of this study are two-fold. First, the inter-annual variability of the methane emissions was found to be <1 Tg over the area of interest and is largely influenced by the length of time the deep soil remains unfrozen. Second, the resulting methane flux estimates and mean soil parameters were used to develop an empirical emissions model to help spatially and temporally constrain the methane exchange at the Alaskan soil surface. The empirical emissions model will provide a basis for exploring the sensitivity of methane emissions to subsurface soil temperature, soil moisture, organic carbon content, and other parameters commonly used in process-based models.

  16. Quantification of methane emissions from danish landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Mønster, Jacob; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Whole-landfill methane emission was quantified using a tracer technique that combines controlled tracer gas release from the landfill with time-resolved concentration measurements downwind of the landfill using a mobile high-resolution analytical instrument. Methane emissions from 13 Danish...... landfills varied between 2.6 and 60.8 kg CH4 h–1. The highest methane emission was measured at the largest (in terms of disposed waste amounts) of the 13 landfills, whereas the lowest methane emissions (2.6-6.1 kgCH4 h–1) were measured at the older and smaller landfills. At two of the sites, which had gas...... collection, emission measurements showed that the gas collection systems only collected between 30-50% of the methane produced (assuming that the produced methane equalled the sum of the emitted methane and the collected methane). Significant methane emissions were observed from disposed shredder waste...

  17. Is methane a new therapeutic gas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wenwu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methane is an attractive fuel. Biologically, methanogens in the colon can use carbon dioxide and hydrogen to produce methane as a by-product. It was previously considered that methane is not utilized by humans. However, in a recent study, results demonstrated that methane could exert anti-inflammatory effects in a dog small intestinal ischemia-reperfusion model. Point of view Actually, the bioactivity of methane has been investigated in gastrointestinal diseases, but the exact mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory effects is required to be further elucidated. Methane can cross the membrane and is easy to collect due to its abundance in natural gas. Although methane is flammable, saline rich in methane can be prepared for clinical use. These seem to be good news in application of methane as a therapeutic gas. Conclusion Several problems should be resolved before its wide application in clinical practice.

  18. Steam reforming of heptane in a fluidized bed membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakib, Mohammad A.; Grace, John R.; Lim, C. Jim; Elnashaie, Said S. E. H.

    n-Heptane served as a model compound to study steam reforming of naphtha as an alternative feedstock to natural gas for production of pure hydrogen in a fluidized bed membrane reactor. Selective removal of hydrogen using Pd 77Ag 23 membrane panels shifted the equilibrium-limited reactions to greater conversion of the hydrocarbons and lower yields of methane, an intermediate product. Experiments were conducted with no membranes, with one membrane panel, and with six panels along the height of the reactor to understand the performance improvement due to hydrogen removal in a reactor where catalyst particles were fluidized. Results indicate that a fluidized bed membrane reactor (FBMR) can provide a compact reformer for pure hydrogen production from a liquid hydrocarbon feedstock at moderate temperatures (475-550 °C). Under the experimental conditions investigated, the maximum achieved yield of pure hydrogen was 14.7 moles of pure hydrogen per mole of heptane fed.

  19. Methane and Carbon Dioxide Concentrations and Fluxes in Amazon Floodplains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melack, J. M.; MacIntyre, S.; Forsberg, B.; Barbosa, P.; Amaral, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    Field studies on the central Amazon floodplain in representative aquatic habitats (open water, flooded forests, floating macrophytes) combine measurements of methane and carbon dioxide concentrations and fluxes to the atmosphere over diel and seasonal times with deployment of meteorological sensors and high-resolution thermistors and dissolved oxygen sondes. A cavity ringdown spectrometer is used to determine gas concentrations, and floating chambers and bubble collectors are used to measure fluxes. To further understand fluxes, we measured turbulence as rate of dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy based on microstructure profiling. These results allow calculations of vertical mixing within the water column and of air-water exchanges using surface renewal models. Methane and carbon dioxide fluxes varied as a function of season, habitat and water depth. High CO2 fluxes at high water are related to high pCO2; low pCO2 levels at low water result from increased phytoplankton uptake. CO2 fluxes are highest at turbulent open water sites, and pCO2 is highest in macrophyte beds. Fluxes and pCH4 are high in macrophyte beds.

  20. A banner year in southern Alberta : shallow gas, CBM drive service houses to record years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colbourne, C.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of increased oil and gas activity on the service and supply industry in Alberta was evaluated. The service and supply industry is benefiting from booms in shallow gas drilling and coalbed methane exploration. Big Country Energy Services is a pipeline installation company that now has over 40 on-going projects with crews ranging in size from 10 to 70 personnel. A shortage of skilled labour has affected the company's ability to meet demand. Manufacturing companies such as Production Control Services, a self-contained parts manufacturer that specializes in plunger lift service and optimizing and servicing gas wells, is also seeing an increase in business, particularly due to recent activity in the coalbed methane sector. The company services both new and existing wells in the region. Managers at Ronco Oilfield Hauling Ltd., who work with many junior companies, believe that this season will be one of the most successful of all time. It was suggested that an increase in energy demand from countries like China will keep the demand for North American oil high. However, trends have indicated a reduction in exploration in Alberta, while new exploration activity appears to be increasing in northern Canada. Officials at Ronco have predicted that in 10 to 15 years most new oil activity will be in the northern regions as well as in northeastern British Columbia. It was also noted that soaring fuel costs have had an impact on the service and supply industry, particularly in businesses responsible for collecting and disposing of drilling fluids from rigs. Companies specializing in gas well optimization in low-pressure situations have also benefited from increased activity. However, issues concerning under-qualified workers and personnel shortages have affected a wide variety of businesses in the industry. 3 figs

  1. Oxidative coupling of methane using inorganic membrane reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Y.H.; Moser, W.R.; Dixon, A.G. [Worcester Polytechnic Institute, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The goal of this research is to improve the oxidative coupling of methane in a catalytic inorganic membrane reactor. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and relatively higher yields than in fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause for decreased selectivity in oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Modeling work which aimed at predicting the observed experimental trends in porous membrane reactors was also undertaken in this research program.

  2. Greenhouse gas emissions from the mineralisation process in a Sludge Treatment Reed Bed system: Seasonal variation and environmental impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Julie Dam; Nielsen, Steen; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Greenhouse gas emission data from the mineralisation process in Sludge Treatment Reed Bed systems (STRB) are scarce. The aim of this study was to quantify the emission rates of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) and to investigate seasonal variations in order to estimate ...

  3. Chemical looping reforming in packed-bed reactors : modelling, experimental validation and large-scale reactor design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spallina, V.; Marinello, B.; Gallucci, F.; Romano, M.C.; van Sint Annaland, M.

    This paper addresses the experimental demonstration and model validation of chemical looping reforming in dynamically operated packed-bed reactors for the production of H2 or CH3OH with integrated CO2 capture. This process is a combination of auto-thermal and steam methane reforming and is carried

  4. Characterization of Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading Microbes in Alaska Coastal Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchman, David L. [Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States)

    2012-03-29

    The net flux of methane from methane hydrates and other sources to the atmosphere depends on methane degradation as well as methane production and release from geological sources. The goal of this project was to examine methane-degrading archaea and organic carbon oxidizing bacteria in methane-rich and methane-poor sediments of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska. The Beaufort Sea system was sampled as part of a multi-disciplinary expedition (Methane in the Arctic Shelf or MIDAS) in September 2009. Microbial communities were examined by quantitative PCR analyses of 16S rRNA genes and key methane degradation genes (pmoA and mcrA involved in aerobic and anaerobic methane degradation, respectively), tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to determine the taxonomic make up of microbes in these sediments, and sequencing of all microbial genes (metagenomes ). The taxonomic and functional make-up of the microbial communities varied with methane concentrations, with some data suggesting higher abundances of potential methane-oxidizing archaea in methane-rich sediments. Sequence analysis of PCR amplicons revealed that most of the mcrA genes were from the ANME-2 group of methane oxidizers. According to metagenomic data, genes involved in methane degradation and other degradation pathways changed with sediment depth along with sulfate and methane concentrations. Most importantly, sulfate reduction genes decreased with depth while the anaerobic methane degradation gene (mcrA) increased along with methane concentrations. The number of potential methane degradation genes (mcrA) was low and inconsistent with other data indicating the large impact of methane on these sediments. The data can be reconciled if a small number of potential methane-oxidizing archaea mediates a large flux of carbon in these sediments. Our study is the first to report metagenomic data from sediments dominated by ANME-2 archaea and is one of the few to examine the entire microbial assemblage potentially involved in

  5. Methane as a climate gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsdottir, S.

    1996-03-01

    This paper was read at the workshop ``The Norwegian Climate and Ozone Research Programme`` held on 11-12 March 1996. Methane is a key component in the atmosphere where its concentration has increased rapidly since pre-industrial time. About 2/3 of it is caused by human activities. Changes in methane will affect the concentrations of other gases, and a model is a very important tool to study sensitivity due to changes in concentration of gases. The author used a three-dimensional global chemistry transport model to study the effect of changes in methane concentration on other trace gases. The model includes natural and anthropogenic emissions of NOx, CO, CH{sub 4} and non-methane hydrocarbons. Wet and dry deposition are also included. The chemical scheme in the model includes 49 compounds, 101 reactions, and 16 photolytic reactions. The trace gas concentrations are calculated every 30 min, using a quasi steady state approximation. Model calculations of three cases are reported and compared. Enhanced methane concentration will have strongest effect in remote regions. In polluted areas local chemistry will have remarked effect. The feedback was always positive. Average atmospheric lifetime calculated in the model was 7.6 years, which agrees with recent estimates based on observations. 8 refs.

  6. A systematic review and summarization of the recommendations and research surrounding Curriculum-Based Measurement of oral reading fluency (CBM-R) decision rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardoin, Scott P; Christ, Theodore J; Morena, Laura S; Cormier, Damien C; Klingbeil, David A

    2013-02-01

    Research and policy have established that data are necessary to guide decisions within education. Many of these decisions are made within problem solving and response to intervention frameworks for service delivery. Curriculum-Based Measurement in Reading (CBM-R) is a widely used data collection procedure within those models of service delivery. Although the evidence for CBM-R as a screening and benchmarking procedure has been summarized multiple times in the literature, there is no comprehensive review of the evidence for its application to monitor and evaluate individual student progress. The purpose of this study was to identify and summarize the psychometric and empirical evidence for CBM-R as it is used to monitor and evaluate student progress. There was an emphasis on the recommended number of data points collected during progress monitoring and interpretive guidelines. The review identified 171 journal articles, chapters, and instructional manuals using online search engines and research databases. Recommendations and evidence from 102 documents that met the study criteria were evaluated and summarized. Results indicate that most decision-making practices are based on expert opinion and that there is very limited psychometric or empirical support for such practices. There is a lack of published evidence to support program evaluation and progress monitoring with CBM-R. More research is required to inform data collection procedures and interpretive guidelines. Copyright © 2012 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. CBM Reading, Mathematics, and Written Expression at the Secondary Level: Examining Latent Composite Relations among Indices and Unique Predictions with a State Achievement Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codding, Robin S.; Petscher, Yaacov; Truckenmiller, Adrea

    2015-01-01

    A paucity of research has examined the utility of curriculum-based measurement (CBM) for data-based decision making at the secondary level. As schools move to multitiered systems of service delivery, it is conceivable that multiple screening measures will be used that address various academic subject areas. The value of including different CBM…

  8. An Examination of Test-Retest, Alternate Form Reliability, and Generalizability Theory Study of the easyCBM Reading Assessments: Grade 1. Technical Report #1216

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daniel; Park, Jasmine, Bitnara; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    This technical report is one in a series of five describing the reliability (test/retest/and alternate form) and G-Theory/D-Study research on the easy CBM reading measures, grades 1-5. Data were gathered in the spring 2011 from a convenience sample of students nested within classrooms at a medium-sized school district in the Pacific Northwest. Due…

  9. Technical Adequacy of the easyCBM Primary-Level Mathematics Measures (Grades K-2), 2009-2010 Version. Technical Report #1006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daniel; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Nese, Joseph F. T.; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Saez, Leilani; Jamgochian, Elisa; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    In the following technical report, we present evidence of the technical adequacy of the easyCBM[R] math measures in grades K-2. In addition to reliability information, we present criterion-related validity evidence, both concurrent and predictive, and construct validity evidence. The results represent data gathered throughout the 2009/2010 school…

  10. Technical Adequacy of the easyCBM[R] Mathematics Measures: Grades 3-8, 2009-2010 Version. Technical Report #1007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nese, Joseph F. T.; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Anderson, Daniel; Jamgochian, Elisa M.; Kamata, Akihito; Saez, Leilani; Park, Bitnara J.; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    In this technical report, data are presented on the practical utility, reliability, and validity of the easyCBM[R] mathematics (2009-2010 version) measures for students in grades 3-8 within four districts in two states. Analyses include: minimum acceptable within-year growth; minimum acceptable year-end benchmark performance; internal and…

  11. The carbohydrate-binding module (CBM)-like sequence is crucial for rice CWA1/BC1 function in proper assembly of secondary cell wall materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kanna; Ito, Sachiko; Fujii, Takeo; Suzuki, Ryu; Takenouchi, Sachi; Nakaba, Satoshi; Funada, Ryo; Sano, Yuzou; Kajita, Shinya; Kitano, Hidemi; Katayama, Yoshihiro

    2010-11-01

    We recently reported that the cwa1 mutation disturbed the deposition and assembly of secondary cell wall materials in the cortical fiber of rice internodes. Genetic analysis revealed that cwa1 is allelic to bc1, which encodes glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored COBRA-like protein with the highest homology to Arabidopsis COBRA-like 4 (COBL4) and maize Brittle Stalk 2 (Bk2). Our results suggested that CWA1/BC1 plays a role in assembling secondary cell wall materials at appropriate sites, enabling synthesis of highly ordered secondary cell wall structure with solid and flexible internodes in rice. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of CWA1/BC1, as well as its orthologs (COBL4, Bk2) and other BC1-like proteins in rice, shows weak similarity to a family II carbohydrate-binding module (CBM2) of several bacterial cellulases. To investigate the importance of the CBM-like sequence of CWA1/BC1 in the assembly of secondary cell wall materials, Trp residues in the CBM-like sequence, which is important for carbohydrate binding, were substituted for Val residues and introduced into the cwa1 mutant. CWA1/BC1 with the mutated sequence did not complement the abnormal secondary cell walls seen in the cwa1 mutant, indicating that the CBM-like sequence is essential for the proper function of CWA1/BC1, including assembly of secondary cell wall materials.

  12. Infant's bed climate and bedding in the Japanese home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura Ikeda, Rie; Fukai, Kiyoko; Okamoto Mizuno, Kazue

    2012-06-01

    to assess the bed climate of infants in their homes in Japan. descriptive, exploratory, non-experimental research design. the data were collected at the participants' homes under normal circumstances. nineteen healthy infants between the ages of two and five months. Their mothers, who joined a parenting class organised by a maternity clinic in Okayama, Japan, consented to participate in this study. we visited the infants' homes and interviewed their mothers concerning the types and use of bedding. The temperature and relative humidity of the bed climate at the back and foot of the bedding, and in the room were measured every minute for four consecutive days. Differences among the bed climates measured during three seasons (spring, summer, and autumn) were assessed by one-way analysis of variance. The bed temperature was higher for infants than for adults. No significant difference in temperature was noted among the three seasons. The bed temperature was about 36.0°C when waterproof sheets and futon mattresses for children or adult were used. The average relative humidity of the bed climate at the back was highest in summer, followed by that in spring and autumn; the differences were significant. The use of waterproof sheets and futon mattresses for children in summer increased the relative humidity to 80% or more. The use of infant beds, sunoko drainboards, and cotton futon mattresses in summer was effective in reducing the bed humidity. these results suggest that nurse-midwives should advise the parents on comfortable bed climates for their infants, as well as how to select and use bedding for them. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Particle bed reactor modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapyta, Joe; Reid, Hank; Walton, Lew

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: particle bed reactor (PBR) core cross section; PBR bleed cycle; fuel and moderator flow paths; PBR modeling requirements; characteristics of PBR and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) modeling; challenges for PBR and NTP modeling; thermal hydraulic computer codes; capabilities for PBR/reactor application; thermal/hydralic codes; limitations; physical correlations; comparison of predicted friction factor and experimental data; frit pressure drop testing; cold frit mask factor; decay heat flow rate; startup transient simulation; and philosophy of systems modeling.

  14. Fluidised bed cereal cooking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, Simon Anthony

    2002-01-01

    Man has been cooking food for thousands of years for a number of reasons: to improve flavour and palatability, sterilise, increase digestibility, improve texture and colour. Increasingly more advanced techniques are employed today in food production plants to engineer foods with many different properties. With this in mind manufacturers are constantly seeking to improve processing techniques and apply new or different technologies (such as microwaves, RF and extrusion) to develop foods with new properties (like puffed texture starches) and to increase process efficiencies (energy efficiency, water reduction). This thesis reports on work undertaken to demonstrate the potential to achieve high temperature starch conversion of whole wheat grains in a fluidised bed, thereby reducing the amount of water required and processing time. Specifically, wheat from the farm at 14% water content is cooked in a fluidised bed. The fluidised bed heats the wheat quickly by convective heating. In addition, energy can be delivered directly to the grain by microwave heating during fluidisation. Degree of starch conversion is determined by measuring the reduction in size of endotherm of reaction as observed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The fluidising gas, processing temperature and starting moisture content were varied in order to investigate their effect on the cooking process. A mathematical model based on energy and species concentration equations was developed to help understand the internal grain processes. The model coupled the thermal energy equation with water diffusion. The effect of water evaporation was represented as a thermal sink in the energy equation. Popular kinetic models from literature were adapted to predict the degree of starch conversion. The model gives solutions consistent with experimental data and physical intuition. A commercial computational fluid dynamics package was used to study simple airflow and particle tracks in the fluidisation column. A

  15. Thermodynamic Study on the Catalytic Partial Oxidation of Methane to Syngas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUJian; WEIWeisheng; 等

    2002-01-01

    The catalytic partial oxidation of methane to syngas (CO+H2) has been simulated thermodynamically with the advanced process simulator PRO/Ⅱ. The influences of temperature,pressure,CH4/O2 ratio and steam addition in feed gas on the conversion of CH4 selectively to syngas and heat duty required were investigated, and their effects on carbon formation were also discussed. The simulation results were in good agreement with the literature data taken from a spouted bed reactor.

  16. Design and Use of a Full Flow Sampling System (FFS) for the Quantification of Methane Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Derek R; Covington, April N; Clark, Nigel N

    2016-06-12

    The use of natural gas continues to grow with increased discovery and production of unconventional shale resources. At the same time, the natural gas industry faces continued scrutiny for methane emissions from across the supply chain, due to methane's relatively high global warming potential (25-84x that of carbon dioxide, according to the Energy Information Administration). Currently, a variety of techniques of varied uncertainties exists to measure or estimate methane emissions from components or facilities. Currently, only one commercial system is available for quantification of component level emissions and recent reports have highlighted its weaknesses. In order to improve accuracy and increase measurement flexibility, we have designed, developed, and implemented a novel full flow sampling system (FFS) for quantification of methane emissions and greenhouse gases based on transportation emissions measurement principles. The FFS is a modular system that consists of an explosive-proof blower(s), mass airflow sensor(s) (MAF), thermocouple, sample probe, constant volume sampling pump, laser based greenhouse gas sensor, data acquisition device, and analysis software. Dependent upon the blower and hose configuration employed, the current FFS is able to achieve a flow rate ranging from 40 to 1,500 standard cubic feet per minute (SCFM). Utilization of laser-based sensors mitigates interference from higher hydrocarbons (C2+). Co-measurement of water vapor allows for humidity correction. The system is portable, with multiple configurations for a variety of applications ranging from being carried by a person to being mounted in a hand drawn cart, on-road vehicle bed, or from the bed of utility terrain vehicles (UTVs). The FFS is able to quantify methane emission rates with a relative uncertainty of ± 4.4%. The FFS has proven, real world operation for the quantification of methane emissions occurring in conventional and remote facilities.

  17. Design and Use of a Full Flow Sampling System (FFS) for the Quantification of Methane Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Derek R.; Covington, April N.; Clark, Nigel N.

    2016-01-01

    The use of natural gas continues to grow with increased discovery and production of unconventional shale resources. At the same time, the natural gas industry faces continued scrutiny for methane emissions from across the supply chain, due to methane's relatively high global warming potential (25-84x that of carbon dioxide, according to the Energy Information Administration). Currently, a variety of techniques of varied uncertainties exists to measure or estimate methane emissions from components or facilities. Currently, only one commercial system is available for quantification of component level emissions and recent reports have highlighted its weaknesses. In order to improve accuracy and increase measurement flexibility, we have designed, developed, and implemented a novel full flow sampling system (FFS) for quantification of methane emissions and greenhouse gases based on transportation emissions measurement principles. The FFS is a modular system that consists of an explosive-proof blower(s), mass airflow sensor(s) (MAF), thermocouple, sample probe, constant volume sampling pump, laser based greenhouse gas sensor, data acquisition device, and analysis software. Dependent upon the blower and hose configuration employed, the current FFS is able to achieve a flow rate ranging from 40 to 1,500 standard cubic feet per minute (SCFM). Utilization of laser-based sensors mitigates interference from higher hydrocarbons (C2+). Co-measurement of water vapor allows for humidity correction. The system is portable, with multiple configurations for a variety of applications ranging from being carried by a person to being mounted in a hand drawn cart, on-road vehicle bed, or from the bed of utility terrain vehicles (UTVs). The FFS is able to quantify methane emission rates with a relative uncertainty of ± 4.4%. The FFS has proven, real world operation for the quantification of methane emissions occurring in conventional and remote facilities. PMID:27341646

  18. OXIDATIVE COUPLING OF METHANE USING INORGANIC MEMBRANE REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Y.H. Ma; Dr. W.R. Moser; Dr. A.G. Dixon; Dr. A.M. Ramachandra; Dr. Y. Lu; C. Binkerd

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this research is to study the oxidative coupling of methane in catalytic inorganic membrane reactors. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and higher yields than in conventional non-porous, co-feed, fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for the formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause of decreased selectivity in the oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Membrane reactor technology also offers the potential for modifying the membranes both to improve catalytic properties as well as to regulate the rate of the permeation/diffusion of reactants through the membrane to minimize by-product generation. Other benefits also exist with membrane reactors, such as the mitigation of thermal hot-spots for highly exothermic reactions such as the oxidative coupling of methane. The application of catalytically active inorganic membranes has potential for drastically increasing the yield of reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity.

  19. Methane layering in bord and pillar workings.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Creedy, DP

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available This report reviews the state of knowledge on the occurrence, investigation, detection, monitoring, prevention and dispensation of methane layers in coal mines. Mining practice throughout the world in respect of methane layering is generally reliant...

  20. A Possible Sink for Methane on Mars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nørnberg, P.; Jensen, S. J. K.; Skibsted, J.; Jakobsen, H. J.; ten Kate, I. L.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Merrison, J. P.; Finster, K.; Bak, E.; Iversen, J. J.; Kondrup, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical simulated wind activation of mineral surfaces act as a trap for Methane through formation of covalent Si-C bonds stable up to temperatures above 250 C. This mechanism is proposed as a Methane sink on Mars.

  1. IPNS grooved, solid methane moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.M.; Schulke, A.W.; Scott, T.L.; Wozniak, D.G.; Benson, B.E.; Leyda, B.D.

    1985-01-01

    There are two motives for using cold moderators in pulsed neutron sources, to provide higher fluxes of long-wavelength neutrons, and to extend the epithermal range with its short pulse structure to lower energies. For both these purposes solid methane, operated at the lowest possible temperatures, is the best material we know of. Two problems accompany the use of solid methane in high power sources, namely heat transport in view of the low thermal conductivity of solid methane, and deterioration due to radiation damage. We have designed a system suitable to operate in IPNS, subject to nuclear heating of about 25 W, which incorporates an aluminum foam matrix to conduct the heat from within the moderator. We report the results of the first few months' operation and of a few tests that we have performed

  2. METHANE INCORPORATION BY PROCARYOTIC PHOTOSYNTHETICMICROORGANISMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, Charles J.; Kirk, Martha; Calvin, Melvin

    1970-08-01

    The procaryotic photosynthetic microorganisms Anacystis nidulans, Nostoc and Rhodospirillum rubrum have cell walls and membranes that are resistant to the solution of methane in their lipid components and intracellular fluids. But Anacystis nidulans, possesses a limited bioxidant system, a portion of which may be extracellularly secreted, which rapidly oxidizes methane to carbon dioxide. Small C{sup 14} activities derived from CH{sub 4} in excess of experimental error are detected in all the major biochemical fractions of Anacystis nidulans and Nostoc. This limited capacity to metabolize methane appears to be a vestigial potentiality that originated over two billion years ago in the early evolution of photosynthetic bacteria and blue-green algae.

  3. Uncertainty assessment of the breath methane concentration method to determine methane production of dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Liansun; Groot Koerkamp, Peter W.G.; Ogink, Nico

    2018-01-01

    The breath methane concentration method uses the methane concentrations in the cow's breath during feed bin visits as a proxy for the methane production rate. The objective of this study was to assess the uncertainty of a breath methane concentration method in a feeder and its capability to measure

  4. A protocol for hit and control synchronous transfer for the front-end electronics at the CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasinski, K.; Szczygiel, R.; Zabolotny, W.; Lehnert, J.; Schmidt, C.J.; Müller, W.F.J.

    2016-01-01

    The Silicon Tracking System, Muon Chamber, Transition Radiation Detector and Time-Of-Flight among others are the detector systems of the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the FAIR facility. These detector systems will be built with tens of thousands of front-end ASICs exposed to high radiation doses and difficult environmental and interference conditions. A CERN's GBTx-based solution was chosen for combining data from multiple front-end ASICs into an optical link before further concentration and preprocessing in the common Data Processing Board data hub. This paper presents the protocol design addressing the DAQ system requirements, simplifying the ASIC's back-end design and presents its adaptation for the STS and MUCH detector's conditions. A specific link synchronization technique, hit data bandwidth optimization and time synchronization method for the self-triggered front-end chip are presented.

  5. A protocol for hit and control synchronous transfer for the front-end electronics at the CBM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasinski, K., E-mail: kasinski@agh.edu.pl [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Measurement and Electronics, Av. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Szczygiel, R. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Measurement and Electronics, Av. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Zabolotny, W. [Institute of Electronic Systems, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Nowowiejska 15/19, 00-665 Warsaw (Poland); Lehnert, J.; Schmidt, C.J. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, 64-291 Darmstadt (Germany); Müller, W.F.J. [FAIR Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, 64-291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    The Silicon Tracking System, Muon Chamber, Transition Radiation Detector and Time-Of-Flight among others are the detector systems of the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the FAIR facility. These detector systems will be built with tens of thousands of front-end ASICs exposed to high radiation doses and difficult environmental and interference conditions. A CERN's GBTx-based solution was chosen for combining data from multiple front-end ASICs into an optical link before further concentration and preprocessing in the common Data Processing Board data hub. This paper presents the protocol design addressing the DAQ system requirements, simplifying the ASIC's back-end design and presents its adaptation for the STS and MUCH detector's conditions. A specific link synchronization technique, hit data bandwidth optimization and time synchronization method for the self-triggered front-end chip are presented.

  6. Finite element simulations of low-mass readout cables for the CBM Silicon Tracking System using RAPHAEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singla, M., E-mail: M.Singla@gsi.de [Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Chatterji, S.; Müller, W.F.J.; Kleipa, V.; Heuser, J.M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-01-21

    The first three-dimensional simulation study of thin multi-line readout cables using finite element simulation tool RAPHAEL is being reported. The application is the Silicon Tracking System (STS) of the fixed-target heavy-ion experiment Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM), under design at the forthcoming accelerator center FAIR in Germany. RAPHAEL has been used to design low-mass analog readout cables with minimum possible Equivalent Noise Charge (ENC). Various trace geometries and trace materials have been explored in detail for this optimization study. These cables will bridge the distance between the microstrip detectors and the signal processing electronics placed at the periphery of the silicon tracking stations. SPICE modeling has been implemented in Sentaurus Device to study the transmission loss (dB loss) in cables and simulation has been validated with measurements. An optimized design having minimum possible ENC, material budget and transmission loss for the readout cables has been proposed.

  7. Systematic characterization and quality assurance of silicon micro-strip sensors for the Silicon Tracking System of the CBM experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, P.

    2014-07-01

    The Silicon Tracking System (STS) is the central detector of the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at future Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt. The task of the STS is to reconstruct trajectories of charged particles originating at relatively high multiplicities from the high rate beam-target interactions. The tracker comprises of 300 μm thick silicon double-sided micro-strip sensors. These sensors should be radiation hard in order to reconstruct charged particles up to a maximum radiation dose of 1 × 1014neqcm-2. Systematic characterization allows us to investigate the sensor response and perform quality assurance (QA) tests. In this paper, systematic characterization of prototype double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors will be discussed. This procedure includes visual, passive electrical, and radiation hardness test. Presented results include tests on three different prototypes of silicon micro-strip sensors.

  8. Quality assurance of double-sided silicon microstrip sensors for the silicon tracking system in the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larionov, Pavel [Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Silicon Tracking System (STS) is the core tracking detector of the CBM experiment at FAIR. The system's task is to reconstruct the trajectories of the charged particles produced in the beam-target interactions, provide their momentum determination, and enable the detection of decay topologies. The STS will comprise 1220 double-sided silicon microstrip sensors. After production each sensor will go through a number of Quality Assurance procedures to verify their validity for performance in the STS and also to confirm the manufacturer's data. In this talk, results of the quality assurance procedures that are being applied to the latest STS prototype sensors, including detailed tests of the quality of each single strip, long-term stability and preparations for volume tests during series production, are presented.

  9. Systematic characterization and quality assurance of silicon micro-strip sensors for the Silicon Tracking System of the CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, P

    2014-01-01

    The Silicon Tracking System (STS) is the central detector of the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at future Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt. The task of the STS is to reconstruct trajectories of charged particles originating at relatively high multiplicities from the high rate beam-target interactions. The tracker comprises of 300 μm thick silicon double-sided micro-strip sensors. These sensors should be radiation hard in order to reconstruct charged particles up to a maximum radiation dose of 1 × 10 14 n eq cm −2 . Systematic characterization allows us to investigate the sensor response and perform quality assurance (QA) tests. In this paper, systematic characterization of prototype double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors will be discussed. This procedure includes visual, passive electrical, and radiation hardness test. Presented results include tests on three different prototypes of silicon micro-strip sensors

  10. Signal Analysis of Automotive Engine Spark Ignition System using Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) and Case-based Maintenance (CBM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Vong, C. M.; Wong, P. K.

    2010-01-01

    With the development of modern technology, modern vehicles adopt electronic control system for injection and ignition. In traditional way, whenever there is any malfunctioning in an automotive engine, an automotive mechanic usually performs a diagnosis in the ignition system of the engine to check any exceptional symptoms. In this paper, we present a case-based reasoning (CBR) approach to help solve human diagnosis problem. Nevertheless, one drawback of CBR system is that the case library will be expanded gradually after repeatedly running the system, which may cause inaccuracy and longer time for the CBR retrieval. To tackle this problem, case-based maintenance (CBM) framework is employed so that the case library of the CBR system will be compressed by clustering to produce a set of representative cases. As a result, the performance (in retrieval accuracy and time) of the whole CBR system can be improved.

  11. Event-by-event extraction of kinetic and chemical freeze-out properties in the CBM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vovchenko, Volodymyr [Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Taras Shevchenko University, Kyiv (Ukraine); Kisel, Ivan [Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Anchishkin, Dmitry [Taras Shevchenko University, Kyiv (Ukraine); Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyiv (Ukraine); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The future CBM experiment at FAIR is designed to study properties of strongly interacting matter produced in heavy-ion collisions at high baryon densities. It will employ high intensity beams and large acceptance detectors. One important task is to extract the thermal parameters of matter at stages of kinetic and chemical freeze-out from the observed data. The extraction of thermal parameters is implemented as a package within the CBMROOT framework. The kinetic freeze-out temperature and the inverse slope of charged pions are extracted from their measured momentum spectra with appropriate correction on acceptance and reconstruction efficiency. The parameters of the chemical freeze-out are extracted by fitting the measured particle ratios in the framework of Hadron Resonance Gas model. The procedures can be used to perform analysis on event-by-event as well as on the inclusive spectra level.

  12. Design of a water based cooling system to take out electronics heat load of MUCH detector in CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Vikas; Saini, J.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Dubey, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    A GEM based detector system is being developed at VECC, Kolkata for use as muon tracker in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the upcoming FAIR facility in Germany. The Muon Chambers (MUCH) consists of alternating layers of six absorbers and detector stations. Out of the six stations, VECC has taken responsibility to build the detectors and related readout electronics for the first two stations where each station consists of three detector layers. MUCH will be use a custom built self-triggering ASIC, which will provide both timing and energy information for each incoming signal in its channel. MUCH uses the sensitive electronics where the desired operating temperature range is 25-30 °C. Temperature going above these limits will drift the biasing scheme and further increase may lead to damage of Front End Electronics (FEE) board itself

  13. Beam test results of STS prototype modules for the future accelerator experiments FAIR/CBM and NICA/MPD projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharlamov, Petr; Dementev, Dmitrii; Shitenkov, Mikhail

    2017-10-01

    High-energy heavy-ion collision experiments provide the unique possibility to create and investigate extreme states of strongly-interacted matter and address the fundamental aspects of QCD. The experimental investigation the QCD phase diagram would be a major breakthrough in our understanding of the properties of nuclear matter. The reconstruction of the charged particles created in the nuclear collisions, including the determination of their momenta, is the central detection task in high-energy heavy-ion experiments. It is taken up by the Silicon Tracking System in CBM@FAIR and by Inner Tracker in MPD@NICA currently under development. These experiments requires very fast and radiation hard detectors, a novel data read-out and analysis concept including free streaming front-end electronics. Thermal and beam tests of prototype detector modules for these tracking systems showed the stability of sensors and readout electronics operation.

  14. Beam test results of STS prototype modules for the future accelerator experiments FAIR/CBM and NICA/MPD projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharlamov Petr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High-energy heavy-ion collision experiments provide the unique possibility to create and investigate extreme states of strongly-interacted matter and address the fundamental aspects of QCD. The experimental investigation the QCD phase diagram would be a major breakthrough in our understanding of the properties of nuclear matter. The reconstruction of the charged particles created in the nuclear collisions, including the determination of their momenta, is the central detection task in high-energy heavy-ion experiments. It is taken up by the Silicon Tracking System in CBM@FAIR and by Inner Tracker in MPD@NICA currently under development. These experiments requires very fast and radiation hard detectors, a novel data read-out and analysis concept including free streaming front-end electronics. Thermal and beam tests of prototype detector modules for these tracking systems showed the stability of sensors and readout electronics operation.

  15. Handbook methane potential; Handbok metanpotential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, My (AnoxKaldnes AB (Sweden)); Schnurer, Anna (Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2011-07-15

    Before using a organic material for biogas production it is essential to evaluate the methane production potential. The methane potential is one important tool possible to use during planning of new plants but also when new materials are considered for already running biogas plants. The chemical composition of different organic material varies extensively and this will have an impact on both the degradability and the methane potential. Information about the methane potential of a specific material can sometimes be found in the literature or can be calculated after a chemical/ physical or biological characterization. Here, the BMP test (Biochemical Methane Potential) is a commonly used method. Today the BMP test is a commonly used method to determine the methane potential. Many national and international research groups, consultants as well as personal at biogas plants are using this method and there is a lot of data available in the literature from such tests. In addition there are several protocols giving guidelines on how to execute a BMP-test. The BMP-test is performed in many different ways, not always under optimized conditions, and there is a lack of information on how to interpret the obtained data. This report summarizes knowledge from the literature and the experience from a Swedish referee group, consisting of persons being active performers of BMP-tests. The report does not include a standardized protocol as the procedure can be performed in different ways depending on available equipment and on the type of material to be tested. Instead the report discusses different factors of great importance for a successful test giving reliable results. The report also summarizes important information concerning the interpretation and how to present results in order to allow comparison of data from different test.

  16. Experimental analysis and evaluation of the mass transfer process in a trickle-bed reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, J.D.; Lima, F.R.A.; Abreu, C.A.M.; Knoechelmann, A.

    2003-01-01

    A transient experimental analysis of a three-phase descendent-cocurrent trickle-bed H2O/CH4-Ar/g -Al2O3 system was made using the stimulus-response technique, with the gas phase as a reference. Methane was used as a tracer and injected into the argon feed and the concentration vs time profiles were obtained at the entrance and exit of the bed, which were maintained at 298K and 1.013 10(5) Pa. A mathematical model for the tracer was developed to estimate the axial dispersion overall gas-liquid...

  17. Online selection of short-lived particles on many-core computer architectures in the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zyzak, Maksym

    2016-07-07

    Modern experiments in heavy ion collisions operate with huge data rates that can not be fully stored on the currently available storage devices. Therefore the data flow should be reduced by selecting those collisions that potentially carry the information of the physics interest. The future CBM experiment will have no simple criteria for selecting such collisions and requires the full online reconstruction of the collision topology including reconstruction of short-lived particles. In this work the KF Particle Finder package for online reconstruction and selection of short-lived particles is proposed and developed. It reconstructs more than 70 decays, covering signals from all the physics cases of the CBM experiment: strange particles, strange resonances, hypernuclei, low mass vector mesons, charmonium, and open-charm particles. The package is based on the Kalman filter method providing a full set of the particle parameters together with their errors including position, momentum, mass, energy, lifetime, etc. It shows a high quality of the reconstructed particles, high efficiencies, and high signal to background ratios. The KF Particle Finder is extremely fast for achieving the reconstruction speed of 1.5 ms per minimum-bias AuAu collision at 25 AGeV beam energy on single CPU core. It is fully vectorized and parallelized and shows a strong linear scalability on the many-core architectures of up to 80 cores. It also scales within the First Level Event Selection package on the many-core clusters up to 3200 cores. The developed KF Particle Finder package is a universal platform for short- lived particle reconstruction, physics analysis and online selection.

  18. Online selection of short-lived particles on many-core computer architectures in the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyzak, Maksym

    2016-01-01

    Modern experiments in heavy ion collisions operate with huge data rates that can not be fully stored on the currently available storage devices. Therefore the data flow should be reduced by selecting those collisions that potentially carry the information of the physics interest. The future CBM experiment will have no simple criteria for selecting such collisions and requires the full online reconstruction of the collision topology including reconstruction of short-lived particles. In this work the KF Particle Finder package for online reconstruction and selection of short-lived particles is proposed and developed. It reconstructs more than 70 decays, covering signals from all the physics cases of the CBM experiment: strange particles, strange resonances, hypernuclei, low mass vector mesons, charmonium, and open-charm particles. The package is based on the Kalman filter method providing a full set of the particle parameters together with their errors including position, momentum, mass, energy, lifetime, etc. It shows a high quality of the reconstructed particles, high efficiencies, and high signal to background ratios. The KF Particle Finder is extremely fast for achieving the reconstruction speed of 1.5 ms per minimum-bias AuAu collision at 25 AGeV beam energy on single CPU core. It is fully vectorized and parallelized and shows a strong linear scalability on the many-core architectures of up to 80 cores. It also scales within the First Level Event Selection package on the many-core clusters up to 3200 cores. The developed KF Particle Finder package is a universal platform for short- lived particle reconstruction, physics analysis and online selection.

  19. Fluidized bed boiler feed system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian C.

    1981-01-01

    A fluidized bed boiler feed system for the combustion of pulverized coal. Coal is first screened to separate large from small particles. Large particles of coal are fed directly to the top of the fluidized bed while fine particles are first mixed with recycled char, preheated, and then fed into the interior of the fluidized bed to promote char burnout and to avoid elutriation and carryover.

  20. Methane-fueled vehicles: A promising market for coalbed methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deul, M.

    1993-01-01

    The most acceptable alternative fuel for motor vehicles is compressed natural gas (CNG). An important potential source of such gas is coalbed methane, much of which is now being wasted. Although there are no technological impediments to the use of CNG it has not been adequately promoted for a variety of reasons: structural, institutional and for coalbed gas, legal. The benefits of using CNG fuel are manifold: clean burning, low cost, abundant, and usable in any internal combustion engine. Even though more than 30,000 CNG vehicles are now in use in the U.S.A., they are not readily available, fueling stations are not easily accessible, and there is general apathy on the part of the public because of negligence by such agencies as the Department of Energy, the Department of Transportation and the Environmental Protection Agency. The economic benefits of using methane are significant: 100,000 cubic feet of methane is equivalent to 800 gallons of gasoline. Considering the many millions of cubic feet methane wasted from coal mines conservation and use of this resource is a worthy national goal

  1. Nitrogen-fixing methane-utilizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, de J.A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Methane occurs abundantly in nature. In the presence of oxygen this gas may be metabolized by bacteria that are able to use it as carbon and energy source. Several types of bacteria involved in the oxidation of methane have been described in literature. Methane-utilizing bacteria have in

  2. Experimental study of methanic fermentation of straw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dopter, P; Beerens, H

    1952-12-03

    The amount of liquid manure obtainable was a limiting factor in methanic fermentation of wheat straw. An equal volume of 0.2% aqueous solution of Na formate could be substituted for 90% of the normal requirements of liquid manure. This shortened the preliminary stages of cellulosic fermentation when no methane was produced and slightly increased the subsequent yield of methane.

  3. 75 FR 9886 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane... the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential...

  4. 46 CFR 154.703 - Methane (LNG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Methane (LNG). 154.703 Section 154.703 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... and Temperature Control § 154.703 Methane (LNG). Unless a cargo tank carrying methane (LNG) can...

  5. Methane emission reduction: an application of FUND

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, R.S.J.; Heintz, R.J.; Lammers, P.E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Methane is, after carbon dioxide, the most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas. Governments plan to abate methane emissions. A crude set of estimates of reduction costs is included in FUND, an integrated assessment model of climate change. In a cost-benefit analysis, methane emission reduction is

  6. Liquid hydrocarbons from coal beds – risk factor for the underground work environment - Case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomescu Cristian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid hydrocarbons from the coal bed and surrounding rocks, besides the stored gases, methane, carbon dioxide, carbon oxide, generate the increase of the risk factor from the occupational health and safety point of view. If for reducing the gas concentrations level and the methane emissions in order to increase the safety in exploitation exist well-known solutions and methods, the oxidation or self-oxidation of the hydrocarbons from the coal bed generate a series of compounds, reaction products over maximum admitted concentrations which give birth to a toxic atmosphere and which is hazardous for workers, at the same time inducing an error in noting the occurrence of a spontaneous combustion phenomena, a major risk for the workers and for the mineral resource. This paper represents a case study performed in one underground mine unit from Jiu Valley and presents the analysis for underground environment factors monitoring and for solutions for diminishing the OHS risk factors.

  7. Methane oxidation and methane fluxes in the ocean surface layer and deep anoxic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, B. B.; Kilpatrick, K. A.; Novelli, P. C.; Scranton, M. I.

    1987-01-01

    Measured biological oxidation rates of methane in near-surface waters of the Cariaco Basin are compared with the diffusional fluxes computed from concentration gradients of methane in the surface layer. Methane fluxes and oxidation rates were investigated in surface waters, at the oxic/anoxic interface, and in deep anoxic waters. It is shown that the surface-waters oxidation of methane is a mechanism which modulates the flux of methane from marine waters to the atmosphere.

  8. Management bedding : vrijloopstal met composterende bedding van houtsnippers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de H.C.; Wiersma, M.; Galama, P.J.; Szanto, G.L.

    2015-01-01

    In de vrijloopstal liggen de koeien meestal op een organische bedding en scheiden daar mest (feces en urine) uit. Om de bedding voldoende droog en schoon te houden wordt er regelmatig nieuw strooisel aangevoerd en wordt de toplaag bewerkt. Op basis van onderzoek- en praktijkervaringen tot nu toe

  9. Field-scale operation of methane biofiltration systems to mitigate point source methane emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hettiarachchi, Vijayamala C.; Hettiaratchi, Patrick J.; Mehrotra, Anil K.; Kumar, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    Methane biofiltration (MBF) is a novel low-cost technique for reducing low volume point source emissions of methane (CH 4 ). MBF uses a granular medium, such as soil or compost, to support the growth of methanotrophic bacteria responsible for converting CH 4 to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and water (H 2 O). A field research program was undertaken to evaluate the potential to treat low volume point source engineered CH 4 emissions using an MBF at a natural gas monitoring station. A new comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model was developed incorporating advection-diffusive flow of gas, biological reactions and heat and moisture flow. The one-dimensional version of this model was used as a guiding tool for designing and operating the MBF. The long-term monitoring results of the field MBF are also presented. The field MBF operated with no control of precipitation, evaporation, and temperature, provided more than 80% of CH 4 oxidation throughout spring, summer, and fall seasons. The numerical model was able to predict the CH 4 oxidation behavior of the field MBF with high accuracy. The numerical model simulations are presented for estimating CH 4 oxidation efficiencies under various operating conditions, including different filter bed depths and CH 4 flux rates. The field observations as well as numerical model simulations indicated that the long-term performance of MBFs is strongly dependent on environmental factors, such as ambient temperature and precipitation. - Highlights: → One-dimensional version of the model was used as a guiding tool for designing and operating the MBF. → Mathematical model predicted CH 4 oxidation behaviors of the field MBF with high accuracy i.e. (> 80 %). → Performance of MBF is dependent on ambient temperature and precipitation. - The developed numerical model simulations and field observations for estimating CH 4 oxidation efficiencies under various operating conditions indicate that the long-term performance of MBFs is strongly

  10. Cryptic Methane Emissions from Upland Forest Ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megonigal, Patrick [Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (United States); Pitz, Scott [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-04-19

    This exploratory research on Cryptic Methane Emissions from Upland Forest Ecosystems was motivated by evidence that upland ecosystems emit 36% as much methane to the atmosphere as global wetlands, yet we knew almost nothing about this source. The long-term objective was to refine Earth system models by quantifying methane emissions from upland forests, and elucidate the biogeochemical processes that govern upland methane emissions. The immediate objectives of the grant were to: (i) test the emerging paradigm that upland trees unexpectedly transpire methane, (ii) test the basic biogeochemical assumptions of an existing global model of upland methane emissions, and (iii) develop the suite of biogeochemical approaches that will be needed to advance research on upland methane emissions. We instrumented a temperate forest system in order to explore the processes that govern upland methane emissions. We demonstrated that methane is emitted from the stems of dominant tree species in temperate upland forests. Tree emissions occurred throughout the growing season, while soils adjacent to the trees consumed methane simultaneously, challenging the concept that forests are uniform sinks of methane. High frequency measurements revealed diurnal cycling in the rate of methane emissions, pointing to soils as the methane source and transpiration as the most likely pathway for methane transport. We propose the forests are smaller methane sinks than previously estimated due to stem emissions. Stem emissions may be particularly important in upland tropical forests characterized by high rainfall and transpiration, resolving differences between models and measurements. The methods we used can be effectively implemented in order to determine if the phenomenon is widespread.

  11. Methane generation from waste materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samani, Zohrab A.; Hanson, Adrian T.; Macias-Corral, Maritza

    2010-03-23

    An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

  12. Methane Dynamics in Flooded Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas with a heat trapping capacity 34 times greater than that of carbon dioxide on a100 year time scale. Known anthropogenic CH4 sources include livestock production, rice agriculture, landfills, and natural gas m...

  13. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  14. Coal Mine Methane in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This paper discusses coal mine methane emissions (CMM) in the Russian Federation and the potential for their productive utilisation. It highlights specific opportunities for cost-effective reductions of CMM from oil and natural gas facilities, coal mines and landfills, with the aim of improving knowledge about effective policy approaches.

  15. Modeling of carbon sequestration in coal-beds: A variable saturated simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guoxiang; Smirnov, Andrei V.

    2008-01-01

    Storage of carbon dioxide in deep coal seams is a profitable method to reduce the concentration of green house gases in the atmosphere while the methane as a byproduct can be extracted during carbon dioxide injection into the coal seam. In this procedure, the key element is to keep carbon dioxide in the coal seam without escaping for a long term. It is depended on many factors such as properties of coal basin, fracture state, phase equilibrium, etc., especially the porosity, permeability and saturation of the coal seam. In this paper, a variable saturation model was developed to predict the capacity of carbon dioxide sequestration and coal-bed methane recovery. This variable saturation model can be used to track the saturation variability with the partial pressures change caused by carbon dioxide injection. Saturation variability is a key factor to predict the capacity of carbon dioxide storage and methane recovery. Based on this variable saturation model, a set of related variables including capillary pressure, relative permeability, porosity, coupled adsorption model, concentration and temperature equations were solved. From results of the simulation, historical data agree with the variable saturation model as well as the adsorption model constructed by Langmuir equations. The Appalachian basin, as an example, modeled the carbon dioxide sequestration in this paper. The results of the study and the developed models can provide the projections for the CO 2 sequestration and methane recovery in coal-beds within different regional specifics

  16. Catalytic combustion of methane over mixed oxides derived from Co-Mg/Al ternary hydrotalcites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Zheng [Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Research Centre of Eco-Environmental Sciences, CAS, Beijing 100085 (China); Jesus College, University of Oxford, OX1 3DW (United Kingdom); Yu, Junjie; Cheng, Jie; Hao, Zhengping [Research Centre of Eco-Environmental Sciences, CAS, Beijing 100085 (China); Xiao, Tiancun; Edwards, Peter P. [Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Jones, Martin O. [Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Co{sub x}Mg{sub 3-x} /Al composite oxides (xCoMAO-800) were prepared by calcination of Co{sub x}Mg{sub 3-x}/Al hydrotalcites (x=0.0,0.5,1.0,1.5,2.0,2.5,3.0, respectively) at 800 C. The materials were characterized using XRD, TG-DSC, N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption and TPR. The methane catalytic combustion over the xCoMAO-800 was assessed in a fixed bed micro-reactor. The results revealed that cobalt can be homogenously dispersed into the matrices of the hydrotalcites and determines the structure, specific surface areas and porosity of the derived xCoMAO-800 oxide catalysts. The thermal stability and homogeneity of the hydrotalcites markedly depends on the cobalt concentration in the hydrotalcites. The Co-based hydrotalcite-derived oxides exhibit good activity in the catalytic combustion of methane. The catalytic activity over the xCoMAO-800 oxides enhances with increasing x up to 1.5, but subsequently decreases dramatically as cobalt loadings are further increased. The 1.5CoMAO-800 catalyst shows the best methane combustion activity, igniting methane at 450 C and completing methane combustion around 600 C. The catalytic combustion activity over the xCoMAO-800 oxides are closely related to the strong Co-Mg/Al interaction within the mixed oxides according to the TG-DSC, TPR and activity characteristics. (author)

  17. Effectiveness of Bed Bug Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before EPA allows a bed bug claim on a label, the product must be supported by data showing it will kill bed bugs when applied according to the label. Also consider factors such as extent of infestation, site preparation, and insect life stages.

  18. Methane in German hard coal mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, P.N.; Den Drijver, J.

    1995-01-01

    Worldwide, hard coal mining is being carried out at ever increasing depth, and has, therefore, to cope with correspondingly increasing methane emissions are caused by coal mining. Beside carbon dioxide, chloro-fluoro-carbons (CFCs) and nitrogen oxides, methane is one of the most significant 'greenhouse' gases. It is mainly through the release of such trace gases that the greenhouse effect is brought about. Reducing methane emissions is therefore an important problem to be solved by the coal mining industry. This paper begins by highlighting some of the fundamental principles of methane in hard coal mining. The methane problem in German hard coal mining and the industry's efforts to reduce methane emissions are presented. The future development in German hard coal mining is illustrated by an example which shows how large methane volumes can be managed, while still maintaining high outputs at increasing depth. (author). 7 tabs., 10 figs., 20 refs

  19. Response of the Black Sea methane budget to massive short-term submarine inputs of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmale, O.; Haeckel, M.; McGinnis, D. F.

    2011-01-01

    A steady state box model was developed to estimate the methane input into the Black Sea water column at various water depths. Our model results reveal a total input of methane of 4.7 Tg yr(-1). The model predicts that the input of methane is largest at water depths between 600 and 700 m (7......% of the total input), suggesting that the dissociation of methane gas hydrates at water depths equivalent to their upper stability limit may represent an important source of methane into the water column. In addition we discuss the effects of massive short-term methane inputs (e. g. through eruptions of deep......-water mud volcanoes or submarine landslides at intermediate water depths) on the water column methane distribution and the resulting methane emission to the atmosphere. Our non-steady state simulations predict that these inputs will be effectively buffered by intense microbial methane consumption...

  20. Improved methane removal in exhaust gas from biogas upgrading process using immobilized methane-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng-Ting; Yang, Zhi-Man; Fu, Shan-Fei; Fan, Xiao-Lei; Guo, Rong-Bo

    2018-05-01

    Methane in exhaust gas from biogas upgrading process, which is a greenhouse gas, could cause global warming. The biofilter with immobilized methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) is a promising approach for methane removal, and the selections of inoculated MOB culture and support material are vital for the biofilter. In this work, five MOB consortia were enriched at different methane concentrations. The MOB-20 consortium enriched at the methane concentration of 20.0% (v/v) was then immobilized on sponge and two particle sizes of volcanic rock in biofilters to remove methane in exhaust gas from biogas upgrading process. Results showed that the immobilized MOB performed more admirable methane removal capacity than suspended cells. The immobilized MOB on sponge reached the highest methane removal efficiency (RE) of 35%. The rough surface, preferable hydroscopicity, appropriate pore size and particle size of support material might favor the MOB immobilization and accordingly methane removal. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.