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Sample records for bed combustor fbc

  1. Cold flow behavior study in novel cyclonic fluidized bed combustor (ψ-FBC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remarkable cyclonic and fluidized combustion regimes have prompted the integration of these two distinct combustion processes into a unique combustor. The possibility of combining these two air-solid phase flow hydrodynamics was investigated by performing experiments with a non-reactive combustor model, named a cyclonic fluidized bed combustor (ψ-FBC). Air-rice husk flow visualization within a ψ-FBC clearly indicated vortex flow when air and rice husk descended along the model wall, while the air-rice husk movement within the entire space underneath the upper vortex ring was characterized by fluidization. The vortex rings and an intensive air curtain generated by the swirling flow of primary air with a high swirl number were the key parameters to promote fluidization, form a solid suspension layer and prevent solids from escaping from the cold ψ-FBC model. The visual observations of swirling and recirculation solid flows agreed well with the results of parallel experiments with non-reacting air flow patterns

  2. Co-firing characteristics of rice husk and coal in a cyclonic fluidized-bed combustor ({Psi}-FBC) under controlled bed temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Madhiyanon; P. Sathitruangsak; S. Soponronnarit [Mahanakorn University of Technology, Bangkok (Thailand). Department of Mechanical Engineering

    2011-06-15

    This study extensively investigated temperature and emission characteristics, and the performance of co-firing rice husk with coal in a cyclonic fluidized-bed combustor ({Psi}-FBC) of 125 kWth nominal capacity. The {Psi}-FBC integrated the distinct features of cyclonic/vortex and fluidized-bed combustion. Fluidization, without any inert material, can be accomplished by the stirring blades and vortex ring. The combustor was equipped with a multi-passes water coil to regulate the bed temperatures, varying 800-900{sup o}C. Rice husk was co-fired with coal, a supplementary fuel, with coal blending ratios of 0-25% by thermal basis. The radial temperature profiles displayed vortex combustion along the wall, while the axial temperature profiles suggested a well-mixed condition in the lower part. The large depletion of O{sub 2} and proliferation of CO in the lower part revealed vigorous combustion beneath the vortex ring. A reducing atmosphere appeared unfavorable to NOx formation. The combustor showed satisfied E{sub c}, mostly {gt}98.5%. The optimum operating conditions with respect to NOx emissions were: (1) the thermal percentage of coal not {gt}20%, and (2) bed temperatures between 800 and 850{sup o}C. Otherwise, NOx emissions would exceed the regulations; even CO and SO{sub 2} emissions were well acceptable. 30 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume VI. FBC-Data Base-Management-System (FBC-DBMS) development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    The primary goal of the Fluidized Bed Combustor Data Base, (FBCDB), situated in MIT's Energy laboratory, is to establish a data repository for the express use of designers and research personnel involved in FBC development. DBMS is a software that provides an efficient way of storing, retrieving, updating and manipulating data using an English-like query language. It is anticipated that the FBCDB would play an active and a direct role in the development of FBC technology as well as in the FBC commercial application. After some in-house experience and after a careful and extensive review of commercially available database systems, it was determined that the Model 204 DBMS by Computer Corporation of America was the most suitable to our needs. The setup of a prototype in-house database also allowed us to investigate and understand fully the particular problems involved in coordinating FBC development with a DBMS. Various difficult aspects were encountered and solutions had been sought. For instance, we found that it was necessary to rename the variables to avoid repetition as well as to increase usefulness of our database and, hence, we had designed a classification system for which variables were classified under category to achieve standardization of variable names. The primary content of FBCDB is a collection of data points defined by the value of a number of specific FBC variables. A user may interactively access the database from a computer terminal at any location, retrieve, examine, and manipulate the data as well as produce tables or graphs of the results.

  4. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume VII. FBC Data-Base-Management System (FBC-DBMS) users manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    The primary goal of the Fluidized Bed Combustor Data Base (FBCDB) is to establish a data repository for the express use of designers and research personnel involved in FBC development. FBCDB is implemented on MIT's 370/168 computer, using the Model 204 Data Base Management System (DBMS) developed by Computer Corporation of America. DBMS is a software that provides an efficient way of storing, retrieving, updating and manipulating data using an English-like query language. The primary content of FBCDB is a collection of data points defined by the value of a number of specific FBC variables. A user may interactively access the data base from a computer terminal at any location, retrieve, examine, and manipulate the data as well as produce tables or graphs of the results. More than 20 program segments are currently available in M204 User Language to simplify the user interface for the FBC design or research personnel. However, there are still many complex and advanced retrieving as well as applications programs to be written for this purpose. Although there are currently 71 entries, and about 2000 groups reposited in the system, this size of data is only an intermediate portion of our selection. The usefulness of the system at the present time is, therefore, limited. This version of FBCDB will be released on a limited scale to obtain review and comments. The document is intended as a reference guide to the use of FBCDB. It has been structured to introduce the user to the basics of FBCDB, summarize what the available segments in FBCDB can do, and give detailed information on the operation of FBCDB. This document represents a preliminary draft of a Users Manual. The draft will be updated when the data base system becomes fully implemented. Any suggestions as to how this manual may be improved will be appreciated.

  5. Coating and melt induced agglomeration in a poultry litter fired fluidized bed combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combustion of poultry litter, which is rich in phosphorus, in a fluidized bed combustor (FBC) is associated with agglomeration problems, which can lead to bed defluidization and consequent shutdown of the installation. Whereas earlier research indicated coating induced agglomeration as the dominant mechanism for bed material agglomeration, it is shown experimentally in this paper that both coating and melt induced agglomeration occur. Coating induced agglomeration mainly takes place at the walls of the FBC, in the freeboard above the fluidized bed, where at the prevailing temperature the bed particles are partially molten and hence agglomerate. In the ash, P2O5 forms together with CaO thermodynamically stable Ca3(PO4)2, thus reducing the amount of calcium silicates in the ash. This results in K/Ca silicate mixtures with lower melting points. On the other hand, in-bed agglomeration is caused by thermodynamically unstable, low melting HPO42− and H2PO4− salts present in the fuel. In the hot FBC these salts may melt, may cause bed particles to stick together and may subsequently react with Ca salts from the bed ash, forming a solid bridge of the stable Ca3(PO4)2 between multiple particles. - Highlights: • Coating induced agglomeration not due to K phosphates, but due to K silicates. • Melt induced agglomeration due to H2PO4− and HPO42− salts in the fuel. • Wall agglomeration corresponds to coating induced mechanism. • In-bed agglomeration corresponds to melt induced mechanism

  6. Numerical modeling of fluidized-bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sha, W T; Soo, S L

    1977-11-01

    Optimum design of fluidized-bed combustor requires high carbon burn-up, good sulfur retention, minimized sorbent (Ca) utilization, efficient feed distribution and mechanical layout. These parameters are strongly affected by the dynamics of the fluidized bed. The dynamic behavior of fluidized combustor is formulated in terms of multidomain - multiphase mechanics. Fluidization, bubble mechanics, coal combustion, sorbent sulfation, oxidation, solids movement and elutriation, and heat transfer are explicitly taken into account in the proposed numerical model. The model solves conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy coupled with chemical reactions as boundary value problem in space and initial value problem in time. Multi-fluid model and modified implicit multi-field numerical scheme are employed. The objective of this numerical model is for use in engineering design and scaling. Progress to date shows that all necessary relations can be incorporated within the framework of an overall multidomain - multiphase model for deterministic computation. Provisions are made for subsequent refinements of submodels of individual mechanism and improvements of the existing numerical model. These refinements and improvements can be achieved as better understanding of physical phenomena and more experimental data become available. The numerical model outlined in this report is specifically designed for the fluidized-bed combustor; however, it can readily be extended to various coal gasification systems.

  7. Ash management in circulating fluidized bed combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Redemann; E.-U. Hartge; J. Werther [Hamburg University of Technology, Hamburg (Germany). Institute of Solids Process Engineering and Particle Technology

    2008-12-15

    Ash management in fluidized bed combustion systems means keeping the particle size distribution of the bed inventory in a given range. A dynamic particle population balancing model was developed for this purpose. It was successfully applied to a refuse-derived fuel fired combustor and a coal-fired circulating fluidized bed combustor. Both were large-scale commercial units. The model uses the concept of the attrited ash particle size distribution which represents the particle size distribution of the attrited ash including the generated fines and replaces the consideration of the particle attrition in the model calculations. The model offers the possibility to gain additional information about the particle size distributions and the solids mass flows at any location of the fluidized bed system. In addition, the model provides information about the dynamic behavior of the plant and about mean residence times of particle size classes in the plant. Uncertainties about the ash formation characteristics of fuels make the management of the bed inventory a very important issue. In this context the population balancing model is used to predict the plant behavior under various operating conditions. The results of the calculations carried out give useful information about the possibilities to manage the ash inventory of such a plant. It could be shown that the recirculation of a fine fraction of the bottom drain solids is a very effective method to manage the particle size distribution of the bed inventory. The calculation results further reveal that the mean residence time of particles is strongly dependent on their size. 21 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Energy recovery from heavy ASR by co-incineration in a fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeulen, Isabel; Caneghem, Jo van; Block, Chantal; Vandecasteele, Carlo [University of Leuven, Department of Chemical Engineering, Leuven (Belgium); Brecht, Andres van; Wauters, Guido [Indaver NV, Mechelen (Belgium)

    2012-10-15

    Automotive shredder residue (ASR) is a heterogeneous waste stream with varying particle size and elemental composition. Owing to its complexity and hazardous characteristics, landfilling of ASR is still a common practice. Nevertheless, incineration with energy recovery of certain ASR fractions (Waste-to-Energy, WtE) emerges as an interesting alternative. In a full scale experiment, a waste mix of 25 % heavy ASR, 25 % refuse derived fuel (RDF), and 50 % waste water treatment (WWT) sludge was incinerated in the SLECO fluidized bed combustor (FBC) at the Indaver site in Antwerp, Belgium. Input and output streams were sampled and analyzed to make an inventory of the most important pollutants and toxics. The inventory was further used to determine the environmental impact. Results are compared to those of two other scenarios: incineration of the usual waste feed (70 % RDF and 30 % WWT sludge) and co-incineration of 39 % ASR with 61 % WWT sludge. It can be concluded that co-incineration of heavy ASR in an existing FBC is a valid and clean technology to increase current reuse and recovery rates. In the considered FBC, 27 % of the energetic value of ASR can be recovered, while all emissions remain well below regulatory limits and only 12.6 % of the heavy ASR needs to be landfilled. The proportion of ASR in the input waste mix is however limited by the heavy metal concentration in the ASR and the generated ashes. (orig.)

  9. Behaviour of meat and bonemeal/peat pellets in a bench scale fluidised bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonnell, K.; Desmond, J.; Leahy, J.J.; Howard-Hildige, R.; Ward, S. [University College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland). Agriculture and Food Engineering Department

    2001-01-01

    As a result of the recent Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy crisis in the European beef industry, safe animal by-product disposal is currently being addressed. One such disposal option is the combustion of by-product material such as meat and bone meal (MBM) in a fluidised bed combustor (FBC) for the purpose of energy recovery. Two short series of combustion tests were conducted on a FBC at the University of Twente, the Netherlands. In the first series, pellets (10 mm in diameter and approximately 10 mm in length) were made from a mixture of MBM and milled peat, at MBM inclusion rates of 0%, 30%, 50%, 70% and 100%. In the second series of tests, the pellets were commercially made and were 4.8 mm in diameter and between 12 and 15 mm long. These pellets had a weight of about 0.3 g and contained 0%, 25%, 35%, 50% and 100% MBM inclusion with the peat. Both sets of pellets were combusted at 800{degree}C. The residence times in the FBC varied from 300 s (25% MBM inclusion) to 120 s (100% MBM inclusion) for the first series of pellets. Increasing compaction pressure increased the residence time. For the second series of pellets, the residence time varied from about 300 s (25% MBM inclusion) to 100 s (100% MBM inclusion). MBM was found to be a volatile product (about 65%) and co-firing it with milled peat in a pelleted feed format reduces its volatile intensity. Pellets made from 100% bone based meal remained intact within the bed and are thought to have undergone a process of calcination during combustion. A maximum MBM inclusion rate of 35% with milled peat in a pellet is recommended.

  10. Major gaseous and PAH emissions from a fluidized-bed combustor firing rice husk with high combustion efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This experimental work investigated major gaseous (CO and NOx) and PAH emissions from a 400 kWth fluidized-bed combustor with a cone-shaped bed (referred to as 'conical FBC') firing rice husk with high, over 99%, combustion efficiency. Experimental tests were carried out at the fuel feed rate of 80 kg/h for different values of excess air (EA). As revealed by the experimental results, EA had substantial effects on the axial CO and NOx concentration profiles and corresponding emissions from the combustor. The concentration (mg/kg-ash) and specific emission (μg/kW h) of twelve polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), acenaphthylene, fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, dibenz[a,h]anthracene and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, were quantified in this work for different size fractions of ash emitted from the conical FBC firing rice husk at EA = 20.9%. The total PAHs emission was found to be predominant for the coarsest ash particles, due to the effects of a highly developed internal surface in a particle volume. The highest emission was shown by acenaphthylene, 4.1 μg/kW h, when the total yield of PAHs via fly ash was about 10 μg/kW h. (author)

  11. Pneumatic and Hydraulic Systems in Coal Fluidized Bed Combustor

    OpenAIRE

    Z. O. Opafunso; I. I. Ozigis; I.A. Adetunde

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: This study designed the pneumatic and hydraulic systems in coal fluidized bed combustor. These are fluidization of silica sand bed material, Air distributor, centrifugal fan, electric motor power drive and surface heat exchanger. Approach: The effects of increased gas velocity on silica sand and the resultant drag force formed the basic equations in fluidization. Air distributor was introduced to achieve pressure drop across the beds. Results: The constructed centrifugal fa...

  12. Characterisation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in flue gas and residues of a full scale fluidized bed combustor combusting non-hazardous industrial waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Caneghem, J; Vandecasteele, C

    2014-11-01

    This paper studies the fate of PAHs in full scale incinerators by analysing the concentration of the 16 EPA-PAHs in both the input waste and all the outputs of a full scale Fluidized Bed Combustor (FBC). Of the analysed waste inputs i.e. Waste Water Treatment (WWT) sludge, Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) and Automotive Shredder Residue (ASR), RDF and ASR were the main PAH sources, with phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene being the most important PAHs. In the flue gas sampled at the stack, naphthalene was the only predominant PAH, indicating that the PAHs in FBC's combustion gas were newly formed and did not remain from the input waste. Of the other outputs, the boiler and fly ash contained no detectable levels of PAHs, whereas the flue gas cleaning residue contained only low concentrations of naphthalene, probably adsorbed from the flue gas. The PAH fingerprint of the bottom ash corresponded rather well to the PAH fingerprint of the RDF and ASR, indicating that the PAHs in this output, in contrast to the other outputs, were mainly remainders from the PAHs in the waste inputs. A PAH mass balance showed that the total PAH input/output ratio of the FBC ranged from about 100 to about 2600 depending on the waste input composition and the obtained combustion conditions. In all cases, the FBC was clearly a net PAH sink. PMID:25002370

  13. Combustion of oil palm solid wastes in fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamsuddin, A.H. [Univ. Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi (Malaysia). Faculty of Engineering; Sopian, K. [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States). College of Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The palm oil industry of Malaysia is the largest in the world producing about 55% of the world production. The industry has approximately 270 mills throughout the country with processing sizes ranging from 10 tonnes/hour to 120 tonnes/hour. All mills produce solid wastes, about 50% of the fresh fruit bunches in terms of weight. The solid wastes produced are in the form of empty fruit bunches, fibers and shells. These wastes have high energy value, ranging from 14 to 18 MJ/kg. The industry is currently self-sufficient in terms of energy. Fibers and shell wastes are being used as boiler fuel to raise steam for electrical power production and process steam. However, the combustion technology currently being employed is obsolete with low efficiency and polluting. A fluidized bed combustor pilot plant is designed and constructed at Combustion Research Laboratory, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. The combustor is made up of 600 mm {times} 900 mm rectangular bed filled with sand up to 400 mm height, static. A bank of heat transfer tubes is imbedded in the bed, designed to absorb 50% of heat released by the fuel in the bed. The remaining heat is transferred in tubes placed on the wall of the freeboard area. Experimental studies were carried out in the pilot plant using palm oil solid wastes. The combustion temperatures were maintained in the range 800--900 C. The performance of the combustor was evaluated in terms of combustion and boiler efficiencies and flue gas emissions monitored.

  14. Refractory experience in circulating fluidized bed combustors, Task 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, R.Q.

    1989-11-01

    This report describes the results of an investigation into the status of the design and selection of refractory materials for coal-fueled circulating fluidized-bed combustors. The survey concentrated on operating units in the United States manufactured by six different boiler vendors: Babcock and Wilcox, Combustion Engineering, Foster Wheeler, Keeler Dorr-Oliver, Pyropower, and Riley Stoker. Information was obtained from the boiler vendors, refractory suppliers and installers, and the owners/operators of over forty units. This work is in support of DOE's Clean Coal Technology program, which includes circulating fluidized-bed technology as one of the selected concepts being evaluated.

  15. Modeling of Sulfur Retention in Circulating Fluidized Bed Coal Combustors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔锐; 吕俊复; 刘青; 吴学安; 岳光溪

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive model for predicting the sulfur retention performance in circulating fluidized bedcombustors was developed which involves the different residence times, the wide particle size distribution andthe different forms of sulfur in the coal. In addition, the reductive decomposition of CaSO4 is highlighted. Thesimulation results from the model show that the sulfur contents, the bed temperature, the sorbent particle sizedistribution and the sorbent activity or the maximum conversion rate can significantly influence the sulfuretention performance in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustors.``

  16. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (PAFBC) is a unique and innovative coal-fueled technology that has the potential to meet these conditions and provide heat and/or process steam to small industrial, commercial, institutional and residential complexes. The potential of Pulse Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion (PAFBC) technology has been amply demonstrated under the sponsorship of a previous DOE/METC contract (DE-AC21-88MC25069). The environmental performance of a coal-fired laboratory-scale system (1.5 million British Thermal Units per hour) (MMBtu/hr) significantly surpassed that of conventional bubbling and circulating fluidized-bed combustion units (see Table 1 for performance comparison). Prompted by these encouraging results in combustion, sulfur capture, emissions control, and enhanced heat transfer, Island Creek Coal Company (ICC) and Baltimore Thermal Energy Corporation expressed interest in the technology and offered to participate by providing host sites for field testing. EA's have been submitted independently for each of these field test sites. This submission addresses the preliminary testing of the PAFBC unit at Manufacturing and Technology Conversion International's (MTCI) Baltimore, MD facility

  17. Mass balance for POPs in a real scale fluidized bed combustor co-incinerating automotive shredder residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Caneghem, J; Block, C; Vermeulen, I; Van Brecht, A; Van Royen, P; Jaspers, M; Wauters, G; Vandecasteele, C

    2010-09-15

    The European directive 2000/53/EC implies a "reuse and recovery" rate for end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) of 95% to be reached by the year 2015. One of the options to increase the actual average European "reuse and recovery" rate of approximately 78% (EU 15, 2008) is incineration of automotive shredder residue (ASR) with energy-recovery. The mass balance and the congener fingerprints for PCDD/Fs, dioxin-like PCBs, PCBs and PAHs in a real scale fluidized bed combustor (FBC) incinerating 25% ASR with 25% refuse derived fuel (RDF) and 50% waste water treatment sludge (WWT sludge) were investigated. The PCDD/F, dioxin-like PCB, PCB and PAH concentrations in this input waste mix were more than hundred times higher than in the usual waste feed of the incinerator (30% RFD and 70% WWT sludge). In the outputs of the FBC, however, the concentrations of these POP groups were comparable or only slightly higher than in the outputs generated during the incineration of the usual waste feed. The considered POPs in the waste were destroyed efficiently and the formation of new POPs during cooling of the flue gas appeared to a large extent independent of the POP concentrations in the incinerated waste. PMID:20541864

  18. Biomass ash-bed material interactions leading to agglomeration in FBC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, H.J.M.; van Lith, Simone Cornelia; Kiel, J.H.A.

    2008-01-01

    In (bubbling) fluidized-bed combustion and gasification of biomass, several potential problems are associated with the inorganic components of the fuel. A major problem area is defluidization due to bed agglomeration. The most common found process leading to defluidization in commercial-scale ins...

  19. Parametric Study of NOx Emissions in Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluidized bed combustion behavior of coal and biomass is of practical interest due to its significant involvement in heating systems and power plant operations. This combustion behavior has been studied by many experimental techniques. . Use of biomass in coal-fired power plants results in high efficiencies and fuel diversity. Co-combustion experiments were carried out in a pilot scale test facility of circulating fluidized bed combustor (70KW). Effect of operating parameters on the NOx emissions is studied while burning coal with wheat straw. Relation between NOx emissions and operating parameters like bed temperature, excess air ratio, air staging, Ca/S molar ratio and fluidizing air velocity have been studied and discussed. (author)

  20. Remediation of ash problems in fluidised-bed combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuthaluru, H.B.; Zhang, D.K. [Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA (Australia). School of Chemical Engineering

    2001-03-01

    The paper reports the control methods for mitigating particle agglomeration and bed defluidisation during fluidised-bed combustion of low-rank coals. A laboratory scale spouted-bed combustion system is used to study the effectiveness of several control methods including the use of alternative bed materials, mineral additives, pretreatment of coal and coal blending. Sillimanite, bauxite, calcite and magnesite were used as alternative bed materials whereas mineral additives viz. clay, kaosil and bauxite were injected into the combustion system while burning South Australian low-rank coal at 800{degree}C. Samples of the same coal subjected to water-washing, Al pretreatment and Ca pretreatment are also tested in the spouted-bed combustor. In addition, experiments were conducted with several coal blends prepared at ratios of 50:50 and 90:10 from two lignites and one sub-bituminous coal. Experiments showed that all the control methods are effective to different extends in reducing ash problems and resulted in extended combustion operation. Tests with alternative bed materials and mineral additives showed trouble free-operation for longer periods (7-12 h at 800{degree}C) than with sand runs at the same bed temperature. Wet pretreatment and coal blending were also found to be effective and resulted in extended combustion operation (9-12 h at 800{degree}C). Chemical analyses indicated that formation of low temperature eutectics was suppressed by Al/Ca/Mg-rich phases in ash coating of bed particles. This was identified as the main mechanism for prevention of ash problems observed with the use of alternative bed materials, mineral additives, pretreated coals and coal blends. 23 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Pneumatic and Hydraulic Systems in Coal Fluidized Bed Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. O. Opafunso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study designed the pneumatic and hydraulic systems in coal fluidized bed combustor. These are fluidization of silica sand bed material, Air distributor, centrifugal fan, electric motor power drive and surface heat exchanger. Approach: The effects of increased gas velocity on silica sand and the resultant drag force formed the basic equations in fluidization. Air distributor was introduced to achieve pressure drop across the beds. Results: The constructed centrifugal fan was driven by selected electric motor based on pressure and temperature changes in the reactor. The dimensions of the heat transfer tube were calculated from fluid flow and energy balance equations. The values obtained were as the follows: Fluidization velocity (1.54 m sec-­1, gas velocity through orifice (29.52 m sec-1, the fan electric motor (2 KW, 3 ph at 1500 pm, the steam temperature obtained was 160°C from water ambient temperature of 30°C and tube length 22 m was coiled into levels in the combustor. Conclusion/Recommendation: Precise specifications of pneumatic and hydraulic systems will adequately address the environment concern of coal fired power supply as a method to address epileptic power supply in Nigeria.

  2. Development of a new method for improving load turndown in fluidized bed combustors: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.C.

    1988-12-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate a new concept in fluidized bed design that improves load turndown capability. This improvement is accomplished by independently controlling heat transfer and combustion in the combustor. The design consists of two fluidized beds, one central and one annular. The central bed serves as the combustion bed. The annular bed is fluidized separately from the combustion bed and its level of fluidization determine the overall heat transfer rate from the combustion bed to the surrounding water jacket. Early theoretical considerations suggested a load turndown exceeding ten was possible for this design. This research consisted of three major phases: development of a computational model to predict heat transfer in the two-bed combustor, heat transfer measurements in hot-and-cold flow models of the combustor, and combustion tests in an optimally designed combustor. The computation model was useful in selecting the design of the combustor. Annular bed width and particle sizes were chosen with the aid of the model. The heat transfer tests were performed to determine if the existing correlations for fluidized bed heat transfer coefficients were sufficiently accurate for high aspect ratio fluidized beds (such as the annular bed in the combustor). Combustion tests were performed in an optimally designed combustor. Three fuel forms were used: double screened, crushed coal, coal-water-limestone mixtures (CWLM), and coal-limestone briquettes. 18 refs., 30 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Effects of Immersed Surfaces on the Combustor Efficiency of Small-Scale Fluidized Beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdil Eskin

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, effects of the different types of heat exchanger surfaces on the second law efficiency of a small-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB combustor are analyzed and the results are compared with the bubbling fluidized bed coal combustor effectiveness values. Using a previously developed simulation program, combustor efficiency and entropy generation values are obtained at different operation velocities at different height and volume ratios of the immersed surfaces, both for circulating and bubbling fluidized bed combustors. Besides that, the influence of the immersed surface types on the combustor efficiency was compared for different fluidized bed combustors. Through this analysis, the dimensions, arrangement and type of the immersed surfaces which achieve maximum efficiency are obtained.

  4. Atmospheric fluidized bed combustor development program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashworth, R.A.; Melick, T.A.; Plessinger, D.A.; Sommer, T.M. [Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Orville, OH (United States); Keener, H.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center; Webner, R.L. [Will-Burt, Orrville, OH (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate and promote the commercialization of a coal-fired atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) system, with limestone addition for SO{sub 2} emissions control and a baghouse for particulate emissions control. This AFBC system was targeted for small scale industrial-commercial-institutional space and process heat applications in the 1 x 10{sup 6} to 10 x 10{sup 6} Btu/hr capacity range. A cost effective and environmentally acceptable AFBC technology in this size range would displace a considerable amount of gas/oil with coal while resulting in significant total cost savings to the owner/operators. The project itself was separated into three levels: (1) feasibility, (2--3) subsystem development and integration, and (4) proof-of-concept. In Level (1), the technical and economic feasibility of a 1 million Btu/hr coal-fired AFBC air heater was evaluated. In Level (2--3), the complete EER fluidized bed combustor (1.5 million Btu/hr) system was developed and tested. The goal or reducing SO{sub 2} emissions to 1.2 lb/10{sup 6} Btu, from high sulfur Ohio coal, was achieved by adding limestone with a Ca/S (coal) ratio of {approximately} 3.0. Finally, in Level (4), the proof-of-concept system, a 2.2 million Btu/hr unit was installed and successfully operated at Cedar Lane Farms, a commercial nursery in Ohio.

  5. Bed agglomeration in fluidized combustor fueled by wood and rice straw blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thy, P.; Jenkins, B.M.; Williams, R.B.; Lesher, C.E.; Bakker, R.R.

    2010-01-01

    Petrographic techniques have been used to examine bed materials from fluidized bed combustion experiments that utilized wood and rice straw fuel blends. The experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale combustor with mullite sand beds, firing temperatures of 840 to 1030 °C, and run durations

  6. The Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas fluidized bed combustor; El combustor de lecho fluidizado del Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milan Foressi, Julio [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1991-12-31

    After synthesizing the most important aspects of the combustion technology in fluidized bed, the experimental combustor developed at the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) is described, as well as the test results of the experiences carried out with coal from Rio Escondido, Coahuila. [Espanol] Tras sintetizar los aspectos mas importantes de la tecnologia de combustion en lecho fluidizado, se describe el combustor experimental desarrollado en el Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), asi como los resultados de las experiencias realizadas con carbon proveniente de Rio Escondido, Coahuila.

  7. Particle size analysis of coal and lime stone used in fbc power plant lakhra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakistan is gifted with huge coal reserves throughout its land from Sindh to NWFP province. The total reserves at Lakhra have been estimated to be 1328 million tones. Average annual production of coal from Lakhra is over one million tones. Most of this production is used in the WAPDA power plant at Khanot, Sindh and in brick kiln industry. The high sulphur content coal has been used in the FBC (Fluidized Bed Combustor) power plant at Lakhra. The coal and limestone have been used ill power plant at Lakhra are 52 and 26 tones/hr as per stoichiometric calculations respectively. The research shows that for complete combustion of high sulphur content coal and reducing the emission, the particles size of coal and limestone is of utmost importance. The particle sizes of coal and limestone have been analyzed. The result is then compared with the required particle size as per design parameters of FBC at Lakhra (coal and lime stone 13 and 6.0 mm). The result shows that the particle size of the coal and limestone is not being as per design parameter of the FBC. The coal and lime stone particles size used in FBC is from 0.075-4.75 that is much lower than the particle size of 13 and 6 mm as per design specification. In addition the particle size analysis was also carried out for the fly ash, bottom ash and re-injected material (un-burnt material from the FBC that is recycled to the FBC as per plant specification) to evaluate the overall performance of the FBC plant in terms of Maintenance and Operational problems. As a result of deviation of particle size of coal and limestone from the recommended size, the combustion of coal is not complete. The incomplete combustion not only reduces the plant efficiency and capacity but various operational and technical problems occurs that even result regular shut down of the power plant. (author)

  8. Analytical model for freeboard and in-bed limestone sulfation in fluidized-bed coal combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fee, D.C.; Myles, K.M.; Marroquin, G.; Fan, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    A new model, which combines in-bed and freeboard sulfation, significantly improves the ability to predict sulfur capture by limestone sorbents in fluidized-bed coal combustors. In this model, the in-bed hydrodynamics are described in terms of a bubble phase and an emulsion phase while the freeboard region has only a diluted emulsion phase. The solids, which are in the emulsion phases, are considered to be completely back-mixed; the gaseous bubble phase travels in plug-flow but exchanges with the emulsion phase. The sulfation reaction occurs principally in the emulsion phase and the reaction rate is a direct function of the sulfur dioxide concentration, the extent of the calcium oxide conversion (as measured by a thermogravimetric analyzer), and the amount of limestone present in the bed and in the freeboard. The amount present, or holdup, in the free-board is calculated from empirical correlations for elutriation and from particle-time trajectories as predicted from equations of motion. 19 references, 4 figures.

  9. Control methods for remediation of ash-related problems in fluidized-bed combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuthaluru, H.B.; Zhang, D.

    1999-07-01

    The paper reports on investigations into control methodologies for mitigating ash-related problems such as particle agglomeration and bed defluidization during fluidized-bed combustion of low-rank coals. A laboratory scale spouted bed combustor is used to study the effectiveness of control methodologies. In the present work, two control methods are investigated viz., the use of alternative bed materials and pretreatment of coal. Bauxite and calcined sillimanite are used as alternative bed materials in the spouted bed combustor while burning South Australian low-rank coal. Samples of the same coal subjected to Al pretreatment, water washing and acid washing are also tested in the spouted bed combustor. Experiments showed that both methods are effective to different extents in reducing ash-related problems. Tests with calcined sillimanite and bauxite (as the bed material) showed trouble free operation for longer periods (7--12 hr at 800 C and 3--5 hr at 850 C) than with sand runs at the same bed temperatures. Al pretreatment and water-washing were also found to be effective and resulted in extended combustion operation. Al enrichment in ash coating of bed particles has been identified as the main mechanism for prevention of agglomeration and defluidization by these control methodologies. For water-washing, the principal reason behind agglomeration and defluidization control is the reduction in sodium levels.

  10. Bed agglomeration in fluidized combustor fueled by wood and rice straw blends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thy, Peter; Jenkins, Brian; Williams, R.B.;

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Petrographic techniques have been used to examine bed materials from fluidized bed combustion experiments that utilized wood and rice straw fuel blends. The experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale combustor with mullite sand beds, firing temperatures of 840 to 1030 °C, and run...... particle surfaces by accumulation of liquid droplets preferentially in areas sheltered from turbulence and mechanical interaction. The composition of the film suggests melting of locally accumulated dust or aerosol mixture of ash particles and mullite. The film only locally enlarged bed particles. Large...... straw ash particles appear to have mostly been passively incorporated into the adhesive melt without melting or reaction....

  11. Improved Robust Adaptive Control of a Fluidized Bed Combustor for Sewage Sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENGHong-Xia; JIAYing-Min

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a robust model reference adaptive control scheme to deal with uncertain time delay in the dynamical model of a fluidized bed combustor for sewage sludge. The theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the proposed scheme can guarantee not only stability and robustness, but also the adaptive decoupling performance of the system.

  12. Effect of secondary air injection on the combustion efficiency of sawdust in a fluidized bed combustor

    OpenAIRE

    K. V. N. Srinivasa Rao; G. Venkat Reddy

    2008-01-01

    Agricultural wastes like bagasse, paddy husks, sawdust and groundnut shells can be effectively used as fuels for fluidized bed combustion; otherwise these biomass fuels are difficult to handle due to high moisture and fines content. In the present work the possibility of using sawdust in the fluidized bed combustor, related combustion efficiencies and problems encountered in the combustion process are discussed. The temperature profiles for sawdust with an increase in fluidizing velocity alon...

  13. High temperature degradation by erosion-corrosion in bubbling fluidized bed combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Peggy Y.; MacAdam, S.; Niu, Y.; Stringer, J.

    2003-04-22

    Heat-exchanger tubes in fluidized bed combustors (FBCs) often suffer material loss due to combined corrosion and erosion. Most severe damage is believed to be caused by the impact of dense packets of bed material on the lower parts of the tubes. In order to understand this phenomenon, a unique laboratory test rig at Berkeley was designed to simulate the particle hammering interactions between in-bed particles and tubes in bubbling fluidized bed combustors. In this design, a rod shaped specimen is actuated a short distance within a partially fluidized bed. The downward specimen motion is controlled to produce similar frequencies, velocities and impact forces as those experienced by the impacting particle aggregates in practical systems. Room temperature studies have shown that the degradation mechanism is a three-body abrasion process. This paper describes the characteristics of this test rig, reviews results at elevated temperatures and compares them to field experience. At higher temperatures, deposits of the bed material on tube surfaces can act as a protective layer. The deposition depended strongly on the type of bed material, the degree of tube surface oxidation and the tube and bed temperatures. With HCl present in the bed, wastage was increased due to enhanced oxidation and reduced oxide scale adherence.

  14. Co-combustion of agricultural residues with coal in a fluidized bed combustor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, W A W A K; Alias, A B; Savory, R M; Cliffe, K R

    2009-02-01

    Power generation from biomass is an attractive technology that utilizes agricultural residual waste. In order to explain the behavior of biomass-fired fluidized bed incinerator, biomass sources from agricultural residues (rice husk and palm kernel) were co-fired with coal in a 0.15m diameter and 2.3m high fluidized bed combustor. The combustion efficiency and carbon monoxide emissions were studied and compared with those for pure coal combustion. Co-combustion of a mixture of biomass with coal in a fluidized bed combustor designed for coal combustion increased combustion efficiency up to 20% depending upon excess air levels. Observed carbon monoxide levels fluctuated between 200 and 900 ppm with the addition of coal. It is evident from this research that efficient co-firing of biomass with coal can be achieved with minimal modifications to existing coal-fired boilers. PMID:18614348

  15. Co-firing of pressed sugar beet pulp with coal in a laboratory-scale fluidised bed combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Pressed pulp (71% moisture) has been successfully co-fired with coal. • Maximum pulp proportion in the blend for successful operation was 50%. • Effect of moisture can increase throughput of fluidised bed. • No agglomeration observed during extended co-firing tests. • NOx emissions were observed to be reduced during co-firing. - Abstract: Relatively cheap, poor quality, unprepared biomass materials can be difficult to burn efficiently on a large commercial scale because of their variable composition, relatively low calorific values and high moisture contents. Consequently it is often necessary to co-fire these materials with a hydrocarbon support fuel to ensure stable and efficient combustion. Fluidised bed combustion (FBC) is a promising method for burning mixtures of fuels with widely differing individual characteristics although there is a need for further information on the “optimum” conditions for efficient operation as well as on the proportions of support fuel which should be used in particular applications. This paper is therefore concerned with co-firing of coal with pressed sugar beet pulp, (a solid biomass with an average moisture content of 71%), in a lab scale (<25 kW net thermal input) fluidised bed combustor. The project was undertaken in collaboration with British Sugar plc. who operate a large coal-fired fluidised bed, with a nominal thermal rating of 40 MW, to generate hot combustion gases for use in subsequent drying applications. The combustion characteristics of different coal and pressed pulp mixtures were investigated over a wide range of operating conditions. For stable combustion the maximum proportion of pulp by mass in the blended fuel was limited to 50%. However under these co-firing conditions a fixed bed temperature can be achieved with 20% lower fluidising air (when compared with coal alone) since evaporation of the moisture in the pressed pulp provides additional cooling of the bed. This reduction in

  16. The combustion of low calorific value fuels (oil shale) by using fluidized bed combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work reports an experimental data for combustion of oil-shale in a fluidized bed combustor. The experimental set up was designed for the combustion of low calorific value fuel such as oil-shale to facilitate the variation of many parameters over a wide operating range. A cold run was firstly conducted to study the fluidization parameters. Fluidization experiment were made with different sized quartiz particles. Minimum fluidization velocities and other fluidization characteristics were determined at room temperature. Secondary a hot run was started, first studying the combustion of 'LPG' in a fluidized bed as a starting process, then studying the combustion if oil-shale with different flow rates. The experimetal results are promising and give rise to hopes that this valuable deposit can be used as a fuel source and can be burned sucessfully in a fluidized bed combustor. This study had prooved that utilization of oil-shale a fuel source is no more a complicated technical problem, this opens the way for power generation using fluidized bed combustors. (author). 17 refs., 32 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Remediation of oil-contaminated gravel using a fluidized bed combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory tests were conducted using a fluidized bed combustor to remediate gravel contaminated with crude oil, such as would be encountered in an oil spill. The objectives of the tests were to characterize the composition of the oil-contaminated gravel; to incinerate three different batches of gravel contaminated by fresh crude, weathered crude, and emulsified crude; and to characterize the stack emissions. In all tests, the outlet gravel samples were found to be completely clean of oil. The CO and O2 concentrations in the combustor stack gases were within the national guidelines for hazardous waste incineration facilities. Problems were encountered with the feed system and the propane heating system used to preheat the combustor and as a supplementary fuel. These problems will have to be resolved before a field unit can be considered. A solids removal system and an air distributor system would have to be designed for the field unit to prevent the accumulation of larger gravel pieces in the fluidized bed combustor. 4 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  18. Analysis of FBC deterministic chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daw, C.S.

    1996-06-01

    It has recently been discovered that the performance of a number of fossil energy conversion devices such as fluidized beds, pulsed combustors, steady combustors, and internal combustion engines are affected by deterministic chaos. It is now recognized that understanding and controlling the chaotic elements of these devices can lead to significantly improved energy efficiency and reduced emissions. Application of these techniques to key fossil energy processes are expected to provide important competitive advantages for U.S. industry.

  19. CO-COMBUSTION OF REFUSE DERIVED FUEL WITH COAL IN A FLUIDISED BED COMBUSTOR

    OpenAIRE

    W. A. Wan Ab Karim Ghani; Alias, A. B.; K.R.CLIFFE

    2009-01-01

    Power generation from biomass is an attractive technology which utilizes municipal solid waste-based refused derived fuel. In order to explain the behavior of biomass-fired fluidized bed incinerator, biomass sources from refuse derived fuel was co-fired with coal in a 0.15 m diameter and 2.3 m high fluidized bed combustor. The combustion efficiency and carbon monoxide emissions were studied and compared with those from pure coal combustion. This study proved that the blending effect had incre...

  20. Refractory experience in circulating fluidized bed combustors, Task 7. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, R.Q.

    1989-11-01

    This report describes the results of an investigation into the status of the design and selection of refractory materials for coal-fueled circulating fluidized-bed combustors. The survey concentrated on operating units in the United States manufactured by six different boiler vendors: Babcock and Wilcox, Combustion Engineering, Foster Wheeler, Keeler Dorr-Oliver, Pyropower, and Riley Stoker. Information was obtained from the boiler vendors, refractory suppliers and installers, and the owners/operators of over forty units. This work is in support of DOE`s Clean Coal Technology program, which includes circulating fluidized-bed technology as one of the selected concepts being evaluated.

  1. Combustion of palm oil solid waste in fluidized bed combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of experimental investigations of fluidized bed combustion of palm oil wastes consisting of shell, fibre and empty fruit bunches high heating value of 17450 kJ/kg and low heating value of 14500 kJ/kg. The fluidized bed combuster used has a vessel size of 486 x 106 mm3, surface area of evaporation tubes and distribution air pipes of 500 mm2 and 320 mm2 respectively. It was found that a fuel feeding rate 160 kg/h is required to achieve a steam flow rate of 600 kg/h, with the combustion efficiency 96% and boiler efficiency of 72%, emission level of flue gas NOx at less than 180 ppm, SO2 at less than 20 ppm are measured in the flue gas. (Author)

  2. Effect of flue gas recirculation on heat transfer in a supercritical circulating fluidized bed combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błaszczuk Artur

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on assessment of the effect of flue gas recirculation (FGR on heat transfer behavior in 1296t/h supercritical coal-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB combustor. The performance test in supercritical CFB combustor with capacity 966 MWth was performed with the low level of flue gas recirculation rate 6.9% into furnace chamber, for 80% unit load at the bed pressure of 7.7 kPa and the ratio of secondary air to the primary air SA/PA = 0.33. Heat transfer behavior in a supercritical CFB furnace between the active heat transfer surfaces (membrane wall and superheater and bed material has been analyzed for Geldart B particle with Sauter mean diameters of 0.219 and 0.246 mm. Bed material used in the heat transfer experiments had particle density of 2700 kg/m3. A mechanistic heat transfer model based on cluster renewal approach was used in this work. A heat transfer analysis of CFB combustion system with detailed consideration of bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient distributions along furnace height is investigated. Heat transfer data for FGR test were compared with the data obtained for representative conditions without recycled flue gases back to the furnace through star-up burners.

  3. Mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of materials exposed to an experimental, atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A joint materials test program developed by the Institute for Mining and Minerals Research (IMMR) and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) involved the postexposure mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of candidate structural materials in an experimental, atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC). This combustor was operated by Accurex Corporation at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, under the direction of TVA. The materials studied were Type 304, Type 310, and INCOLOY alloy 800 in the form of disc coupons with and without crevice configurations. Type 304 was also used for mechanical property measurements. The alloys were exposed to the combustor environment at about8400C for approximately 330 hours. The ranking in terms of decreasing weight loss was: (1) Type 304, (2) Type 310, and (3) INCOLOY alloy 800. The presence of tight crevices did not enhance the corrosion rate. In addition, the corrosion rates, based on the weight loss (typically 1 to 6 mpy), indicated that the alloys performed reasonably well when considering materials wastage. However, optical microscopy observations showed intergranular corrosion penetration in INCOLOY alloy 800 and Type 304. The mechanical properties of Type 304 were inferior to the unexposed alloy. A comparison of the data obtained from the combustor-exposed 304ss tensile samples with data from control samples exposed in vacuum to a similar thermal history indicated that the chemistry of the AFBC environment did not play a major role in the observed degradation of the mechanical properties

  4. Staged fluidized-bed coal combustor for boiler retrofit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Staged Fluidized-Bed Coal Combustion System (ASC) is a novel clean coal technology for either coal-fired repowering of existing boilers or for incremental power generation using combined-cycle gas turbines. This new technology combines staged combustion for gaseous emission control, in-situ sulfur capture, and an ash agglomeration/vitrification process for the agglomeration/vitrification of ash and spent sorbent, thus rendering solid waste environmentally benign. The market for ASC is expected to be for clean coal-fired repowering of generating units up to 250 MW, especially for units where space is limited. The expected tightening of the environmental requirements on leachable solids residue by-products could considerably increase the marketability for ASC. ASC consists of modular low-pressure vessels in which coal is partially combusted and gasified using stacked fluidized-bed processes to produce low-to-medium-Btu, high-temperature gas. This relatively clean fuel gas is used to repower/refuel existing pulverized-coal, natural gas, or oil-fired boilers using bottom firing and reburning techniques. The benefits of ASC coal-fired repowering include the ability to repower boilers without obtaining additional space while meeting the more stringent environmental requirements of the future. Low NOx, SOx, and particulate levels are expected while a nonleachable solid residue with trace metal encapsulation is produced. ASC also minimizes boiler modification and life-extension expenditures. Repowered efficiencies can be restored to the initial operating plant efficiency, and the existing boiler capacity can be increased by 10%. Preliminary cost estimates indicate that ASC will have up to a $250/kW capital cost advantage over existing coal-fired repowering options. 4 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Experimental Investigations of Extracted Rapeseed Combustion Emissions in a Small Scale Stationary Fluidized Bed Combustor

    OpenAIRE

    Dieter Steinbrecht; Tristan Vincent; Nguyen Dinh Tung

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the combustion process of extracted rapeseed (ER) grist in a stationary fluidized bed combustor (SFBC) and evaluate the chemical compositions of the flue gas emissions. The experimental tests of ER combustion in the 90 to 200 kW (Kilowatt) SFB combustion test facility show that the optimal ER combustion temperature is within the range from 850 to 880° C. Temperature and the concentration of exhausted emissions (e.g. O 2 , CO, CO 2 , NO, NO 2 , SO 2 ...

  6. Thermo-hydrodynamic design of fluidized bed combustors estimating metal wastage

    CERN Document Server

    Lyczkowski, Robert W; Bouillard, Jacques X; Folga, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    Thermo-Hydrodynamic Design of Fluidized Bed Combustors: Estimating Metal Wastage is a unique volume that finds that the most sensitive parameters affecting metal wastage are superficial fluidizing velocity, particle diameter, and particle sphericity.  Gross consistencies between disparate data sources using different techniques were found when the erosion rates are compared on the same basis using the concept of renormalization.  The simplified mechanistic models and correlations, when validated, can be used to renormalize any experimental data so they can be compared on a consistent basis using a master equation.

  7. Destruction and formation of PCDD/Fs in a fluidised bed combustor co-incinerating automotive shredder residue with refuse derived fuel and wastewater treatment sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Caneghem, J; Vermeulen, I; Block, C; Van Brecht, A; Van Royen, P; Jaspers, M; Wauters, G; Vandecasteele, C

    2012-03-15

    During an eight day trial automotive shredder residue (ASR) was added to the usual waste feed of a Fluidized Bed Combustor (FBC) for waste-to-energy conversion; the input waste mix consisted of 25% ASR, 25% refuse-derived fuel (RDF) and 50% wastewater treatment (WWT) sludge. All inputs and outputs were sampled and the concentration of the 17 PCDD/Fs with TEF-values was determined in order to obtain "PCDD/F fingerprints". The ASR contained approximately 9000 ng PCDD/Fs/kg(DW), six times more than the RDF and 10 times more than the WWT sludge. The fingerprint of ASR and RDF was dominated by HpCDD and OCDD, which accounted for 90% of the total PDDD/F content, whereas the WWT sludge contained relatively more HpCDFs and OCDF (together 70%). The flue gas cleaning residue (FGCR) and fly and boiler ash contained approximately 30,000 and 2500 ng PCDD/Fs/kg(DW), respectively. The fingerprints of these outputs were also dominated by HpCDFs and OCDF. The bottom ash contained only OCDD and OCDF, in total 8 ng PCDD/Fs/kg (DW). From the comparison of the bottom ash fingerprints with the fingerprints of the other output fractions and of the inputs, it could be concluded that the PCDD/Fs in the waste were destroyed and new PCDD/Fs were formed in the post combustion process by de novo synthesis. During the ASR-co-incineration, the PCDD/F congener concentrations in the fly and boiler ash, FGCR and flue gas were 1.25-10 times higher compared to the same output fractions generated during incineration of the usual waste mix (70% RDF and 30% WWT sludge). The concentration of the higher chlorinated PCDD/Fs increased most. As these congeners have the lowest TEF-factors, the total PCDD/F output, expressed in kg TEQ/year, of the FBC did not increase significantly when ASR was co-incinerated. Due to the relatively high copper levels in the ASR, the copper concentrations in the FBCs outputs increased. As copper catalysis the de novo syntheses, this could explain the increase in PCDD

  8. CO-COMBUSTION OF REFUSE DERIVED FUEL WITH COAL IN A FLUIDISED BED COMBUSTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. WAN AB KARIM GHANI

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Power generation from biomass is an attractive technology which utilizes municipal solid waste-based refused derived fuel. In order to explain the behavior of biomass-fired fluidized bed incinerator, biomass sources from refuse derived fuel was co-fired with coal in a 0.15 m diameter and 2.3 m high fluidized bed combustor. The combustion efficiency and carbon monoxide emissions were studied and compared with those from pure coal combustion. This study proved that the blending effect had increased the carbon combustion efficiency up to 12% as compared to single MSW-based RDF. Carbon monoxide levels fluctuated between 200-1600 ppm were observed when coal is added. It is evident from this research that efficient co-firing of biomass with coal can be achieved with minimum modification of existing coal-fired boilers.

  9. Dual-Fuel Fluidized Bed Combustor Prototype for Residential Heating: Steady-State and Dynamic Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarota, Antonio; Chirone, Riccardo; Miccio, Michele; Sollmene, Roberto; Urcluohr, Massimo

    Fluidized bed combustion of biogenic fuels can be recognized as an attractive option for an ecologically sustainable use of biofuels in residential applications. Nevertheless, biomass combustion in fluidized bed reactors presents some drawbacks that are mainly related to mixing/segregation of fuel particles/volatile matter during devolatilization inside the bed and in the freeboard or to bed agglomeration. A prototype of a 30-50 kWth fluidized bed boiler for residential heating has been designed to burn either a gaseous combustible or a solid biomass fuel or both fuels at the same time. The prototype has been equipped with a gas burner located in the wind-box to optimize the start-up stage of the boiler and with a fluidized bed characterized by a conical geometry ("Gulf Stream" circulation) to improve the mixing of the fuel particles during both devolatilization and char burn-out. The operation of the combustor adopting wood pellets as fuel has been investigated to evaluate their use in residential combustion applications. Steady-state thermally stable regimes of operation have been recognized analyzing both boiler temperatures and gaseous emissions. The optimization of the steady-state operation of the boiler in terms of gaseous emissions has been achieved by varying the nominal thermal power and air excess. An ad-hoc experimental campaign has been carried out to analyze the dynamic performance of the prototype as a response to changes of the demanded thermal power. On the basis of the experimental data, an interpretation of the dynamic behavior of the fluidized bed boiler has been proposed.

  10. A comparative analysis of two solid mixing models suitable for coal fluidized bed combustors and gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abanades, J.C.; Atares, S.; Grasa, G.

    1999-07-01

    Rapid solid mixing is important to avoid undesirable temperature profiles in fluidized beds combustors and gasifiers. In this work, two alternative mathematical models for solid axial mixing are compared and their suitability for coal based fluidized beds is discussed. The two models: the Dispersion Model (May (1959)) and the Countercurrent Backmixing Model (van Deemter (1967)) were postulated early in the development of fluidized beds and both have been applied successfully despite their fundamental differences in conception. A numerical analysis investigating the convergence in the predictions of both models under practical conditions has been carried out. There is a wide area of practical interest in which both models are close (relative to typical experimental errors). Reasonable values for the bubble/slug parameters in the CCBM model are able to fit data where the dispersion model has been previously successful. This result has been confirmed with both their experimental data and other published works. The conclusion from this analysis is that the CCBM model is more reliable idealization in describing and scaling up solid mixing in coal based fluidized beds.

  11. Effect of secondary air injection on the combustion efficiency of sawdust in a fluidized bed combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. N. Srinivasa Rao

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural wastes like bagasse, paddy husks, sawdust and groundnut shells can be effectively used as fuels for fluidized bed combustion; otherwise these biomass fuels are difficult to handle due to high moisture and fines content. In the present work the possibility of using sawdust in the fluidized bed combustor, related combustion efficiencies and problems encountered in the combustion process are discussed. The temperature profiles for sawdust with an increase in fluidizing velocity along the vertical height above the distributor plate indicate that considerable burning of fuel particles is taking place in the freeboard zone rather than complete burning within the bed. Therefore, an enlarged disengagement section is provided to improve the combustion of fines. The temperature profiles along the bed height are observed at different feed rates. The feed rate of sawdust corresponding to the maximum possible temperature was observed to be 10.2 kg/h. It is observed that 50-60% excess air is optimal for reducing carbon loss during the burning of sawdust. The maximum possible combustion efficiency with sawdust is 99.2% and is observed with 65% excess air.

  12. Forest biomass waste combustion in a pilot-scale bubbling fluidised bed combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combustion experiments of forest biomass waste in a pilot-scale bubbling fluidised bed combustor were performed under the following conditions: i) bed temperature in the range 750-800 oC, ii) excess air in the range 10-100%, and iii) air staging (80% primary air and 20% secondary air). Longitudinal pressure, temperature and gas composition profiles along the reactor were obtained. The combustion progress along the reactor, here defined as the biomass carbon conversion to CO2, was calculated based on the measured CO2 concentration at several locations. It was found that 75-80% of the biomass carbon was converted to CO2 in the region located below the freeboard first centimetres, that is, the region that includes the bed and the splash zone. Based on the CO2 and NO concentrations in the exit flue gas, it was found that the overall biomass carbon conversion to CO2 was in the range 97.2-99.3%, indicating high combustion efficiency, whereas the biomass nitrogen conversion to NO was lower than 8%. Concerning the Portuguese regulation about gaseous emissions from industrial biomass combustion, namely, the accomplishment of CO, NO and volatile organic compounds (VOC) (expressed as carbon) emission limits, the set of adequate operating conditions includes bed temperatures in the range 750oC-800 oC, excess air levels in the range 20%-60%, and air staging with secondary air accounting for 20% of total combustion air.

  13. Experimental studies on pulp and paper mill sludge ash behavior in fluidized bed combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latva-Somppi, J. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland). Process Technology

    1998-11-01

    Ash formation during the fluidized bed combustion (FBC) of pulp and paper mill sludges has been experimentally studied on an industrial and bench scale. The methods included aerosol measurements, chemical and crystalline composition analyses, thermogravimetry and electron microscopy. Fly ash mass and number size distributions and elemental enrichment in submicron particles and bottom ash were measured. Fly ash, bottom ash and ash deposits were characterized and their formation mechanisms are discussed. During combustion the fine paper-making additives in sludge, clay minerals and calcite, sintered fanning porous agglomerates. The fly ash mass mean size was 7.5 - 15 lam and the supermicron particles included 93.6 - 97.3 % of the fly ash. Condensation of the volatilized inorganic species formed spherical submicron particles in the fly ash. Their mass concentration was almost negligible when co-firing paper mill sludges and wood. This suggests that the fraction of the volatilized inorganic species in the paper mill sludges was low. Results from pulp mill sludge and bark co-firing were different. A clear mass mode below 0.3 pm, presenting 2.2 - 5.0 weight-% of the fly ash was detected. The condensed species included K, Na, S and Cl. Their mass fraction was higher in the pulp mill sludge than in the paper mill sludge. Evidently this resulted in increased volatilization and formation of condensed particles. The following trace elements were enriched in the submicron ash during pulp mill sludge and wood co-firing: As, Cd, Rb and Pb. The main part of the volatile species was, however, captured in the bulk ash. Presumably, this was due to the high surface area concentration in the bulk ash. Sludge moisture was observed to reduce the inorganic species volatilization. Probably steam vaporization from the wet sludge through the burning layer decreased combustion temperatures on char surface and less char was produced. Hence, the volatilization of ash forming species was

  14. Experimental Investigations of Extracted Rapeseed Combustion Emissions in a Small Scale Stationary Fluidized Bed Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Steinbrecht

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to observe the combustion process of extracted rapeseed (ER grist in a stationary fluidized bed combustor (SFBC and evaluate the chemical compositions of the flue gas emissions. The experimental tests of ER combustion in the 90 to 200 kW (Kilowatt SFB combustion test facility show that the optimal ER combustion temperature is within the range from 850 to 880° C. Temperature and the concentration of exhausted emissions (e.g. O2, CO, CO2, NO, NO2, SO2, Corg were measured with dedicated sensors distributed within the combustor, along its height and in the flue gas duct. The experimental results showed that with respect to German emission limits the concentration of SO2 and NOx in the flue gas were high whereas that of CO was low. This study furthermore is applicable for the abundant biomass residue resources in Vietnam (rice husk, rice straw, bagasse, cassava residues, coconut shell etc., which have similar chemical compositions to ER.

  15. An Experimental Study on Axial Temperature Distribution of Combustion of Dewatered Poultry Sludge in Fluidized bed combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas A.H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory scale bubbling fluidized bed combustor was designed and fabricated to study the combustion of dewatered poultry sludge at different operational parameters. This paper present a study on the influence of equivalent ratio, secondary to primary air ratio and the fuel feed rate on the temperature distribution along the combustor. The equivalent ratio has been changed between 0.8 to 1.4% under poultry sludge feed rate of 10 kg/h and from 0.8 to 1 under poultry sludge feed rate of 15 kg/h. The secondary to primary air ratio was varied from 0.1 to 0.5 at 0.65 m injection height and 1.25 equivalent ratio. The results showed that these factors had a significant influence on the combustion characteristics of poultry sludge. The temperature distribution along the combustor was found to be strongly dependent on the fuel feed rate and the equivalent ratio and it increased when these two factors increased. However, the secondary air ratio increased the temperature in the lower region of the combustor while no significant effect was observed at the upper region of the combustor. The results suggested that the poultry sludge can be used as a fuel with high thermal combustor efficiency.

  16. Shrinkage characteristics of Casuarina wood during devolatilization in a fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, R.Renu; Kolar, Ajit Kumar [Heat Transfer and Thermal Power Lab, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036, Tamil Nadu (India); Leckner, Bo [Department of Energy Conversion, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2006-02-15

    The shrinkage characteristics of Casuarina wood in terms of the effect of fuel particle shape and size on the longitudinal, transverse, and volumetric shrinkage during devolatilization in a laboratory scale bubbling fluidized bed combustor are presented. Shrinkage of single fuel particles was measured in the longitudinal and transverse directions (with respect to the wood fibre) for various fuel particle shapes-like disc (l/d=0.2-0.67), cylinder (l/d{sup 1}) and rod (l/d=2-10). The fuel particle dimensions ranged from 5 to 100mm. The effect of the bed temperature on the shrinkage was studied by varying the bed temperature in the range of 650-850{sup o}C. Fuel particle shape and size were found to influence the shrinkage in the two mutually perpendicular directions. The variation in the fuel particle heating rates for various shapes and sizes was found to be the cause of the variation in the shrinkage values. For all the shapes and sizes considered, the longitudinal shrinkage was found to be in the range of 6.5-24%, the transverse shrinkage from 14% to 29%, and the volumetric shrinkage from 35% to 58%. The average volumetric shrinkage was estimated to be 47% with a standard deviation of +/-3.8%. Shrinkage increased negligibly with the increase in bed temperature. Increase in fuel particle density led to a decrease in volumetric shrinkage, however, this effect was not conclusive because of the effect of other factors-like chemical composition and wood type. Correlations for estimating the shrinkage coefficients in the two principal directions are presented. (author)

  17. Avoidable and unavoidable exergy destructions of a fluidized bed coal combustor and a heat recovery steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Performing advanced exergy analysis of a fluidized-bed combustion for the first time. • Comparing conventional and modified exergy efficiencies of the subsystems. • Deducting inefficiencies of the system components for possible improvements. - Abstract: Advanced exergy analysis was performed using the actual operational data taken from a fluidized bed coal combustor (FBCC) and a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) in a textile plant located at Torbalı, Izmir. First, the conventional exergy analysis of the units was carried out. The exergetic efficiencies of the units were found to be 44.2% and 46.2%, respectively. Advanced exergy analysis was then performed by splitting the exergy destructions of the units into avoidable and unavoidable parts. The avoidable exergy destruction rates of the FBCC and the HRSG were determined to be 2999 kW and 760 kW according to the measurements. Correspondingly, the exergy efficiencies were modified to 53.1% and 48.1%, respectively

  18. Model-Based Water Wall Fault Detection and Diagnosis of FBC Boiler Using Strong Tracking Filter

    OpenAIRE

    Li Sun; Junyi Dong; Donghai Li; Yuqiong Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) boilers have received increasing attention in recent decades. The erosion issue on the water wall is one of the most common and serious faults for FBC boilers. Unlike direct measurement of tube thickness used by ultrasonic methods, the wastage of water wall is reconsidered equally as the variation of the overall heat transfer coefficient in the furnace. In this paper, a model-based approach is presented to estimate internal states and heat transfer coefficient d...

  19. Combustion of palm kernel shell in a fluidized bed: Optimization of biomass particle size and operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Safe burning of palm kernel shell is achievable in a FBC using alumina as the bed material. • Thermogravimetric analysis of the shell with different particle sizes is performed. • Optimal values of the shell particle size and excess air lead to the minimum emission costs. • Combustion efficiency of 99.4–99.7% is achievable when operated under optimal conditions. • CO and NO emissions of the FBC are at levels substantially below national emission limits. - Abstract: This work presents a study on the combustion of palm kernel shell (PKS) in a conical fluidized-bed combustor (FBC) using alumina sand as the bed material to prevent bed agglomeration. Prior to combustion experiments, a thermogravimetric analysis was performed in nitrogen and dry air to investigate the effects of biomass particle size on thermal and combustion reactivity of PKS. During the combustion tests, the biomass with different mean particle sizes (1.5 mm, 4.5 mm, 7.5 mm, and 10.5 mm) was burned at a 45 kg/h feed rate, while excess air was varied from 20% to 80%. Temperature and gas concentrations (O2, CO, CxHy as CH4, and NO) were recorded along the axial direction in the reactor as well as at stack. The experimental results indicated that the biomass particle size and excess air had substantial effects on the behavior of gaseous pollutants (CO, CxHy, and NO) in different regions inside the reactor, as well as on combustion efficiency and emissions of the conical FBC. The CO and CxHy emissions can be effectively controlled by decreasing the feedstock particle size and/or increasing excess air, whereas the NO emission can be mitigated using coarser biomass particles and/or lower excess air. A cost-based approach was applied to determine the optimal values of biomass particle size and excess air, ensuring minimum emission costs of burning the biomass in the proposed combustor. From the optimization analysis, the best combustion and emission performance of the conical FBC is

  20. Study of a 30 MW bubbling fluidized bed combustor based on co-firing biomass and coal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hemant Kumar; S K Mohapatra; Ravi Inder Singh

    2015-06-01

    Today’s power generation sources are largely dependent on fossil fuels due to which the future sustainable development has become a challenge. A significant amount of the pollutant emissions such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide from the power sector is related to the use of fossil fuels for power generation. As the demand for electricity is growing rapidly, emissions of carbon dioxide and other pollutants from this sector can be expected to increase unless other alternatives are made available. Among the energy sources that can substitute fossil fuels, biomass fuels appear as one of the options with a high worldwide potential. In the Punjab region of India, Fluidized-bed combustion technology is being used for converting biomass into thermal energy and power generation in various small scale units. The investigation of biomass-based plant through experimental activities and numerical simulation is the scope of this study. The investigations were done at Captive Power Plant (CPP), Ambuja Cement Limited, a project of Holcim, District Ropar, India. During experimental investigations, the study of bed temperatures and steam temperatures at different zones has been done for coal fired and biomass fired combustors with 30% share. No clear effects of co-firing on boiler performance are observed. However, the operational behavior of the boiler in terms of bed temperature and stack emissions shows a different trend. During simulation, the contours of temperature have been obtained for both the boilers and the trends are found in agreement with real process.

  1. Commercial liquid-metal MHD conversion systems coupled to LMFBR and coal-fired fluidized bed combustors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The constraints imposed on two-phase liquid-metal MHD (LMMHD) when employed in commercial power plants with practical heat sources have not previously been studied. The coupling of a LMMHD power system with an LMFBR and a coal-fired fluidized bed combustor are considered. Two MHD systems are considered. The first is a dual cycle where heat is added to both the liquid metal and the gas, and the gas may expand through a gas turbine after the MHD generator. The second system, a binary cycle, differs in that a significant portion of the sensible heat in the gas entering the compression loop is converted to useful power in a steam bottoming cycle. The effect of liquid-metal vapor carry-over into the gas loop is included. The couplings of the LMMHD system with the heat sources and with the steam plants were studied in depth. The results of the study of each interface are presented parametrically for each heat source and energy conversion system. Operating points have been selected and the complete schematic of each system considered is presented along with all thermodynamic state points and fluid flow rates. All system parameters and component efficiencies were selected to be consistent with near term technology and good engineering design principles. These criteria yielded a system performance of 37 percent for an LMFBR operating with a maximum reactor coolant temperature of 12000F when the pure LMMHD energy converter was used. A LMMHD/steam binary cycle is shown to be capable of achieving a thermal efficiency of 44.8 percent when used with the same heat source. Results with the coal fluidized bed combustor as a heat source show even higher performance levels (about 50 percent efficiency) since the maximum cycle temperature is increased

  2. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the JEA Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2000-06-30

    This EIS assesses environmental issues associated with constructing and demonstrating a project that would be cost-shared by DOE and JEA (formerly the Jacksonville Electric Authority) under the Clean Coal Technology Program. The project would demonstrate circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion technology at JEA's existing Northside Generating Station in Jacksonville, Florida, about 9 miles northeast of the downtown area of Jacksonville. The new CFB combustor would use coal and petroleum coke to generate nearly 300 MW of electricity by repowering the existing Unit 2 steam turbine, a 297.5-MW unit that has been out of service since 1983. The proposed project is expected to demonstrate emission levels of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), and particulate matter that would be lower than Clean Air Act limits while at the same time producing power more efficiently and at less cost than conventional coal utilization technologies. At their own risk, JEA has begun initial construction activities without DOE funding. Construction would take approximately two years and, consistent with the original JEA schedule, would be completed in December 2001. Demonstration of the proposed project would be conducted during a 2-year period from March 2002 until March 2004. In addition, JEA plans to repower the currently operating Unit 1 steam turbine about 6 to 12 months after the Unit 2 repowering without cost-shared funding from DOE. Although the proposed project consists of only the Unit 2 repowering, this EIS analyzes the Unit 1 repowering as a related action. The EIS also considers three reasonably foreseeable scenarios that could result from the no-action alternative in which DOE would not provide cost-shared funding for the proposed project. The proposed action, in which DOE would provide cost-shared finding for the proposed project, is DOE's preferred alternative. The EIS evaluates the principal environmental issues, including air quality

  3. Co-firing of eucalyptus bark and rubberwood sawdust in a swirling fluidized-bed combustor using an axial flow swirler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakritthakul, Songpol; Kuprianov, Vladimir I

    2011-09-01

    Co-combustion of eucalyptus bark (as shredded fuel) and rubberwood sawdust was conducted in a swirling fluidized-bed combustor using a 22-vane axial flow swirler. During the co-firing tests, the fuel blend feed rate was maintained at about 60 kg/h, while the mass/energy fraction of the blended fuels was variable. Excess air supply ranged from 20% to 80% for each fuel option via variation of primary air, while secondary air was injected tangentially into the bed splash zone at a constant flowrate. For comparison, tests with pure rubberwood sawdust at similar operating conditions were performed as well. Temperature and concentrations of O(2), CO and NO were measured along radial and axial directions in the combustor as well as at stack. For all fuel firing options, the radial and axial temperature profiles in the reactor were found to be weakly dependent on operating conditions. However, the gas concentration profiles exhibited apparent effects of fuel properties, excess air and secondary air injection, which resulted in variable emission characteristics of the combustor. For the sawdust energy fraction in the fuel blend of about 0.85, CO and NO emissions can be controlled at acceptable levels (both complying with the national emission limits) by maintaining excess air between 50% and 55%. Under such conditions, the co-combustion of high-moisture eucalyptus bark and rubberwood sawdust in the proposed combustor occurs in a stable regime with high, 99.6%, combustion efficiency. PMID:21729824

  4. Erosion in Steam General Tubes in Boiler and ID Fans in Coal Fired FBC Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Shaheen Aziz; Suhail Ahmed Soomro; Ghulam Yasin Shaikh

    2012-01-01

    The FBC (Fluidized Bed Combustion) is a technique used to make solid particles behave like fluid and grow very fast for the power generation using low grade coal. Due to its merits, first time this technology has been introduced in Pakistan by installing 3x50 MW power plants at Khanote. Fluidized beds have long been used for the combustion of low-quality, difficult fuels and have become a rapidly developing technology for the clean burning of coal. The FBC Power Plant at Khanote h...

  5. Metal wastage design guidelines for bubbling fluidized-bed combustors. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyczkowski, R.W.; Podolski, W.F.; Bouillard, J.X.; Folga, S.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-11-01

    These metal wastage design guidelines identify relationships between metal wastage and (1) design parameters (such as tube size, tube spacing and pitch, tube bundle and fluidized-bed height to distributor, and heat exchanger tube material properties) and (2) operating parameters (such as fluidizing velocity, particle size, particle hardness, and angularity). The guidelines are of both a quantitative and qualitative nature. Simplified mechanistic models are described, which account for the essential hydrodynamics and metal wastage processes occurring in bubbling fluidized beds. The empirical correlational approach complements the use of these models in the development of these design guidelines. Data used for model and guideline validation are summarized and referenced. Sample calculations and recommended design procedures are included. The influences of dependent variables on metal wastage, such as solids velocity, bubble size, and in-bed pressure fluctuations, are discussed.

  6. Retrofit design of rice husk feeding system in the production of amorphous silica ash in a pilot scale fluidized bed combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Rice husk is among the most important recovery resources for silica that is produced annually in huge quantities in many countries such as Malaysia which produces 2.38 (MT) of rice paddy. Rice husks accounts for 14-35 % of the weight of the paddy harvested, depending on the paddy variety and because of its abundance it poses serious environmental problems in the rice producing countries. Therefore, the thermo-chemical conversion of rice husks to useful silica ash by fluidized bed combustion is the proven and cost-effective technology for converting the renewable waste husks by making commercial use of this rice husk ash because of its self sustaining ability. However, feeding of rice husk into the reactor bed has become a difficult problem hindering the production of amorphous silica. This is due to the poor penetration and low bulk density as well as the flaky, abrasive and joined nature of rice husk. Most of the researches into fluidized bed combustion are on laboratory or bench scale and none had discussed pilot scale combustion of rice husk into amorphous silica. A recent attempt to solve this feeding problem from an experimental investigation in a bench-scale culminates into a pilot-scale fluidized bed combustor designed with a combined screw conveyor and an inclined pneumatic feeding by direct injection, yet the problem persists. This paper presents a retrofit design of the existing 0.5 m internal diameter pilot scale fluidized bed combustor by the use of combined screw feeding system. It is envisaged that at the end of the experimental investigation the retrofit design will address the problem associated with rice husk feeding in bubbling fluidized bed combustors. (author)

  7. Trace elements partitioning during co-firing biomass with lignite in a pilot-scale fluidized bed combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes the partitioning of 18 trace elements (As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Tl, V, Zn) and 9 major and minor elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, S, Si, Ti) during co-firing of olive residue, hazelnut shell and cotton residue with high sulfur and ash content lignite in 0.3 MWt Middle East Technical University (METU) Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustor (ABFBC) test rig with limestone addition. Concentrations of trace elements in coal, biomass, limestone, bottom ash, cyclone ash and filter ash were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission and mass spectroscopy (ICP-OES and ICP-MS). Partitioning of major and minor elements are influenced by the ash split between the bottom ash and fly ash and that the major proportion of most of the trace elements (As, Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Tl, V and Zn) are recovered in fly ash when firing lignite only. Co-firing lignite with biomass enhances partitioning of these elements to fly ash. Co-firing also shifts the partitioning of Cd, P, Sb and Sn from bottom to fly ash

  8. Trace elements partitioning during co-firing biomass with lignite in a pilot-scale fluidized bed combustor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogebakan, Zuhal; Selçuk, Nevin

    2009-03-15

    This study describes the partitioning of 18 trace elements (As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Tl, V, Zn) and 9 major and minor elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, S, Si, Ti) during co-firing of olive residue, hazelnut shell and cotton residue with high sulfur and ash content lignite in 0.3 MW(t) Middle East Technical University (METU) Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustor (ABFBC) test rig with limestone addition. Concentrations of trace elements in coal, biomass, limestone, bottom ash, cyclone ash and filter ash were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission and mass spectroscopy (ICP-OES and ICP-MS). Partitioning of major and minor elements are influenced by the ash split between the bottom ash and fly ash and that the major proportion of most of the trace elements (As, Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Tl, V and Zn) are recovered in fly ash when firing lignite only. Co-firing lignite with biomass enhances partitioning of these elements to fly ash. Co-firing also shifts the partitioning of Cd, P, Sb and Sn from bottom to fly ash. PMID:18621479

  9. Hydrodynamics of a fluidized bed co-combustor for tobacco waste and coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Yu, Bangting; Chang, Jian; Wu, Guiying; Wang, Tengda; Wen, Dongsheng

    2012-09-01

    The fluidization characteristics of binary mixtures containing tobacco stem (TS) and cation exchange resin (a substitute for coal) were studied in a rectangular bed with the cross-section area of 0.3 × 0.025 m(2). The presence of herbaceous biomass particles and their unique properties such as low density and high aspect ratio resulted in different fluidization behaviors. Three fluidization velocities, i.e. initial, minimum and full fluidization velocities, were observed as the TS mass fraction increased from 7% to 20%, and four hydrodynamic stages were experienced, including the static, segregation, transition and mixing stages, with increasing operational gas velocities. The results suggest that the operational gas velocity should be in the range of 2.0-5.0 times of the minimum fluidization velocity of the binary mixtures, and less than 7% TS mass fraction should be used in an existing bubbling fluidized bed. Higher TS fraction inclusion requires the introduction of central jet gas to improve the mixing effect. PMID:22750501

  10. Simulation of emission performance and combustion efficiency in biomass fired circulating fluidized bed combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gungor, Afsin [Nigde University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 51100 Nigde (Turkey)

    2010-04-15

    In this study, the combustion efficiency and the emission performance of biomass fired CFBs are tested via a previously published 2D model [Gungor A. Two-dimensional biomass combustion modeling of CFB. Fuel 2008; 87: 1453-1468.] against two published comprehensive data sets. The model efficiently simulates the outcome with respect to the excess air values, which is the main parameter that is verified. The combustion efficiency of OC changes between 82.25 and 98.66% as the excess air increases from 10 to 116% with the maximum error of about 8.59%. The rice husk combustion efficiency changes between 98.05 and 97.56% as the bed operational velocity increases from 1.2 to 1.5 m s{sup -1} with the maximum error of about 7.60%. CO and NO{sub x} emissions increase with increasing bed operational velocity. Increasing excess air results in slightly higher levels of NO{sub x} emission. A significant amount of combustion occurs in the upper zone due to the high volatile content of the biomass fuels. (author)

  11. Decomposition and reduction of N2O over Limestone under FBC Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Jensen, Anker; Vaaben, Rikke;

    1997-01-01

    The addition of limestone for sulfur retention in FBC has in many cases been observed to influence the emission of N2O. The catalytic activity of N2O over calcined Stevns Chalk for decomposition of N2O in a laboratory fixed bed quartz reactor was measured. It was found that calcined Stevns Chalk ...

  12. Characterizations of Deposited Ash During Co-Firing of White Pine and Lignite in Fluidized Bed Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Jesse; Preto, Fernando; Tourigny, Guy; Wang, Jinsheng; Badour, Chadi; Li, Hanning; Xu, Chunbao Charles

    Characterizations of ash deposits from co-firing/co-combusting of a woody biomass (i.e., white pine) and lignite coal were investigated in a fluidized-bed combustor using a custom designed air-cooled probe installed in the freeboard region of the reactor. Ash deposition behaviors on a heat transfer surface were comprehensively investigated and discussed under different conditions including fuel type, fuel blending ratios (20-80% biomass on a thermal basis), and moisture contents. For the combustion of 100% lignite, the compositions of the deposited ash were very similar to those of the fuel ash, while in the combustion of 100% white pine pellets or sawdust the deposited ash contained a much lower contents of CaO, SO3, K2O and P2O5 compared with the fuel ash, but the deposited ash was enriched with SiO2, Al2O3 and MgO. A small addition of white pine (20% on a heat input basis) to the coal led to the highest ash deposition rates likely due to the strong interaction of the CaO and MgO (from the biomass ash) with the alumina and silica (from the lignite ash) during the co-combustion process, evidenced by the detection of high concentrations of calcium/magnesium sulfates, aluminates and silicates in the ash deposits. Interestingly, co-firing of white pine pellets and lignite at a 50% blending ratio led to the lowest ash deposition rates. Ash deposition rates in combustion of fuels as received with a higher moisture content was found to be much lower than those of oven-dried fuels.

  13. Gaseous emissions from sewage sludge combustion in a moving bed combustor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistella, Luciane; Silva, Valdemar; Suzin, Renato C; Virmond, Elaine; Althoff, Chrtistine A; Moreira, Regina F P M; José, Humberto J

    2015-12-01

    Substantial increase in sewage sludge generation in recent years requires suitable destination for this residue. This study evaluated the gaseous emissions generated during combustion of an aerobic sewage sludge in a pilot scale moving bed reactor. To utilize the heat generated during combustion, the exhaust gas was applied to the raw sludge drying process. The gaseous emissions were analyzed both after the combustion and drying steps. The results of the sewage sludge characterization showed the energy potential of this residue (LHV equal to 14.5 MJ kg(-1), db) and low concentration of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF). The concentration of CO, NOx, BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes) emitted from the sludge combustion process were lower than the legal limits. The overall sludge combustion and drying process showed low emissions of PCDD/PCDF (0.42 ng I-TEQ N m(-3)). BTEX and PAH emissions were not detected. Even with the high nitrogen concentration in the raw feed (5.88% db), the sludge combustion process presented NOx emissions below the legal limit, which results from the combination of appropriate feed rate (A/F ratio), excess air, and mainly the low temperature kept inside the combustion chamber. It was found that the level of CO emissions from the overall sludge process depends on the dryer operating conditions, such as the oxygen content and the drying temperature, which have to be controlled throughout the process in order to achieve low CO levels. The aerobic sewage sludge combustion process generated high SO2 concentration due to the high sulfur content (0.67 wt%, db) and low calcium concentration (22.99 g kg(-1)) found in the sludge. The high concentration of SO2 in the flue gas (4776.77 mg N m(-3)) is the main factor inhibiting PCDD/PCDF formation. Further changes are needed in the pilot plant scheme to reduce SO2 and particulate matter emissions

  14. Fluid dynamic simulation of the fluidized bed using propane-air fuel; Simulacao dinamica de um combustor de leito fluidizado utilizando como combustivel o ar-propanado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Junior, L.P.; Lucena, S.; Silva, D.J. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica]. E-mail: limajun@br.inter.net

    2004-07-01

    This paper has for purpose to present the modeling and simulation of the homogeneous combustion of the mixture of propane-air in a combustor of fluidized bed with inert particles, basing on a stationary model with phases in series, being taken into account the thermal changes and mass changes among the phases and it changes thermal with the wall for radiation. Computational methods are used for such simulation and CFX 4.4 as dynamic flowing computation software (CFD), kindred of more proximity with the real aspects. Being studied like this dynamic and kinetic flowing parameters of the involved components. (author)

  15. Fluidized bed combustion: mixing and pollutant limitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leckner, B. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Energy Conversion

    1997-10-01

    Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) has been applied commercially during a few decades, and sufficient knowledge is gained to design boilers with sizes of up to several hundreds of megawatt thermal power (MW{sub th}). The knowledge of what goes on inside a large combustion chamber is still limited, however, and this impedes further optimization and efficient solution of problems that might occur. Despite this lack of knowledge the present survey deals with combustion chamber processes and discusses mixing and distribution of fuel and air in the combustion chamber and its importance for sulphur capture and reduction of emissions of nitrogen oxides. It is desirable to present the material in a general way and to cover the entire field of FBC. However, the scarce openly published information deals mostly with coal combustion in atmospheric circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustors, and therefore this application will receive most attention, but reference is also made to pressurized combustion and to other fuels than coal. In this context the important work made in the LIEKKI project on the analysis of different fuels and on the influence of pressure should be especially pointed out. (orig.)

  16. Minimum emissions from biomass FBC. Improved energy generation based on biomass FBC with minimum emission. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallgren, A. [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2002-02-01

    The primary aim of the project is to improve the performance of biomass fired FBC (fluidised bed combustion) through a concurrent detailed experimental and modelling approach. The expected results shall establish in experimental investigations, the thermochemical performance of a selection of fuels separately and in combination with suitable bed materials, stipulate recommendations, based on labscale via test rig and pilot scale to commercial scale investigations, how to repress agglomeration and defluidisation in fluidised bed combustion systems, indicate, based on the experimental findings, how to utilise primary measures to minimise the formation of nitrogen oxide compounds in the FB and provide a logistic assessment, based on case studies, identifying optimum logistic strategies for the selected fuels in commercial heat and power production. The investigation programme comprises straw, meat and bone meal (MBM) and forest residues as biofuels, quartz sand, bone ash, magnesium oxide and mullite as bed materials, sodium and ammonia carbonate as NO{sub x} reduction additives, and dolomite, kaolinite and coal ash for suppression of bed defluidisation. All materials have undergone a very detailed characterisation programme generating basic data on their chemical and structural composition as well as their sintering propensities. Combustion residues such as bottom and fly ashes have run through the same characterisation programme. The knowledge obtained by the characterisation programme supports the experimental combustion campaigns which are performed at 20, 90 and 350 kW FBC reactors. The information produced is validated in a 3 MW and 25 MW commercial FBC reactor. NO{sub x} formation and destruction mechanisms and rates have been included in a 3-D CFD software code used for NO{sub x} formation modelling. Parameter assessments confirmed the theoretical achievement of a 20-30 % reduction of NO{sub x} formation through implementation of the alkali injection concept as

  17. Effects of operating conditions and fuel properties on emission performance and combustion efficiency of a swirling fluidized-bed combustor fired with a biomass fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work reports an experimental study on firing 80 kg/h rice husk in a swirling fluidized-bed combustor (SFBC) using an annular air distributor as the swirl generator. Two NOx emission control techniques were investigated in this work: (1) air staging of the combustion process, and (2) firing rice husk as moisturized fuel. In the first test series for the air-staged combustion, CO, NO and CxHy emissions and combustion efficiency were determined for burning 'as-received' rice husk at fixed excess air of 40%, while secondary-to-primary air ratio (SA/PA) was ranged from 0.26 to 0.75. The effects of SA/PA on CO and NO emissions from the combustor were found to be quite weak, whereas CxHy emissions exhibited an apparent influence of air staging. In the second test series, rice husks with the fuel-moisture content of 8.4% to 35% were fired at excess air varied from 20% to 80%, while the flow rate of secondary air was fixed. Radial and axial temperature and gas concentration (O2, CO, NO) profiles in the reactor, as well as CO and NO emissions, are discussed for the selected operating conditions. The temperature and gas concentration profiles for variable fuel quality exhibited significant effects of both fuel-moisture and excess air. As revealed by experimental results, the emission of NO from this SFBC can be substantially reduced through moisturizing rice husk, while CO is effectively mitigated by injection of secondary air into the bed splash zone, resulting in a rather low emission of CO and high (over 99%) combustion efficiency of the combustor for the ranges of operating conditions and fuel properties.

  18. Characterization of ashes from a 100 kWth pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed with oxy-fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Y.H.; Wang, C.B.; Tan, Y.W.; Jia, L.F.; Anthony, E.J. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Oxy-fuel combustion experiments have been carried out on an oxygen-fired 100 kW(th) mini-circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) facility. Coal and petroleum coke were used as fuel together with different limestones (and fixed Ca:S molar ratios) premixed with the fuel, for in situ SO{sub 2} capture. The bed ash (BA) and fly ash (FA) samples produced from this unit were collected and characterized to obtain physical and chemical properties of the ash samples. The characterization methods used included X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), char carbon and free lime analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and surface analysis. The main purpose of this work is to characterize the CFBC ashes from oxy-fuel firing to obtain a better understanding of the combustion process, and to identify any significant differences from the ash generated by a conventional air-fired CFBC. The primary difference in the sulfur capture mechanism between atmospheric air-fired and oxy-fuel FBC, at typical FBC temperatures (similar to 850{sup o}C), is that, in the air-fired case the limestone sorbents calcine, whereas the partial pressure of CO{sub 2} in oxy-fuel FBC is high enough to prevent calcination, and hence the sulfation process should mimic that seen in pressurized FBC (PFBC). Here, the char carbon content in the fly ash was much higher than that in the bed ash, and was also high by comparison with ash obtained from conventional commercial air-firing CFBC units. In addition, measurements of the free lime content in the bed and fly ash showed that the unreacted Ca sorbent was present primarily as CaCO{sub 3}, indicating that sulfur capture in the oxy-fuel combustor occurred via direct sulfation.

  19. Sintering in Biofuel and Coal-Biofuel Fired FBC's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Weigang; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the results of systematic experiments conducted in a laboratory scale fluidized bed combustor in order to study agglomeration phenomena during firing straw and co-firing straw with coal. The influence of operating conditions on ag-glomeration was investigated. The effect of co......-containing compounds are prone to remain in the bed and form low melting tem-perature potassium rich ash. The molten ashes coat the surfaces of the bed material, promoting agglomeration and defluidization eventually.Based on a competition between the strengthening adhesive force by sintering of the ash coating and the...

  20. Decomposition and Reduction of N2O over Limestone under FBC Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Jensen, Anker; Vaaben, Rikke;

    1997-01-01

    The addition of limestone for sulfur retention in fluidized bed combustion (FBC) has in many cases been observed to influence the emission of N2O. The catalytic activity of N2O over calcined Stevns Chalk for decomposition of N2O in a laboratory fixed bed quartz reactor was measured. It was found...... that calcined Stevns Chalk is an active catalyst for N2O decomposition in an inert atmosphere at FBC temperatures, and the presence of 3 vol% CO increased the rate of N2O destruction by a factor of 5 due to the catalytic reduction of N2O by CO. The activity decreased with increasing CO2 concentration...... reaction between N2O and CaS takes place and SO2 is released....

  1. Mercury emissions during cofiring of sub-bituminous coal and biomass (chicken waste, wood, coffee residue, and tobacco stalk) in a laboratory-scale fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Cao; Hongcang Zhou; Junjie Fan; Houyin Zhao; Tuo Zhou; Pauline Hack; Chia-Chun Chan; Jian-Chang Liou; Wei-ping Pan [Western Kentucky University (WKU), Bowling Green, KY (USA). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology (ICSET)

    2008-12-15

    Four types of biomass (chicken waste, wood pellets, coffee residue, and tobacco stalks) were cofired at 30 wt % with a U.S. sub-bituminous coal (Powder River Basin Coal) in a laboratory-scale fluidized bed combustor. A cyclone, followed by a quartz filter, was used for fly ash removal during tests. The temperatures of the cyclone and filter were controlled at 250 and 150{sup o}C, respectively. Mercury speciation and emissions during cofiring were investigated using a semicontinuous mercury monitor, which was certified using ASTM standard Ontario Hydra Method. Test results indicated mercury emissions were strongly correlative to the gaseous chlorine concentrations, but not necessarily correlative to the chlorine contents in cofiring fuels. Mercury emissions could be reduced by 35% during firing of sub-bituminous coal using only a quartz filter. Cofiring high-chlorine fuel, such as chicken waste (Cl = 22340 wppm), could largely reduce mercury emissions by over 80%. When low-chlorine biomass, such as wood pellets (Cl = 132 wppm) and coffee residue (Cl = 134 wppm), is cofired, mercury emissions could only be reduced by about 50%. Cofiring tobacco stalks with higher chlorine content (Cl = 4237 wppm) did not significantly reduce mercury emissions. Gaseous speciated mercury in flue gas after a quartz filter indicated the occurrence of about 50% of total gaseous mercury to be the elemental mercury for cofiring chicken waste, but occurrence of above 90% of the elemental mercury for all other cases. Both the higher content of alkali metal oxides or alkali earth metal oxides in tested biomass and the occurrence of temperatures lower than 650{sup o}C in the upper part of the fluidized bed combustor seemed to be responsible for the reduction of gaseous chlorine and, consequently, limited mercury emissions reduction during cofiring. 36 refs., 3 figs. 1 tab.

  2. Reactivation of spent limestone for sulphur capture in fluidized bed combustion : hydration and sulphation behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.; Wu, Y.; Anthony, E.J. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Energy Technology Centre

    2003-07-01

    From an economic and environmental perspective, there is a need to reuse partially sulphated limestone sorbent to control sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions. Currently, limestone is not used efficiently for in-situ capture in fluidized bed combustors (FBC) because of incomplete sulphation of CaO. Spent limestone can be reactivated by hydrating the FBC ash. This allows the ash to take up SO{sub 2} as SO{sub 2} sorbent. In this study, ashes from a large FBC were hydrated. Sulphation tests were then conducted on the hydrated ashes with particular attention to their kinetic behaviour. Temperature, particle size and hydration time were the factors that affected the rate and efficiency of the reactivation process. A comparative evaluation between the behaviour of hydration with liquid water and steam was conducted along with a comparison of the behaviour of sulphation following hydration. The effect of hydration on the sulphation rate was analyzed in terms of changes to the solid particle's microstructure. The results of this study were compared with those reported in literature and with other studies on enhanced hydration through grinding and sonication.

  3. Emissions of SO2, NO and N2O in a circulating fluidized bed combustor during co-firing coal and biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jian-jun; Yang, Xue-min; Zhang, Lei; Ding, Tong-li; Song, Wen-li; Lin, Wei-gang

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental investigations of the emissions of SO2, NO and N20 in a bench scale circulating fluidized bed combustor for coal combustion and co-firing coal and biomass. The thermal capacity of the combustor is 30 kW. The setup is electrically heated during startup. The influence of the excess air, the degree of the air staging, the biomass share and the feeding position of the fuels on the emissions of SO2, NO and N2O were studied. The results showed that an increase in the biomass shares resulted in an increase of the CO concentration in the flue gas, probably due to the high volatile content of the biomass. In co-firing, the emission of SO2 increased with increasing biomass share slightly, however, non-linear increase relationship between SO2 emission and fuel sulfur content was observed. Air staging significantly decreased the NO emission without raising the SO2 level. Although the change of the fuel feeding position from riser to downer resulted in a decrease in the NO emission level, no obvious change was observed for the SO2 level. Taking the coal feeding position R as a reference, the relative NO emission could significantly decrease during co-firing coal and biomass when feeding fuel at position D and keeping the first stage stoichiometry greater than 0.95. The possible mechanisms of the sulfur and nitrogen chemistry at these conditions were discussed and the ways of simultaneous reduction of SO2, NO and N20 were proposed. PMID:17913163

  4. Model-Based Water Wall Fault Detection and Diagnosis of FBC Boiler Using Strong Tracking Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluidized bed combustion (FBC boilers have received increasing attention in recent decades. The erosion issue on the water wall is one of the most common and serious faults for FBC boilers. Unlike direct measurement of tube thickness used by ultrasonic methods, the wastage of water wall is reconsidered equally as the variation of the overall heat transfer coefficient in the furnace. In this paper, a model-based approach is presented to estimate internal states and heat transfer coefficient dually from the noisy measurable outputs. The estimated parameter is compared with the normal value. Then the modified Bayesian algorithm is adopted for fault detection and diagnosis (FDD. The simulation results demonstrate that the approach is feasible and effective.

  5. The influence of fine char particles burnout on bed agglomeration during the fluidized bed combustion of a biomass fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scala, Fabrizio; Chirone, Riccardo [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione, CNR, P.le V. Tecchio, 80-80125 Naples (Italy); Salatino, Piero [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, P.le V. Tecchio, 80-80125 Naples (Italy)

    2003-11-15

    The combustion of biomass char in a bubbling fluidized bed is hereby addressed, with specific reference to the influence that the combustion of fine char particles may exert on ash deposition and bed agglomeration phenomena. Experiments of steady fluidized bed combustion (FBC) of powdered biomass were carried out with the aim of mimicking the postcombustion of attrited char fines generated in the fluidized bed combustion of coarse char. Experimental results showed that the char elutriation rate is much smaller than expected on the basis of the average size of the biomass powder and of the carbon loading in the combustor. Samples of bed material collected after prolonged operation of the combustor were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-EDX analysis and revealed the formation of relatively coarse sand-ash-carbon aggregates. The phenomenology is consistent with the establishment of a char phase attached to the bed material as a consequence of adhesion of char fines onto the sand particles. Combustion under sound-assisted fluidization conditions was also tested. As expected, enhancement of fines adhesion on bed material and further reduction of the elutriation rate were observed. Experimental results are interpreted in the light of a simple model which accounts for elutriation of free fines, adhesion of free fines onto bed material and detachment of attached fines by attrition of char-sand aggregates. Combustion of both free and attached char fines is considered. The parameters of the model are assessed on the basis of the measured carbon loadings and elutriation rates. Model computations are directed to estimate the effective size and the peak temperature of char-sand aggregates. The theoretical estimates of the effective aggregate size match fairly well those observed in the experiments.

  6. 40 CFR 60.53b - Standards for municipal waste combustor operating practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Modular excess air 50 4 Refuse-derived fuel stoker 150 24 Bubbling fluidized bed combustor 100 4 Circulating fluidized bed combustor 100 4 Pulverized coal/refuse-derived fuel mixed fuel-fired combustor 150 4 Spreader stoker coal/refuse-derived fuel mixed fuel-fired combustor 150 24 a Measured at the...

  7. Studies in an atmospheric bubbling fluidized-bed combustor of 10 MW power plant based on rice husk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper an experience, environmental assessment, a model for exit gas composition, agglomeration problem and a model for solid population balance of 10 MW power plant at Jalkheri, Distt. Fatehgarh Sahib, Punjab, India based on rice husk has been discussed. Three phase multistage mathematical model for exit gas composition of rice husk in fluidized bed has been derived. The model is based on three-phase theory of fluidization and material balance for shrinking rice husk particles and it is similar to model developed by Kunii and Levenspiel. The burning of rice husk is assumed to take place according to single film theory. The model has been used to predict the exit gas composition particularly O2, CO2 and N2. The agglomeration problem of above plant which is main reason for defluidization of bed has also been discussed. SEM of ash agglomerates has been done. Ash samples taken from the above 10 MW power plant at Jalkheri has been quantitatively analyzed. Finally solid population model has been formed to calculate bed carbon load and carbon utilization efficiency. Above two models are experimentally correlated with the data collected from the above 10 MW power plant at Jalkheri, Distt. Fatehgarh Sahib, Punjab, India which uses rice husk as a fuel input (at the time of study). All the results from the model for rice husk are coming with in permissible limits

  8. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Fff of... - Municipal Waste Combustor Operating Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 4 Refuse-derived fuel stoker 200 24 Fluidized bed, mixed fuel (wood/refuse-derived fuel) 200 c 24 Bubbling fluidized bed combustor 100 4 Circulating fluidized bed combustor 100 4 Pulverized coal/refuse-derived fuel mixed fuel-fired combustor 150 4 Spreader stoker coal/refuse-derived fuel mixed...

  9. Characterization of ashes from a 100 kWth pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed with oxy-fuel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Oxy-fuel combustion was carried out in a 100 kWth circulating fluidized bed. → Coal and petroleum coke are fuels together with limestone added for SO2 capture. → The ashes produced are characterized and compared with air-firing CFBC ash. → The dominant calcium compounds in the ash are CaCO3 and CaSO4 rather than CaO. - Abstract: Oxy-fuel combustion experiments have been carried out on an oxygen-fired 100 kWth mini-circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) facility. Coal and petroleum coke were used as fuel together with different limestones (and fixed Ca:S molar ratios) premixed with the fuel, for in situ SO2 capture. The bed ash (BA) and fly ash (FA) samples produced from this unit were collected and characterized to obtain physical and chemical properties of the ash samples. The characterization methods used included X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), char carbon and free lime analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and surface analysis. The main purpose of this work is to characterize the CFBC ashes from oxy-fuel firing to obtain a better understanding of the combustion process, and to identify any significant differences from the ash generated by a conventional air-fired CFBC. The primary difference in the sulfur capture mechanism between atmospheric air-fired and oxy-fuel FBC, at typical FBC temperatures (∼850 oC), is that, in the air-fired case the limestone sorbents calcine, whereas the partial pressure of CO2 in oxy-fuel FBC is high enough to prevent calcination, and hence the sulfation process should mimic that seen in pressurized FBC (PFBC). Here, the char carbon content in the fly ash was much higher than that in the bed ash, and was also high by comparison with ash obtained from conventional commercial air-firing CFBC units. In addition, measurements of the free lime content in the bed and fly ash showed that the unreacted Ca sorbent was present primarily as CaCO3, indicating that sulfur capture in the oxy

  10. Investigation of ash deposition in a pilot-scale fluidized bed combustor co-firing biomass with lignite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogebakan, Zuhal; Gogebakan, Yusuf; Selçuk, Nevin; Selçuk, Ekrem

    2009-01-01

    This study presents the results from investigation of ash deposition characteristics of a high ash and sulfur content lignite co-fired with three types of biomass (olive residue, 49 wt%; hazelnut shell, 42 wt%; and cotton residue, 41 wt%) in 0.3 MW(t) Middle East Technical University (METU) Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustion (ABFBC) Test Rig. Deposit samples were collected on an air-cooled probe at a temperature of 500 degrees C. Samples were analyzed by SEM/EDX and XRD methods. The results reveal that co-firing lignite with olive residue, hazelnut shell and cotton residue show low deposition rates. High concentrations of silicon, calcium, sulfur, iron, and aluminum were found in deposit samples. No chlorine was detected in deposits. Calcium sulfate and potassium sulfate were detected as major and minor components of the deposits, respectively. High sulfur and alumina-silicate content of lignite resulted in formation of alkali sulfates instead of alkali chlorides. Therefore, fuel blends under consideration can be denoted to have low-fouling propensity. PMID:18762413

  11. Inhibition of the limestone sulphation process during fluidized bed combustion - a theoretical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdett, N.A.

    1983-12-01

    The extents and rates of absorption of sulphur oxides by limestone (or similar) sorbents are important factors which influence operating costs of fluidized-bed combustors for power generation with simultaneous flue gas desulphurization. Laboratory experiments have been conducted in order to ascertain the parameters affecting the kinetics of the sulphation, and a simple mathematical model has been constructed. It is shown that when the reaction conditions are altered to favour the production of SO/sub 3/, in general the extent of sulphation is reduced. The model has been used to predict the effect of temperature on sulphation, and it is shown that the presence of SO/sub 3/ as an intermediate in the reaction provides an explanation for the optimum sulphation temperature commonly observed in FBC operation.

  12. Erosion in steam general tubes in boiler and ID fans in coal fired FBC power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FBC (Fluidized Bed Combustion) is a technique used to make solid particles behave like fluid and grow very fast for the power generation using low grade coal. Due to its merits, first time this technology has been introduced in Pakistan by installing 3 X 50 MW power plants at Khanote. Fluidized beds have long been used for the combustion of low-quality, difficult fuels and have become a rapidly developing technology for the clean burning of coal. The FBC Power Plant at Khanote has been facing operational and technical problems, resulting frequently shut down of generation units, consequently facing heavy financial losses. This study reveals that due to the presence of high percentage of silica in the lime stone that are further distributed in the bottom ash, fly ash and re-injection material, the generation tubes in the boiler and wings/blades of ID (Induced Draft) fans were eroded. In addition, filter bags were also ruptured; resulting frequent shut down of power plant units. (author)

  13. Erosion in Steam General Tubes in Boiler and ID Fans in Coal Fired FBC Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen Aziz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The FBC (Fluidized Bed Combustion is a technique used to make solid particles behave like fluid and grow very fast for the power generation using low grade coal. Due to its merits, first time this technology has been introduced in Pakistan by installing 3x50 MW power plants at Khanote. Fluidized beds have long been used for the combustion of low-quality, difficult fuels and have become a rapidly developing technology for the clean burning of coal. The FBC Power Plant at Khanote has been facing operational and technical problems, resulting frequently shut down of generation units, consequently facing heavy financial losses. This study reveals that due to the presence of high percentage of silica in the lime stone that are further distributed in the bottom ash, fly ash and re-injection material, the generation tubes in the boiler and wings/blades of ID (Induced Draft fans were eroded. In addition, filter bags were also ruptured; resulting frequent shut down of power plant units.

  14. Possible ways of suppression of agglomeration of particles in fluidized bed combustion of selected waste biomass fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) of biomass is often complicated by agglomeration of particles within the bed. The alkali compounds from biomass ash have tendency to accumulate esp. in a bed with sand particles. For typical cases of FBC of straw, wood and sewage sludge from a paper mill the experimental results on fluidized bed particle agglomeration are presented and possible ways for agglomeration abatement are critically assessed (author)

  15. Polluted emission in mineral coal combustor CE4500 in atmospheric bubbling fluidized bed coal; Emissoes poluentes na combustao do carvao mineral CE4500 em reator de leito fluidizado atmosferico borbulhante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Manoel Carlos Diniz; Samaniego, Julio Edgardo Lindo; Milioli, Fernando Eduardo; Pagliuso, Josmar Davison [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Nucleo de Engenharia Termica e Fluidos], e-mail: mcdcosta@petrobras.com.br, e-mail: jelindo@sc.usp.br, e-mail: milioli@sc.usp.br, e-mail: josmar@sc.usp.br

    2006-07-01

    The SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO and NO{sub x} polluted gases emission were evaluated in coal combustor with absorption of SO{sub 2} by means of limestone in the pilot-plan for combustor in atmospheric bubbling fluidized bed coal of NETeF. The CE4500 mineral coal (energetic coal with upper average calorific power of 4500 kcal/kg) from of Criciuma region was utilized, with 2.3% of sulfur, 31,6% of ashes, and average diameter of particle of 425 um. The dolomite limestone DP from Ipeuna- SP was utilized with 16.2% of coal, 10.1% of magnesium, and average diameter of particle of 400 um. The pilot-plan has a reactor of square cross-section of 0,5*0,5 m in which it were controlled the excess air level, the velocity of fluidization (U/U{sub mf}), the size of particle grain and the temperature of process. The main variable of analysis was the supplies relation Ca/S. The relationship of 2, 3, 4 and 5 Ca/S at temperature of bed around 850 deg C was used. Concentration discharge gases of reactor were measured and distribution of size grain and chemical composition of the material bed, removal and global coefficient of reaction of sulfation for many cases were determined. The SO{sub 2} emission dropped in asymptotic way for the increment of supplies of rate Ca/S. Increasing Ca/S from 3 to 5 (67%) resulted in a gain of efficiency of absorption between 4 to 21%. The emission of NOx increased lightly by the increment of supplies Ca/S. That result is agreement with current publication, which it attributes this fact to the catalyst effect of CaO to generation of NO{sub x} by means of reduction of CO. (author)

  16. IEA FBC Biannual report 1993-1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M.; Matinlinna, J.

    1995-12-31

    This publication is the 14th report (biannual, 1993-1994) of the Executive Committee of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Implement Agreement for Co-operation in the Filed of Fluidized Bed Conversion of Fuels Applied to Clean Energy Production. It has been submitted to IEA in accordance with the provisions of the agreement. This report is edited by Aabo Akademi University, Finland, which has been the operating agent during 1994. The report includes contributions from all the participating member countries. During this period Aabo Akademi University received additional financial support from the Combustion and Gasification Programme LIEKKI 2 of Finland

  17. Thermodynamic optimisation and computational analysis of irreversibilities in a small-scale wood-fired circulating fluidised bed adiabatic combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of irreversibilities generated due to combustion in an adiabatic combustor burning wood was conducted. This was done for a reactant mixture varying from a rich to a lean mixture. A non-adiabatic non-premixed combustion model of a numerical code was used to simulate the combustion process where the solid fuel was modelled by using the ultimate analysis data. The entropy generation rates due to the combustion and frictional pressure drop processes were computed to eventually arrive at the irreversibilities generated. It was found that the entropy generation rate due to frictional pressure drop was negligible when compared to that due to combustion. It was also found that a minimum in irreversibilities generated was achieved when the Air–Fuel mass ratio was 4.9, which corresponds to an equivalence ratio of 1.64, which are lower than the respective Air–Fuel mass ratio and equivalence ratio for complete combustion with theoretical amount of air of 8.02 and 1. - Highlights: • Entropy generation rate in an adiabatic combustor firing pine wood was investigated. • Most entropy generation rate due to combustion process. • Minimum entropy generation rate was found to occur for an Air–Fuel mass ratio of 4.9. • Molar fractions of species H2 and H2O are equal at minimum entropy generation rate

  18. Interactions between SO2 and NOx emissions in fluidised bed combustion of coal. Doctoral thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, W.

    1994-01-01

    ;Contents: Introduction; The emissions of SO2 and NOx and their interactions in fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) of coal; SO2 and NOx emissions in FBC of coal: a literature survey; Oxidation of NH3 in a fixed bed; Oxidation of NH3: influence of SO2, CO and CO2; Modeling SO2 and NOx emissions in AFBC: a simple approach; Modeling SO2 and NOx emissions in CFBC; Modeling SO2 and NOx emissions in FBC: a fundamental approach; Optimization and Conclusions.

  19. Experimental investigation and mathematical modelling of the combustion of brown coal, refuse and mixed fuels in a circulating fluidized bed combustor; Experimentelle Untersuchung und mathematische Modellierung der Verbrennung von Braunkohle, Abfallstoffen und Mischbrennstoffen in einer zirkulierenden Wirbelschichtfeuerung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, W.; Brunne, T.; Hiller, A. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Energietechnik; Albrecht, J. [Lurgi Umwelt GmbH, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Quang, N. [Polytechnic Inst., Danang (Viet Nam)

    1998-09-01

    Extensive experiments on combustion of biological materials and residues in fluidized bed combustors and dust combustors have been carried out at the Department of Power Plant Engineering of Dresden University since the early nineties. Particular interest was taken in mixing brown coal with sewage sludge, sugar pulp and waste wood. The experiments were supplemented by modelling in a research project funded jointly by the BMBF and Messrs. Lurgi since early 1997. A combustion cell model designed by Siegen University is being modified for the new mixed fuels, and preliminary investigations were carried out on a batch reactor while the modelling work was continued. (orig.) [Deutsch] An dem Lehrstuhl fuer Kraftwerkstechnik der TU Dresden werden seit Anfang der 90-iger Jahre umfangreiche experimentelle Untersuchungen zur Verbrennung von Bio- und Reststoffen in Wirbelschicht- und Staubfeuerungen durchgefuehrt. Dabei war vor allem die Zufeuerung dieser Stoffe in Waermeerzeugeranlagen auf Braunkohlenbasis von besonderem Interesse. Experimentell konnte nachgewiesen werden, dass sowohl Biobrennstoffe als auch Abfaelle in zirkulierenden Wirbelschichtfeuerungen umweltschonend zur Waermeerzeugung eingesetzt werden koennen. Als Beispiel wird das an Hand von Braunkohle-Klaerschlammgemischen sowie Bagasse- und Holz-Braunkohlegemischen gezeigt. Neben den experimentellen Untersuchungen bietet die Modellierung der Verbrennungsvorgaenge ein geeignetes Mittel um Voraussagen zu anderen Mischungsanteilen sowie anderen geometrischen Abmessungen machen zu koennen. Seit Anfang 1997 wird dazu ein vom BMBF und der Firma Lurgi gefoerdertes Forschungsvorhaben bearbeitet. Ein von der Universitaet Gesamthochschule Siegen fuer die Braunkohleverbrennung konzipiertes Zellenmodell wird auf die neuen Brennstoffgemische erweitert. Da grundsaetzlich andere Stoffzusammensetzungen vorliegen, wurden an einem Batch-Reaktor Voruntersuchungen zum Pyrolyseverhalten der Brennstoffe durchgefuehrt. Erste

  20. Control and reduction of NOx emissions on light hydrocarbons combustion in fluidized bed combustors: a technological prospection surveys; Controle e reducao de emissoes de NOx durante queima de hidrocarbonetos leves em combustores a leito fluidizado: um estudo de prospeccao tecnologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Douglas Alves; Winter, Eduardo [Instituto Nacional da Propriedade Industrial (INPI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The present paper aims a technological prospecting study of the main technological agents involved in industrial light hydrocarbons combustion process. More specifically, the work approaches technologies applied to nitrogen oxides emissions control and reduction. Nitrogen oxides are typically known as 'NOx' (NO, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}). 'NOx' are byproducts from fuel burning in combustion systems, including also in fluidized bed combustion systems. The technological prospecting study employed 'technology foresight' as tool for evaluating the technological perspectives of the thermal generation, basis on environment protection. Such technological perspectives of the thermal generation were evaluated through invention patent documents. The query methodology for obtaining of patent documents employed a free patent base, known as ESPACENET. Additionally, the documents obtained were evaluated, considering beyond the countries and the publication dates, technological perspectives employed to 'NOx' emissions control and reduction. It is very important to highlight around 70% of the industrial technological information are just found in invention patent documents. (author)

  1. Process costs and flowsheets, bed defluidization characteristics, stone reactivity changes and attrition losses for a regenerative fluidized-bed combustion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, W.M.; Montagna, J.C.; Smith, G.W.; Smyk, E.B.

    1980-05-01

    As a means of significantly reducing the amount of limestone required by the fluidized-bed combustion of coal, a limestone regeneration process has been developed which allows the sorbent to be recycled back to the combustor for reuse. To further the development of regeneration, experiments were performed to (1) evaluate the effects of repeated utilization on the sorbent reactivity for sulfation and regeneration and (2) characterize the minimum fluidizing-gas velocity required for the regeneration process to prevent agglomeration and defluidization of the bed. This report presents the results of those investigations plus (1) the development of process flowsheets and (2) an estimation of process costs and the economics of regeneration. The results of the experimental regeneration process studies confirm the potentially large reductions in the amount of sorbent required by FBC's which can be achieved by regeneration, possibly as high as 80%. The economic projections indicate that at current limestone prices, regeneration is not clearly justified on an economic basis; i.e., the cost of the regeneration process slightly exceeds the anticipated savings in limestone raw material cost which results from the regeneration process. However, the cost of limestone disposal has not been thoroughly addressed. Hence, if disposal costs due to environmental considerations, particularly the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, become significant, the economic attractiveness of regeneration would be greatly enhanced.

  2. Analysis of combustion efficiency in CFB coal combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afsin Gungor [Nigde University, Nigde (Turkey). Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture

    2008-06-15

    Fluidized bed technology is well known for its high combustion efficiency and is widely used in coal combustion. In this study, the combustor efficiency has been defined and investigated for CFB coal combustor based on the losses using a dynamic 2D model. The model is shown to agree well with the published data. The effect of operating parameters such as excess air ratio, bed operational velocity, coal particle diameter and combustor load and the effect of design variables such as bed height and bed diameter on the mean bed temperature, the overall CO emission and the combustion efficiency are analyzed for the small-scale of CFBC in the presently developed model. As a result of this analysis, it is observed that the combustion efficiency decreases with increasing excess air value. The combustion efficiency increases with the bed operational velocity. Increasing coal particle size results in higher combustion efficiency values. The coal feed rate has negative effect on the combustion efficiency. The combustor efficiency considerably increases with increasing combustor height and diameter if other parameters are kept unchanged. 46 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. The use of FBC wastes in the reclamation of coal slurry solids. Technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.

    1992-08-01

    The present research project is designed to provide initial data on one possible use of FBC waste. FBC wastes from five different locations in Illinois are mixed with coal slurry solids (CSS) from two different coal preparation plants at Illinois coal mines. In mixtures of FBC waste and coal slurry solids, the alkaline components of the FBC waste are expected to react with acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in the coal slurry solid. An objective of this research is to determine the chemical composition of aqueous leachates from mixtures of FBC wastes, generated under various operating conditions, and the coal slurry solids.

  4. Nitrogen Chemistry in Fluidized Bed Combustion of Coal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anker Degn

    , was proposed and compared to experimental data. The agreement between model and experimental data was fair. Experiments were also conducted with simultaneous oxidation of HCN and sulphation of seven different types of limestone. The catalytic activity of the limestones decreases to a non-zero level......The present Ph.D thesis describes an experimental and theoretical investigation of the formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides (NOx and N2O) in fluidized bed combustion (FBC) of coal. A review of the current knowledge of nitrogen chemistry in FBC is presented. The review covers both laboratory...... studies and pilot and full-scale observations. In the experimental part of the work, the heterogeneous oxidation of HCN catalyzed by two Danish limestones was investigated in a fixed bed laboratory reactor to establish how the reduction of the SO2 emission by addition of limestone to FBC influences...

  5. Gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, Steven W. (Inventor); Cheung, Albert K. (Inventor); Dempsey, Dae K. (Inventor); Hoke, James B. (Inventor); Kramer, Stephen K. (Inventor); Ols, John T. (Inventor); Smith, Reid Dyer Curtis (Inventor); Sowa, William A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gas turbine engine has a combustor module including an annular combustor having a liner assembly that defines an annular combustion chamber having a length, L. The liner assembly includes a radially inner liner, a radially outer liner that circumscribes the inner liner, and a bulkhead, having a height, H1, which extends between the respective forward ends of the inner liner and the outer liner. The combustor has an exit height, H3, at the respective aft ends of the inner liner and the outer liner interior. The annular combustor has a ratio H1/H3 having a value less than or equal to 1.7. The annular combustor may also have a ration L/H3 having a value less than or equal to 6.0.

  6. Hydration products of FBC wastes as SO2 sorbents: comparison between ettringite and calcium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) enables the in situ capture of SO2, but generates large amounts of wastes whose composition and physico-chemical properties make both landfilling and reuse in traditional fields of application (e.g., cement and concrete industries) problematic. Reactivation by water hydration of the desulphurizing ability of these residues is considered a viable mean for their recycling: besides Ca(OH)2, this process can generate other hydration products, such as ettringite. This paper is devoted to a comparison between the behaviour of Ca(OH)2 and ettringite as SO2 sorbents. To this end, synthetic preparations (in the particle size range 0.4-0.6 mm) of the two materials were dehydrated and then sulphated in a lab-scale fluidized bed reactor. Sulphation tests were carried out at 850 C by fluidizing the bed with an SO2-N2-O2 mixture (1800 ppm SO2) at 0.8 m/s. Calcium conversion degree and fines elutriation rate were evaluated as a function of sulphation time. The propensity of the sorbents to undergo fragmentation was also estimated by particle sizing of in-bed exhausted sorbent particles, with the aid of laser granulometry. Mercury intrusion porosimetry of samples was directed to the assessment of the influence of sorbent dehydration and subsequent sulphation on pore size distribution and porosimetric texture. X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis on the synthetic sorbents complemented the characterization. Results showed that dehydration/thermal decomposition brought about a significant increase of the overall porosity for both sorbents, more extensive than it is commonly observed with calcined commercial limestones. Upon sulphation, the two sorbents showed satisfactory degrees of calcium conversion, larger than those usually observed with limestones. Sulphation resulted into a decrease of particle voidage (that of the Ca(OH)2-based sorbent was negligible after the process). Ettringite was more prone to attrition/fragmentation than

  7. The inhibition of the limestone sulphation process during fluidized bed combustion --- a theoretical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdett, N.A.

    1983-12-01

    The extents and rates of absorption of sulfur oxides by limestone (or similar) sorbents are important factors which influence operating costs of fluidized bed combustors for power generation with simultaneous flue gas desulphurization. Laboratory experiments have been conducted in order to ascertain the parameters affecting the kinetics of the sulfation and a simple mathematical model has been constructed assuming that the critical factor in the process is the production of SO/sub 3/ by oxidation of SO/sub 2/ within the pores of the stone. It is shown that when reaction conditions are altered so as to favour the production of SO/sub 3/ in general the extent of sulfation is reduced owing to a more rapid formation of a shell of CaSO/sub 4/ around the outer edge of the particle, and hence a faster rate of pore-blocking. The model has been used to predict the effect of temperature upon sulfation, and it is shown that the presence of SO/sub 3/ as an intermediate in the reaction provides an explanation for the optimum sulfation temperature commonly observed in FBC operation.

  8. One dimensional numerical simulation of small scale CFB combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gungor, Afsin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Nigde University, 51100 Nigde (Turkey)

    2009-03-15

    In this study, a one-dimensional model which includes volatilization, attrition and combustion of char particles for a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustor has been developed. In the modeling, the CFB combustor is analyzed in two regions: bottom zone considering as a bubbling fluidized bed in turbulent fluidization regime and upper zone core-annulus solids flow structure is established. In the bottom zone, a single-phase back-flow cell model is used to represent the solid mixing. Solids exchange, between the bubble phase and emulsion phase is a function of the bubble diameter and varies along the axis of the combustor. In the upper zone, particles move upward in the core and downward in the annulus. Thickness of the annulus varies according to the combustor height. Using the developed simulation program, the effects of operational parameters which are the particle diameter, superficial velocity and air-to-fuel ratio on net solids flux, oxygen and carbon dioxide mole ratios along the bed height and carbon content and bed temperature on the top of the riser are investigated. Simulation results are compared with test results obtained from the 50 kW Gazi University Heat Power Laboratory pilot scale unit and good agreement is observed. (author)

  9. Combustor and method for purging a combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jonathan Dwight; Hughes, Michael John

    2015-06-09

    A combustor includes an end cap. The end cap includes a first surface and a second surface downstream from the first surface, a shroud that circumferentially surrounds at least a portion of the first and second surfaces, a plate that extends radially within the shroud, a plurality of tubes that extend through the plate and the first and second surfaces, and a first purge port that extends through one or more of the plurality of tubes, wherein the purge port is axially aligned with the plate.

  10. Combustor burner vanelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, Benjamin (Greer, SC); Varatharajan, Balachandar (Loveland, OH); Kraemer, Gilbert Otto (Greer, SC); Yilmaz, Ertan (Albany, NY); Zuo, Baifang (Simpsonville, SC)

    2012-02-14

    The present application provides a burner for use with a combustor of a gas turbine engine. The burner may include a center hub, a shroud, a pair of fuel vanes extending from the center hub to the shroud, and a vanelet extending from the center hub and/or the shroud and positioned between the pair of fuel vanes.

  11. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 5, Appendix C, Fluidized-bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-10-01

    This appendix provides information on fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) technology as it has been applied to municipal waste combustion (MWC). A review of the literature was conducted to determine: (1) to what extent FBC technology has been applied to MWC, in terms of number and size of units was well as technology configuration; (2) the operating history of facilities employing FBC technology; and (3) the cost of these facilities as compared to conventional MSW installations. Where available in the literature, data on operating and performance characteristics are presented. Tabular comparisons of facility operating/cost data and emissions data have been complied and are presented. The literature review shows that FBC technology shows considerable promise in terms of providing improvements over conventional technology in areas such as NOx and acid gas control, and ash leachability. In addition, the most likely configuration to be applied to the first large scale FBC dedicated to municipal solid waste (MSW) will employ circulating bed (CFB) technology. Projected capital costs for the Robbins, Illinois 1600 ton per day CFB-based waste-to-energy facility are competitive with conventional systems, in the range of $125,000 per ton per day of MSW receiving capacity.

  12. Neural Network Based Montioring and Control of Fluidized Bed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodruzzaman, M.; Essawy, M.A.

    1996-04-01

    The goal of this project was to develop chaos analysis and neural network-based modeling techniques and apply them to the pressure-drop data obtained from the Fluid Bed Combustion (FBC) system (a small scale prototype model) located at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC)-Morgantown. The second goal was to develop neural network-based chaos control techniques and provide a suggestive prototype for possible real-time application to the FBC system. The experimental pressure data were collected from a cold FBC experimental set-up at the Morgantown Center. We have performed several analysis on these data in order to unveil their dynamical and chaotic characteristics. The phase-space attractors were constructed from the one dimensional time series data, using the time-delay embedding method, for both normal and abnormal conditions. Several identifying parameters were also computed from these attractors such as the correlation dimension, the Kolmogorov entropy, and the Lyapunov exponents. These chaotic attractor parameters can be used to discriminate between the normal and abnormal operating conditions of the FBC system. It was found that, the abnormal data has higher correlation dimension, larger Kolmogorov entropy and larger positive Lyapunov exponents as compared to the normal data. Chaotic system control using neural network based techniques were also investigated and compared to conventional chaotic system control techniques. Both types of chaotic system control techniques were applied to some typical chaotic systems such as the logistic, the Henon, and the Lorenz systems. A prototype model for real-time implementation of these techniques has been suggested to control the FBC system. These models can be implemented for real-time control in a next phase of the project after obtaining further measurements from the experimental model. After testing the control algorithms developed for the FBC model, the next step is to implement them on hardware and link them to

  13. Environmental & Health Hazards of Fly Ash & SOx from FBC Power Plant at Khanote

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen Aziz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Lakhra coal reserves are estimated to about 1328 million tones. Most of mined Coal in Pakistan has been used for power generation in addition to some other uses. Lakhra coal (lignite reserves are very high in sulphur content, moisture and ash that not only cause environmental pollution but also cause operational problems. In order to avoid environmental & operational problems, clean coal technology (FBC technology has been used globally because of its merits. In FBC power plant, sulphure is captured by using limestone. In Pakistan, 3x50MW power plant was installed at Khanote to utilize the lakhra coal for the first time. The present study is focused on formation of ash & sulphur. In the FBC power plant at khanote, the generation rate of fly ash & bottom ash was 55680 m3/hr and 16550 m3/hr respectively. Unexpected huge amount of ash causes environmental problem in shape of particulate matter that causes respiratory diseases in the workers. It also affects nearby villages by polluting agricultural land, cattles & habitants. The present research not only indentifies the risks on the basis of extensive experimental analysis, but also proposed solution for its proper disposal.

  14. Market Assessment and Demonstration of Lignite FBC Ash Flowable Fill Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montana-Dakota Utilities (MDU) and Western Research Institute (WRI) have been developing flowable fill materials formulated using ash from the Montana-Dakota Utilities R. M. Heskett Station in Mandan, North Dakota. MDU and WRI have partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Dakota Industrial Commission (NDIC) to further the development of these materials for lignite-fired fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) facilities. The MDU controlled density fill (CDF) appears to be a viable engineering material and environmentally safe. WRI is pursuing the commercialization of the technology under the trademark Ready-Fill(trademark). The project objectives were to: (1) assess the market in the Bismarck-Mandan area; (2) evaluate the geotechnical properties and environmental compatibility; and (3) construct and monitor demonstrations of the various grades of flowable fill products in full-scale demonstrations. The scope of initial phase of work entailed the following: Task I--Assess Market for MDU Flowable Fill Products; Task II--Assess Geotechnical and Environmental Properties of MDU Flowable Fill Products; and Task III--Demonstrate and Monitor MDU Flowable Fill Products in Field-Scale Demonstrations. The results of these testing and demonstration activities proved the following: (1) The market assessment indicated that a market exists in the Bismarck-Mandan area for structural construction applications, such as sub-bases for residential and commercial businesses, and excavatable fill applications, such as gas line and utility trench filling. (2) The cost of the MDU flowable fill product must be lower than the current $35-$45/cubic yard price if it is to become a common construction material. Formulations using MDU ash and lower-cost sand alternatives offer that opportunity. An estimated market of 10,000 cubic yards of MDU flowable fill products could be realized if prices could be made competitive. (3) The geotechnical properties of the MDU ash-based flowable

  15. Market Assessment and Demonstration of Lignite FBC Ash Flowable Fill Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan E. Bland

    2003-09-30

    Montana-Dakota Utilities (MDU) and Western Research Institute (WRI) have been developing flowable fill materials formulated using ash from the Montana-Dakota Utilities R. M. Heskett Station in Mandan, North Dakota. MDU and WRI have partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Dakota Industrial Commission (NDIC) to further the development of these materials for lignite-fired fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) facilities. The MDU controlled density fill (CDF) appears to be a viable engineering material and environmentally safe. WRI is pursuing the commercialization of the technology under the trademark Ready-Fill{trademark}. The project objectives were to: (1) assess the market in the Bismarck-Mandan area; (2) evaluate the geotechnical properties and environmental compatibility; and (3) construct and monitor demonstrations of the various grades of flowable fill products in full-scale demonstrations. The scope of initial phase of work entailed the following: Task I--Assess Market for MDU Flowable Fill Products; Task II--Assess Geotechnical and Environmental Properties of MDU Flowable Fill Products; and Task III--Demonstrate and Monitor MDU Flowable Fill Products in Field-Scale Demonstrations. The results of these testing and demonstration activities proved the following: (1) The market assessment indicated that a market exists in the Bismarck-Mandan area for structural construction applications, such as sub-bases for residential and commercial businesses, and excavatable fill applications, such as gas line and utility trench filling. (2) The cost of the MDU flowable fill product must be lower than the current $35-$45/cubic yard price if it is to become a common construction material. Formulations using MDU ash and lower-cost sand alternatives offer that opportunity. An estimated market of 10,000 cubic yards of MDU flowable fill products could be realized if prices could be made competitive. (3) The geotechnical properties of the MDU ash-based flowable

  16. Pulse Combustor Design, A DOE Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2003-07-31

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment (PPA) of a project selected in CCT Round IV, the Pulse Combustor Design Qualification Test, as described in a Report to Congress (U.S. Department of Energy 1992). Pulse combustion is a method intended to increase the heat-transfer rate in a fired heater. The desire to demonstrate the use of pulse combustion as a source of heat for the gasification of coal, thus avoiding the need for an oxygen plant, prompted ThermoChem, Inc. (TCI), to submit a proposal for this project. In October 1992, TCI entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to conduct this project. In 1998, the project was restructured and scaled down, and in September 1998, a new cooperative agreement was signed. The site of the revised project was TCI's facilities in Baltimore, Maryland. The original purpose of this CCT project was to demonstrate a unit that would employ ten identical 253-resonance tube combustors in a coal gasification unit. The objective of the scaled-down project was to test a single 253-resonance-tube combustor in a fluidized sand bed, with gasification being studied in a process development unit (PDU). DOE provided 50 percent of the total project funding of $8.6 million. The design for the demonstration unit was completed in February 1999, and construction was completed in November 2000. Operations were conducted in March 2001.

  17. Modelling of N2O Reduction in a Circulating Fluidized Bed Boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Åmand, Lars Erik; Dam-Johansen, Kim;

    1996-01-01

    The addition of limestone for sulphur retention in Fluidized Bed Combustion (FBC) has been observed to influence the emission of N2O, and in many cases a lower emission was observed. The catalytic activity of a Danish limestone (Stevns Chalk) for decomposition of N2O in a laboratory fixed bed...... quartz reactor was measured. It was found that calcined Stevns Chalk is a very active catalyst for N2O decomposition in an inert atmosphere compared to bed material, i.e. a mixture of ash and sand. However, in FBC the limestone is exposed to a mixture of gases, including CO, CO2 and SO2, and sulphation...... uncalcined or recarbonated limestone had negligible activity. Sulphation of the calcined limestone under oxidizing conditions lowered the activity, however sulphidation under reducing conditions showed that CaS is an active catalyst for the reduction of N2O by CO. Without CO present a gas solid reaction...

  18. Micro-mixer/combustor

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad Ahmad

    2014-09-18

    A micro-mixer/combustor to mix fuel and oxidant streams into combustible mixtures where flames resulting from combustion of the mixture can be sustained inside its combustion chamber is provided. The present design is particularly suitable for diffusion flames. In various aspects the present design mixes the fuel and oxidant streams prior to entering a combustion chamber. The combustion chamber is designed to prevent excess pressure to build up within the combustion chamber, which build up can cause instabilities in the flame. A restriction in the inlet to the combustion chamber from the mixing chamber forces the incoming streams to converge while introducing minor pressure drop. In one or more aspects, heat from combustion products exhausted from the combustion chamber may be used to provide heat to at least one of fuel passing through the fuel inlet channel, oxidant passing through the oxidant inlet channel, the mixing chamber, or the combustion chamber. In one or more aspects, an ignition strip may be positioned in the combustion chamber to sustain a flame without preheating.

  19. Combustor and method for distributing fuel in the combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; York, William David

    2016-04-26

    A combustor includes a tube bundle that extends radially across at least a portion of the combustor. The tube bundle includes an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface. A plurality of tubes extends from the upstream surface through the downstream surface, and each tube provides fluid communication through the tube bundle. A baffle extends axially inside the tube bundle between adjacent tubes. A method for distributing fuel in a combustor includes flowing a fuel into a fuel plenum defined at least in part by an upstream surface, a downstream surface, a shroud, and a plurality of tubes that extend from the upstream surface to the downstream surface. The method further includes impinging the fuel against a baffle that extends axially inside the fuel plenum between adjacent tubes.

  20. Flow and combustion characteristics of a 2-dimensional spouted bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, R. F.; Hart, J. R.; Ohtake, K.

    1982-03-01

    A two dimensional spouted bed laboratory combustor was designed and constructed with the objective of studying the interaction among the gas flow, particle flow, and combustion. The facility, designed for a maximum thermal power of 20 kW, has a quartz front wall providing full optical access to particle flows and combustion processes. The combustor was characterized in terms of pressure, temperature, gas velocity, and particle velocity profiles and operating limits. Initial studies employed premixed propane and air and a fixed bed height, bed material, injector slot width, and combustor geometry. As in previous investigations of axisymmetric spouted beds, the ratio of particle mass circulation rate to jet mass flow rate was observed to be about ten. Combustion increased this ratio by about 10%. A pulsating mode of operation was noted with a characteristic frequency of about 10 Hz, controlled by the interaction of the particle and gas flows.

  1. Modelling of Devolatilization in Fluidized Bed Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenseng, Mette; Lin, Weigang; Johnsson, Jan Erik;

    1997-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the devolatilization process in a circulating fluidized bed combustor. The model is a combination of two submodels: single particle devolatilization and fluid dynamics. The single particle model includes the influence of both chemical kinetics and hea...

  2. Methanol tailgas combustor control method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart-Predmore, David J.; Pettit, William H.

    2002-01-01

    A method for controlling the power and temperature and fuel source of a combustor in a fuel cell apparatus to supply heat to a fuel processor where the combustor has dual fuel inlet streams including a first fuel stream, and a second fuel stream of anode effluent from the fuel cell and reformate from the fuel processor. In all operating modes, an enthalpy balance is determined by regulating the amount of the first and/or second fuel streams and the quantity of the first air flow stream to support fuel processor power requirements.

  3. Fluidized-bed-combustion ash for the solidification and stabilization of a metal-hydroxide sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, K L; Behr-Andres, C

    1998-01-01

    Fluidized-bed-combustion (FBC) ash is a by-product from a developing technology for coal-fired power plants that will economically reduce air emissions to meet requirements of the Clean Air Act. FBC ash has physical and chemical properties similar to Portland cement, but only has moderate success as a pozzolan in concrete applications due to low compressive strengths. However, FBC ash has proven effective for use as a binder for the solidification and stabilization (S/S) of metal-bearing sludges. Physical and chemical characterization procedures were used to analyze FBC ash and a metal-bearing sludge obtained from a hazardous waste treatment facility to develop 12 different S/S mix designs. The mix designs consist of four binder designs to evaluate sludge-to-binder ratios of approximately 0, 0.5, and 1. Portland cement is used as a control binder to compare unconfined compressive strengths and Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) analyses from different ratios of the FBC ash streams: fly ash, char, and spent bed material (SBM). Compressive strengths ranging from 84 lbs per square inch (psi) to 298 psi were obtained from various mix designs containing different sludge-to-ash ratios cured for 28 days. All the mix designs passed the TCLP. Recoveries from leaching for each metal were less than 5% for most mix designs. Results of unconfined compressive strengths, TCLP, and percent recovery calculations indicate that the mix design containing approximately a 1:1 ratio of fly ash to char-and-sludge is the best mix design for the S/S of the metal-bearing sludge. PMID:15655996

  4. Assessment of Combustor Working Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiyong Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the remaining life of gas turbine critical components, it is vital to accurately define the aerothermodynamic working environments and service histories. As a part of a major multidisciplinary collaboration program, a benchmark modeling on a practical gas turbine combustor is successfully carried out, and the two-phase, steady, turbulent, compressible, reacting flow fields at both cruise and takeoff are obtained. The results show the complicated flow features inside the combustor. The airflow over each flow element of the combustor can or liner is not evenly distributed, and considerable variations, ±25%, around the average values, are observed. It is more important to note that the temperatures at the combustor can and cooling wiggle strips vary significantly, which can significantly affect fatigue life of engine critical components. The present study suggests that to develop an adequate aerothermodynamics tool, it is necessary to carry out a further systematic study, including validation of numerical results, simulations at typical engine operating conditions, and development of simple correlations between engine operating conditions and component working environments. As an ultimate goal, the cost and time of gas turbine engine fleet management must be significantly reduced.

  5. Pulse Detonation Engine Test Bed Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.

    2002-01-01

    A detonation is a supersonic combustion wave. A Pulse Detonation Engine (PDE) repetitively creates a series of detonation waves to take advantage of rapid burning and high peak pressures to efficiently produce thrust. NASA Glenn Research Center's Combustion Branch has developed a PDE test bed that can reproduce the operating conditions that might be encountered in an actual engine. It allows the rapid and cost-efficient evaluation of the technical issues and technologies associated with these engines. The test bed is modular in design. It consists of various length sections of both 2- and 2.6- in. internal-diameter combustor tubes. These tubes can be bolted together to create a variety of combustor configurations. A series of bosses allow instrumentation to be inserted on the tubes. Dynamic pressure sensors and heat flux gauges have been used to characterize the performance of the test bed. The PDE test bed is designed to utilize an existing calorimeter (for heat load measurement) and windowed (for optical access) combustor sections. It uses hydrogen as the fuel, and oxygen and nitrogen are mixed to simulate air. An electronic controller is used to open the hydrogen and air valves (or a continuous flow of air is used) and to fire the spark at the appropriate times. Scheduled tests on the test bed include an evaluation of the pumping ability of the train of detonation waves for use in an ejector and an evaluation of the pollutants formed in a PDE combustor. Glenn's Combustion Branch uses the National Combustor Code (NCC) to perform numerical analyses of PDE's as well as to evaluate alternative detonative combustion devices. Pulse Detonation Engine testbed.

  6. Residues characterisation from the fluidised bed combustion of East London's solid recovered fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Balampanis, Dimitris E.; Pollard, Simon J. T.; Simms, N; Longhurst, Philip J.; Coulon, Frederic; Villa, Raffaella

    2010-01-01

    Waste thermal treatment in Europe is moving towards the utilisation of the combustible output of mechanical, biological treatment (MBT) plants. The standardisation of solid recovered fuels (SRF) is expected to support this trend and increase the amount of the generated combustion residues. In this work, the residues and especially the fly ashes from the fluidised bed combustion (FBC) of East London’s NCV 3, Cl 2, and Hg 1 class SRF, are characterised. The following toxicity ...

  7. Bed material agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion. Technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.C.; Dawson, M.R.; Smeenk, J.L.

    1995-04-01

    Experiments performed support the hypothesis that a reducing atmosphere during fluidized bed coal combustion contributes to the formation of agglomerates. Reducing conditions are imposed by controlling the amount of combustion air supplied to the combustor, 50% of theoretical in these experiments. These localized reducing conditions may arise from either poor lateral bed mixing or oxygen-starved conditions due to the coal feed locations. Deviations from steady-state operating conditions in bed pressure drop may be used to detect agglomerate formation. Interpretation of the bed pressure drop was made more straightforward by employing a moving average difference method. During steady-state operation, the difference between the moving point averages should be close to zero, within {plus_minus}0.03 inches of water. Instability within the combustor, experienced once agglomerates begin to form, can be recognized as larger deviations from zero, on the magnitude of {plus_minus}0.15 inches of water.

  8. Preliminary assessment of the health and environmental impacts of fluidized-bed combustion of coal as applied to electrical utility systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the health and environmental impacts of fluidized-bed combustion of coal (FBC), specifically as applied to base-load generation of electrical energy by utilities. The public health impacts of Fluidized-Bed Combustion (FBC) plants are expected to be quite similar to those for Low Sulfur Coal (LSC) and Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) plants because all appear to be able to meet Federal emission standards; however, there are emissions not covered by standards. Hydrocarbon emissions are higher and trace element emissions are lower for FBC than for conventional technologies. For FBC, based on an analytical model and a single emission data point, the polycyclic organic material decreases the anticipated lifespan of the highly exposed public very slightly. Added health protection due to lower trace element emissions is not known. Although there is a large quantity of solid wastes from the generating plant, the environmental impact of the FBC technology due to solid residue appears lower than for FGD, where sludge management requires larger land areas and presents problems due to the environmentally noxious calcium sulfite in the waste. Fixing the sludge may become a requirement that increases the cost of wet-limestone FGD but makes that system more acceptable. The potential for aquatic or terrestrial impacts from hydrocarbon emissions is low. If application of AFBC technology increases the use of local high-sulfur coals to the detriment of western low-sulfur coal, a sociological benefit could accrue to the FBC (or FGD) technology, because impacts caused by western boom towns would decrease. The infrastructure of areas that mine high-sulfur coal in the Midwest are better equipped to handle increased mining than the West.

  9. Numerical Modelling of Scramjet Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Deepu

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerical modelling of turbulent-reacting flow field of supersonic combustion ramjet(scramjet combustors are presented. The developed numerical procedure is based on the implicittreatment of chemical source terms by preconditioning and solved along with unstedy turbulentNavier-Stokes equations explicitly. Reaction is modelled using an eight-step hydrogen-airchemistry. Code is validated against a standard wall jet experimental data and is successfullyused to model the turbulent-reacting flow field resulting due to the combustion of hydrogeninjected from diamond-shaped strut and also in the wake region of wedge-shaped strut placedin the heated supersonic airstream. The analysis could demonstrate the effect of interaction ofoblique shock wave with a supersonic stream of hydrogen  in its (fuel-air mixing and reactionfor strut-based scramjet combustors.

  10. Particle Size Distribution in CFD Simulation of Gas-Particle Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Niemi, Timo Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) boilers have become one of the leading technologies in environment-friendly biomass combustion. In fluidized bed combustors the solid fuel particles are suspended on upward-blowing air resulting in a turbulent mixing of gas and solids. This mixing process allows efficient chemical reactions and heat transfer which in turn help to reduce emissions and allow to utilize many different types of fuels. In order to develop even better FBC designs, numerical simulat...

  11. Precise f_{D*,B*} and f_{B_c} from QCD spectral sum rules

    CERN Document Server

    Narison, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Anticipating future precise measurements of the B-like leptonic decays for alternative determinations of the CKM mixing angles or/and for predicting their semi-leptonic and hadronic decays, we pursue our program on the B-like mesons by improving the estimates of f_D* and f_B* [analogue to f_\\pi=130.4(2) MeV] using suitable ratios of the well-established (inverse) Laplace sum rules less affected by the systematics and known to N2LO pQCD and where the full d=6 non-perturbative condensate contributions are included. An estimate of the N3LO terms based on geometric growth of the pQCD series is included in the error calculations. Our optimal results based on stability criteria and on an (in)dependence on the choice of the QCD subtraction point read: f_D*/f_D=1.209(22),f_B*/f_B=1.031(8) which imply : f_D*=246(7) MeV and f_B*=212(8) MeV if we use our recent results in [1] for f_D and f_B. We complete the analysis by a direct estimate of f_Bc using the complete NLO + N2LO for massless m_c pQCD expression and complete...

  12. Analytical fuel property effects--small combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, R. D.; Troth, D. L.; Miles, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    The consequences of using broad-property fuels in both conventional and advanced state-of-the-art small gas turbine combustors are assessed. Eight combustor concepts were selected for initial screening, of these, four final combustor concepts were chosen for further detailed analysis. These included the dual orifice injector baseline combustor (a current production 250-C30 engine combustor) two baseline airblast injected modifications, short and piloted prechamber combustors, and an advanced airblast injected, variable geometry air staged combustor. Final predictions employed the use of the STAC-I computer code. This quasi 2-D model includes real fuel properties, effects of injector type on atomization, detailed droplet dynamics, and multistep chemical kinetics. In general, fuel property effects on various combustor concepts can be classified as chemical or physical in nature. Predictions indicate that fuel chemistry has a significant effect on flame radiation, liner wall temperature, and smoke emission. Fuel physical properties that govern atomization quality and evaporation rates are predicted to affect ignition and lean-blowout limits, combustion efficiency, unburned hydrocarbon, and carbon monoxide emissions.

  13. Concepts of Emission Reduction in Fluidized Bed Combustion of Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amon Purgar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A status report on fluidized bed technology in Austria is under preparation, in response to the Fluidized Bed Conversion multi-lateral technology initiative of the International Energy Agency. This status report focuses on the current operation of fluidized bed combustors. Combustors have been installed in the following industrial sectors: pulp and paper, biomass heat and power plants, waste-to-energy plants, and communal sewage sludge treatment plants. There are also some small demonstration plants. These plants all have in common that they treat renewable fuel types. In many cases, only bio-fuels are treated. Besides the ability to burn a wide range of low-grade and difficult fuels, fluidized bed combustors have the advantages of low NOX emissions and the possibility of in-process capture of SO2. Various emission reduction concepts for fluidized bed combustors that are typical for their industrial sector are discussed. The discussion of these concepts focuses on NOX, SO2 and dust.

  14. Fluidized bed combustion (citations from the American Petroleum Institute data base). Report for 1964-Jan 79

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavagnaro, D.M.

    1980-04-01

    These citations from the American Petroleum Institute pertain to fluidized bed processes and processors for the combustion of oil, coal, natural gas, and industrial and municipal wastes. They also discuss air pollution control by fluidized bed combustion, sludge incineration, fluidized bed boilers and furnaces, and design of the fluidized bed combustors. (This updated bibliography contain 108 abstracts, 9 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  15. Beneficiation of pulverized coal combustion fly ash in fluidised bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammarota, A.; Chirone, R.; Solimene, R.; Urciuolo, M. [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione - C.N.R., P.le V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy)

    2008-07-15

    The paper addresses the thermal treatment of pulverized coal combustion fly ash belonging to the group C of Geldart powder classification in unconventional configurations of fluidised bed reactors. A sound-assisted fluidised bed combustor operated at 850 and 750 C, and a fluidised bed combustor characterized by a conical geometry, operated at 850 C, are the two lab-scale reactors tested. Combustion experiments have been carried out at different air excesses, ranging between 10% and 170%, and in the case of the conical fluidization column with different bed inventory. Both tested configurations have been proved to be efficient to reduce the carbon content initially present in the fly ash of 11%{sub w}, to a very low level, generally smaller than 1%{sub w}. Both the fly ash residence time in the reactor and the air excess strongly influenced the reactor performance. Residence times of 3-4 min and 10-60 min have been estimated for experiments carried out with the sound-assisted fluidised bed combustor and with the conical fluidised bed combustor, respectively. Regarding the possibility of a concurrent reduction of unburned carbon in the ash and of a particle size separation of the beneficiated material, on the basis of the obtained experimental data, the sound-assisted fluidised bed combustor is not able to separate the broad particle size distribution of the fly ash in different outlet solid streams. The use of a conical fluidised bed combustor is promising to realize an efficient separation of the inlet broad particle size distribution of the fly ash fed to the reactor into narrower outlet solid streams extracted from different locations: combustor exit, top and bottom of the bed. In this framework a hydrodynamic characterization of binary mixtures in a conical fluidised bed column carried out at ambient and high temperature (850 C) has demonstrated that the operating conditions of the conical fluidised bed combustor can be chosen on the basis of a compromise

  16. Low NOx Advanced Vortex Combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan G. Edmonds; Joseph T. Williams; Robert C. Steele; Douglas L. Straub; Kent H. Casleton; Avtar Bining

    2008-05-01

    A lean-premixed advanced vortex combustor (AVC) has been developed and tested. The natural gas fueled AVC was tested at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown, WV. All testing was performed at elevated pressures and inlet temperatures and at lean fuel-air ratios representative of industrial gas turbines. The improved AVC design exhibited simultaneous NOx /CO/unburned hydrocarbon (UHC) emissions of 4/4/0 ppmv (all emissions corrected to 15% O2 dry). The design also achieved less than 3 ppmv NOx with combustion efficiencies in excess of 99.5%. The design demonstrated marked acoustic dynamic stability over a wide range of operating conditions, which potentially makes this approach significantly more attractive than other lean-premixed combustion approaches. In addition, the measured 1.75% pressure drop is significantly lower than conventional gas turbine combustors, which could translate into an overall gas turbine cycle efficiency improvement. The relatively high velocities and low pressure drop achievable with this technology make the AVC approach an attractive alternative for syngas fuel applications.

  17. Proceedings - Fourth annual fluidized bed conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings contain 14 papers which deal with the following topics: anthracite culm combustion for process heat and cogeneration; case histories describing the performance of circulating fluidized bed combustors (CFBC); design and economics of CFBC; pulverizers for coal and sorbent preparation; ash removal systems; and the status of independent power generation and the Clean Coal Technology Program. Appendices contain manufacturers' installation lists with details of customers, fuels, steam conditions, and applications. All papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  18. Limestone fragmentation and attrition during fluidized bed oxyfiring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrizio Scala; Piero Salatino [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione - CNR, Napoli (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Attrition/fragmentation of limestone under simulated fluidized bed oxyfiring conditions was investigated by means of an experimental protocol that had been previously developed for characterization of attrition/fragmentation of sorbents in air-blown atmospheric fluidized bed combustors. The protocol was based on the use of different and mutually complementary techniques. The extent and pattern of attrition by surface wear in the dense phase of a fluidized bed were assessed in experiments carried out with a bench scale fluidized bed combustor under simulated oxyfiring conditions. Sorbent samples generated during simulated oxyfiring tests were further characterized from the standpoint of fragmentation upon high velocity impact by means of a purposely designed particle impactor. Results showed that under calcination-hindered conditions attrition and fragmentation patterns are much different from those occurring under air-blown atmospheric combustion conditions. Noteworthy, attrition/fragmentation enhanced particle sulfation by continuously regenerating the exposed particle surface. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Particle motion in fluidised beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas fluidised beds are important components in many process industries, e.g. coal combustors and granulators, but not much is known about the movement of the solids. Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) enables the movement of a single, radioactive tracer particle to be followed rapidly and faithfully. Experiments were carried out in columns sized between 70 and 240mm. diameter, operating in the bubbling regime at ambient process conditions using particles of group B and D (Geldart Classification). Particle motion was tracked and the data applied to models for particle movement at the gas distributor as well as close to other surfaces and to models for particle circulation in beds of cohesive particles. In the light of these data, models for particle and bubble interaction, particle circulation, segregation, attrition, erosion, heat transfer and fluidised bed scale-up rules were reassessed. Particle motion is directly caused by bubble motion, and their velocities were found to be equal for particles travelling in a bubble. PEPT enables particle circulation to be measured, giving a more accurate correlation for future predictions. Particle motion follows the scale-up rules based on similarities of the bubble motion in the bed. A new group of parameters was identified controlling the amount of attrition in fluidised beds and a new model to predict attrition is proposed. (author)

  20. Energy recovery from municipal solid waste and sewage sludge using multi-solid fluidized bed combustion technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    The concept is to recover energy as high and low pressure steam, simultaneously. High pressure steam would be generated from flue gas using a conventional tubular boiler. Low pressure steam would be generated by direct contact drying of DSS (as 4 percent solids) with hot sand in a fluidized bed that is an integral part of the MS-FBC process. It is proposed that high pressure steam could be used for district heating or electricity generation. The low pressure steam could be used for close proximity building heat. The results of the investigation show that the MS-FBC process concept for the co-utilization of MSW and DSS is technically feasible and that the thermal efficiency of the process is 76 to 82 percent based on experiments conducted in a 70 to 85 lb/h pilot plant and calculations on three conceptual cases.

  1. The characteristics of bed agglomeration/defluidization in fluidized bed firing palm fruit bunch and rice straw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviors of bed particle agglomeration and defluidization were investigated during the combustion of oil palm bunch and rice straw in a laboratory scale bubbling fluidized bed reactor. The study focused on (1) the effects of fuel inorganic properties and operating variables on the bed agglomeration tendency and (2) the elucidation in the behaviors of fuel inorganic elements and the governing mode of the agglomeration. It was experimentally found that the defluidization caused by the bed agglomeration was clearly detectable from the decrease of measured bed pressure. The accumulation and growth of the agglomerates provided the partial to complete defluidization. The fuel inorganic composition was the significant influence on the bed agglomeration. The combustion of palm bunch showed higher in the bed agglomeration tendency than the straw combustion in every experimental condition. The defluidization was accelerated in response to the increase in bed temperature and bed particle size, and the decrease of air velocity and static bed height. In the SEM/EDS analysis, the agglomeration was attributed to the formation of the molten substance rich in silicon and fuel derived potassium, likely the potassium silicate compounds, which presented as the adhesive coating and bonding layer. The filling of irregularity on the bed particle surface by the liquid material to form the adhesive layer was dominated by the collision with burning fuel particles. The propagation/reaction inward the bed particles by some reactive constituents was found. The thermodynamic analysis on the ternary phase diagram corroborated that the formation of the liquid material derived from the fuel inorganic elements controlled the agglomeration; the large melt fraction in the adhesive materials at the observed bed temperature range (62–99%) was estimated. - Highlights: • The bed agglomeration was investigated during the FBC of palm bunch and rice straw. • Bed temperature, sand size, air

  2. Combustor bulkhead heat shield assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeisser, M.H.

    1990-06-19

    This paper describes a gas turbine engine having an annular combustion chamber defined by an annular, inner liner, a concentric outer liner, and an upstream annular combustor head, wherein the head includes a radially extending bulkhead having circumferentially distributed openings for each receiving an individual fuel nozzle therethrough. It comprises: a segmented heat shield assembly, disposed between the combustion chamber interior and the bulkhead, including generally planar, sector shaped heat shields, each shield abutting circumferentially with two next adjacent shields and extending radially from proximate the inner liner to proximate the outer liner, the plurality of shields collectively defining an annular protective barrier, and wherein each sector shaped shield further includes an opening, corresponding to one of the bulkhead nozzle openings for likewise receiving the corresponding nozzle therethrough, the shield opening further including an annular lip extending toward the bulkhead and being received within the bulkhead opening, raised ridges on the shield backside, the ridges contacting the facing bulkhead surface and defining a flow path for a flow of cooling air issuing from a sized supply opening disposed in the bulkhead, the flow path running ultimately from adjacent the annular lip to the edges of each shield segment, wherein the raised edges extend fully along the lateral, circumferentially spaced edges of each shield segment and about the adjacent shield segments wherein the raised ridges further extend circumferentially between the annular lip and the abutting edge ridges.

  3. Combustion of biomass-derived, low caloric value, fuel gas in a gasturbine combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andries, J.; Hoppesteyn, P.D.J.; Hein, K.R.G. [Technische Univ. Delf (Netherlands)

    1998-09-01

    The use of biomass and biomass/coal mixtures to produce electricity and heat reduces the net emissions of CO{sub 2}, contributes to the restructuring of the agricultural sector, helps to reduce the waste problem and saves finite fossil fuel reserves. Pressurised fluidised bed gasification followed by an adequate gas cleaning system, a gas turbine and a steam turbine, is a potential attractive way to convert biomass and biomass/coal mixtures. To develop and validate mathematical models, which can be used to design and operate Biomass-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (BIGCC) systems, a Process Development Unit (PPDU) with a maximum thermal capacity of 1.5 MW{sub th}, located at the Laboratory for Thermal Power Engineering of the Delft University of Technology in The Netherlands is being used. The combustor forms an integral part of this facility. Recirculated flue gas is used to cool the wall of the combustor. (orig.)

  4. FBC desulfurization process using coal with low sulfur content, high oxidizing conditions and metamorphic limestones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Bragança

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A metamorphic limestone and a dolomite were employed as SO2 sorbents in the desulfurization of gas from coal combustion. The tests were performed in a fluidized bed reactor on a bench and pilot scale. Several parameters such as bed temperature, sorbent type, and sorbent particle size at different Ca/S molar ratios were analyzed. These parameters were evaluated for the combustion of coal with low-sulfur/high-ash content, experimental conditions of high air excess and high O2 level in fluidization air. Under these conditions, typical of furnaces, few published data can be found. In this work, a medium level of desulfurization efficiency (~60% for Ca/S = 2 was obtained.

  5. System and method for controlling a combustor assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2013-03-05

    A system and method for controlling a combustor assembly are disclosed. The system includes a combustor assembly. The combustor assembly includes a combustor and a fuel nozzle assembly. The combustor includes a casing. The fuel nozzle assembly is positioned at least partially within the casing and includes a fuel nozzle. The fuel nozzle assembly further defines a head end. The system further includes a viewing device configured for capturing an image of at least a portion of the head end, and a processor communicatively coupled to the viewing device, the processor configured to compare the image to a standard image for the head end.

  6. Study of instrumentation needs for process control and safety in coal fluidized-bed combustion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzenberg, C.L.; Griggs, K.E.; Henry, R.F.; Podolski, W.F.

    1981-02-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the current state of the art of instrumentation for planned and operating fluidized-bed combustion systems. This study is intended to identify instrumentation needs and serve as a data base for projects to develop this instrumentation. A considerable number of needs for measurements for which presently available instrumentation is not suitable were reported by respondents. The identified deficiencies are presented with the associated physical parameter ranges for FBC processes. New techniques and instrumentation under development, as well as some available alternative instruments, are discussed briefly. Also, newly instituted mechanisms for technical information exchange on instrumentation for fossil energy applications are identified. Development of instruments to meet the identified measurement deficiencies is recommended in order to ensure the feasibility of automatic control of large-scale fluidized-bed combustion systems, and to advance the state of the art of fluidized-bed combustion technology.

  7. Active Control of High-Frequency Combustor Instability Demonstrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2003-01-01

    To reduce the environmental impact of aerospace propulsion systems, extensive research is being done in the development of lean-burning (low fuel-to-air ratio) combustors that can reduce emissions throughout the mission cycle. However, these lean-burning combustors have an increased susceptibility to thermoacoustic instabilities-high-pressure oscillations much like sound waves that can cause severe high-frequency vibrations in the combustor. These pressure waves can fatigue the combustor components and even the downstream turbine blades. This can significantly decrease the combustor and turbine safe operating life. Thus, suppression of the thermoacoustic combustor instabilities is an enabling technology for lean, low-emissions combustors. Under the Propulsion and Power Program, the NASA Glenn Research Center in partnership with Pratt & Whitney, United Technologies Research Center, and Georgia Institute of Technology is developing technologies for the active control of combustion instabilities.

  8. Flashback Arrestor for LPP, Low NOx Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Gil; Lee, Chi-Ming

    1998-01-01

    Lean premixed, prevaporized (LPP) high temperature combustor designs as explored for the Advanced Subsonic Transport (AST) and High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) combustors can achieve low NO(x), emission levels. An enabling device is needed to arrest flashback and inhibit preignition at high power conditions and during transients (surge and rapid spool down). A novel flashback arrestor design has demonstrated the ability to arrest flashback and inhibit preignition in a 4.6 cm diameter tubular reactor at full power inlet temperatures (725 C) using Jet-A fuel at 0.4 less than or equal To phi less than or equal to 3.5. Several low pressure loss (0.2 to 0.4% at 30 m/s) flashback arrestor designs were developed which arrested flashback at all of the test conditions. Flame holding was also inhibited off the flash arrestor face or within the downstream tube even velocities (less than or equal to 3 to 6 m/s), thus protecting the flashback arrestor and combustor components. Upstream flow conditions influence the specific configuration based on using either a 45% or 76% upstream geometric blockage. Stationary, lean premixed dry low NO(x) gas turbine combustors would also benefit from this low pressure drop flashback arrestor design which can be easily integrated into new and existing designs.

  9. Kinetic behavior of solid particles in fluidized beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kono, H.O.

    1990-06-01

    The overall objectives of this project are to develop experimental techniques for measuring the forces of fluidized particles, and to predict the solid-gas performance in fluidized beds by using data analysis system, and by elucidating the intrinsic mechanism of erosion and attrition phenomena in fluidized beds. The reduction of erosion and attrition rates is one of the critical engineering problems for the design and operation of fluidized bed combustors. Specifically, the objectives are to: (1) develop the experimental techniques to measure the forces of solid particles prevailing in fluidized beds: (2) measure and characterize the forces of solid particles in various types of fluidized beds with various configurations (conventional and spouted fluidized beds) and with different scales (10, 20, and 30cm) under various fluidization conditions (particle size, bed aspect ratio and gas velocity); (3) find and verify the mechanism of erosion rates of in-bed tubes and attrition rates of fluidized particles by forces of solid particles in fluidized beds. We developed three different kinds of measurement methods, i.e., fracture sensitive sensor, piezoelectric sensor and gas pressure fluctuation method. By using these methods the exact forces of solid particles, including the transient corporate in fluidized beds, were systematically measured. Simultaneously, the erosion rates of in-bed tubes and attrition rates of fluidized particles were measured. 69 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Advanced Low NOx Combustors for Aircraft Gas Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, P. B.; White, D. J.; Shekleton, J. R.; Butze, H. F.

    1976-01-01

    A test rig program was conducted with the objective of evaluating and minimizing the exhaust emissions, in particular NOx, of two advanced aircraft combustor concepts at a simulated high-altitude cruise condition. The two pre-mixed, lean-reaction designs are known as the Jet Induced Circulation (JIC) combustor and the Vortex Air Blast (VAB) combustor and were rig tested in the form of reverse flow can combustors in the 0.13 ni (5.0 in. ) size range. Various configuration modifications were applied to the JIC and VAB combustor designs in an effort to reduce the emissions levels. The VAB combustor demonstrated a NOx level of 1.11 gm NO2/kg fuel with essentially 100 percent combustion efficiency at the simulated cruise combustor condition of 507 kPa (5 atm), 833 K (1500 R), inlet pressure and temperature respectively, and 1778 K (3200 R) outlet temperature on Jet-Al fuel. These configuration screening tests were carried out on essentially reaction zones only, in order to simplify the construction and modification of the combustors and to uncouple any possible effects on the emissions produced by the dilution flow. Tests were also conducted however at typical engine idle conditions on both combustors equipped with dilution ports in order to better define the problem areas involved in the operation of such concepts over a complete engine operational envelope. Versions of variable-geometry, JIC and VAB annular combustors are proposed.

  11. SEWAGE SLUDGE COMBUSTION IN A SPOUTED BED CASCADE SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mirko Barz

    2003-01-01

    @@ In modern society, sewage is disposed of in a two-step process: it is first made into granules and the sewage sludge granules are then burned in an appropriate combustor. The present paper describes a spouted bed cascade system for sewage sludge combustion developed at the Technical University of Berlin at the turn of the present century. Combustion results in the recovery of the combustible matters of the sewage in the form of thermal energy.

  12. Importance of fragmentation on the steady state combustion of wood char in a bubbling fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinho, Carlos [Universidade do Porto (CEFT/FEUP), Porto (Portugal). Faculdade de Engenharia. Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte], E-mail: ctp@fe.up.pt

    2010-07-01

    A simple mathematical model for the analysis of the steady state behavior of a bubbling fluidized bed burner is presented, with the main intention of evaluating the importance of the primary fragmentation of fuel particles on the performance of this type of burners. This model has pedagogical advantages because of its simplicity and easiness of application to the analysis of realistic situations. The model is based upon the classical models used for the study of batch combustion processes in fluidized bed reactors. Experimental data from studies of fluidized bed combustion of portuguese vegetable chars are used to support the analysis of the performance of a 1 m diameter fluidized bed combustor. (author)

  13. Fuel property effects in stirred combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Soot formation in strongly backmixed combustion was investigated using the jet-stirred combustor (JSC). This device provided a combustion volume in which temperature and combustion were uniform. It simulated the recirculating characteristics of the gas turbine primary zone; it was in this zone where mixture conditions were sufficiently rich to produce soot. Results indicate that the JSC allows study of soot formation in an aerodynamic situation revelant to gas turbines.

  14. Low NOx Fuel Flexible Combustor Integration Project Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Joanne C.; Chang, Clarence T.; Lee, Chi-Ming; Kramer, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The Integrated Technology Demonstration (ITD) 40A Low NOx Fuel Flexible Combustor Integration development is being conducted as part of the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project. Phase 2 of this effort began in 2012 and will end in 2015. This document describes the ERA goals, how the fuel flexible combustor integration development fulfills the ERA combustor goals, and outlines the work to be conducted during project execution.

  15. Low Emissions RQL Flametube Combustor Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Clarence T.; Holdeman, James D.

    2001-01-01

    The overall objective of this test program was to demonstrate and evaluate the capability of the Rich-burn/Quick-mix/Lean-burn (RQL) combustor concept for HSR applications. This test program was in support of the Pratt & Whitney and GE Aircraft Engines HSR low-NOx Combustor Program. Collaborative programs with Parker Hannifin Corporation and Textron Fuel Systems resulted in the development and testing of the high-flow low-NOx rich-burn zone fuel-to-air ratio research fuel nozzles used in this test program. Based on the results obtained in this test program, several conclusions can be made: (1) The RQL tests gave low NOx and CO emissions results at conditions corresponding to HSR cruise. (2) The Textron fuel nozzle design with optimal multiple partitioning of fuel and air circuits shows potential of providing an acceptable uniform local fuel-rich region in the rich burner. (3) For the parameters studied in this test series, the tests have shown T3 is the dominant factor in the NOx formation for RQL combustors. As T3 increases from 600 to 1100 F, EI(NOx) increases approximately three fold. (4) Factors which appear to have secondary influence on NOx formation are P4, T4, infinity(sub rb), V(sub ref,ov). (5) Low smoke numbers were measured for infinity(sub rb) of 2.0 at P4 of 120 psia.

  16. Simulation of Combustor-Turbine Interaction in a Jet Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Klapdor, Eva Verena

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, “Simulation of Combustor-Turbine Interaction in a Jet Engine”, the theory and the simulation of combustor-turbine interaction in a jet engine are presented. The objective of this thesis was the extension of a given incompressible CFD-code for the calculation of the compressible, reactive flow inside the combustor and the adjacent stator of a jet engine. The extended solver shall be used to investigate possible interaction between combustor and turbine of a jet engine....

  17. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume V. Appendix: stability and instability in fluidized-bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    This document is the fifth of the seven volumes series of our Phase II Final Report. The material developed in this volume has not been incorporated into the system model. It will be used as a precursor of a transient model to be developed in the next phase of our model work. There have been various fluidized combustor models of differing complexity and scope published in the literature. Most of these models have identified and predicted - often in satisfactory agreement with results from pilot units - the key steady state combustor characteristics such as the mass of carbon in the bed (carbon loading), the combustion efficiency, the sulfur retention by the solid sorbent and the pollutant (mainly NO/sub x/) emissions. These models, however, cannot be in most instances successfully used to study the extinction and ignition characteristics of the combustor because they are isothermal in structure in the sense that the bed temperature is not an output variable but rather an input one and must be a priori specified. In order to remedy these inadequacies of the previous models, we here present a comprehensive account of the formulation and some typical results of a new nonisothermal model which has been developed in order to study, among other things, the ignition and extinction characteristics of the AFBC units. This model is able to predict the temperature patterns in the bed, the carbon loading, the combustion efficiency and the O/sub 2/ and CO concentration profiles in the combustor for the different design or operational characteristics.

  18. Effect of fluidized bed combustion ashes used in metal polluted soil remediation on life history traits of the oligochaeta Eisenia andrei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grumiaux, F.; Demuynck, S.; Schikorski, D.; Lemiere, S.; Vandenbulcke, F.; Lepretre, A. [University of Science Technology in Lille, Villeneuve Dascq (France)

    2007-11-15

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the effects of two fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ashes (silico-aluminous and sulfo-calcical) used as immobilizing agents for metals in contaminated soils, on the earthworm Eisenia andrei life history traits in OECD artificial soil. A significant mortality of either juveniles or mature worms was observed following silico-aluminous (> 60% mortality) or sulfo-calcical (100% mortality) ashes addition. This effect was due to a transient pH rise of soil. No mortality occurred when worms were introduced eight weeks after soils were amended with FBC ashes. However, growth rates were significantly reduced for both treatments and both ashes exhibited sub-lethal effects likely to affect population dynamics. Thus, cocoon productions were reduced for both amendments and no hatching was recorded with suffo-calcical ashes. Most of the harmful effects observed on worms growth and reproduction could be attributed to an increase of pH and/or an osmotic disturbance caused by FBC ashes, especially suffo-calcical ones.

  19. Variable volume combustor with pre-nozzle fuel injection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keener, Christopher Paul; Johnson, Thomas Edward; McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin; Ostebee, Heath Michael

    2016-09-06

    The present application provides a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of fuel nozzles, a pre-nozzle fuel injection system supporting the fuel nozzles, and a linear actuator to maneuver the fuel nozzles and the pre-nozzle fuel injection system.

  20. Active Control of Combustor Instability Shown to Help Lower Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2002-01-01

    In a quest to reduce the environmental impact of aerospace propulsion systems, extensive research is being done in the development of lean-burning (low fuel-to-air ratio) combustors that can reduce emissions throughout the mission cycle. However, these lean-burning combustors have an increased susceptibility to thermoacoustic instabilities, or high-pressure oscillations much like sound waves, that can cause severe high-frequency vibrations in the combustor. These pressure waves can fatigue the combustor components and even the downstream turbine blades. This can significantly decrease the safe operating life of the combustor and turbine. Thus, suppression of the thermoacoustic combustor instabilities is an enabling technology for lean, low-emissions combustors. Under the Aerospace Propulsion and Power Base Research and Technology Program, the NASA Glenn Research Center, in partnership with Pratt & Whitney and United Technologies Research Center, is developing technologies for the active control of combustion instabilities. With active combustion control, the fuel is pulsed to put pressure oscillations into the system. This cancels out the pressure oscillations being produced by the instabilities. Thus, the engine can have lower pollutant emissions and long life.The use of active combustion instability control to reduce thermo-acoustic-driven combustor pressure oscillations was demonstrated on a single-nozzle combustor rig at United Technologies. This rig has many of the complexities of a real engine combustor (i.e., an actual fuel nozzle and swirler, dilution cooling, etc.). Control was demonstrated through modeling, developing, and testing a fuel-delivery system able to the 280-Hz instability frequency. The preceding figure shows the capability of this system to provide high-frequency fuel modulations. Because of the high-shear contrarotating airflow in the fuel injector, there was some concern that the fuel pulses would be attenuated to the point where they would

  1. Parameters controlling nitric oxide emissions from gas turbine combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, J. B.; Mikus, T.

    1973-01-01

    Nitric oxide forms in the primary zone of gas turbine combustors where the burnt gas composition is close to stoichiometric and gas temperatures are highest. It was found that combustor air inlet conditions, mean primary zone fuel-air ratio, residence time, and the uniformity of the primary zone are the most important variables affecting nitric oxide emissions. Relatively simple models of the flow in a gas turbine combustor, coupled with a rate equation for nitric oxide formation via the Zeldovich mechanism are shown to correlate the variation in measured NOx emissions. Data from a number of different combustor concepts are analyzed and shown to be in reasonable agreement with predictions. The NOx formation model is used to assess the extent to which an advanced combustor concept, the NASA swirl can, has produced a lean well-mixed primary zone generally believed to be the best low NOx emissions burner type.

  2. Experimental evaluation of combustor concepts for burning broad property fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, J. M.; Ekstedt, E. E.; Dodds, W. J.; Shayeson, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    A baseline CF6-50 combustor and three advanced combustor designs were evaluated to determine the effects of combustor design on operational characteristics using broad property fuels. Three fuels were used in each test: Jet A, a broad property 13% hydrogen fuel, and a 12% hydrogen fuel blend. Testing was performed in a sector rig at true cruise and simulated takeoff conditions for the CF6-50 engine cycle. The advanced combustors (all double annular, lean dome designs) generally exhibited lower metal temperatures, exhaust emissions, and carbon buildup than the baseline CF6-50 combustor. The sensitivities of emissions and metal temperatures to fuel hydrogen content were also generally lower for the advanced designs. The most promising advanced design used premixing tubes in the main stage. This design was chosen for additional testing in which fuel/air ratio, reference velocity, and fuel flow split were varied.

  3. Lean stability augmentation for premixing, prevaporizing combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcvey, J. B.; Kennedy, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to investigate techniques for improving the lean combustion limits of premixing, prevaporizing combustors applicable to gas turbine engine main burners. Augmented flameholders employing recessed perforated plates, catalyzed tube bundles, and configurations in which pilot fuel was injected into the wakes of V-gutters or perforated plates were designed and tested. Stable operation of the piloted designs was achieved at equivalence ratios as low as 0.25; NOx emissions of less than 1.0 g/kg at simulated turbine engine cruise conditions were obtained. A piloted perforated plate employing four percent pilot fuel flow produced the best performance while meeting severe NOx constraints.

  4. Pressure Fluctuations as a Diagnostic Tool for Fluidized Beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ethan Bure; Joel R. Schroeder; Ramon De La Cruz; Robert C. Brown

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the origin of pressure fluctuations in fluidized bed systems. The study assessed the potential for using pressure fluctuations as an indicator of fluidized bed hydrodynamics in both laboratory scale cold-models and industrial scale boilers. Both bubbling fluidized beds and circulating fluidized beds were evaluated. Testing including both cold-flow models and laboratory and industrial-scale combustors operating at elevated temperatures. The study yielded several conclusions on the relationship of pressure fluctuations and hydrodynamic behavior in fluidized beds. The study revealed the importance of collecting sufficiently long data sets to capture low frequency (on the order of 1 Hz) pressure phenomena in fluidized beds. Past research has tended toward truncated data sets collected with high frequency response transducers, which miss much of the spectral structure of fluidized bed hydrodynamics. As a result, many previous studies have drawn conclusions concerning hydrodynamic similitude between model and prototype fluidized beds that is insupportable from the low resolution data presented.

  5. Analytical fuel property effects: Small combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The study performed in Phase 1 of this program applies only to a T700/CT7 engine family type combustor functioning in the engine as defined and does not necessarily apply to other cycles or combustors of differing stoichiometry. The study was not extended to any of the fuel delivery accessories such as pumps or control systems, nor was there any investigation of potential systems problems which might arise as a consequence of abnormal properties such as density which might affect delivery schedules or aromatics content which might affect fuel system seals. The T700/CT7 engine is a front drive turboshaft or turboprop engine in the 1500-1800 shp (1120-1340 kW) class as currently configured with highpower core flows of about 10 lb/sec (4.5 kg/sec). It employs a straight-through annular combustion system less than 5 in. (12.5 cm) in length utilizing a machined ring film cooled construction and twelve low-pressure air blast fuel injectors. Commercial and Naval versions employ two 0.5 Joule capacitive discharge surface gap ignitors.

  6. Azimuthally forced flames in an annular combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, Nicholas; Dawson, James; Mastorakos, Epaminondas

    2015-11-01

    Thermoacoustic instabilities are more likely to occur in lean burn combustion systems, making their adoption both difficult and costly. At present, our knowledge of such phenomena is insufficient to produce an inherently stable combustor by design, and therefore an improved understanding of these instabilities has become the focus of a significant research effort. Recent experimental and numerical studies have demonstrated that the symmetry of annular chambers permit a range of self-excited azimuthal modes to be generated in annular geometry, which can make the study of isolated modes difficult. While acoustic forcing is common in single flame experiments, no equivalent for forced azimuthal modes in an annular chamber have been demonstrated. The present investigation focuses on the novel application of acoustic forcing to a laboratory scale annular combustor, in order to generate azimuthal standing wave modes at a prescribed frequency and amplitude. The results focus on the ability of the method to isolate the mode of oscillation using experimental pressure and high speed OH* measurements. The successful excitation of azimuthal modes demonstrated represents an important step towards improving our fundamental understanding of this phenomena in practically relevant geometry.

  7. CIRCULATING MOVING BED COMBUSTION PROOF OF CONCEPT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jukkola, Glen

    2010-06-30

    Circulating Moving Bed (CMB) combustion technology has its roots in traditional circulating fluidized bed technology and involves a novel method of solid fuel combustion and heat transfer. CMB technology represents a step change in improved performance and cost relative to conventional PC and FBC boilers. The CMB heat exchanger preheats the energy cycle working fluid, steam or air, to the high temperature levels required in systems for advanced power generation. Unique features of the CMB are the reduction of the heat transfer surfaces by about 60% as a result of the enhanced heat transfer rates, flexibility of operation, and about 30% lower cost over existing technology. The CMB Phase I project ran from July 2001 through March 2003. Its objective was to continue development of the CMB technology with a series of proof of concept tests. The tests were conducted at a scale that provided design data for scale up to a demonstration plant. These objectives were met by conducting a series of experiments in ALSTOM Power’s Multi-use Test Facility (MTF). The MTF was modified to operate under CMB conditions of commercial interest. The objective of the tests were to evaluate gas-to-solids heat transfer in the upper furnace, assess agglomeration in the high temperature CMB bubbling bed, and evaluate solids-to-tube heat transfer in the moving bed heat exchanger. The Phase I program results showed that there are still some significant technical uncertainties that needed to be resolved before the technology can be confidently scaled up for a successful demonstration plant design. Work remained in three primary areas: • scale up of gas to solid heat transfer • high temperature finned surface design • the overall requirements of mechanical and process design. The CMB Phase II workscope built upon the results of Phase I and specifically addressed the remaining technical uncertainties. It included a scaled MTF heat transfer test to provide the necessary data to scale up gas

  8. Experimental study of a high-efficiency low-emission surface combustor-heater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface combustor-heater is a combined combustion/heat-transfer device in which the heat-exchange surfaces are embedded in a stationary bed of refractory material where gaseous fuel is burned. Because of intensive heat radiation from the hot solid particles and enhanced heat convection from the gas flow to the heat-exchange tubes, heat transfer is significantly intensified. Removing heat simultaneously with the combustion process has the benefit of reducing the combustion temperature, which suppresses NOx formation. A basic experimental study was conducted on a 60-kW bench-scale surface combustor-heater with two rows of water-cooled tube coils to evaluate its performance and explore the mechanism of combined convective-radiative heat transfer and its interaction with combustion in the porous matrix. Combustion stability in the porous matrix, heat-transfer rates, emissions, and pressure drop through the unit have been investigated for the variable parameters of operation and unit configurations. Experimental results have demonstrated that high combustion intensity (up to 2.5 MW/m2), high heat-transfer rates (up to 310 kW/m2), high density of energy conversion (up to 8 MW/m3), as well as ultra-low emissions (NOx and CO as low as 15 vppm*) have been achieved. The excellent performance of the test unit and the extensive data obtained from the present experimental study provide the basis for further development of high-efficiency and ultra low-emission water heaters, boilers, and process heaters based on the surface combustor-heater concept. 4 refs., 16 figs

  9. Production of renewable energy from biomass and waste materials using fluidized bed technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaysian industries generate substantial amount of biomass and waste materials such as wastes from agricultural and wood based industries, sludge waste from waste-water treatment plants and solid waste from municipals. Incinerating these waste materials not only produces renewable energy, but also solving their disposal problems. Fluidized bed combustors are widely used for incinerating these biomass materials. The significant advantages of fluidized bed incineration include simple design, efficient, and ability to reduce air pollution emissions. This paper discusses the opportunities and challenges of producing the green energy from biomass materials using the fluidized bed technologies. (Author)

  10. Flow visualization studies of a toroidal low NOx combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeath, Giorgio Marco

    1999-11-01

    Rapid mixing of jet fuel and air was simulated in a toroidal combustor for low nitric oxide (NOx) applications. Flow visualization results and laser doppler velocimetry (LDV) measurements showed agreement with the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results which were obtained using FLUENT code. The combustor consisted of Multiple-Combustion Zones separated by baffles. The mixing effectiveness was estimated by the degree of uniformity of the temperature distribution at the combustor exit. A theoretical method for determining nitric oxide emissions from a non-premixed combustor under nonequilibrium conditions was developed. This method was compared with published theoretical results and experimental data. The method allows for parametric examination of combustion parameters to minimize nitric oxide emissions. The effects of design parameters such as combustion geometry, baffle arrangement and fuel injection techniques were also determined using FLUENT code. Several design modifications and variations are proposed for mixing enhancement and NOx reduction. An examination of combustor liner and shell materials using a heat loss computer program gave useful insight into the practical design of a high speed civil transport (HSCT) jet combustor---e.g., thickness, heat loss, slip stream velocity, material type and position, and surface temperature. A HSCT combustor lined with ceramic composites must withstand 18,000 hours (2 years) at a 3,000 F operating temperature.

  11. Non-linear dynamics in pulse combustor: A review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sirshendu Mondal; Achintya Kukhopadhyay; Swarnendu Sen

    2015-03-01

    The state of the art of non-linear dynamics applied to pulse combustor theoretically and experimentally is reviewed. Pulse combustors are a class of air-breathing engines in which pulsations in combustion are utilized to improve the performance. As no analytical solution can be obtained for most of the nonlinear systems, the whole set of solutions can be investigated with the help of dynamical system theory. Many studies have been carried out on pulse combustors whose dynamics include limit cycle behaviour, Hopf bifurcation and period-doubling bifurcation. The dynamic signature has also been used for early prediction of extinction.

  12. Exhaust emissions of a double annular combustor: Parametric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    A full scale double-annular ram-induction combustor designed for Mach 3.0 cruise operation was tested. Emissions of oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, and smoke were measured over a range of combustor operating variables including reference velocity, inlet air temperature and pressure, and exit average temperature. ASTM Jet-A fuel was used for these tests. An equation is provided relating oxides of nitrogen emissions as a function of the combustor, operating variables. A small effect of radial fuel staging on reducing exhaust emissions (which were originally quite low) is demonstrated.

  13. 煤和垃圾衍生燃料循环流化床混烧的试验研究%Experimental Investigation on Co-firing of Coal and Refuse-derived Fuel in a Pilot-scale Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柏继松; 余春江; 李廉明; 李兴亮; 王勤辉; 骆仲泱

    2012-01-01

    Co-firing of coal and refuse derived fuel(RDF) were investigated using a thermogravimetric analyzer(TGA) and a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed combustor(CFB).Results obtained in TGA experiment show that,during co-firing process,coal and RDF can largely maintain their own combustion characteristics,while the addition of RDF significantly improve the combustion performance of coal.The CFB experiment shows that,compared to coal combustion,co-firing makes the axial temperature distribution more uniform;The addition of RDF reduce the CO,NO,N2O,SO2 emissions,but it greatly increase the HCl concentration in flue gas;The Ca-based materials contained in RDF can remove SO2 through sulfate reaction,while the presence of HCl promotes this kind of desulfurization reaction;During co-firing conditions,with the bed temperature increase,not only the conversion of fuel N/S/Cl to gas pollutants increase,but also the SO2 and HCl removal reactions by Ca-based substances are inhibited,therefore,the NO,SO2,HCl concentration in flue gas increase.%分别在热重分析仪和0.5MW循环流化床燃烧系统上进行了煤和垃圾衍生燃料混烧实验。热重试验表明:混烧过程中,两者基本上保持各自的燃烧特性,同时垃圾衍生燃料的加入能显著提高煤粉的燃烧性能。循环流化床试验表明:相对于煤粉单独燃烧,混烧能使整个炉膛的温度分布更均匀;垃圾衍生燃料的加入降低了CO、NO、N2O、SO2的排放,但却大大增加了烟气中HCl的浓度;垃圾衍生燃料中的钙基物质能对SO2起到脱除作用,同时HCl的存在会促进钙基物质与SO2的反应;在混烧情况下,随着床层温度的升高,N、S、Cl等元素对气相污染物的转化率增加,同时,钙基物质对酸性气体SO2、HCl的脱除反应受到抑制,因此烟气中的NO、SO2、HCl等污染物浓度增加。

  14. Co-combustion of automotive shredder residue (ASR) and sewage sludge with a mixture of industrial and household waste in an 20MW fluidized bed combustor; Samfoerbraenning av bilfluff, roetslam och avfall i en 20 MW fluidbaeddpanna - Studier av braenslesammansaettningens paaverkan paa belaeggningsbildning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskilsson, David; Johansson, Andreas; Johansson, Linda; Wikstroem-Blomqvist, Evalena

    2007-07-01

    In order to prevent a further increased use of resources and to decrease the environmental impact from landfills, organic wastes are today diverted towards material and energy recovery. This creates a waste market with an increasing number of waste fractions that needs to be treated properly. As an example, in Sweden it has recently been prohibited to landfill source separated combustible waste (2002) and organic waste (2005). Wastes as automotive shredder residue (ASR) and sewage sludge can no longer be landfilled and needs to be either material or energy recovered, which challenge the waste treatment sector. This work investigates the effects of ASR and sewage sludge co-combustion in a 20 MW Energy-from-Waste plant (bubbling fluidised bed). The long term objective of the work is to increase the fuel flexibility, the boiler availability and the power production. This report focus on boiler operation and combustion performance in terms of agglomeration, deposit rates and emissions. In addition to the tests with ASR and sewage sludge, repeated measurements were performed during normal load as a reference. The results show that the co-combusted fractions of ASR and sewage sludge, which on mass basis constituted 6 % and 15 % respectively, did not increase the risk for agglomeration or deposits on heat-exchanging surfaces. Instead, compared to the two reference cases, the deposit rates decreased when sewage sludge was added. Only minor variation in the emissions was seen between the different cases. The levels of I-TEQs were far below the legislated values in all cases

  15. Low NOx heavy fuel combustor concept program

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D. J.; Kubasco, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    Three simulated coal gas fuels based on hydrogen and carbon monoxide were tested during an experimental evaluation with a rich lean can combustor: these were a simulated Winkler gas, Lurgi gas and Blue Water gas. All three were simulated by mixing together the necessary pure component species, to levels typical of fuel gases produced from coal. The Lurgi gas was also evaluated with ammonia addition. Fuel burning in a rich lean mode was emphasized. Only the Blue Water gas, however, could be operated in such fashion. This showed that the expected NOx signature form could be obtained, although the absolute values of NOx were above the 75 ppm goals for most operating conditions. Lean combustion produced very low NOx well below 75 ppm with the Winkler and Lurgi gases. In addition, these low levels were not significantly impacted by changes in operating conditions.

  16. A variable geometry combustor for broadened properties fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, W. J.; Fear, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    A program was conducted to design and develop a variable geometry combustor, sized for the cycle and envelope of a large commercial turbofan engine. The combustor uses a variable area swirl cup to control stoichiometry in the primary combustion zone. Potential advantages of this design include improved capability to burn non-standard fuels, short system length, and increased operating temperature range for advanced high performance engine cycles. After considerable development, key program emissons and performance goals were met with the variable geometry combustor. Primary development efforts were to evolve improved variable swirl cup configurations. In particular, air leakage through the variable area swirl cup had a strong effect on low power emissions and performance, while smoke level at high power was affected by features for improved mixing of the fuel and swirler air flow. Additional design and development is still needed to evolve a practical variable geometry combustor.

  17. Investigation of a low NOx full-scale annular combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    An atmospheric test program was conducted to evaluate a low NOx annular combustor concept suitable for a supersonic, high-altitude aircraft application. The lean premixed combustor, known as the vortex air blast (VAB) concept, was tested as a 22.0-cm diameter model in the early development phases to arrive at basic design and performance criteria. Final demonstration testing was carried out on a full scale combustor of 0.66-m diameter. Variable geometry dilution ports were incorporated to allow operation of the combustor across the range of conditions between idle (T(in) = 422 K, T(out) = 917 K) and cruise (T(in) = 833 K, T(out) - 1778 K). Test results show that the design could meet the program NOx goal of 1.0 g NO2/kg fuel at a one-atmospheric simulated cruise condition.

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organic matter associated to particulate matter emitted from atmospheric fluidized bed coal combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and the organic matter (OM) content associated with particulate matter (PM) emissions from atmospheric fluidized bed coal combustion have been studied. The two main aims of the work have been (a) to study OM and PAH emissions as a function of the coal fluidized bed combustion (FBC) variables in solid phase and (b) to check if there is any correlation between OM and PAH contained in the PM. The combustion was carried out in a laboratory scale plant at different combustion conditions: temperature, percentage of oxygen excess, and total air flow. PAH associated on the particulate matter have been analyzed by fluorescence spectroscopy in the synchronous mode (FS) after PM extraction by sonication with dimethylformamide (DMF). It can be concluded that there is not a direct relationship between the OM content and the PAH supported in the PM emitted. In addition, neither PM or OM show dependence between themselves

  19. Development program on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion. Annual report, July 1, 1974--June 30, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, G.J.; Cunningham, P.; Fischer, J.

    1975-07-01

    The feasibility of using fluidized-bed combustors in power and steam plants is being evaluated. The concept involves burning fuels such as coal in a fluidized bed of either a naturally occurring, calcium-containing limestone or dolomite or in a synthetically prepared calcium-containing stone. The calcium oxide in the stone reacts with the sulfur released during combustion to form calcium sulfate, which remains in the bed, thus decreasing the level of SO/sub 2/ in the flue gas. Levels of NO/sub x/ in the flue gas are also low. The effect of operating variables and type of stone on the levels of SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ is being determined. Behavior of trace elements during combustion has been preliminarily evaluated. The properties of a fluidized bed at minimum fluidization at different temperatures and pressures have been determined. The CaSO/sub 4/ produced in the combustion process is regenerated to CaO for reuse in the combustor by reductive decomposition at 1095/sup 0/C (2000/sup 0/F). The effects of operating variables on sulfur release during regeneration are being evaluated. Another regeneration process, solid-solid reaction of CaSO/sub 4/ with CaS, is also being investigated. Fundamental investigations of the kinetics of sulfation and regeneration reactions for the natural and synthetic stones are continuing. A model for the sulfation reaction is presented. The status of the new combustor andancillary regenerator equipment is discussed. (auth)

  20. Ignition sequence of an annular multi-injector combustor

    OpenAIRE

    Philip, Maxime; Boileau, Matthieu; Vicquelin, Ronan; Schmitt, Thomas; Durox, Daniel; Bourgoin, Jean-François; Candel, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    Ignition is a critical process in combustion systems. In aeronautical combustors, altitude relight capacities are required in case of accidental extinction of the chamber. A simultaneous study of light-round ignition in an annular multi-injector combustor has been performed on the experimental and numerical sides. This effort allows a unique comparison to assess the reliability of Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) in such a configuration. Results are presented in fluid dynamics videos.

  1. Combustion of Syngas Fuel in Gas Turbine Can Combustor

    OpenAIRE

    Chaouki Ghenai

    2010-01-01

    Numerical investigation of the combustion of syngas fuel mixture in gas turbine can combustor is presented in this paper. The objective is to understand the impact of the variability in the alternative fuel composition and heating value on combustion performance and emissions. The gas turbine can combustor is designed to burn the fuel efficiently, reduce the emissions, and lower the wall temperature. Syngas mixtures with different fuel compositions are produced through different coal and biom...

  2. Aerotrace. Measurement of particulates from an engine combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, C.D. [DRA, Farnborough (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The effect of gas turbine operating conditions, inlet temperature, pressure and overall air fuel ratio, on particulate number density has been measured. Particulate number density was found to be proportional to combustor inlet pressure and decrease with increasing combustor inlet temperature. The relationship with air fuel ratio is more complex. The mechanism of particulate loss down sample lines has been elucidated and equations are presented to predict particulate losses for stainless steel and PTFE sample lines. (author) 3 refs.

  3. CFD Analysis of Emissions for a Candidate N+3 Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmani, Kumud

    2015-01-01

    An effort was undertaken to analyze the performance of a model Lean-Direct Injection (LDI) combustor designed to meet emissions and performance goals for NASA's N+3 program. Computational predictions of Emissions Index (EINOx) and combustor exit temperature were obtained for operation at typical power conditions expected of a small-core, high pressure-ratio (greater than 50), high T3 inlet temperature (greater than 950K) N+3 combustor. Reacting-flow computations were performed with the National Combustion Code (NCC) for a model N+3 LDI combustor, which consisted of a nine-element LDI flame-tube derived from a previous generation (N+2) thirteen-element LDI design. A consistent approach to mesh-optimization, spray-modeling and kinetics-modeling was used, in order to leverage the lessons learned from previous N+2 flame-tube analysis with the NCC. The NCC predictions for the current, non-optimized N+3 combustor operating indicated a 74% increase in NOx emissions as compared to that of the emissions-optimized, parent N+2 LDI combustor.

  4. Low NOx, Lean Direct Wall Injection Combustor Concept Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacina, Robert R.; Wey, Changlie; Choi, Kyung J.

    2003-01-01

    The low-emissions combustor development at the NASA Glenn Research Center is directed toward advanced high-pressure aircraft gas turbine applications. The emphasis of this research is to reduce nitrogen oxides (NOx) at high-power conditions and to maintain carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons at their current low levels at low-power conditions. Low-NOx combustors can be classified into rich burn and lean burn concepts. Lean burn combustors can be further classified into lean-premixed-prevaporized (LPP) and lean direct injection (LDI) combustors. In both concepts, all the combustor air, except for liner cooling flow, enters through the combustor dome so that the combustion occurs at the lowest possible flame temperature. The LPP concept has been shown to have the lowest NOx emissions, but for advanced high-pressure-ratio engines, the possibly of autoignition or flashback precludes its use. LDI differs from LPP in that the fuel is injected directly into the flame zone and, thus, does not have the potential for autoignition or flashback and should have greater stability. However, since it is not premixed and prevaporized, the key is good atomization and mixing of the fuel quickly and uniformly so that flame temperatures are low and NOx formation levels are comparable to those of LPP.

  5. Thermodynamics of premixed combustion in a heat recirculating micro combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermodynamic model has been developed to evaluate exergy transfer and its destruction in the process of premixed combustion in a heat recirculating micro combustor. Exergy destruction caused by process irreversibilities is characterized by entropy generation in the process. The entropy transport equation along with the solution of temperature and species concentration fields in the wake of flame sheet assumptions have been used to determine the different components of entropy generation. The role of thermal conductivity and thickness of combustor wall, and Peclet number on transfer and destruction rate of exergy is depicted in the process of flame stabilization via heat recirculation. The entropy generations due to gas phase heat conduction and chemical reaction are identified as the major sources of exergy destruction. The total irreversibility in pre-flame region is confined only within a small distance upstream of the flame. It has been observed that the local volumetric entropy generation is higher near the axis than that near the combustor wall. The second law efficiency is almost invariant with heat loss from the combustor, Peclet number, and thermal conductivity and thickness of combustor wall. - Highlights: • Irreversibility in the combustor is mainly due to conduction and chemical reaction. • Entropy generation near the axis is higher compared to that near the wall. • Heat recirculation and process irreversibility decrease with heat loss. • The second law efficiency is almost independent of Peclet number. • Second law efficiency is almost independent of wall thermal conductivity

  6. Pollution technology program, can-annular combustor engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, R.; Fiorentino, A. J.; Greene, W.

    1976-01-01

    A Pollution Reduction Technology Program to develop and demonstrate the combustor technology necessary to reduce exhaust emissions for aircraft engines using can-annular combustors is described. The program consisted of design, fabrication, experimental rig testing and assessment of results and was conducted in three program elements. The combustor configurations of each program element represented increasing potential for meeting the 1979 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) emission standards, while also representing increasing complexity and difficulty of development and adaptation to an operational engine. Experimental test rig results indicate that significant reductions were made to the emission levels of the baseline JT8D-17 combustor by concepts in all three program elements. One of the Element I single-stage combustors reduced carbon monoxide to a level near, and total unburned hydrocarbons (THC) and smoke to levels below the 1979 EPA standards with little or no improvement in oxides of nitrogen. The Element II two-stage advanced Vorbix (vortex burning and mixing) concept met the standard for THC and achieved significant reductions in CO and NOx relative to the baseline. Although the Element III prevaporized-premixed concept reduced high power NOx below the Element II results, there was no improvement to the integrated EPA parameter relative to the Vorbix combustor.

  7. Acid mine drainage abatement from small, buried piles of tipple refuse using fluidized bed fly ash grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buried, pyrite-rich tipple refuse and pit cleanings on a reclaimed 37 acre surface coal mine site in Pennsylvania were found to be producing severe acid mine drainage (AMD). The pyritic material is located in discrete piles or pods in the backfill. The pods and the resulting contaminant plumes were initially defined using geophysical techniques and were confirmed by drilling. A fluidized bed combustion (FBC) fly ash was used as a grout in two different ways to isolate the pyritic material from water and oxygen, thus preventing AMD production. The first was pressure injecting grout directly into the buried pods to fill the void spaces within the pods and to coat the pyritic materials with a cementitious layer. Pods which would not accept the grout because of a clayey matrix were isolated from percolating water with a cap and trench seal of the grout. In certain areas, the AMD migrates to the groundwater table below the mine through fractures in the pit floor. The FBC ash grout was used in some of these areas in an attempt to seal the pit floor. A combination of geophysical mapping and monitoring wells is being used to monitor changes in the water quality. Minimal surface disturbance is required because only the sources of severe AMD production were targeted with the grout applications. Reduced costs are also possible since the FBC ash is a waste product. This methodology is designed as a true abatement technique requiring no future maintenance. The project was nearing completion at the time of this writing. This paper is an interim report

  8. Investigations into the control of agglomeration and defluidisation during fluidised-bed combustion of low-rank coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuthaluru, H.B.; Linjewile, T.M.; Zhang, D.; Manzoori, A.R. [University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-03-01

    A laboratory scale spouted bed combustor was used to study the effectiveness of various control methodologies in alleviating ash-related problems such as particle agglomeration and bed defluidisation during bed combustion of low-rank coals. The three control techniques investigated are: (1) the use of mineral additives; (2) alternative bed materials; and (3) pretreatment of coal. Mineral additives including dolomite, two clays and gibbsite, were injected into the spouted bed combustor while burning a South Australian low-rank coal at 800{degree}C. Samples of the same coal treated with Al, water washing and acid washing were also tested in the spouted bed combustor. In addition, experiments were also conducted with alternative bed materials including bauxite and calcined sillimanite. Experiments showed that the three techniques reported in this paper are effective to different extents in reducing particle agglomeration and defluidisation. Among the mineral additives tested, gibbsite and a clay additive rich in kaolinite and sillimanite were found to be most effective. The use of calcined sillimanite and bauxite as alterative bed materials extended the combustion time before defluidisation occurred by 7 and 10 times, respectively, compared to silica sand. While A1 pretreatment and water-washing were found effective for control of agglomeration and defluidisation, acid-washing did not improve the operation of the bed burning this particular coal. Al enrichment in ash coating of bed particles which suppress the formation of Na and S rich eutectics was identified as the main mechanism for prevention of agglomeration and defluidisation by these control techniques. 10 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Fluidized bed combustion research in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present 20% of the total energy consumption in Turkey is met by combustion of lignites. The amount of lignite utilization in the total energy consumption in the year 2000 is expected to double compared to the present. The prevalent characteristics of Turkish lignites are high volatile matter, moisture, ash, and sulfur contents and low calorific value. Also, there are combustion difficulties in conventional combustors associated with the low ash sintering temperatures. For these reasons, there is a major air pollution problem in the main cities of Turkey during winter months. In this paper, the authors review the fluidized bed combustion research work undertaken in Turkey in the last decade and discuss the relevant problem of volatile matter combustion, stability and design

  10. Experimental study on fuel oil combustion in circulating fluidized bed; Estudio experimental sobre la combustion de combustoleo en lecho fluidizado circulante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Rangel, Ricardo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1996-12-31

    The Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) developed a circulating fluidized bed combustor of 0.5 thermal MW unique in its type in Latin America. The Bachelor`s thesis entitled ``Experimental Study on Fuel Oil Combustion in Circulating Fluidized Bed`` was performed operating this combustor with the purpose of determining the feasibility of burning heavy fuel oil in a stable and sustained form, as well as the effect of the addition of calcium carbonate to the combustor. The results of the experimental trials showed heavy fuel oil can be burned in a circulating fluidized bed, with low sulfur dioxide emissions. During the conduction of the experiments a sulfur retention of 43% was achieved with a Ca/S relationship of 4.5. [Espanol] El Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) desarrollo un combustor de lecho fluidizado circulante de 0.5 MW termicos de potencia, unico en su tipo en Latinoamerica. La tesis de licenciatura titulada Estudio Experimental sobre la Combustion de Combustoleo en Lecho Fluidizado Circulante se realizo operando dicho combustor, con el proposito de determinar la factibilidad de quemar combustoleo pesado en forma estable y autosostenida, asi como la influencia que tiene la adicion de carbonato de calcio al lecho. Los resultados de los ensayos experimentales mostraron que se puede quemar combustoleo pesado en un lecho fluidizado circulante, con bajas emisiones de bioxido de azufre. Durante la experimentacion se logro una retencion de azufre del 43%, con una relacion Ca/S de 4.5.

  11. Flow conditioner for fuel injector for combustor and method for low-NO.sub.x combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Partha; Smith, Kenneth O.; Ritz, Frank J.

    2013-09-10

    An injector for a gas turbine combustor including a catalyst coated surface forming a passage for feed gas flow and a channel for oxidant gas flow establishing an axial gas flow through a flow conditioner disposed at least partially within an inner wall of the injector. The flow conditioner includes a length with an interior passage opening into upstream and downstream ends for passage of the axial gas flow. An interior diameter of the interior passage smoothly reduces and then increases from upstream to downstream ends.

  12. CFD simulation of hydrodynamic characteristics on pulse combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmatika, Annie Mufyda; Salihat, Efaning; Tikasari, Rachma; Widiyastuti, W.; Winardi, Sugeng

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the simulation of the combustion characteristics and performances in pulse combustor using different excess air composition and different pulse combustor geometry using CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) software Ansys FLUENT 15.0. The distribution of temperature, pressure, and fluid velocity using 2D axisymmetric with k-ɛ turbulence models. Two kind geometries of pulse combustors were selected and compared their performance. The first combustor, called geometry A has expanded tail-pipe with diameter 10 mm expanded to 20 mm with length 86 mm. The second combustor, called geometry B has cylinder tailpipe which 10 mm in diameter and 200 mm in length. Air and propane were selected as oxidizer and fuel, respectively, at temperature 27°C and pressure 1 atm with varied excess air of 0%, 23%, 200%, and 500%. The simulation result shows that the average temperature of outflow gas combustion decreased with increasing the excess air. On the other hand, the pressure amplitude increased with increasing the excess air. Amplitude of presure for excess air of 0%, 23%, 200% and 500% were 14,976.03 Pa; 26,100.19 Pa; 41,529.02 Pa; and 85,019.01 Pa, respectively. The geometry of pulse combustor affected the performance of gas combustion produced. Geometry A showed that the energy produced in the combustion cycle amounts to 538,639 to 958,639 J/kg. On the other hand, geometry B showed that the generated energy was in the range 864,502 to 1,280,814 J/kg. Combustor with geometry B provided more effective combustion performance rather than B caused by its larger heat transfer area sectional area.

  13. Core Noise: Overview of Upcoming LDI Combustor Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Fixed Wing Project. The presentation covers: the emerging importance of core noise due to turbofan design trends and its relevance to the NASA N+3 noise-reduction goal; the core noise components and the rationale for the current emphasis on combustor noise; and the current and planned research activities in the combustor-noise area. Two NASA-sponsored research programs, with particular emphasis on indirect combustor noise, "Acoustic Database for Core Noise Sources", Honeywell Aerospace (NNC11TA40T) and "Measurement and Modeling of Entropic Noise Sources in a Single-Stage Low-Pressure Turbine", U. Illinois/U. Notre Dame (NNX11AI74A) are briefly described. Recent progress in the development of CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is outlined. Combustor-design trends and the potential impacts on combustor acoustics are discussed. A NASA GRC developed nine-point lean-direct-injection (LDI) fuel injector is briefly described. The modification of an upcoming thermo-acoustic instability evaluation of the GRC injector in a combustor rig to also provide acoustic information relevant to community noise is presented. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Quiet Performance Research Theme of the Fixed Wing Project aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived community noise attributable to aircraft with minimal impact on weight and performance.

  14. Simultaneous determination of devolatilization and char burnout times during fluidized bed combustion of coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the authors investigate a method for simultaneous determination of devolatilization and char burnout times based on the analysis of CO2 emissions from a fluidized bed combustor. The technique is not-intrusive and can be performed under realistic combustion conditions. The authors' method involves batching single-sized coal sample sin a fluidized bed combustor that is heated with propane gas or other fuel. Carbon dioxide profiles versus time for the batch tests are analyzed with a linear model to obtain characteristic time constants for coal devolatilization and char combustion which can be related to total devolatilization time and burnout time for a coal sample. The authors' approach does not require special sample preparation, can be performed in actual combustion equipment, and employs standard boiler instrumentation

  15. Simultaneous determination of devolatilization and char burnout times during fluidized bed combustion of coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the authors investigate a method for simultaneous determination of devolatilization and char burnout times based on the analysis of CO2 emissions from a fluidized bed combustor. The technique is non-intrusive and can be performed under realistic combustion conditions. The authors' method involves batching single-size coal samples in a fluidized bed combustor that is heated with propane gas or other fuel. Carbon dioxide profiles versus time for the batch tests are analyzed with a linear model to obtain characteristic time constants for coal devolatilization and char combustion which can be related to total devolatilization time and burnout time for a coal sample. The authors' approach does not require special sample preparation, can be performed in actual combustion equipment and employs standard boiler instrumentation

  16. Combustion modeling in a model combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.Y.Jiang; I.Campbell; K.Su

    2007-01-01

    The flow-field of a propane-air diffusion flame combustor with interior and exterior conjugate heat transfers was numerically studied.Results obtained from four combustion models,combined with the re-normalization group (RNG) k-ε turbulence model,discrete ordinates radiation model and enhanced wall treatment are presented and discussed.The results are compared with a comprehensive database obtained from a series of experimental measurements.The flow patterns and the recirculation zone length in the combustion chamber are accurately predicted,and the mean axial velocities are in fairly good agreement with the experimental data,particularly at downstream sections for all four combustion models.The mean temperature profiles are captured fairly well by the eddy dissipation (EDS),probability density function (PDF),and laminar flamelet combustion models.However,the EDS-finite-rate combustion model fails to provide an acceptable temperature field.In general,the flamelet model illustrates little superiority over the PDF model,and to some extent the PDF model shows better performance than the EDS model.

  17. Alternate-Fueled Combustor-Sector Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Nikita T.; Thomas, Anna E.; Shouse, Dale T.; Neuroth, Craig; Hendricks, Robert C.; Lynch, Amy; Frayne, Charles W.; Stutrud, Jeffrey S.; Corporan, Edwin; Hankins, Terry

    2013-01-01

    In order to meet rapidly growing demand for fuel, as well as address environmental concerns, the aviation industry has been testing alternate fuels for performance and technical usability in commercial and military aircraft. In order to make alternate fuels (and blends) a viable option for aviation, the fuel must be able to perform at a similar or higher level than traditional petroleum fuel. They also attempt to curb harmful emissions, and therefore a truly effective alternate fuel would emit at or under the level of currently used fuel. This report analyzes data from gaseous and particulate emissions of an aircraft combustor sector. The data were evaluated at various inlet conditions, including variation in pressure and temperature, fuel-to-air ratios, and percent composition of alternate fuel. Traditional JP-8+100 data were taken as a baseline, and blends of JP-8+100 with synthetic-paraffinic-kerosene (SPK) fuel (Fischer-Tropsch (FT)) were used for comparison. Gaseous and particulate emissions, as well as flame luminosity, were assessed for differences between FT composition of 0, 50, and 100 percent. The data show that SPK fuel (an FT-derived fuel) had slightly lower harmful gaseous emissions, and smoke number information corroborated the hypothesis that SPK-FT fuels are cleaner burning fuels.

  18. 40 CFR 60.36b - Emission guidelines for municipal waste combustor fugitive ash emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... combustor fugitive ash emissions. 60.36b Section 60.36b Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... September 20, 1994 § 60.36b Emission guidelines for municipal waste combustor fugitive ash emissions. For approval, a State plan shall include requirements for municipal waste combustor fugitive ash emissions...

  19. Surviving Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor will give you specific information about the duration of your bed rest. continue How Does Bed ... reading about high-risk pregnancy issues, learn about breastfeeding or how to encourage your child's development instead. ...

  20. Gas turbine engine combustor can with trapped vortex cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrus, David Louis; Joshi, Narendra Digamber; Haynes, Joel Meier; Feitelberg, Alan S.

    2005-10-04

    A gas turbine engine combustor can downstream of a pre-mixer has a pre-mixer flowpath therein and circumferentially spaced apart swirling vanes disposed across the pre-mixer flowpath. A primary fuel injector is positioned for injecting fuel into the pre-mixer flowpath. A combustion chamber surrounded by an annular combustor liner disposed in supply flow communication with the pre-mixer. An annular trapped dual vortex cavity located at an upstream end of the combustor liner is defined between an annular aft wall, an annular forward wall, and a circular radially outer wall formed therebetween. A cavity opening at a radially inner end of the cavity is spaced apart from the radially outer wall. Air injection first holes are disposed through the forward wall and air injection second holes are disposed through the aft wall. Fuel injection holes are disposed through at least one of the forward and aft walls.

  1. Analytical fuel property effects: Small combustors, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T. G.; Monty, J. D.; Morton, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of non-standard aviation fuels on a typical small gas turbine combustor were studied and the effectiveness of design changes intended to counter the effects of these fuels was evaluated. The T700/CT7 turboprop engine family was chosen as being representative of the class of aircraft power plants desired for this study. Fuel properties, as specified by NASA, are characterized by low hydrogen content and high aromatics levels. No. 2 diesel fuel was also evaluated in this program. Results demonstrated the anticipated higher than normal smoke output and flame radiation intensity with resulting increased metal temperatures on the baseline T700 combustor. Three new designs were evaluated using the non standard fuels. The three designs incorporated enhanced cooling features and smoke reduction features. All three designs, when burning the broad specification fuels, exhibited metal temperatures at or below the baseline combustor temperatures on JP-5. Smoke levels were acceptable but higher than predicted.

  2. Municipal solid waste combustor ash demonstration program `the boathouse`

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roethel, F.J.; Breslin, V.T.

    1995-08-01

    The report presents the results of a research program designed to examine the engineering and environmental acceptability of using municipal solid waste (MSW) combustor ash as an aggregate substitute in the manufacture of construction quality cement blocks. 350 tons of MSW combustor ash was combined with Portland and Cement to form standard hollow masonary blocks. These stabilized combustor ash (SCA) blocks were used to construct a boathouse on the campus of the University at Stony Brook. Air samples collected within the boathouse were examined and compared to ambient air samples for the presence and concentrations of suspended particulate, and vapor phase PCDD/PCDF, volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds and volatile mercury. Rainwater samples following contact with the boathouse walls were collected and analyzed for the presence of trace elements. Soil samples were collected prior to and following the construction of the boathouse.

  3. Experimental Study of Ethylene Combustion in a Scramjet Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Yin-li; SONG Wen-yan; LE Jia-ling

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the ignition characteristics of gaseous ethylene hydrocarbon fuel is investigated in the supersonic clean airstreams experimental facility with a resistance heater. The generic cavity flame holder is used to create recirculation and promote the fuel/air mixing at the lower wall of the combustor. Three different injection concepts are considered in this research: (1) ethylene injection upstream of the cavity; (2) ethylene and hydrogen injection upstream of the cavity simultaneously; (3) ethylene injection preceded by pilot hydrogen injection. The pilot injection showed to be a supportive tool for holding the flame of the main normal ethylene fuel injection. Therefore, using pilot hydrogen injection and cavity configuration necessitates optimizing the combustor length to ensure the complete combustion and the full liberation of the chemical energy stored in the fuel before exiting the combustor. The present study proved the possibility of igniting the ethylene and maintaining its flame in the supersonic airstreams.

  4. Modeling N2O Reduction and Decomposition in a Circulating Fluidized bed Boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Åmand, Lars-Erik; Dam-Johansen, Kim;

    1996-01-01

    combustion chamber and the cyclone was calculated taking three mechanisms into account: Reduction by char, catalytic decomposition over bed material and thermal decomposition. The calculated destruction rate was in good agreement with the measured destruction of N2O injected at different levels in the boiler...... decomposition over bed material, and homogeneous thermal decomposition was negligible. However, at higher levels in the combustor the solids concentration is lower: at the top 60% of the N2O destruction was due to thermal decomposition and in the cyclone heterogeneous destruction of N2O was insignificant. It...

  5. Variable volume combustor with center hub fuel staging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin; Stewart, Jason Thurman; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2016-08-23

    The present application and the resultant patent provide a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles and a fuel injection system for providing a flow of fuel to the micro-mixer fuel nozzles. The fuel injection system may include a center hub for providing the flow of fuel therethrough. The center hub may include a first supply circuit for a first micro-mixer fuel nozzle and a second supply circuit for a second micro-mixer fuel nozzle.

  6. Numerical Simulations of Static Tested Ramjet Dump Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Afroz; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2016-06-01

    The flow field of a Liquid Fuel Ram Jet engine side dump combustor with kerosene fuel is numerically simulated using commercial CFD code CFX-11. Reynolds Averaged 3-D Navier-Stokes equations are solved alongwith SST turbulence model. Single step infinitely fast reaction is assumed for kerosene combustion. The combustion efficiency is evaluated in terms of the unburnt kerosene vapour leaving the combustor. The comparison of measured pressures with computed values show that the computation underpredicts (~5 %) pressures for non reacting cases but overpredicts (9-7 %) for reacting cases.

  7. Comparative evaluation of SRF and RDF co-combustion with coal in a fluidised bed combustor

    OpenAIRE

    Garg, A; Smith, Richard; Longhurst, Philip J.; Pollard, Simon J. T.; Simms, Nigel J; D. Hill

    2007-01-01

    The experimental study reported here was carried out to assess the feasibility of municipal solid waste (MSW) derived solid recovered fuel (SRF) in energy recovery applications. SRF was prepared by grinding and blending the major MSW constituents such as paper, plastics, wood and textile. The percentage of various constituents was the same as from the Ecodeco process employing bio- drying followed by mechanical treatment. The heating value of synthetic SRF was ca. 21 MJ/kg (...

  8. Application of fluidized bed combustor for use of low grade and waste fuels in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a span of less that 15 years, CFB combustion technology has progressed from a concept to a demonstrated capability of providing clean, reliable energy from low-cost, low-grade fuels. In fact, one of the major advantages of CFB technology is its ability to burn fuels with high moisture, high ash and high sulfur levels, allowing the users the option of using inexpensive open-quotes opportunityclose quotes fuels. CFB technology has demonstrated reliable operation while burning low-grade, easily available fuels which other combustion technologies, preclude or cannot easily accommodate (such as peat, waste coals, sludges, municipal wastes and lignite). The CFB units can be designed to burn a wide range of different fuels, alone or in combination. This capability allows the user to take advantage of various fuel supplies to lower operating costs while still complying with ever increasing environmental regulations. This paper will review the evolution and experience of CFB technology and discuss the operating history of the first culm-fired (anthracite mine tailings) power plant. The development of opportunity-fueled power plants has been associated with the establishment of the Independent Power Industry in the United States. Traditional utilities have relied on premium fuels (oil, natural gas, coal and nuclear) due to availability and the ability to pass fuel costs through to consumers. With the development of privatized power plants, more emphasis has been placed on fixing fuel costs over the life of the plant to minimize investor risk. An analogy can be drawn between the growth of the Independent Power Industry in the United States over the last ten years with the need for capacity in many Developing Countries today

  9. Top Ten Bed Bug Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have bed bugs, not fleas, ticks or other insects. You can compare your insect to the pictures on our Identifying bed bugs ... bedbugs Bed Bugs Home Learn about Bed Bugs — Characteristics of Bed Bugs — Finding Bed Bugs Protecting Your ...

  10. Non-reacting flow visualization of supersonic combustor based on cavity and cavity-strut flameholder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanhui; Liang, Jianhan; Zhao, Yuxin

    2016-04-01

    Nano-particle planer laser scattering and particle image velocimetry technology are employed to observe the flow field of scramjet combustors based on cavity and cavity-strut flameholder. Density field and velocity distribution inside combustors are obtained. Mainstream fluid enters into cavity nearby side wall in experimental observation because side wall shock waves interact with bottom wall boundary layer. Cavity fluid is entrained into mainstream in the middle of combustor meanwhile. Flow past cavity displays obvious three dimensional characteristics in both combustors. But cavity-strut combustor displays asymmetrical flow field because of strut configuration. Mass exchange between mainstream and cavity fluid is evaluated by statistic mass flow rate into cavity. Mass flow rate near side wall is raised to 6.62 times of the value in the middle of cavity combustor while it is 5.1 times in cavity-strut combustor. Further study is needed to injection strategies and realistic flow characteristics on condition of combustion.

  11. CFD analysis of jet mixing in low NOx flametube combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpallikar, M. V.; Smith, C. E.; Lai, M. C.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    The Rich-burn/Quick-mix/Lean-burn (RQL) combustor was identified as a potential gas turbine combustor concept to reduce NO(x) emissions in High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft. To demonstrate reduced NO(x) levels, cylindrical flametube versions of RQL combustors are being tested at NASA Lewis Research Center. A critical technology needed for the RQL combustor is a method of quickly mixing by-pass combustion air with rich-burn gases. Jet mixing in a cylindrical quick-mix section was numerically analyzed. The quick-mix configuration was five inches in diameter and employed twelve radial-inflow slots. The numerical analyses were performed with an advanced, validated 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code named REFLEQS. Parametric variation of jet-to-mainstream momentum flux ratio (J) and slot aspect ratio was investigated. Both non-reacting and reacting analyses were performed. Results showed mixing and NO(x) emissions to be highly sensitive to J and slot aspect ratio. Lowest NO(x) emissions occurred when the dilution jet penetrated to approximately mid-radius. The viability of using 3-D CFD analyses for optimizing jet mixing was demonstrated.

  12. Transient/structural analysis of a combustor under explosive loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Peyton B.; Holland, Anne D.

    1992-01-01

    The 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel (HTT) at NASA Langley Research Center is a combustion-driven blow-down wind tunnel. A major potential failure mode that was considered during the combustor redesign was the possibility of a deflagration and/or detonation in the combustor. If a main burner flame-out were to occur, then unburned fuel gases could accumulate and, if reignited, an explosion could occur. An analysis has been performed to determine the safe operating limits of the combustor under transient explosive loads. The failure criteria was defined and the failure mechanisms were determined for both peak pressures and differential pressure loadings. An overview of the gas dynamics analysis was given. A finite element model was constructed to evaluate 13 transient load cases. The sensitivity of the structure to the frequency content of the transient loading was assessed. In addition, two closed form dynamic analyses were conducted to verify the finite element analysis. It was determined that the differential pressure load or thrust load was the critical load mechanism and that the nozzle is the weak link in the combustor system.

  13. MHD coal combustor technology. Final report, phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    The design, performance, and testing of a 20-MW coal combustor for scaleup to 50 MW for use in an MHD generator are described. The design incorporates the following key features: (1) a two-stage combustor with an intermediate slag separator to remove slag at a low temperture, thus minimizing enthalpy losses required for heating and vaporizing the slag; (2) a first-stage pentad (four air streams impinging on one coal stream) injector design with demonstrated efficient mixing, promoting high carbon burnout; (3) a two-section first-stage combustion chamber; the first stage using a thin slag-protected refractory layer and the second section using a thick refractory layer, both to minimize heat losses; (4) a refractory lining in the slag separator to minimize heat losses; (5) a second-stage combustor, which provided both de-swirl of the combustion products exiting from the slag separator and simple mixing of the vitiated secondary air and seed; (6) a dense-phase coal feed system to minimize cold carrier gas entering the first-stage combustors; (7) a dry seed injection system using pulverized K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ with a 1% amorphous, fumed silicon dioxide additive to enhance flowability, resulting in rapid vaporization and ionization and ensuring maximum performance; and (8) a performance evaluation module (PEM) of rugged design based on an existing, successfully-fired unit. (WHK)

  14. Synergy effects of the co-combustion of biomass and sewage sludge with coal in the CFB combustor of Stadtwerke Duisburg AG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wischnewski, R.; Werther, J. [Hamburg Univ. of Tech. (Germany). Inst. of Solids Process Engineering and Particle Technology; Heidenhof, N. [Stadtwerke Duisburg AG, Duisburg (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    In the framework of an EU-funded research project, co-combustion tests of biomass and waste in the coal-fired circulating fluidised bed (CFB) combustor of Stadtwerke Duisburg AG were performed. The aim of the study was to investigate whether positive synergy effects with respect to the overall emissions of the plant and its operating behaviour could be detected. Local measurements of gas and solids concentrations as well as fluid dynamic parameters were performed in the combustion chamber in addition to the measurements with the measurement devices of the plant. (orig.)

  15. Use of bioethanol in a gas turbine combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of a gas turbine combustor that considers two conventional fuels and one biofuel is presented. The kind of fuel supplied to the combustor can impact in the Turbine Inlet Temperature (TIT) provoking significant changes in the power output and efficiency. Moreover, it can cause some damage in the initial steps of the gas turbine due to the migration of the hot streak. Natural gas, Diesel and Bioethanol are considered in the combustor in order to compare the performance of the power plant. The use of biofuel in a gas turbine combustor presents some benefits; a) better behavior in the distribution of the TIT, b) slightly higher power output and c) less impact of NOx and CO2 emissions. The analysis was based in the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and thermodynamics. The results indicate that it is necessary to increase the mass flow rate of bioethanol to maintain the power output of the turbine, due to a significant reduction of the TIT was observed. On the other hand, the use of bioethanol permits an important reduction of NOx emissions when they are compared with the conventional fuels (natural gas or diesel). Also, a noble benefit is obtained due to the biofuel comes from biomass-derived material, resulting in a reduction of CO2 global warming. -- Highlights: • We apply numerical and thermodynamic analysis to study the effect of the biofuel in gas turbine combustor. • We apply different air distribution to check experimental measurements of NOx emissions using conventional fuels and biofuel. • Two different conditions to study the power output, efficiency and Turbine Inlet Temperature (TIT), were applied

  16. Conversion of Fuel-N to N2O and NOx during Coal Combustion in Combustors of Different Scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周昊; 黄燕; 莫桂源; 廖子昱; 岑可法

    2013-01-01

    With focus on investigating the effect of combustor scale on the conversion of fuel-N to NOx and N2O, experiments are carried out in three combustors, including single coal particle combustion test rig, laboratory scale circulating fluidized-bed boiler (CFB) and full scale CFB in this work. For single coal particle combustion, the ma-jority of fuel-N (65%-82%) is released as NOx, while only a little (less than 8%) fuel-N yields N2O. But in labora-tory scale CFB, the conversion of fuel-N to N2O is increases, but the conversion of fuel-N to NOx is quite less than that of single coal particle combustion. This is because much char in CFB can promote the NOx reduction by in-creasing N2O formation. In full scale CFB, both of the conversion of fuel-N to NOx and the conversion of fuel-N to N2O are smaller than laboratory scale CFB.

  17. Incineration of kitchen waste with high nitrogen in vortexing fluidized-bed incinerator and its NO emission characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Duan; Chiensong Chyang; Jiaruei Wen; Jim Tso

    2013-01-01

    Some municipal solid waste (MSW) can be used as the fuel.Combustion of MSW with high nitrogen content is successfully conducted in a lab-scale vortexing fluidized-bed incinerator (VFBI).Pigskin with 16.5 wt.% nitrogen content was used to simulate the high nitrogen content kitchen waste,and silica sand was used as the bed material.The effects of operating conditions,such as the bed temperature,freeboard temperature,excess oxygen ratio,and static bed height on the CO and NO concentrations at the exit of combustor and cyclone were investigated.The experimental results show that the freeboard temperature is the most important factor for CO emission.The order of operating conditions impact on the NO emission is:(1) excess oxygen ratio; (2) bed temperature; (3)freeboard temperature; and (4) static bed height.Utilizing cyclone can significantly reduce the CO emission concentration when the CO concentration released from the freeboard is higher than 50 ppm.On the other hand,the cyclone has no significant effect on the NO emission.Despite having high nitrogen content,a low conversion from fuel-N to NO was attained.Compared with other types of combustors,VFBI reduces the CO and NO emission concentrations much better when burning MSW with high nitrogen content.

  18. Comparison of coal/solid recovered fuel (SRF) with coal/refuse derived fuel (RDF) in a fluidised bed reactor.

    OpenAIRE

    Wagland, Stuart Thomas; Kilgallon, P.; Coveney, R.; Garg, A; Smith, Richard; Longhurst, Philip J.; Pollard, Simon J. T.; Simms, Nigel J

    2011-01-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to compare the differences between municipal solid waste (MSW) derived solid recovered fuel (SRF) (complying with CEN standards) and refuse derived fuel (RDF). Both fuels were co-combusted with coal in a 50kW fluidised bed combustor and the metal emissions were compared. Synthetic SRF was prepared in the laboratory by grinding major constituents of MSW such as paper, plastic, textile and wood. RDF was obtained from a local mechanical trea...

  19. Bed In Summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In winter I get up at night And dress by yellow candle-light. In summer, quite the other way, I have to go to bed by day. I have to go to bed and see The birds still hopping on the tree, Or hear the grown-up people' s feet Still going past me in the stree

  20. Fluidized bed incinerator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fluidized bed incinerator is being developed for burning rad contaminated solid and liquid waste materials. In situ neutralization of acid gases by the bed material, catalytic afterburning, and gas filtration are used to produce a clean flue gas without the use of aqueous scrubbing

  1. An Adaptive Instability Suppression Controls Method for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George; DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2008-01-01

    An adaptive controls method for instability suppression in gas turbine engine combustors has been developed and successfully tested with a realistic aircraft engine combustor rig. This testing was part of a program that demonstrated, for the first time, successful active combustor instability control in an aircraft gas turbine engine-like environment. The controls method is called Adaptive Sliding Phasor Averaged Control. Testing of the control method has been conducted in an experimental rig with different configurations designed to simulate combustors with instabilities of about 530 and 315 Hz. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of this method in suppressing combustor instabilities. In addition, a dramatic improvement in suppression of the instability was achieved by focusing control on the second harmonic of the instability. This is believed to be due to a phenomena discovered and reported earlier, the so called Intra-Harmonic Coupling. These results may have implications for future research in combustor instability control.

  2. Vortex combustor for low NOX emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Robert C; Edmonds, Ryan G; Williams, Joseph T; Baldwin, Stephen P

    2012-11-20

    A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

  3. Systems and methods for preventing flashback in a combustor assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2016-04-05

    Embodiments of the present application include a combustor assembly. The combustor assembly may include a combustion chamber, a first plenum, a second plenum, and one or more elongate air/fuel premixing injection tubes. Each of the elongate air/fuel premixing injection tubes may include a first length at least partially disposed within the first plenum and configured to receive a first fluid from the first plenum. Moreover, each of the elongate air/fuel premixing injection tubes may include a second length disposed downstream of the first length and at least partially disposed within the second plenum. The second length may be formed of a porous wall configured to allow a second fluid from the second plenum to enter the second length and create a boundary layer about the porous wall.

  4. Analytical fuel property effects, small combustors, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of nonstandard aviation fuels on a typical small gas turbine combustor was analyzed. The T700/CT7 engine family was chosen as being representative of the class of aircraft power plants desired. Fuel properties, as specified by NASA, are characterized by low hydrogen content and high aromatics levels. Higher than normal smoke output and flame radiation intensity for the current T700 combustor which serves as a baseline were anticipated. It is, therefore, predicted that out of specification smoke visibility and higher than normal shell temperatures will exist when using NASA ERBS fuels with a consequence of severe reduction in cyclic life. Three new designs are proposed to compensate for the deficiencies expected with the existing design. They have emerged as the best of the eight originally proposed redesigns or combinations thereof. After the five choices that were originally made by NASA on the basis of competing performance factors, General Electric narrowed the field to the three proposed.

  5. PGT cuts emissions with dry low NOx combustors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the installation and development of dry, low NOx combustors on the Pacific Gas Transmission Co. (PGT), distribution system. Because of increasingly stringent pollution control measures required in the permitting process, PGT found itself forced to develop innovative techniques for emission control in order to repermit and/or gain new permits for pipeline construction. This paper describes the process used by PGT to enter into agreements with two manufacturers to participate in the development of test programs on two different versions of a dry, low NOx combustor for pipeline gas turbine service. It also reviews the regulatory and permitting procedures that PGT had to go through to get approval of this concept

  6. Numerical Study of Cofiring Biomass with Coal in Cyclone Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkepli, I. I.; Hasini, H.; Ikram, A. M.; Yusoff, M. Z.; Abd Rahman, A.; Shamsuddin, A. H.

    2013-06-01

    This paper investigates the flow and temperature distribution inside a cyclone combustor during combustion of coal and coal blend. The combustion under study is based on the actual cyclone combustor experiment rig used to test the performance of combustion when it be different coal-biomass blend is used. Experiment investigation on 100% coal combustion was also carried out and serves as a basis for the subsequent test for co-firing of different coal or biomass blend. Validation of temperature magnitude along cyclone furnace at 100% coal combustion condition shows good agreement between the measured and CFD results. Subsequent simulation of coal and biomass blend shows very good impact as it gave less error compared to experiment

  7. Experimental study on the heavy-duty gas turbine combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of stand and field testing of a combustion chamber for a heavy-duty 150 MW gas turbine are discussed. The model represented one of 14 identical segments of a tubular multican combustor constructed in the scale 1:1. The model experiments were executed at a pressure smaller than in the real gas turbine. The combustion efficiency, pressure loss factor, pattern factor, liner wall temperature, flame radiation, fluctuating pressure, and NOx emission were measured at partial and full load for both model and on-site testing. The comparison of these items of information, received on similar modes in the stand and field tests, has allowed the development of a method of calculation and the improvement of gas turbine combustors

  8. Experimental results from a reverse flow annual combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, F. M.; Hattingh, H. V.

    Computer-predicted temperature distributions in the wall liners of a combustion chamber were compared to the experimentally obtained values from combustion tests carried out in a small, full-scale reverse-flow annular combustor at sea level take-off conditionns. The largest discrepancies between the measured and predicted linear temperatures occured in the primary zone, with most of the predictions falling above the measured values, and with neither of the two computer programs satisfying the accuracy of 4 percent (of the experimental values) needed for making estimates on the life of a combustor. On the other hand, the correlation between the measured and predicted liner pressure drop was satisfactory. The validity and usefulnes of simple computer models as aids in the design of gas turbine combustion chambers are discussed.

  9. Fatigue Life of Haynes 188 Superalloy in Direct Connect Combustor Durability Rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, TIm; Gayda, John; Webster, Henry; Ribeiro, Greg

    2007-01-01

    The Direct Connect Combustor Durability Rig (DCR) will provide NASA a flexible and efficient test bed to demonstrate the durability of actively cooled scramjet engine structure, static and dynamic sealing technologies, and thermal management techniques. The DCR shall be hydrogen fueled and cooled, and test hydrogen coolded structural panels at Mach 5 and 7. Actively cooled Haynes 188 superalloy DCR structural panels exposed to the combustion environment shall have electrodischarge machined (EDM) internal cooling holes with flowing liquid hydrogen. Hydrogen combustion could therefore produce severe thermal conditions that could challenge low cycle fatigue durability of this material. The objective of this study was to assess low cycle fatigue capability of Haynes 188 for DCR application. Tests were performed at 25 and 650 C, in hydrogen and helium environments, using specimens with low stress ground (LSG) and electro-discharge machined (EDM) surface finish. Initial fatigue tests in helium and hydrogen indicate the low cycle fatigue life capability of Haynes 188 in hydrogen appears quite satisfactory for the DCR application. Fatigue capability did not decrease with increasing test temperature. Fatigue capability also did not decrease with EDM surface finish. Failure evaluations indicate retention of ductility in all conditions. Additional tests are planned to reconfirm these positive trends.

  10. Emissions from a gas-burning pulse combustor

    OpenAIRE

    David, Jiri

    1993-01-01

    The pulse combustor has a number of attractive features for heating applications. These include simplicity of construction, compactness for a given heat input rate, enhanced exhaust gas heat transfer and most importantly low CO and NOx emissions. With more stringent air quality and emissions standards soon to be in force in many countries, the latter has received much attention among the producers of gas appliances. This study investigates the performance of and emissions from a Helrnholtz...

  11. Numerical Modeling of a Ducted Rocket Combustor With Experimental Validation

    OpenAIRE

    Hewitt, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    The present work was conducted with the intent of developing a high-fidelity numerical model of a unique combustion flow problem combining multi-phase fuel injection with substantial momentum and temperature into a highly complex turbulent flow. This important problem is very different from typical and more widely known liquid fuel combustion problems and is found in practice in pulverized coal combustors and ducted rocket ramjets. As the ducted rocket engine cycle is only now finding wides...

  12. Low NOx heavy fuel combustor concept program, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrone, M. B.

    1981-01-01

    Combustion tests were completed with seven concepts, including three rich/lean concepts, three lean/lean concepts, and one catalytic combustor concept. Testing was conducted with ERBS petroleum distillate, petroleum residual, and SRC-II coal-derived liquid fuels over a range of operating conditions for the 12:1 pressure ratio General Electric MS7001E heavy-duty turbine. Blends of ERBS and SRC-II fuels were used to vary fuel properties over a wide range. In addition, pyridine was added to the ERBS and residual fuels to vary nitrogen level while holding other fuel properties constant. Test results indicate that low levels of NOx and fuel-bound nitrogen conversion can be achieved with the rich/lean combustor concepts for fuels with nitrogen contents up to 1.0% by weight. Multinozzle rich/lean Concept 2 demonstrated dry low Nox emissions within 10-15% of the EPA New Source Performance Standards goals for SRC-II fuel, with yields of approximately 15%, while meeting program goals for combustion efficiency, pressure drop, and exhaust gas temperature profile. Similar, if not superior, potential was demonstrated by Concept 3, which is a promising rich/lean combustor design.

  13. Experimental investigation of the low NOx vortex airblast annular combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S. M.; Biaglow, J. A.; Smith, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A low oxides of nitrogen vortex airblast annular combustor was evaluated which has attained the goal of 1 gm NO2/kg fuel or less during operation. The experimental combustor test conditions were a nominal inlet-air temperature of 703 K, inlet total pressures between 0.52 to 0.83 MPa, and a constant inlet Mach number of 0.26. Exit temperature pattern factors for all test points were between 0.16 and 0.20 and exit swirl flow angles were 47 degrees at isothermal conditions and 23 degrees during combustion. Oxides of nitrogen did not exceed 1.05 gm NO2/kg fuel at the highest inlet pressure and exhaust temperature tested. Previous correlations have related NOx proportionally to the combustor inlet pressure raised to some exponent. In this experiment, a band of exponents between 0.5 and 1.0 resulted for fuel-air ratios from 0.023 to 0.027 and inlet pressures from 0.52 to 0.83 MPa. Previously announced in STAR as N84-22567

  14. Experimental study of entrainment phenomenon in a trapped vortex combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Rongchun; Fan Weijun

    2013-01-01

    Trapped vortex combustor (TVC) is an advanced low-pollution gas turbine combustor,with the adoption of staged combustion technique.To achieve low-pollutant emission and better combustion performance,the proportion of the air flow in each combustion zone should be precisely determined in the design of the combustor.Due to the presence of entrainment phenomenon,the total air flow in the cavity zone is difficult to estimate.To overcome the measurement difficulty,this study adopts the indirect measurement approach in the experimental research of entrainment phenomenon in the cavity.In accordance with the measurement principle,a TVC model fueled by methane is designed.Under two experimental conditions,i.e.with and without direct air intake in the cavity,the influence of the mainstream air flow velocity,the air intake velocity in the cavity,the height of inlet channel,the structure of holder and the structural proportion of the cavity on entrainment in the cavity is studied,respectively,through experiment at atmospheric temperature and pressure.The results suggest that the air flow velocity of mainstream,the air intake velocity of the cavity and the structure of the holder exert significant influence on the air entrainment,while the influence of structural proportion of the cavity is comparatively insignificant.The square root of momentum ratio of cavity air to mainstream air could be used to analyze the correlation of the entrainment data.

  15. Flame dynamics of a meso-scale heat recirculating combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayan, V.; Gupta, A.K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The dynamics of premixed propane-air flame in a meso-scale ceramic combustor has been examined here. The flame characteristics in the combustor were examined by measuring the acoustic emissions and preheat temperatures together with high-speed cinematography. For the small-scale combustor, the volume to surface area ratio is small and hence the walls have significant effect on the global flame structure, flame location and flame dynamics. In addition to the flame-wall thermal coupling there is a coupling between flame and acoustics in the case of confined flames. Flame-wall thermal interactions lead to low frequency flame fluctuations ({proportional_to}100 Hz) depending upon the thermal response of the wall. However, the flame-acoustic interactions can result in a wide range of flame fluctuations ranging from few hundred Hz to few kHz. Wall temperature distribution is one of the factors that control the amount of reactant preheating which in turn effects the location of flame stabilization. Acoustic emission signals and high-speed flame imaging confirmed that for the present case flame-acoustic interactions have more significant effect on flame dynamics. Based on the acoustic emissions, five different flame regimes have been identified; whistling/harmonic mode, rich instability mode, lean instability mode, silent mode and pulsating flame mode. (author)

  16. Enhanced heat transfer rocket combustor technology component hot-fire test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William S.

    1990-01-01

    The evaluation of a method for enhancing combustor hot-gas wall heat extraction by using hot-fire tests of a rocket engine combustor calorimeter with hot-gas wall ribs is presented. The capability for enhanced heat extraction is required to increase available turbine drive energy for high chamber pressure operation, and therefore higher overall expander cycle engine performance. Determination of the rib effectiveness for incorporation into the design of a high-performance combustor for an advanced expander cycle combustor intended for use in an orbital transfer vehicle or advanced space engine, was the objective of these tests.

  17. Graphite waste incineration in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French gas-cooled reactors belonging to the Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Electricite de France (EDF), Hifrensa (Spain), etc., commissioned between the 1950s and 1970s, have generated large quantities of graphite wastes, mainly in the form of spent fuel sleeves. Furthermore, some of these reactors scheduled for dismantling in the near future (such as the G2 and G3 reactors at Marcoule) have cores consisting of graphite blocks. Consequently, a fraction of the contaminated graphite, amounting to 6000 t in France for example, must be processed in the coming years. For this processing, incineration using a circulating fluidized bed combustor has been selected as a possible solution and validated. However, the first operation to be performed involves recovering this graphite waste, and particularly, first of all, the spent fuel sleeves that were stored in silos during the years of reactor operation. Subsequent to the final shutdown of the Spanish gas-cooled reactor unit, Vandellos 1, the operating utility Hifrensa awarded contracts to a Framatome Iberica SA/ENSA consortium for removing, sorting, and prepackaging of the waste stored in three silos on the Vandellos site, essentially graphite sleeves. On the other hand, a program to validate the Framatome fluidized bed incineration process was carried out using a prototype incinerator installed at Le Creusot, France. The validation program included 22 twelve-hour tests and one 120-hour test. Particular attention was paid to the safety aspects of this project. During the performance of the validation program, a preliminary safety assessment was carried out. An impact assessment was performed with the help of the French Institute for Protection and Nuclear Safety, taking into account the preliminary spectra supplied by the CEA and EDF, and the activities of the radionuclides susceptible of being released into the atmosphere during the incineration. (author). 4 refs, 11 figs, 1 tab

  18. Enuresis (Bed-Wetting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... get out of bed to go to the bathroom. When do most children achieve bladder control? Children ... ask questions about your child's daytime and nighttime bathroom habits. Then your doctor will do a physical ...

  19. Particle fuel bed tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas-cooled reactors, using packed beds of small diameter coated fuel particles have been proposed for compact, high-power systems. The particulate fuel used in the tests was 800 microns in diameter, consisting of a thoria kernel coated with 200 microns of pyrocarbon. Typically, the bed of fuel particles was contained in a ceramic cylinder with porous metallic frits at each end. A dc voltage was applied to the metallic frits and the resulting electric current heated the bed. Heat was removed by passing coolant (helium or hydrogen) through the bed. Candidate frit materials, rhenium, nickel, zirconium carbide, and zirconium oxide were unaffected, while tungsten and tungsten-rhenium lost weight and strength. Zirconium-carbide particles were tested at 2000 K in H2 for 12 hours with no visible reaction or weight loss

  20. Tapered bed bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Charles D.; Hancher, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    A vertically oriented conically shaped column is used as a fluidized bed bioreactor wherein biologically catalyzed reactions are conducted in a continuous manner. The column utilizes a packing material a support having attached thereto a biologically active catalytic material.

  1. Bed rest and immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Aviles, Hernan; Butel, Janet S.; Shearer, William T.; Niesel, David; Pandya, Utpal; Allen, Christopher; Ochs, Hans D.; Blancher, Antoine; Abbal, Michel

    2007-02-01

    Space flight has been shown to result in altered immune responses. The current study was designed to investigate this possibility by using the bed rest model of some space flight conditions. A large number of women are included as subjects in the study. The hypothesis being tested is: 60 days head-down tilt bed rest of humans will affect the immune system and resistance to infection. Blood, urine and saliva samples will be obtained from bed rest subjects prior to, at intervals during, and after completion of 60 days of head-down tilt bed rest. Leukocyte blastogenesis, cytokine production and virus reactivation will be assessed. The ability of the subjects to respond appropriately to immunization with the neoantigen bacteriophage φX-174 will also be determined. Bed rest is being carried out at MEDES, Toulouse France, and the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX. The studies to be carried out in France will also allow assessment of the effects of muscle/bone exercise and nutritional countermeasures on the immune system in addition to the effects of bed rest.

  2. Technical evaluation: pressurized fluidized-bed combustion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, S A; Vogel, G J; Gehl, S M; Hanway, Jr, J E; Henry, R F; Parker, K M; Smyk, E B; Swift, W M; Podolski, W F

    1982-04-01

    The technology of pressurized fluidized-bed combustion, particularly in its application to a coal-burning combined-cycle plant, is evaluated by examining the technical status of advanced-concept plant components - boiler system (combustor, air-handling and air-injection equipment, and heat exchangers); solids handling, injection, and ejection system; hot-gas cleanup equipment; instrumentation/control system; and the gas turbine - along with materials of plant construction. Environmental performance as well as energy efficiency are examined, and economic considerations are reviewed briefly. The evaluation concludes with a broad survey of the principal related research and development programs in the United States and other countries, a foreview of the most likely technological developments, and a summary of unresolved technical issues and problems.

  3. Single-particle behaviour in circulating fluidized beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinell, Claus Erik; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Johnsson, Jan Erik

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of single-particle behaviour in a cold pilot-scale model of a circulating fluidized bed combustor (CFBC). In the system, sand is recirculated by means of air. Pressure measurements along the riser are used to determine the suspension density. A...... density, which results in a decreased number of particle observations for the larger particles with the riser height. The experiments show that the mean particle residence times in the zones above and below the secondary air inlet are almost independent of the particle characteristics. The overall mean...... radioactive tracking facility, which detects single radioactive particles, is developed and applied to determine the dynamic picture of the particle trajectories in the simulated boiler. The tracer particles are observed to move between the zone above and below the secondary air inlet with a mean frequency of...

  4. Single annular combustor: Experimental investigations of aerodynamics, dynamics and emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Bassam Sabry

    The present work investigates the aerodynamics, dynamics and emissions of a Single Cup Combustor Sector. The Combustor resembles a real Gas Turbine Combustor with primary, secondary and dilution zones (also known as fuel rich dome combustor). The research is initiated by studying the effect of the combustor front end geometry on the flow field. Two different exit configurations (one causes a sudden expansion to the swirling flow while the other causes a gradual expansion), installed in a dump combustor, are tested using LDV. The results reveal that the expanding surface reduces the turbulence activities, eliminates the corner recirculation zone and increases the length of the CRZ appreciably. An asymmetry in the flow field is observed due to the asymmetry of the expanding surface. To study the effect of chamber geometry on the flow field, the dome configuration is tested in the combustor sector with the primary dilution jets blocked. The size of the CRZ is reduced significantly (40% reduction in the height). With active primary jets, the CRZ is reconstructed in 3D by conducting several PIV measurements off-center. The confinement appears to significantly influence the shape of the CRZ such that the area ratio is similar for both the confinement and the CRZ (approximately 85%). The primary jets considerably contribute to the heat release process at high power conditions. Also, the primary jets drastically impact the flow field structure. Therefore, the parameters influencing the primary jets are studied using PIV (pressure drop, jets size, off-centering, interaction with convective cooling air, jet blockage and fuel injection). This study is referred to as a jet sensitivity study. The results indicate that the primary jets can be used effectively in controlling the flow field structure. A pressure drop of 4.3% and 7.6% result in similar flows with no noticeable effect on the size of the CRZ and the four jets wake regions. On the other hand, the results show that the

  5. Erosion/corrosion of turbine airfoil materials in the high-velocity effluent of a pressurized fluidized coal combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four candidate turbine airfoil superalloys were exposed to the effluent of a pressurized fluidized bed coal combustor operating with two gas velocities (150 and 270 m/s, 500 and 885 ft/s) and at two temp. (730 and 7950C, 1350 and 14600F). The materials tested, IN-100, U-700, IN-792, and MM-509, experienced both erosion and corrosion under these conditions. After exposure the specimens were examined by cross-sectional loss measurement, scanning electron microscopy, light metallography, and x-ray analysis to evaluate the effects of temp., velocity, particle loading, and alloy properties on erosion/corrosion. The results indicate that erosive damage was severe and was primarily dependent on gas velocity, both oxidation and sulfidation occurred at the higher temp., while oxidation of IN-100 was the only reaction at the lower temp., deposition of bed materials and erosion were observed on the same surfaces, and there was little difference in the erosion/corrosion damage to the four alloys tested under these severe conditions. 15 references

  6. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Cb of... - Municipal Waste Combustor Operating Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... conversion 250 c 24 Spreader stoker fixed floor refuse-derived fuel-fired combustor/100 percent coal capable... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Emissions Guidelines... Operating Guidelines Municipal waste combustor technology Carbon monoxide emissions levels (parts...

  7. 40 CFR 60.52a - Standard for municipal waste combustor metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for municipal waste combustor metals. 60.52a Section 60.52a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... September 20, 1994 § 60.52a Standard for municipal waste combustor metals. (a) On and after the date...

  8. Analysis of the combustion oscillation in a silo-type gas turbine combustor and its suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of combustion oscillation of a silo-type 79.5 MW gas turbine combustor in commercial operation and its suppression have been investigated. The oscillation of the lean premixed gas turbine combustor resulting from the combustion instability occurred at near full load operation. An FFT analysis of the combustion dynamics showed that the dominant frequency of the oscillation would be that of the 1st longitudinal acoustic resonance mode of the combustor. To suppress the combustion oscillation, a passive control technique for reducing the combustion instability was employed: that is, the fuel to the combustor was redistributed by adjusting the operational schedule of one of six fuel control valves, which would lead the increase of the local operational equivalence ratio near the central recirculation zone of the combustor. By doing so, the oscillation was successfully reduced to the permissible level while the amount of NOx emission met proper regulatory level set by the local government

  9. The 3-D CFD modeling of gas turbine combustor-integral bleed flow interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D. Y.; Reynolds, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model was developed to analyze the flow interaction between a gas turbine combustor and an integral bleed plenum. In this model, the elliptic governing equations of continuity, momentum and the k-e turbulence model were solved on a boundary-fitted, curvilinear, orthogonal grid system. The model was first validated against test data from public literature and then applied to a gas turbine combustor with integral bleed. The model predictions agreed well with data from combustor rig testing. The model predictions also indicated strong flow interaction between the combustor and the integral bleed. Integral bleed flow distribution was found to have a great effect on the pressure distribution around the gas turbine combustor.

  10. Fuel properties effect on the performance of a small high temperature rise combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Waldo A.; Beckel, Stephen A.

    1989-01-01

    The performance of an advanced small high temperature rise combustor was experimentally determined at NASA-Lewis. The combustor was designed to meet the requirements of advanced high temperature, high pressure ratio turboshaft engines. The combustor featured an advanced fuel injector and an advanced segmented liner design. The full size combustor was evaluated at power conditions ranging from idle to maximum power. The effect of broad fuel properties was studied by evaluating the combustor with three different fuels. The fuels used were JP-5, a blend of Diesel Fuel Marine/Home Heating Oil, and a blend of Suntec C/Home Heating Oil. The fuel properties effect on the performance of the combustion in terms of pattern factor, liner temperatures, and exhaust emissions are documented.

  11. Investigation of low NOx staged combustor concept in high-speed civil transport engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung Lee; Bittker, David A.; Niedzwiecki, Richard W.

    1989-01-01

    Levels of exhaust emissions due to high temperatures in the main combustor of high-speed civil transport (HSCT) engines during supersonic cruise are predicted. These predictions are based on a new combustor design approach: a rich burn/quick quench/lean burn combustor. A two-stage stirred reactor model is used to calculate the combustion efficiency and exhaust emissions of this novel combustor. A propane-air chemical kinetics model is used to simulate the fuel-rich combustion of jet fuel. Predicted engine exhaust emissions are compared with available experimental test data. The effect of HSCT engine operating conditions on the levels of exhaust emissions is also presented. The work described in this paper is a part of the NASA Lewis Research Center High-Speed Civil Transport Low NO(x) Combustor program.

  12. A Numerical and an Experimental Study for Optimization of a Small Annular Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iki, Norihiko; Gruber, Andrea; Yoshida, Hiro

    The small annular combustor of a micro gas turbine fueled with methane is investigated experimentally and numerically in order to improve the overall efficiency of the small engine. The CFD analysis of the tiny combustor relies on a low Reynolds number turbulence model coupled to the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) and provides important insight about the turbulent flow pattern, flame shape, position and optimal flame anchoring. For the experimental observation, a model combustor, representing 120 degrees of the original annular combustor, is fabricated, which enables us to visualize internal flow. The burning area in the combustion chamber moves to downstream with increase of air flow rate. At full-load, some fuel remains at the combustion chamber exit. Moreover, temperatures are measured and compared with the numerical simulations. The results shown here will form the basis for future optimization of the micro gas turbine with minimal or no increase in combustor pressure loss.

  13. The pollution reduction technology program for can-annular combustor engines - Description and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, R.; Fiorentino, A. J.; Diehl, L.

    1976-01-01

    Pollutant reduction and performance characteristics were determined for three successively more advanced combustor concepts. Program Element I consisted of minor modifications to the current production JT8D combustor and fuel system to evaluate means of improved fuel preparation and changes to the basic airflow distribution. Element II addressed versions of the two-staged Vorbix (vortex burning and mixing) combustor and represented a moderate increase in hardware complexity and difficulty of development. The concept selected for Element III employed vaporized fuel as a means of achieving minimum emission levels and represented the greatest difficulty of development and adaptation to the JT8D engine. Test results indicate that the Element I single-stage combustors were capable of dramatic improvement in idle pollutants. The multistage combustors evaluated in Program Elements II and III simultaneously reduced CO, THC and NOx emissions, but were unable to satisfy the current 1979 EPA standards.

  14. Design of a multipurpose laboratory scale analytical combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current method of digestion in order to determine the content of heavy metals and other elements in Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is either too long or dangerous due to the usage of concentrated acids. As such, a Multi Purpose Portable Lab Scale Combustor was developed. It could also be used as a test rig under the various combustion conditions i.e. excess air combustion, gasification and pyrolysis. Another future of this rig, is to trap and analyse the combustion gasses produced from the different types of combustion processes. The rig can also be used to monitor weight loss against time during a combustion process. (Author)

  15. Device for improved air and fuel distribution to a combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laster, Walter R.; Schilp, Reinhard

    2016-05-31

    A flow conditioning device (30, 50, 70, 100, 150) for a can annular gas turbine engine, including a plurality of flow elements (32, 34, 52, 54, 72, 74, 102) disposed in a compressed air flow path (42, 60, 80, 114, 122) leading to a combustor (12), configured such that relative adjustment of at least one flow directing element (32, 52, 72, 110) with respect to an adjacent flow directing element (34, 54, 74, 112, 120) during operation of the gas turbine engine is effective to adjust a level of choking of the compressed air flow path (42, 60, 80, 114, 122).

  16. Dynamic analysis of a flameless combustion model combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Flameless combustion is a new technology with the following advantages:1)Ultra-low emissions of both NOX and CO;2)fuel flexibility,from liquid fuels,natural gas to hydrogen-rich syngas;3)lower possibility of flashback and thermoacoustic oscillations.In this paper,we focus on the dynamic characteristics of a flameless model combustor.Experimental results show that flameless combustion can lower emissions while maintaining combustion stability.However,combining a pilot flame with flameless combustion may excite thermoacoustic instability.

  17. Three-dimensional full-loop simulation of a dual fluidized-bed biomass gasifier

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, H; Cattolica, RJ; Seiser, R.; Liao, CH

    2015-01-01

    © 2015. A three-dimensional CFD model was developed to simulate the full-loop of a dual fluidized-bed biomass gasification system consisting of a gasifier, a combustor, a cyclone separator, and a loop-seal. This full-loop simulation includes the chemical kinetic modeling of biomass drying and pyrolysis, heterogeneous char reactions, and homogeneous gas-phase reactions. In the model, the gas phase is described using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and the particle phase is described with the Multi...

  18. Studies on ash behavior during co-combustion of paper sludge in fluidized bed boilers

    OpenAIRE

    Coda, Beatrice

    2004-01-01

    The present work analysis the ash behaviour and the environmental impact with respect to the toxic trace metals (e.g. Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Mn, Cr, Ni) upon co-combustion of paper sludge, a waste deriving from the treatment of recovered paper, with coal and coal/biomass blends in fluidised bed combustors designed for energy production or steam generation. The study, conducted in the framework of a European research project aiming at widening the spectrum of fuels utilised by coal-fired and coal...

  19. Modelling of NOx emissions from pressurized fluidized bed combustion - A parameter study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anker; Johnsson, Jan Erik

    1997-01-01

    Simulations with a mathematical model of a pressurized bubbling fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) combined with a kinetic model for NO formation and reduction are reported. The kinetic model for NO formation and reduction considers NO and NH3 as the fixed nitrogen species, and includes homogeneous r...... velocity, the bubble size, the bubble rise velocity and the gas interchange coefficient between bubble and dense phase. The most important combustion parameters are the rates of CO and CH4 combustion and the CO/(CO + CO2) ratio from char combustion. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd....

  20. Optimum temperature for sulphur retention in fluidised beds working under oxy-fuel combustion conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Poza, Luis F. de; Rufas, Aránzazu; García Labiano, Francisco; Obras-Loscertales, Margarita de las; Abad Secades, Alberto; Gayán Sanz, Pilar; Adánez Elorza, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion is one of the leading options for power generation with CO 2 capture. The process consists of burning the fuel with a mixture of nearly pure oxygen and a CO 2 -rich recycled flue gas, result- ing in a product flue gas from the boiler containing mainly CO 2 and H 2 O. Among the possible boiler types, fluidised bed combustors are very appropriate for the oxy-fuel process because they allow the in situ des- ulphurisation by feeding Ca-based...

  1. Calcium-based sorbents behaviour during sulphation at oxy-fuel fluidised bed combustion conditions

    OpenAIRE

    García Labiano, Francisco; Rufas, Aránzazu; Diego Poza, Luis F. de; Obras-Loscertales, Margarita de las; Gayán Sanz, Pilar; Abad Secades, Alberto; Adánez Elorza, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Sulphur capture by calcium-based sorbents is a process highly dependent on the temperature and CO2 concentration. In oxy-fuel combustion in fluidised beds (FB), CO2 concentration in the flue gas may be enriched up to 95%. Under so high CO2 concentration, different from that in conventional coal combustion with air, the calcination and sulphation behaviour of the sorbent must be defined to determine the optimum operating temperature in the FB combustors. In this work, the SO2 retention capacit...

  2. Fluidised bed heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems that have arisen during the initial stages of development of fluidised bed boilers in which heat transfer surfaces are immersed in fluidised solids are discussed. The very high heat transfer coefficients that are obtained under these conditions can be exploited to reduce the total heat transfer surface to a fraction of that in normal boilers. However, with the high heat flux levels involved, tube stressing becomes more important and it is advantageous to use smaller diameter tubes. One of the initial problems was that the pumping power absorbed by the fluidised bed appeared to be high. The relative influence of the fluidising velocity (and the corresponding bed area), tube diameter, tube spacing, heat transfer coefficient and bed temperature on pumping power and overall cost was determined. This showed the importance of close tube packing and research was undertaken to see if this would adversely affect the heat transfer coefficient. Pressure operation also reduces the pumping power. Fouling and corrosion tests in beds burning coal suggest that higher temperatures could be reached reliably and cost studies show that, provided the better refractory metals are used, the cost of achieving higher temperatures is not unduly high. It now remains to demonstrate at large scale that the proposed systems are viable and that the methods incorporated to overcome start up and part lead running problems are satisfactory. The promising role of these heat transfer techniques in other applications is briefly discussed

  3. Active Combustion Control for Aircraft Gas-Turbine Engines-Experimental Results for an Advanced, Low-Emissions Combustor Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaat, John C.; Kopasakis, George; Saus, Joseph R.; Chang, Clarence T.; Wey, Changlie

    2012-01-01

    Lean combustion concepts for aircraft engine combustors are prone to combustion instabilities. Mitigation of instabilities is an enabling technology for these low-emissions combustors. NASA Glenn Research Center s prior activity has demonstrated active control to suppress a high-frequency combustion instability in a combustor rig designed to emulate an actual aircraft engine instability experience with a conventional, rich-front-end combustor. The current effort is developing further understanding of the problem specifically as applied to future lean-burning, very low-emissions combustors. A prototype advanced, low-emissions aircraft engine combustor with a combustion instability has been identified and previous work has characterized the dynamic behavior of that combustor prototype. The combustor exhibits thermoacoustic instabilities that are related to increasing fuel flow and that potentially prevent full-power operation. A simplified, non-linear oscillator model and a more physics-based sectored 1-D dynamic model have been developed to capture the combustor prototype s instability behavior. Utilizing these models, the NASA Adaptive Sliding Phasor Average Control (ASPAC) instability control method has been updated for the low-emissions combustor prototype. Active combustion instability suppression using the ASPAC control method has been demonstrated experimentally with this combustor prototype in a NASA combustion test cell operating at engine pressures, temperatures, and flows. A high-frequency fuel valve was utilized to perturb the combustor fuel flow. Successful instability suppression was shown using a dynamic pressure sensor in the combustor for controller feedback. Instability control was also shown with a pressure feedback sensor in the lower temperature region upstream of the combustor. It was also demonstrated that the controller can prevent the instability from occurring while combustor operation was transitioning from a stable, low-power condition to

  4. Co-combustion of biomass and gaseous fuel in a novel configuration of fluidized bed: Thermal characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Jetting-fountain fluidized bed enables smooth co-firing of biomass and gaseous fuel. • Applying jetting-fountain configuration dampens greatly freeboard overheating. • Heat gain by bed greatly increases with jetting-fountain configuration. • Increasing gaseous fuel ratio causes more reduction in freeboard overheating. • Heat gain by bed considerably increases with increasing gaseous fuel ratio. - Abstract: Experimental study on co-combustion of rice straw and natural gas has been performed in a fluidized bed. The used combustor allows the novel, jetting-fountain configuration and the conventional operation as well. In the jetting-fountain configuration, natural gas premixed with the air sufficient for combustion proceeds through the jet pipe to create a jetting-fountain zone. Whereas only the air required for rice straw combustion passes through the gas distributor. The experiments show that smooth combustion of natural gas with rice straw can be performed in the jetting-fountain fluidized bed avoiding acoustic effects and explosions of burning bubbles that occurs in conventional operation. The jetting-fountain fluidized bed is shown to dampen greatly the freeboard overheating at particularly lower bed temperatures. This is because the fountain-particles absorb a great part of heat released in the freeboard and recover it back to the bed. It is confirmed by measuring the in-bed cooling load that was found to increase considerably at lower bed temperatures. The natural gas contribution is found to play a major role when applying the jetting-fountain configuration. Increasing the natural gas contribution enlarges the fountain zone that causes greater reduction in the freeboard overheating and recovers more heat back to the bed. Measuring the in-bed cooling also approves the later conclusion

  5. in Spouted Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronislaw Buczek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Samples of active coke, fresh and spent after cleaning flue gases from communal waste incinerators, were investigated. The outer layers of both coke particles were separately removed by comminution in a spouted bed. The samples of both active cokes were analysed by means of densities, mercury porosimetry, and adsorption technique. Remaining cores were examined to determine the degree of consumption of coke by the sorption of hazardous emissions (SO2, HCl, and heavy metals through its bed. Differences in contamination levels within the porous structure of the particles were estimated. The study demonstrated the effectiveness of commercial active coke in the cleaning of flue gases.

  6. Detecting deterministic nature of pressure measurements from a turbulent combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tony, J.; Gopalakrishnan, E. A.; Sreelekha, E.; Sujith, R. I.

    2015-12-01

    Identifying nonlinear structures in a time series, acquired from real-world systems, is essential to characterize the dynamics of the system under study. A single time series alone might be available in most experimental situations. In addition to this, conventional techniques such as power spectral analysis might not be sufficient to characterize a time series if it is acquired from a complex system such as a thermoacoustic system. In this study, we analyze the unsteady pressure signal acquired from a turbulent combustor with bluff-body and swirler as flame holding devices. The fractal features in the unsteady pressure signal are identified using the singularity spectrum. Further, we employ surrogate methods, with translational error and permutation entropy as discriminating statistics, to test for determinism visible in the observed time series. In addition to this, permutation spectrum test could prove to be a robust technique to characterize the dynamical nature of the pressure time series acquired from experiments. Further, measures such as correlation dimension and correlation entropy are adopted to qualitatively detect noise contamination in the pressure measurements acquired during the state of combustion noise. These ensemble of measures is necessary to identify the features of a time series acquired from a system as complex as a turbulent combustor. Using these measures, we show that the pressure fluctuations during combustion noise has the features of a high-dimensional chaotic data contaminated with white and colored noise.

  7. Flow and Emissions Characteristics of Multi-Swirler Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Li, Guoqiang

    2003-11-01

    Modern industrial gas-turbine spray combustors feature multiple swirlers and distributed fuel injection for rapid mixing and stabilization. The flow field of this combustor, the related combustion characteristics and their control are discussed. The velocity flow field downstream of a Triple Annular Research Swirler (TARS) was characterized. Multiple combinations of swirlers were tested in cold flow under atmospheric conditions with and without confining combustion chamber. The experiments showed that a central recirculation zone (CTRZ), an annular jet with internal and external shear layers dominated the flow field downstream of TARS. Compared to unconfined case, flow with confined tube showed an enlarged CTRZ region and a recirculation region in the expansion corner with reduced concentration of turbulence intensity in the jet region. TARS also produced low emissions of NOx and CO. Measurements were performed to study the effects of several factors, including swirler combinations, exhaust nozzle size, air assist for fuel atomization and mixing length on NOx and CO emissions and combustion instability. The data showed that emissions and stability depend on the combination of several of these factors.

  8. Thermal performance of a meso-scale liquid-fuel combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Demonstrated successful combustion of liquid fuel-air mixtures in a novel meso-scale combustor. → Flame quenching was eliminated using heat recirculation in a swiss roll type combustor that also extended the flammability limits. → Liquid fuel was rapidly vaporized with the use of hot narrow channel walls that eliminated the need of a fuel atomizer. → Maximum power density of the combustor was estimated to be about 8.5 GW/m3 and heat load in the range of 50-280W. → Overall efficiency of the combustor was estimated in the range of 12 to 20%. - Abstract: Combustion in small scale devices poses significant challenges due to the quenching of reactions from wall heat losses as well as the significantly reduced time available for mixing and combustion. In the case of liquid fuels there are additional challenges related to atomization, vaporization and mixing with the oxidant in the very short time-scale liquid-fuel combustor. The liquid fuel employed here is methanol with air as the oxidizer. The combustor was designed based on the heat recirculating concept wherein the incoming reactants are preheated by the combustion products through heat exchange occurring via combustor walls. The combustor was fabricated from Zirconium phosphate, a ceramic with very low thermal conductivity (0.8 W m-1 K-1). The combustor had rectangular shaped double spiral geometry with combustion chamber in the center of the spiral formed by inlet and exhaust channels. Methanol and air were introduced immediately upstream at inlet of the combustor. The preheated walls of the inlet channel also act as a pre-vaporizer for liquid fuel which vaporizes the liquid fuel and then mixes with air prior to the fuel-air mixture reaching the combustion chamber. Rapid pre-vaporization of the liquid fuel by the hot narrow channel walls eliminated the necessity for a fuel atomizer. Self-sustained combustion of methanol-air was achieved in a chamber volume as small as 32.6 mm3. The

  9. Investigation of operational parameters for an industrial CFB combustor of coal, biomass and sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The combustion of coal and/or biomass (sludge, wood waste, RDF, etc.) in a circulating fluidized bed has been a commercial topper for over 20 years, and references to principles and applications are numerous and widespread although few data are presented concerning the operation of large scale CFB-units. The authors studied the CFB-combustion at UPM-Kymmene (Ayr), a major paper mill relying for its steam production upon the combustion of coal (80-85%), wood bark (5-10%) and wastewater treatment sludge (5-10%). The maximum capacity of the CFB is 58 MWth.A complete diagnostic of the operation was made, and additional tests were performed to assess the operating mode. The plant schematics,relevant dimensions and process data are given. To assess the operation of the UPM-CFB, it is important to review essential design parameters and principles of CFB combustors, which will be discussed in detail to include required data, heat balance and flowrates, operating versus transport velocity, kinetics and conversion (including the possible effect of the Bouduard reaction if carbon is present).Since the residence time in the riser and the cyclone efficiency determine the burnout of circulating fuel-particles, the UPM-CFB was subjected to a stimulus response technique using nickel oxide as tracer. Results illustrate the efficiency of the cyclone separation and the number of recycle loops for particles of a given size. Results will also be used to assess the cyclone operation and efficiency and to comment upon expected and measured carbon conversion.

  10. Bed expansion crucible tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Am/Cm program will vitrify the americium and curium currently stored in F-canyon. A batch flowsheet has been developed (with non-radioactive surrogate feed in place of the F-canyon solution) and tested full-scale in the 5-inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM) facility at TNX. During a normal process run, a small bed expansion occurs when oxygen released from reduction of cerium (IV) oxide to cerium (III) oxide is trapped in highly viscous glass. The bed expansion is characterized by a foamy layer of glass that slowly expands as the oxygen is trapped and then dissipates when the viscosity of the foam becomes low enough to allow the oxygen to escape. Severe bed expansions were noted in the 5-inch CIM when re-heating after an interlock during the calcination phase of the heat cycle, escaping the confines of the melter vessel. In order to better understand the cause of the larger than normal bed expansion and to develop mitigating techniques, a series of three crucible tests were conducted

  11. Sludge combustion in fluidized bed reactors at laboratory scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combustion of a dried sewage sludge in laboratory scale fluidized bed has been studied in Naples by the Istituto di ricerche sulla combustione (Irc) in the framework of a National project named Thermal Process with Energy Recovery to be used in laboratory and pre-pilot scale apparatus. The attention has been focused on emissions of unreacted carbon as elutriated fines, on the emissions of pollutant gases and on the assessment of the inventory of fly- and bottom ashes. The combustion behaviour of sewage sludge has been compared with those of a market available Tyre Derived Fuel (TDF) and a biomass from Mediterranean area (Robinia Pseudoacacia) and with that of a South African bituminous coal. Stationary combustion tests were carried out at 8500 C by feeding particles in the size range 0-1 mm into a bed of silica sand without any sorbent addition. The fluidized bed combustor has been operated, at a superficial gas velocity of 0.4 m/s and different excesses of air ranging between 14 and 98%. Relatively high combustion efficiency, larger than 98.9% has been obtained in experiments carried out with sewage sludge and excess of air larger than 20%. These values, are comparable with those obtained in previously experimental activity carried out under similar operative conditions with a South Africa Bituminous coal (97-98%). It is larger than those obtained by using a Tyre Derived Fuel (89-90%) and the Robinia Pseudoacacia Biomass (93-93%). The relative importance of carbon fines elutriation, CO emissions and volatile bypassing the bed in determining the loss of combustion efficiency has been evaluated for the different fuels tested

  12. Wide range operation of advanced low NOx combustors for supersonic high-altitude aircraft gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, P. B.; Fiorito, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    An initial rig program tested the Jet Induced Circulation (JIC) and Vortex Air Blast (VAB) systems in small can combustor configurations for NOx emissions at a simulated high altitude, supersonic cruise condition. The VAB combustor demonstrated the capability of meeting the NOx goal of 1.0 g NO2/kg fuel at the cruise condition. In addition, the program served to demonstrate the limited low-emissions range available from the lean, premixed combustor. A follow-on effort was concerned with the problem of operating these lean, premixed combustors with acceptable emissions at simulated engine idle conditions. Various techniques have been demonstrated that allow satisfactory operation on both the JIC and VAB combustors at idle with CO emissions below 20 g/kg fuel. The VAB combustor was limited by flashback/autoignition phenomena at the cruise conditions to a pressure of 8 atmospheres. The JIC combustor was operated up to the full design cruise pressure of 14 atmospheres without encountering an autoignition limitation although the NOx levels, in the 2-3 g NO2/kg fuel range, exceeded the program goal.

  13. Experimental Study on Effects of Fuel Injection on Scramjet Combustor Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Xianyu; Li Xiaoshan; Ding Meng; Liu Weidong; Wang Zhenguo

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of fuel injection distribution on the scramjet combustor performance, there are conducted three sets of test on a hydrocarbon fueled direct-connect scramjet test facility. The results of Test A; whose fuel injection is carried out with injectors located on the top-wall and the bottom-wall, show that the fuel injection with an appropriate close-front and centralized distribution would be of much help to optimize combustor performances. The results of Test B, whose fuel injection is performed at the optimal injection locations found in Test A, with a given equivalence ratio and different injection proportions for each injector, show that this injection mode is of little benefit to improve combustor performances. The results of Test C with a circumferential fuel injection distribution displaies the possibility of ameliorating combustor performance. By analyzing the effects of injection location parameters on combustor performances on the base of the data of Test C, it is clear that the injector location has strong coupled influences on combustor performances. In addition, an inner-force synthesis specific impulse is used to reduce the errors caused by the disturbance of fuel supply and working state of air heater while assessing combustor performances.

  14. Orbit transfer rocket engine technology program enhanced heat transfer combustor technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William S.

    1991-01-01

    In order to increase the performance of a high performance, advanced expander-cycle engine combustor, higher chamber pressures are required. In order to increase chamber pressure, more heat energy is required to be transferred to the combustor coolant circuit fluid which drives the turbomachinery. This requirement was fulfilled by increasing the area exposed to the hot-gas by using combustor ribs. A previous technology task conducted 2-d hot air and cold flow tests to determine an optimum rib height and configuration. In task C.5 a combustor calorimeter was fabricated with the optimum rib configuration, 0.040 in. high ribs, in order to determine their enhancing capability. A secondary objective was to determine the effects of mixture ratio changers on the enhancement during hot-fire testing. The program used the Rocketdyne Integrated Component Evaluator (ICE) reconfigured into a thrust chamber only mode. The test results were extrapolated to give a projected enhancement from the ribs for a 16 in. long cylindrical combustor at 15 Klb nominal thrust level. The hot-gas wall ribs resulted in a 58 percent increase in heat transfer. When projected to a full size 15K combustor, it becomes a 46 percent increase. The results of those tests, a comparison with previous 2-d results, the effects of mixture ratio and combustion gas flow on the ribs and the potential ramifications for expander cycle combustors are detailed.

  15. Combustion Dynamics in Multi-Nozzle Combustors Operating on High-Hydrogen Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santavicca, Dom; Lieuwen, Tim

    2013-09-30

    Actual gas turbine combustors for power generation applications employ multi-nozzle combustor configurations. Researchers at Penn State and Georgia Tech have extended previous work on the flame response in single-nozzle combustors to the more realistic case of multi-nozzle combustors. Research at Georgia Tech has shown that asymmetry of both the flow field and the acoustic forcing can have a significant effect on flame response and that such behavior is important in multi-flame configurations. As a result, the structure of the flame and its response to forcing is three-dimensional. Research at Penn State has led to the development of a three-dimensional chemiluminescence flame imaging technique that can be used to characterize the unforced (steady) and forced (unsteady) flame structure of multi-nozzle combustors. Important aspects of the flame response in multi-nozzle combustors which are being studied include flame-flame and flame-wall interactions. Research at Penn State using the recently developed three-dimensional flame imaging technique has shown that spatial variations in local flame confinement must be accounted for to accurately predict global flame response in a multi-nozzle can combustor.

  16. Experimental and Computational Study of Trapped Vortex Combustor Sector Rig with High-Speed Diffuser Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Hendricks

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The Trapped Vortex Combustor (TVC potentially offers numerous operational advantages over current production gas turbine engine combustors. These include lower weight, lower pollutant emissions, effective flame stabilization, high combustion efficiency, excellent high altitude relight capability, and operation in the lean burn or RQL modes of combustion. The present work describes the operational principles of the TVC, and extends diffuser velocities toward choked flow and provides system performance data. Performance data include EINOx results for various fuel-air ratios and combustor residence times, combustion efficiency as a function of combustor residence time, and combustor lean blow-out (LBO performance. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations using liquid spray droplet evaporation and combustion modeling are performed and related to flow structures observed in photographs of the combustor. The CFD results are used to understand the aerodynamics and combustion features under different fueling conditions. Performance data acquired to date are favorable compared to conventional gas turbine combustors. Further testing over a wider range of fuel-air ratios, fuel flow splits, and pressure ratios is in progress to explore the TVC performance. In addition, alternate configurations for the upstream pressure feed, including bi-pass diffusion schemes, as well as variations on the fuel injection patterns, are currently in test and evaluation phases.

  17. Maximum spoutable bed height of spout-fluid bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenqi Zhong; Mingyao Zhang; Baosheng Jin [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Key Laboratory on Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education

    2006-11-15

    Experimental study on the maximum spoutable bed height of a spout-fluid bed (cross-section of 0.3 m x 0.03 m and height of 2 m) packed with Geldart group D particles has been carried out. The effects of particle size, spout nozzle size and fluidizing gas flow rate on the maximum spoutable bed height were studied. Experimental data were compared to some published experiments and predictions. The results show that the maximum spoutable bed height of spout-fluid bed decreases with increasing particle size and spout nozzle size, which appears the same trend to that of spouted beds. The increasing of fluidizing gas flow rate leads to a sharply decrease in the maximum spoutable bed height. The existent correlations of the maximum spoutable bed height in the literature were observed to involve large discrepancies. Additionally, the flow characteristics when bed materials deeper than the maximum spoutable height were summarized. Under this condition, the spout-fluid bed operated without a stable and coherent spout or fountain assembles the characteristics of jetting fluidized bed. Besides, the mechanisms of spout termination were investigated. It was found that slugging in the spout and growth of instabilities would cause the spout termination in spout-fluid bed.

  18. NONEQUILIBRIUM SULFUR CAPTURE & RETENTION IN AN AIR COOLED SLAGGING COAL COMBUSTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bert Zauderer

    2003-04-21

    Calcium oxide injected in a slagging combustor reacts with the sulfur from coal combustion to form sulfur-bearing particles. The reacted particles impact and melt in the liquid slag layer on the combustor wall by the centrifugal force of the swirling combustion gases. Due to the low solubility of sulfur in slag, it must be rapidly drained from the combustor to limit sulfur gas re-evolution. Prior analyses and laboratory scale data indicated that for Coal Tech's 20 MMBtu/hour, air-cooled, slagging coal combustor slag mass flow rates in excess of 400 lb/hr should limit sulfur re-evolution. The objective of this 42-month project was to validate this sulfur-in-slag model in a group of combustor tests. A total of 36 days of testing on the combustor were completed during the period of performance of this project. This was more that double the 16 test days that were required in the original work statement. The extra tests were made possible by cost saving innovations that were made in the operation of the combustor test facility and in additional investment of Coal Tech resources in the test effort. The original project plan called for two groups of tests. The first group of tests involved the injection of calcium sulfate particles in the form of gypsum or plaster of Paris with the coal into the 20 MMBtu/hour-combustor. The second group of tests consisted of the entire two-step process, in which lime or limestone is co-injected with coal and reacts with the sulfur gas released during combustion to form calcium sulfate particles that impact and dissolve in the slag layer. Since this sulfur capture process has been validated in numerous prior tests in this combustor, the primary effort in the present project was on achieving the high slag flow rates needed to retain the sulfur in the slag.

  19. Getting Rid of Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... how you select a company. Related Information Collaborative Strategy on Bed Bugs - highlights ways that all levels of government, community, academia and private industry can work together to reduce bed bugs across ...

  20. CFD Investigation of Pollutant Emission in Can-Type Combustor Firing Natural Gas, LNG and Syngas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasini, H.; Fadhil, SSA; Mat Zian, N.; Om, NI

    2016-03-01

    CFD investigation of flow, combustion process and pollutant emission using natural gas, liquefied natural gas and syngas of different composition is carried out. The combustor is a can-type combustor commonly used in thermal power plant gas turbine. The investigation emphasis on the comparison of pollutant emission such in particular CO2, and NOx between different fuels. The numerical calculation for basic flow and combustion process is done using the framework of ANSYS Fluent with appropriate model assumptions. Prediction of pollutant species concentration at combustor exit shows significant reduction of CO2 and NOx for syngas combustion compared to conventional natural gas and LNG combustion.

  1. A simulation for prediction of nitrogen oxide emissions in lean premixed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Do Yong; Park, Jung Kyu; Jin, Jae Min [Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Min Chul [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    Chemical reactor networks (CRN) models were developed for lean premixed gas turbine combustor to predict the NOx emissions. In this study, CRN models are constructed based on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for both non-pilot and pilot flame cases. Predictions of NOx emissions in combustor with the developed models were made by using CHEMKIN code and full GRI 3.0 chemical kinetic mechanism in the CRN. The predicted results agree reasonably well with the experimental data obtained from a simplified test combustor for the GE7FA gas turbine. The effects of overall equivalence ratio, swirl angle and pilot fuel ratio on the NOx emissions were investigated.

  2. A simulation for prediction of nitrogen oxide emissions in lean premixed combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical reactor networks (CRN) models were developed for lean premixed gas turbine combustor to predict the NOx emissions. In this study, CRN models are constructed based on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for both non-pilot and pilot flame cases. Predictions of NOx emissions in combustor with the developed models were made by using CHEMKIN code and full GRI 3.0 chemical kinetic mechanism in the CRN. The predicted results agree reasonably well with the experimental data obtained from a simplified test combustor for the GE7FA gas turbine. The effects of overall equivalence ratio, swirl angle and pilot fuel ratio on the NOx emissions were investigated

  3. Development of an analytical model to assess fuel property effects on combustor performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, R. D.; Troth, D. L.; Miles, G. A.; Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    A generalized first-order computer model has been developed in order to analytically evaluate the potential effect of alternative fuels' effects on gas turbine combustors. The model assesses the size, configuration, combustion reliability, and durability of the combustors required to meet performance and emission standards while operating on a broad range of fuels. Predictions predicated on combustor flow-field determinations by the model indicate that fuel chemistry, as defined by hydrogen content, exerts a significant influence on flame retardation, liner wall temperature, and smoke emission.

  4. Optimisation of a two-head lean pre-vaporized premixed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guin, Ch. [Office National d' Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA/DEFA), Dept. Chemin de la Huniere, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Trichet, P. [Office National d' Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA/DMAE), 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2004-01-01

    As part of the European Brite Euram Low Emission Combustor Technology programme, a two-head combustor sector, designed by SNECMA and ONERA, that includes an LPP (lean pre-vaporizing pre mixing) main zone and an RQL (rich-quick quench-lean) pilot zone within the same volume, was tested at ONERA. A significant 50% reduction in NO{sub x} emissions was recorded for a pressure, air inlet temperature and fuel air ratio of 7 bar, 750 K, and 2.4%, respectively. The optimisation of each combustor component allowed to understand the phenomena and to identify solutions to the main difficulties associated with this new concept. (authors)

  5. Ignition and Flame Stabilization of a Strut-Jet RBCC Combustor with Small Rocket Exhaust

    OpenAIRE

    Jichao Hu; Juntao Chang; Wen Bao

    2014-01-01

    A Rocket Based Combined Cycle combustor model is tested at a ground direct connected rig to investigate the flame holding characteristics with a small rocket exhaust using liquid kerosene. The total temperature and the Mach number of the vitiated air flow, at exit of the nozzle are 1505 K and 2.6, respectively. The rocket base is embedded in a fuel injecting strut and mounted in the center of the combustor. The wall of the combustor is flush, without any reward step or cavity, so the strut-je...

  6. Residues characterisation from the fluidised bed combustion of East London's solid recovered fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balampanis, D E; Pollard, S J T; Simms, N; Longhurst, P; Coulon, F; Villa, R

    2010-07-01

    Waste thermal treatment in Europe is moving towards the utilisation of the combustible output of mechanical, biological treatment (MBT) plants. The standardisation of solid recovered fuels (SRF) is expected to support this trend and increase the amount of the generated combustion residues. In this work, the residues and especially the fly ashes from the fluidised bed combustion (FBC) of East London's NCV 3, Cl 2, and Hg 1 class SRF, are characterised. The following toxicity indicators have been studied: leachable chlorine, organochlorides expressed as pentachlorobenzene and hexachlorobenzene, and the heavy metals Cu, Cr, Cd, Zn, Ni, and Pb. Furthermore the mineralogical pattern of the ashes has been studied by means of XRD and SEM-EDS. The results suggest that these SRF derived ashes have significantly lower quantities of Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn, leachable Cl, and organochlorides when compared to other literature values from traditional waste thermal treatment applications. This fact highlights the importance of modern separation technologies employed in MBT plants for the removal of components rich in metals and chlorine from the combustible output fraction of SRF resulting to less hazardous residues. PMID:20231082

  7. Acid mine drainage abatement using fluidized bed combustion ash grout after geophysical site characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyritic coal refuse and pit cleanings buried in a 15-ha (37-acre) surface mine produce severe acid mine drainage (AMD). The pyritic material had been buried in discrete piles or pods in the backfill. The pods and the resulting contaminant plumes were initially defined using geophysical techniques and were confirmed by drilling. Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash, mixed with water to form a grout, was used in different ways to isolate the pyritic material from water and oxygen. In the first approach, grout was pressure injected directly into the buried pods to fill the void spaces within the pods and to coat the pyritic materials with a cementitious layer. A second approach used the grout to divert water from specific areas. Pods which did not accept grout because of a clay matrix were isolated from percolating water with a cap and trench seal of the grout. The grout was also used in certain areas to blanket the clay pit floor since clays are believed to be a primary source of aluminum at this site. In certain areas, the AMD migrates downward though fractures in the pit floor to the groundwater table. Grout was injected along the fractures in some of these areas to seal them. This would inhibit further AMD migration toward one of the receiving streams. The initial postgrouting water quality data have been encouraging

  8. Biomass fueled fluidized bed combustion: atmospheric emissions, emission control devices and environmental regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluidized bed combustors have become the technological choice for power generation from biomass fuels in California. Atmospheric emission data obtained during compliance tests are compared for five operating 18 to 32 MW fluidized bed combustion power plants. The discussion focuses on the impact of fuel properties and boiler design criteria on the emission of pollutants, the efficiency of pollution control devices, and regulations affecting atmospheric emissions. Stack NOx emission factors are shown not to vary substantially among the five plants which burn fuels with nitrogen concentrations between 0.3 and 1.1% dry weight. All facilities use at least one particular control device, but not all use limestone injection or other control techniques for sulfur and chlorine. The lack of control for chlorine suggests the potential for emission of toxic species due to favorable temperature conditions existing in the particulate control devices, particularly when burning fuels containing high concentrations of chlorine. (Author)

  9. Release of alkali salts and coal volatiles affecting internal components in fluidized bed combustion systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arias del Campo, E.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the potential advantages of atmospheric fluidized bed systems, experience has proved that, under certain environments and operating conditions, a given material employed for internal components could lead to catastrophic events. In this study, an attempt is made to establish material selection and operational criteria that optimize performance and availability based on theoretical considerations of the bed hydrodynamics, thermodynamics and combustion process. The theoretical results may indicate that, for high-volatile coals with particle diameters (dc of 1-3 mm and sand particle size (ds of 0.674 mm, a considerable proportion of alkali chlorides may be transferred into the freeboard region of fluidized bed combustors as vapor phase, at bed temperatures (Tb < 840 °C, excess air (XSA ≤ 20 %, static bed height (Hs ≤ 0.2 m and fluidizing velocity (Uo < 1 m/s. Under these operating conditions, a high alkali deposition may be expected to occur in heat exchange tubes located above the bed. Conversely, when the combustors operate at Tb > 890 °C and XSA > 30 %, a high oxidation rate of the in-bed tubes may be present. Nevertheless, for these higher Tb values and XSA < 10 %, corrosion attack of metallic components, via sulfidation, would occur since the excessive gas-phase combustion within the bed induced a local oxygen depletion.

    A pesar de las ventajas potenciales de los sistemas atmosféricos de lecho fluidizado, la experiencia ha demostrado que, bajo ciertas atmósferas y condiciones de operación, un material que se emplea como componente interno podría experimentar una falla y conducir a eventos catastróficos. En este estudio, se intenta establecer un criterio tanto operativo como de selección del material que permita optimizar su disponibilidad y funcionalidad basados en consideraciones teóricas de la hidrodinámica del lecho, la termodin

  10. Combustion characteristics of Athabasca froth treatment tailings in a simulated fluidilized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esmaeili, P.; Ghosh, M.; Speirs, B. C. [Imperial Oil Resources (Canada); Leon, M. A.; Rao, S.; Dutta, A.; Basu, P. [Greenfield Research Inc. (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In surface-mined oil sands, a stream of water, asphaltenes, solids and residual bitumen/solvent, known as PFT tailings, is created during the bitumen production process. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of this PFT tailings stream as a fuel source for combustion in a fluidized bed for energy recovery. To do so, physical and fluidization characteristics of the fuel as well as combustion kinetics were assessed through laboratory analysis. In addition, the fuel's combustion characteristics were investigated through experiments in a quartz wool matrix tubular reactor and theoretical calculations at various moisture contents. Results showed that this fuel can be burned in a fluidized bed with a reactivity comparable to that of coal samples. This research found that PFT tailings could be used to generate energy during disposal but further work will have to be undertaken in a hot CFB combustor to confirm this.

  11. Granular-bed and ceramic candle filters in commercial plants: A comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, K.B.; Haas, J.C.; Eshelman, M.B.

    1993-04-01

    Advanced coal fired power cycles require the removal of coal ash at high temperature and pressure. Granular-bed and ceramic candle filters can be used for this service. Conceptual designs for commercial size applications are made for each type of filter. The filters are incorporated in the design of a Foster Wheeler 450 MWe second generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion plant which contains a pressurized fluidized combustor and carbonizer. In a second application, the inters are incorporated in the design of a 100 MWe KRW (air) gasifier based power plant. The candle filter design is state of the art as determined from the open literature with an effort to minimize the cost. The granular-bed filter design is based on test work performed at high temperature and low pressure, tests at New York University performed at high pressure and temperate, and new analysis used to simplify the scale up of the filter and reduce overall cost. The incorporation of chemically reactive granites in the granular-bed filter for the removal of additional coal derived contaminants such as alkali or sulfur is considered. The conceptual designs of the granular-bed inter and the ceramic candle filter are compared in terms of the cost of electricity, capital cost, and operating and maintenance costs for each application.

  12. Circulating fluidized bed combustion in the turbulent regime: Modeling of carbon combustion efficiency and sulfur retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adanez, J.; Gayan, P.; Grasa, G.; Diego, L.F. de; Armesto, L.; Cabanillas, A.

    1999-07-01

    In this work carbon combustion efficiencies and sulfur retentions in CFBC under the turbulent regime were studied. Experimental results were obtained from the combustion of a lignite and an anthracite with a limestone in a CBF pilot plant with 20 cm internal diameter and 6.5 m height. The effect of operating conditions such as coal and limestone particle size distributions, temperature, excess air, air velocity and Ca/S molar ratio on carbon combustion efficiency and sulfur retention was studied. On the other hand, a mathematical model for the carbon combustion efficiencies and sulfur retentions in circulating fluidized bed combustors operating under the turbulent regime was developed. The model has been developed considering the hydrodynamics behavior of a turbulent bed, the kinetics of carbon combustion and sulfur retention in the riser. The hydrodynamics characteristics of the turbulent regime were previously studied in a cold pilot plant and equations to determine the axial and radial voidage in the bed were proposed. A core-annulus structure in the dilute region of the bed was found in this regime. Carbon combustion and sulfur retention were modeled by modifying a model developed for fast beds and taking into account turbulent regime characteristics. The experimental results of carbon combustion efficiencies and sulfur retentions were compared with those predicted by the model and a good correlation was found for all the conditions used.

  13. Peach and apricot stone combustion in a bubbling fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaynak, B.; Atimtay, Aysel T. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06531 (Turkey); Topal, H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering and Architecture Faculty, Gazi University, Ankara 06570 (Turkey)

    2005-07-25

    In this study, a bubbling fluidized bed combustor (BFBC) of 102 mm inside diameter and 900 mm height was used to investigate the combustion characteristics of peach and apricot stones produced as a waste from the fruit juice industry. A lignite coal was also burned in the same combustor. The combustion characteristics of the wastes were compared with that of a lignite coal that is most widely used in Turkey. On-line concentrations of O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub X} and total hydrocarbons (C{sub m}H{sub n}) were measured in the flue gas during combustion experiments. By changing the operating parameters (excess air ratio, fluidization velocity, and fuel feed rate), the variation of emissions of various pollutants was studied. Temperature distribution along the bed was measured with thermocouples. During the combustion tests, it was observed that the volatile matter from peach and apricot stones quickly volatilizes and mostly burn in the freeboard. The temperature profiles along the bed and the freeboard also confirmed this phenomenon. It was found that as the volatile matter of fruit stones increases, the combustion takes place more in the freeboard region. The results of this study have shown that the combustion efficiencies ranged between 98.8% and 99.1% for coal, 96.0% and 97.5% for peach stone and 93.4% and 96.3% for apricot stones. The coal has zero CO emission, but biomass fuels have very high CO emission which indicates that a secondary air addition is required for the system. SO{sub 2} emission of the coal is around 2400-2800 mg/Nm{sup 3}, whereas the biomass fuels have zero SO{sub 2} emission. NO{sub x} emissions are all below the limits set by the Turkish Air Quality Control Regulation of 1986 (TAQCR) for all tests. As the results of combustion of two biomass fuels are compared with each other, peach stones gave lower CO and NO{sub x} emissions but the SO{sub 2} emissions are a little higher than for apricot stones. These results suggest that

  14. Combustion studies of high moisture content waste in a fluidised bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksankraisorn, K; Patumsawad, S; Fungtammasan, B

    2003-01-01

    The combustion of three high moisture content waste materials in a fluidised bed combustor has been investigated and a comparison with co-firing of these materials with coal in the same combustor has been made. Waste materials burnt were olive oil waste, municipal solid waste and potato, which is representative of vegetable waste. Mixtures of up to 20% mass concentration water in the waste were fed to the combustor. Above that value the moisture content was too high to sustain combustion without addition of coal. Measurements of CO, NOx, SO2 temperatures were made and the carbon combustion efficiency evaluated. Co-firing with coal resulted in markedly higher combustion efficiencies with an increase of approximately 10-80% when burning the simulated MSW. However, this was much lower than the value of 93% when coal was burnt on its own. It was also much lower than the value obtained, average 90%, when co-firing potato and olive oil waste with coal and there was little difference in the combustion efficiency between the two types of waste and with increasing moisture content. It was concluded that the high ash content of the simulated MSW 26%, compared with 5% in the other two waste materials resulted in slower burning and consequently the char particles were elutriated from the bed without being fully burnt. In term of gaseous emissions during co-combustion, CO emission is relatively insensitive to change in waste fraction. While emission of SO2 can be reduced as the waste fraction increases as a result of fuel-S dilution. But in terms of percent fuel-S converted, it is actually increased by increasing waste fraction. Emissions of NO and N2O increase slightly with MSW fraction. PMID:12893016

  15. A Simplified Model for Detonation Based Pressure-Gain Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    A time-dependent model is presented which simulates the essential physics of a detonative or otherwise constant volume, pressure-gain combustor for gas turbine applications. The model utilizes simple, global thermodynamic relations to determine an assumed instantaneous and uniform post-combustion state in one of many envisioned tubes comprising the device. A simple, second order, non-upwinding computational fluid dynamic algorithm is then used to compute the (continuous) flowfield properties during the blowdown and refill stages of the periodic cycle which each tube undergoes. The exhausted flow is averaged to provide mixed total pressure and enthalpy which may be used as a cycle performance metric for benefits analysis. The simplicity of the model allows for nearly instantaneous results when implemented on a personal computer. The results compare favorably with higher resolution numerical codes which are more difficult to configure, and more time consuming to operate.

  16. Role of fuel chemical properties on combustor radiative heat load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosfjord, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    In an attempt to rigorously study the fuel chemical property influence on combustor radiative heat load, UTRC has conducted an experimental program using 25 test fuels. The burner was a 12.7-cm dia cylindrical device fueled by a single pressure-atomizing injector. Fuel physical properties were de-emphasized by selecting injectors which produced highly-atomized, and hence rapidly-vaporizing sprays. The fuels were specified to cover the following wide ranges of chemical properties: hydrogen, 9.1 to 15- (wt) pct; total aromatics, 0 to 100 (vol) pct; and naphthalene, 0 to 30 (vol) pct. They included standard fuels, specialty products and fuel blends. Fuel naphthalene content exhibited the strongest influence on radiation of the chemical properties investigated. Smoke point was a good global indicator of radiation severity.

  17. Gas turbine combustor exit piece with hinged connections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charron, Richard C.; Pankey, William W.

    2016-04-26

    An exit piece (66) with an inlet throat (67) that conducts a combustion gas flow (36A) in a path (82) from a combustor (63) to an annular chamber (68) that feeds the first blade section (37) of a gas turbine (26). The exit piece further includes an outlet portion (69) that forms a circumferential segment of the annular chamber. The outlet portion interconnects with adjacent outlet portions by hinges (78A, 78B, 80A, 80B). Each hinge may have a hinge axis (82A, 82B) parallel to a centerline (21) of the turbine. Respective gas flows (36A) are configured by an assembly (60) of the exit pieces to converge on the feed chamber (68) into a uniform helical flow that drives the first blade section with minimal circumferential variations in force.

  18. Advanced atomization concept for CWF burning in small combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, H.; McHale, E.

    1991-01-01

    The present project involves the second phase of research on a new concept in coal-water fuel (CWF) atomization that is applicable to burning in small combustors. It is intended to address the most important problem associated with CWF combustion; i.e., production of small spray droplets in an efficient manner by an atomization device. Phase 1 of this work was successfully completed with the development of an opposed-jet atomizer that met the goals of the first contract. Performance as a function of operating conditions was measured, and the technical feasibility of the device established in the Atlantic Research Atomization Test Facility employing a Malvern Particle Size Analyzer. Testing then proceeded to a combustion stage in a test furnace at a firing rate of 0.5 to 1.5 MMBtu/H.

  19. Combustion of hydrogen in an experimental trapped vortex combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui; Chen, Qin; Shao, Weiwei; Zhang, Yongliang; Wang, Yue; Xiao, Yunhan

    2009-09-01

    Combustion performances of pure hydrogen in an experimental trapped vortex combustor have been tested under different operating conditions. Pressure fluctuations, NOx emissions, OH distributions, and LBO (Lean Blow Out) were measured in the tests. Results indicate that the TVC test rig has successfully realized a double vortex construction in the cavity zone in a wide range of flow conditions. Hydrogen combustion in the test rig has achieved an excellent LBO performance and relatively low NOx emissions. Through comparison of dynamic pressure data, OH fluctuation images, and NOx emissions, the optimal operating condition has been found out to be Φp =0.4, fuel split =0.4, and primary air/fuel premixed.

  20. Geomechanics of bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creep data from the literature search is reinterpreted by SGI, resulting in a better understanding of the temperature and stress state dependence of the octahedral creep rate and the octahedral shear strength. The concept of a transition strength between the elastic and the plastic states is in agreement with the data. The elastic and rheological properties of salt are described, and a set of constitutive equations is presented. The dependence of material properties on parameters such as temperature is considered. Findings on the permeability of salt are summarized, and the in-situ behavior of openings in bedded salt is described based on extensive engineering experience. A stress measuring system utilizing a finite element computer code is discussed. Geological factors affecting the stability of salt openings are considered, and the Stress Control Technique for designing stable openings in bedded salt formations is explained

  1. Enabling Advanced Modeling and Simulations for Fuel-Flexible Combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinz Pitsch

    2010-05-31

    The overall goal of the present project is to enable advanced modeling and simulations for the design and optimization of fuel-flexible turbine combustors. For this purpose we use a high-fidelity, extensively-tested large-eddy simulation (LES) code and state-of-the-art models for premixed/partially-premixed turbulent combustion developed in the PI's group. In the frame of the present project, these techniques are applied, assessed, and improved for hydrogen enriched premixed and partially premixed gas-turbine combustion. Our innovative approaches include a completely consistent description of flame propagation, a coupled progress variable/level set method to resolve the detailed flame structure, and incorporation of thermal-diffusion (non-unity Lewis number) effects. In addition, we have developed a general flamelet-type transformation holding in the limits of both non-premixed and premixed burning. As a result, a model for partially premixed combustion has been derived. The coupled progress variable/level method and the general flamelet tranformation were validated by LES of a lean-premixed low-swirl burner that has been studied experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The model is extended to include the non-unity Lewis number effects, which play a critical role in fuel-flexible combustor with high hydrogen content fuel. More specifically, a two-scalar model for lean hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched combustion is developed and validated against experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Results are presented to emphasize the importance of non-unity Lewis number effects in the lean-premixed low-swirl burner of interest in this project. The proposed model gives improved results, which shows that the inclusion of the non-unity Lewis number effects is essential for accurate prediction of the lean-premixed low-swirl flame.

  2. Enabling Advanced Modeling and Simulations for Fuel-Flexible Combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitsch, Heinz

    2010-05-31

    The overall goal of the present project is to enable advanced modeling and simulations for the design and optimization of fuel-flexible turbine combustors. For this purpose we use a high fidelity, extensively-tested large-eddy simulation (LES) code and state-of-the-art models for premixed/partially-premixed turbulent combustion developed in the PI's group. In the frame of the present project, these techniques are applied, assessed, and improved for hydrogen enriched premixed and partially premixed gas-turbine combustion. Our innovative approaches include a completely consistent description of flame propagation; a coupled progress variable/level set method to resolve the detailed flame structure, and incorporation of thermal-diffusion (non-unity Lewis number) effects. In addition, we have developed a general flamelet-type transformation holding in the limits of both non-premixed and premixed burning. As a result, a model for partially premixed combustion has been derived. The coupled progress variable/level method and the general flamelet transformation were validated by LES of a lean-premixed low-swirl burner that has been studied experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The model is extended to include the non-unity Lewis number effects, which play a critical role in fuel-flexible combustor with high hydrogen content fuel. More specifically, a two-scalar model for lean hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched combustion is developed and validated against experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Results are presented to emphasize the importance of non-unity Lewis number effects in the lean-premixed low-swirl burner of interest in this project. The proposed model gives improved results, which shows that the inclusion of the non-unity Lewis number effects is essential for accurate prediction of the lean-premixed low-swirl flame.

  3. Research on coal staged conversion poly-generation system based on fluidized bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingjiang Ni; Chao Li; Mengxiang Fang; Qinhui Wang; Zhongyang Luo; Kefa Cen

    2014-01-01

    A new coal staged conversion poly-generation system combined coal combustion and pyrolysis has been developed for clean and high efficient utilization of coal. Coal is the first pyrolysed in a fluidized pyrolyzer. The pyrolysis gas is then purified and used for chemical product or liquid fuel production. Tar is collected during purification and can be processed to extract high value product and to make liquid fuels by hydro-refining. Semi-coke from the pyrolysis reactor is burned in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustor for heat or power generation. The system can realize coal multi-product generation and has a great potential to increase coal utilization value. A 1 MW poly-generation system pilot plant and a 12 MW CFB gas, tar, heat and power poly-generation system was erected. The experimental study focused on the two fluidized bed operation and characterization of gas, tar and char yields and compositions. The results showed that the system could operate stable, and produce about 0.12 m3/kg gas with 22 MJ/m3 heating value and about 10 wt%tar when using Huainan bituminous coal under pyrolysis temperature between 500 and 600 ?C. The produced gases were mainly H2, CH4, CO, CO2, C2H4, C2H6, C3H6 and C3H8. The CFB combustor can burn semi-coke steadily. The application prospect of the new system was discussed.

  4. Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion Second-Generation System Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Robertson; D. Horazak; R. Newby; H. Goldstein

    2002-11-01

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DE-AC21-86MC21023 to develop a new type of coal-fired plant for electric power generation. This new type of plant--called a Second-Generation or Advanced Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion (APCFB) plant--offers the promise of efficiencies greater than 45% (HHV), with both emissions and a cost of electricity that are significantly lower than conventional pulverized-coal-fired plants with scrubbers. The APCFB plant incorporates the partial gasification of coal in a carbonizer, the combustion of carbonizer char in a pressurized circulating fluidized bed boiler (PCFB), and the combustion of carbonizer syngas in a topping combustor to achieve gas turbine inlet temperatures of 2300 F and higher. A conceptual design was previously prepared for this new type of plant and an economic analysis presented, all based on the use of a Siemens Westinghouse W501F gas turbine with projected carbonizer, PCFB, and topping combustor performance data. Having tested these components at the pilot plant stage, the referenced conceptual design is being updated to reflect more accurate performance predictions together with the use of the more advanced Siemens Westinghouse W501G gas turbine and a conventional 2400 psig/1050 F/1050 F/2-1/2 in. steam turbine. This report describes the updated plant which is projected to have an HHV efficiency of 48% and identifies work completed for the October 2001 through September 2002 time period.

  5. Fundamental Combustion Characteristics of Sewage Sludge in Fluidized Bed Incinerator with Turbocharger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takahiro; Suzuki, Yoshizo; Nagasawa, Hidekazu; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Koseki, Takami; Hirose, Hitoshi; Ochi, Shuichi

    An epoch-making incineration plant, which is equipped with a pressurized fluidized-bed combustor coupled to a turbocharger, for the recovery of the energy contained in sewage sludge is proposed. This plant has three main advantages. (1) A pressure vessel is unnecessary because the maximum operating pressure is 0.3 MPa (absolute pressure). The material cost for plant construction can be reduced. (2) CO2 emissions originating from power generation can be decreased because the FDF (Forced Draft Fan) and the IDF (Induced Draft Fan) are omitted. (3) Steam in the flue gas becomes a working fluid of the turbocharger, so that in addition to the combustion air, the surplus air is also generable. Therefore, this proposed plant will not only save energy but also the generate energy. The objective of this study is to elucidate the fundamental combustion characteristics of the sewage sludge using a lab-scale pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC). The tested fuels are de-watered sludge and sawdust. The temperature distribution in the furnace and N2O emissions in the flue gas are experimentally clarified. As the results, for sludge only combustion, the temperature in the sand bed decreases by drying and pyrolysis, and the pyrolysis gas burns in the freeboard so that the temperature rises. On the other hand, the residual char of sawdust after pyrolysis burns stably in the sand bed for the co-firing of sludge and sawdust. Thus the temperature of the co-firing is considerably higher than that of the sludge only combustion. N2O emissions decreases with increasing freeboard temperature, and are controlled by the temperature for all experimental conditions. These data can be utilize to operation the demonstration plant.

  6. Test bed concentrator mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argoud, M. J.

    1980-05-01

    The test bed concentrator (TBC) was des point focusing distributed receiver (PFDR) systems. The reflective surface of the concentrator was fabricated using mirror facet designs and techniques. The facets are made by bonding mirrored glass to spherically-conducted substrates. Several aspects of earlier work were reevaluated for application to the TBC: optimum glass block size, material selection, environmental test, optical characteristics, and reliability. A detailed explanation of tooling, substrate preparation, testing techniques, and mirror assembly is presented.

  7. Integrating coal cleaning with pulverized coal and fluidized bed boilers to meet the Clean Air Act Amendment and for new plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrating coal cleaning into a two boiler, pulverized coal-fired/fluidized bed (PC/FBC) power plant can reduce emissions at low cost for both retrofit projects and new power plants. The technology, because it relies on proven equipment and practices, albeit in a novel context, is low risk and near term. Its low cost makes it particularly suitable to retrofit many of the older coal- fired power plants in the US, and also for retrofitting power plants in the less affluent Eastern European and Asian countries that rely on coal for power generation and need to reduce emission but cannot afford scrubbers. In retrofit applications the technology involves a simple coal cleaning plant and the addition of a small fluidized bed boiler with its steam circuitry integrated into the plant's steam cycle. The clean coal stream will be fired in the existing boiler while the fluidized bed will use the low grade (waste) stream from the coal cleaning plant. This paper reports that this approach is particularly applicable to the many power plants along the Ohio River

  8. System and method for reducing combustion dynamics and NO.sub.x in a combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Jong H.; Johnson, Thomas Edward

    2015-11-20

    A system for reducing combustion dynamics and NO.sub.x in a combustor includes a tube bundle that extends radially across at least a portion of the combustor, wherein the tube bundle comprises an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface. A shroud circumferentially surrounds the upstream and downstream surfaces. A plurality of tubes extends through the tube bundle from the upstream surface through the downstream surface, wherein the downstream surface is stepped to produce tubes having different lengths through the tube bundle. A method for reducing combustion dynamics and NO.sub.x in a combustor includes flowing a working fluid through a plurality of tubes radially arranged between an upstream surface and a downstream surface of an end cap that extends radially across at least a portion of the combustor, wherein the downstream surface is stepped.

  9. Low NOx heavy fuel combustor concept program. Phase 1: Combustion technology generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, H. G.; Carl, D. R.; Vermes, G.; Dezubay, E. A.; Schwab, J. A.; Prothroe, D.

    1981-01-01

    The viability of low emission nitrogen oxide (NOx) gas turbine combustors for industrial and utility application. Thirteen different concepts were evolved and most were tested. Acceptable performance was demonstrated for four of the combustors using ERBS fuel and ultralow NOx emissions were obtained for lean catalytic combustion. Residual oil and coal derived liquids containing fuel bound nitrogen (FBN) were also used at test fuels, and it was shown that staged rich/lean combustion was effective in minimizing the conversion of FBN to NOx. The rich/lean concept was tested with both modular and integral combustors. While the ceramic lined modular configuration produced the best results, the advantages of the all metal integral burners make them candidates for future development. An example of scaling the laboratory sized combustor to a 100 MW size engine is included in the report as are recommendations for future work.

  10. Assessment of thermoacoustic instabilities in a partially premixed model combustor using URANS approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahi, Mina; Kok, Jim B.W.; Roman Casado, J.C.; Pozarlik, Artur K.

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a numerical study of the mechanisms driving thermoacoustic instabilities in a lean partially premixed combustor in conditions representative of gas turbine combustion systems. Various combustion models and modeling approaches able to predict the onset of thermoacoustic instabiliti

  11. Robust High Fidelity Large Eddy Simulation Tool for Gas Turbine Combustors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective is to develop and demonstrate the use of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) for computations of gas turbine combustor flow and transport processes, using the...

  12. Exposure of Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites in Simulated and Actual Combustor Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brentnall, W.D.; Ferber, M.K.; Keiser, j.R.; Miriyala, N.; More, K.L.; Price, J.R.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Walker, L.R.

    1999-06-07

    A high-temperature, high-pressure, tube furnace has been used to evaluate the long term stability of different monolithic ceramic and ceramic matrix composite materials in a simulated combustor environment. All of the tests have been run at 150 psia, 1204 degrees C, and 15% steam in incremental 500 h runs. The major advantage of this system is the high sample throughput; >20 samples can be exposed in each tube at the same time under similar exposure conditions. Microstructural evaluations of the samples were conducted after each 500 h exposure to characterize the extent of surface damage, to calculate surface recession rates, and to determine degradation mechanisms for the different materials. The validity of this exposure rig for simulating real combustor environments was established by comparing materials exposed in the test rig and combustor liner materials exposed for similar times in an actual gas turbine combustor under commercial operating conditions.

  13. Effects of Burning Alternative Fuel in a 5-Cup Combustor Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacina, K. M.; Chang, C. T.; Lee, C.-M.; He, Z.; Herbon, J.

    2015-01-01

    A goal of NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) program is to develop a combustor that will reduce the NOx emissions and that can burn both standard and alternative fuels. To meet this goal, NASA partnered with General Electric Aviation to develop a 5-cup combustor sector; this sector was tested in NASA Glenn's Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig (ASCR). To verify that the combustor sector was fuel-flexible, it was tested with a 50-50 blend of JP-8 and a biofuel made from the camelina sativa plant. Results from this test were compared to results from tests where the fuel was neat JP-8. Testing was done at three combustor inlet conditions: cruise, 30% power, and 7% power. When compared to burning JP-8, burning the 50-50 blend did not significantly affect emissions of NOx, CO, or total hydrocarbons. Furthermore, it did not significantly affect the magnitude and frequency of the dynamic pressure fluctuations.

  14. An investigation of the effects of fuel composition on combustion characteristics in a T-63 combustor

    OpenAIRE

    DuBeau, Robert William; Hickey, P J; Krug, Andrew Clarence; Lohman, Alan L.; Weller, J. P.; Netzer, David W.

    1985-01-01

    A T63 combustor was instrumented to allow measurement ofcenterline distributions of temperature and soot size and concentration using water-cooled probes. Three-wavelength light transmission measurements were also made at two locations to determine the mean soot size and NOx concentrations were measured in the exhaust duct. Five fuels of varying composition were used in the combustor and initial tests were conducted using two smoke-suppressant fuel additives. The data indicated that the aft r...

  15. CFD Study of NOx Emissions in a Model Commercial Aircraft Engine Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Man; FU Zhenbo; LIN Yuzhen; LI Jibao

    2012-01-01

    Air worthiness requirements of the aircraft engine emission bring new challenges to the combustor research and design.With the motivation to design high performance and clean combustor,computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is utilized as the powerful design approach.In this paper,Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations of reactive two-phase flow in an experimental low emission combustor is performed.The numerical approach uses an implicit compressible gas solver together with a Lagrangian liquid-phase tracking method and the extended coherent flamelet model for turbulence-combustion interaction.The NOx formation is modeled by the concept of post-processing,which resolves the NOx transport equation with the assumption of frozen temperature distribution.Both turbulence-combustion interaction model and NOx formation model are firstly evaluated by the comparison of experimental data published in open literature of a lean direct injection (LDI) combustor.The test rig studied in this paper is called low emission stirred swirl (LESS) combustor,which is a two-stage model combustor,fueled with liquid kerosene (RP-3) and designed by Beihang University (BUAA).The main stage of LESS combustor employs the principle of lean prevaporized and premixed (LPP) concept to reduce pollutant,and the pilot stage depends on a diffusion flame for flame stabilization.Detailed numerical results including species distribution,turbulence performance and burning performance are qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated.Numerical prediction of NOx emission shows a good agreement with test data at both idle condition and full power condition of LESS combustor.Preliminary results of the flame structure are shown in this paper.The flame stabilization mechanism and NOx reduction effort are also discussed with in-depth analysis.

  16. Development of methane oxidation catalysts for different gas turbine combustor concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Sara

    2005-01-01

    Due to continuously stricter regulations regarding emissions from power generation processes, development of existing gas turbine combustors is essential. A promising alternative to conventional flame combustion in gas turbines is catalytic combustion, which can result in ultra low emission levels of NOx, CO and unburned hydrocarbons. The work presented in this thesis concerns the development of methane oxidation catalysts for gas turbine combustors. The application of catalytic combustion to...

  17. Development of catalysts for natural gas-fired gas turbine combustors

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Sara

    2006-01-01

    Due to continuously stricter regulations regarding emissions from power generation processes, further development of existing gas turbine combustors is essential. A promising alternative to conventional flame combustion in gas turbines is catalytic combustion, which can result in ultralow emission levels of NOx, CO and unburned hydrocarbons. The work presented in this thesis concerns the development of methane oxidation catalysts for gas turbine combustors. The application of catalytic combus...

  18. Combustor having mixing tube bundle with baffle arrangement for directing fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Michael John; McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin

    2016-08-23

    A combustor includes a tube bundle that extends radially across at least a portion of the combustor. The tube bundle includes an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface, and a plurality of tubes extend from the upstream surface through the downstream surface to provide fluid communication through the tube bundle. A barrier extends radially inside the tube bundle between the upstream and downstream surfaces, and a baffle extends axially inside the tube bundle between the upstream surface and the barrier.

  19. Effect of Air Staging and Limestone Addition on Emissions of SO2 and NOx in Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this work is to provide more detailed knowledge about the effect of air staging and its relation to the addition of limestone on the emissions of SO2 and NOx from fluidized bed combustors. This knowledge can be used in models of (circulating) fluidized bed combustors for the development of control strategies. The effect of air staging can be divided in to two parts: (1) The effect on the hydrodynamics in a circulating fluidized bed; and (2) The effect on the local gas concentrations, especially the O2 concentration. In this work the influence of both these effects on the SO2 and NOx emissions from (circulating) fluidized bed combustors with air staging was investigated. In Chapter 2 the influence air staging and the use of secondary air injection on the hydrodynamics in a circulating fluidized beds is described. In the first section of that chapter a literature review is given. In the second section an experimental study is presented on the solids distribution and circulation rate under different air staging conditions. Chapter 3 presents fixed bed studies on the SO2 retention by limestone. To understand the influence of air staging, the effect of oxygen on the SO2 retention was investigated. The kinetics were determined and the so-called grain model was used to model the SO2 retention. In Chapter 4 an extensive study was made on the kinetics of the formation of NO from NH3 and the influence of oxygen on these reactions. The kinetics and the activation energies of both homogenous reactions and reactions catalyzed by limestone were determined and the effect of oxygen was investigated. Chapter 5 presents an experimental study and modeling work on the effect of water and CO2 on the reactivity of limestone. It was found that the presence of water reduced the reactivity of limestone significantly. In Chapter 6 the oxidation of NH3 over partially sulphated limestone is studied. A model is developed that describes the NO formation and selectivity as a

  20. Effects of broadened property fuels on radiant heat flux to gas turbine combustor liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggard, J. B., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of fuel type, inlet air pressure, inlet air temperature, and fuel/air ratio on the combustor radiation were investigated. Combustor liner radiant heat flux measurements were made in the spectral region between 0.14 and 6.5 microns at three locations in a modified commercial aviation can combustor. Two fuels, Jet A and a heavier distillate research fuel called ERBS were used. The use of ERBS fuel as opposed to Jet A under similar operating conditions resulted in increased radiation to the combustor liner and hence increased backside liner temperature. This increased radiation resulted in liner temperature increases always less than 73 C. The increased radiation is shown by way of calculations to be the result of increased soot concentrations in the combustor. The increased liner temperatures indicated can substantially affect engine maintenance costs by reducing combustor liner life up to 1/3 because of the rapid decay in liner material properties when operated beyond their design conditions.

  1. Unstructured LES of Reacting Multiphase Flows in Realistic Gas Turbine Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Frank; Apte, Sourabh; Iaccarino, Gianluca; Wu, Xiao-Hua; Herrmann, Marcus; Constantinescu, George; Mahesh, Krishnan; Moin, Parviz

    2003-01-01

    As part of the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) program, an accurate and robust simulation tool is being developed to perform high-fidelity LES studies of multiphase, multiscale turbulent reacting flows in aircraft gas turbine combustor configurations using hybrid unstructured grids. In the combustor, pressurized gas from the upstream compressor is reacted with atomized liquid fuel to produce the combustion products that drive the downstream turbine. The Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach is used to simulate the combustor because of its demonstrated superiority over RANS in predicting turbulent mixing, which is central to combustion. This paper summarizes the accomplishments of the combustor group over the past year, concentrating mainly on the two major milestones achieved this year: 1) Large scale simulation: A major rewrite and redesign of the flagship unstructured LES code has allowed the group to perform large eddy simulations of the complete combustor geometry (all 18 injectors) with over 100 million control volumes; 2) Multi-physics simulation in complex geometry: The first multi-physics simulations including fuel spray breakup, coalescence, evaporation, and combustion are now being performed in a single periodic sector (1/18th) of an actual Pratt & Whitney combustor geometry.

  2. Non-reacting Flow Analysis from Combustor Inlet to Outlet using Computational Fluid Dynamics Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ananda Reddy

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes non-reacting flow analysis of a gas turbine combustion system. The method is based on the solution of Navier-Strokes equations using generalised non-orthogonal coordinate system. The turbulence effects are modelled through the renormalisation group k-E model. The method has been applied to a practical gas turbine combustor. The combustionsystem includes swirler vane passages, fuel nozzles, rotor bleed, customer bleed, air-blast atomiser, swirl cone, and all holes in primary , dilution , dome, flare, and cooling ring. Thetotal geometry has been created using the pre-processors GAMBIT and CATIA, and the meshing has been done using GAMBIT, and the analysis carried out in a FLUENT solver. The interaction between the diffuser and the combustor external flows plays a key role in controlling the pressure loss, air flow distribution around the combustor liner, durability, and stability. The aero gas turbine combustor designs are generally guided by experimental methods and past experience; however, experimental methods are inherently slow, costly, especially at hightemperature engine-operating conditions. These drawbacks and the growing need to understand the complex flow-field phenomenon involved, have led to the development of a numericalmodel for predicting flow in the gas turbine combustor. These models are used to optimise the design of the combustor and its subcomponents, and reduce cost, time, and the number ofexperiments.

  3. Note on the feasibility of a dual solid fuel supersonic combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosa, Jose Luis [Comission Nacional de Investigaciones e Desarollo Aeroespacial, Lima (Peru); Villa-Nova, Helcio Francisco; Bastos-Netto, Demetrio [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    1998-07-01

    This paper investigates an air fed supersonic combustor of dual type using a solid fuel which is burned in a secondary combustor chamber under oxidizer starving conditions, with a small fraction of the main feeding air stream decelerated to subsonic conditions. These combustion products, consisting of a mixture of combustible gases and active radicals, are then accelerated back to sonic conditions and injected in the primary combustor chamber where it is mixed with the main supersonic air stream and burned under supersonic conditions. The solid fuel is a polyester enriched with a small fraction of ammonium perchlorate. The secondary chamber was designed as a subsonic solid fuel ramjet combustor and the primary combustion chamber design followed a simple and well know model which assumes a one dimensional, steady state flow with Crocco's relation to describe the pressure field and uses the Reynolds'Analogy to describe the coupling between the heat flux and the wall friction. Experiments with five different combustor configurations were performed using a vitiated air, connected, kerosene-fed testing facility for scramjet combustors. (author)

  4. Challenges to Laser-Based Imaging Techniques in Gas Turbine Combustor Systems for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Randy J.; Anderson, Robert C.; Zaller, Michelle M.; Hicks, Yolanda R.

    1998-01-01

    Increasingly severe constraints on emissions, noise and fuel efficiency must be met by the next generation of commercial aircraft powerplants. At NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) a cooperative research effort with industry is underway to design and test combustors that will meet these requirements. To accomplish these tasks, it is necessary to gain both a detailed understanding of the combustion processes and a precise knowledge of combustor and combustor sub-component performance at close to actual conditions. To that end, researchers at LeRC are engaged in a comprehensive diagnostic investigation of high pressure reacting flowfields that duplicate conditions expected within the actual engine combustors. Unique, optically accessible flame-tubes and sector rig combustors, designed especially for these tests. afford the opportunity to probe these flowfields with the most advanced, laser-based optical diagnostic techniques. However, these same techniques, tested and proven on comparatively simple bench-top gaseous flame burners, encounter numerous restrictions and challenges when applied in these facilities. These include high pressures and temperatures, large flow rates, liquid fuels, remote testing, and carbon or other material deposits on combustor windows. Results are shown that document the success and versatility of these nonintrusive optical diagnostics despite the challenges to their implementation in realistic systems.

  5. Dependence of saltation parameters on bed roughness and bed porosity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kharlamova, Irina; Vlasák, Pavel

    Prague : ITAM AS CR, v. v. i., 2012 - (Náprstek, J.; Fischer, C.), s. 625-629 ISBN 978-80-86246-40-6. [Engineering Mechanics 2012 /18./. Svratka (CZ), 14.05.2012-17.05.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/09/1718 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : saltation parameters * saltation length * saltation height * bed structure * normal distribution of bed particles * bed roughness Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  6. Low NO sub x heavy fuel combustor concept program. Phase 1A: Combustion technology generation coal gas fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, T. P.

    1982-01-01

    Combustion tests of two scaled burners using actual coal gas from a 25 ton/day fluidized bed coal gasifier are described. The two combustor configurations studied were a ceramic lined, staged rich/lean burner and an integral, all metal multiannual swirl burner (MASB). The tests were conducted over a range of temperature and pressures representative of current industrial combustion turbine inlet conditions. Tests on the rich lean burner were conducted at three levels of product gas heating values: 104, 197 and 254 btu/scf. Corresponding levels of NOx emissions were 5, 20 and 70 ppmv. Nitrogen was added to the fuel in the form of ammonia, and conversion efficiencies of fuel nitrogen to NOx were on the order of 4 percent to 12 percent, which is somewhat lower than the 14 percent to 18 percent conversion efficiency when src-2 liquid fuel was used. The MASB was tested only on medium btu gas (220 to 270 btu/scf), and produced approximately 80 ppmv NOx at rated engine conditions. Both burners operated similarly on actual coal gas and erbs fuel, and all heating values tested can be successfully burned in current machines.

  7. Coal Bed Methane Primer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

    2005-05-25

    During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of

  8. Fluidised bed cereal cooking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man has been cooking food for thousands of years for a number of reasons: to improve flavour and palatability, sterilise, increase digestibility, improve texture and colour. Increasingly more advanced techniques are employed today in food production plants to engineer foods with many different properties. With this in mind manufacturers are constantly seeking to improve processing techniques and apply new or different technologies (such as microwaves, RF and extrusion) to develop foods with new properties (like puffed texture starches) and to increase process efficiencies (energy efficiency, water reduction). This thesis reports on work undertaken to demonstrate the potential to achieve high temperature starch conversion of whole wheat grains in a fluidised bed, thereby reducing the amount of water required and processing time. Specifically, wheat from the farm at 14% water content is cooked in a fluidised bed. The fluidised bed heats the wheat quickly by convective heating. In addition, energy can be delivered directly to the grain by microwave heating during fluidisation. Degree of starch conversion is determined by measuring the reduction in size of endotherm of reaction as observed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The fluidising gas, processing temperature and starting moisture content were varied in order to investigate their effect on the cooking process. A mathematical model based on energy and species concentration equations was developed to help understand the internal grain processes. The model coupled the thermal energy equation with water diffusion. The effect of water evaporation was represented as a thermal sink in the energy equation. Popular kinetic models from literature were adapted to predict the degree of starch conversion. The model gives solutions consistent with experimental data and physical intuition. A commercial computational fluid dynamics package was used to study simple airflow and particle tracks in the fluidisation column. A

  9. Energy recovery by gasification of agricultural and forestry wastes in fluidized bed reactors and in moving bed reactors with internal recycle of pyrolysis gas; process development and reactor modelling. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aarsen, F.G. van den; Susanto, H.; Beenackers, A.A.C.M.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1986-01-01

    A modified co-current moving gasifier bed has been developed which substantially reduces product gas tar content compared to conventional down draft gasifiers and allows for a better scale-up of the reactor. These improvements have been realized by installing an ejector in the air inlet which sucks the pyrolysis gases into the gasifying air stream and allows for subsequent combustion of the pyrolysis products in a separate combustor. In relation to the modelling of a fluidized bed biomass gasifier, we studied the fast pyrolysis of beech wood particles and the char-carbondioxide gasification kinetics in a bench scale fluidized bed reactor. A 30 cm diameter fluidized bed biomass gasifier has been constructed and the reactor performance on wood and rice husks has been studied. Those experiments (at 50 kg biomass/hr) revealed that a good gas quality is produced if the reactor is operated above 800/sup 0/ C, in the co-current mode (bottomfeed). Ongoing research is on mass transfer and flow behaviour in the fluidized bed reactor; a mathematical model of the fluidized bed gasifier is under development.

  10. Industrial Gas Turbine Engine Catalytic Pilot Combustor-Prototype Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etemad, Shahrokh [Precision Combustion, Inc., North Haven, CT (United States); Baird, Benjamin [Precision Combustion, Inc., North Haven, CT (United States); Alavandi, Sandeep [Precision Combustion, Inc., North Haven, CT (United States); Pfefferle, William [Precision Combustion, Inc., North Haven, CT (United States)

    2010-04-01

    PCI has developed and demonstrated its Rich Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL®) technology for industrial and utility gas turbines to meet DOE's goals of low single digit emissions. The technology offers stable combustion with extended turndown allowing ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment and further increasing overall efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses). The objective of the work was to develop and demonstrate emission benefits of the catalytic technology to meet strict emissions regulations. Two different applications of the RCL® concept were demonstrated: RCL® catalytic pilot and Full RCL®. The RCL® catalytic pilot was designed to replace the existing pilot (a typical source of high NOx production) in the existing Dry Low NOx (DLN) injector, providing benefit of catalytic combustion while minimizing engine modification. This report discusses the development and single injector and engine testing of a set of T70 injectors equipped with RCL® pilots for natural gas applications. The overall (catalytic pilot plus main injector) program NOx target of less than 5 ppm (corrected to 15% oxygen) was achieved in the T70 engine for the complete set of conditions with engine CO emissions less than 10 ppm. Combustor acoustics were low (at or below 0.1 psi RMS) during testing. The RCL® catalytic pilot supported engine startup and shutdown process without major modification of existing engine controls. During high pressure testing, the catalytic pilot showed no incidence of flashback or autoignition while operating over a wide range of flame temperatures. In applications where lower NOx production is required (i.e. less than 3 ppm), in parallel, a Full RCL® combustor was developed that replaces the existing DLN injector providing potential for maximum emissions reduction. This concept was tested at industrial gas turbine conditions in a Solar Turbines, Incorporated high-pressure (17 atm.) combustion rig and in a modified Solar

  11. Residence time measurement of an isothermal combustor flow field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Liangta; Spencer, Adrian [Loughborough University, Department of Aero and Auto Engineering, Loughborough (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    Residence times of combustors have commonly been used to help understand NO{sub x} emissions and flame blowout. Both the time mean velocity and turbulence fields are important to the residence time, but determining the residence time via analysis of a measured velocity field is difficult due to the inherent unsteadiness and the three-dimensional nature of a high-Re swirling flow. A more direct approach to measure residence time is reported here that examines the dynamic response of fuel concentration to a sudden cutoff in the fuel injection. Residence time measurement was mainly taken using a time-resolved planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique, but a second camera for particle image velocimetry (PIV) was added to check that the step change does not alter the velocity field and the spectral content of the coherent structures. Characteristic timescales evaluated from the measurements are referred to as convection and half-life times: The former describes the time delay from a fuel injector exit reference point to a downstream point of interest, and the latter describes the rate of decay once the effect of the reduced scalar concentration at the injection source has been transported to the point of interest. Residence time is often defined as the time taken for a conserved scalar to reduce to half its initial value after injection is stopped: this equivalent to the sum of the convection time and the half-life values. The technique was applied to a high-swirl fuel injector typical of that found in combustor applications. Two test cases have been studied: with central jet (with-jet) and without central jet (no-jet). It was found that the relatively unstable central recirculation zone of the no-jet case resulted in increased transport of fuel into the central region that is dominated by a precessing vortex core, where long half-life times are also found. Based on this, it was inferred that the no-jet case may be more prone to NO{sub x} production. The

  12. Capacitively-Heated Fluidized Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mchale, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    Fluidized-bed chamber in which particles in bed are capacitively heated produces high yields of polycrystalline silicon for semiconductor devices. Deposition of unrecoverable silicon on chamber wall is reduced, and amount of recoverable silicon depositing on seed particles in bed is increased. Particles also have a size and density suitable for direct handling without consolidation, unlike silicon dust produced in heated-wall chambers.

  13. Case studies--Problem solving in fluidized bed waste fuel incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluidized bed combustion technology has been widely used as the new, flexible, multi-fuel boiler for waste combustion and energy recovery from low grade fuels. However, problems such as low thermal efficiency, high emissions, bed agglomeration etc. are still encountered in the operation of fluidized beds. Valuable experiences were gained from two case studies recently conducted regarding wastes combustion in industrial scale fluidized beds. In the first case, the performance of a fluidized bed combustor for energy recovery from oil sludge was evaluated during the commissioning trials. Apart from the sludge characterization and bed material analysis, the combustion efficiency, solid flow balance and on stack emission of CO, SOx and NOx were investigated, as well as the fluidization quality. Although the system was operated with good combustion efficiency (>99.9%), sulfur dioxide emission (>1000 ppm) was found to be substantially higher than the allowable discharge limit. It was recommended to increase the limestone feed rate in order to meet the SO2 emission standard, and subsequently, installation of a cyclone is suggested to remove the potentially significant increase in ash and fine particles. The second case study focused on the bed agglomeration observed in a fluidized bed incinerator where a burning blend of three wastes (i.e. carbon soot, bio sludge and fuel oil) is involved. To understand the mechanisms and related chemistry, several analytical approaches are employed to identify the bed materials (fresh sand and degrader sand) and the clinkers formed from full scale incinerator tests. The formation of clinker is believed to follow the mechanism of partial melting and/or reactive liquid sintering. The effects of temperature and blending ratio are tested in a muffle furnace. Carbon soot is believed to be more susceptible than the other two fuels. Thermodynamic multi-phase multi-component equilibrium (Tce) calculations predict that the main low melting point

  14. The study of solid circulation rate in a compartmented fluidized bed gasifier (CFBG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, S. K.; Pok, Y. W.; Law, M. C.; Lee, V. C. C.

    2016-06-01

    Biomass waste has been abundantly available in Malaysia since the booming of palm oil industry. In order to tackle this issue, gasification is seen a promising technology to convert waste into energy. In view of the heat requirement for endothermic gasification reaction as well as the complex design and operation of multiple fluidized beds, compartmented fluidized bed gasifier (CFBG) with the combustor and the gasifier as separate compartments is proposed. As such, solid circulation rate (SCR) is one of the essential parameters for steady gasification and combustion to be realized in their respective compartments. Experimental and numerical studies (CFD) on the effect of static bed height, main bed aeration, riser aeration and v-valve aeration on SCR have been conducted in a cold- flow CFBG model with only river sand as the fluidizing medium. At lower operating range, the numerical simulations under-predict the SCR as compared to that of the experimental results. Also, it predicts slightly different trends over the range. On the other hand, at higher operating range, the numerical simulations are able to capture those trends as observed in the experimental results at the lower operating range. Overall, the numerical results compare reasonably well with that of the experimental works.

  15. Dynamic behavior of tobacco waste in the coal-fired fluidized-bed boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kai; Chang, Jian; Chen, Honggang; Yang, Yongping [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). National Eng Lab for Biomass Power Generation Equipment; Yu, Bangting [China Univ. of Petroleum, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Heavy Oil Processing

    2013-07-01

    Circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology is an advanced method for utilizing coal and other solid fuels in an environmentally acceptable manner. During the processing procedure in the nicotiana tabacum plants, lots of tobacco stem wastes are produced, which are normally being dumped to the landfill field. If this kind of waste can be used as a part of the fuel to be added into the coal in a CFB combustor, it will reduce the use of coal and then cut the net carbon emissions. To understand the complicated fluid dynamics of nicotiana tabacum wastes in the coal-fired CFB boiler, the mixing and segregation behavior of tobacco stalk are preliminary measured in a cylindrical fluidized bed. Obvious segregation behavior is found due to distinct differences in density and shape between tobacco stem and coal, which results in poor fluidization quality and bad combustion efficiency. To overcome this disadvantage, a jet with high gas velocity is introduced through the air distributor and a detailed experimental study is conducted in a fluidized bed made up of stem-sand mixture with different solid components at various jet velocities, which greatly improve the mixing performance of stem in the fluidized bed. The above findings are helpful for the technological upgrading of small- or middle-sized CFB boiler with adding tobacco stem into coal.

  16. Variability of bed drag on cohesive beds under wave action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, Ilgar

    2016-01-01

    Drag force at the bed acting on water flow is a major control on water circulation and sediment transport. Bed drag has been thoroughly studied in sandy waters, but less so in muddy coastal waters. The variation of bed drag on a muddy shelf is investigated here using field observations of currents, waves, and sediment concentration collected during moderate wind and wave events. To estimate bottom shear stress and the bed drag coefficient, an indirect empirical method of logarithmic fitting to current velocity profiles (log-law), a bottom boundary layer model for combined wave-current flow, and a direct method that uses turbulent fluctuations of velocity are used. The overestimation by the log-law is significantly reduced by taking turbulence suppression due to sediment-induced stratification into account. The best agreement between the model and the direct estimates is obtained by using a hydraulic roughness of 10  m in the model. Direct estimate of bed drag on the muddy bed is found to have a decreasing trend with increasing current speed, and is estimated to be around 0.0025 in conditions where wave-induced flow is relatively weak. Bed drag shows an increase (up to fourfold) with increasing wave energy. These findings can be used to test the bed drag parameterizations in hydrodynamic and sediment transport models and the skills of these models in predicting flows in muddy environments.

  17. Performance of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toqan, M.A.; Paloposki, T.; Yu, T.; Teare, J.D.; Beer, J.M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States))

    1989-12-01

    Under contract from DOE-PETC, Combustion Engineering, Inc. undertook the lead-role in a multi-task R D program aimed at development of a new burner system for coal-based fuels; the goal was that this burner system should be capable of being retrofitted in oil- or gas-fired industrial boilers, or usable in new units. In the first phase of this program a high efficiency advanced coal combustor was designed jointly by CE and MIT. Its burner is of the multiannular design with a fixed shrouded swirler in the center immediately surrounding the atomizer gun to provide the primary act,'' and three further annuli for the supply of the secondary air.'' The degree of rotation (swirl) in the secondary air is variable. The split of the combustion air into primary and secondary air flows serves the purpose of flame stabilization and combustion staging, the latter to reduce NO{sub x} formation.

  18. Simulations of a Circulating Fluidized Bed Chemical Looping Combustion System Utilizing Gaseous Fuel Simulation de la combustion en boucle chimique d’une charge gazeuse dans un lit fluidisé circulant

    OpenAIRE

    Mahalatkar K.; Kuhlman J.; Huckaby E.D.; O’Brien T.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical studies using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) have been carried out for a complete circulating fluidized bed chemical looping combustor described in the literature (Abad et al., 2006 Fuel 85, 1174-1185). There have been extensive experimental studies in Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC), however CFD simulations of this concept are quite limited. The CLC experiments that were simulated used methane as fuel. A 2-D continuum model was used to describe both the gas and solid phases. ...

  19. A new fluidized bed combustion system to capture CO{sub 2} with CaO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Carlos Abanades; Diego Alvarez; Gemma Grasa; Enric Soley; Jesus Pajares [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (CSIC), Oviedo (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    A combustion system that includes CO{sub 2} capture, and comprises three interconnected fluidized beds, is described. Coal is first burned in a circulating fluidised bed combustor at temperatures around 1000{sup o}C in the presence of a large flow of CaO, that is acting here as a heat carrier. After heat recovery, these gases enter a second circulating fluidized bed operating at around 650{sup o}C where they meet again CaO particles, capturing the CO{sub 2} in the flue gas as CaCO{sub 3}. The CaCO{sub 3} particles are separated from the gas and sent to a calciner fluidized by steam and CO{sub 2}. The heat required for calcination is supplied by the particles of CaO circulating from the high temperature combustor. Since the separation of CO{sub 2} is carried out at high temperatures, there are negligible efficiency penalties. In this work we focus on the effect of sorbent performance on the operating variables expected in the different units. Multicycle carbonation-calcination-combustion tests have been carried out with natural limestones at conditions representative of their life in the circulating system. The decay in sorbent capacity has been measured up to 500 cycles. The consequences of the rapid decay, but also the stability found in long cycle numbers (between 5-10% Ca conversion) are discussed in terms of the solid flow requirements to achieve a given CO{sub 2} separation efficiency. It is shown that this is a promising system where only relatively modest make up flows of limestone are required to maintain the activity in the CO{sub 2} capture loop and to purge the system of inert components. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tab.

  20. Development program on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion. Annual report, July 1975--June 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, G.J.; Johnson, I.; Cunningham, P.T.

    1976-07-01

    The feasibility of using fluidized-bed combustors in power and steam plants is being evaluated. The concept involves burning fuels such as coal in a fluidized bed of either a limestone (CaCO/sub 3/) or a synthetically prepared calcium-containing stone. The calcium reacts with the sulfur to form CaSO/sub 4/, which remains in the bed, thus decreasing the level of SO/sub 2/ in the flue gas. Levels of NO/sub x/ in the flue gas are low. In a separate step, the CaSO/sub 4/ is regenerated to CaO by reductive decomposition at Ca/sub solar/ 1100/sup 0/C for reuse in the combustor. Progress is reported on the following: the effect of regeneration operating variables on extent of regeneration and SO/sub 2/ concentration in the off-gas using coal as the source of reducing agent and of heat; the alternate combustion and regeneration behavior of stone; the rate and extent of sulfation of agents impregnated on Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/; the effect of variables on sorption and release of sulfur for CaO-impregnated stone; attrition resistance of stone; the kinetic and structural changes occurring during half-calcination of dolomite; the CaS-CaSO/sub 4/ regeneration reaction; and the volatility of trace elements when heating coal ash. Procurement and disposal of regenerated stone, minimum fluidization studies, modeling of a gas-solid combustion reaction and of the regeneration process, combustion studies using different sizes of coal and additive and also using lignite are reported.

  1. Ability of bed bug-detecting canines to locate live bed bugs and viable bed bug eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfiester, Margie; Koehler, Philip G; Pereira, Roberto M

    2008-08-01

    The bed bug, Cimex lectularius L., like other bed bug species, is difficult to visually locate because it is cryptic. Detector dogs are useful for locating bed bugs because they use olfaction rather than vision. Dogs were trained to detect the bed bug (as few as one adult male or female) and viable bed bug eggs (five, collected 5-6 d after feeding) by using a modified food and verbal reward system. Their efficacy was tested with bed bugs and viable bed bug eggs placed in vented polyvinyl chloride containers. Dogs were able to discriminate bed bugs from Camponotus floridanus Buckley, Blattella germanica (L.), and Reticulitermes flavipes (Kollar), with a 97.5% positive indication rate (correct indication of bed bugs when present) and 0% false positives (incorrect indication of bed bugs when not present). Dogs also were able to discriminate live bed bugs and viable bed bug eggs from dead bed bugs, cast skins, and feces, with a 95% positive indication rate and a 3% false positive rate on bed bug feces. In a controlled experiment in hotel rooms, dogs were 98% accurate in locating live bed bugs. A pseudoscent prepared from pentane extraction of bed bugs was recognized by trained dogs as bed bug scent (100% indication). The pseudoscent could be used to facilitate detector dog training and quality assurance programs. If trained properly, dogs can be used effectively to locate live bed bugs and viable bed bug eggs. PMID:18767752

  2. LSP Composite Test Bed Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Arthur C.; Griess, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    This document provides standalone information for the Lightning Strike Protection (LSP) Composite Substrate Test Bed Design. A six-sheet drawing set is reproduced for reference, as is some additional descriptive information on suitable sensors and use of the test bed.

  3. Assessing the effects of FBC ash treatments of metal-contaminated soils using life history traits and metal bioaccumulation analysis of the earthworm Eisenia andrei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grumiaux, F.; Demuynck, S.; Schikorski, D.; Lemiere, S.; Lepretre, A. [Universite Lille Nord de France, Villeneuve Dascq (France)

    2010-03-15

    Earthworms (Eisenia andrei) were exposed, in controlled conditions, to metal-contaminated soils previously treated in situ with two types of fluidized bed combustion ashes. Effects on this species were determined by life history traits analysis. Metal immobilizing efficiency of ashes was indicated by metal bioaccumulation. Ashes-treated soils reduced worm mortality compared to the untreated soil. However, these ashes reduced both cocoon hatching success and hatchlings numbers compared to the untreated soil. In addition, sulfo-calcical ashes reduced or delayed worm maturity and lowered cocoon production compared to silico-alumineous ones. Metal immobilizing efficiency of ashes was demonstrated for Zn, Cu and to a lesser extent Pb. Only silico-alumineous ashes reduced Cd bioaccumulation, although Cd was still bioconcentrated. Thus, although ash additions to metal-contaminated soils may help in immobilizing metals, their use might result, depending on the chemical nature of ashes, to severe detrimental effects on earthworm reproduction with possible long term consequences to populations.

  4. Fuel property effects on USAF gas turbine engine combustors and afterburners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    Since the early 1970s, the cost and availability of aircraft fuel have changed drastically. These problems prompted a program to evaluate the effects of broadened specification fuels on current and future aircraft engine combustors employed by the USAF. Phase 1 of this program was to test a set of fuels having a broad range of chemical and physical properties in a select group of gas turbine engine combustors currently in use by the USAF. The fuels ranged from JP4 to Diesel Fuel number two (DF2) with hydrogen content ranging from 14.5 percent down to 12 percent by weight, density ranging from 752 kg/sq m to 837 kg/sq m, and viscosity ranging from 0.830 sq mm/s to 3.245 sq mm/s. In addition, there was a broad range of aromatic content and physical properties attained by using Gulf Mineral Seal Oil, Xylene Bottoms, and 2040 Solvent as blending agents in JP4, JP5, JP8, and DF2. The objective of Phase 2 was to develop simple correlations and models of fuel effects on combustor performance and durability. The major variables of concern were fuel chemical and physical properties, combustor design factors, and combustor operating conditions.

  5. Factors that limit control effectiveness in self-excited noise driven combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Jackie H., III

    This thesis considers what limits control effectiveness in self-excited, noise driven, combustors using a full Strouhal number thermo-acoustic model with the ultimate aim of learning how to design combustors to be responsive to feedback control of combustion instabilities. The inclusion of time delays in the volumetric heat release perturbation models create unique behavioral characteristics which are not properly reproduced within current low Strouhal number thermo-acoustic models used for feedback control. New analysis tools using probability density functions are introduced in this thesis which enable exact expressions for the statistics of a time delayed system. Additionally, preexisting tools from applied mathematics and control theory for spectral analysis of time delay systems are introduced to the combustion community. These new analysis tools can be used to extend sensitivity function analysis used in control theory to explain limits to control effectiveness in self-excited combustors. The control effectiveness of self-excited combustors with actuator constraints are found to be most sensitive to the location of non-minimum phase zeros. Modeling the non-minimum phase zeros correctly require accurate volumetric heat release perturbation models. Designs that removes non-minimum phase zeros are more likely to have poles in the right hand complex plane. As a result, unstable combustors are inherently more responsive to feedback control.

  6. Combustor Operability and Performance Verification for HIFiRE Flight 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Andrea M.; Bynum, Michael; Liu, Jiwen; Gruber, Mark

    2011-01-01

    As part of the Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) Direct-Connect Rig (HDCR) test and analysis activity, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed using two Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes solvers. Measurements obtained from ground testing in the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF) were used to specify inflow conditions for the simulations and combustor data from four representative tests were used as benchmarks. Test cases at simulated flight enthalpies of Mach 5.84, 6.5, 7.5, and 8.0 were analyzed. Modeling parameters (e.g., turbulent Schmidt number and compressibility treatment) were tuned such that the CFD results closely matched the experimental results. The tuned modeling parameters were used to establish a standard practice in HIFiRE combustor analysis. Combustor performance and operating mode were examined and were found to meet or exceed the objectives of the HIFiRE Flight 2 experiment. In addition, the calibrated CFD tools were then applied to make predictions of combustor operation and performance for the flight configuration and to aid in understanding the impacts of ground and flight uncertainties on combustor operation.

  7. Parametric Modeling Investigation of a Radially-Staged Low-Emission Aviation Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Aviation gas-turbine combustion demands high efficiency, wide operability and minimal trace gas emissions. Performance critical design parameters include injector geometry, combustor layout, fuel-air mixing and engine cycle conditions. The present investigation explores these factors and their impact on a radially staged low-emission aviation combustor sized for a next-generation 24,000-lbf-thrust engine. By coupling multi-fidelity computational tools, a design exploration was performed using a parameterized annular combustor sector at projected 100% takeoff power conditions. Design objectives included nitrogen oxide emission indices and overall combustor pressure loss. From the design space, an optimal configuration was selected and simulated at 7.1, 30 and 85% part-power operation, corresponding to landing-takeoff cycle idle, approach and climb segments. All results were obtained by solution of the steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Species concentrations were solved directly using a reduced 19-step reaction mechanism for Jet-A. Turbulence closure was obtained using a nonlinear K-epsilon model. This research demonstrates revolutionary combustor design exploration enabled by multi-fidelity physics-based simulation.

  8. Emission Characteristics of A P and W Axially Staged Sector Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhuohui J.; Wey, Changlie; Chang, Clarence T.; Lee, Chi Ming; Surgenor, Angela D.; Kopp-Vaughan, Kristin; Cheung, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Emission characteristics of a three-cup P and W Axially Controlled Stoichiometry (ACS) sector combustor are reported in this article. Multiple injection points and fuel staging strategies are used in this combustor design. Pilot-stage injectors are located on the front dome plate of the combustor, and main-stage injectors are positioned on the top and bottom of the combustor liners downstream. Low power configuration uses only pilot-stage injectors. Main-stage injectors are added to high power configuration to help distribute fuel more evenly and achieve overall lean burn yielding very low NOx emissions. Combustion efficiencies at four ICAO LTO conditions were all above 99%. Three EINOx emissions correlation equations were developed based on the experimental data to describe the NOx emission trends of this combustor concept. For the 7% and 30% engine power conditions, NOx emissions are obtained with the low power configuration, and the EINOx values are 6.16 and 6.81. The high power configuration was used to assess 85% and 100% engine power NOx emissions, with measured EINOx values of 4.58 and 7.45, respectively. The overall landing-takeoff cycle NOx emissions are about 12% relative to ICAO CAEP/6 level.

  9. The Mechanisms of Flame Stabilization and Low NOx Emission in an Eccentric Jet Pulverized Coal Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SunWenchao; SunYezhu; 等

    1992-01-01

    The mechanisms of flame stabilization and low NOx emission features of an accentric jet pulverzed coal combustor were studied through numerical modelling and experimental investigation.The results show that the formation of the unique flowfield structure is closely related to the interaction among combustor configuration.the primary jet and the control Jet.and that certain rules should be follwed in orber to obtain the optimum condition for flame stabilization.The distributions of temperature and concentration of NO,O2,CO and CO2 inside the combustor were experimentally measured.The effects of strustural and operational parameters on combustion and NO formation were studied.It was found that reduction of primary air,suitable use of control jet and reasonable uptilt angle of the primary jet all contributed to the reduction of NOx at the combustor exit.A new hypothesis,that reasonable separation of oxygen and fuel within the fuel-rich zone is beneficial to further reduction of NOx emission,is given,The study showed that good compatibility existed between the capability of flame stabilization and low NOX emission for this type of combustor.

  10. Do-it-yourself Bed Bug Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bed Bug Control Do-it-yourself Bed Bug Control Can you treat and eliminate the bed bugs ... all of the residents to participate. Achieving complete control can take weeks to months, depending on the ...

  11. Fuel Flexible, Low Emission Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuel Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eteman, Shahrokh

    2013-06-30

    Limited fuel resources, increasing energy demand and stringent emission regulations are drivers to evaluate process off-gases or process waste streams as fuels for power generation. Often these process waste streams have low energy content and/or highly reactive components. Operability of low energy content fuels in gas turbines leads to issues such as unstable and incomplete combustion. On the other hand, fuels containing higher-order hydrocarbons lead to flashback and auto-ignition issues. Due to above reasons, these fuels cannot be used directly without modifications or efficiency penalties in gas turbine engines. To enable the use of these wide variety of fuels in gas turbine engines a rich catalytic lean burn (RCL®) combustion system was developed and tested in a subscale high pressure (10 atm.) rig. The RCL® injector provided stability and extended turndown to low Btu fuels due to catalytic pre-reaction. Previous work has shown promise with fuels such as blast furnace gas (BFG) with LHV of 85 Btu/ft3 successfully combusted. This program extends on this work by further modifying the combustor to achieve greater catalytic stability enhancement. Fuels containing low energy content such as weak natural gas with a Lower Heating Value (LHV) of 6.5 MJ/m3 (180 Btu/ft3 to natural gas fuels containing higher hydrocarbon (e.g ethane) with LHV of 37.6 MJ/m3 (1010 Btu/ft3) were demonstrated with improved combustion stability; an extended turndown (defined as the difference between catalytic and non-catalytic lean blow out) of greater than 250oF was achieved with CO and NOx emissions lower than 5 ppm corrected to 15% O2. In addition, for highly reactive fuels the catalytic region preferentially pre-reacted the higher order hydrocarbons with no events of flashback or auto-ignition allowing a stable and safe operation with low NOx and CO emissions.

  12. Flame structure in a swirl stabilized combustor inferred by radiant emission measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyler, C. L.; Gouldin, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    Results of measurements of time-averaged chemiluminescent emissions from CH, OH, and CO2 and of Na tracer emissions along lateral lines-of-sight through a cylindrical premixed, swirl-stabilized combustor are reported. Assuming axial symmetry and small optical depth, raw data are inverted to obtain local emission levels from these species as a function of radius. The chemiluminescent emissions are interpreted as signatures of chemical reaction and used in determining the regions of reactions and heat release in the combustor. The data are compared with composition and velocity data obtained in the combustor for identical operating conditions. The results demonstrate that reaction occurs in a relatively narrow, turbulent flame-like combustion zone which begins upstream of the time-averaged location of the swirl-induced recirculation zone and propagates around and laterally away from the recirculation zone into the unburned gas.

  13. Wide range operation of advanced low NOx aircraft gas turbine combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, P. B.; Fiorito, R. J.; Butze, H. F.

    1978-01-01

    The paper summarizes the results of an experimental test rig program designed to define and demonstrates techniques which would allow the jet-induced circulation and vortex air blast combustors to operate stably with acceptable emissions at simulated engine idle without compromise to the low NOx emissions under the high-altitude supersonic cruise condition. The discussion focuses on the test results of the key combustor modifications for both the simulated engine idle and cruise conditions. Several range-augmentation techniques are demonstrated that allow the lean-reaction premixed aircraft gas turbine combustor to operate with low NOx emissons at engine cruise and acceptable CO and UHC levels at engine idle. These techniques involve several combinations, including variable geometry and fuel switching designs.

  14. An emissions audit of a biomass combustor burning treated wood waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the Emissions Audit carried out on a Biomass Combustor burning treated wood waste at the premises of a furniture manufacturer. The Biomass Combustor was tested in two firing modes; continuous fire and modulating fire. Combustion chamber temperatures and gas residence times were not measured. Boiler efficiencies were very good at greater than 75% in both tests. However, analysis of the flue gases indicated that improved efficiencies are possible. The average concentrations of CO (512mgm-3) and THC (34mgm-3) for Test 1 were high, indicating that combustion was poor. The combustor clearly does not meet the requirements of the Guidance Note for the Combustion of Wood Waste. CO2 and O2 concentrations were quite variable showing that combustion conditions were fairly unstable. Improved control of combustion should lead to acceptable emission concentrations. (Author)

  15. Emissions of nitrogen oxides from an experimental hydrogen-fueled gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgren, C. T.; Ingebo, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of operating variables of a hydrogen fueled combustor on exhaust concentrations of total oxides of nitrogen was determined at inlet-air temperature levels up to 810 K, pressure of 414,000N/sa m, and reference velocity of 21.3 m/sec. The combustor, which was originally designed for hydrocarbon fuel produced a NO(x) concentration of 380 ppm with hydrogen at 810 K inlet-air temperature. A reduction in NO(x) of about 30 % was obtained by modification to a lean or rich primary zone. The lowest NO(x) levels obtained with hydrogen were equivalent to those of the reference combustor burning hydrocarbon fuels.

  16. Numerical simulation of the reactive flow in advanced (HSR) combustors using KIVA-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winowich, Nicholas S.

    1991-01-01

    Recent work has been done with the goal of establishing ultralow emission aircraft gas turbine combustors. A significant portion of the effort is the development of three dimensional computational combustor models. The KIVA-II computer code which is based on the Implicit Continuous Eulerian Difference mesh Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ICED-ALE) numerical scheme is one of the codes selected by NASA to achieve these goals. This report involves a simulation of jet injection through slanted slots within the Rich burn/Quick quench/Lean burn (RQL) baseline experimental rig. The RQL combustor distinguishes three regions of combustion. This work specifically focuses on modeling the quick quench mixer region in which secondary injection air is introduced radially through 12 equally spaced slots around the mixer circumference. Steady state solutions are achieved with modifications to the KIVA-II program. Work currently underway will evaluate thermal mixing as a function of injection air velocity and angle of inclination of the slots.

  17. Combustion Control and Diagnostics Sensor Testing in a Thermal Barrier Coated Combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chorpening, B.T.; Dukes, M.G.; Robey, E.H.; Thornton, J.D.

    2007-05-01

    The combustion control and diagnostics sensor (CCADS) continues to be developed as an in-situ combustion sensor, with immediate application to natural gas fired turbines. In-situ combustion monitoring is also expected to benefit advanced power plants of the future, fueled by coal-derived syngas, liquified natural gas (LNG), hydrogen, or hydrogen blend fuels. The in-situ monitoring that CCADS provides can enable the optimal operation of advanced, fuel-flexible turbines for minimal pollutant emissions and maximum efficiency over the full operating range of an advanced turbine. Previous work has demonstrated CCADS as a useful sensor for in-situ monitoring of natural gas combustion, including detection of important combustion events such as flashback and lean blowoff, in experimental combustors without thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Since typical TBC materials are electrical insulators at room temperature, and CCADS operation requires conduction of electrical current to the walls of the combustor, a TBC on the combustion liner was identified as a potential barrier to CCADS operation in commercial application. This paper reports on CCADS experiments in a turbulent lean premixed combustor with a yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coating on the combustor wall. The tests were conducted at 0.1 MPa (1 atm), with a 15V excitation voltage on the CCADS electrodes. The results confirm that for a typical thermal barrier coating, CCADS operates properly, and the total measured average resistance is close to that of an uncoated combustor. This result is consistent with previous materials studies that found the electrical resistance of typical TBC materials considerably decreases at combustor operating temperatures.

  18. Flue gas desulfurization under simulated oxyfiring fluidized bed combustion conditions: The influence of limestone attrition and fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scala, F.; Salatino, P. [CNR, Naples (Italy)

    2010-01-01

    Flue gas desulfurization by means of limestone injection under simulated fluidized bed oxyfiring conditions was investigated, with a particular focus on particle attrition and fragmentation phenomena. An experimental protocol was applied, based on the use of complementary techniques that had been previously developed for the characterization of attrition of sorbents in air-blown atmospheric fluidized bed combustors. The extent and pattern of limestone attrition by surface wear in the dense phase of a fluidized bed were assessed in bench scale fluidized bed experiments under simulated oxyfiring conditions. Sorbent samples generated during the oxyfiring tests were further characterized from the standpoint of fragmentation upon high velocity impact by means of a particle impactor. The experimental results were compared with those previously obtained with the same limestone under air-blown atmospheric fluidized bed combustion conditions. The profound differences in the attrition and fragmentation extents and patterns associated with oxyfiring as compared to air-blown atmospheric combustion and the role played by the different attrition/fragmentation paths were highlighted. In particular, it was noted that attrition could effectively enhance particle sulfation under oxyfiring conditions by continuously disclosing unconverted calcium to the sulfur-bearing atmosphere.

  19. System for reducing combustion dynamics and NO.sub.x in a combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Hughes, Michael John; York, William David

    2016-05-31

    A combustor includes an end cap that extends radially across at least a portion of the combustor. The end cap includes an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface. A plurality of tubes extend from the upstream surface through the downstream surface of the end cap to provide fluid communication through the end cap. Each tube in a first set of the plurality of tubes has an inlet proximate to the upstream surface and an outlet downstream from the downstream surface. Each outlet has a first portion that extends a different axial distance from the inlet than a second portion.

  20. Chemical reactions in a scramjet combustor and two-dimensional nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Moon-Tai

    Finite-rate chemistry of hydrogen-air combustion is to be investigated numerically in a one-dimensional constant pressure SCRAMJET combustor and two-dimensional nozzles. Detailed reaction mechanisms and temperature dependent thermodynamics are to be used in the models. The aspects of interest include the combustion characteristics at different fuel-air ratios, pressures and initial temperatures in the combustor. Methods for enhancing the combustion rate in the combustor is to be studied also. The effect of expansion rate on the hydrogen-air reactions is the prime focus of the nozzle calculation. The results from different inlet conditions and wall geometries are to be analyzed. A computer model for a one-dimensional (channel-flow) combustor is constructed based on the chemical kinetics subroutine library CHEMKIN. Subsequent calculations show that the initial temperature is the most important parameter in the combustor. It is further discovered that certain reaction steps are responsible for the initial delay exhibited in all hydrogen-air combustion processes. Low temperature behavior is studied extensively and augmentation methods are developed. The introduction of a small percentage of the hydrogen radical into the initial mixture is found to be the most effective in reducing the reaction delay. The combustor pressure enters the overall reaction process in a linear manner. The calculations over five combustor pressures show that the initial delay in hydrogen-air reaction and the following period of explosion are proportional to the combustor pressure raised to certain powers. The nozzle model is two-dimensional, steady and inviscid with no conductivity and diffusivity. Two schemes are developed to handle the boundary conditions. One is based on pure numerical interpolation/extrapolation methods while the other imposes analytical supersonic characteristic equations. The former scheme is found to be more efficient while the latter is more accurate. In analysing the

  1. Simulations of NOx Emissions from Low Emissions Discrete Jet Injector Combustor Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmani, Kumud; Breisacher, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    An experimental and computational study was conducted to evaluate the performance and emissions characteristics of a candidate Lean Direct Injection (LDI) combustor configuration with a mix of simplex and airblast injectors. The National Combustion Code (NCC) was used to predict the experimentally measured EINOx emissions for test conditions representing low power, medium power, and high-power engine cycle conditions. Of the six cases modeled with the NCC using a reduced-kinetics finite-rate mechanism and lagrangian spray modeling, reasonable predictions of combustor exit temperature and EINOx were obtained at two high-power cycle conditions.

  2. Development of an advanced high efficiency coal combustor for boiler retrofit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFlesh, R.C.; Rini, M.J.; McGowan, J.G.; Beer, J.M.; Toqan, M.A.

    1990-04-01

    The objective of the program was to develop an advanced coal combustion system for firing beneficiated coal fuels (BCFs) capable of being retrofitted to industrial boilers originally designed for firing natural gas. The High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor system is capable of firing microfine coal-water fuel (MCWF), MCWF with alkali sorbent (for SO{sub 2} reduction), and dry microfine coal. Design priorities for the system were that it be simple to operate and offer significant reductions in NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulate emissions as compared with current coal-fired combustor technology. (VC)

  3. Development of an advanced high efficiency coal combustor for boiler retrofit. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFlesh, R.C.; Rini, M.J.; McGowan, J.G.; Beer, J.M.; Toqan, M.A.

    1990-04-01

    The objective of the program was to develop an advanced coal combustion system for firing beneficiated coal fuels (BCFs) capable of being retrofitted to industrial boilers originally designed for firing natural gas. The High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor system is capable of firing microfine coal-water fuel (MCWF), MCWF with alkali sorbent (for SO{sub 2} reduction), and dry microfine coal. Design priorities for the system were that it be simple to operate and offer significant reductions in NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulate emissions as compared with current coal-fired combustor technology. (VC)

  4. Techno-economic assessment of a hybrid solar receiver and combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jin Han; Nathan, Graham; Dally, Bassam; Chinnici, Alfonso

    2016-05-01

    A techno-economic analysis is performed to compare two different configurations of hybrid solar thermal systems with fossil fuel backup to provide continuous electricity output. The assessment compares a Hybrid Solar Receiver Combustor (HSRC), in which the functions of a solar cavity receiver and a combustor are integrated into a single device with a reference conventional solar thermal system using a regular solar cavity receiver with a backup boiler, termed the Solar Gas Hybrid (SGH). The benefits of the integration is assessed by varying the size of the storage capacity and heliostat field while maintaining the same overall thermal input to the power block.

  5. On the acoustics of rocket combustors equipped with quarter wave absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oschwald, M.; Marpert, M.

    2011-10-01

    The acoustic resonance spectrum and the dissipation of specific modes in combustors equipped with absorbers have been investigated experimentally and numerically. It is found that the application of absorber rings to a combustor changes its resonance behavior significantly. Based on the acoustic fields obtained by three-dimensional (3D) modal analysis, the damping behavior for modes is predicted and compared to measurements. There is a good agreement between prediction and experimental data with respect to the general trend of the dependence of damping on the absorber length. However, the experimentally determined dissipation rates are significantly larger than the predicted values.

  6. Design and control of a 12 MW coal-fired fluidized bed deodorizing and steam generation plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uys, B.; North, B.; Eleftheriades, C.

    1999-07-01

    Odorous gas containing 58% water vapor from a biomass drying circuit is fed to a fluidized bed combustor for odor abatement through incineration. The gas is pre-conditioned in a scrubber, where it is cooled and the moisture content decreased to 36%. The hot off gas from the fluidized bed combustor is used to generate stream in a fire-tube boiler. The plant is equipped with instrumentation and controls to allow operation in two modes, namely Odour Control Mode and Steam Production Mode. Under Odour Control Mode the plant adjusts to accommodate the full delivery of dryer air, within the limits of defluidization and maximum FD fan capacity. Under Steam Production Mode, the plant draws in additional ambient air into the incinerator to satisfy the required steam demand, provided that all the available odorous gas is incinerated. The plant has the flexibility to operate during changes in the odorous gas delivery rate from 0% to 100% of dryer throughput. The control philosophy of the plant and design of the FB incinerator are discussed. Special reference is made to the maintenance of sufficient excess air conditions in the furnace, despite the high water content of the fluidizing gas.

  7. The development of an integrated multistaged fluid-bed retorting process. Final report, September 1990--August 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, S.D.; Taulbee, D.N.; Stehn, J.L.; Vego, A.; Robl, T.L.

    1995-02-01

    This summarizes the development of the KENTORT II retorting process, which includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of oil shale. Purpose was to design and test the process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The program included bench- scale studies of coking and cracking reactions of shale oil vapors over processed shale particles to address issues of scaleup associated with solid-recycle retorting. The bench-scale studies showed that higher amounts of carbon coverage reduce the rate of subsequent carbon deposition by shale oil vapors onto processed shale particles; however carbon-covered materials were also active in terms of cracking and coking. Main focus was the 50-lb/hr KENTORT II PDU. Cold-flow modeling and shakedown were done before the PDU was made ready for operation. Seven mass-balanced, steady-state runs were completed within the window of design operating conditions. Goals were achieved: shale feedrate, run duration (10 hr), shale recirculation rates (4:1 to pyrolyzer and 10:1 to combustor), bed temperatures (pyrolyzer 530{degree}C, gasifier 750{degree}C, combustor 830{degree}C), and general operating stability. Highest oil yields (up to 109% of Fischer assay) were achieved for runs lasting {ge} 10 hours. High C content of the solids used for heat transfer to the pyrolysis zone contributed to the enhanced oil yield achieved.

  8. Sulphation and carbonation properties of hydrated sorbents from a fluidized bed CO{sub 2} looping cycle reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilije Manovic; Edward J. Anthony; Dennis Y. Lu [CANMET Energy Technology Centre-Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Sulphation and carbonation have been performed on hydrated spent residues from a 75 kW{sub th} dual fluidized bed combustion (FBC) pilot plant operating as a CO{sub 2} looping cycle unit. The sulphation and carbonation tests were done in an atmospheric pressure thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), with the sulphation performed using synthetic flue gas (0.45% SO{sub 2}, 3% O{sub 2}, 15% CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} balance). Additional tests were carried out in a tube furnace (TF) with a higher SO{sub 2} concentration (1%) and conversions were determined by quantitative X-ray diffraction (QXRD) analyses. The morphology of the sulphated samples from the TF was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sulphation tests were performed at 850{sup o}C for 150 min and carbonation tests at 750{sup o}C, 10 cycles for 15 min (7.5 min calcination + 7.5 min carbonation). Sulphation conversions obtained for the hydrated samples depended on sample type: in the TGA, they were 75-85% (higher values were obtained for samples from the carbonator); and in the TF, values around 90% and 70% for sample from carbonator and calciner, respectively, were achieved, in comparison to the 40% conversion seen with the original sample. The SEM analyses showed significant residual porosity that can increase total conversion with longer sulphation time. The carbonation tests showed a smaller influence of the sample type and typical conversions after 10 cycles were 50% - about 10% higher than that for the original sample. The influence of hydration duration, in the range of 15-60 min, is not apparent, indicating that samples are ready for use for either SO{sub 2} retention, or further CO{sub 2} capture after at most 15 min using saturated steam. The present results show that, upon hydration, spent residues from FBC CO{sub 2} capture cycles are good sorbents for both SO{sub 2} retention and additional CO{sub 2} capture. 33 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Tensile strength of ash cake beds at high-temperature conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dockter, B.A.; Hurley, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is working with Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and a consortium of companies in partnership with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to perform the research necessary to determine the factors that cause hot-gas cleanup filters to be blinded by ash or to develop deposits that can bridge the filters and cause them to fail. The primary deliverable will be a graphics-driven computer model that can be used as an engineering tool to help predict ash-related hot-gas filter problems based on analyses of coal and sorbent, as well as system operating parameters. This paper presents preliminary testing data on determining the tensile strengths of coal ash particles at elevated temperatures and simulated combustor gas conditions. The range in temperatures for tensile testing is ambient to 900 C. The simulated gas atmosphere includes carbon dioxide, water vapor, oxygen, sulfur dioxide, sodium chloride, hydrochloric acid, and nitrogen. At present, all testing has been performed using ash from the Westinghouse advanced particle filter (APF) at the American Electric Power Service Corporation (AEP) Tidd pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) demonstration plant in Ohio. Other sources of filter ashes, including several from non-American PFBC systems, will also be evaluated.

  10. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Yan Cao; John Smith

    2008-05-31

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Clear Skies Initiative, a legislative proposal to control the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and mercury from power plants. In response to this initiative, the National Energy Technology Laboratory organized a Combustion Technology University Alliance and hosted a Solid Fuel Combustion Technology Alliance Workshop. The workshop identified multi-pollutant control; improved sorbents and catalysts; mercury monitoring and capture; and improved understanding of the underlying reaction chemistry occurring during combustion as the most pressing research needs related to controlling environmental emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The Environmental Control Technology Laboratory will help meet these challenges and offer solutions for problems associated with emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The goal of this project was to develop the capability and technology database needed to support municipal, regional, and national electric power generating facilities to improve the efficiency of operation and solve operational and environmental problems. In order to effectively provide the scientific data and the methodologies required to address these issues, the project included the following aspects: (1) Establishing an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory using a laboratory-scale, simulated fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) system; (2) Designing, constructing, and operating a bench-scale (0.6 MW{sub th}), circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC) system as the main component of the Environmental Control Technology Laboratory; (3) Developing a combustion technology for co-firing municipal solid waste (MSW), agricultural waste, and refuse-derived fuel (RDF) with high sulfur coals; (4) Developing a control strategy for gaseous emissions, including NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, organic compounds, and heavy metals; and (5) Developing new mercury capturing sorbents and new

  11. Sea bed mapping and inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The conference has 24 presentations on the topics: Sea bed mapping, inspection, positioning, hydrography, marine archaeology, remote operation vehicles and computerized simulation technologies, oil field activities and plans, technological experiences and problems. (tk)

  12. Torsion testing of bed joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klavs Feilberg; Pedersen, Carsten Mørk

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a simple test method for determining the torsion strength of a single bed joint between two bricks and presents results from testing using this test method. The setup for the torsion test is well defined, require minimal preparation of the test specimen and the test can be...... carried out directly in a normal testing machine. The torsion strength is believed to be the most important parameter in out-of-plane resistance of masonry walls subjected to bending about an axis perpendicular to the bed joints. The paper also contains a few test results from bending of small walls about...... an axis perpendicular to the bed joints, which indicate the close connection between these results and results from torsion tests. These characteristics make the torsion strength well suited to act as substitute parameter for the bending strength of masonry about an axis perpendicular to the bed...

  13. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Andy Wu; John T. Riley

    2005-07-30

    This purpose of this report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. The following tasks have been completed. First, the new Combustion Laboratory was occupied on June 15, 2005, and the construction of the Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Combustor Building is in the final painting stage. Second, the fabrication and manufacturing contract for the CFBC Facility was awarded to Sterling Boiler & Mechanical, Inc. of Evansville, Indiana. Sterling is manufacturing the assembly and component parts of the CFBC system. The erection of the CFBC system is expected to start September 1, 2005. Third, mercury emissions from the cofiring of coal and chicken waste was studied experimentally in the laboratory-scale simulated fluidized-bed combustion facility. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter is described.

  14. Measurement of alkali-vapor emission from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion of Illinois coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.H.D.; Teats, F.G.; Swift, W.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Banerjee, D.D. (Illinois Clean Coal Inst., Carterville, IL (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Two Illinois Herrin No. 6 coals and one Illinois Springfield No. 5 coal were separately combusted in a laboratory-scale (15-cm dia) pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) combined with an alkali sorber. These coals were combusted in a fluidized bed of Tymochtee dolomite at temperatures ranging from 910 to 950[degree]C and a system pressure of 9.2 atm absolute. Alkali-vapor emission (Na and K) in the PFBC flue gas was determined by the analytical activated-bauxite sorber bed technique developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The test results showed that sodium is the major alkali-vapor species present in the PFBC flue gas, and that the level of sodium-vapor emission increases linearly with both Na and Cl contents in the coals. This suggests that the sodium-vapor emission results from direct vaporization of NaCl present in the coals. The measured alkali-vapor concentration (Na + K), 67 to 190 ppbW, is more than 2.5 times greater than the allowable alkali limit of 24 ppb for an industrial gas turbine. Combusting these coals in a PFBC for power generation may require developing a method to control alkali vapors.

  15. Measurement of alkali-vapor emission from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion of Illinois coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.H.D.; Teats, F.G.; Swift, W.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Banerjee, D.D. [Illinois Clean Coal Inst., Carterville, IL (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Two Illinois Herrin No. 6 coals and one Illinois Springfield No. 5 coal were separately combusted in a laboratory-scale (15-cm dia) pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) combined with an alkali sorber. These coals were combusted in a fluidized bed of Tymochtee dolomite at temperatures ranging from 910 to 950{degree}C and a system pressure of 9.2 atm absolute. Alkali-vapor emission (Na and K) in the PFBC flue gas was determined by the analytical activated-bauxite sorber bed technique developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The test results showed that sodium is the major alkali-vapor species present in the PFBC flue gas, and that the level of sodium-vapor emission increases linearly with both Na and Cl contents in the coals. This suggests that the sodium-vapor emission results from direct vaporization of NaCl present in the coals. The measured alkali-vapor concentration (Na + K), 67 to 190 ppbW, is more than 2.5 times greater than the allowable alkali limit of 24 ppb for an industrial gas turbine. Combusting these coals in a PFBC for power generation may require developing a method to control alkali vapors.

  16. International evaluation of the programme on fluid bed combustion and gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer, H. [Ruhr Univ., Bochum (Germany); Magnusson, B.F. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Reed, T. [Colorado School of Mines (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This report on the Swedish National Program on Fluid Bed Combustion and Gasification is part of the on-going evaluation process adopted by the funding organization NUTEK. This agency has invited the undersigned to act as members of an international panel responsible for evaluating the progress made in 9 projects initiated between 1993-1996. The output of this evaluation procedure is given in this report. The main aim of the Fluid Bed Combustion and Gasification Program is to develop industrially relevant knowledge and competence in experimental and computational techniques capable of characterizing the flow, heat transfer, combustion, gasification, ash formation and deposition and emissions in fluid bed gasifiers and combustors. To achieve this aim NUTEK is sponsoring research in a number of universities and encourages close cooperation between universities and industry. In the evaluation of the various sponsored research programs, the evaluation committee has considered the following key points: relevance of research to industrial needs; originality of research; program management; adequacy of resources; degree of collaboration between industry and academia; international standing of research. In this report comments and recommendations are made on individual projects as well as on the programme in general and they express the unanimous view of the panel members

  17. Materials performance in the atmospheric fluidized-bed cogeneration air heater experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Podolski, W.; Wang, D.Y.; Teats, F.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gerritsen, W.; Stewart, A.; Robinson, K. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States)

    1991-02-01

    The Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Cogeneration Air Heater Experiment (ACAHE) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) was initiated to assess the performance of various heat-exchanger materials to be used in fluidized-bed combustion air heater systems. Westinghouse Electric Corporation, through subcontracts with Babcock & Wilcox, Foster Wheeler, and ABB Combustion Engineering Systems, prepared specifications and hardware for the ACAHE tests. Argonne National Laboratory contracted with Rockwell International to conduct tests in the DOE atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion facility. This report presents an overview of the project, a description of the facility and the test hardware, the test operating conditions, a summary of the operation, and the results of analyzing specimens from several uncooled and cooled probes exposed in the facility. Extensive microstructural analyses of the base alloys, claddings, coatings, and weldments were performed on specimens exposed in several probes for different lengths of time. Alloy penetration data were determined for several of the materials as a function of specimen orientation and the exposure location in the combustor. Finally, the data were compared with earlier laboratory test data, and the long-term performance of candidate materials for air-heater applications was assessed.

  18. Materials performance in the atmospheric fluidized-bed cogeneration air heater experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Podolski, W.; Wang, D.Y.; Teats, F.G. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Gerritsen, W.; Stewart, A.; Robinson, K. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States))

    1991-02-01

    The Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Cogeneration Air Heater Experiment (ACAHE) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) was initiated to assess the performance of various heat-exchanger materials to be used in fluidized-bed combustion air heater systems. Westinghouse Electric Corporation, through subcontracts with Babcock Wilcox, Foster Wheeler, and ABB Combustion Engineering Systems, prepared specifications and hardware for the ACAHE tests. Argonne National Laboratory contracted with Rockwell International to conduct tests in the DOE atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion facility. This report presents an overview of the project, a description of the facility and the test hardware, the test operating conditions, a summary of the operation, and the results of analyzing specimens from several uncooled and cooled probes exposed in the facility. Extensive microstructural analyses of the base alloys, claddings, coatings, and weldments were performed on specimens exposed in several probes for different lengths of time. Alloy penetration data were determined for several of the materials as a function of specimen orientation and the exposure location in the combustor. Finally, the data were compared with earlier laboratory test data, and the long-term performance of candidate materials for air-heater applications was assessed.

  19. Two-stage dual fluidized bed gasification: Its conception and application to biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Guangwen [Research Laboratory, IHI Corporation, Ltd., Isogo-Ku, Yokohama 235-8501 (Japan); Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Haidian, Beijing 100080 (China); Murakami, Takahiro [Research Laboratory, IHI Corporation, Ltd., Isogo-Ku, Yokohama 235-8501 (Japan); Clean Gas Group, National Institute of Advanced Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Suda, Toshiyuki; Matsuzaw, Yoshiaki; Tani, Hidehisa [Research Laboratory, IHI Corporation, Ltd., Isogo-Ku, Yokohama 235-8501 (Japan)

    2009-01-15

    The quoted two-stage dual fluidized bed gasification (T-DFBG) devises the use of a two-stage fluidized bed (TFB) to replace the single-stage bubbling fluidized bed gasifier involved in the normally encountered dual fluidized bed gasification (N-DFBG) systems. By feeding fuel into the lower stage of the TFB, this lower stage functions as a fuel gasifier similar to that in the N-DFBG so that the upper stage of the TFB works to upgrade the produced gas in the lower stage and meanwhile to suppress the possible elutriation of fuel particles fed into the freeboard of the lower-stage bed. The heat carrier particles (HCPs) circulated from the char combustor enter first the upper stage of the TFB to facilitate the gas upgrading reactions occurring therein, and the particles are in turn forwarded into the lower stage to provide endothermic heat for fuel pyrolysis and gasification reactions. Consequently, with T-DFBG it is hopeful to increase gasification efficiency and decrease tar content in the produced gas. This anticipation was corroborated through gasifying dry coffee grounds in two 5.0kg/h experimental setups configured according to the principles of T-DFBG and N-DFBG, respectively. In comparison with the N-DFBG case, the test according to T-DFBG increased, the fuel C conversion and cold gas efficiency by about 7% and decreased tar content in the produced gas by up to 25% under similar reaction conditions. Test results demonstrated also that all these upgrading effects via adopting T-DFBG were more pronounced when a Ca-based additive was blended into the fuel. (author)

  20. Ecological characteristics of the fluidized bed boilers burning low-rank lignite coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance simulation of fluidized bed coal plants with Bulgarian low-rank coal has been made. Fluidized bed models, developed in the Institute of Energy Technology, UGN - Siegen, based on one-dimensional compartment-in-series model have been used. The parameters of each data block can be optimized according to criteria chosen in advance. The 'quality of coal - pollution characteristics of the boilers' channel has been chosen as a channel of priority importance. The input information on coal quality characteristics reflects the regression connections between ash content and the other quality components. The wide range of ash value variations of the coal (26 - 44%) causes a lot of problems. Two different models - Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed Model (ABFB) and Atmospheric Circulated Fluidized Bed Model - have been applied. Some results of computer experiments with ABFB model are given presenting the influence of coal quality on temperature profile in the combustor and on ecological characteristics of the gases. The following interconnections are marked: 1) ash content increase (connected with a net calorific value diminution) leading to a decrease in the temperature along the height of the furnace; 2) dependence of SO2 concentration on the ash value connected with the 'temperature - NOx' relationship; 3) decrease in SO2 concentration caused by the augmentation of Ca/S ratio and the increase in the ash content of the coal. It is concluded that the fluidized bed technology is reliable enough for the Bulgarian low rank lignite because of the low rate of the environmental pollutants. 4 figs., 3 refs

  1. Co-firing a pressurized fluidized-bed combustion system with coal and refuse derived fuels and/or sludges. Task 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLallo, M.; Zaharchuk, R.

    1994-01-01

    The co-firing of waste materials with coal in utility scale power plants has emerged as an effective approach to produce energy and manage municipal waste. Leading this approach, the atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) has demonstrated its commercial acceptance in the utility market as a reliable source of power burning a variety of waste and alternative fuels. The fluidized bed, with its stability of combustion, reduces the amount of thermochemical transients and provides for easier process control. The application of pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) technology, although relatively new, can provide significant enhancements to the efficient production of electricity while maintaining the waste management benefits of AFBC. A study was undertaken to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of co-firing a PFBC with coal and municipal and industrial wastes. Focus was placed on the production of electricity and the efficient disposal of wastes for application in central power station and distributed locations. Wastes considered for co-firing include municipal solid waste (MSW), tire-derived fuel (TDF), sewage sludge, and industrial de-inking sludge. Issues concerning waste material preparation and feed, PFBC operation, plant emissions, and regulations are addressed. This paper describes the results of this investigation, presents conclusions on the key issues, and provides recommendations for further evaluation.

  2. COMBUSTOR STUDY OF THE DEACTIVATION OF A THREE-WAY CATALYST BY LEAD AND MANGANESE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The activity and durability of a platinum-rhodium automotive three-way catalyst were investigated as a function of lead and manganese fuel levels using a pulse-flame combustor. Total hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and nitric oxide conversions and three-way (HC/CO/NO) conversion e...

  3. Genetic algorithm to optimize the design of main combustor and gas generator in liquid rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Min; Ko, Sangho; Koo, Jaye

    2014-06-01

    A genetic algorithm was used to develop optimal design methods for the regenerative cooled combustor and fuel-rich gas generator of a liquid rocket engine. For the combustor design, a chemical equilibrium analysis was applied, and the profile was calculated using Rao's method. One-dimensional heat transfer was assumed along the profile, and cooling channels were designed. For the gas-generator design, non-equilibrium properties were derived from a counterflow analysis, and a vaporization model for the fuel droplet was adopted to calculate residence time. Finally, a genetic algorithm was adopted to optimize the designs. The combustor and gas generator were optimally designed for 30-tonf, 75-tonf, and 150-tonf engines. The optimized combustors demonstrated superior design characteristics when compared with previous non-optimized results. Wall temperatures at the nozzle throat were optimized to satisfy the requirement of 800 K, and specific impulses were maximized. In addition, the target turbine power and a burned-gas temperature of 1000 K were obtained from the optimized gas-generator design.

  4. Experimental and numerical studies of a lean-burn internally-staged combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Zhenbo; Lin Yuzhen; Li Lin; Zhang Chi

    2014-01-01

    A lean-burn internally-staged combustor for low emissions that can be used in civil avi-ation gas turbines is introduced in this paper. The main stage is designed and optimized in terms of fuel evaporation ratio, fuel/air pre-mixture uniformity, and particle residence time using commer-cial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. A single-module rectangular combustor is adopted in performance tests including lean ignition, lean blowout, combustion efficiency, emis-sions, and combustion oscillation using aviation kerosene. Furthermore, nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission is also predicted using CFD simulation to compare with test results. Under normal inlet temperature, this combustor can be ignited easily with normal and negative inlet pressures. The lean blowout fuel/air ratio (LBO FAR) at the idle condition is 0.0049. The fuel split proportions between the pilot and main stages are determined through balancing emissions, combustion efficiency, and combustion oscillation. Within the landing and take-off (LTO) cycle, this combustor enables 42%NOx reduction of the standard set by the 6th Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection (CAEP/6) with high combustion efficiency. The maximum board-band pressure oscillations of inlet air and fuel are below 1%of total pressure during steady-state operations at the LTO cycle specific conditions.

  5. Co-combustor: the solid waste thermal treatment plant in MINT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MINT has geared up into the field of solid waste thermal treatment processing back in 1999 when a new unit known as MIREC was established. Since then, a fast progress has taken place including the design and construction of a pilot scale incinerator, named as the Co-Combustor. The Co-combustor was designed and developed based on the gasification principles, which employs combustion in starved air condition. In year 2001, this plant was commissioned. To date, it has been running quite well according to its design values. Several test runs were also performed in order to collect and gather data, which serve as a background or backtrack record for upgrading purposes and optimizing its performance in future. On going research is also conducted on this plant especially on the study of the waste's behaviors under combustion. Besides the typical RND activities, the Co-combustor is also currently being used to burn waste paper especially to dispose restricted and confidential documents. This paper will highlight on the design, performance, application and usage of the co-combustor. The direction for research and development activities for this plant is also discussed in this paper so as to strengthen the knowledge and build up expertise in the field of incineration

  6. Effect of Spray Cone Angle on Flame Stability in an Annular Gas Turbine Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, R. K.; Kumar, S. Kishore; Chandel, Sunil

    2016-04-01

    Effect of fuel spray cone angle in an aerogas turbine combustor has been studied using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and full-scale combustor testing. For CFD analysis, a 22.5° sector of an annular combustor is modeled and the governing equations are solved using the eddy dissipation combustion model in ANSYS CFX computational package. The analysis has been carried out at 125 kPa and 303 K inlet conditions for spray cone angles from 60° to 140°. The lean blowout limits are established by studying the behavior of combustion zone during transient engine operation from an initial steady-state condition. The computational study has been followed by testing the practical full-scale annular combustor in an aerothermal test facility. The experimental result is in a good agreement with the computational predictions. The lean blowout fuel-air ratio increases as the spray cone angle is decreased at constant operating pressure and temperature. At higher spray cone angle, the flame and high-temperature zone moves upstream close to atomizer face and a uniform flame is sustained over a wide region causing better flame stability.

  7. Experimental and numerical studies of a lean-burn internally-staged combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Zhenbo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A lean-burn internally-staged combustor for low emissions that can be used in civil aviation gas turbines is introduced in this paper. The main stage is designed and optimized in terms of fuel evaporation ratio, fuel/air pre-mixture uniformity, and particle residence time using commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD software. A single-module rectangular combustor is adopted in performance tests including lean ignition, lean blowout, combustion efficiency, emissions, and combustion oscillation using aviation kerosene. Furthermore, nitrogen oxides (NOx emission is also predicted using CFD simulation to compare with test results. Under normal inlet temperature, this combustor can be ignited easily with normal and negative inlet pressures. The lean blowout fuel/air ratio (LBO FAR at the idle condition is 0.0049. The fuel split proportions between the pilot and main stages are determined through balancing emissions, combustion efficiency, and combustion oscillation. Within the landing and take-off (LTO cycle, this combustor enables 42% NOx reduction of the standard set by the 6th Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection (CAEP/6 with high combustion efficiency. The maximum board-band pressure oscillations of inlet air and fuel are below 1% of total pressure during steady-state operations at the LTO cycle specific conditions.

  8. INTERIM REPORT ON PIC (PRODUCTS OF INCOMPLETE COMBUSTION) MINIMIZATION IN A RESEARCH COMBUSTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    A series of five organic compounds (1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, trichloroethylene, Freon-113, carbon tetrachloride and chlorobenzene) were burned in heptane in a 100,000 Btu/hour water-jacketed research combustor in order to determine what, if any, PICs (Products of Incomplete Com...

  9. Bioethanol combustion in an industrial gas turbine combustor: simulations and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sallevelt, J.L.H.P.; Pozarlik, A.K.; Beran, Martin; Axelsson, L.; Brem, G.

    2014-01-01

    Combustion tests with bioethanol and diesel as a reference have been performed in OPRA's 2 MWe class OP16 gas turbine combustor. The main purposes of this work are to investigate the combustion quality of ethanol with respect to diesel and to validate the developed CFD model for ethanol spray combus

  10. 40 CFR 62.14106 - Emission limits for municipal waste combustor fugitive ash emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... minutes per 3-hour period), as determined by EPA Reference Method 22 observations as specified in 40 CFR... combustor fugitive ash emissions. 62.14106 Section 62.14106 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... ash emissions. (a) The owner or operator of an affected facility must not cause to be discharged...

  11. 40 CFR 60.55b - Standards for municipal waste combustor fugitive ash emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... fugitive ash emissions. 60.55b Section 60.55b Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... municipal waste combustor fugitive ash emissions. (a) On and after the date on which the initial performance... combustion ash from an ash conveying system (including conveyor transfer points) in excess of 5 percent...

  12. EMISSION TEST REPORT- FIELD TEST OF CARBON INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL, CAMDEN COUNTY MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of parametric test to evaluate the injection powdered activated carbon to control volatile pollutants in municipal waste combustor (MWC) flue gas. he tests were conducted at a spray dryer absorber/electrostatic precipitator (SD/ESP)-equipped MWC in Camden...

  13. Effect of dilution holes on the performance of a triple swirler combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Guoyu; He Xiaomin; Zhao Ziqiang; An Bokun; Song Yaoyu; Zhu Yixiao

    2014-01-01

    A triple swirler combustor is considered to be a promising solution for future high temperature rise combustors. The present paper aims to study dilution holes including primary dilu-tion holes and secondary dilution holes on the performance of a triple swirler combustor. Experi-mental investigations are conducted at different inlet airflow velocities (40–70 m/s) and combustor overall fuel–air ratio with fixed inlet airflow temperature (473 K) and atmospheric pressure. The experimental results show that the ignition is very difficult with specific performance of high ignition fuel–air ratio when the primary dilution holes are located 0.6H (where H is the liner dome height)downstream the dome, while the other four cases have almost the same ignition performance. The position of primary dilution holes has an effect on lean blowout stability and has a large influence on combustion efficiency. The combustion efficiency is the highest when the primary dilution holes are placed 0.9H downstream the dome among the five different locations. For the secondary dilution holes, the pattern factor of Design A is better than that of Design B.

  14. Basic thermodynamics of FLOXCOM, the low-NOx gas turbines adiabatic combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FLOXCOM Project is aimed to develop technology for clean and efficient gas turbines, operating at high temperatures. It is based on the technologically innovative combustion solution--flameless oxidation. The investigation is directed towards the validation of engineering feasibility of the flameless oxidation technology for the production of operating pilot combustors that will demonstrate, advantages including among others, improved performance relating to low NOx levels, maintaining uniform combustor wall temperatures, uniform fuel stream injection and more, resulting in an increased mean time between failure (MTBF) and reliability of the gas turbine. Combustion chambers for gas turbines and jet engines differ from conventional industrial furnace design by being 'adiabatic' (without heat extraction inside the combustor) and by operating at elevated pressures. Consequently, the aero-thermodynamics of the internal flow requires a different approach. The present paper is concerned with the thermodynamic relationships of gas turbine flameless oxidation. A detailed analysis of the different operational scheme options is described. It is shown that the thermodynamic process and operational parameters within the present low-NOx gas turbine combustor are principally different to those of industrial furnace operating in the flameless oxidation mode of combustion

  15. Reuse of Partially Sulphated CFBC Ash as an SO2 Sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yinghai; Jia, Lufei; Anthony, E.J. [CanmetENERGY, 1 Haanel Drive, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A1M1 (Canada); Nobili, M.; Telesca, A. [Department of Environmental Engineering and Physics, University of Basilicata, Viale dell' Ateneo, Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Montagnaro, F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Monte Sant' Angelo, 80126 Naples (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    Ashes produced from fluidized bed combustors (FBC) burning high-sulphur fuels often contain 20-30 % unreacted CaO because of the limestone added to remove SO2 in situ. This paper presents the results from experiments into reactivating partially sulphated FBC ash (both bed ash and fly ash) with liquid water, steam and sodium carbonate. The water- or steam-hydrated ashes were subsequently re-sulphated in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) with simulated flue gas. The TGA results show that, while liquid water and steam successfully hydrate and reactivate the unreacted CaO in the bed ash, the treated ashes sulphated to widely different extents. Attempts to reactivate fly ash with hydration failed, although fly ash by itself is extremely reactive. A pilot-scale mini-circulating FBC (CFBC) was also used to evaluate the results of reactivation on the bed ash by hydrating with liquid water and admixtures of inorganic salt (Na2CO3) in the form of either powder or solution. When the treated ash was re-injected into the combustor with the fuel, the effect on SO2 removal efficiency was negligible if Na2CO3 was added as powder. Doping with aqueous solution resulted in enhanced SO2 removal; however, the extent was lower than the level achieved if only water hydration was employed. Increasing the amount of water (from 10% to 30%) to reactivate the ash did not improve the sulphur capture capacity in the mini-CFBC. Overall, this study suggests that the most practical way for re-use of the partially sulphated bed ash as a sulphur sorbent is reactivation by water. A proposal for utilization of the fly ash in an economically reasonable way is also discussed.

  16. Prediction of Co-Firing Characteristics of Wastes in Circulating Fluidized Bed by Fuel Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takahiro; Suda, Toshiyuki

    The purpose of this study is to experimentally investigate the co-firing characteristics of different kinds of wastes in circulating fluidized bed combustors, and further to correlate the acquired combustion efficiency with fuel property parameters. The tested individual fuels were wasted tire, RPF, wood tip, RDF and coal, which typified the fuels with distinctively different contents of volatile matters. Coal was employed to represent the fuel containing particularly low volatile matters. The experiments were carried out in a pilot circulating fluidized bed combustor, and varied parameters included the fuel blending ratio, furnace temperature and secondary air ratio. The acquired results indicated that co-firing wasted tire and RPF led to higher CO concentration in the flue gas than firing RPF independently, and this CO concentration increased with increasing the blending ratio of wasted tire. The lower volatile matter content, higher carbon to hydrogen ratio (C⁄H ratio) and carbon to oxygen ratio (C⁄O ratio) of wasted tire than those of RPF were suggested to be responsible for the results. The study also found that the available combustion efficiencies in co-firing various pairs of the tested fuels were correlative with the volatile matter contents, C⁄H and C⁄O ratios of the blended fuels estimated as the weighed sums of the same property parameters of individual fuels. This allows thus a simple determination of the co-firing efficiency of any fuel blend from calculating the blend‧s fuel property parameters using the fuel blending ratio as a weight.

  17. Sulphation of calcium-based sorbents in circulating fluidised beds under oxy-fuel combustion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisco Garcia-Labiano; Luis F. de Diego; Alberto Abad; Pilar Gayan; Margarita de las Obras-Loscertales; Aranzazu Rufas; Juan Adanez [Instituto de Carboquimica (CSIC), Zaragoza (Spain). Dept. Energy and Environment

    2009-07-01

    Sulphur Retention (SR) by calcium-based sorbents is a process highly dependent on the temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration. In circulating fluidised beds combustors (CFBC's) operating under oxy-fuel conditions, the sulphation process takes place in atmospheres enriched in CO{sub 2} with bed concentrations that can vary from 40 to 95%. Under so high CO{sub 2} concentrations, very different from that in conventional coal combustion atmosphere with air, the calcination and sulphation behaviour of the sorbent must be defined to optimise the SR process in the combustor. The objective of this work was to determine the SO{sub 2} retention capacity of a Spanish limestone at typical oxy-fuel conditions in CFBC's. Long term duration tests of sulphation (up to 24 h), to simulate the residence time of sorbents in CFBC's, were carried out by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Clear behaviour differences were found under calcining and non-calcining conditions. Especially relevant was the result obtained at calcining conditions but close to the thermodynamic temperature given for sorbent calcination. This situation must be avoided in CFBC's because the CO{sub 2} produced inside the particle during calcination can destroy the particles if a non-porous sulphate product layer has been formed around the particle. The effect of the main variables on the sorbent sulphation such as SO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and particle size were analysed in the long term TGA tests. These data were also used to determine the kinetic parameters for the sulphation under oxy-fuel combustion conditions, which were able to adequately predict the sulphation conversion values in a wide range of operating conditions. 20 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Fluid bed porosity equation for an inverse fluidized bed bioreactor with particles growing biofilm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluid Bed Bioreactor performance is strongly affected by bed void fraction or bed porosity fluctuations. Particle size enlargement due to biofilm growth is an important factor that is involved in these variations and until now there are no mathematical equations that consider biofilm growth. In this work a mathematical equation is proposed to calculate bed void fraction in an inverse fluid bed bioreactor. (Author)

  19. Disposal of fluidized bed combustion ash in an underground mine to control acid mine drainage and subsidence - phase II - small scale field demonstration. Topical report, December 1, 1996--February 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemkiewicz, P.F.; Head, W.J.; Gray, D.D.; Siriwardane, H.J.; Sack, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    It has been proposed that a mix made from fly and bottom ash from atmospheric pressure fluidized bed coal combusters (FBC ash), water, and stabilizers be injected from the surface into abandoned room and pillar coal mines through boreholes. Besides ash disposal, this process would prevent subsidence and acid mine drainage. Such a mix (called `grout`) needs to be an adequately stable and flowable suspension for it to spread and cover large areas in the mine. This is necessary as the drilling of the boreholes will be an expensive operation and the number such holes should be minimized. Addition of bentonite was found to be needed for this purpose. A suitable grout mix was tested rheologically to determine its fluid flow properties. Finding little published information on such materials, tests were performed using a commercial rotational viscometer with a T-bar rotor and a stand which produced a helical rotor path. Existing mixer viscometer test methods were modified and adapted to convert the measurements of torque vs. angular speed to the material properties appearing in several non-Newtonian constitutive equations. Yield stress was measured by an independent test called the vane method. The rheological behavior was a close fit to the Bingham fluid model. Bleed tests were conducted to ascertain the stability of the mixtures. Spread tests were conducted to compare the flowability of various mixes. Using the flow parameters determined in the laboratory, numerical simulations of grout flow were performed and compared with the results of scale model and field tests. A field injection of this grout was performed at the Fairfax mines in Preston county, W.V.. The observations there proved that this FBC ash grout flows as desired, is a very economical way of disposing the environmentally menacing ash, while also preventing the subsidence and acid mine drainage of the mines.

  20. Combustion of hydrogen-air in micro combustors with catalytic Pt layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro power generators have high power density. However, their key components micro combustors have low stability. In this experiment, catalyst is applied to improve the stability. The catalytic micro combustor is made from an alumina ceramic tube. It has inner diameter of 1 mm, outer diameter of 2.02 mm and length of 24.5 mm. It is prepared through impregnation of aqueous solution of H2PtCl6. The flammability limits and surface temperatures under different operation conditions are measured. The flow rates range from 0.08 to 0.4 L/min. According to the experimental results, catalyst is effective to inhibit extinction. For example, At 0.8 L/min, the stability limit is 0.193-14.9 in the non-catalytic combustor. After applying catalyst, the lean limit is near 0, and the rich limit is 29.3. But catalyst is less effective to inhibit blow out. Increasing flow rates also inhibits extinction. In the non-catalytic combustor, while the flow rates increase from 0.08 to 0.2 L/min, the lean stability limit decreases from 0.193 to 0.125. The experimental results indicate that catalyst induces shift downstream in the stoichiometric and rich cases. The numeric simulation verifies that the heterogeneous reaction weakens the homogeneous reaction through consuming fuels. Thus, the insufficient heat recirculation makes the reaction region shift downstream. However, lean mixture has intense reaction in the catalytic combustor. It is attributed to the high mass diffusion and low thermal diffusion of lean mixture.

  1. Thermal characteristics of various biomass fuels in a small-scale biomass combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomass combustion is a mature and reliable technology, which has been used for heating and cooking. In the UK, biomass currently qualifies for financial incentives such as the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI). Therefore, it is vital to select the right type of fuel for a small-scale combustor to address different types of heat energy needs. In this paper, the authors attempt to investigate the performance of a small-scale biomass combustor for heating, and the impact of burning different biomass fuels on useful output energy from the combustor. The test results of moisture content, calorific value and combustion products of various biomass samples were presented. Results from this study are in general agreement with published data as far as the calorific values and moisture contents are concerned. Six commonly available biomass fuels were tested in a small-scale combustion system, and the factors that affect the performance of the system were analysed. In addition, the study has extended to examine the magnitude and proportion of useful heat, dissipated by convection and radiation while burning different biomass fuels in the small-scale combustor. It is concluded that some crucial factors have to be carefully considered before selecting biomass fuels for any particular heating application. - Highlights: • Six biomass materials combustion performance in a small combustor was examined. • Fuel combustion rate and amount of heat release has varied between materials. • Heat release by radiation, convection and flue gasses varied between materials. • Study helps engineers and users of biomass systems to select right materials

  2. Analytical and experimental evaluations of the effect of broad property fuels on combustors for commercial aircraft gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The impacts of broad property fuels on the design, performance, durability, emissions, and operational characteristics of current and advanced combustors for commercial aircraft gas turbine engines were studied. The effect of fuel thermal stability on engine and airframe fuel system was evaluated. Tradeoffs between fuel properties, exhaust emissions, and combustor life were also investigated. Results indicate major impacts of broad property fuels on allowable metal temperatures in fuel manifolds and injector support, combustor cyclic durability, and somewhat lesser impacts on starting characteristics, lightoff, emissions, and smoke.

  3. Clinical physiology of bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1993-01-01

    Maintenance of optimal health in humans requires the proper balance between exercise, rest, and sleep as well as time in the upright position. About one-third of a lifetime is spent sleeping; and it is no coincidence that sleeping is performed in the horizontal position, the position in which gravitational influence on the body is minimal. Although enforced bed rest is necessary for the treatment of some ailments, in some cases it has probably been used unwisely. In addition to the lower hydrostatic pressure with the normally dependent regions of the cardiovascular system, body fuid compartments during bed rest in the horizontal body position, and virtual elimination of compression on the long bones of the skeletal system during bed rest (hypogravia), there is often reduction in energy metabolism due to the relative confinement (hypodynamia) and alteration of ambulatory circadian variations in metabolism, body temperature, and many hormonal systems. If patients are also moved to unfamiliar surroundings, they probably experience some feelings of anxiety and some sociopsychological problems. Adaptive physiological responses during bed rest are normal for that environment. They are attempts by the body to reduce unnecessary energy expenditure, to optimize its function, and to enhance its survival potential. Many of the deconditioning responses begin within the first day or two of bed rest; these early responses have prompted physicians to insist upon early resumption of the upright posture and ambulation of bedridden patients.

  4. Evaluation of Kerosene Fuelled Scramjet Combustor using a Combination of Cooled and Uncooled Struts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chandrasekhar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The scramjet combustor a vital component of scramjet engine has been designed by employing fuel injection struts. Several experimental studies have been carried out to evaluate the propulsive performance and structural integrity of the in-stream fuel injection struts in the connect-pipe test facility. As the mission objective of hypersonic demonstrator is to flight test the scramjet engine for 20 s duration, in-stream fuel injection struts which are designed as heat sink devices encounter hostile flow field conditions especially in terms of high thermal and high convective loads in the scramjet combustor. To circumvent these adverse conditions, materials like Niobium C-103 and W-Ni-Fe alloys have been used for the construction of struts and a number of tests have been carried out to evaluate the survivability of the in-stream fuel injection struts in the scramjet combustor. The results thus obtained show that the erosion of leading edges of the Stage-II fuel injection struts in the initial phase and subsequently puncturing of the fuel injection manifold after 10-12 s of the test are noticed, while the other stages of the struts are found to be intact. This deteriorating leading edges of Stage-II struts with respect to time, affect the overall propulsive performance of the combustor. To mitigate this situation, Stage-II struts have been designed as cooled structure and other Stages of struts are designed as un-cooled structure. Material of construction of struts used is Nimonic C-263 alloy. This paper highlights the results of the static test of the scramjet combustor, which has been carried out at a combustor entry Mach number of 2.0, total temperature of 2000 K, with an overall kerosene fuel equivalence ratio of 1.0 and for the supersonic combustion duration of 20 s. Low back pressure has been created at the exit of the scramjet combustor using ejector system to avoid flow separation.Visual inspection of the fuel injection struts after the test

  5. Assessment of an atmospheric fluidized-bed coal-combustion gas-turbine cogeneration system for industrial application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, R. L.; Holcomb, R. S.; Tallackson, J. R.

    1979-10-01

    This study was initiated to provide information on the future potential industrial market for a cogeneration system consisting of a fluidized-bed coal combustor coupled to a gas-turbine (Brayton cycle) power system that uses air as the working fluid. In assessing the potential applications for the system, the process heat energy consumption by industry is identified, with special detail included on the six most energy-intensive industries. The potential impact on the nation's oil and natural gas consumption that would result from wide-spread utilization of coal for process heat is also estimated. The fraction of industrial process heat that the system could feasibly satisfy from a thermodynamic viewpoint is estimated, and the performance (potential fuel efficiency and heat/power ratio) of the atmospheric fluidized-bed gas-turbine system is calculated. Also treated are several specific case studies of industries in which the system could be incorporated. Major parameters are specified, and flow sheets are derived for systems that would satisfy the heat and power requirements of the process or industry. The overall fuel utilization efficiency, thermal power rating, and potential number of installations are specified for these case studies. The findings of the study indicate that there is a sizable potential market for the system, with over 1000 possible installations disclosed after reviewing only 8 specific industries from 6 major Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) groups. The potential displacement of oil and gas by coal in process heating is shown to be about 1.60 m/sup 3//sec (870,000 bbl/d) of oil and 4590 m/sup 3//sec (14.0 billion ft/sup 3//d) of natural gas for all industries combined. Continued development of the fluidized-bed coal combustor and power system is recommended so that this potential may be at least partially realized.

  6. Physiology Of Prolonged Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes physiological effects of prolonged bed rest. Rest for periods of 24 hours or longer deconditions body to some extent; healing proceeds simultaneously with deconditioning. Report provides details on shifts in fluid electrolytes and loss of lean body mass, which comprises everything in body besides fat - that is, water, muscle, and bone. Based on published research.

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF CATALYTIC COMBUSTOR TURBULENCE AND ITS INFLUENCE ON VANE AND ENDWALL HEAT TRANSFER AND ENDWALL FILM COOLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest E. Ames

    2002-10-01

    Endwall heat transfer distributions taken in a large-scale low speed linear cascade facility are documented for mock catalytic and dry low NOx (DLN) combustion systems. Inlet turbulence levels range from about 1.0 percent for the mock Catalytic combustor condition to 14 percent for the mock dry low NOx combustor system. Stanton number contours are presented at both turbulence conditions for Reynolds numbers based on true chord length and exit conditions ranging from 500,000 to 2,000,000. Catalytic combustor endwall heat transfer shows the influence of the complex three-dimensional flow field, while the effects of individual vortex systems are less evident for the mock dry low NOx cases. Turbulence scales have been documented for both cases. Inlet boundary layers are relatively thin for the mock catalytic combustor case while inlet flow approximates a channel flow with high turbulence for the mock DLN combustor case. Inlet boundary layer parameters are presented across the inlet passage for the three Reynolds numbers and both the mock catalytic and DLN combustor inlet cases. Both midspan and 95 percent span pressure contours are included. This research provides a well-documented database taken across a range of Reynolds numbers and turbulence conditions for assessment of endwall heat transfer predictive capabilities.

  8. Ash and heavy metals in fluidized-bed combustion of wood wastes; Tuhka ja raskasmetallit puuperaeisen jaetteen kerrosleijupoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaessi, T.; Aittoniemi, P. [IVO Power Engineering, Vantaa (Finland); Kauppinen, E.; Latva-Somppi, J.; Kurkela, J. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Partanen, J. [IVO Technology Centre, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Ash formation and deposition mechanisms during co-combustion of pulp mill sludge and bark in industrial bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) combustor have been studied. Similar fuels were used in a bench-scale BFB for co-combustion of sludge and bark pellets and comparative studies with separate combustion of these fuels. Results indicated that in industrial scale unit significant fraction of ash had vaporization. About 14 mass-% of the total fly ash was found in the particle size below 0.2 {mu}m. The vaporized species consisted of potassium (K), sulfur (S), chlorine (Cl) and also of minor quantities of sodium (Na). In the benchscale similar vaporization fractions during co-combustion were measured, about 11 mass-%. During the combustion of bark this ratio, about 20 mass-%, was higher than during sludge combustion. The vaporized ash fraction was in the case of dried sludge combustion about 7 mass-%, but with wet sludge the vaporization rate was remarkably lower, about 1-2 mass-%. An increase in the bed temperature increased also ash vaporization. Test run period without combustion at elevated temperatures produced very low quantities of vaporized ash. The vaporized species in bench-scale test during bark pellet combustion were K, S and Cl, for sludge combustion also Na was clearly detected. No condensation of the vaporized species in bed area or furnace walls was observed. Bed defluidization was studied in the bench-scale unit. During bark pellet combustion the bed-agglomeration proceeded via small ash particle, below 2 {mu}m, coating on sand particle surface and consequent bonding between the ash layers. In the case of sludge combustion the accumulation of large ash particles and sintering of these porous agglomerates was observed to cause bed coarsening and defluidization. (orig.)

  9. The development of a three-dimensional partially elliptic flow computer program for combustor research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y. S.

    1978-01-01

    A three dimensional, partially elliptic, computer program was developed. Without requiring three dimensional computer storage locations for all flow variables, the partially elliptic program is capable of predicting three dimensional combustor flow fields with large downstream effects. The program requires only slight increase of computer storage over the parabolic flow program from which it was developed. A finite difference formulation for a three dimensional, fully elliptic, turbulent, reacting, flow field was derived. Because of the negligible diffusion effects in the main flow direction in a supersonic combustor, the set of finite-difference equations can be reduced to a partially elliptic form. Only the pressure field was governed by an elliptic equation and requires three dimensional storage; all other dependent variables are governed by parabolic equations. A numerical procedure which combines a marching integration scheme with an iterative scheme for solving the elliptic pressure was adopted.

  10. Large Eddy Simulations and Experimental Investigation of Flow in a Swirl Stabilized Combustor

    KAUST Repository

    Kewlani, Gaurav

    2012-01-09

    Swirling flows are the preferred mode of flame stabilization in lean premixed gas turbine engine combustors. Developing a fundamental understanding of combustion dynamics and flame stability in such systems requires a detailed investigation of the complex interactions between fluid mechanics and combustion. The turbulent reacting flow in a sudden expansion swirl combustor is studied using compressible large eddy simulations (LES) and compared with experimental data measured using PIV. Different vortex breakdown structures are observed, as the mixture equivalence ratio is reduced, that progressively diminish the stability of the flame. Sub-grid scale combustion models such as the artificially thickened flame method and the partially stirred reactor approach, along with appropriate chemical schemes, are implemented to describe the flame. The numerical predictions for average velocity correspond well with experimental results, and higher accuracy is obtained using the more detailed reaction mechanism. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Combustion and Rotor-Stator Interaction in a Turbine Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragos D. Isvoranu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the development of a numerical algorithm for the computation of flow and combustion in a turbine combustor. The flow and combustion are modeled by the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the species-conservation equations. The chemistry model used herein is a two-step, global, finite-rate combustion model for methane and combustion gases. The governing equations are written in the strong conservation form and solved using a fully implicit, finite-difference approximation. The gas dynamics and chemistry equations are fully decoupled. A correction technique has been developed to enforce the conservation of mass fractions. The numerical algorithm developed herein has been used to investigate the flow and combustion in a one-stage turbine combustor.

  12. Computational analysis of mixing and transport of air and fuel co-fired combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computational analysis for air fuel mixing and transport in a combustor used for co fired burner has been done by RANS (Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes) model comparing with 3D (Three Dimensional) LES (Large Eddy Simulation). To investigate the better turbulence level and mixing within co fired combustor using the solid fuel biomass with coal is main purpose of this research work. The results show the difference in flow predicted by the two models, LES give better results than the RANS. For compressible flow the LES results show more swirling effect, The velocity decays along axial and radial distance for both swirling and non-swirling jet. Because of no slip condition near boundary the near the wall velocity is about zero. (author)

  13. Efficiency enhancement of wood stove integrated with catalytic combustor and modified chimney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Murali

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Domestic wood combustion produces smoke that is harmful to human health and increases fine particle level in the atmosphere. Some necessary changes in the design are essential in the domestic wood stove in order to improve the performance and scale down the emission. In this work, an improved wood stove integrated with the catalytic combustor and modified chimney that uses wood as fuel has been experimentally evaluated. Water boiling test, cooking test and emission test have been conducted to evaluate the performance of the stove. It was observed that emission has been considerably controlled because of the incorporation of catalytic combustor. The heat losses through the walls of stove decresed by providing ceramic insulation. The thermal efficiency value of an improved wood stove obtained was 41.18% and this is 31.52% higher than traditional stove. The improved wood stove results better performance than a traditional wood stove.

  14. A DRD finite element formulation for computing turbulent reacting flows in gas turbine combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsini, A.; Iossa, C.; Rispoli, F.; Tezduyar, T. E.

    2009-11-01

    An effective multiscale treatment of turbulent reacting flows is presented with the use of a stabilized finite element formulation. The method proposed is developed based on the streamline-upwind/Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) formulation, and includes discontinuity capturing in the form of a new generation “DRD” method, namely the “DRDJ” technique. The stabilized formulation is applied to finite-rate chemistry modelling based on mixture-fraction approaches with the so-called presumed-PDF technique. The turbulent combustion process is simulated for an aero-engine combustor configuration of RQL concept in non-premixed flame regime. The comparative analysis of the temperature and velocity fields demonstrate that the proposed SUPG+DRDJ formulation outperforms the stand-alone SUPG method. The improved accuracy is demonstrated in terms of the combustor overall performance, and the mechanisms involved in the distribution of the numerical diffusivity are also discussed.

  15. Ultra low injection angle fuel holes in a combustor fuel nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, William David

    2012-10-23

    A fuel nozzle for a combustor includes a mixing passage through which fluid is directed toward a combustion area and a plurality of swirler vanes disposed in the mixing passage. Each swirler vane of the plurality of swirler vanes includes at least one fuel hole through which fuel enters the mixing passage in an injection direction substantially parallel to an outer surface of the plurality of swirler vanes thereby decreasing a flameholding tendency of the fuel nozzle. A method of operating a fuel nozzle for a combustor includes flowing a fluid through a mixing passage past a plurality of swirler vanes and injecting a fuel into the mixing passage in an injection direction substantially parallel to an outer surface of the plurality of swirler vanes.

  16. Computational Analysis of Mixing and Transport of Air and Fuel in Co-Fired Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javaid Iqbal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational analysis for air fuel mixing and transport in a combustor used for co fired burner has been done by RANS (Reynolds-Averaged Navier?Stokes model comparing with 3D (Three Dimensional LES (Large Eddy Simulation. To investigate the better turbulence level and mixing within co fired combustor using the solid fuel biomass with coal is main purpose of this research work. The results show the difference in flow predicted by the two models, LES give better results than the RANS. For compressible flow the LES results show more swirling effect, The velocity decays along axial and radial distance for both swirling and non-swirling jet. Because of no slip condition near boundary the near the wall velocity is about zero

  17. An experimental study of turbulent flow in attachment jet combustors by LDV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Wu, Cheng-Kang

    1993-12-01

    Flame stabilization in attachment jet combustors is based on the existence of the high temperature recirculation zone, provided by the Coanda effect of an attachment jet. The single attachment jet in a rectangular channel is a fundamental form of this type of flow. In this paper, the detailed characteristics of turbulent flow of a single attachment jet were experimentally studied by using a 2-D LDV. The flowfield consists of a forward flow and two reverse flows. The forward one is composed of a curved and a straight section. The curved section resembles a bent turbulent free jet, and the straight part is basically a section of turbulent wall jet. A turbulent counter-gradient transport region exists at the curved section. According to the results, this kind of combustor should have a large sudden enlargement ratio and not too narrow in width.

  18. LES of combustion dynamics near blowout in a realistic gas-turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esclapez, Lucas; Nik, Medhi B.; Ma, Peter C.; O'Brien, Jeff; Carbajal, Serena; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Driven by increasingly stringent emission regulations, modern gas turbines operate at lean conditions to reduce combustion chamber temperature and NOx emissions. However, as the combustor operates closer to the lean blow-out (LBO) limit, flame stabilization mechanisms are weakened, which increases the risk for complete flame blowout. To better understand the LBO-process, large-eddy simulations of the combustion dynamics near blowout are performed in a realistic two-phase flow combustor. An unstructured incompressible Navier-Stokes solver is used in combination with a Lagrangian dispersed phase formulation. Flame dynamics near and at LBO conditions are studied to identify the role of the liquid fuel composition, spray evaporation, and complex flow pattern on the LBO limit.

  19. Pulling a patient up in bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moving a patient in bed ... takes at least two people to safely move a patient up in bed. Friction from rubbing can ... A slide sheet is the best way to prevent friction. If you do not have one, you ...

  20. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: SPOUTED BED REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Spouted Bed Reactor (SBR) technology utilizes the unique attributes of the "spouting " fluidization regime, which can provide heat transfer rates comparable to traditional fluid beds, while providing robust circulation of highly heterogeneous solids, concurrent with very agg...

  1. Pulling a patient up in bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moving a patient in bed ... takes at least 2 people to safely move a patient up in bed. Friction from rubbing can ... A slide sheet is the best way to prevent friction. If you do not have one, you ...

  2. Numerical Simulation of Combustion and Rotor-Stator Interaction in a Turbine Combustor

    OpenAIRE

    Isvoranu, Dragos D.; Cizmas, Paul G. A.

    2003-01-01

    This article presents the development of a numerical algorithm for the computation of flow and combustion in a turbine combustor. The flow and combustion are modeled by the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the species-conservation equations. The chemistry model used herein is a two-step, global, finite-rate combustion model for methane and combustion gases. The governing equations are written in the strong conservation form and solved using a fully implicit, finite-diffe...

  3. Flow structures in a lean-premixed swirl-stabilized combustor with microjet air injection

    KAUST Repository

    LaBry, Zachary A.

    2011-01-01

    The major challenge facing the development of low-emission combustors is combustion instability. By lowering flame temperatures, lean-premixed combustion has the potential to nearly eliminate emissions of thermally generated nitric oxides, but the chamber acoustics and heat release rate are highly susceptible to coupling in ways that lead to sustained, high-amplitude pressure oscillations, known as combustion instability. At different operating conditions, different modes of instability are observed, corresponding to particular flame shapes and resonant acoustic modes. Here we show that in a swirl-stabilized combustor, these instability modes also correspond to particular interactions between the flame and the inner recirculation zone. Two stable and two unstable modes are examined. At lean equivalence ratios, a stable conical flame anchors on the upstream edge of the inner recirculation zone and extends several diameters downstream along the wall. At higher equivalence ratios, with the injection of counter-swirling microjet air flow, another stable flame is observed. This flame is anchored along the upstream edge of a stronger recirculation zone, extending less than one diameter downstream along the wall. Without the microjets, a stationary instability coupled to the 1/4 wave mode of the combustor shows weak velocity oscillations and a stable configuration of the inner and outer recirculation zones. Another instability, coupled to the 3/4 wave mode of the combustor, exhibits periodic vortex breakdown in which the core flow alternates between a columnar mode and a vortex breakdown mode. © 2010 Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of The Combustion Institute. All rights reserved.

  4. Hygroscopic properties of jet engine combustor particles during the partemis campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gysel, M.; Nyeki, S.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Petzold, A. [Deutsche Luft- und Raumfahrt, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Wilson, C.W.

    2002-03-01

    The influence of fuel sulphur content (FSC) on particle properties from a jet engine combustor test rig was investigated during the EC-project PartEmis. Hygroscopic growth factors were measured using a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (H-TDMA). While particles were hydrophobic at low FSC, hygroscopic growth factors increased significantly with increasing FSC. Under similar conditions small particles were more hygroscopic than large particles. (author)

  5. Large Eddy Simulation of ignition in an annular multi-injector combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicquelin, Ronan; Philip, Maxime; Boileau, Matthieu; Schmitt, Thomas; Bourgoin, Jean-François; Durox, Daniel; Candel, Sébastien

    2013-11-01

    The present work deals with validating the LES methodology for transient ignition simulations, and in particular elucidating the mechanisms that control the light round sequence in a laboratory annular combustor, representative of many practical industrial systems. The simulation benefits from the unique experimental database built at EM2C on a fully transparent annular chamber equipped with 16 premixed swirled injectors. The F-TACLES combustion model is used for its ability to properly represent the flame propagation.

  6. SiC Recession Due to SiO2 Scale Volatility Under Combustor Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Raymond Craig

    1997-01-01

    One of today's most important and challenging technological problems is the development of advanced materials and processes required to design and build a fleet of supersonic High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) airliners, a follow-up to the Concorde SST. The innovative combustor designs required for HSCT engines will need high-temperature materials with long-term environmental stability. Higher combustor liner temperatures than today's engines and the need for lightweight materials will require the use of advanced ceramic-matrix composites (CMC's) in hot-section components. The HSCT is just one example being used to demonstrate the need for such materials. This thesis evaluates silicon carbide (SiC) as a potential base material for HSCT and other similar applications. Key issues are the environmental durability for the materials of interest. One of the leading combustor design schemes leads to an environment which will contain both oxidizing and reducing gas mixtures. The concern is that these environments may affect the stability of the silica (SiO2) scale on which SiC depends for environmental protection. A unique High Pressure Burner Rig (HPBR) was developed to simulate the combustor conditions of future gas turbine engines, and a series of tests were conducted on commercially available SiC material. These tests are intended as a feasibility study for the use of these materials in applications such as the HSCT. Linear weight loss and surface recession of the SiC is observed as a result of SiO2 volatility for both fuel-lean and fuel-rich gas mixtures. These observations are compared and agree well with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) experiments. A strong Arrhenius-type temperature dependence exists. In addition, the secondary dependencies of pressure and gas velocity are defined. As a result, a model is developed to enable extrapolation to points outside the experimental space of the burner rig, and in particular, to potential gas turbine engine conditions.

  7. Large-eddy simulation of ow and combustion dynamics in a lean partially premixed swirling combustor

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shaoshuai; Zheng, Yunzhe; Zhu, Min; Mira, Daniel; Jiang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    A lean partially premixed swirling combustor was studied by resolving the complete flow path from the swirl vanes to the chamber outlet with large-eddy simulation (LES). The flow and combustion dynamics for non-reacting and reacting situations was analysed, where the intrinsic effects of swirl vanes and counter flows on the vortex formation, vorticity distribution for non-reacting cases were examined. A modified flame index was introduced to identify the flame regime during the partially prem...

  8. Design and testing of a combustor for a turbo-ramjet for UAV and missile applications

    OpenAIRE

    Piper, Ross H.

    2003-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution unlimited An existing freejet facility was upgraded and its range of operation extended into the high subsonic regime for operation as a test rig for the development of a combined-cycle, turbo-ramjet engine. A combustor was designed, developed, and tested as the afterburner for the turbo-ramjet engine. At subsonic speeds with the afterburner running, an increase in thrust of 40% was measured over the baseline turbojet running at 80% spool speed. A ...

  9. Quantitative evaluation of minerals in fly ashes of biomass, coal and biomass-coal mixture derived from circulating fluidised bed combustion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical and mineralogical composition of fly ash samples collected from laboratory scale circulating fluidised bed (CFB) combustion facility have been investigated. Three fly ashes were collected from the second cyclone in a 50 kW laboratory scale boiler, after the combustion of different solid fuels. Characterisation of the fly ash samples was conducted by means of X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Quantitative analysis of the crystalline (mineral) and amorphous phases in each ash sample was carried out using the Rietveld-based Siroquant system, with an added spike of ZnO to evaluate the amorphous content. SiO2 is the dominant oxide in the fly ashes, with CaO, Al2O3 and Fe2O3 also present in significant proportions. XRD results show that all three fly ashes contain quartz, anhydrite, hematite, illite and amorphous phases. The minerals calcite, feldspar, lime and periclase are present in ashes derived from Polish coal and/or woodchips. Ash from FBC combustion of a Greek lignite contains abundant illite, whereas illite is present only in minor proportions in the other ash samples.

  10. Quantitative evaluation of minerals in fly ashes of biomass, coal and biomass-coal mixture derived from circulating fluidised bed combustion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koukouzas, N.; Ward, C.R.; Papanikolaou, D.; Li, Z.S.; Ketikidis, C. [Institute of Solid Fuels Technology & Applications, Athens (Greece)

    2009-09-15

    The chemical and mineralogical composition of fly ash samples collected from laboratory scale circulating fluidised bed (CFB) combustion facility have been investigated. Three fly ashes were collected from the second cyclone in a 50 kW laboratory scale boiler, after the combustion of different solid fuels. Characterisation of the fly ash samples was conducted by means of X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Quantitative analysis of the crystalline (mineral) and amorphous phases in each ash sample was carried out using the Rietveld-based Siroquant system, with an added spike of ZnO to evaluate the amorphous content. SiO{sub 2} is the dominant oxide in the fly ashes, with CaO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} also present in significant proportions. XRD results show that all three fly ashes contain quartz, anhydrite, hematite, illite and amorphous phases. The minerals calcite, feldspar, lime and periclase are present in ashes derived from Polish coal and/or woodchips. Ash from FBC combustion of a Greek lignite contains abundant illite, whereas illite is present only in minor proportions in the other ash samples.

  11. Quantitative evaluation of minerals in fly ashes of biomass, coal and biomass-coal mixture derived from circulating fluidised bed combustion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koukouzas, Nikolaos, E-mail: koukouzas@certh.gr [Centre for Research and Technology Hellas, Institute for Solid Fuels Technology and Applications, Mesogeion Ave. 357-359, 15231 Halandri, Athens (Greece); Ward, Colin R. [School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Papanikolaou, Dimitra [Centre for Research and Technology Hellas, Institute for Solid Fuels Technology and Applications, Mesogeion Ave. 357-359, 15231 Halandri, Athens (Greece); Li, Zhongsheng [School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Ketikidis, Chrisovalantis [Centre for Research and Technology Hellas, Institute for Solid Fuels Technology and Applications, Mesogeion Ave. 357-359, 15231 Halandri, Athens (Greece)

    2009-09-30

    The chemical and mineralogical composition of fly ash samples collected from laboratory scale circulating fluidised bed (CFB) combustion facility have been investigated. Three fly ashes were collected from the second cyclone in a 50 kW laboratory scale boiler, after the combustion of different solid fuels. Characterisation of the fly ash samples was conducted by means of X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Quantitative analysis of the crystalline (mineral) and amorphous phases in each ash sample was carried out using the Rietveld-based Siroquant system, with an added spike of ZnO to evaluate the amorphous content. SiO{sub 2} is the dominant oxide in the fly ashes, with CaO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} also present in significant proportions. XRD results show that all three fly ashes contain quartz, anhydrite, hematite, illite and amorphous phases. The minerals calcite, feldspar, lime and periclase are present in ashes derived from Polish coal and/or woodchips. Ash from FBC combustion of a Greek lignite contains abundant illite, whereas illite is present only in minor proportions in the other ash samples.

  12. The development of an ultra-low-emission gas-fired combustor for space heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultra-low-emission as-fired combustor has been developed for relatively low-temperature direct-air heating applications. High-lean premixed cyclonic combustion with a flame stabilizer is employed to achieve ultra-low emissions and high turndown operation. On the basis of analytical studies and cold modeling a 350-kW test combustor was designed and successfully tested. Experimental results obtained using natural gas and ambient air demonstrated that the test combustor can operate steadily at high excess air up to 80% to 100% over a large turndown range up to 40:1. At design operating conditions, NOx emissions as low as 0.6 vppm and CO and total hydrocarbon (THC) emissions below 3 vppm were achieved. Over the full operating range, NOx emissions from 0.3 to 1.0 vppm and CO and THC emissions below 4 vppm were demonstrated. In all tests, concentrations of NO2 were less than 40% of the total NO2 emissions from combustion processes required for good indoor air quality (0.5 vppm). This paper presents the concept of high-lean premixed ultra-low-emission cyclonic combustion, design specifications for the combustion system, and the major experimental results, including flame stability, emissions, and turndown performance. 15 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  13. The development of an ultra-low-emission gas-fired cyclonic combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gas-fired cyclonic combustor has been developed for relatively low-temperature direct-air heating applications that require ultra-low pollutant emissions. High-lean premixed combustion with a flame stabilizer is adopted to achieve ultra-low emissions and high turndown operation. On the basis of analytical studies and cold modeling, a 350-kW test combustor was designed and successfully tested. Experimental results obtained using natural gas and ambient air demonstrated that the test combustor can operate steadily at high excess air up to 80% to 100% over a large turndown range up to 40:1. At design operating conditions, NOx emissions as low as 0.6 vppm and CO and total hydrocarbon (THC) emissions below 3 vppm were achieved. Over the full operating range, NOx emissions from 0.3 to 1.0 vppm and CO and THC emissions below 4 vppm were demonstrated. In all tests, concentrations of NO2 were less than 40% of the total NOx emissions -- lower than the level of NO2 emissions from combustion processes required for good indoor air quality (0.5 vppm). This paper presents the concept of high-lean premixed ultra-low-emission cyclonic combustion, design specifications for the combustion system, and the major experimental results, including flame stability, emissions, and turndown performance. 13 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  14. Performance Evaluation of Hybrid Gas Turbine Engine Embedded with Pulse Detonation Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jun-Xiang; Yan, Chuan-Jun; Zheng, Long-Xi; Huang, Xi-Qiao

    2011-09-01

    The numerical investigations of performance evaluation of a hybrid gas turbine engine embedded with a pulse detonation combustor (PDC) were performed to examine the improvement of the performance of the hybrid propulsion system. The calculation model and method were described. The architecture, configuration and size of detonation tubes were investigated in the calculation. Two models of detonation tube exit temperature were utilized. Eight configuration choices for the PDC based on the calculation model were designed. Specific fuel consumption of a hybrid gas turbine engine was compared with that of the baseline engine at the condition of the same engine net thrust. The experimental research of a PDC interacted with a radial flow turbine of a turbocharger was conducted. The numerical results show that if the net thrust of hybrid PDC engine is matched to that of baseline engine, specific fuel consumption of hybrid PDC engine is 20-25% less than that of baseline engine. The total volume of the hybrid engine combustor is reduced. The incorporation of PDC into gas turbine engine can improve the performance of hybrid PDC engine, decrease the combustor weight, and increase the thrust-weight ratio. The experimental results show that the fully developed detonation waves are achieved in the experimental apparatus.

  15. Microjet Injection Strategies for Mitigating Dynamics in a Lean Premixed Swirl-Stabilized Combustor

    KAUST Repository

    LaBry, Zachary

    2011-01-04

    Combustion dynamics remain a challenge in the development of low-emission, air-breathing combustors for power generation and aircraft propulsion. In this paper, we presenta parametric study on the use of microjet injectors for suppressing or mitigating the combustion dynamics that energize the thermoacoustic instability in a swirl-stabilized, premixed combustor. Microjet injectors consist of small inlet ports intended to inject flow with high momentum at relatively low mass flow rates into the flame-anchoring region. The microjets were configured to inject flow either axially, into the outer recirculation zone, or radially into the inner recirculation zone. Additionally, different injectors were tested with different relative senses of swirl (signs of angular momentum)with respect to the main flow: co-swirling, not swirling, or counter-swirling. We observed that injecting air or premixed fuel/air into the inner recirculation zone via counter-swirling radial microjets, we were able to reduce the overall sound pressure level in the combustor by over 20 dB in the lean end of the operating range. Other injector configurations were not observed to positively influence the combust or stability. Detailed PIV measurements are used to examine possible mechanisms of how the microjets impact the combustion dynamics, and the technology implications of our experiments are discussed.

  16. Flow-acoustic Characterisation of a Cavity-based Combustor Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Kant Agarwal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns the flow-acoustic characterisation of a cavity-based combustor configuration. A well-validated numerical tool has been used to simulate the unsteady, two-dimensional reacting flow. Initially, a conventional flow over a cavity with dimensions and conditions corresponding to a compact cavity combustor was studied. Cavity mass injections in the form of fuel and air injections required for trapped vortex formation were then employed and the resonance features of this configuration were studied. The results indicate that the cavity depth mode resonance mechanism is dominant at the conditions studied in this work and that the oscillation frequencies do not change with cavity air injection. This observation is important since it implies that the only important variable which can alter resonant frequencies is the cavity depth. With combustion, the pressure oscillation amplitude was observed to increases significantly due to periodic entrainment of the cavity air jet and fluctuation of fuel-air mixture composition to produce highly fluctuating heat-release rates. The underlying mechanisms of the unsteady flow in the cavity combustor identified in this study indicate the strong dependence of the acoustics on the cavity injection strategies.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(6, pp.523-528, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.870

  17. Dual-Pump CARS Temperature and Species Concentration Measurements in a Supersonic Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Byrne, S.; Danehy, P. M.; Tedder, S. A.; Cutler, A. D.

    2007-01-01

    The dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) method was used to measure temperature and the mole fractions of N2 and O2 in a supersonic combustor. Experiments were conducted in NASA Langley Research Center s Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Test Facility. In this facility, H2 and oxygen-enriched air burn to increase the enthalpy of the simulated air test gas. This gas is expanded through a Mach 2 nozzle and into a combustor model consisting of a short constant-area section followed by a small rearward-facing step and another constant-area section. At the end of this straight section, H2 fuel is injected at Mach 2 and at a 30 angle with respect to the freestream. One wall of the duct then expands at a 3 angle for over 1 meter. The ensuing combustion is probed optically through ports in the side of the combustor. Dual-pump CARS measurements were performed at the facility nozzle exit and at four planes downstream of fuel injection. Maps are presented of the mean temperature, as well as N2 and O2 mean mole fraction fields. Correlations between fluctuations of the different measured parameters are also presented.

  18. An integrated approach for optimal design of micro gas turbine combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuligno, Luca; Micheli, Diego; Poloni, Carlo

    2009-06-01

    The present work presents an approach for the optimized design of small gas turbine combustors, that integrates a 0-D code, CFD analyses and an advanced game theory multi-objective optimization algorithm. The output of the 0-D code is a baseline design of the combustor, given the required fuel characteristics, the basic geometry (tubular or annular) and the combustion concept (i.e. lean premixed primary zone or diffusive processes). For the optimization of the baseline design a simplified parametric CAD/mesher model is then defined and submitted to a CFD code. Free parameters of the optimization process are position and size of the liner hole arrays, their total area and the shape of the exit duct, while different objectives are the minimization of NOx emissions, pressure losses and combustor exit Pattern Factor. A 3D simulation of the optimized geometry completes the design procedure. As a first demonstrative example, the integrated design process was applied to a tubular combustion chamber with a lean premixed primary zone for a recuperative methane-fuelled small gas turbine of the 100 kW class.

  19. Analysis of oxy-fuel combustion power cycle utilizing a pressurized coal combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growing concerns over greenhouse gas emissions have driven extensive research into new power generation cycles that enable carbon dioxide capture and sequestration. In this regard, oxy-fuel combustion is a promising new technology in which fuels are burned in an environment of oxygen and recycled combustion gases. In this paper, an oxy-fuel combustion power cycle that utilizes a pressurized coal combustor is analyzed. We show that this approach recovers more thermal energy from the flue gases because the elevated flue gas pressure raises the dew point and the available latent enthalpy in the flue gases. The high-pressure water-condensing flue gas thermal energy recovery system reduces steam bleeding which is typically used in conventional steam cycles and enables the cycle to achieve higher efficiency. The pressurized combustion process provides the purification and compression unit with a concentrated carbon dioxide stream. For the purpose of our analysis, a flue gas purification and compression process including de-SOx, de-NOx, and low temperature flash unit is examined. We compare a case in which the combustor operates at 1.1 bars with a base case in which the combustor operates at 10 bars. Results show nearly 3% point increase in the net efficiency for the latter case.

  20. Ignition and Flame Stabilization of a Strut-Jet RBCC Combustor with Small Rocket Exhaust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jichao Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A Rocket Based Combined Cycle combustor model is tested at a ground direct connected rig to investigate the flame holding characteristics with a small rocket exhaust using liquid kerosene. The total temperature and the Mach number of the vitiated air flow, at exit of the nozzle are 1505 K and 2.6, respectively. The rocket base is embedded in a fuel injecting strut and mounted in the center of the combustor. The wall of the combustor is flush, without any reward step or cavity, so the strut-jet is used to make sure of the flame stabilization of the second combustion. Mass flow rate of the kerosene and oxygen injected into the rocket is set to be a small value, below 10% of the total fuel when the equivalence ratio of the second combustion is 1. The experiment has generated two different kinds of rocket exhaust: fuel rich and pure oxygen. Experiment result has shown that, with a relative small total mass flow rate of the rocket, the fuel rich rocket plume is not suitable for ignition and flame stabilization, while an oxygen plume condition is suitable. Then the paper conducts a series of experiments to investigate the combustion characteristics under this oxygen pilot method and found that the flame stabilization characteristics are different at different combustion modes.

  1. Ignition of Hydrogen-Oxygen Rocket Combustor with Chlorine Trifluoride and Triethylaluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, John W.; Straight, David M.

    1961-01-01

    Ignition of a nominal-125-pound-thrust cold (2000 R) gaseous-hydrogen - liquid-oxygen rocket combustor with chlorine trifluoride (hypergolic with hydrogen) and triethylaluminum (hypergolic with oxygen) resulted in consistently smooth starting transients for a wide range of combustor operating conditions. The combustor exhaust nozzle discharged into air at ambient conditions. Each starting transient consisted of the following sequence of events: injection of the lead main propellant, injection of the igniter chemical, ignition of these two chemicals, injection of the second main propellant, ignition of the two main propellants, increase in chamber pressure to its terminal value, and cutoff of igniter-chemical flow. Smooth ignition was obtained with an ignition delay of less than 100 milliseconds for the reaction of the lead propellant with the igniter chemical using approximately 0.5 cubic inch (0-038 lb) of chlorine trifluoride or 1.0 cubic inch (0-031 lb) of triethylaluminum. These quantities of igniter chemical were sufficient to ignite a 20-percent-fuel hydrogen-oxygen mixture with a delay time of less than 15 milliseconds. Test results indicated that a simple, light weight chemical ignition system for hydrogen-oxygen rocket engines may be possible.

  2. Testing of DLR C/C-SiC for HIFiRE 8 Scramjet Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.; Capriotti, Diego P.; Reimer, Thomas; Kutemeyer, Marius; Smart, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) have been proposed for hot structures in scramjet combustors. Previous studies have calculated significant weight savings by utilizing CMCs (active and passive) versus actively cooled metallic scramjet structures. Both a C/C and a C/C-SiC material system fabricated by DLR (Stuttgart, Germany) are being considered for use in a passively cooled combustor design for HIFiRE 8, a joint Australia / AFRL hypersonic flight program, expected to fly at Mach 7 for approximately 30 sec, at a dynamic pressure of 55 kPa. Flat panels of the DLR C/C and the C/C-SiC were tested in the NASA Langley Direct Connect Rig (DCR) at Mach 5 and Mach 6 enthalpy for several minutes. Gaseous hydrogen fuel was used to fuel the scramjet combustor. The test panels were instrumented with embedded Type K and Type S thermocouples. Zirconia felt insulation was used in some of the tests to increase the surface temperature of the C/C-SiC panel for approximately 350degF. The final C/C-SiC panel was tested for 3 cycles totaling over 135 sec at Mach 6 enthalpy. Slightly more erosion was observed on the C/C panel than the C/C-SiC panels, but both material systems demonstrated acceptable recession performance for the HIFiRE 8 flight.

  3. The development of an ultra-low-emission gas-fired combustor for space heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Tian-yu; Khinkis, M.J. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)); Coppin, W.P. (Maxon Corp., Muncie, IN (United States))

    1991-01-01

    An ultra-low-emission as-fired combustor has been developed for relatively low-temperature direct-air heating applications. High-lean premixed cyclonic combustion with a flame stabilizer is employed to achieve ultra-low emissions and high turndown operation. On the basis of analytical studies and cold modeling a 350-kW test combustor was designed and successfully tested. Experimental results obtained using natural gas and ambient air demonstrated that the test combustor can operate steadily at high excess air up to 80% to 100% over a large turndown range up to 40:1. At design operating conditions, NO{sub x} emissions as low as 0.6 vppm and CO and total hydrocarbon (THC) emissions below 3 vppm were achieved. Over the full operating range, NO{sub x} emissions from 0.3 to 1.0 vppm and CO and THC emissions below 4 vppm were demonstrated. In all tests, concentrations of NO{sub 2} were less than 40% of the total NO{sub 2} emissions from combustion processes required for good indoor air quality (0.5 vppm). This paper presents the concept of high-lean premixed ultra-low-emission cyclonic combustion, design specifications for the combustion system, and the major experimental results, including flame stability, emissions, and turndown performance. 15 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Operability of an Ejector Enhanced Pulse Combustor in a Gas Turbine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Dougherty, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    A pressure-gain combustor comprised of a mechanically valved, liquid fueled pulsejet, an ejector, and an enclosing shroud, was coupled to a small automotive turbocharger to form a self-aspirating, thrust producing gas turbine engine. The system was constructed in order to investigate issues associated with the interaction of pulsed combustion devices and turbomachinery. Installed instrumentation allowed for sensing of distributed low frequency pressure and temperature, high frequency pressure in the shroud, fuel flow rate, rotational speed, thrust, and laboratory noise. The engine ran successfully and reliably, achieving a sustained thrust of 5 to 6 lbf, and maintaining a rotor speed of approximately 90,000 rpm, with a combustor pressure gain of approximately 4 percent. Numerical simulations of the system without pressure-gain combustion indicated that the turbocharger would not operate. Thus, the new combustor represented a substantial improvement in system performance. Acoustic measurements in the shroud and laboratory indicated turbine stage sound pressure level attenuation of 20 dB. This is consistent with published results from detonative combustion experiments. As expected, the mechanical reed valves suffered considerable damage under the higher pressure and thermal loading characteristics of this system. This result underscores the need for development of more robust valve systems for this application. The efficiency of the turbomachinery components did not appear to be significantly affected by unsteadiness associated with pulsed combustion, though the steady component efficiencies were already low, and thus not expected to be particularly sensitive.

  5. Gasifier-combustor using chips of eucalyptus firewood in drying pulped coffee; Gasificador/combustor a cavacos de lenha na secagem de cafe despolpado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jadir Nogueira da; Saiki, Emilio Takashi; Vilarinho, Mauricio Coelho; Cardoso Sobrinho, Jose [Vicosa Univ., MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Agricola

    2000-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the viability of the of a gasifier/combustor using chip of eucalyptus firewood as fuel, in drying pulped coffee. The gasifier used was designed by Silva (1988) with modifications in the gasification chamber, being the area of the grate reduced from 0,21 to 0,06m{sup 2}. An addition of a coating involving the gasifier was done and a damper was placed in the exit of the combustion chamber. The air heated up in the combustor was sent to dryer developed by Campos (1998) that possessed four movable metallic chambers with movement and hoisted by a pulleys system. It was dried coffee with initial moisture of 54,5% w.b. up to 11,1{+-}1,6% w.b. The moisture of the coffee was determined by equipment of the universal type, EDABO and stove. The temperature of the drying air was of 60 deg C, static pressure of the air in the exit of the fan of 9 mm ca with speed of 46,3m{sup 3}.min{sup -1}. It was ended that the gasifier using chips of eucalyptus firewood as fuel consumed among 15,3 and 18,8 kg/hour of the biomass and that the equipment is viable for the drying of pulped coffee, not impregnating it with smoke or other particles, usually generated in the direct fired furnaces. (author)

  6. Co-combustion of tannery sludge in a commercial circulating fluidized bed boiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hao; Jiang, Xuguang; Lv, Guojun; Chi, Yong; Yan, Jianhua

    2015-12-01

    Co-combusting hazardous wastes in existing fluidized bed combustors is an alternative to hazardous waste treatment facilities, in shortage in China. Tannery sludge is a kind of hazardous waste, considered fit for co-combusting with coal in fluidized bedboilers. In this work, co-combustion tests of tannery sludge and bituminous coal were conducted in a power plant in Jiaxing, Zhejiang province. Before that, the combustion behavior of tannery sludge and bituminous were studied by thermogravimetric analysis. Tannery sludge presented higher reactivity than bituminous coal. During the co-combustion tests, the emissions of harmful gases were monitored. The results showed that the pollutant emissions met the Chinese standard except for NOx. The Concentrations of seven trace elements (As, Cr, Cd, Ni, Cu, Pb, Mn) in three exit ash flows (bottom ash in bed, fly ash in filter, and submicrometer aerosol in flue gas) were analyzed. The results of mono-combustion of bituminous coal were compared with those of co-combustion with tannery sludge. It was found that chromium enriched in fly ash. At last, the leachability of fly ash and bottom ash was analyzed. The results showed that most species were almost equal to or below the limits except for As in bottom ashes and Cr in the fly ash of co-combustion test. The concentrations of Cr in leachates of co-combustion ashes are markedly higher than that of coal mono-combustion ashes. PMID:26278370

  7. Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator test bed for continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator, located on the K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, continues to be the only operational incinerator in the country that can process hazardous and radioactively contaminated polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste. During 1996, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems established a continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) test bed and began conducting evaluations of CEMS under development to measure contaminants from waste combustion and thermal treatment stacks. The program was envisioned to promote CEMS technologies meeting requirements of the recently issued Proposed Standards for Hazardous Waste Combustors as well as monitoring technologies that will allay public concerns about mixed waste thermal treatment and accelerate the development of innovative treatment technologies. Fully developed CEMS, as well as innovative continuous or semi-continuous sampling systems not yet interfaced with a pollutant analyzer, were considered as candidates for testing and evaluation. Complementary to other Environmental Protection Agency and DOE sponsored CEMS testing and within compliant operating conditions of the TSCA Incinerator, prioritization was given to multiple metals monitors also having potential to measure radionuclides associated with particulate emissions. In August 1996, developers of two multiple metals monitors participated in field activities at the incinerator and a commercially available radionuclide particulate monitor was acquired for modification and testing planned in 1997. This paper describes the CEMS test bed infrastructure and summarizes completed and planned activities

  8. Review of acute cancer beds.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Evans, D S

    2012-01-01

    A review of admissions to cancer services at University Hospital Galway (UHG) was undertaken to assess the appropriateness of hospital usage. All cancer specialty patients admitted from 26-28 May 2009 were reviewed (n = 82). Chi square tests, Exact tests, and One-way ANOVA were utilised to analyse key issues emerging from the data. Fifty (61%) were classified as emergencies. Twenty three (67%) occupied a designated cancer bed with 24 (30%) in outlying non-oncology wards. The mean length of stay was 29.3 days. Possible alternatives to admission were identified for 15 (19%) patients. There was no evidence of discharge planning for 50 (60%) admissions. There is considerable potential to make more appropriate utilisation of UHG for cancer patients, particularly in terms of reducing bed days and length of stay and the proportion of emergency cancer admissions, and further developing integrated systems of discharge planning.

  9. Better backs by better beds?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, Kim; Fabricius, Rasmus N; Bendix, Tom

    2008-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A "randomized"/stratified, single-blinded, parallel-group study. OBJECTIVE.: To evaluate 3 structurally different mattresses relative influence on patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: In several advertisements, it is proclaimed that certain......-conforming foam mattress (Tempur), and (3) a hard mattress (Innovation Futon). At baseline and after 4 weeks, a blinded observer interviewed the patients on LBP levels (0-10), daily function (activities of daily living, 0-30), and on the amount of sleeping hours/night. RESULTS: Because of dropout of 19 patients...... using the probably most relevant "worst case" data. There were no relevant difference between the effects of the water bed and the foam bed. CONCLUSION: The Waterbed and foam mattress' did influence back symptoms, function and sleep more positively as apposed to the hard mattress, but the differences...

  10. Reactor vessel for pebble beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wall and the bottom of the vessel for the gas-cooled pebble-bed reactor consist of numerous blocks of graphite or carbon rock piled up. They are held together by an exterior cylindrical or polygonal ring and supported by a foundation. The blocks form coherent sectors resp. annular sectors with well-defined separating lines. At high temperatures or load change operation these sectors behave like monolithic blocks expanding heely and contracting again, the center of the vessel remaining fixed. The forces causing the compression result from the own weight of the sectors and the weight of the pebble bed. This motion is supported by the convex arrangement of the opposite surfaces of the sectors and the supporting walls and by roller bearings. The bottom of the vessel may be designed funnel-shaped, in this way facilitating the removal of spheres. (DG)

  11. Bed bathing patients in hospital

    OpenAIRE

    L Downey; Lloyd, Hilary

    2008-01-01

    There are a number of circumstances that may affect an individual's ability to maintain personal hygiene. Hospitalised patients, and in particular those who are bedridden, may become dependent on nursing staff to carry out their hygiene needs. Assisting patients to maintain personal hygiene is a fundamental aspect of nursing care. However, it is a task often delegated to junior or newly qualified staff. This article focuses on the principles of bed bathing patients in hospital, correct proced...

  12. THE BAUXITES AND JELAR - BEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krešimir Sakač

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Minor bauxite deposits and occurrences were formed in technically disturbed environments in the middle part of the Adriatic geotectonic unit in Dinarides, contemporary with the clastic Jelar-beds in the Late Lutetian time. Uneven chemical composition of these Eocene bauxites, their sporadic occurrences in developed paleorelief as well as characteristic petrographic composition of the immediate overlying rocks point out at different genetical conditions (the paper is published in Croatian.

  13. Solids mixing in spouted beds

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, H. H.; Bridgwater, J.; Professor J. Bridgwater

    1981-01-01

    Many industrial processes require contact between particles and a fluid or spray in order to effect drying, coating or granulation. One device capable of contacting fluid and particles efficiently is a spouted bed in which a jet of fluid is injected into solid particles. This forms an open channel or spout and induces material circulation in a downward moving annulus. For the continuous throughput of solids, knowledge is required of the mixing and particle motions within th...

  14. Stochastic modelling of turbulent combustion for design optimization of gas turbine combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehanna Ismail, Mohammed Ali

    The present work covers the development and the implementation of an efficient algorithm for the design optimization of gas turbine combustors. The purpose is to explore the possibilities and indicate constructive suggestions for optimization techniques as alternative methods for designing gas turbine combustors. The algorithm is general to the extent that no constraints are imposed on the combustion phenomena or on the combustor configuration. The optimization problem is broken down into two elementary problems: the first is the optimum search algorithm, and the second is the turbulent combustion model used to determine the combustor performance parameters. These performance parameters constitute the objective and physical constraints in the optimization problem formulation. The examination of both turbulent combustion phenomena and the gas turbine design process suggests that the turbulent combustion model represents a crucial part of the optimization algorithm. The basic requirements needed for a turbulent combustion model to be successfully used in a practical optimization algorithm are discussed. In principle, the combustion model should comply with the conflicting requirements of high fidelity, robustness and computational efficiency. To that end, the problem of turbulent combustion is discussed and the current state of the art of turbulent combustion modelling is reviewed. According to this review, turbulent combustion models based on the composition PDF transport equation are found to be good candidates for application in the present context. However, these models are computationally expensive. To overcome this difficulty, two different models based on the composition PDF transport equation were developed: an improved Lagrangian Monte Carlo composition PDF algorithm and the generalized stochastic reactor model. Improvements in the Lagrangian Monte Carlo composition PDF model performance and its computational efficiency were achieved through the

  15. Development of the control and ignition systems on a high pressure gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Carlos Alejandro

    The ignition and control systems of a laboratory scale high-pressure gas turbine combustor were developed in the present work. This work provides a detailed description of the design, development and testing of the remote control system developed for a High Pressure Gas Turbine Combustor (HPTC). The combustor has the capability to operate at pressures up to 1.5 MPa and temperatures up to 2400 K. It is also designed for a maximum air and fuel flow rates of 81.93 g/s and 35.77 g/s respectively. The fuel used will be CH4 for the early experiments but it is designed to operate using a mixture of H2-CO with a hydrogen fuel composition variation of up to 30 percent. The HPTC also has optical accessibility capabilities in its combustion chamber with a converging nozzle that restricts the exhaust flow. It also has three circular ports that can be used as instrumentation ports to obtain real time data from the combustion chamber. LabVIEW was used as the controlling interface for the user. A detailed outline of the LabVIEW programming is also described. LabVIEW controlled the proportional valves (ball valves), and solenoid valves; it also provided the user with data from mass flow meters as well as pressure transducers. Both proportional and solenoid valves are 1.91 cm and can withstand pressures of up to 1551 kPa. Thermal mass flow meters were used to obtain the flow in the lines with a range from 200-1000 L/min with an accuracy of 1.5 percent. Pressure transducers with a range from 0 to 2068 kPa were also positioned on the lines in order to know the line pressures. The ignition system design, development and testing is also described with its integration to the High Pressure Gas Turbine Combustor. A modified spark plug was used to provide the igniter with an ignition source. A diffusion flame was used to ignite the main line using methane as the fuel that utilizes the air in the combustion chamber as the oxidizer. Testing included a functional test of the equipment, and

  16. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Vitiated Air Effects on Hydrogen-fueled Supersonic Combustor Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Feiteng; SONG Wenyan; ZHANG Zhiqiang; LI Weiqiang; LI Jianping

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the vitiation effects of test air on the scramjet performance in the ground combustion heated facilities.The primary goal is to evaluate the effects of H2O and CO2,the two major vitiated species generated by combustion heater,on hydrogen-fueled supersonic combustor performance with experimental and numerical approaches.The comparative experiments in the clean air and vitiated air are conducted by using the resistance heated direct-connected facility,with the typical Mach 4 flight conditions simulated.The H2O and CO2 species with accurately controlled contents are added to the high enthalpy clean air from resistance heater,to synthesize the vitiated air of a combustion-type heater.Typically,the contents of H2O species can be varied within the range of 3.5%-30o% by mole,and 3.0%-10% for CO2 species.The total temperature,total pressure,Mach number and O2 mole fraction at the combustor entrance are well-matched between the clean air and vitiated air.The combustion experiments are completed at the fuel equivalence ratios of 0.53 and 0.42 respectively.Furthermore,three-dimensional (3D) reacting flow simulations of combustor towpath are performed to provide insight into flow field structures and combustion chemistry details that cannot resolved by experimental instruments available.Finally,the experimental data,combined with computational results,are employed to analyze the effects of H2O and CO2 vitiated air on supersonic combustion characteristics and performance.It is concluded that H2O and CO2 contaminants can significantly inhibit the combustion induced pressure rise measured from combustor wall,and the pressure profile decreases with the increasing H2O and CO2 contents in nonlinear trend;simulation results agree well with experimental data and the overall vitiation effects are captured; direct extrapolation of the results from vitiated air to predict the performance of actual flight conditions could result in over-fueling the combustor

  17. Method and apparatus for a combination moving bed thermal treatment reactor and moving bed filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, Phillip C.; Dunn, Jr., Kenneth J.

    2015-09-01

    A moving bed gasification/thermal treatment reactor includes a geometry in which moving bed reactor particles serve as both a moving bed filter and a heat carrier to provide thermal energy for thermal treatment reactions, such that the moving bed filter and the heat carrier are one and the same to remove solid particulates or droplets generated by thermal treatment processes or injected into the moving bed filter from other sources.

  18. The characteristics of bed agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion of eucalyptus bark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bed agglomeration behaviors were investigated experimentally when eucalyptus bark was burning tested in a laboratory scale fluidized bed reactor. The focuses of this work were the influences of operating conditions and bed materials on the bed agglomeration tendency and the elucidation in the behaviors of fuel inorganic elements and the governing mode of the agglomeration. It was found that the defluidization caused by the bed agglomeration was clearly detectable from the decrease in measured bed pressure. The growth of bed particle and accumulation of agglomerates during combustion provided the partial to complete defluidization. The defluidization was promoted by the increase of bed temperature and bed particle size, and the decrease of fluidizing air velocity. The SEM-EDS analyses revealed that the bed agglomeration was mainly attributed to the formation of potassium silicate compounds as liquid phase during the combustion. This was initiated by the chemical reaction between the bed particle and the released ash constituents. In this study, the inorganic migration from fuel particle to bed particle was likely dominated by the condensation/reaction. The thermodynamic examination by ternary phase diagram analysis corroborated that the liquid phase formation of the ash derived materials controlled the agglomeration. The alumina sand prevented the bed agglomeration since it was inactive in the formation of viscous molten substances during combustion at the observed temperatures. - Highlights: • The behaviors of bed agglomeration were studied during the fluidized bed combustion of eucalyptus bark. • The increase in bed temperature and sand size, and the decrease of air velocity promoted bed defluidization. • The formation of molten potassium silicate compounds conduced to the bed agglomeration. • Condensation/reaction was the dominant inorganic migration mechanism from fuel particle to bed particle. • The alumina sand prevented effectively the bed

  19. Bed to wall heat transfer in supercritical water fluidized bed: Comparison with the gas–solid fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supercritical water (SCW) fluidized bed is a new reactor concept for gasification of wet biomass. In this paper, the Eulerian two-fluid model based on Kinetic Theory of Granular Flow in fluidized bed was established, and the physical model of movement of single bubble up the wall was adopted. The comparison studies of particle distribution, temperature distribution and transient heat transfer characteristics between the SCW and gas–solid fluidized bed were carried out. The results show that the bubble diameter and rise velocity in SCW fluidized bed are smaller than those in gas–solid fluidized bed. With the increasing solid volume fraction near the wall, the bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient decreases in SCW fluidized bed, while it increases in gas–solid fluidized bed. What is more, the bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient is sensitive to superficial velocity where the solid volume fraction is low, which is different from that in gas–solid fluidized bed

  20. Partitioning behavior of trace elements during pilot-scale fluidized bed combustion of high ash content lignite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes the partitioning of 20 trace elements (As, B, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Tl, V, Zn) and eight major and minor elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, Si, Ti) during the combustion of high ash content lignite. The experiments were carried out in the 0.3 MWt Middle East Technical University (METU) atmospheric bubbling fluidized bed combustor (ABFBC) test rig with and without limestone addition. Inert bed material utilized in the experiments was bed ash obtained previously from the combustion of the same lignite without limestone addition in the same test rig. Concentrations of trace elements in coal, limestone, bottom ash, cyclone ash and filter ash were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Partitioning of major and minor elements are influenced by the ash split between the bottom ash and fly ash and that the major proportion of most of the trace elements (As, Ba, Cr, Hg, Li, Mo, Ni, Sn, V, Zn) are recovered in fly ash. Limestone addition shifts the partitioning of Ba, Cr, Mo, Ni, Sn, V, Zn from bottom ash to fly ash

  1. Potential approaches to improve gasification of high water content biomass rich in cellulose in dual fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Li; Xu, Guangwen [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex System, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Suda, Toshiyuki [Research Laboratory, IHI Corporation, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Murakami, Takahiro [National Institute of Advanced Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    Biomass containing water of 30-65 wt.% and rich in cellulose, such as various grounds of drinking materials and the lees of spirit and vinegar, is not suitable for biological digestion, and the thermal conversion approach has to be applied to its conversion into bioenergy. The authors have recently worked on converting such biomass into middle heating-value gas via dual fluidized bed gasification (DFBG) integrated with various process intensification technologies. This article is devoted to highlighting those technical ways, including the choice of the superior technical deployment for a DFBG system, the impregnation of Ca onto fuel in fuel drying, the integration of gas cleaning with fuel gasification via two-stage DFBG (T-DFBG), and the decoupling of fuel drying/pyrolysis and char gasification via the decoupled DFBG (D-DFBG). The attained results demonstrated that the superior deployment of bed combination for the DFBG should be a bubbling/turbulent fluidized bed gasifier integrated with a pneumatic riser combustor. In terms of improving efficiency of fuel conversion into combustible gas and suppressing tar generation during gasification, the impregnation of Ca onto fuel exhibited distinctively high upgrading effect, while both the T-DFBG and D-DFBG were also demonstrated to be effective to a certain degree. (author)

  2. Effects of Combustion-Induced Vortex Breakdown on Flashback Limits of Syngas-Fueled Gas Turbine Combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahsan Choudhuri

    2011-03-31

    Turbine combustors of advanced power systems have goals to achieve very low pollutants emissions, fuel variability, and fuel flexibility. Future generation gas turbine combustors should tolerate fuel compositions ranging from natural gas to a broad range of syngas without sacrificing operational advantages and low emission characteristics. Additionally, current designs of advanced turbine combustors use various degrees of swirl and lean premixing for stabilizing flames and controlling high temperature NOx formation zones. However, issues of fuel variability and NOx control through premixing also bring a number of concerns, especially combustor flashback and flame blowout. Flashback is a combustion condition at which the flame propagates upstream against the gas stream into the burner tube. Flashback is a critical issue for premixed combustor designs, because it not only causes serious hardware damages but also increases pollutant emissions. In swirl stabilized lean premixed turbine combustors onset of flashback may occur due to (i) boundary layer flame propagation (critical velocity gradient), (ii) turbulent flame propagation in core flow, (iii) combustion instabilities, and (iv) upstream flame propagation induced by combustion induced vortex breakdown (CIVB). Flashback due to first two foregoing mechanisms is a topic of classical interest and has been studied extensively. Generally, analytical theories and experimental determinations of laminar and turbulent burning velocities model these mechanisms with sufficient precision for design usages. However, the swirling flow complicates the flashback processes in premixed combustions and the first two mechanisms inadequately describe the flashback propensity of most practical combustor designs. The presence of hydrogen in syngas significantly increases the potential for flashback. Due to high laminar burning velocity and low lean flammability limit, hydrogen tends to shift the combustor operating conditions towards

  3. Experimental and Modeling Investigation of the Effect of Air Preheat on the Formation of NOx in an RQL Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, G. S.; Brouwer, J.; Vardakas, M. A.; Holderman, J. D.

    2012-01-01

    The Rich-burn/Quick-mix/Lean-burn (RQL) combustor concept has been proposed to minimize the formation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) in gas turbine systems. The success of this low-NOx combustor strategy is dependent upon the links between the formation of NOx, inlet air preheat temperature, and the mixing of the jet air and fuel-rich streams. Chemical equilibrium and kinetics modeling calculations and experiments were performed to further understand NOx emissions in an RQL combustor. The results indicate that as the temperature at the inlet to the mixing zone increases (due to preheating and/or operating conditions) the fuel-rich zone equivalence ratio must be increased to achieve minimum NOx formation in the primary zone of the combustor. The chemical kinetics model illustrates that there is sufficient residence time to produce NOx at concentrations that agree well with the NOx measurements. Air preheat was found to have very little effect on mixing, but preheating the air did increase NOx emissions significantly. By understanding the mechanisms governing NOx formation and the temperature dependence of key reactions in the RQL combustor, a strategy can be devised to further reduce NOx emissions using the RQL concept.

  4. Pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1993, the pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR) was identified by ESKOM, the electric utility of South Africa, as a leading option for the installation of new generating capacity to their electric grid. This innovative nuclear power plant incorporates a closed cycle primary coolant system utilizing helium to transport heat energy directly from the modular pebble bed reactor to a recuperative power conversion unit with a single-shaft turbine/compressor/generator. This replacement of the steam cycle that is common in present nuclear power plants (NPP) with a direct gas cycle provides the benefits of simplification and a substantial increase in overall system efficiency with the attendant lowering of capital and operational costs. Although the historical development of this plant is interrelated to other types of high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs), the principle focus herein is on the pebble bed (spherical) fuel element type reactor. The long-term development of this reactor type began in Germany by the KFA Nuclear Research Center (now FZJ). Two pebble bed plants were constructed in Germany, the 46 MW(th)/15 MW(e) Arbeitsgemeinshaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) and the 750 MW(th)/296 MW(e) thorium high temperature reactor (THTR-300). Basically, these steam/electric plants validated the temperature and fission product retention capabilities of the ceramic (TRISO) coated fuel particle and the safety characteristics of the HTGR. Most notable of the operational achievements was with the AVR in sustaining longterm operation at an average core outlet temperature of 950 deg. C, and in demonstration of safety such as extended loss of forced cooling on the core. More details on the AVR and THTR-300 plants are provided The next evolution of the pebble bed plant began in the early 1980s with development of the modular reactor. This small reactor added the unique characteristic of being able to cool the core entirely by passive heat transfer mechanisms following postulated

  5. Combustion of agro-waste with coal in a fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atimtay, Aysel T. [Middle East Technical University, Department of Environmental Engineering, Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-02-15

    In this study, a review of the studies done on the co-combustion of some agro-waste in a bubbling fluidized bed combustor (BFBC) having an inside diameter of 102 mm and a height of 900 mm is given. The agro-waste used to investigate the co-combustion characteristics were peach and apricot stones produced as a waste from the fruit juice industry, and olive cake produced as a waste from the olive oil industry. These are typical wastes for a Mediterranean country. A lignite coal was used for co-combustion. On-line concentrations of O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and total hydrocarbons (C{sub m} H{sub n}) were measured in the flue gas during combustion experiments. Variations of emissions of various pollutants were studied by changing the operating parameters (excess air ratio, fluidization velocity and fuel feed rate). Temperature distribution along the bed was measured with thermocouples. Emissions were also monitored from the exhaust. Various combinations of coal and biomass mixtures were tested. During the combustion tests, it was observed that the volatile matter from the biomass quickly volatilizes and mostly burns in the freeboard. The temperature profiles along the bed and the freeboard also confirmed this phenomenon. It was found that as the volatile matter of the biomass increases, combustion takes place more in the freeboard region. Better combustion conditions occur at higher excess air ratios. The results showed that co-combustion with these three proposed biomasses lowers the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions considerably. CO and hydrocarbon emissions are lower at the higher excess air ratios. (orig.)

  6. Analysis of bed agglomeration during gasification of wheat straw in a bubbling fluidised bed gasifier using mullite as bed material

    OpenAIRE

    Mac an Bhaird, Seán T.; Walsh, Eilín; Hemmingway, Phil; McDonnell, Kevin; et al.

    2014-01-01

    The quantity and composition of the ash content of straw poses technical challenges to its thermal conversion and have been widely reported to cause severe ash sintering and bed agglomeration during fluidised bed gasification. Literature indicates that a combination of reactor design and bed material measures is required to avoid defluidisation at temperatures above 800 °C. Using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy this study investigated the initial agglomer...

  7. MICROTURBULENCE IN GRAVEL BED STREAMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanicolaou, T.; Tsakiris, A. G.; Kramer, C. M.

    2009-12-01

    The overarching objective of this investigation was to evaluate the role of relative submergence on the formation and evolution of cluster microforms in gravel bed streams and its implications to bedload transport. Secondary objectives of this research included (1) a detailed analysis of mean flow measurements around a clast; and (2) a selected number of experimental runs where the mean flow characteristics are linked together with the bed micro-topography observations around a clast. It is hypothesized that the relative submergence is an important parameter in defining the feedback processes between the flow and clasts, which governs the flow patterns around the clasts, thus directly affecting the depositional patterns of the incoming sediments. To examine the validity of the hypothesis and meet the objectives of this research, 19 detailed experimental runs were conducted in a tilting, water recirculating laboratory flume under well-controlled conditions. A fixed array of clast-obstacles were placed atop a well-packed bed with uniform size glass beads. During the runs, multifractional spherical particles were fed upstream of the clast section at a predetermined rate. State-of-the-art techniques/instruments, such as imaging analysis software, Large Scale Particle Velocimeter (LSPIV) and an Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) were employed to provide unique quantitative measurements for bedload fluxes, clast/clusters geomorphic patterns, and mean flow characteristics in the vicinity of the clusters. Different flow patterns were recorded for the high relative submergence (HRS) and low relative submergence (LRS) experimental runs. The ADV measurements provided improved insight about the governing flow mechanisms for the HRS runs. These mechanisms were described with flow upwelling at the center of the flume and downwelling occurring along the flume walls. Flow downwelling corresponded to an increase in the free surface velocity. Additionally, the visual observations

  8. Fixed bed nuclear reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The fixed bed nuclear reactor (FBNR) is essentially a pressurized light water reactor (PWR) having spherical fuel elements constituting a suspended reactor core at its lowest bed porosity. The core is movable thus under any adverse condition, the fuel elements can leave the reactor core naturally through the force of gravity and fall into the passively cooled fuel chamber or leave the reactor all together entering the spent fuel pool. It is a small and modular reactor being simple in design. Its spent fuel is in such a convenient form and size that may be utilized directly as the source for irradiation and applications in agriculture and industry. This feature results in a positive impact on waste management and environmental protection. The principle features of the proposed reactor are that the concept is polyvalent, simple in design, may operate either as fixed or fluidized bed, have the core suspended contributing to inherent safety, passive cooling features of the reactor. The reactor is modular and has integrated primary system utilizing either water, supercritical steam or helium gas as its coolant. Some of the advantages of the proposed reactor are being modular, low environmental impact, exclusion of severe accidents, short construction period, flexible adaptation to demand, excellent load following characteristics, and competitive economics. The characteristics of the Fluidized Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR) concept may be analyzed under the light of the requirements set for the IV generation nuclear reactors. It is shown that FBNR meet the goals of (1) Providing sustainable energy generation that meets clean air objectives and promotes long-term availability of systems and effective fuel utilization for worldwide energy production, (2) Minimize and manage their nuclear waste and notably reduce the long term stewardship burden in the future, thereby improving protection for the public health and the environment, (3) Excel in safety and reliability

  9. Design and fabrication of a meso-scale stirling engine and combustor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echekki, Tarek (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Haroldsen, Brent L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Krafcik, Karen L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Morales, Alfredo Martin (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Mills, Bernice E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Liu, Shiling (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Lee, Jeremiah C. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Karpetis, Adionos N. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Chen, Jacqueline H. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Ceremuga, Joseph T. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Raber, Thomas N. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Hekmuuaty, Michelle A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-05-01

    Power sources capable of supplying tens of watts are needed for a wide variety of applications including portable electronics, sensors, micro aerial vehicles, and mini-robotics systems. The utility of these devices is often limited by the energy and power density capabilities of batteries. A small combustion engine using liquid hydrocarbon fuel could potentially increase both power and energy density by an order of magnitude or more. This report describes initial development work on a meso-scale external combustion engine based on the Stirling cycle. Although other engine designs perform better at macro-scales, we believe the Stirling engine cycle is better suited to small-scale applications. The ideal Stirling cycle requires efficient heat transfer. Consequently, unlike other thermodynamic cycles, the high heat transfer rates that are inherent with miniature devices are an advantage for the Stirling cycle. Furthermore, since the Stirling engine uses external combustion, the combustor and engine can be scaled and optimized semi-independently. Continuous combustion minimizes issues with flame initiation and propagation. It also allows consideration of a variety of techniques to promote combustion that would be difficult in a miniature internal combustion engine. The project included design and fabrication of both the engine and the combustor. Two engine designs were developed. The first used a cylindrical piston design fabricated with conventional machining processes. The second design, based on the Wankel rotor geometry, was fabricated by through-mold electroforming of nickel in SU8 and LIGA micromolds. These technologies provided the requisite precision and tight tolerances needed for efficient micro-engine operation. Electroformed nickel is ideal for micro-engine applications because of its high strength and ductility. A rotary geometry was chosen because its planar geometry was more compatible with the fabrication process. SU8 lithography provided rapid

  10. Fluid-bed process for SYNROC production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SYNROC is a titanate-based ceramic waste developed for the immobilization of high-level nuclear reactor waste. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has investigated a fluid-bed technique for the large-scale production of SYNROC precursor powders. Making SYNROC in a fluid bed permits slurry drying, calcination and reduction-oxidation reactions to be carried out in a single unit. We present the results of SYNROC fluid-bed studies from two fluid-bed units 10 cm in diameter: an internally heated fluid-bed unit developed by Exxon Idaho and an externally heated unit constructed at LLNL. Bed operation over a range of temperatures, feed rates, fluidizing rates, and redox conditions indicate that SYNROC powders of a high density and a uniform particle size can be produced. These powders facilitate the densification step and yield dense ceramics (greater than 95% theoretical density) with well-developed phases and low leaching rates

  11. Numerical Investigation of Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor with Large Upstream Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohieldin, T. O.; Tiwari, S. N.; Reubush, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    Dual-mode scramjet combustor configuration with significant upstream interaction is investigated numerically, The possibility of scaling the domain to accelerate the convergence and reduce the computational time is explored. The supersonic combustor configuration was selected to provide an understanding of key features of upstream interaction and to identify physical and numerical issues relating to modeling of dual-mode configurations. The numerical analysis was performed with vitiated air at freestream Math number of 2.5 using hydrogen as the sonic injectant. Results are presented for two-dimensional models and a three-dimensional jet-to-jet symmetric geometry. Comparisons are made with experimental results. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional results show substantial oblique shock train reaching upstream of the fuel injectors. Flow characteristics slow numerical convergence, while the upstream interaction slowly increases with further iterations. As the flow field develops, the symmetric assumption breaks down. A large separation zone develops and extends further upstream of the step. This asymmetric flow structure is not seen in the experimental data. Results obtained using a sub-scale domain (both two-dimensional and three-dimensional) qualitatively recover the flow physics obtained from full-scale simulations. All results show that numerical modeling using a scaled geometry provides good agreement with full-scale numerical results and experimental results for this configuration. This study supports the argument that numerical scaling is useful in simulating dual-mode scramjet combustor flowfields and could provide an excellent convergence acceleration technique for dual-mode simulations.

  12. Influence of stabilizer jets on combustion characteristics and NOx emission in a jet-stabilized combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Influence of stabilizer jets number and location in a combustor is studied. ► Numerical simulation shows reasonable agreement with experiments. ► Increase of stabilizer jets number leads to increase of temperature and NO formation. ► Uniformity of temperature profiles decreases with increase of stabilizer jets number. ► With increase of distance between stabilizer jets and injector NO emission decreases. -- Abstract: The main purpose of the present work is to investigate numerically the effects of number and location of stabilizer jets on the combustion characteristics and NOx emission in a jet-stabilized combustor (JSC). A Finite Volume staggered grid approach is employed to solve the governing equations. The eddy dissipation-finite rate model is adopted for the heat release simulation and the Realizable k − ε turbulence model is taken on for the flow predictions. An Eulerian–Lagrangian formulation is used for the two-phase (gas-droplet) flow. The Discrete Ordinates method, adopting its S4 approximation is applied for thermal radiation modeling of the gas phase. It is demonstrated that an increase in axial distance of stabilizer jets from fuel injector results in NOx emission to decrease significantly and conversely it results in thermal power of combustor to enhance slightly. Also, an increase in number of jet holes (with invariable entrance air velocity) causes both the thermal power and NOx emission to enhance. NOx formation is shown to be more sensitive to location of stabilizer jet holes rather than its number. As the distance between stabilizer jets and fuel injector increases from 40 mm to 60 mm and then 80 mm, uniformity of temperature profile is improved which could lead to better conditions at the combustor’s downstream section. This situation is valid for smaller number of stabilizer jets. An increase of stabilizer jets number from 4 to 6 and then 8 leads to an enhanced non-uniformity of temperature distribution towards

  13. Rayleigh/Raman/LIF measurements in a turbulent lean premixed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandula, S.P.; Pitz, R.W. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Barlow, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Much of the industrial electrical generation capability being added worldwide is gas-turbine engine based and is fueled by natural gas. These gas-turbine engines use lean premixed (LP) combustion to meet the strict NO{sub x} emission standards, while maintaining acceptable levels of CO. In conventional, diffusion flame gas turbine combustors, large amount of NO{sub x} forms in the hot stoichiometric zones via the Zeldovich (thermal) mechanism. Hence, lean premixed combustors are rapidly becoming the norm, since they are specifically designed to avoid these hot stoichiometric zones and the associated thermal NO, However, considerable research and development are still required to reduce the NO{sub x} levels (25-40 ppmvd adjusted to 15% O{sub 2} with the current technology), to the projected goal of under 10 ppmvd by the turn of the century. Achieving this objective would require extensive experiments in LP natural gas (or CH{sub 4}) flames for understanding the combustion phenomena underlying the formation of the exhaust pollutants. Although LP combustion is an effective way to control NO{sub x}, the downside is that it increases the CO emissions. The formation and destruction of the pollutants (NO{sub x} and CO) are strongly affected by the fluid mechanics, the finite-rate chemistry, and their (turbulence-chemistry) interactions. Hence, a thorough understanding of these interactions is vital for controlling and reducing the pollutant emissions. The present research is contributing to this goal by providing a detailed nonintrusive laser based data set with good spatial and temporal resolutions of the pollutants (NO and CO) along with the major species, temperature, and OH. The measurements reported in this work, along with the existing velocity data on a turbulent LP combustor burning CH{sub 4}, would provide insight into the turbulence-chemistry interactions and their effect on pollutant formation.

  14. Study of thermal throat of RBCC combustor based on one-dimensional analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-jun; Li, Jiang; Qin, Fei; He, Guo-qiang; Shi, Lei

    2015-12-01

    An analysis model was developed to better understand the formation mechanism and variation law of the thermal throat in a rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) combustor. This analysis model is based on one-dimensional flow equations and consideration of the variation in factors such as the area, exothermic distribution, and the fuel-rich jet of the rocket. The influence law for the thermal throat under the interaction of the exothermic distribution and the variation of the area is consistent with the heat release models for a gaseous jet and liquid kerosene. The effective cross-sectional area of the jet was calculated and incorporated into the model. The results calculated using the one-dimensional model were found to be consistent with those obtained from a three-dimensional numerical simulation. The position of the thermal throat was predicted with an error of 0.36%. The maximum relative errors of the static pressure among the corresponding points were 7.4% and 9.3% for the static temperature and total pressure, respectively. The one-dimensional model and three-dimensional numerical simulation were validated using experimental data obtained in direct-connect testing. Except for the cavity region, the maximum relative error of the corresponding points between the simulation results and test results was less than 8.9%, and that between the model results and test results was 10.4%. Compared to the fuel equivalence ratio, the expansion ratio, injection location, and exothermic rate have a significant impact on the position of the thermal throat. An optimization study of the RBCC combustor for the ramjet mode was conducted by adjusting the thermal throat. The thrust performance improved by 31.6% at Ma3 after optimization. These results indicate the important role that the one-dimensional model can play in analyzing the thermal throat and guiding the preliminary design of an RBCC combustor.

  15. Rayleigh/Raman/LIF measurements in a turbulent lean premixed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandula, S.P.; Pitz, R.W. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Barlow, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Much of the industrial electrical generation capability being added worldwide is gas-turbine engine based and is fueled by natural gas. These gas-turbine engines use lean premixed (LP) combustion to meet the strict NO{sub x} emission standards, while maintaining acceptable levels of CO. In conventional, diffusion flame gas turbine combustors, large amount of NO{sub x} forms in the hot stoichiometric zones via the Zeldovich (thermal) mechanism. Hence, lean premixed combustors are rapidly becoming the norm, since they are specifically designed to avoid these hot stoichiometric zones and the associated thermal NO, However, considerable research and development are still required to reduce the NO{sub x} levels (25-40 ppmvd adjusted to 15% O{sub 2} with the current technology), to the projected goal of under 10 ppmvd by the turn of the century. Achieving this objective would require extensive experiments in LP natural gas (or CH{sub 4}) flames for understanding the combustion phenomena underlying the formation of the exhaust pollutants. Although LP combustion is an effective way to control NO{sub x}, the downside is that it increases the CO emissions. The formation and destruction of the pollutants (NO{sub x} and CO) are strongly affected by the fluid mechanics, the finite-rate chemistry, and their (turbulence-chemistry) interactions. Hence, a thorough understanding of these interactions is vital for controlling and reducing the pollutant emissions. The present research is contributing to this goal by providing a detailed nonintrusive laser based data set with good spatial and temporal resolutions of the pollutants (NO and CO) along with the major species, temperature, and OH. The measurements reported in this work, along with the existing velocity data on a turbulent LP combustor burning CH{sub 4}, would provide insight into the turbulence-chemistry interactions and their effect on pollutant formation.

  16. Experimental Assessment of the Emissions Control Potential of a Rich/Quench/Lean Combustor for High Speed Civil Transport Aircraft Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosfjord, T. J.; Padget, F. C.; Tacina, Robert R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In support of Pratt & Whitney efforts to define the Rich burn/Quick mix/Lean burn (RQL) combustor for the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft engine, UTRC conducted a flametube-scale study of the RQL concept. Extensive combustor testing was performed at the Supersonic Cruise (SSC) condition of a HSCT engine cycle, Data obtained from probe traverses near the exit of the mixing section confirmed that the mixing section was the critical component in controlling combustor emissions. Circular-hole configurations, which produced rapidly-, highly-penetrating jets, were most effective in limiting NOx. The spatial profiles of NOx and CO at the mixer exit were not directly interpretable using a simple flow model based on jet penetration, and a greater understanding of the flow and chemical processes in this section are required to optimize it. Neither the rich-combustor equivalence ratio nor its residence time was a direct contributor to the exit NOx. Based on this study, it was also concluded that (1) While NOx formation in both the mixing section and the lean combustor contribute to the overall emission, the NOx formation in the mixing section dominates. The gas composition exiting the rich combustor can be reasonably represented by the equilibrium composition corresponding to the rich combustor operating condition. Negligible NOx exits the rich combustor. (2) At the SSC condition, the oxidation processes occurring in the mixing section consume 99 percent of the CO exiting the rich combustor. Soot formed in the rich combustor is also highly oxidized, with combustor exit SAE Smoke Number emissions control at SSC also performed better at part-power conditions. Data from mixer exit traverses reflected the expected mixing behavior for off-design jet to crossflow momentum-flux ratios. (4) Low power operating conditions require that the RQL combustor operate as a lean-lean combustor to achieve low CO and high efficiency. (5) A RQL combustor can achieve the emissions goal

  17. Spring packed particle bed fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a gas cooled particle bed nuclear fuel element. It comprises: a porous inner frit; a porous outer frit attached to the inner frit by an end cap t a first end and radially guided by a shoulder at a second end, forming an annulus between the frits; a fuel particle bed in the annulus; a first compressive device at each end of the annulus; and a second compressive device positioned in the annulus within the fuel particle bed

  18. Fluidized bed combustion in praxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operation at deregulated energy markets emphasize utilities competitiveness in power generation. This means power plant investment cost as well as operation and maintenance costs must be competitive to ensure economical performance. Improvements in competitiveness can also be achieved investing to modem combustion technology and this way improve power generation efficiency (lower fuel consumption). Other means to improve cost effectiveness are optimisation of daily operation and process control system but also improving fuel flexibility if feasible (fuel price). The other need for utilities in the future is of course environmental issues like reduction of CO2 emissions in particular. As known fluidized bed combustion offers many advantages that might be needed at future energy markets. These are superior fuel and operation flexibility, multi-fuel capability, environmental performance with inherently low NOx emissions due favourable combustion conditions and cost effective sulphur reduction applying in-furnace SO2 capture. These advantages makes fluidized bed combustion attractive alternative power generation in the future. The current trends for development of the technology are discussed in this paper. (authors)

  19. Fuel distribution measurements in a model low NOx double annular combustor using laser induced fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Lockett, R. D.; Greenhalgh, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) was employed in a three sector, low NOx double annular combustor in order to characterise the combusting fuel spray. Naphthalene was employed as a fluorescent agent in odourless kerosene in order to determine the behavior of the light fractions in the fuel vapour, and the light to medium fractions in the fuel spray, while 2,5 di-phenyl oxizol (ppo) was employed to determine the behavior of the heavy fractions in the fuel spray. Counter-swirl air blast ...

  20. Evaluation of contaminant release from solidified/stabilized municipal waste combustor residues for disposal and utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solidification/stabilization of municipal waste combustor residues is being considered for treatment of municipal waste combustion residues prior to disposal or utilization. Traditionally, contaminant release has been evaluated based on regulatory leach tests such as EP Toxicity or TCLP. Five S/S. processes, applied to bottom ash, combined ash and APC residues, each were evaluated using five different leaching procedures. The set of leaching procedures selected was designed to provide an understanding of contaminant release under differing potential management scenarios. This paper will discuss testing results and implications for evaluation of MWC residue utilization

  1. Stability analysis of thermo-acoustic nonlinear eigenproblems in annular combustors. Part II. Uncertainty quantification

    CERN Document Server

    Magri, Luca; Nicoud, Franck; Juniper, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo and Active Subspace Identification methods are combined with first- and second-order adjoint sensitivities to perform (forward) uncertainty quantification analysis of the thermo-acoustic stability of two annular combustor configurations. This method is applied to evaluate the risk factor, i.e., the probability for the system to be unstable. It is shown that the adjoint approach reduces the number of nonlinear-eigenproblem calculations by up to $\\sim\\mathcal{O}(M)$, as many as the Monte Carlo samples.

  2. Advanced atomization concept for CWF burning in small combustors: Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, H.; McHale, E.

    1991-01-01

    The present project involves the second phase of research on a new concept in coal-water fuel (CWF) atomization that is applicable to burning in small combustors. It is intended to address the single most important problem associated with CWF combustion; i.e., production of small spray droplets in an efficient manner by an atomization device. Phase 1 of this work was successfully completed with the development of a prototype opposed-jet atomizer that met the goals of the first contract.

  3. Kinetics of char burnout and ash vaporization in coal-fired MHD combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuck, R.; Hastings, T.; Mims, C.; Sarofim, A.

    1979-01-01

    A computer model which simulates coal combustion in a simple MHD combustor was assembled. Data from parallel experimental work on devolatilization, char oxidation, and ash vaporization at MHD conditions provide input parameters to the model and provide checks on some of the assumptions therein. Trade-offs between ash vaporization and char utilization predicted by the model are shown. The importance of CO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/O, O/sub 2/, O, and OH to char oxidation is indicated from both theoretical and experimental considerations.

  4. Turbomachine combustor nozzle including a monolithic nozzle component and method of forming the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoia, Lucas John; Melton, Patrick Benedict; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Stevenson, Christian Xavier; Vanselow, John Drake; Westmoreland, James Harold

    2016-02-23

    A turbomachine combustor nozzle includes a monolithic nozzle component having a plate element and a plurality of nozzle elements. Each of the plurality of nozzle elements includes a first end extending from the plate element to a second end. The plate element and plurality of nozzle elements are formed as a unitary component. A plate member is joined with the nozzle component. The plate member includes an outer edge that defines first and second surfaces and a plurality of openings extending between the first and second surfaces. The plurality of openings are configured and disposed to register with and receive the second end of corresponding ones of the plurality of nozzle elements.

  5. Application of Chimera Grid Scheme to Combustor Flowfields at all Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yungster, Shaye; Chen, Kuo-Huey

    1997-01-01

    A CFD method for solving combustor flowfields at all speeds on complex configurations is presented. The approach is based on the ALLSPD-3D code which uses the compressible formulation of the flow equations including real gas effects, nonequilibrium chemistry and spray combustion. To facilitate the analysis of complex geometries, the chimera grid method is utilized. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of the chimera scheme to reacting flows. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of this numerical approach, several benchmark calculations of subsonic flows are presented. These include steady and unsteady flows, and bluff-body stabilized spray and premixed combustion flames.

  6. Effects of nozzle lip geometry on spray atomization and emissions advanced gas turbine combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micklow, Gerald J.; Roychoudhury, Subir; Nguyen, H. L.

    1991-01-01

    A parametric study is conducted to investigate the effect of nozzle lip geometry on nozzle fuel distribution, emissions and temperature distribution for a rich burn section of a rich burn/quick quench/lean burn combustor. It is seen that the nozzle lip geometry greatly affects the fuel distribution, emissions and temperature distribution. It is determined that at an equivalence ratio of 1.6 the NO concentration could be lowered by a factor greater than three by changing the nozzle lip geometry.

  7. Radial flow fuel nozzle for a combustor of a gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Means, Gregory Scott; Boardman, Gregory Allen; Berry, Jonathan Dwight

    2016-07-05

    A combustor for a gas turbine generally includes a radial flow fuel nozzle having a fuel distribution manifold, and a fuel injection manifold axially separated from the fuel distribution manifold. The fuel injection manifold generally includes an inner side portion, an outer side portion, and a plurality of circumferentially spaced fuel ports that extend through the outer side portion. A plurality of tubes provides axial separation between the fuel distribution manifold and the fuel injection manifold. Each tube defines a fluid communication path between the fuel distribution manifold and the fuel injection manifold.

  8. A preliminary study of the effect of equivalence ratio on a low emissions gas turbine combustor using KIVA-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S. L.; Chen, R.; Cline, M. C.

    The staged turbine combustor (STC) concept has drawn more and more attention since the late 70's because of its potential in reducing pollutant emissions where a high power output is required. A numerical study is performed to investigate the chemically reactive flow with sprays inside a STC combustor using a modified version of the KIVA-II code. This STC combustor consists of a fuel nozzle (FN), a rich-burn (RB) zone, a converging connecting section, a quick-quench (QQ) zone, a diverging connecting section, and a lean-combustion (LC) zone. An advanced airblast fuel nozzle, which has two fuel injection passages and four air flow passages for providing swirl, is used in this study. The effect of the equivalence ratio phi on the performance of the STC combustor is reported in this paper for phi range of 1.2 to 2.0. Preliminary results reveal some major features of the flow and temperature fields inside the STC combustor. Distributions of velocity, temperature, and some critical species information inside the FN/RB zone illustrate the effect of phi on the flame temperature and the NO(x) formation in rich burning. The co- and counter-rotating bulk flow, and the sandwiched-ring-shape temperature field in the QQ/LC zone, typical of the confined inclined jet-in-cross flow, are clearly shown from the computation. The predicted mass-weighted standard deviation and the pattern factor of temperature show that the mixing performance of the STC combustor is very good. The temperature of the fluid leaving the LC zone is very uniform. As expected. lower value of the emission index of NO can be achieved with larger value of phi. Prediction of the NO(x) emission shows that there is no excessive thermal NO(x) produced in the QQ/LC zone for all the cases studied.

  9. Gruppebaseret behandling af BED - et faseopdelt behandlingstilbud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laust, Jakob; Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht; Waaddegaard, Mette

    2015-01-01

    konsekvenser. BED blev i 2013 optaget i DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) som en selvstændig diagnose og BED forventes medtaget i den forestående revision af det internationale diagnose system, ICD-11. Sundhedsstyrelsen gav på denne baggrund satspuljemidler til erfaringsopsamling......Titel: Afrapportering vedr. SATS-puljemidler til behandling og erfaringsopsamling vedr. BED for perioden 1. marts 2013 – 1. maj 2015. Baggrund: Binge Eating Disorder (BED), på dansk tvangsoverspisning, er en udbredt, men overset spiseforstyrrelse med alvorlige psykiske, fysiske og sociale...

  10. The guidelines for the design and layout of oxy-fuel combustor based on the experiments of pulverized coal combusted in Ar, N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} respectively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yu; Fan, Weidong; Ren, Peng; Wang, Kang; Wang, Junchao [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China). School of Mechanical and Power Engineering

    2013-07-01

    The oxy-fuel combustion technology is going to be a key solution for CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. And the era of oxy-fuel combustion is approaching. However, the combustion characteristics, such as ignition, flame stability, and combustion duration, have changed because the coal particles are combusted in CO{sub 2} atmosphere. Thus, the novel design technologies of combustor used in oxy-fuel combustion technology are demanded. We have concluded several critical rules from the experiment data obtained from the coal particles combusted in a retrofitted fixed bed reactor in Ar, N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} respectively. The coal particles are prone to be ignited but take more time to burn up in CO{sub 2} atmosphere at low temperature of 1,000-1,300 C comparing to the data obtained from N{sub 2} and Ar atmospheres under the same conditions. And when at high temperature of 1,600 C, the combustion duration of coal particles combusted in CO{sub 2} is the same with that of Ar and N{sub 2} situation. The NO{sub x} is prone to released ahead of the carbon combustion at relatively high temperature, and the priority of NO{sub x} release to Carbon combustion is aggravated as the temperature increases. The overall analysis and comparison among the three atmospheres make the novel design and layout of oxy-fuel combustor feasible. Consequently, the guidelines for these aims basing on those rules conclude from the experimental data and the relative researchers' work are discussed and a novel design of oxy-fuel burner is put forward and simulated in this paper.

  11. Designing a CR Test bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cattoni, Andrea Fabio; Buthler, Jakob Lindbjerg; Tonelli, Oscar;

    2014-01-01

    available, the software is most of the times open source and ready to use for third party users. Even though the software solution developers claim complete easiness in the development of custom applications, in reality there are a number of practical hardware and software issues that research groups need...... solutions. Finally, an overview on common research-oriented software products for SDR development, namely GNU Radio, Iris, and ASGARD, will be provided, including how to practically start the software development of simple applications. Finally, best practices and examples of all the software platforms will...... with their own set up, since the potential costs and efforts could not pay back in term of expected research results. Software Defined Radio solutions offer an easy way to communication researchers for the development of customized research test beds. While several hardware products are commercially...

  12. Metabolic Resistance in Bed Bugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omprakash Mittapalli

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Blood-feeding insects have evolved resistance to various insecticides (organochlorines, pyrethroids, carbamates, etc. through gene mutations and increased metabolism. Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius are hematophagous ectoparasites that are poised to become one of the major pests in households throughout the United States. Currently, C. lectularius has attained a high global impact status due to its sudden and rampant resurgence. Resistance to pesticides is one factor implicated in this phenomenon. Although much emphasis has been placed on target sensitivity, little to no knowledge is available on the role of key metabolic players (e.g., cytochrome P450s and glutathione S-transferases towards pesticide resistance in C. lectularius. In this review, we discuss different modes of resistance (target sensitivity, penetration resistance, behavioral resistance, and metabolic resistance with more emphasis on metabolic resistance.

  13. Low-Emission Hydrogen Combustors for Gas Turbines Using Lean Direct Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, C. John; Smith, Timothy D.; Kundu, Krishna

    2007-01-01

    One of the key technology challenges for the use of hydrogen in gas turbine engines is the performance of the combustion system, in particular the fuel injectors. To investigate the combustion performance of gaseous hydrogen fuel injectors flame tube combustor experiments were performed. Tests were conducted to measure the nitrogen oxide (NO(x)) emissions and combustion performance at inlet conditions of 588 to 811 K, 0.4 to 1.4 MPa, and equivalence ratios up to 0.48. All the injectors were based on Lean Direct Injection (LDI) technology with multiple injection points and quick mixing. One challenge to hydrogen-based premixing combustion systems is flashback since hydrogen has a reaction rate over 7 times that of Jet-A. To reduce the risk, design mixing times were kept short and velocities high to minimize flashback. Five fuel injector designs were tested in 6.35- and 8.9-cm-diameter flame tubes with non-vitiated heated air and gaseous hydrogen. Data is presented on measurements of NO(x) emissions and combustion efficiency for the hydrogen injectors at 2.540, 7.937, and 13.652 cm from the injector face. Results show that for some configurations, NO(x) emissions are comparable to that of state of the art Jet-A LDI combustor concepts.

  14. Lean blowout limits of a gas turbine combustor operated with aviation fuel and methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wei; Huang, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Lean blowout (LBO) limits is critical to the operational performance of combustion systems in propulsion and power generation. The swirl cup plays an important role in flame stability and has been widely used in aviation engines. Therefore, the effects of swirl cup geometry and flow dynamics on LBO limits are significant. An experiment was conducted for studying the lean blowout limits of a single dome rectangular model combustor with swirl cups. Three types of swirl cup (dual-axial swirl cup, axial-radial swirl cup, dual-radial swirl cup) were employed in the experiment which was operated with aviation fuel (Jet A-1) and methane under the idle condition. Experimental results showed that, with using both Jet A-1 and methane, the LBO limits increase with the air flow of primary swirler for dual-radial swirl cup, while LBO limits decrease with the air flow of primary swirler for dual-axial swirl cup. In addition, LBO limits increase with the swirl intensity for three swirl cups. The experimental results also showed that the flow dynamics instead of atomization poses a significant influence on LBO limits. An improved semi-empirical correlation of experimental data was derived to predict the LBO limits for gas turbine combustors.

  15. Low NOx heavy fuel combustor concept program addendum: Low/mid heating value gaseous fuel evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, A. S.; Troth, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    The combustion performance of a rich/quench/lean (RQL) combustor was evaluated when operated on low and mid heating value gaseous fuels. Two synthesized fuels were prepared having lower heating values of 10.2 MJ/cu m. (274 Btu/scf) and 6.6 MJ/cu m (176 Btu/scf). These fuels were configured to be representative of actual fuels, being composed primarily of nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. A liquid fuel air assist fuel nozzle was modified to inject both of the gaseous fuels. The RQL combustor liner was not changed from the configuration used when the liquid fuels were tested. Both gaseous fuels were tested over a range of power levels from 50 percent load to maximum rated power of the DDN Model 570-K industrial gas turbine engine. Exhaust emissions were recorded for four power level at several rich zone equivalence ratios to determine NOx sensitivity to the rich zone operating point. For the mid Btu heating value gas, ammonia was added to the fuel to simulate a fuel bound nitrogen type gaseous fuel. Results at the testing showed that for the low heating value fuel NOx emissions were all below 20 ppmc and smoke was below a 10 smoke number. For the mid heating value fuel, NOx emissions were in the 50 to 70 ppmc range with the smoke below a 10 smoke number.

  16. Instability Suppression in a Swirl-Stabilized Combustor Using Microjet Air Injection

    KAUST Repository

    LaBry, Zachary

    2010-01-04

    In this study, we examine the effectiveness of microjet air injection as a means of suppressing thermoacoustic instabilities in a swirl-stabilized, lean-premixed propane/air combustor. High-speed stereo PIV measurements, taken to explore the mechanism of combustion instability, reveal that the inner recirculation zone plays a dominant role in the coupling of acoustics and heat release that leads to combustion instability. Six microjet injector configurations were designed to modify the inner and outer recirculation zones with the intent of decoupling the mechanism leading to instability. Microjets that injected air into the inner recirculation zone, swirling in the opposite sense to the primary swirl were effective in suppressing combustion instability, reducing the overall sound pressure level by up to 17 dB within a certain window of operating conditions. Stabilization was achieved near an equivalence ratio of 0.65, corresponding to the region where the combustor transitions from a 40 Hz instability mode to a 110 Hz instability mode. PIV measurements made of the stabilized flow revealed significant modification of the inner recirculation zone and substantial weakening of the outer recirculation zone.

  17. Unsteady heat transfer in turbine blade ducts - Focus on combustor sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Huff, R.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal waves generated by either turbine rotor blades cutting through nonuniform combustor temperature fields or unsteady burning could lead to thermal fatigue cracking in the blades. To determine the magnitude of the thermal oscillation in blades with complex shapes and material compositions, a finite element Galerkin formulation has been developed to study combustor generated thermal wave propagation in a model two-dimensional duct with a uniform plug flow profile. The reflection and transmission of the thermal waves at the entrance and exit boundaries are determined by coupling the finite element solutions at the entrance and exit to the eigenfunctions of an infinitely long adiabatic duct. Example solutions are presented. In general, thermal wave propagation from an air passage into a metallic blade wall is small and not a problem. However, if a thermal barrier coating is applied to a metallic surface under conditions of a high heat transfer, a good impedance match is obtained and a significant portion of the thermal wave can pass into the blade material.

  18. Unsteady heat transfer in turbine blade ducts: focus on combustor sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumeister, K.J.; Huff, R.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal waves generated by either turbine rotor blades cutting through nonuniform combustor temperature fields or unsteady burning could lead to thermal fatigue cracking in the blades. To determine the magnitude of the thermal oscillation in blades with complex shapes and material compositions, a finite element Galerkin formulation has been developed to study combustor generated thermal wave propagation in a model two-dimensional duct with a uniform plug flow profile. The reflection and transmission of the thermal waves at the entrance and exit boundaries are determined by coupling the finite element solutions at the entrance and exit to the eigenfunctions of an infinitely long adiabatic duct. Example solutions are presented. In general, thermal wave propagation from an air passage into a metallic blade wall is small and not a problem. However, if a thermal barrier coating is applied to a metallic surface under conditions of a high heat transfer, a good impedance match is obtained and a significant portion of the thermal wave can pass into the blade material.

  19. Measurement of nitrogen species NO{sub y} at the exhaust of an aircraft engine combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristori, A. [Office National d`Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), Palaiseau (France); Baudoin, C. [Societe Nationale d`Etude et de Construction de Moteurs d`Aviation (SNECMA), Villaroche (France)

    1997-12-31

    A research programme named AEROTRACE was supported by the EC (CEC contract AERA-CT94-0003) in order to investigate trace species measurements at the exhaust of aero-engines. Within this project, NO{sub y}, NO, HNO{sub 3} and HONO were measured at the exhaust of aircraft engine combustors. Major species (NO{sub y},NO) were measured by using a chemiluminescence instrument. Minor species (HNO{sub 3},HONO) were measured by using filter packs. Two combustors were tested under various running conditions; the first one at ONERA (Task 2) and the second one at DRA (Task 5). Results show that EI{sub NOy} < 50 g/kg, EI{sub HNO3} < 0.2 g/kg and EI{sub HONO} < 0.55 g/kg. Regarding ratios, (HNO{sub 3})/(NO{sub y}) < 0.5%, (HONO)/(NO{sub y}) < 8%, (HONO)/(NO{sub 2}) {approx} 19.2%, and (HNO{sub 3})/(NO{sub 2}) {approx} 0.8% was found. (author) 9 refs.

  20. The Two-Dimensional Supersonic Flow and Mixing with a Perpendicular Injection in a Scramjet Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Ali; S.Ahmed; A.K.M.Sadrul Islam

    2003-01-01

    A numerical investigation has been performed on supersonic mixing of hydrogen with air in a Scramjet(Supersonic Combustion Ramjet) combustor and its flame holding capability by solving Two-Dimensional full Navier-Stokes equations. The main flow is air entering through a finite width of inlet and gaseous hydrogen is injected perpendicularly from the side wall. An explicit Harten-Yee Non-MUSCL Modified-flux-type TVD scheme has been used to solve the system of equations, and a zero-equation algebraic turbulence model to calculate the eddy viscosity coefficient. In this study the enhancement of mixing and good flame holding capability of a supersonic combustor have been investigated by varying the distance of injector position from left boundary keeping constant the backward-facing step height and other calculation parameters. The results show that the configuration for small distance of injector position has high mixing efficiency but the upstream recirculation can not evolved properly which is an important factor for flame holding capability. On the other hand, the configuration for very long distance has lower mixing efficiency due to lower gradient of hydrogen mass concentration on the top of injector caused by the expansion of side jet in both upstream and downstream of injector. For moderate distance of injector position, large and elongated upstream recirculation can evolve which might be activated as a good flame holder.