WorldWideScience

Sample records for bed coating scale-up

  1. Batch top-spray fluid bed coating: Scale-up insight using dynamic heat- and mass-transfer modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Peter Dybdahl; Bach, P.; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2009-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for batch top-spray fluid bed coating processes based on Ronsse et al. [2007a.b. Combined population balance and thermodynamic modelling of the batch top-spray fluidised bed coating process. Part I-model development and validation. journal of Food Engineering 78......, 296-307; Combined population balance and thermodynamic modelling of the batch top-spray fluidised bed coating process. Part II-model and process analysis. journal of Food Engineering 78, 308-322]. The model is based on one-dimensional discretisation of the fluid bed into a number of well-mixed control......-TEC Anhydro) production-scale, the gradients become too large to use the simple combined drying force/relative droplet size scale-up approach without also increasing the inlet fluidisation air temperature significantly. Instead, scale-up in terms of combinations of the viscous Stokes theory with simulated...

  2. Top-spray fluid bed coating: Scale-up in terms of relative droplet size and drying force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Peter Dybdahl; Bach, P.; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2008-01-01

    Top-spray fluid bed coating scale-up experiments have been performed in three scales in order to test the validity of two parameters as possible scaling parameters: The drying force and the relative droplet size. The aim was to be able to reproduce the degree of agglomeration as well as the...... as binder. Coating experiments were repeated for various drying force and relative droplet size values in three top-spray fluid bed scales being a small-scale (Type: GEA Aeromatic-Fielder Strea-1), medium-scale (Type: Niro MP-1) and large-scale (Type: GEA MP-2/3). The tendency of agglomeration was...... assessed in terms of particle size fractions larger than 425 mu m determined by sieve analysis. Results indicated that the particle size distribution may be reproduced across scale with statistical valid precision by keeping the drying force and the relative droplet size constant across scale. It is also...

  3. Evaluating of scale-up methodologies of gas-solid spouted beds for coating TRISO nuclear fuel particles using advanced measurement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Neven Y.

    The work focuses on implementing for the first time advanced non-invasive measurement techniques to evaluate the scale-up methodology of gas-solid spouted beds for hydrodynamics similarity that has been reported in the literature based on matching dimensionless groups and the new mechanistic scale up methodology that has been developed in our laboratory based on matching the radial profile of gas holdup since the gas dynamics dictate the hydrodynamics of the gas-solid spouted beds. These techniques are gamma-ray computed tomography (CT) to measure the cross-sectional distribution of the phases' holdups and their radial profiles along the bed height and radioactive particle tracking (RPT) to measure in three-dimension (3D) solids velocity and their turbulent parameters. The measured local parameters and the analysis of the results obtained in this work validate our new methodology of scale up of gas-solid spouted beds by comparing for the similarity the phases' holdups and the dimensionless solids velocities and their turbulent parameters that are non-dimensionalized using the minimum spouting superficial gas velocity. However, the scale-up methodology of gas-solid spouted beds that is based on matching dimensionless groups has not been validated for hydrodynamics similarity with respect to the local parameters such as phases' holdups and dimensionless solids velocities and their turbulent parameters. Unfortunately, this method was validated in the literature by only measuring the global parameters. Thus, this work confirms that validation of the scale-up methods of gas-solid spouted beds for hydrodynamics similarity should reside on measuring and analyzing the local hydrodynamics parameters.

  4. Scale Up of Pan Coating Process Using Quality by Design Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anjali M; Pandey, Preetanshu

    2015-11-01

    Scale up of pan coating process is of high importance to the pharmaceutical and food industry. The number of process variables and their interdependence in a pan coating process can make it a rather complex scale-up problem. This review discusses breaking down the coating process variables into three main categories: pan-related, spray-related, and thermodynamic-related factors. A review on how to scale up each of these factors is presented via two distinct strategies--"macroscopic" and "microscopic" scale-up. In a Quality by Design paradigm, where an increased process understanding is required, there is increased emphasis on "microscopic" scale-up, which by definition ensures a more reproducible process and thereby robust scale-up. This article also reviews the various existing and new modeling and process analytical technology tools that can provide additional information to facilitate a more fundamental understanding of the coating process. PMID:26202540

  5. Simulation for Supporting Scale-Up of a Fluidized Bed Reactor for Advanced Water Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhana Tisa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulation of fluidized bed reactor (FBR was accomplished for treating wastewater using Fenton reaction, which is an advanced oxidation process (AOP. The simulation was performed to determine characteristics of FBR performance, concentration profile of the contaminants, and various prominent hydrodynamic properties (e.g., Reynolds number, velocity, and pressure in the reactor. Simulation was implemented for 2.8 L working volume using hydrodynamic correlations, continuous equation, and simplified kinetic information for phenols degradation as a model. The simulation shows that, by using Fe3+ and Fe2+ mixtures as catalyst, TOC degradation up to 45% was achieved for contaminant range of 40–90 mg/L within 60 min. The concentration profiles and hydrodynamic characteristics were also generated. A subsequent scale-up study was also conducted using similitude method. The analysis shows that up to 10 L working volume, the models developed are applicable. The study proves that, using appropriate modeling and simulation, data can be predicted for designing and operating FBR for wastewater treatment.

  6. Simulation for supporting scale-up of a fluidized bed reactor for advanced water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisa, Farhana; Raman, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri Wan

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of fluidized bed reactor (FBR) was accomplished for treating wastewater using Fenton reaction, which is an advanced oxidation process (AOP). The simulation was performed to determine characteristics of FBR performance, concentration profile of the contaminants, and various prominent hydrodynamic properties (e.g., Reynolds number, velocity, and pressure) in the reactor. Simulation was implemented for 2.8 L working volume using hydrodynamic correlations, continuous equation, and simplified kinetic information for phenols degradation as a model. The simulation shows that, by using Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) mixtures as catalyst, TOC degradation up to 45% was achieved for contaminant range of 40-90 mg/L within 60 min. The concentration profiles and hydrodynamic characteristics were also generated. A subsequent scale-up study was also conducted using similitude method. The analysis shows that up to 10 L working volume, the models developed are applicable. The study proves that, using appropriate modeling and simulation, data can be predicted for designing and operating FBR for wastewater treatment. PMID:25309949

  7. Optimization and scale up of trickling bed bioreactors for degradation of volatile organic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For optimization and scale up of trickling bed bioreactors used in waste gas cleaning following investigations were made: the degradation of toluene was measured in reactors with various volumes and diameter to high ratios. The degradation of toluene was investigated in bioreactors with different carrier materials. It turned out, that the increase of the elimination capacity with the height of the reactor depends on the carrier material. At low gas velocities PU-foam allows higher elimination capacities than pallrings, VSP and DINPAC. On the other hand for PU-foam there is a permanent danger of clogging. The other materials allowed a stable operation for several months. Mass transfer of toluene was studied by absorption experiments in a 100 litre plant without microorganisms. The experiments lead to a henry coefficient of 0,23 (kg/m3)g/(kg/m3)l. Mass transfer coefficients were calculated between 3,6 and 5,2 depending an the space velocity of the gas and the trickling density of the water phase. The degradation of ethyl acetate, toluene and heptane was investigated considering the different water solubility of these substances. Further on degradation of toluene and heptane in several mixtures was investigated. (author)

  8. Comparison of a laboratory and a production coating spray gun with respect to scale-up

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Ronny; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory spray gun and a production spray gun were investigated in a scale-up study. Two Schlick spray guns, which are equipped with a new antibearding cap, were used in this study. The influence of the atomization air pressure, spray gun-to tablet bed distance, polymer solution viscosity, and spray rate were analyzed in a statistical design of experiments. The 2 spray guns were compared with respect to the spray width and height, droplet size, droplet velocity, and spray density. The dro...

  9. A Kinetic-theory Analysis of the Scale-up for Hydrodynamics of a Rectangular Slot, Spouted Fluidized Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alireza Shirvanian, Pezhman; Calo, Joseph Manuel

    2003-03-01

    An Eulerian model that was presented by the same authors [1], has been used to identify the important scaling parameters for the hydrodynamic scale-up of a rectangular slot, spouted bed. In this research, the scaling relationships proposed by Glicksman [2] for fluidized bed scale-up has been modified to provide a full set of scaling parameters for a 2D rectangular slot, spouted bed. The simulation results have been compared against the experimental ones [3] to substantiate the validity of the simulation. Thereafter, scale-up has been performed exclusively by simulation to investigate the effect of different dimensionless parameters on the performance of the spouted bed. References [1] Shirvanian, A.P., Calo, J.M., Hradil, G., An Investigation of the Hydrodynamics of a Rectangular Slot, Spouted Bed, Proceedings of 2001 ASME conference, Fluids Engineering Division. [2] Glicksman, L.R.; Hyre, M.; Woloshun, K., Simplified scaling relationships for fluidized beds, Powder Technology, 77 (1993) 177-199. [3] Shirvanian, A.P., Calo, J.M., Hradil, G., An experimental investigation of the hydrodynamics of a rectangular, spouted vessel with a draft tube., Particle Technology Forum, AiChE, 2002.

  10. Feasibility studies in spheronization and scale-up of ibuprofen microparticulates using the rotor disk fluid-bed technology

    OpenAIRE

    Chukwumezie, Beatrice Nkem; Wojcik, Mark; Malak, Paul; Adeyeye, Moji Christianah

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop spheronized microparticulates as a drug delivery system using the 1-step closed rotor disk fluid-bed technology, and to scale up the batch spheronization process. Ibuprofen was used as the model drug and microcrystalline cellulose/sodium carboxymethyl cellulose hydrocolloid (Avicel® RC-581 or CL-611) was present as the diluent/binder. The mixture, in 1∶1 ratio, was blended with and without 1% sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and spheronized with the rotor disk ...

  11. Simulation for Supporting Scale-Up of a Fluidized Bed Reactor for Advanced Water Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Farhana Tisa; Abdul Aziz Abdul Raman; Wan Mohd Ashri Wan Daud

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of fluidized bed reactor (FBR) was accomplished for treating wastewater using Fenton reaction, which is an advanced oxidation process (AOP). The simulation was performed to determine characteristics of FBR performance, concentration profile of the contaminants, and various prominent hydrodynamic properties (e.g., Reynolds number, velocity, and pressure) in the reactor. Simulation was implemented for 2.8 L working volume using hydrodynamic correlations, continuous equation, and simp...

  12. Scale-up of a fixed bed electrochemical reactor consisting of parallel screen electrode used for p-aminophenol production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of a fixed bed consisting of amalgamated copper screens has been investigated for the electrolytic reduction of nitrobenzene to p-aminophenol under potentiostatic condition (controlled potential). The preparative electrolysis of nitrobenzene was carried out using supporting electrolytes consisting of 2 M H2SO4 in a solution of 50% 2-propanol/50% water (v/v). The criterion for scale-up (εn) was determined through application of one-dimensional model. The polarization curves that describe the reduction of nitrobenzene to p-aminophenol were obtained experimentally by using a pilot scale for different nitrobenzene concentrations and flow rates of catholyte. It was found that the effectiveness factor (εn) increases with increasing flow rate, and decreasing nitrobenzene concentration. An optimum thickness of bed equal to 0.6 cm was obtained, in which the effectiveness factor not less than 0.588, to ensure a well distribution of current and potential

  13. Feasibility studies in spheronization and scale-up of ibuprofen microparticulates using the rotor disk fluid-bed technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwumezie, Beatrice Nkem; Wojcik, Mark; Malak, Paul; Adeyeye, Moji Christianah

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop spheronized microparticulates as a drug delivery system using the 1-step closed rotor disk fluid-bed technology, and to scale up the batch spheronization process. Ibuprofen was used as the model drug and microcrystalline cellulose/sodium carboxymethyl cellulose hydrocolloid (Avicel(R) RC-581 or CL-611) was present as the diluent/binder. The mixture, in 1:1 ratio, was blended with and without 1% sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and spheronized with the rotor disk insert, using either water or hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC) as binder. Fluid-bed machines (Vector/Freund Flo-Coater model) FLM-1 (with 9-inch rotor insert for 0.75 kg) and FLM-15 (with a 12-inch and 19-inch rotor inserts for 1 kg and 5, 10 kg, respectively) were used. The critical process parameters included inlet air temperature, rotor disk speed and configuration, air flow, and rate of binder application. The 1 kg batch containing SLS that was made with 12-inch smooth stainless steel or waffle teflon plates rotating at 500 rpm had desirable characteristics. The sphericity values were 0.88 and 0.91, with percent yield of 85.4 and 91.2 and drug content values of 94.47% and 91.44%, respectively. The spheroids showed good flow properties with respective rapid drug release (Q20 = 83.27 and 91.75). No difference was seen in the Avicel RC-581 and CL-611. Based on the 1 kg data, Avicel RC-581 and smooth stainless steel and waffle teflon plates (12 inch and 19 inch), the batch was scaled up to 5 and 10 kg. The scale-up parameters included rotor speed (124 -300 rpm) and spray rate (90-140 g/min). The scale-up batches had similar flow characteristics, release rate, and size distribution. The geometric mean diameter increased as batch size increased, and slightly bigger spheroids were obtained using the waffle teflon plate. Ibuprofen spheres with very good physical characteristics were developed using the rotor disk fluid-bed technology, a 1-step closed process that did not

  14. Development of a simulation tool based on a segregated model to optimize the design and the scale up of animal cell culture in fixed-bed bioreactor [abstract

    OpenAIRE

    Gelbgras, V.; Drugmand, JC.; Haut, B

    2010-01-01

    The fixed-bed bioreactor is a promising system for the process intensification of the adherent animal cell culture. Nevertheless the fixed-bed bioreactor presents heterogeneity of the cell and the species concentrations which can complicate its optimization and its scale-up. The aim of this work is to develop a mathematical model of the evolution of the cell concentration and the species concentrations to study the process optimization and the bioreactor scale-up. The developed model is used ...

  15. Development of combinatorial chemistry methods for coatings: high-throughput weathering evaluation and scale-up of combinatorial leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potyrailo, Radislav A; Ezbiansky, Karin; Chisholm, Bret J; Morris, William G; Cawse, James N; Hassib, Lamyaa; Medford, George; Reitz, Hariklia

    2005-01-01

    Combinatorial screening of materials formulations followed by the scale-up of combinatorial leads has been applied for the development of high-performance coating materials for automotive applications. We replaced labor-intensive coating formulation, testing, and measurement with a "combinatorial factory" that includes robotic formulation of coatings, their deposition as 48 coatings on a 9x12-cm plastic substrate, accelerated performance testing, and automated spectroscopic and image analysis of resulting performance. This high-throughput (HT) performance testing and measurement of the resulting properties provided a powerful set of tools for the 10-fold accelerated discovery of these coating materials. Performance of coatings is evaluated with respect to their weathering, because this parameter is one of the primary considerations in end-use automotive applications. Our HT screening strategy provides previously unavailable capabilities of (1) high speed and reproducibility of testing by using robotic automation and (2) improved quantification by using optical spectroscopic analysis of discoloration of coating-substrate structure and automatic imaging of the integrity loss of coatings. Upon testing, the coatings undergo changes that are impossible to quantitatively predict using existing knowledge. Using our HT methodology, we have developed several cost-competitive coatings leads that match the performance of more costly coatings. These HT screening results for the best coating compositions have been validated on the traditional scales of coating formulation and weathering testing. These validation results have confirmed the improved weathering performance of combinatorially developed coatings over conventional coatings on the traditional scale. PMID:15762746

  16. A Novel Scale Up Model for Prediction of Pharmaceutical Film Coating Process Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Minami, Hidemi; Terada, Katsuhide

    2016-01-01

    In the pharmaceutical tablet film coating process, we clarified that a difference in exhaust air relative humidity can be used to detect differences in process parameters values, the relative humidity of exhaust air was different under different atmospheric air humidity conditions even though all setting values of the manufacturing process parameters were the same, and the water content of tablets was correlated with the exhaust air relative humidity. Based on this experimental data, the exhaust air relative humidity index (EHI), which is an empirical equation that includes as functional parameters the pan coater type, heated air flow rate, spray rate of coating suspension, saturated water vapor pressure at heated air temperature, and partial water vapor pressure at atmospheric air pressure, was developed. The predictive values of exhaust relative humidity using EHI were in good correlation with the experimental data (correlation coefficient of 0.966) in all datasets. EHI was verified using the date of seven different drug products of different manufacturing scales. The EHI model will support formulation researchers by enabling them to set film coating process parameters when the batch size or pan coater type changes, and without the time and expense of further extensive testing. PMID:26936048

  17. Scale-Up of SLIP Process: Producing Nanoengineered Coatings at High Volumes to Meet Multi-Directorate Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, K C; Sanders, D M; Moffitt, K C; Marquez, R; Spadaccini, C

    2005-10-27

    There are a variety of applications that require the use of nanoengineered surfaces for separation applications. Surfaces are commonly functionalized in order to facilitate the purification of gases and liquids. Functionalization often requires the application of a polymer to the surface. The most common means is to dissolve the polymer in a solvent and then either cast or spray it onto the surface. This traditional approach causes two severe limitations: (1) the polymer must be soluble; (2) the solvent must be removed from the final coating. The first limitation often eliminates many potential candidate polymers. The second limitation is influential on the transport and separation properties of the coating. Low levels of residual solvents can significantly degrade the ability of the coating to perform the separation process. These two issues can be overcome through the use of ''Solvent-Less vapor deposition followed by In-situ Polymerization'' (SLIP). The SLIP process was originally developed for the fabrication of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets. This application required the deposition of films of 100 to 200 microns in thickness onto a spherical substrate. The process consists of two evaporation chambers each containing a quantity of monomer. The precursors, monomers, are vaporized and flow though a mixing nozzle and eventually are deposited on a substrate surface. They react at the surface and form a nanoengineered polymer film. The SLIP process has been utilized to develop composite membranes for gas and liquid separation applications. Polyimide films that range in thickness from 50 to 400 nm were deposited onto a range of substrates. The SLIP process has been shown to be robust and current plans are in place to scale-up the process. This scale-up would enable the coating of flat sheets and fibers. This paper will outline the roadmap to constructing a pilot scale SLIP system in order to meet multiple programmatic needs.

  18. Development of a simulation tool based on a segregated model to optimize the design and the scale up of animal cell culture in fixed-bed bioreactor [abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelbgras, V.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The fixed-bed bioreactor is a promising system for the process intensification of the adherent animal cell culture. Nevertheless the fixed-bed bioreactor presents heterogeneity of the cell and the species concentrations which can complicate its optimization and its scale-up. The aim of this work is to develop a mathematical model of the evolution of the cell concentration and the species concentrations to study the process optimization and the bioreactor scale-up. The developed model is used as a simulation tool to study the influence of different phenomena on the cell heterogeneity. In this work, the importance of the adherent phase is investigated. This phase takes place in the beginning of the process. To realize a good implementation of the process, it is important to control the adherent cell concentration and to minimize the heterogeneity during this phase. If cell concentration heterogeneity appears, it will have repercussions during the whole process. In the model, four cell populations are considered: the viable cells in suspension in the medium, the captured cells by the fixed-bed in suspension in the medium, the adherent cells on the fixed-bed and the dead cells in suspension in the medium. Five extracellular species are considered: glucose, glutamine, oxygen, ammonia and lactate. Five phenomena are modeled: the culture medium flow through the fixed-bed (with axial convection, radial dispersion and axial dispersion, the cell capture by the fixed-bed, the cell adherence on the fixed-bed, the cell growth with a maximal cell concentration imposed by the specific area of the fixed-bed and the cell death. The interaction between cells and species is modeled by a Monod equation for the specific growth rate. The model equations are solved with a routine developed with Matlab 6.5. This routine used the Finite Volume Method coupled with a Newton-Raphson algorithm. The model parameters are experimentally identified by cell cultures in a pilot

  19. Scale-up of Nano-Engineered Anti-Reflection Coating Process for Large Plastic Optics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In a recently completed NASA SBIR program, Agiltron and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology developed a novel nanoporous UV anti-reflection coating technology...

  20. Scaling up as Catachresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The metaphor of scaling up is the wrong one to use for describing and prescribing educational change. Many of the strategies being employed to achieve scaling up are counter-productive: they conceive of practitioners as delivery agents or consumers, rather than as co-constructors of change. An approach to educational innovation based on the…

  1. Insect cell entrapment, growth and recovering using a single-use fixed-bed bioreactor. Scaling up and recombinant protein production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventini-Monteiro, D; Dubois, S; Astray, R M; Castillo, J; Pereira, C A

    2015-12-20

    Insect cells are largely used for industrial production of vaccines, viral vectors and recombinant proteins as well as in research and development as an important tool for biology and bioprocess studies. They grow in suspension and are semi-adherent cells. Among the cell culture systems enabling scalable bioprocess the single-use fixed-bed iCELLis(®) bioreactors offer great advantages. We have established the conditions for Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) and Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells entrapment into the fixed-bed, cell growth and recover from the fixed-bed once high cell densities were attained. Our established protocol allowed these cells, at a cell seeding of 2×1E5 cells/microfiber carriers (MC) (3.5×1E6cells/mL; 1.7×1E4cells/cm(2)), to grow inside a 4m(2)/200mL fixed-bed attaining a concentration of 5.3×1E6 cells/MC (9.5×1E7cells/mL; 4.7×1E5 cells/cm(2)) for S2 cells or 4.6×1E6 cells/MC (8×1E7cells/mL; 4.1×1E5cells/cm(2)) for Sf9 cells. By washing the fixed-bed, entrapped cells could then be recovered from the fixed-bed at a high rate (>85%) with high viability (>95%) by increasing the agitation to 1200/1500rpm. Although the cell yields in the fixed-bed bioreactor were comparable to those obtained in a stirred tank (respectively, 1.3×1E10 and 2.5×1E10 total cells), S2 cells stably transfected with a cDNA coding for the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVGP) showed a 30% higher preserved rRVGP production (2.5±0.1 and 1.9±0.1μg/1E7 cells), as evidenced by a conformational ELISA evaluation. These findings demonstrate not only the possibility to entrap, cultivate to high densities and recover insect cells using a single-use fixed-bed bioreactor, but also that this system provides suitable physiological conditions for the entrapped cells to produce a cell membrane associated recombinant protein with higher specific biological activity as compared to classical suspension cell cultures. PMID:26481831

  2. Acoustic monitoring of a fluidized bed coating process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naelapaa, Kaisa; Veski, Peep; Pedersen, Joan G.; Anov, Dan; Jørgensen, Pia; Kristensen, Henning Gjelstrup; Bertelsen, Poul

      The aim of the study was to investigate the potential of acoustic monitoring of a production scale fluidized bed coating process. The correlation between sensor signals and the estimated amount of film applied and percentage release, respectively, were investigated in coating potassium chloride...

  3. Coating particles by chemical vapor deposition in fluidized bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique to deposit a thin, adherent, uniformly dispersed coating onto the individual particles in a batch of granular or powdered material is described. We have been able to apply successfully a number of coatings to a variety of particulate materials using a fluidized-bed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. By means of this technique we used tri-isobutylaluminum to apply adherent coatings of aluminum on powdered mica and powdered nickel. The powdered mica was also coated with titanium in a fluidized bed reactor in which titanium precursors were generated in situ by the reaction between HCl and metallic titanium. Post treatment of the titanium coated mica with ammonia produced agglomerates coated with TiN. These systems demonstrate the potential utility of the fluidized bed reactor for depositing a variety of coatings onto metallic and non-metallic dispersed materials. Preparation of such coated powders is likely to be valuable in a variety of industrial applications, such as the manufacture of composite structures. (orig.)

  4. Fluidized bed dip coated silicon carbide on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon carbide (SiC) coatings hold great promise in high temperature applications by virtue of their excellent physical and chemical properties. They are produced by techniques ranging from chemical vapor deposition to reaction bonding by melt infiltration. Reaction bonded SiC finds importance in nuclear applications as high temperature, thermally conducting coatings with good abrasion resistance. Additionally, they also possess the ability to withstand high neutron fluence, and thereby find importance as a protective layer in the graphite fuel tubes used in the compact high temperature reactor. The current work explores the deposition of SiC on graphite cylinders by dip-coating a heated graphite rod in a fluidized bed of silicon. The solid state reaction of silicon and carbon under vacuum/inert atmosphere and elevated temperatures is explored. A novel idea of immersing a heated graphite sample in a bed of fluidized silicon powder is presented. The graphite sample is heated to 1450-1550 deg C prior to dipping in the fluidized bed of silicon. The technique presents advantages of quick heating and lower deposition times, and reasonably uniform coatings. Importantly, the setup does not require effluent treatment nor does it involve the use of corrosive precursors leading to higher operational safety as opposed to other vapor deposition methods. The method is well adapted for three-dimensional surfaces as well. Initial experimental results are presented along with the design details of the perforated distributor plate for the coating unit, and the feasibility of the technique is explored. (author)

  5. Development and Application of a Process Window for Achieving High-Quality Coating in a Fluidized Bed Coating Process

    OpenAIRE

    Laksmana, F. L.; Hartman Kok, P. J. A.; Vromans, H; Frijlink, H. W.; Van der Voort Maarschalk, K.

    2009-01-01

    Next to the coating formulation, process conditions play important roles in determining coating quality. This study aims to develop an operational window that separates layering from agglomeration regimes and, furthermore, the one that leads to the best coating quality in a fluidized bed coater. The bed relative humidity and the droplet size of the coating aerosol were predicted using a set of engineering models. The coating quality was characterized using a quantitative image analysis method...

  6. CFD simulations of a spouted bed equipment for particle coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff Filho, Germano Klaus; Cabral, Paulo Alexandre de Moraes [Centro Tecnologico do Exercito (CTEx-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: klauswolff@ctex.eb.br; paulo@ctex.eb.br

    2007-07-01

    Due to their solids circulation characteristics and excellent gas-particle contact, spouted beds have been used in several engineering applications, including nuclear fuel particles coatings. A laboratory scale equipment was mounted, aiming particles coating for use in nuclear fuel research. The line operates with a spouted bed reactor filled with particles on whose surface the deposition process happens. Some computational simulations, using the CFD commercial code PHOENICS{sup R} , were made in order to show some of the equipment possibilities and limitations. It's important to exhaust theoretical investigations about this kind of system, because experimental conditions seem to be dangerous, beyond associated difficulties in process control and operation. In this work, CFD simulations are used to obtain patterns of solids and gas flows. (author)

  7. Fluidized bed coating efficiency and morphology of coatings for producing Al-based nanocomposite hollow spheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mostafa Amirjan; Hamid Khorsand; Manouchehr Khorasani

    2014-01-01

    We performed fluidized bed coating of Al-based nanocomposite powder–binder suspensions onto polymer substrates. The effects of the type and amount of the binder and nanoparticle additive on the coating process efficiency and coating characteristics were investigated. The efficiency decreased from 52% to 49% as the processing time increased from 15 to 20 min. However, the amount and thickness of the coating also increased as the processing time and amount of the binder were increased. The addition of nanoparticles to the system decreased the thickness of the coating from 222 to 207 µm when polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) was used as a binder. The suspension containing 3wt% R-4410 binder exhibited the greatest efficiency of 60%.

  8. ScaleUp America Communities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — SBA’s new ScaleUp America Initiative is designed to help small firms with high potential “scale up” and grow their businesses so that they will provide more jobs...

  9. Development and application of a process window for achieving high-quality coating in a fluidized bed coating process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laksmana, F.L.; Hartman Kok, P.J.A.; Vromans, H.; Frijlink, H.W.; Van Der Voort Maarschalk, K.

    2009-01-01

    Next to the coating formulation, process conditions play important roles in determining coating quality. This study aims to develop an operational window that separates layering from agglomeration regimes and, furthermore, the one that leads to the best coating quality in a fluidized bed coater. The

  10. State-of-the-art review and report on critical aspects and scale-up considerations in the design of fluidized-bed reactors. Final report on Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Information is given on the design of distributor plates and opening geometry to provide uniform flow over the reactor area. The design of granular bed filters is also considered. Pressure drops and particle size in the bed are discussed. (LTN)

  11. Scaling up the neutral solution antireflection process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirtenson, G.R.; Brown, N.J.; Cook, L.M.

    The neutral solution process (NSP) for chemically producing antireflection coatings has been scaled up from 24 cm and used successfully to treat components as large as 90 cm diameter. Since the process is primarily determined by diffusion through the surface, it has proven to be relatively insensitive to fluid flow effects which influence the chemical concentration buildup at the surface. Large parts visually appear more uniform than small parts processed in model tanks. The major problems encountered have been associated with using plastic support components beyond their normal temperature limits and with handling parts to the required cleanliness outside of a clean room environment.

  12. The SCALE-UP Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beichner, Robert

    2015-03-01

    The Student Centered Active Learning Environment with Upside-down Pedagogies (SCALE-UP) project was developed nearly 20 years ago as an economical way to provide collaborative, interactive instruction even for large enrollment classes. Nearly all research-based pedagogies have been designed with fairly high faculty-student ratios. The economics of introductory courses at large universities often precludes that situation, so SCALE-UP was created as a way to facilitate highly collaborative active learning with large numbers of students served by only a few faculty and assistants. It enables those students to learn and succeed not only in acquiring content, but also to practice important 21st century skills like problem solving, communication, and teamsmanship. The approach was initially targeted at undergraduate science and engineering students taking introductory physics courses in large enrollment sections. It has since expanded to multiple content areas, including chemistry, math, engineering, biology, business, nursing, and even the humanities. Class sizes range from 24 to over 600. Data collected from multiple sites around the world indicates highly successful implementation at more than 250 institutions. NSF support was critical for initial development and dissemination efforts. Generously supported by NSF (9752313, 9981107) and FIPSE (P116B971905, P116B000659).

  13. Scaling up of renewable chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Karl; Chotani, Gopal; Danielson, Nathan; Zahn, James A

    2016-04-01

    The transition of promising technologies for production of renewable chemicals from a laboratory scale to commercial scale is often difficult and expensive. As a result the timeframe estimated for commercialization is typically underestimated resulting in much slower penetration of these promising new methods and products into the chemical industries. The theme of 'sugar is the next oil' connects biological, chemical, and thermochemical conversions of renewable feedstocks to products that are drop-in replacements for petroleum derived chemicals or are new to market chemicals/materials. The latter typically offer a functionality advantage and can command higher prices that result in less severe scale-up challenges. However, for drop-in replacements, price is of paramount importance and competitive capital and operating expenditures are a prerequisite for success. Hence, scale-up of relevant technologies must be interfaced with effective and efficient management of both cell and steel factories. Details involved in all aspects of manufacturing, such as utilities, sterility, product recovery and purification, regulatory requirements, and emissions must be managed successfully. PMID:26874264

  14. Enteric coating of soft gelatin capsules by spouted bed: effect of operating conditions on coating efficiency and on product quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pissinati, Rafael; Oliveira, Wanderley Pereira

    2003-05-01

    The present study was conducted in order to analyze the viability of the spouted bed process for application of a gastric-resistant coating to soft gelatin capsules. The variables investigated were: included angle of conical base, (gamma), the relation between the feed mass flow rate of the coating suspension and the feed mass flow rate of spouting gas (W(s)/W(g)); the ratio between the flow rate of the spouting gas and the flow rate at minimum spouting condition (Q/Q(ms)); the mass of capsules in the bed (M(0)), and the capsule's size. The product quality was measured by disintegration tests, traction x deformation tests, image analysis and by the evaluation of the coating mass distribution and shape factor variation during the coating operation. The experiments were performed in a spouted bed with a column diameter of 200 mm and included a conical base angle of 40 degrees. The best coating efficiency values were obtained for M(0)=300 g. Coating efficiency tended to increase with increasing W(s)/W(g) ratio. Disintegration tests showed that the gastric-resistant effect was obtained with a coating mass of 3.86 mg/cm(2). The shape factor increase during the coating operation. The capsule's coating mass distribution tended to maintain the original distribution. PMID:12754006

  15. Silicon coatings on copper by chemical vapor deposition in fluidized bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A coating technique based on (a) chemical vapor deposition, (b) fluidized bed technology and (c) subhalide chemistry was used to siliconize copper. Copper samples were siliconized in silicon beds kept at temperatures in the range 350-550degC. Alternating current (a.c.) impedance measurements indicate that the corrosion resistance of the coated samples is significantly better than that of uncoated copper. (orig.)

  16. ADVANCING THE FUNDAMENTAL UNDERSTANDING AND SCALE-UP OF TRISO FUEL COATERS VIA ADVANCED MEASUREMENT AND COMPUTATIONAL TECHNIQUES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Pratim; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna

    2012-11-01

    Tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle coating is critical for the future use of nuclear energy produced byadvanced gas reactors (AGRs). The fuel kernels are coated using chemical vapor deposition in a spouted fluidized bed. The challenges encountered in operating TRISO fuel coaters are due to the fact that in modern AGRs, such as High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs), the acceptable level of defective/failed coated particles is essentially zero. This specification requires processes that produce coated spherical particles with even coatings having extremely low defect fractions. Unfortunately, the scale-up and design of the current processes and coaters have been based on empirical approaches and are operated as black boxes. Hence, a voluminous amount of experimental development and trial and error work has been conducted. It has been clearly demonstrated that the quality of the coating applied to the fuel kernels is impacted by the hydrodynamics, solids flow field, and flow regime characteristics of the spouted bed coaters, which themselves are influenced by design parameters and operating variables. Further complicating the outlook for future fuel-coating technology and nuclear energy production is the fact that a variety of new concepts will involve fuel kernels of different sizes and with compositions of different densities. Therefore, without a fundamental understanding the underlying phenomena of the spouted bed TRISO coater, a significant amount of effort is required for production of each type of particle with a significant risk of not meeting the specifications. This difficulty will significantly and negatively impact the applications of AGRs for power generation and cause further challenges to them as an alternative source of commercial energy production. Accordingly, the proposed work seeks to overcome such hurdles and advance the scale-up, design, and performance of TRISO fuel particle spouted bed coaters. The overall objectives of the proposed work are

  17. Titanium-based coatings on copper by chemical vapor deposition in fluidized bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium, TiN and TiOx coatings were deposited on copper and Cu-Ni alloys by chemical vapor deposition in fluidized bed reactors. These coatings provide the copper with a tenfold increase in corrosion resistance in chloride aqueous environments, as determined by a.c. impedance studies. (orig.)

  18. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer in packed bed brying of seeds having a mucilage coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Prado

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The simultaneous heat and mass transfer between fluid phase and seeds having a mucilaginous coating was studied during packed bed drying. To describe the process, a two-phase model approach was employed, in which the effects of bed shrinkage and nonconstant physical properties were considered. The model took into account bed contraction by employing moving coordinates. Equations relating shrinkage and structural parameters of the packed bed with moisture content, required in the drying model, were developed from experimental results in thick-layer bed drying. The model verification was based on a comparison between experimental and predicted data on moisture content and temperature along the bed. Parametric studies showed that the application of correlations capable of incorporating changes in bed properties gives better data simulation. By experimental-theoretical analysis, the importance of shrinkage for a more accurate interpretation of heat and mass transfer phenomena in the drying of porous media composed of mucilaginous seeds is corroborated.

  19. Coating and melt induced agglomeration in a poultry litter fired fluidized bed combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combustion of poultry litter, which is rich in phosphorus, in a fluidized bed combustor (FBC) is associated with agglomeration problems, which can lead to bed defluidization and consequent shutdown of the installation. Whereas earlier research indicated coating induced agglomeration as the dominant mechanism for bed material agglomeration, it is shown experimentally in this paper that both coating and melt induced agglomeration occur. Coating induced agglomeration mainly takes place at the walls of the FBC, in the freeboard above the fluidized bed, where at the prevailing temperature the bed particles are partially molten and hence agglomerate. In the ash, P2O5 forms together with CaO thermodynamically stable Ca3(PO4)2, thus reducing the amount of calcium silicates in the ash. This results in K/Ca silicate mixtures with lower melting points. On the other hand, in-bed agglomeration is caused by thermodynamically unstable, low melting HPO42− and H2PO4− salts present in the fuel. In the hot FBC these salts may melt, may cause bed particles to stick together and may subsequently react with Ca salts from the bed ash, forming a solid bridge of the stable Ca3(PO4)2 between multiple particles. - Highlights: • Coating induced agglomeration not due to K phosphates, but due to K silicates. • Melt induced agglomeration due to H2PO4− and HPO42− salts in the fuel. • Wall agglomeration corresponds to coating induced mechanism. • In-bed agglomeration corresponds to melt induced mechanism

  20. Fluidization and coating of very dense powders by fluidized bed chemical vapour deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Philippe; Caussat, Brigitte; Ablitzer, Carine; Iltis, Xavière; Brothier, Méryl

    2013-01-01

    The hydrodynamic behaviour of a very dense tungsten powder, 75 µm in median diameter and 19,300 kg/m3 in grain density, has been studied in a fluidized bed at room temperature using nitrogen and argon as carrier gas. Even if fluidization was achieved, the small bed expansion indicated that it was imperfect. Then, the fluidization was studied at 400 °C in order to investigate the feasibility of coating this powder by Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapour Deposition (FBCVD). In particular, the influenc...

  1. Fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor for nanoparticles coating via atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Chen-Long; Liu, Xiao; Chen, Rong, E-mail: rongchen@mail.hust.edu.cn, E-mail: bshan@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Shan, Bin, E-mail: rongchen@mail.hust.edu.cn, E-mail: bshan@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die & Mould Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2015-07-15

    A fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor has been designed for coating on nanoparticles (NPs) via atomic layer deposition. It consists of five major parts: reaction chamber, dosing and fluidizing section, pumping section, rotary manipulator components, as well as a double-layer cartridge for the storage of particles. In the deposition procedure, continuous fluidization of particles enlarges and homogenizes the void fraction in the particle bed, while rotation enhances the gas-solid interactions to stabilize fluidization. The particle cartridge presented here enables both the fluidization and rotation acting on the particle bed, demonstrated by the analysis of pressure drop. Moreover, enlarged interstitials and intense gas–solid contact under sufficient fluidizing velocity and proper rotation speed facilitate the precursor delivery throughout the particle bed and consequently provide a fast coating process. The cartridge can ensure precursors flowing through the particle bed exclusively to achieve high utilization without static exposure operation. By optimizing superficial gas velocities and rotation speeds, minimum pulse time for complete coating has been shortened in experiment, and in situ mass spectrometry showed the precursor usage can reach 90%. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy results suggested a saturated growth of nanoscale Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films on spherical SiO{sub 2} NPs. Finally, the uniformity and composition of the shells were characterized by high angle annular dark field-transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  2. Fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor for nanoparticles coating via atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fluidized bed coupled rotary reactor has been designed for coating on nanoparticles (NPs) via atomic layer deposition. It consists of five major parts: reaction chamber, dosing and fluidizing section, pumping section, rotary manipulator components, as well as a double-layer cartridge for the storage of particles. In the deposition procedure, continuous fluidization of particles enlarges and homogenizes the void fraction in the particle bed, while rotation enhances the gas-solid interactions to stabilize fluidization. The particle cartridge presented here enables both the fluidization and rotation acting on the particle bed, demonstrated by the analysis of pressure drop. Moreover, enlarged interstitials and intense gas–solid contact under sufficient fluidizing velocity and proper rotation speed facilitate the precursor delivery throughout the particle bed and consequently provide a fast coating process. The cartridge can ensure precursors flowing through the particle bed exclusively to achieve high utilization without static exposure operation. By optimizing superficial gas velocities and rotation speeds, minimum pulse time for complete coating has been shortened in experiment, and in situ mass spectrometry showed the precursor usage can reach 90%. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy results suggested a saturated growth of nanoscale Al2O3 films on spherical SiO2 NPs. Finally, the uniformity and composition of the shells were characterized by high angle annular dark field-transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

  3. Breakthrough analysis for water disinfection using silver nanoparticles coated resin beads in fixed-bed column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Performance of silver nanoparticles coated resin in water disinfection is presented. ► Sigmoidal models are used to describe breakthrough curves. ► The performance of the media in water disinfection is affected by process variables. ► Test with environmental water shows the media is effective in water disinfection. - Abstract: This study demonstrates the use of silver nanoparticles coated resin beads in deactivating microbes in drinking water in a column filtration system. The coated resin beads are characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to confirm the functional groups, morphology and the presence of silver nanoparticles on the surface of the resin. The performance of the coated resin is evaluated as a function of bed mass, initial bacterial concentration and flow rate using Escherichia coli as model microbial contaminant in water. The survival curves of E. coli are expressed as breakthrough curves (BTCs), which are modeled using sigmoidal regression equations to obtain relevant rate parameters. The number of bed volumes processed at breakthrough point and capacity of the bed are used as performance indicators. Results show that performance increases with a decrease in initial bacterial concentration, an increase in flow rate and an increase in bed mass.

  4. Lits fluidisés pour l'industrie chimique. Extrapolation et amélioration des catalyseurs. Première partie : Etudes et modèles. Enseignements issus des pilotes Fluidized Beds in Chemical Industry. Scale Up and Catalysts Improvement. First Part: Studies, Models, Learning from Pilot Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botton R.

    2006-12-01

    est intitulée Études théoriques, réalités expérimentales, suggestions . Les bulles des lits fluidisés ont fait l'objet de très nombreux travaux, dont les résultats sont très souvent explicités sous la forme de modèles mécanistiques à un paramètre qui est le diamètre des bulles. Pour confronter ces modèles à l'expérience, une relation est établie entre le diamètre des bulles et la vitesse minimum de fluidisation de comportement. Des suggestions sont alors faites pour améliorer les modèles, et l'on propose des conclusions générales sur les lits fluidisés. The firsts catalytic fluidized beds appear near 1942 in petroleum industry and near 1960 in chemical industry. We only consider very high performances chemical fluidized bed reactors (> 99%. In the past, they were developed through the use of very expensive pilot plants of about 0. 5 m diameter and 10 in high. We will demonstrate that direct scale up from laboratory data is possible. This possibility gives also a simple method to improve catalysts used into operating units and opens fluidized bed technique to products that need only low production. Presentation is made with three articles:- In the first, Studies, Models, Learning from Pilot Plants : after a description of the major scale-up problems, studies to solve then are summarized. Then scale-up works of two processes with the use of about 0. 5 m diameter pilot plant are given. From the results it is deduced the possible performances of a catalytic fluidized bed and how to operate to obtain then. - In the second*, Scale up with Only Laboratory Data , it is experimentally demonstrated that the information's scale-up can be obtained in a laboratory. A strategy to obtain them is suggested. An another result of theses experimental studies is that all physical properties of catalytic fluidized bed depends of only one parameter. It is called comportment incipient fluidization velocity . - In the third*, Theoretical Studies, Experimental

  5. Evaluation of the tablet coating by the conventional spouted-bed process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, G D; Publio, M C; Oliveira, W P

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to present an analysis of the tablet coating by the conventional spouted-bed process. To analyze the equipment performance, the rate of increase of the tablets mass, K1, and the adhesion coefficient eta were determined as a function of the feed flow rate of coating suspension Ws; of the Reynolds number Rep; of the flow rate of atomizing gas Wat, and of the cone base angle gamma. To analyze the product quality, the uniformity of coating mass deposition onto the tablet's surface was used. Three different procedures for description of kinetics growth, weighing method, image analysis, and measurements with a micrometer were used to verify the validity of the commonly used weighing method. Comparison between experimental results of kinetics growth with estimates obtained by a literature model was also performed. A tendency toward an increase in K1 and in eta with the feeding flow rate of coating suspension Ws was detected. The weighing method can be used for the process analysis. The kinetics of growth can be described by the growth model used. The variable that produce more pronounced effect on K1 and eta was the feed flow rate of coating suspension, the weighing method describes very well the increase of particle diameter with coating time, the growth model can be used for the describe the kinetics of growth during the coating operation, and the coating does not deposit uniformly onto the tablet's surface. PMID:11291201

  6. The influence of the moisture content of microcrystalline cellulose on the coating process in a fluidized bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva O. S.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the coating of microcrystalline cellulose with a polymeric suspension in a fluidized bed. The coating operation was carried out using a fluidized bed with top spraying by a double-fluid nozzle. The fluidized bed consists of a cylindrical column made of plexiglass with a height of 0.6 m and an inner diameter of 0.14 m. The polymeric coating suspension was formulated using Eudragit® as the basic component. As the quality of the coating product is greatly affected by the spraying characteristics, the influence of the flow rate of the coating suspension and the moisture content of the particles on the agglomeration index and efficiency of the process of coating microcrystalline cellulose was analyzed.

  7. Scaling up the Quality of Care Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XieZhenming

    2005-01-01

    Like the pilot project, the scaling up of the quality of care approach is also new in China and requires continued research anct explorauon, in July 2003, the National Population and Family Planning Commission (NPFPC) drew on the experience of scaling up the quality of care project and decided to launch a campaign to select and commend model counties (cities/districts) in implementing the project in order to set an example for different regions with different economies and ensure the quality of care approach is adequately applied.

  8. Characterization of Filtration Scale-Up Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Billing, Justin M.; Luna, Maria L.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Bonebrake, Michael L.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Jagoda, Lynette K.

    2009-03-09

    The scale-up performance of sintered stainless steel crossflow filter elements planned for use at the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) and at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were characterized in partial fulfillment (see Table S.1) of the requirements of Test Plan TP RPP WTP 509. This test report details the results of experimental activities related only to filter scale-up characterization. These tests were performed under the Simulant Testing Program supporting Phase 1 of the demonstration of the pretreatment leaching processes at PEP. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the tests discussed herein for Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) to address the data needs of Test Specification 24590-WTP-TSP-RT-07-004. Scale-up characterization tests employ high-level waste (HLW) simulants developed under the Test Plan TP-RPP-WTP-469. The experimental activities outlined in TP-RPP-WTP-509 examined specific processes from two broad areas of simulant behavior: 1) leaching performance of the boehmite simulant as a function of suspending phase chemistry and 2) filtration performance of the blended simulant with respect to filter scale-up and fouling. With regard to leaching behavior, the effect of anions on the kinetics of boehmite leaching was examined. Two experiments were conducted: 1) one examined the effect of the aluminate anion on the rate of boehmite dissolution and 2) another determined the effect of secondary anions typical of Hanford tank wastes on the rate of boehmite dissolution. Both experiments provide insight into how compositional variations in the suspending phase impact the effectiveness of the leaching processes. In addition, the aluminate anion studies provide information on the consequences of gibbsite in waste. The latter derives from the expected fast dissolution of gibbsite relative to boehmite. This test report concerns only results of the filtration performance with respect to scale-up. Test results for boehmite

  9. Fluidized-Bed Coating with Sodium Sulfate and PVA-TiO2, 1. Review and Agglomeration Regime Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Peter Dybdahl; Bach, Poul; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2009-01-01

    This paper, and two associated papers [Hede, P. D.; Jensen, A. D.; Bach, P. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 2009, 48, 1905 and 1914], address the fluid-bed coating of placebo enzyme granules (i.e., sodium sulfate cores, with a size range of 400-500 mu m) using two types of coatings: sodium sulfate and PVA...

  10. Global Scaling Up Sanitation Project : Training and Capacity Building to Scale Up Rural Sanitation

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2010-01-01

    The Water and Sanitation Program's (WSP's) Global Scaling up Sanitation Project combines the approaches of Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS), behavior change communications, and social marketing to generate sanitation demand and strengthen the supply of sanitation products and services at large scale. Training has played an essential role to scale up rural sanitation in India, Indonesi...

  11. Carbon coated (carbonous) catalyst in ebullated bed reactor for production of oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the work completed under DOE's Support of Advanced Fuel Research program, Contract No. DE-FG26-99FT40681. The contract period was October 2000 through September 2002. This R and D program investigated the modification of the mechanical strength of catalyst extrudates using Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. (HTI) carbon-coated catalyst technology so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO2 efficiently and economically. Exothermic chemical reactions benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. The carbon-coated extrudates prepared using these procedures had sufficient attrition resistance and surface area for use in ebullated bed operation. The low cost of carbon coating makes the carbon-coated catalysts highly competitive in the market of catalyst extrudates

  12. Scaling up Family Medicine in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Innocent K. Besigye; Jane F. Namatovu

    2014-01-01

    It is evident that politicians, health managers and academics are realising the potential contribution of Family Medicine to health systems in sub-Saharan Africa. The challenge is in training institutions to recruit and train enough Family Physicians in order to meet expectations. The 3rd Family Medicine Conference in Uganda, held in October 2013, explored innovative ways of scaling up Family Medicine training and practice in Uganda.

  13. Scaling up: Distributed machine learning with cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provost, F.J. [NYNEX Science & Technology, White Plains, NY (United States); Hennessy, D.N. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Machine-learning methods are becoming increasingly popular for automated data analysis. However, standard methods do not scale up to massive scientific and business data sets without expensive hardware. This paper investigates a practical alternative for scaling up: the use of distributed processing to take advantage of the often dormant PCs and workstations available on local networks. Each workstation runs a common rule-learning program on a subset of the data. We first show that for commonly used rule-evaluation criteria, a simple form of cooperation can guarantee that a rule will look good to the set of cooperating learners if and only if it would look good to a single learner operating with the entire data set. We then show how such a system can further capitalize on different perspectives by sharing learned knowledge for significant reduction in search effort. We demonstrate the power of the method by learning from a massive data set taken from the domain of cellular fraud detection. Finally, we provide an overview of other methods for scaling up machine learning.

  14. Microstructural investigation of phases and pinning properties in MBa2Cu3O7-x (M = Y and/or Gd) coated conductors produced by scale-up facilitie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hye-Jin; Moon, Han-Kyoul; Yoon, Seokhyun; Jo, William; Kim, Kunsu; Kim, Miyoung; Ko, Rock-Kil; Jo, Young-Sik; Ha, Dong-Woo

    2016-03-01

    To expedite the commercialization of coated conductors, a robust stacking architecture of the wires must be developed and the performance of the critical currents improved. More importantly, the manufacturability, or large-scale delivery, and the capability of sustaining production at a high rate must be considered. The products of three companies, American Superconductor, Superpower Inc., and SuNAM Co., Ltd, were selected because these companies have announced commercial-grade production lines and delivered a significant amounts of wires to the open market that meet the standards demanded by power devices. X-ray diffraction patterns were used to verify the structural properties and the phase formation in the wires, and transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to investigate the microstructure and composition of the conductors. In addition, Raman scattering spectroscopy was used for the analysis of the phase formation and for the elucidation of secondary phases in the superconducting layers. The field dependence of the critical current was also studied to compare the transport characteristics under relatively low and medium magnetic field at 77 K and 60 K. Pinning forces were obtained from the field dependence of transport properties and pinning characteristics were investigated. The theoretical and experimental analyses were combined together using the Dew-Hughes formula to extract the scaling exponents and estimate the irreversibility lines of the fields. The results showed that the three conductors possess pinning mechanisms that originate from core pinning with a surface pinning geometry. It is remarkable that the wires discussed in this paper exhibit very similar pinning characteristics even though they have different characteristics in terms of chemical composition, microstructure, stacking architectures, and distribution of parasitic phases.

  15. IGNITOR scale-up studies (DIGNITOR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of a scaled-up version of IGNITOR (to a major radius of 2.16 m) is discussed. The design, referred to as DIGNITOR, is a direct extrapolation of IGNITOR. The consequences from the increased size are discussed (mainly due to decreased temperature excursions). A summary of comprehensive calculations of the stresses (documented in an accompanying paper) are presented. The case of a divertor plasma configuration is analyzed. The implications of a CIT-like vacuum vessel are also discussed. 4 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  16. Scaling up Family Medicine in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Innocent K. Besigye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 It is evident that politicians, health managers and academics are realising the potential contribution of Family Medicine to health systems in sub-Saharan Africa. The challenge is in training institutions to recruit and train enough Family Physicians in order to meet expectations. The 3rd Family Medicine Conference in Uganda, held in October 2013, explored innovative ways of scaling up Family Medicine training and practice in Uganda.

  17. Analysis of the fluidization behavior and application of a novel spouted bed apparatus for spray granulation and coating

    OpenAIRE

    Gryczka, O.; Heinrich, S; Jacob, M; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Spouted beds are well known for their good mixing of the solid phase and for their intensive heat and mass transfers between the fluid phase and the solid phase. Nearly isothermal conditions are enabled which is of advantage for the treatment of granular solid materials in granulation, agglomeration or coating processes. In this work the hydrodynamic behaviour of a novel spouted bed apparatus with two horizontal and slit-shaped gas inlets is investigated by high-frequency recordings of the ga...

  18. Analysis of the surface quality of sulphur-coated urea particles in a two-dimensional spouted bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayub G.S.E.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work the quality of sulphur-coated urea was determined by the urea dissolution rate and analysed by electron microscopy. Particles of urea were coated in a two-dimensional spouted bed, having a 60° slanted base angle and an atomization nozzle installed at the base. Elementary sulphur was liquefied and atomized on the particles. The experiments were planned with the objective of verifying the influences of flowrates of sulphur and atomized air and the temperature of the air used in the spouted bed on the quality of the coated particle surface. The temperature of the spout air and the flowrate of the atomized air showed a significant influence on the quality of the coating.

  19. A seed coat bedding assay to genetically explore in vitro how the endosperm controls seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez Molina, Luis; Lee, Keun Pyo

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis endosperm consists of a single cell layer surrounding the mature embryo and playing an essential role to prevent the germination of dormant seeds or that of nondormant seeds irradiated by a far red (FR) light pulse. In order to further gain insight into the molecular genetic mechanisms underlying the germination repressive activity exerted by the endosperm, a "seed coat bedding" assay (SCBA) was devised. The SCBA is a dissection procedure physically separating seed coats and e...

  20. Formulating food protein-stabilized indomethacin nanosuspensions into pellets by fluid-bed coating technology: physical characterization, redispersibility, and dissolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He W

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Wei He,1,2 Yi Lu,1 Jianping Qi,1 Lingyun Chen,3 Lifang Yin,2 Wei Wu1 1School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Smart Drug Delivery of Ministry of Education and PLA, Shanghai, 2Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China; 3Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Background: Drug nanosuspensions are very promising for enhancing the dissolution and bioavailability of drugs that are poorly soluble in water. However, the poor stability of nanosuspensions, reflected in particle growth, aggregation/agglomeration, and change in crystallinity state greatly limits their applications. Solidification of nanosuspensions is an ideal strategy for addressing this problem. Hence, the present work aimed to convert drug nanosuspensions into pellets using fluid-bed coating technology. Methods: Indomethacin nanosuspensions were prepared by the precipitation-ultrasonication method using food proteins (soybean protein isolate, whey protein isolate, ß-lactoglobulin as stabilizers. Dried nanosuspensions were prepared by coating the nanosuspensions onto pellets. The redispersibility, drug dissolution, solid-state forms, and morphology of the dried nanosuspensions were evaluated. Results: The mean particle size for the nanosuspensions stabilized using soybean protein isolate, whey protein isolate, and β-lactoglobulin was 588 nm, 320 nm, and 243 nm, respectively. The nanosuspensions could be successfully layered onto pellets with high coating efficiency. Both the dried nanosuspensions and nanosuspensions in their original amorphous state and not influenced by the fluid-bed coating drying process could be redispersed in water, maintaining their original particle size and size distribution. Both the dried nanosuspensions and the original drug nanosuspensions showed similar dissolution profiles, which were both much

  1. Analysis of the surface quality of sulphur-coated urea particles in a two-dimensional spouted bed

    OpenAIRE

    G.S.E. Ayub; S.C.S. Rocha; A.L.I. Perrucci

    2001-01-01

    In this work the quality of sulphur-coated urea was determined by the urea dissolution rate and analysed by electron microscopy. Particles of urea were coated in a two-dimensional spouted bed, having a 60° slanted base angle and an atomization nozzle installed at the base. Elementary sulphur was liquefied and atomized on the particles. The experiments were planned with the objective of verifying the influences of flowrates of sulphur and atomized air and the temperature of the air used in the...

  2. Physical characterization of meloxicam-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex pellets prepared by a fluid-bed coating method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Lu; Xingwang Zhang; Jie Lai; Zongning Yin; Wei Wu

    2009-01-01

    Meloxicam-β-cyclodextrin (ME-β-CD) inclusion complex was prepared by a fluid-bed coating technique upon solvent removal and simultaneous depositing onto the surface of nonpareil pellets and using PVP K30 as a binding agent to facilitate good coating. The resultant pellets were spherical and intact in shape with good flowability and friability. SEM analysis showed that the pellets were smooth and had a tightly coated inclusion complex layer. In vitro dissolution of the inclusion complex pellets in pH 7.4 phosphate buffer was dramatically enhanced at an ME/CD ratio of 1/1. DSC and powder X-ray diffractometry proved the absence of crystallinity in the ME/CD inclusion complexes. Moreover, Fourier transform-infrared spectrometry together with Raman spectrometry indicated that the thiazole ring of ME was possibly included in the cavity of β-CD.

  3. Coated fuel particle temperature analysis of the pebble-bed modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the 200 MWe pebble-bed modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-PM), each sphere fuel element contains approximately 12,000 coated fuel particles scattered in the inner graphite matrix with a diameter of 50 mm to form the fuel zone, while the outer shell with a thickness of 5 mm is a fuel-free zone made up of the same graphite material. The coated fuel particle, with a diameter of less than 1 mm, consists of a UO2 kernel in 0.5 mm diameter and multiple coated ceramic layers. The HTR-PM has good inherent safety properties, one of which is exhibited like that, under some transient or accidental situations leading to an unexpected power increase, the reactor can shut down itself automatically or be brought down to a very low power level only by the negative temperature coefficient of reactivity due to the fuel temperature rise. During the calculation of the fuel element temperature with the pebble bed reactor analysis software THERMIX, which was originally developed by the German KFA-Juelich, a uniform power density in the fuel zone is assumed, without considering the temperature difference between the coated fuel particles and the surrounding graphite matrix. In this paper, the reactor temperature feedback characteristics and the nuclear power during a rapid reactivity introduction accident are analyzed in detail for two cases, i.e. taking into account the coated fuel particle temperature or not. The calculation results show that, the coated fuel particle temperature rises more quickly than the graphite matrix, and then the reactor power descends after a limited increase due to the higher negative temperature coefficient of reactivity of the fuel particle compared with that of the graphite moderator. Besides, the calculation conservation of the THERMIX code is revealed, and the safety properties of the HTR-PM are illustrated as well. (authors)

  4. Readiness for Change. Scaling-Up Brief. Number 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fixsen, Dean L.; Blase, Karen A.; Horner, Rob; Sugai, George

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this "Brief" is to define the variables a state or large district leadership team may wish to consider as they determine if they are "ready" to invest in the scaling-up of an innovation in education. As defined here, "scaling up" means that at least 60% of the students who could benefit from an innovation have access to that…

  5. Continuous adsorption of Pb(II) and methylene blue by engineered graphite oxide coated sand in fixed-bed column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Ji-Lai, E-mail: jilaigong@gmail.com [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhang, Yong-Liang; Jiang, Yan [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zeng, Guang-Ming, E-mail: zgming@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Cui, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Ke; Deng, Can-Hui; Niu, Qiu-Ya; Deng, Jiu-Hua [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Huan, Shuang-Yan [State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2015-03-01

    Highlights: • GO-sand was prepared by coating GO on the surface of sand. • Pb(II) and MB were efficiently removed by GO-sand filter in column. • The removal of MB was enhanced with the presence of Pb(II). • GO-sand is low-cost and convenient for its application as packed bed filter. - Abstract: The mixture of several effluents, caused by the improper handling and management of effluents, generated multi-component wastewater containing both metals and dyes, leading to the complicated treatment process. In this study, a continuous adsorption of Pb(II) and methylene blue (MB) has been studied in single and binary solutions by using graphite oxide coated sand (GO-sand) as an adsorbent in a fixed-bed column. GO-sand was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy before and after analyte adsorption. Compared with sand filter, adsorption quantity and capacity for Pb(II) and MB by GO-sand filter were greatly increased. In Pb(II) and MB single solutions, the experimental parameters were investigated in detail including initial concentration, flow rate, bed depth and pH. Exhaustion time decreased with increasing initial concentration and flow rate, and increased with increasing bed depth and pH. In the Pb(II)-MB binary solution, exhaustion time significantly decreased for Pb(II) adsorption, but increased for MB adsorption. The reason was explained that the more favorable adsorption for MB onto the surface of GO-sand than that for Pb(II), which was derived from π–π interaction between MB and GO on sand surface in packed filter. The Yoon–Nelson model was applied at different concentration of Pb(II) and MB to predict the breakthrough curves. The experimental data were well fit with the model indicating that it was suitable for this column design.

  6. Continuous adsorption of Pb(II) and methylene blue by engineered graphite oxide coated sand in fixed-bed column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • GO-sand was prepared by coating GO on the surface of sand. • Pb(II) and MB were efficiently removed by GO-sand filter in column. • The removal of MB was enhanced with the presence of Pb(II). • GO-sand is low-cost and convenient for its application as packed bed filter. - Abstract: The mixture of several effluents, caused by the improper handling and management of effluents, generated multi-component wastewater containing both metals and dyes, leading to the complicated treatment process. In this study, a continuous adsorption of Pb(II) and methylene blue (MB) has been studied in single and binary solutions by using graphite oxide coated sand (GO-sand) as an adsorbent in a fixed-bed column. GO-sand was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy before and after analyte adsorption. Compared with sand filter, adsorption quantity and capacity for Pb(II) and MB by GO-sand filter were greatly increased. In Pb(II) and MB single solutions, the experimental parameters were investigated in detail including initial concentration, flow rate, bed depth and pH. Exhaustion time decreased with increasing initial concentration and flow rate, and increased with increasing bed depth and pH. In the Pb(II)-MB binary solution, exhaustion time significantly decreased for Pb(II) adsorption, but increased for MB adsorption. The reason was explained that the more favorable adsorption for MB onto the surface of GO-sand than that for Pb(II), which was derived from π–π interaction between MB and GO on sand surface in packed filter. The Yoon–Nelson model was applied at different concentration of Pb(II) and MB to predict the breakthrough curves. The experimental data were well fit with the model indicating that it was suitable for this column design

  7. Two-fluid spray atomisation and pneumatic nozzles for fluid bed coating/agglomeration purposes: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Peter Dybdahl; Bach, Poul; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2008-01-01

    In fluid bed processing in the chemical, food or pharmaceutical industries, pneumatic nozzles are typically used to convert binder or coating liquids into droplets. Producing fine droplets from liquids in a gas phase is termed atomisation, and it involves complex phenomena which are not yet fully...... understood. This paper provides a systematic and up-to-date review of two-fluid nozzle designs and principles together with a presentation of nozzle fundamentals introducing basic nozzle theory and thermodynamics. Correlations for the prediction of mean droplet diameters are reviewed, compared...

  8. Scaling up in agriculture, rural development, and nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Linn, Johannes F;

    2012-01-01

    Taking successful development interventions to scale is critical if the world is to achieve the Millennium Development Goals and make essential gains in the fight for improved agricultural productivity, rural incomes, and nutrition. How to support scaling up in these three areas, however, is a major challenge. This collection of policy briefs is designed to contribute to a better understanding of the experience to date and the lessons for the future. Scaling up means expanding, replicating, a...

  9. Constraints to Achieving the MDGs with Scaled-Up Aid

    OpenAIRE

    François Bourguignon; Mark Sundberg

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the macroeconomic and structural constraints to scaling up aid flows to developing countries to meet the Millennium Development Goals in 2015, including infrastructure, competitiveness and the real exchange rate, labour markets, fiscal constraints, governance, and aid volatility and fragmentation. The impact of these constraints on cost-efficient sequencing and composition of scaled-up aid flows is considered, using a dynamic computable general equilibrium model applied to...

  10. Scaling up debris-flow experiments on a centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, C.; Capart, H.; Crone, T. J.; Grinspum, E.; Hsu, L.; Kaufman, D.; Li, L.; Ling, H.; Reitz, M. D.; Smith, B.; Stark, C. P.

    2013-12-01

    Boundary forces generated by debris flows can be powerful enough to erode bedrock and cause considerable damage to infrastructure during runout. Formulation of an erosion-rate law for debris flows is therefore a high priority, and it makes sense to build such a law around laboratory experiments. However, running experiments big enough to generate realistic boundary forces is a logistical challenge to say the least [1]. One alternative is to run table-top simulations with unnaturally weak but fast-eroding pseudo-bedrock, another is to extrapolate from micro-erosion of natural substrates driven by unnaturally weak impacts; hybrid-scale experiments have also been conducted [2]. Here we take a different approach in which we scale up granular impact forces by running our experiments under enhanced gravity in a geotechnical centrifuge [3]. Using a 40cm-diameter rotating drum [2] spun at up to 100g, we generate debris flows with an effective depth of over several meters. By varying effective gravity from 1g to 100g we explore the scaling of granular flow forces and the consequent bed and wall erosion rates. The velocity and density structure of these granular flows is monitored using laser sheets, high-speed video, and particle tracking [4], and the progressive erosion of the boundary surfaces is measured by laser scanning. The force structures and their fluctuations within the granular mass and at the boundaries are explored with contact dynamics numerical simulations that mimic the lab experimental conditions [5]. In this presentation we summarize these results and discuss how they can contribute to the formulation of debris-flow erosion law. [1] Major, J. J. (1997), Journal of Geology 105: 345-366, doi:10.1086/515930 [2] Hsu, L. (2010), Ph.D. thesis, University of California, Berkeley [3] Brucks, A., et al (2007), Physical Review E 75, 032301, doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.75.032301 [4] Spinewine, B., et al (2011), Experiments in Fluids 50: 1507-1525, doi: 10.1007/s00348

  11. Stearic acid coating on circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ashes and its effect on the mechanical performance of polymer composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Nina [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Zhang, Ping, E-mail: pingzhang@swust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, Sichuan 621010 (China); Song, Lixian; Kang, Ming; Lu, Zhongyuan [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, Sichuan 621010 (China); Zheng, Rong [Sichuan Jinhe Group Co., Ltd., Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2013-08-15

    The aim of this work was to test circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ashes (CFAs) for its potential to be utilized in polymer composites manufacturing to improve its toughness. CFAs was coated by stearic acid and used in the composite of polypropylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/high density polyethylene (PP/EVA/HDPE) by molding process method. The resulting coated and uncoated CFAs were fully characterized by particle size analyzer, contact angles, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The stearic acid coated onto the surface of CFAs particles in the physical and chemical ways, and the total clad ratio reached 2.05% by measuring TGA/DTA curve. The percentage of CFAs particles focused to a narrow range 2–4 μm and the median mean size was 3.2 μm more than uncoated CFAs. The properties of hydrophobic and dispersive of CFAs particles improved and original activity was reserved after stearic acid coating. The stearic acid was verified as a coupling agent by how much effect it had on the mechanical properties. It showed the elongation at break of PP/EVA/HDPE reinforced with 15 wt% coated CFAs (c-CFAs) was 80.20% and higher than that of the uncoated. The stearic acid treatment of CFAs is a very promising approach to improve the mechanical strength due to the incorporation of stearic acid on the CFAs surface, and hence, further enhances the potential for recycling CFAs as a suitable filler material in polymer composites.

  12. Stearic acid coating on circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ashes and its effect on the mechanical performance of polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to test circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ashes (CFAs) for its potential to be utilized in polymer composites manufacturing to improve its toughness. CFAs was coated by stearic acid and used in the composite of polypropylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/high density polyethylene (PP/EVA/HDPE) by molding process method. The resulting coated and uncoated CFAs were fully characterized by particle size analyzer, contact angles, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The stearic acid coated onto the surface of CFAs particles in the physical and chemical ways, and the total clad ratio reached 2.05% by measuring TGA/DTA curve. The percentage of CFAs particles focused to a narrow range 2–4 μm and the median mean size was 3.2 μm more than uncoated CFAs. The properties of hydrophobic and dispersive of CFAs particles improved and original activity was reserved after stearic acid coating. The stearic acid was verified as a coupling agent by how much effect it had on the mechanical properties. It showed the elongation at break of PP/EVA/HDPE reinforced with 15 wt% coated CFAs (c-CFAs) was 80.20% and higher than that of the uncoated. The stearic acid treatment of CFAs is a very promising approach to improve the mechanical strength due to the incorporation of stearic acid on the CFAs surface, and hence, further enhances the potential for recycling CFAs as a suitable filler material in polymer composites.

  13. Scaling up breastfeeding programmes in a complex adaptive world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Hall Moran, Victoria

    2016-07-01

    The 2016 Breastfeeding Lancet Series continues to provide unequivocal evidence regarding the numerous benefits that optimal breastfeeding practices offer to children and women worldwide and the major savings that improving these practices can have as a result of their major public health benefits. Unfortunately, this knowledge remains underutilized as there has been little progress scaling up effective breastfeeding programmes globally. Improving the uptake and scaling up of effective national breastfeeding programmes that are potent enough to improve exclusive breastfeeding duration should be a top priority for all countries. Complex analysis systems longitudinal research is needed to understand how best to empower decision makers to achieve this goal through well-validated participatory decision-making tools to help their countries assess baseline needs, including costs, as well as progress with their scaling-up efforts. Sound systems thinking frameworks and scaling-up models are now available to guide and research prospectively future scaling-up efforts that can be replicated, with proper adaptations, across countries. PMID:27161881

  14. Advances and Practices of Bioprocess Scale-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jianye; Wang, Guan; Lin, Jihan; Wang, Yonghong; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2016-01-01

    : This chapter addresses the update progress in bioprocess engineering. In addition to an overview of the theory of multi-scale analysis for fermentation process, examples of scale-up practice combining microbial physiological parameters with bioreactor fluid dynamics are also described. Furthermore, the methodology for process optimization and bioreactor scale-up by integrating fluid dynamics with biokinetics is highlighted. In addition to a short review of the heterogeneous environment in large-scale bioreactor and its effect, a scale-down strategy for investigating this issue is addressed. Mathematical models and simulation methodology for integrating flow field in the reactor and microbial kinetics response are described. Finally, a comprehensive discussion on the advantages and challenges of the model-driven scale-up method is given at the end of this chapter. PMID:25636486

  15. Scaling up impact on nutrition: what will it take?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Stuart; Menon, Purnima; Kennedy, Andrew L

    2015-07-01

    Despite consensus on actions to improve nutrition globally, less is known about how to operationalize the right mix of actions-nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive-equitably, at scale, in different contexts. This review draws on a large scaling-up literature search and 4 case studies of large-scale nutrition programs with proven impact to synthesize critical elements for impact at scale. Nine elements emerged as central: 1) having a clear vision or goal for impact; 2) intervention characteristics; 3) an enabling organizational context for scaling up; 4) establishing drivers such as catalysts, champions, systemwide ownership, and incentives; 5) choosing contextually relevant strategies and pathways for scaling up, 6) building operational and strategic capacities; 7) ensuring adequacy, stability, and flexibility of financing; 8) ensuring adequate governance structures and systems; and 9) embedding mechanisms for monitoring, learning, and accountability. Translating current political commitment to large-scale impact on nutrition will require robust attention to these elements. PMID:26178028

  16. Challenges in Designing and Scaling up Community Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morelli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    latter is to develop a platform to activate hidden or latent resources in neighbourhoods. Both of the projects are an application of service design to the public sector and together provide useful insights about designing and scaling up highly localized and personalized services and service platforms....... While several analogies can be found between the existing generation of social networking platforms and the services proposed in these projects, there are also several important differences that challenge the way local and individual services should be designed in the perspective of being scaled up to...

  17. Challenges in Designing and Scaling-up Community Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morelli, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    hidden or latent resources in neighbourhoods. Both the projects are based on the activities in four pilot locations. They are an application of service design to the public sector that provide interesting insights about designing and scaling up highly localised and personalised services and platforms of...... several important differences can also be found, that challenge the way those platforms should be designed and scaled up in different contexts. Being at a more advanced stage, the Life 2.0 project obviously provided more insights, whereas MyN gives an opportunity to verify the hypotheses coming from Life...

  18. Experimental study and simulation of mass distribution of the covering layer of soybean seeds coated in a spouted bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte C. R.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous work, it was observed that the covering of soybean seeds with bacteria and micronutrients enhances vigorous growth of the plant thereby avoiding use of ammoniacal fertilizers. In the spouted bed covering can be done by pulverization of the coater slurry on the soybean seeds using a pneumatic atomizer. The optimum thickness of the cover allows the fundamental gaseous interchanges for germination and provides the ideal conditions for bacterium activity. The objective of this work was to study the influence of the process variables on thickness of the cover. A simulation of the mass distribution of seeds was obtained using a population balance model. Through the results obtained the operational conditions under which the coating layer distribution were determined has the greatest uniformity.

  19. A low-cost pyrogas cleaning system for power generation: Scaling up from lab to pilot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Oil scrubber and char adsorber for tar removal has been installed to rotary kiln pyrolysis plant. • Used oil and char will be utilized again as fuel of IC engine and heat source for pyrolysis reactor. • The demonstrating test was successfully accomplished with 98.7% gravimetric tar removal. - Abstract: An effective pyrogas cleaning system is necessary for downstream application of biomass pyrolysis technology for power generation. Particularly, tar must be lowered to a satisfying level in order to avoid the problem of tar blockage for preventing damage to the engine and to prolong the engine lifetime. This research was carried out from previous successful research on oil scrubbers and char adsorption for tar removal. Further lab scale experimentation was done to find the appropriate quantity of oil to be used in the scrubber; the results were used for scaling up and showed that the optimum system needed for 0.045 m3/h pyrogas the quantity of 1 l, during a test lasted 30 min. The 1 l oil scrubber was combined with a 41 g char adsorption bed and 97.6% gravimetric tar removal efficiency was obtained. The combination of the oil scrubber and the char adsorption bed was scaled up and installed into the IPRP (Integrated Pyrolysis Regenerated Plant) at the University of Perugia, with chestnut wood (Castanea Sativa Miller) as feedstock, and connected to a 6 kWe Lombardini engine with a power generator and electric load. Pyrogas was sampled at 0.7 m3/h and connected to the cleaning system, consisting of a 15 l oil scrubber combined with a 922 g char adsorption bed. The demonstrating test was successfully accomplished with 98.7% gravimetric tar removal at the exit of the char adsorption bed. The engine ran smoothly and the electric load was constant

  20. Scaling Up Access to Electricity : The Case of Lighting Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Daniel; Sharma, Arsh

    2014-01-01

    This knowledge note is the first of three case studies that concerns scaling up access to electricity in Africa, Bangladesh, and Rwanda. Lighting Africa, a joint IFC and World Bank program launched in 2007, was the first private-sector-oriented effort to leverage new LED lighting technologies to build sustainable markets that provide safe, affordable, and modern off-grid lighting to commun...

  1. Scaling Up Rural Sanitation and Hygiene in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2016-01-01

    This report is a synthesis of the technical assistance (TA) Scaling Up Rural Sanitation and Hygiene in Indonesia, carried out by the World Bank - Water and Sanitation Program (WSP). It was developed in consultation with the Directorate of Environmental Health, Directorate General of Public Health and Centre for Health Promotion of the Ministry of Health (MoH) and with key institutions in t...

  2. Scale-up of bioreactors: physiological approach contra geometrical similarity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prell, Aleš; Sobotka, Miroslav; Kujan, Petr; Votruba, Jaroslav; Flieger, Miroslav

    Brooklyn, NY : Verlag, 2006, s. 15-15. [Natural Products Discovery and Production: New Challenges; New Opportunities. Santa Fe (US), 04.06.2006-08.06.2006] Grant ostatní: XE(XE) COOP-CT-2003-508169 BIOFERM Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : scale-up * bioreactors Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  3. Scaling-up Support for Emergency Response Organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomes, A.H.J.; Neef, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    We present the design of an information system that supports the process of scaling-up of emergency response organizations. This process is vital for effective emergency response but tends to go awry in practice. Our proposed system consists of multiple distributed agents that are capable of exchang

  4. Scale-Up to High Shear Wet Granulation Process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Belohlav, Z.; Brenková, L.; Durdil, P.; Hanika, Jiří; Lehotský, M.; Rápek, P.; Tomášek, V.

    Praha : Process Engineering Publisher, 2004, s. 993. ISBN 80-86059-40-5. [International Congress of Chemical and Process Engineering CHISA 2004 /16./. Praha (CZ), 22.08.2004-26.08.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : scale-up * pharmaceutical industry * granulation process Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  5. New tuberculosis technologies: challenges for retooling and scale-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, M; Palamountain, K M

    2012-10-01

    The availability of new tools does not mean that they will be adopted, used correctly, scaled up or have public health impact. Experience to date with new diagnostics suggests that many national tuberculosis programmes (NTPs) in high-burden countries are reluctant to adopt and scale up new tools, even when these are backed by evidence and global policy recommendations. We suggest that there are several common barriers to effective national adoption and scale-up of new technologies: global policy recommendations that do not provide sufficient information for scale-up, complex decision-making processes and weak political commitment at the country level, limited engagement of and support to NTP managers, high cost of tools and poor fit with user needs, unregulated markets and inadequate business models, limited capacity for laboratory strengthening and implementation research, and insufficient advocacy and donor support. Overcoming these barriers will require enhanced country-level advocacy, resources, technical assistance and political commitment. Some of the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa) countries are emerging as early adopters of policies and technologies, and are increasing their investments in TB control. They may provide the first opportunities to fully assess the public health impact of new tools. PMID:23107630

  6. Collaborative Group Learning using the SCALE-UP Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Gerald

    2011-10-01

    The time-honored conventional lecture (``teaching by telling'') has been shown to be an ineffective mode of instruction for science classes. In these cases, where the enhancement of critical thinking skills and the development of problem-solving abilities are emphasized, collaborative group learning environments have proven to be far more effective. In addition, students naturally improve their teamwork skills through the close interaction they have with their group members. Early work on the Studio Physics model at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in the mid-1990's was extended to large classes via the SCALE-UP model pioneered at North Carolina State University a few years later. In SCALE-UP, students sit at large round tables in three groups of three --- in this configuration, they carry out a variety of pencil/paper exercises (ponderables) using small whiteboards and perform hands-on activities like demos and labs (tangibles) throughout the class period. They also work on computer simulations using a shared laptop for each group of three. Formal lecture is reduced to a minimal level and the instructor serves more as a ``coach'' to facilitate the academic ``drills'' that the students are working on. Since its inception in 1997, the SCALE-UP pedagogical approach has been adopted by over 100 institutions across the country and about 20 more around the world. In this talk, I will present an overview of the SCALE-UP concept and I will outline the details of its deployment at George Washington University over the past 4 years. I will also discuss empirical data from assessments given to the SCALE-UP collaborative classes and the regular lecture classes at GWU in order to make a comparative study of the effectiveness of the two methodologies.

  7. Scaling Up Estimation of Distribution Algorithms For Continuous Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Weishan; Tino, Peter; Yao, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Since Estimation of Distribution Algorithms (EDA) were proposed, many attempts have been made to improve EDAs' performance in the context of global optimization. So far, the studies or applications of multivariate probabilistic model based continuous EDAs are still restricted to rather low dimensional problems (smaller than 100D). Traditional EDAs have difficulties in solving higher dimensional problems because of the curse of dimensionality and their rapidly increasing computational cost. However, scaling up continuous EDAs for higher dimensional optimization is still necessary, which is supported by the distinctive feature of EDAs: Because a probabilistic model is explicitly estimated, from the learnt model one can discover useful properties or features of the problem. Besides obtaining a good solution, understanding of the problem structure can be of great benefit, especially for black box optimization. We propose a novel EDA framework with Model Complexity Control (EDA-MCC) to scale up EDAs. By using Weak...

  8. Scaling up high-impact interventions: how is it done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffrey Michael; de Graft-Johnson, Joseph; Zyaee, Pashtoon; Ricca, Jim; Fullerton, Judith

    2015-06-01

    Building upon the World Health Organization's ExpandNet framework, 12 key principles of scale-up have emerged from the implementation of maternal and newborn health interventions. These principles are illustrated by three case studies of scale up of high-impact interventions: the Helping Babies Breathe initiative; pre-service midwifery education in Afghanistan; and advanced distribution of misoprostol for self-administration at home births to prevent postpartum hemorrhage. Program planners who seek to scale a maternal and/or newborn health intervention must ensure that: the necessary evidence and mechanisms for local ownership for the intervention are well-established; the intervention is as simple and cost-effective as possible; and the implementers and beneficiaries of the intervention are working in tandem to build institutional capacity at all levels and in consideration of all perspectives. PMID:26115856

  9. What Does It Take to Scale Up Rural Sanitation?

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Eduardo; Cardosi, Jason; Coombes, Yolande; Devine, Jacqueline; Grossman, Amy; Kullmann, Craig; Kumar, C. Ajith; Mukherjee, Nilanjana; Prakash, Manu; Robiarto, Amin; Setiwan, Deviariandy; Singh, Upneet; Wartono, Djoko

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, most rural sanitation projects have had pockets of success, but were small in scale and could not be scaled up. Learning how to expand on the successes of small-scale projects to increase access at large scale has been an enduring challenge. Project outcomes often fail the sustainability test once external funding ceases, and the benefits, even if sustained, remain ...

  10. Breastfeeding Peer Counseling: From Efficacy through Scale-up

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Donna J.; Morel, Katherine; Anderson, Alex Kojo; Damio, Grace; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    There are a growing number of publications evaluating various breastfeeding peer counseling (PC) models. We have systematically reviewed a) the randomized trials assessing the effectiveness of breastfeeding PC in improving rates of breastfeeding initiation, duration, exclusivity and maternal and child health outcomes; and b) scientific literature describing the scale-up of breastfeeding PC programs. Twenty-six peer-reviewed publications were included in this review. The overwhelming majority ...

  11. Scale-up of batch processes via decentralized control

    OpenAIRE

    Marchetti, Alejandro; Amrhein, Michael; Chachuat, Benoit; Bonvin, Dominique

    2006-01-01

    The economic environment in the specialty chemicals industry requires short times to market and thus the ability to develop new products and processes very rapidly. This, in turn, calls for large scale-ups from laboratory to production. Due to scale-related differences in operating conditions, direct extrapolation of conditions obtained in the laboratory is often impossible, especially when terminal objectives must be met and path constraints respected. This paper proposes a decentralized con...

  12. A new process control strategy for aqueous film coating of pellets in fluidised bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C.C.; Sonnergaard, Jørn; Bertelsen, Pernille Scholdan;

    2003-01-01

    controlling factor. The type of pellets affected the maximum spray rate. A thermodynamic model for the coating process is employed throughout the process and not just during steady state. The thermodynamic model is incorporated into a new process control strategy. The process control strategy is based on in......-process calculation of degree of utilisation of the potential evaporation energy (DUE) of the outlet air and the relative outlet air humidity (RH). The spray rate is maximised using set points of DUE and RH as control parameters. The product temperature is controlled simultaneously by regulating the inlet air...

  13. Photocatalytic Active Coatings for Lignin Degradation in a Continuous Packed Bed Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Colin Awungacha Lekelefac; Johannes Hild; Peter Czermak; Michael Herrenbauer

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of immobilized catalyst on porous glass support material via the sol-gel route is reported. TiO2-P25-SiO2 + Pt, TiO2-P25-SiO2, TiOSO4_30.6 wt%, and ZnO + TiO2-P25-SiO2 catalysts were synthesized and a comparative study is done regarding morphology of coatings, degradation rates, reaction rates, dissolved carbon (DC), formation of peaks, and fluorescence of products formed from the photocatalytic degradation of lignin sulfonate obtained from a local paper plant. Through simultane...

  14. Droplet size measurements for spray dryer scale-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thybo, Pia; Hovgaard, Lars; Andersen, Sune Klint; Lindeløv, Jesper Saederup

    2008-01-01

    This study was dedicated to facilitate scale-up in spray drying from an atomization standpoint. The purpose was to investigate differences in operating conditions between a pilot and a production scale nozzle. The intension was to identify the operating ranges in which the two nozzles produced similar droplet size distributions. Furthermore, method optimization and validation were also covered. Externally mixing two-fluid nozzles of similar designs were used in this study. Both nozzles are typically used in commercially available spray dryers, and they have been characterized with respect to droplet size distributions as a function of liquid type, liquid flow rate, atomization gas flow rate, liquid orifice diameter, and atomization gas orifice diameter. All droplet size measurements were carried out by using the Malvern Spraytec with nozzle operating conditions corresponding to typical settings for spray drying. This gave droplets with Sauter Mean Diameters less than 40 microm and typically 5-20 microm. A model previously proposed by Mansour and Chigier was used to correlate the droplet size to the operating parameters. It was possible to make a correlation for water incorporating the droplet sizes for both the pilot scale and the production scale nozzle. However, a single correlation was not able to account properly for the physical properties of the liquid to be atomized. Therefore, the droplet size distributions of ethanol could not be adequately predicted on the basis of the water data. This study has shown that it was possible to scale up from a pilot to production scale nozzle in a systematic fashion. However, a prerequisite was that the nozzles were geometrically similar. When externally mixing two-fluid nozzles are used as atomizers, the results obtained from this study could be a useful guideline for selecting appropriate operating conditions when scaling up the spray-drying process. PMID:18379901

  15. Scale-up activation of carbon fibres for hydrogen storage

    OpenAIRE

    Kunowsky, Mirko; Marco Lozar, Juan Pablo; Cazorla Amorós, Diego; Linares Solano, Ángel

    2009-01-01

    In a previous study, we investigated, at a laboratory scale, the chemical activation of two different carbon fibres (CF), their porosity characterization, and their optimization for hydrogen storage [1]. In the present work, this study is extended to: (i) a larger range of KOH activated carbon fibres, (ii) a larger range of hydrogen adsorption measurements at different temperatures and pressures (i.e. at room temperature, up to 20 MPa, and at 77 K, up to 4 MPa), and (iii) a scaling-up activat...

  16. Scale-up on electrokinetic remediation: Engineering and technological parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vizcaíno, Rubén; Navarro, Vicente; León, María J; Risco, Carolina; Rodrigo, Manuel A; Sáez, Cristina; Cañizares, Pablo

    2016-09-01

    This study analyses the effect of the scale-up of electrokinetic remediation (EKR) processes in natural soils. A procedure is proposed to prepare soils based on a compacting process to obtaining soils with similar moisture content and density to those found in real soils in the field. The soil used here was from a region with a high agrarian activity (Mora, Spain). The scale-up study was performed in two installations at different scales: a mock-up pilot scale (0.175m(3)) and a prototype with a scale that was very similar to a real application (16m(3)). The electrode configuration selected consisted of rows of graphite electrodes facing each other located in electrolyte wells. The discharge of 20mg of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid [2,4-D] per kg of dry soil was treated by applying an electric potential gradient of 1Vcm(-1). An increase in scale was observed to directly influence the amount of energy supplied to the soil being treated. As a result, electroosmotic and electromigration flows and electric heating are more intense than in smaller-scale tests (24%, 1% and 25%, respectively respect to the values in prototype). In addition, possible leaks were evaluated by conducting a watertightness test and quantifying evaporation losses. PMID:27209275

  17. THE SCALE-UP OF LARGE PRESSURIZED FLUIDIZED BEDS FOR ADVANCED COAL-FIRED POWER PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon R. Glicksman; Michael Louge; Hesham F. Younis; Richard Tan; Mathew Hyre; Mark Torpey

    2003-11-24

    This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor an agency thereof, nor any of the their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, A combined-cycle High Performance Power System (HIPPS) capable of overall cycle efficiencies approaching 50% has been proposed and designed by Foster Wheeler Development Corporation (FWDC). A pyrolyzer in the first stage of the HIPPS process converts a coal feedstock into fuel gas and char at an elevated pressure of 1.4 Map. (206 psia) and elevated temperature of 930 C (1700 F). The generated char serves as the feedstock for a Pulverized Coal (PC) boiler operating at atmospheric pressure, and the fuel gas is directly fired in a gas turbine. The hydrodynamic behavior of the pyrolyzer strongly influences the quality of both the fuel gas and the generated char, the energy split between the gas turbine and the steam turbine, and hence the overall efficiency of the system. By utilizing a simplified set of scaling parameters (Glicksman et al.,1993), a 4/7th labscale cold model of the pyrolyzer operating at ambient temperature and pressure was constructed and tested. The scaling parameters matched include solid to gas density ratio, Froude number, length to diameter ratio; dimensionless superficial gas velocity and solid recycle rate, particle sphericity and particle size distribution (PSD).

  18. Scaling Up Family Therapy in Fragile, Conflict-Affected States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlés, Laurie L

    2015-09-01

    This article discusses the design and delivery of two international family therapy-focused mental health and psychosocial support training projects, one in a fragile state and one in a post-conflict state. The training projects took place in Southeast Asia and the Middle East/North Africa. Each was funded, supported, and implemented by local, regional, and international stakeholders, and delivered as part of a broader humanitarian agenda to develop human resource capacity to work with families affected by atrocities. The two examples illustrate how task-shifting/task-sharing and transitional justice approaches were used to inform the scaling-up of professionals involved in each project. They also exemplify how state-citizen phenomena in each location affected the project design and delivery. PMID:25315510

  19. Accounting for the cost of scaling-up health interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Benjamin; Baltussen, Rob

    2004-11-01

    Recent studies such as the Commission on Macroeconomics and Health have highlighted the need for expanding the coverage of services for HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, immunisations and other diseases. In order for policy makers to plan for these changes, they need to analyse the change in costs when interventions are 'scaled-up' to cover greater percentages of the population. Previous studies suggest that applying current unit costs to an entire population can misconstrue the true costs of an intervention. This study presents the methodology used in WHO-CHOICE's generalised cost effectiveness analysis, which includes non-linear cost functions for health centres, transportation and supervision costs, as well as the presence of fixed costs of establishing a health infrastructure. Results show changing marginal costs as predicted by economic theory. PMID:15386683

  20. Preferred antiretroviral drugs for the next decade of scale up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Andrieux-Meyer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Global commitments aim to provide antiretroviral therapy (ART to 15 million people living with HIV by 2015, and recent studies have demonstrated the potential for widespread ART to prevent HIV transmission. Increasingly, countries are adapting their national guidelines to start ART earlier, for both clinical and preventive benefits. To maximize the benefits of ART in resource-limited settings, six key principles need to guide ART choice: simplicity, tolerability and safety, durability, universal applicability, affordability and heat stability. Currently available drugs, combined with those in late-stage clinical development, hold great promise to simplify treatment in the short term. Over the longer term, newer technologies, such as long-acting formulations and nanotechnology, could radically alter the treatment paradigm. This commentary reviews recommendations made in an expert consultation on treatment scale up in resource-limited settings.

  1. Production Scale-Up or Activated Carbons for Ultracapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Steven D. Dietz

    2007-01-10

    Transportation use accounts for 67% of the petroleum consumption in the US. Electric and hybrid vehicles are promising technologies for decreasing our dependence on petroleum, and this is the objective of the FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Inexpensive and efficient energy storage devices are needed for electric and hybrid vehicle to be economically viable, and ultracapacitors are a leading energy storage technology being investigated by the FreedomCAR program. The most important parameter in determining the power and energy density of a carbon-based ultracapacitor is the amount of surface area accessible to the electrolyte, which is primarily determined by the pore size distribution. The major problems with current carbons are that their pore size distribution is not optimized for liquid electrolytes and the best carbons are very expensive. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) has developed methods to prepare porous carbons with tunable pore size distributions from inexpensive carbohydrate based precursors. The use of low-cost feedstocks and processing steps greatly lowers the production costs. During this project with the assistance of Maxwell Technologies, we found that an impurity was limiting the performance of our carbon and the major impurity found was sulfur. A new carbon with low sulfur content was made and found that the performance of the carbon was greatly improved. We also scaled-up the process to pre-production levels and we are currently able to produce 0.25 tons/year of activated carbon. We could easily double this amount by purchasing a second rotary kiln. More importantly, we are working with MeadWestvaco on a Joint Development Agreement to scale-up the process to produce hundreds of tons of high quality, inexpensive carbon per year based on our processes.

  2. Scaling up biomass gasifier use: an application-specific approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomass energy accounts for about 11% of the global primary energy supply, and it is estimated that about 2 billion people worldwide depend on biomass for their energy needs. Yet, most of the use of biomass is in a primitive and inefficient manner, primarily in developing countries, leading to a host of adverse implications on human health, environment, workplace conditions, and social well being. Therefore, the utilization of biomass in a clean and efficient manner to deliver modern energy services to the world's poor remains an imperative for the development community. One possible approach to do this is through the use of biomass gasifiers. Although significant efforts have been directed towards developing and deploying biomass gasifiers in many countries, scaling up their dissemination remains an elusive goal. Based on an examination of biomass gasifier development, demonstration, and deployment efforts in India-a country with more than two decades of experiences in biomass gasifier development and dissemination, this article identifies a number of barriers that have hindered widespread deployment of biomass gasifier-based energy systems. It also suggests a possible approach for moving forward, which involves a focus on specific application areas that satisfy a set of criteria that are critical to deployment of biomass gasifiers, and then tailoring the scaling up strategy to the characteristics of the user groups for that application. Our technical, financial, economic and institutional analysis suggests an initial focus on four categories of applications-small and medium enterprises, the informal sector, biomass-processing industries, and some rural areas-may be particularly feasible and fruitful

  3. Competitive Fixed-Bed Adsorption of Pb(II, Cu(II, and Ni(II from Aqueous Solution Using Chitosan-Coated Bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Chi Tsai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fixed-bed adsorption studies using chitosan-coated bentonite (CCB as adsorbent media were investigated for the simultaneous adsorption of Pb(II, Cu(II, and Ni(II from a multimetal system. The effects of operational parameters such as bed height, flow rate, and initial concentration on the length of mass transfer zone, breakthrough time, exhaustion time, and adsorption capacity at breakthrough were evaluated. With increasing bed height and decreasing flow rate and initial concentration, the breakthrough and exhaustion time were observed to favorably increase. Moreover, the adsorption capacity at breakthrough was observed to increase with decreasing initial concentration and flow rate and increasing bed height. The maximum adsorption capacity at breakthrough of 13.49 mg/g for Pb(II, 12.14 mg/g for Cu(II, and 10.29 mg/g for Ni(II was attained at an initial influent concentration of 200 mg/L, bed height of 2.0 cm, and flow rate of 0.4 mL/min. Adsorption data were fitted with Adams-Bohart, Thomas, and Yoon-Nelson models. Experimental breakthrough curves were observed to be in good agreement (R2>0.85 and E%<50% with the predicted curves generated by the kinetic models. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of CCB in the removal of Pb(II, Cu(II, and Ni(II from a ternary metal solution.

  4. Polyethylene encapsulation of mixed wastes: Scale-up feasibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A polyethylene process for the improved encapsulation of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Improvements in waste loading and waste form performance have been demonstrated through bench-scale development and testing. Maximum waste loadings of up to 70 dry wt% mixed waste nitrate salt were achieved, compared with 13-20 dry wt% using conventional cement processes. Stability under anticipated storage and disposal conditions and compliance with applicable hazardous waste regulations were demonstrated through a series of tab-scale waste form performance tests. Full-scale demonstration of this process using actual or surrogate waste is currently planned. A scale-up feasibility test was successfully conducted, demonstrating the ability to process nitrate salts at production rates (up to 450 kg/hr) and the close agreement between bench- and full-scale process parameters. Cored samples from the resulting pilot-scale (114 liter) waste form were used to verify homogeneity and to provide additional specimens for confirmatory performance testing. (author)

  5. Scaling up: Assessing social impacts at the macro-scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Social impacts occur at various scales, from the micro-scale of the individual to the macro-scale of the community. Identifying the macro-scale social changes that results from an impacting event is a common goal of social impact assessment (SIA), but is challenging as multiple factors simultaneously influence social trends at any given time, and there are usually only a small number of cases available for examination. While some methods have been proposed for establishing the contribution of an impacting event to macro-scale social change, they remain relatively untested. This paper critically reviews methods recommended to assess macro-scale social impacts, and proposes and demonstrates a new approach. The 'scaling up' method involves developing a chain of logic linking change at the individual/site scale to the community scale. It enables a more problematised assessment of the likely contribution of an impacting event to macro-scale social change than previous approaches. The use of this approach in a recent study of change in dairy farming in south east Australia is described.

  6. Evaluation of the effectiveness factor along immobilized enzyme fixed-bed reactors: design of a reactor with naringinase covalently immobilized into glycophase-coated porous glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manjon, A.; Iborra, J.L.; Gomez, J.L.; Gomez, E.; Bastida, J.; Bodalo, A.

    1987-09-01

    A design equation is presented for packed-bed reactors containing immobilized enzymes in spherical porous particles with internal diffusion effects and obeying reversible one-intermediate Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The equation is also able to explain irreversible and competitive product inhibition kinetics. It allows the axial substrate profiles to be calculated and the dependence of the effectiveness factor along the reactor length to be continuously evaluated. The design equation was applied to explain the behavior of naringinase immobilized in Glycophase-coated porous glass operating in a packed-bed reactor and hydrolyzing both p-nitrophenyl-alpha-L-rhamnoside and naringin. The theoretically predicted results were found to fit well with experimentally measured values. (Refs. 28).

  7. WET-GRANULATION RESEARCH WITH APPLICATION TO SCALE-UP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriel I.Tardos

    2005-01-01

    in a granulator by employing calibrated "test" particles of known strength. This knowledge is employed in granulation scale-up to determine a kinematic rule that conserves stresses in the small and the large-scale machines. It was found that conserving the magnitude of internal stresses in the moving powder yields granules with similar attributes in granulators of different size.

  8. Scaling Up Nature: Large Area Flexible Biomimetic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinyong; John, Jacob; Kolewe, Kristopher W; Schiffman, Jessica D; Carter, Kenneth R

    2015-10-28

    The fabrication and advanced function of large area biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces (SHS) and slippery lubricant-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS) are reported. The use of roll-to-roll nanoimprinting techniques enabled the continuous fabrication of SHS and SLIPS based on hierarchically wrinkled surfaces. Perfluoropolyether hybrid molds were used as flexible molds for roll-to-roll imprinting into a newly designed thiol-ene based photopolymer resin coated on flexible polyethylene terephthalate films. The patterned surfaces exhibit feasible superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle around 160° without any further surface modification. The SHS can be easily converted into SLIPS by roll-to-roll coating of a fluorinated lubricant, and these surfaces have outstanding repellence to a variety of liquids. Furthermore, both SHS and SLIPS display antibiofouling properties when challenged with Escherichia coli K12 MG1655. The current article describes the transformation of artificial biomimetic structures from small, lab-scale coupons to low-cost, large area platforms. PMID:26423494

  9. Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Dennis G.

    1989-01-01

    This review covers analytical techniques applicable to the examination of coatings, raw materials, and substrates upon which coatings are placed. Techniques include chemical and electrochemical methods, chromatography, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, microscopy, and miscellaneous techniques. (MVL)

  10. Fluidized-Bed Coating with Sodium Sulfate and PVA-TiO2, 2. Influence of Coating Solution Viscosity, Stickiness, pH, and Droplet Diameter on Agglomeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Peter Dybdahl; Bach, Poul; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2009-01-01

    In the first part of this study [Hede, P. D.; Bach, P.; Jensen, A. D. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 2009, 49, 1914], agglomeration regime maps were developed for two types of coatings: sodium sulfate and PVA-TiO2. It was observed here how the agglomeration tendency is always lower for the salt coating...

  11. Simulating the Dynamics of Spouted-Bed Nuclear Fuel Coaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Boyalakuntla, Dhanunjay S [ORNL; Syamlal, M [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); O' Brien, T. J. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

    2007-01-01

    We describe simulation studies of the dynamics of spouted beds used for CVD coating of nuclear fuel particles. Our principal modeling tool is the Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges (MFIX) code that was originally developed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for fossil energy process applications. In addition to standard MFIX features that allow coupling of transient hydrodynamics, heat and mass transfer, and chemical kinetics, we employ special post-processing tools to track particle mixing and circulation as functions of operating conditions and bed design. We describe in detail one major feature of the dynamics, which is the occurrence of very regular spontaneous pulsations of gas and particle flow in the spout. These pulsations appear to be critically linked to the entrainment and circulation of solids, and they produce readily accessible dynamic pressure variations that can be used for direct comparisons of model predictions with experiments. Spouted-bed dynamics are important from a CVD perspective because they directly determine the magnitude and variability of the concentration and species gradients in the zone where reactant gases first come into contact with hot particles. As this unsteady spouted-bed environment differs from other types of CVD reactors, the design and scale-up of such reactors is likely to involve unique modeling issues. Our primary goal here is to lay the groundwork for how computational simulation can be used to address these modeling issues in the specific context of nuclear fuel particle coating.

  12. Simulating the dynamics of spouted-bed nuclear fuel coaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannala, S.; Daw, C.S.; Finney, C.E.A.; Boyalakuntla, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Syamlal, M.; O' Brien, T.J. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV, 26505 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    We describe simulation studies of the dynamics of spouted beds used for CVD coating of nuclear fuel particles. Our principal modeling tool is the Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges (MFIX) code that was originally developed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for fossil energy process applications. In addition to standard MFIX features that allow coupling of transient hydrodynamics, heat and mass transfer, and chemical kinetics, we employ special post-processing tools to track particle mixing and circulation as functions of operating conditions and bed design. We describe in detail one major feature of the dynamics, which is the occurrence of very regular spontaneous pulsations of gas and particle flow in the spout. These pulsations appear to be critically linked to the entrainment and circulation of solids, and they produce readily accessible dynamic pressure variations that can be used for direct comparisons of model predictions with experiments. Spouted-bed dynamics are important from a CVD perspective because they directly determine the magnitude and variability of the concentration and species gradients in the zone where reactant gases first come into contact with hot particles. As this unsteady spouted-bed environment differs from other types of CVD reactors, the design and scale-up of such reactors is likely to involve unique modeling issues. Our primary goal here is to lay the groundwork for how computational simulation can be used to address these modeling issues in the specific context of nuclear fuel particle coating. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. High-Throughput Synthesis, Screening, and Scale-Up of Optimized Conducting Indium Tin Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Peter; Makwana, Neel M; Tighe, Christopher J; Gruar, Robert I; Parkin, Ivan P; Carmalt, Claire J; Darr, Jawwad A

    2016-02-01

    A high-throughput optimization and subsequent scale-up methodology has been used for the synthesis of conductive tin-doped indium oxide (known as ITO) nanoparticles. ITO nanoparticles with up to 12 at % Sn were synthesized using a laboratory scale (15 g/hour by dry mass) continuous hydrothermal synthesis process, and the as-synthesized powders were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Under standard synthetic conditions, either the cubic In2O3 phase, or a mixture of InO(OH) and In2O3 phases were observed in the as-synthesized materials. These materials were pressed into compacts and heat-treated in an inert atmosphere, and their electrical resistivities were then measured using the Van der Pauw method. Sn doping yielded resistivities of ∼ 10(-2) Ω cm for most samples with the lowest resistivity of 6.0 × 10(-3) Ω cm (exceptionally conductive for such pressed nanopowders) at a Sn concentration of 10 at %. Thereafter, the optimized lab-scale composition was scaled-up using a pilot-scale continuous hydrothermal synthesis process (at a rate of 100 g/hour by dry mass), and a comparable resistivity of 9.4 × 10(-3) Ω cm was obtained. The use of the synthesized TCO nanomaterials for thin film fabrication was finally demonstrated by deposition of a transparent, conductive film using a simple spin-coating process. PMID:26798986

  14. Evaluation of Fluidized Beds for Mass Production of IFE Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of the building blocks of an inertial fusion energy (IFE) plant, target fabrication remains a significant credibility issue. For this reason, an extensive parametric study has been conducted on mass production of glow discharge polymer (GDP) shells in a vertical fluidized bed. Trans-2-butene was used as a reactant gas with hydrogen as a diluting and etching agent. Coating rates in the range of 1 to 2 μm/h were demonstrated on batches of 30 shells where National Ignition Facility-quality surfaces were obtained for 3- to 5-μm-thick coatings. Thick coatings up to 325 μm were also demonstrated that are visually transparent, without void and stress fracture. A phenomenological understanding of the GDP growth mechanisms to guide future experiments was further established. Specifically, gas-phase precipitation and high-impact collisions were identified as the main surface-roughening mechanisms. The former produces dense cauliflower-like surface patterns that can be eliminated by adjusting the gas flow rates and the flow ratio. The latter produces isolated domelike surface defects that can be reduced by introducing concerted motion between the shells. By converting from a vertical to a horizontal configuration, fully transparent coatings were obtained on 350 shells. Collisions in a fluidized bed have been identified as the limiting factor in meeting IFE specifications, and a related-rotary kiln technique is recommended for scale-up

  15. Optimization of the UO{sub 2} kernel coating process by 2D simulation of spouted bed dynamics in the coater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Malin, E-mail: liumalin@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu Bing; Shao Youlin [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-10-15

    In the present study, a 2D Euler-Euler numerical simulation was carried out to study the hydrodynamics in the spouted bed with different gas velocities and gas inlets (single-nozzle and multi-nozzle). The maximum spouted height could be mainly determined by the gas velocity if the packing heights of particles were the same. The spatial distribution of particles was uneven and the aggregation of them near the wall could be found when using the single-nozzle gas inlet, regardless of the gas velocity. The aggregation of particles could be partly reduced by using the multi-nozzle gas inlet instead. The dead zone could be eliminated under appropriate particle loading by using the spouted bed bottom with the multi-nozzle gas inlet. Based on the simulation results, the appropriate gas distributor design was recommended to increase the gas solid contact efficiency. It can also be revealed that the temperature would affect the physical properties of gas and particles, thus affecting the particle fluidized state from the simulation results. The maximum spouted height increased with increasing temperature, but the quantitative comparison between the simulation results and the experimental ones can not be obtained because of the limitation of the measuring techniques at high temperature. The present investigation showed that the gas distributor had a critical impact on the gas-particle contact efficiency in the gas-solid two-phase system in the spouted bed, and CFD is a good alternative tool to optimize the spouted bed design in researching the coating process of the UO{sub 2} kernel.

  16. Synthesis of a nanosilica supported CO2 sorbent in a fluidized bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CaO coating at atmospheric pressure is applied on silica nanoparticles in a fluidized bed. • Atmospheric pressure would facilitate scaling-up of the process. • The conditions for the coating process at atmospheric pressure are discussed. • The CO2 sorbent capacity is demonstrated by TGA in carbonation/calcination. • STEM-EDX shows the presence of CaO on the surface of the nanoparticles. - Abstract: CaO has been deposited on a nanosilica powder matrix by a procedure based on atomic layer deposition (ALD) in a fluidized bed reactor at atmospheric pressure following a potentially scalable process. In previous works ALD in gas fluidized bed has been mostly performed under reduced pressure, which hampers scaling-up the production technology. The material synthesized in the present work is tested as CO2 solid sorbent at calcium looping conditions. Multicyclic thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) shows that the nanosilica support stabilizes the capture capacity of CaO. EDX-STEM analysis illustrates the presence of Ca well distributed on the surface of the SiO2 nanoparticles

  17. Analysis of the fluidization behaviour and application of a novel spouted bed apparatus for spray granulation and coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gryczka, O.; Heinrich, S.; Jacob, M.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Spouted beds are well known for their good mixing of the solid phase and for their intensive heat and mass transfers between the fluid phase and the solid phase. Nearly isothermal conditions are enabled which is of advantage for the treatment of granular solid materials in granulation, agglomeration

  18. Optimization design of the coating furnace by 3-d simulation of spouted bed dynamics in the coater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Malin, E-mail: liumalin@tsinghua.edu.cn; Liu, Bing; Shao, Youlin; Wang, Jing

    2014-05-01

    The 3-d Euler–Euler CFD simulation was adopted to study the particle dynamics in the spouted bed under different operation conditions and different gas inlet structures (traditional single-nozzle inlet, modified single-nozzle inlet, multi-nozzle inlet and swirl flow design inlet). The maximum spouted height is mainly determined by the gas velocity. The simulation results were in good agreement with the experimental results in spouted bed with traditional single-nozzle inlet. The gas velocity increase will also reduce the volume of particle clusters in spouted bed with multi-nozzle inlet. By comparing simulation results, the multi-nozzle inlet and special swirl flow design inlet is better than single nozzle inlet for obtaining a more uniform fluidization state, which can disperse the gas to increase the gas–particle contact efficiency. The specially swirl flow design can reduce the accumulation of solid particles close to the wall further, especially at the bottom of the spouted bed. The experimental study should be given to validate the superiority of this newly swirl flow design inlet before the industrial application in the future.

  19. Carbon honeycomb grids for advanced lead-acid batteries. Part III: Technology scale-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchev, A.; Serra, L.; Dumenil, S.; Brichard, G.; Alias, M.; Jammet, B.; Vinit, L.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon honeycomb grid technology employs new carbon/carbon composites with ordered 3D structure instead of the classic lead-acid battery current collectors. The technology is laboratory scaled up from small size grids corresponding to electrodes with a capacity of 3 Ah to current collectors suitable for assembly of lead-acid batteries covering the majority of the typical lead-acid battery applications. Two series of 150 grids each (one positive and one negative) are manufactured using low-cost lab-scale equipment. They are further subjected to pasting with active materials and the resulting battery plates are assembled in 12 V AGM-VLRA battery mono-blocks for laboratory testing and outdoor demonstration in electric scooter replacing its original VRLAB pack. The obtained results demonstrate that the technology can replace successfully the state of the art negative grids with considerable benefits. The use of the carbon honeycomb grids as positive plate current collectors is limited by the anodic corrosion of the entire structure attacking both the carbon/carbon composite part and the electroplated lead-tin alloy coating.

  20. Investigation of flow behaviour of coat/ash particles in an advanced pressurised fluidized bed gasifier (APFBG) using radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge of Residence Time Distribution (RTD), Mean Residence Time (MRT) and degree of backmixing of solid phase is important for efficient operation of the coal gasifier. Radiotracer technique was used for measure RTD of coal/ash particles in a pilot-scale gasifier and obtain the values of MRT and backmixing. Lanthanum 140 labeled coal (100 g) was used as a tracer. The tracer was instantaneously injected into the coal feed line and monitored at ash and gas outlets of the gasifier using collimated scintillation detectors. The measured RTD data were treated and MRTs of coal/ash particles were determined. The treated data were simulated using tank-in-series model. The simulation RTD data indicated good degree of mixing with minor bypassing/short-circulating of coal particles. The results of the investigation were found useful for scale-up of the gasification process. (author)

  1. An integrated health sector response to violence against women in Malaysia: lessons for supporting scale up.

    OpenAIRE

    Colombini Manuela; Mayhew Susannah H; Ali Siti; Shuib Rashidah; Watts Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Malaysia has been at the forefront of the development and scale up of One-Stop Crisis Centres (OSCC) - an integrated health sector model that provides comprehensive care to women and children experiencing physical, emotional and sexual abuse. This study explored the strengths and challenges faced during the scaling up of the OSCC model to two States in Malaysia in order to identify lessons for supporting successful scale-up. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with ...

  2. Eficiência do processo de recobrimento de sementes de brócolos recobertas com polímero em leito de jorro Coating process efficiency for polymer coated broccoli seeds in spouted bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina de Almeida

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, sementes de brócolos foram recobertas em leito de jorro cone-cilíndrico, com suspensão aquosa de hidroxietilcelulose, visando a aprimorar a técnica do recobrimento de sementes, utilizando o processo fluidodinâmico. Foram investigados os efeitos das variáveis operacionais temperatura do ar de jorro, pressão de ar de atomização e vazão de suspensão de recobrimento, na eficiência do processo e na germinação das sementes. Os resultados revelaram que houve influência das variáveis operacionais na eficiência do processo e na germinação. Verificou-se, também, que as sementes recobertas apresentaram de 2 a 10% de umidade a menos que as sementes não-recobertas, quando em ambiente com temperatura controlada e saturado de vapor de água em determinado período.Broccoli seeds were coated in a conical-cylindrical spouted bed with an aqueous suspension of hydroxy ethyl cellulose aiming to improve the seeds coating technique using a fluid-dynamic process. An experimental design was applied to investigate the effects of the operating variables: gas temperature, atomizing air pressure and suspension flow rate on the germination of the seeds and on the process efficiency. Results indicated that the operating variables affect both the coating process efficiency and the germination ability. However, the analysis didn’t identify differences between the germination potential of coated and uncoated seeds. Coated seeds absorbed up to 10 percent less moisture than the uncoated ones, when the environment temperature and humidity were controlled over a period of time.

  3. ContiClean A-H Coated Bed Technology - a new solution to minimise the carryback of conveyed fines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantorek, F. [Contitech (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    A series of 28 overheads/slides reproduced in the proceedings outlines the content of this presentation which describes the development and manufacture of a coated conveyor belt for use in power stations and in the chemical industry or the sand industry for transporting for example, gypsum, ash, and sand. The ContiClean{reg_sign} A-H cleaning system reduces the harshness of cleaning systems by allowing the use of rubber scrapers coated with plastic on one or both sides, preventing caking and friction.

  4. Experimental study and simulation of mass distribution of the covering layer of soybean seeds coated in a spouted bed

    OpenAIRE

    C. R. Duarte; J. L.V. Neto; M. H. Lisboa; Santana, R.C.; M. A. S. Barrozo; V. V. Murata

    2004-01-01

    In previous work, it was observed that the covering of soybean seeds with bacteria and micronutrients enhances vigorous growth of the plant thereby avoiding use of ammoniacal fertilizers. In the spouted bed covering can be done by pulverization of the coater slurry on the soybean seeds using a pneumatic atomizer. The optimum thickness of the cover allows the fundamental gaseous interchanges for germination and provides the ideal conditions for bacterium activity. The objective of this work wa...

  5. Nanolayer biofilm coated on magnetic nanoparticles by using a dielectric barrier discharge glow plasma fluidized bed for immobilizing an antimicrobial peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the monomer of acrylic acid and the novel technique of using a dielectric barrier discharge glow plasma fluidized bed (GPFB), a nanolayer biofilm of polyacrylic acid (PAA) was uniformly coated on the surface of magnetic nickel nanoparticles (NPs). Transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, etc, were used to characterize the modified NPs. The thickness of the biofilm was about 2 nm when the NPs were treated using the GPFB once, and the discharging conditions affected the density of the carboxyl group obviously. The PAA acting as an adhesion layer was used to immobilize the antimicrobial peptide LL-37, to kill the bacteria of Escherichia coli (E. coli), and the results indicated that the modified nickel NPs immobilizing a certain concentration of LL-37 could kill the bacteria effectively.

  6. Analytical Solution of Fick's Law of the TRISO-Coated Fuel Particles and Fuel Elements in Pebble-Bed High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two kinds of approaches are built to solve the fission products diffusion models (Fick's equation) based on sphere fuel particles and sphere fuel elements exactly. Two models for homogenous TRISO-coated fuel particles and fuel elements used in pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactors are presented, respectively. The analytical solution of Fick's equation for fission products diffusion in fuel particles is derived by variables separation. In the fuel element system, a modification of the diffusion coefficient from D to D/r is made to characterize the difference of diffusion rates in distinct areas and it is shown that the Laplace and Hankel transformations are effective as the diffusion coefficient in Fick's equation is dependant on the radius of the fuel element. Both the solutions are useful for the prediction of the fission product behaviors and could be programmed in the corresponding engineering calculations. (general)

  7. Analytical solution of Fick's law of the TRISO-coated fuel particles and fuel elements in pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two kinds of approaches are built to solve the fission products diffusion models (Fick's equation) based on sphere fuel particles and sphere fuel elements exactly. Two models for homogenous TRISO-coated fuel particles and fuel elements used in pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactors are presented, respectively. The analytical solution of Fick's equation for fission products diffusion in fuel particles is derived by variables separation. In the fuel element system, a modification of the diffusion coefficient from D to D/r is made to characterize the difference of diffusion rates in distinct areas and it is shown that the Laplace and Hankel transformations are effective as the diffusion coefficient in Fick's equation is dependant on the radius of the fuel element. Both the solutions are useful for the prediction of the fission product behaviors and could be programmed in the corresponding engineering calculations. (authors)

  8. Analytical Solution of Fick's Law of the TRISO-Coated Fuel Particles and Fuel Elements in Pebble-Bed High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Jian-Zhu; FANG Chao; SUN Li-Feng

    2011-01-01

    T wo kinds of approaches are built to solve the fission products diffusion models (Fick's equation) based on sphere fuel particles and sphere fuel elements exactly. Two models for homogenous TRISO-coated fuel particles and fuel elements used in pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactors are presented, respectively. The analytica,solution of Fick's equation for fission products diffusion in fuel particles is derived by variables separation.In the fuel element system, a modification of the diffusion coefficient from D to D/r is made to characterize the difference of diffusion rates in distinct areas and it is shown that the Laplace and Hankel transformations are effective as the diffusion coefficient in Fick's equation is dependant on the radius of the fuel element. Both the solutions are useful for the prediction of the fission product behaviors and could be programmed in the corresponding engineering calculations.%@@ Two kinds of approaches are built to solve the fission products diffusion models(Fick's equation) based on sphere fuel particles and sphere fuel elements exactly.Two models for homogenous TRISO-coated fuel particles and fuel elements used in pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactors are presented,respectively.The analytical solution of Fick's equation for fission products diffusion in fuel particles is derived by variables separation.In the fuel element system,a modification of the diffusion coefficient from D to D/r is made to characterize the difference of diffusion rates in distinct areas and it is shown that the Laplace and Hankel transformations are effective as the diffusion coefficient in Fick's equation is dependant on the radius of the fuel element.Both the solutions are useful for the prediction of the fission product behaviors and could be programmed in the corresponding engineering calculations.

  9. Scaling up community mobilisation through women's groups for maternal and neonatal health: experiences from rural Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahar Tasmin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Program coverage is likely to be an important determinant of the effectiveness of community interventions to reduce neonatal mortality. Rigorous examination and documentation of methods to scale-up interventions and measure coverage are scarce, however. To address this knowledge gap, this paper describes the process and measurement of scaling-up coverage of a community mobilisation intervention for maternal, child and neonatal health in rural Bangladesh and critiques this real-life experience in relation to available literature on scaling-up. Methods Scale-up activities took place in nine unions in rural Bangladesh. Recruitment and training of those who deliver the intervention, communication and engagement with the community and other stakeholders and active dissemination of intervention activities are described. Process evaluation and population survey data are presented and used to measure coverage and the success of scale-up. Results The intervention was scaled-up from 162 women's groups to 810, representing a five-fold increase in population coverage. The proportion of women of reproductive age and pregnant women who were engaged in the intervention increased from 9% and 3%, respectively, to 23% and 29%. Conclusions Examination and documentation of how scaling-up was successfully initiated, led, managed and monitored in rural Bangladesh provide a deeper knowledge base and valuable lessons. Strong operational capabilities and institutional knowledge of the implementing organisation were critical to the success of scale-up. It was possible to increase community engagement with the intervention without financial incentives and without an increase in managerial staff. Monitoring and feedback systems that allow for periodic programme corrections and continued innovation are central to successful scale-up and require programmatic and operational flexibility.

  10. Methodologies Used for Scaling-up From a Single Energy Production Unit to State Energy Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimdina, Ginta; Timma, Lelde; Veidenbergs, Ivars; Blumberga, Dagnija

    2015-12-01

    In a well-functioning and sustainable national energy sector, each of its elements should function with maximum efficiency. To ensure maximum efficiency and study possible improvement of the sector, a scaling-up framework is presented in this work. The scaling-up framework means that the starting point is a CHP unit and its operation, the next step of aggregation is in a district heating network, followed by a municipal energy plan and finally leading to a low carbon strategy. In this framework the authors argue, that the successful, innovative practices developed and tested at the lower level of aggregation can be then transferred to the upper levels of aggregation, thus leading to a scaling-up effect of innovative practices. The work summarizes 12 methodologies used in the energy sector, by dividing these methodologies among the levels of aggregation in a scaling-up framework.

  11. Radiochemical separation of 90Sr from high level waste: scaled-up studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemical separation of 90Sr was carried out from High Level Waste (HLW) using a combination of different chemical techniques. This paper describes various steps for separation as well as the modifications incorporated during the scaling-up. (author)

  12. A Route to Scale Up DNA Origami Using DNA Tiles as Folding Staples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Zhao; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2010-01-26

    A new strategy is presented to scale up DNA origami using multi-helical DNA tiles as folding staples. Atomic force microscopy images demonstrate the two-dimensional structures formed by using this strategy.

  13. Emerging Freeze-Drying Process Development and Scale-up Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Sajal Manubhai; Pikal, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Although several guidelines do exist for freeze-drying process development and scale-up, there are still a number of issues that require additional attention. The objective of this review article is to discuss some emerging process development and scale-up issue with emphasis on effect of load condition and freeze-drying in novel container systems such as syringes, Lyoguard trays, ampoules, and 96-well plates. Understanding the heat and mass transfer under different load conditions and for fr...

  14. Impacts of the Teach For America Investing in Innovation Scale-Up

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Melissa A.; Eric Isenberg; Albert Y. Liu; Libby Makowsky; Marykate Zukiewicz

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, Teach For America (TFA) launched a major expansion effort, funded in part by a five-year Investing in Innovation (i3) scale-up grant of $50 million from the U.S. Department of Education. This study examines the effectiveness of TFA elementary school teachers in the second year of the scale-up, relative to other teachers in the same grades and schools.

  15. Assessing the Effectiveness of Teach For America's Investing in Innovation Scale-Up

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Melissa A.; Eric Isenberg; Albert Y. Liu; Libby Makowsky; Marykate Zukiewicz

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, Teach For America (TFA) launched a major expansion effort, funded in part by a five-year Investing in Innovation (i3) scale-up grant of $50 million from the U.S. Department of Education. This study examines the effectiveness of TFA elementary school teachers in the second year of the scale-up, relative to other teachers in the same grades and schools.

  16. Rethinking Sustainability, Scaling Up, and Enabling Environment: A Framework for Their Implementation in Drinking Water Supply

    OpenAIRE

    Urooj Q. Amjad; Edema Ojomo; Kristen Downs; Ryan Cronk; Jamie Bartram

    2015-01-01

    The terms sustainability, scaling up, and enabling environment are inconsistently used in implementing water supply projects. To clarify these terms we develop a framework based on Normalization Process Theory, and apply the framework to a hypothetical water supply project in schools. The resulting framework provides guidance on how these terms could be implemented and analyzed in water supply projects. We conclude that effective use of the terms sustainability, scaling up, and enabling envir...

  17. Enabling Environment Assessment for Scaling up Sanitation Programs : East Java, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Andy

    2008-01-01

    The Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) is in the start-up phase of a new Global Scaling up Sanitation Project. The project is applying Total Sanitation and Sanitation Marketing (TSSM) to stimulate and scale up sanitation demand and supply. One of the central objectives of the project is to improve sanitation at a scale sufficient to meet the 2015 sanitation Millennium Development Goal (MDG...

  18. Scaling Up Rural Sanitation : Findings from the Impact Evaluation Baseline Survey in Madhya Pradesh, India

    OpenAIRE

    Salvatore, Alicia L.; Patil, Sumeet R.

    2011-01-01

    In India, Water and Sanitation Program's (WSP's) global scaling up rural sanitation program is supporting the Government of India's (GoI) Total Sanitation Campaign (TSC) in two states: Himachal Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh. TSC is an ambitious countrywide, scaled-up rural sanitation program launched by the GoI in 1999, which seeks to attain an Open Defecation Free (ODF) India by 2012. In con...

  19. Enabling Environment Assessment for Scaling Up Sanitation Programs : Madhya Pradesh, India

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Andy; Raman, Rajiv

    2008-01-01

    The Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) is in the start-up phase of a new Global Scaling up Sanitation Project. The project is applying Total Sanitation and Sanitation Marketing (TSSM) to stimulate and scale up sanitation demand and supply. One of the central objectives of the project is to improve sanitation at a scale sufficient to meet the 2015 sanitation Millennium Development Goal (MDG...

  20. Scale-up analysis and critical issues of an experimental pilot plant for edible film production using agricultural waste processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Sarghini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was developed to test a multifunctional experimental pilot plant with a reduced environmental impact that is able to process agricultural (fennel and food production (liquid whey waste. The pilot plant, using different thermal and filtration process parameters, is able to recover pectin and whey proteins in a single processing unit in order to produce edible films. An innovative feature of the proposed configuration is related to the possibility of coupling different types of waste treatment, obtaining a final product with a higher economical value, combining the two processing lines. Although an edible film production procedure based on pectin extracted from fennel matrix and whey proteins has already been published in literature, the scale-up process highlighted several critical issues, in particular related to the fennel matrix. Nonetheless, the pilot plant configuration allowed an edible film to be produced that is suitable for use as a direct coating to improve the shelf-life of food products.

  1. Particle fuel bed tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas-cooled reactors, using packed beds of small diameter coated fuel particles have been proposed for compact, high-power systems. The particulate fuel used in the tests was 800 microns in diameter, consisting of a thoria kernel coated with 200 microns of pyrocarbon. Typically, the bed of fuel particles was contained in a ceramic cylinder with porous metallic frits at each end. A dc voltage was applied to the metallic frits and the resulting electric current heated the bed. Heat was removed by passing coolant (helium or hydrogen) through the bed. Candidate frit materials, rhenium, nickel, zirconium carbide, and zirconium oxide were unaffected, while tungsten and tungsten-rhenium lost weight and strength. Zirconium-carbide particles were tested at 2000 K in H2 for 12 hours with no visible reaction or weight loss

  2. Scale-up approach for industrial plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition processes and SiOx thin film technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high efficiency, large area deposition process was developed for silicon oxide films using a scale-up of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) with an additional modified electrode design. We constructed an advanced plasma source by modifying an 8 in. electrode used in small-scale PECVD into a 370 × 470 mm electrode for large area PECVD. The effect of the modified electrode design on the large area and the mechanical properties of the silicon oxide films produced from the setup were examined. Dissociation of octamethylycyclodisiloxane (OMCTS) precursor was controlled by the plasma processing parameters. SiOx films were deposited on polycarbonate substrates by PECVD using OMCTS and oxygen carrier gas. The uniformity of the SiOx film and the mechanical properties were improved by the modified PECVD system design. The plasma was analyzed by optical emission spectroscopy. In addition, we measured the neutral radicals in the plasma by a residual gas analyzer. The mechanical properties of the coatings were examined using a nano-indenter and pencil hardness measurements. The chemical properties of the coatings were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The uniformity and film properties of the SiOx films were controlled by the dissociation of OMCTS using the appropriate intensity of excited neutrals, ionized atoms and input power with RF bias. - Highlights: • SiOx thin films synthesized using scale-up PECVD. • Large area deposition process was developed by modified electrode. • Plasma process enables high mechanical properties (Hardness 8H and 6.93 GPa)

  3. A new scale-up approach for dispersive mixing in twin-screw compounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Graeme; Bigio, David I.; Andersen, Paul; Wetzel, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Scale-up rules in polymer processing are critical in ensuring consistency in product quality and properties when transitioning from low volume laboratory mixing processes to high volume industrial compounding. The scale-up approach investigated in this study evaluates the processes with respect to dispersive mixing. Demand of polymer composites with solid additives, such as carbon microfibers and nanotubes, has become increasingly popular. Dispersive mixing breaks down particles that agglomerate, which is paramount in processing composites because solid additives tend to collect and clump. The amount of stress imparted on the material governs the degree of dispersive mixing. A methodology has been developed to characterize the Residence Stress Distribution (RSD) within a twin-screw extruder in real time through the use of polymeric stress beads. Through this technique, certain mixing scale-up rules can be analyzed. The following research investigated two different scale-up rules. The industry standard for mixing scale-up takes the ratio of outer diameters cubed to convert the volumetric flow rate from the smaller process to a flow rate appropriate in the larger machine. This procedure then resolves both operating conditions since shear rate remains constant. The second rule studied is based on percent drag flow, or the fraction of pumping potential, for different elements along the screw configuration. The percent drag flow rule aims to bring greater focus to operating conditions when scaling-up with respect to dispersive mixing. Through the use of the RSD methodology and a Design of Experiment (DOE) approach, rigorous statistical analysis was used to determine the validity between the scale-up rules of argument.

  4. Preparation and scale up of extended-release tablets of bromopride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Neves Ferreira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Reproducibility of the tablet manufacturing process and control of its pharmaceutics properties depends on the optimization of formulation aspects and process parameters. Computer simulation such as Design of Experiments (DOE can be used to scale up the production of this formulation, in particular for obtaining sustained-release tablets. Bromopride formulations are marketed in the form of extended-release pellets, which makes the product more expensive and difficult to manufacture. The aim of this study was to formulate new bromopride sustained release formulations as tablets, and to develop mathematical models to standardize the scale up of this formulation, controlling weight and hardness of the tablets during manufacture according to the USP 34th edition. DOE studies were conducted using Minitab(tm software. Different excipient combinations were evaluated in order to produce bromopride sustained-release matrix tablets. In the scale-up study, data were collected and variations in tableting machine parameters were measured. Data were processed by Minitab(tm software, generating mathematical equations used for prediction of powder compaction behavior, according to the settings of the tableting machine suitable for scale-up purposes. Bromopride matrix tablets with appropriate characteristics for sustained release were developed. The scale-up of the formulation with the most suitable sustained release profile was established by using mathematical models, indicating that the formulation can be a substitute for the pellets currently marketed.

  5. Operation of a fluidized-bed denitrification bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P.A.

    1978-11-15

    In the fluidized-bed denitrification process developed, bacteria are allowed to grow and attach themselves to 0.25 to 0.60-mm-OD coal particles, and nitrate-containing solution is pumped up through the column at a velocity sufficient to fluidize the bacteria-coated coal particles. The denitrification bacteria convert the nitrate ions to nitrogen gas. A 10-cm-ID column has been operated by Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant personnel to test the scale-up and operational characteristics of the fluidized bed process. The reactor consists of a tapered bottom section for flow distribution, several straight 10-cm-ID cylindrical sections, and a tapered top section for solid/liquid disengaging. Increasing the diameter of the reactor by a factor of two did not cause any decrease in reactor performance. The fluidized-bed reactor is characterized by short-residence-time requirements (about 2 minutes per meter of height), and by high, but variable, denitrification rates (2 to 35 g NO/sub 3//sup -/-N/dm/sup 3//day). The reactor is best suited for relatively low-concentration nitrate wastes (<1 wt% NO/sub 3//sup -/). The economics of using the reactor for high-concentration wastes (>20 wt% NO/sub 3//sup -/) is less favorable, but still may be competitive with other reactor types. 9 figs, 2 tables.

  6. Simulation and Scale-up of Barium Sulphate Precipitation Process Using CFD Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚俊波; 卫宏远; 王静康; JohnGarsideb

    2005-01-01

    Some empirical mixing models were used to describe the imperfect mixing in precipitation process.However, the models can not, in general, reflect the details of interactions between mixing and crystallization in a vessel. In this study, CFD (computational fluid dynamics) technique were developed by simulating the precipitation of barium sulphate in stirred tanks by integration of population balance equations with a CFD solver. Two typical impellers, Rushton and pitched blade turbines, were employed for agitation. The influence of feed concentration and position on crystal product properties was investigated by CFD simulation. The scale-up of these precipitators was systematically studied. Significant effect on the crystal properties was found for the scale-up under some conditions.Keywords simulation, scale up, precipitation, CFD(computational fluid dynamics)

  7. Enabling and challenging factors in institutional reform: The case of SCALE-UP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Kathleen; Knaub, Alexis; Henderson, Charles; Dancy, Melissa; Beichner, Robert J.

    2016-06-01

    While many innovative teaching strategies exist, integration into undergraduate science teaching has been frustratingly slow. This study aims to understand the low uptake of research-based instructional innovations by studying 21 successful implementations of the Student Centered Active Learning with Upside-down Pedagogies (SCALE-UP) instructional reform. SCALE-UP significantly restructures the classroom environment and pedagogy to promote highly active and interactive instruction. Although originally designed for university introductory physics courses, SCALE-UP has spread to many other disciplines at hundreds of departments around the world. This study reports findings from in-depth, open-ended interviews with 21 key contact people involved with successful secondary implementations of SCALE-UP throughout the United States. We defined successful implementations as those who restructured their pedagogy and classroom and sustained and/or spread the change. Interviews were coded to identify the most common enabling and challenging factors during reform implementation and compared to the theoretical framework of Kotter's 8-step Change Model. The most common enabling influences that emerged are documenting and leveraging evidence of local success, administrative support, interaction with outside SCALE-UP user(s), and funding. Many challenges are linked to the lack of these enabling factors including difficulty finding funding, space, and administrative and/or faculty support for reform. Our focus on successful secondary implementations meant that most interviewees were able to overcome challenges. Presentation of results is illuminated with case studies, quotes, and examples that can help secondary implementers with SCALE-UP reform efforts specifically. We also discuss the implications for policy makers, researchers, and the higher education community concerned with initiating structural change.

  8. Costs and impacts of scaling up voluntary medical male circumcision in Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena Menon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given the proven effectiveness of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC in preventing the spread of HIV, Tanzania is scaling up VMMC as an HIV prevention strategy. This study will inform policymakers about the potential costs and benefits of scaling up VMMC services in Tanzania. METHODOLOGY: The analysis first assessed the unit costs of delivering VMMC at the facility level in three regions-Iringa, Kagera, and Mbeya-via three currently used VMMC service delivery models (routine, campaign, and mobile/island outreach. Subsequently, using these unit cost data estimates, the study used the Decision Makers' Program Planning Tool (DMPPT to estimate the costs and impact of a scaled-up VMMC program. RESULTS: Increasing VMMC could substantially reduce HIV infection. Scaling up adult VMMC to reach 87.9% coverage by 2015 would avert nearly 23,000 new adult HIV infections through 2015 and an additional 167,500 from 2016 through 2025-at an additional cost of US$253.7 million through 2015 and US$302.3 million from 2016 through 2025. Average cost per HIV infection averted would be US$11,300 during 2010-2015 and US$3,200 during 2010-2025. Scaling up VMMC in Tanzania will yield significant net benefits (benefits of treatment costs averted minus the cost of performing circumcisions in the long run-around US$4,200 in net benefits for each infection averted. CONCLUSION: VMMC could have an immediate impact on HIV transmission, but the full impact on prevalence and deaths will only be apparent in the longer term because VMMC averts infections some years into the future among people who have been circumcised. Given the health and economic benefits of investing in VMMC, the scale-up of services should continue to be a central component of the national HIV prevention strategy in Tanzania.

  9. How Data Volume Affects Spark Based Data Analytics on a Scale-up Server

    OpenAIRE

    Awan, Ahsan Javed; Brorsson, Mats; Vlassov, Vladimir; Ayguade, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Sheer increase in volume of data over the last decade has triggered research in cluster computing frameworks that enable web enterprises to extract big insights from big data. While Apache Spark is gaining popularity for exhibiting superior scale-out performance on the commodity machines, the impact of data volume on the performance of Spark based data analytics in scale-up configuration is not well understood. We present a deep-dive analysis of Spark based applications on a large scale-up se...

  10. Scale-up of dextransucrase production by Leuconostoc mesenteroides in fed batch fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelena Georgina L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Fed batch fermentation was carried out for the dextransucrase enzyme production from Leuconostoc mesenteroides and the production was scale-up using oxygen transfer criteriuom. It was found that in 5 L vessel fermentation capacity, the best agitation speed was 225 min-1 and aeration rate was 0.15 vvm, obtaining dextransucrase activity of 127 DSU/mL.. The maximum enzyme production velocity coincide with the maximum growth velocity between 6 and 7 h of fermentation, which confirmed that dextransucrase production was associated with microbial growth. High enzyme yields were achieved during scale up based on oxygen transfer rate.

  11. Implementation of the Teach For America Investing in Innovation Scale-Up

    OpenAIRE

    Marykate Zukiewicz; Clark, Melissa A.; Libby Makowsky

    2015-01-01

    Teach For America (TFA) is a nonprofit organization that seeks to improve educational opportunities for disadvantaged students by recruiting and training teachers to work in low-income schools. In 2010, TFA launched a major expansion effort, funded in part by a five-year Investing in Innovation (i3) Scale-Up grant of $50 million from the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Innovation and Improvement. This report examines TFA’s implementation of the i3 scale-up in the first and second...

  12. Modeling heat efficiency, flow and scale-up in the corotating disc scraped surface heat exchanger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Alan; Szabo, Peter; Karlson, Torben

    2002-01-01

    A comparison of two different scale corotating disc scraped surface heat exchangers (CDHE) was performed experimentally. The findings were compared to predictions from a finite element model. We find that the model predicts well the flow pattern of the two CDHE's investigated. The heat transfer...... performance predicted by the model agrees well with experimental observations for the laboratory scale CDHE whereas the overall heat transfer in the scaled-up version was not in equally good agreement. The lack of the model to predict the heat transfer performance in scale-up leads us to identify the key...

  13. Physical mass transfer model and scale-up design procedure for aerobic bioreactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scale-up design procedure based on new physical mass transfer model aerobic bioreactors in developed. This scale-up procedure can be used to determine the disc surface area needed to prevent an oxygen limitation or to obtain a specific degree of treatment. In contrast to the empirical and earliest rotating biological contactors performance model, a major advantage of the physical mass transfer model design is the prediction of the onset of oxygen limiting conditions since it accounts for the fact that low dissolved oxygen concentrations can limit the growth rate of the attached microorganisms. (author)

  14. Particle motion in fluidised beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas fluidised beds are important components in many process industries, e.g. coal combustors and granulators, but not much is known about the movement of the solids. Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) enables the movement of a single, radioactive tracer particle to be followed rapidly and faithfully. Experiments were carried out in columns sized between 70 and 240mm. diameter, operating in the bubbling regime at ambient process conditions using particles of group B and D (Geldart Classification). Particle motion was tracked and the data applied to models for particle movement at the gas distributor as well as close to other surfaces and to models for particle circulation in beds of cohesive particles. In the light of these data, models for particle and bubble interaction, particle circulation, segregation, attrition, erosion, heat transfer and fluidised bed scale-up rules were reassessed. Particle motion is directly caused by bubble motion, and their velocities were found to be equal for particles travelling in a bubble. PEPT enables particle circulation to be measured, giving a more accurate correlation for future predictions. Particle motion follows the scale-up rules based on similarities of the bubble motion in the bed. A new group of parameters was identified controlling the amount of attrition in fluidised beds and a new model to predict attrition is proposed. (author)

  15. Applying UPC Scaling-Up Methodology to the LSTF-PKL Counterpart Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Martinez-Quiroga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the nodalization qualification process and quality guarantee procedures and following the guidelines of Kv-scaled analysis and UMAE methodology, further development has been performed by UPC team resulting in a scaling-up methodology. Such methodology has been applied in this paper for analyzing discrepancies that appear between the simulations of two counterpart tests. It allows the analysis of scaling-down criterion used for the design of an ITF and also the investigation of the differences of configuration between an ITF and a particular NPP. For analyzing both, it applies two concepts “scaled-up nodalizations” and “hybrid nodalizations.” The result of this activity is the explanation of appeared distortions and its final goal is to qualify nodalizations for their use in the analysis of equivalent scenarios at an NPP scale. In this sense, the experimental data obtained in the OECD/NEA PKL-2 and ROSA-2 projects as counterpart test are of a great value for the testing of the present methodology. The results of the posttest calculations of LSTF-PKL counterpart tests have allowed the analyst to define which phenomena could be well reproduced by their nodalizations and which not, in this way establishing the basis for a future extrapolation to an NPP scaled calculation. The application of the UPC scaling up methodology has demonstrated that selected phenomena can be scaled-up and explained between counterpart simulations by carefully considering the differences in scale and design.

  16. Enabling Environment Assessment and Baseline for Scaling Up Handwashing Programs : Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Cogswell, Lynne; Anh Thu, Le Thi

    2008-01-01

    To follow up country work supported by the Public-Private Partnership for Handwashing (PPPHW), the World Bank Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) received funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to support projects to scale up the promotion of handwashing with soap (HWWS) in Peru, Senegal, Tanzania, and Vietnam. The major project objectives of the Handwashing Initiative are: a) inc...

  17. Tank 18-F And 19-F Tank Fill Grout Scale Up Test Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-level waste (HLW) tanks 18-F and 19-F have been isolated from FTF facilities. To complete operational closure the tanks will be filled with grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways to residual waste, (3) entombing waste removal equipment, (4) discouraging future intrusion, and (5) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to control speciation and solubility of select radionuclides. This report documents the results of a four cubic yard bulk fill scale up test on the grout formulation recommended for filling Tanks 18-F and 19-F. Details of the scale up test are provided in a Test Plan. The work was authorized under a Technical Task Request (TTR), HLE-TTR-2011-008, and was performed according to Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00587. The bulk fill scale up test described in this report was intended to demonstrate proportioning, mixing, and transportation, of material produced in a full scale ready mix concrete batch plant. In addition, the material produced for the scale up test was characterized with respect to fresh properties, thermal properties, and compressive strength as a function of curing time.

  18. Analysis and Improvement of a Scaled-Up and Stacked Microbial Fuel Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, A.J.G.; Heijne, ter A.; Saakes, M.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2009-01-01

    Scaling up microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is inevitable when power outputs have to be obtained that can power electrical devices other than small sensors. This research has used a bipolar plate MFC stack of four cells with a total working volume of 20 L and a total membrane surface area of 2 m2. The ca

  19. Scaling up adsorption media reactors for copper removal with the aid of dimensionless numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Houmann, Cameron; Wanielista, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Adsorption media may be used to sorb copper in an aquatic environment for pollution control. Effective design of adsorption media reactors is highly dependent on selection of the hydraulic residence time when scaling up a pilot-scale reactor to a field-scale reactor. This paper seeks to improve scaling-up technique of the reactor design process through the use of the Damköhler and Péclet numbers via a dimensional analysis. A new scaling-up theory is developed in this study through a joint consideration of the Damköhler and Péclet numbers for a constant media particle size such that a balance between transport control and reaction control can be harmonized. A series of column breakthrough tests at varying hydraulic residence times revealed a clear peak adsorption capacity at a Damköhler number of 2.74. The Péclet numbers for the column breakthrough tests indicated that mechanical dispersion is an important effect that requires further consideration in the scaling-up process. However, perfect similitude of the Damköhler number cannot be maintained for a constant media particle size, and relaxation of hydrodynamic similitude through variation of the Péclet number must occur. PMID:26454119

  20. Global Scaling Up Handwashing Project : Involving Men in Handwashing Behavior Change Interventions in Senegal

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2010-01-01

    Launched in December 2006, the Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) Global Scaling up Handwashing Project has been implemented by local and National governments in Peru, Senegal, Tanzania, and Vietnam, with technical support from WSP. A central component of the handwashing project is the planning and implementation of an integrated communications program that includes mass media at national ...

  1. Enabling and Challenging Factors in Institutional Reform: The Case of SCALE-UP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Kathleen; Knaub, Alexis; Henderson, Charles; Dancy, Melissa; Beichner, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    While many innovative teaching strategies exist, integration into undergraduate science teaching has been frustratingly slow. This study aims to understand the low uptake of research-based instructional innovations by studying 21 successful implementations of the Student Centered Active Learning with Upside-down Pedagogies (SCALE-UP) instructional…

  2. "Scaling Up" Educational Change: Some Musings on Misrecognition and Doxic Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Pat

    2014-01-01

    Educational policy-makers around the world are strongly committed to the notion of "scaling up". This can mean anything from encouraging more teachers to take up a pedagogical innovation, all the way through to system-wide efforts to implement "what works" across all schools. In this paper, I use Bourdieu's notions of…

  3. 77 FR 18216 - Applications for New Awards; Investing in Innovation Fund, Scale-Up Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... assessments that measure students' progress toward college- and career-readiness, including curricular and... FR 11087) and is available at http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-02-24/pdf/2012-4357.pdf . Scale-up... limited funding to increase the likelihood that the work of successful projects endures and expands...

  4. An efficient permeability scaling-up technique applied to the discretized flow equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urgelli, D.; Ding, Yu [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

    1997-08-01

    Grid-block permeability scaling-up for numerical reservoir simulations has been discussed for a long time in the literature. It is now recognized that a full permeability tensor is needed to get an accurate reservoir description at large scale. However, two major difficulties are encountered: (1) grid-block permeability cannot be properly defined because it depends on boundary conditions; (2) discretization of flow equations with a full permeability tensor is not straightforward and little work has been done on this subject. In this paper, we propose a new method, which allows us to get around both difficulties. As the two major problems are closely related, a global approach will preserve the accuracy. So, in the proposed method, the permeability up-scaling technique is integrated in the discretized numerical scheme for flow simulation. The permeability is scaled-up via the transmissibility term, in accordance with the fluid flow calculation in the numerical scheme. A finite-volume scheme is particularly studied, and the transmissibility scaling-up technique for this scheme is presented. Some numerical examples are tested for flow simulation. This new method is compared with some published numerical schemes for full permeability tensor discretization where the full permeability tensor is scaled-up through various techniques. Comparing the results with fine grid simulations shows that the new method is more accurate and more efficient.

  5. Mexico : New Technology-Enabled Channels to Scale Up Financial Access

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund; World Bank

    2013-01-01

    This is a technical note for the 2011 the Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) carried out in Mexico. The focus of this document is the new technology-enabled channels to scale up financial access being employed. Key issues such as a pro-inclusion policy environment and harnessing technology for financial inclusion are discussed. Issues relevant to enabling policy framework, such as ...

  6. TANK 18-F AND 19-F TANK FILL GROUT SCALE UP TEST SUMMARY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2012-01-03

    High-level waste (HLW) tanks 18-F and 19-F have been isolated from FTF facilities. To complete operational closure the tanks will be filled with grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways to residual waste, (3) entombing waste removal equipment, (4) discouraging future intrusion, and (5) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to control speciation and solubility of select radionuclides. This report documents the results of a four cubic yard bulk fill scale up test on the grout formulation recommended for filling Tanks 18-F and 19-F. Details of the scale up test are provided in a Test Plan. The work was authorized under a Technical Task Request (TTR), HLE-TTR-2011-008, and was performed according to Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00587. The bulk fill scale up test described in this report was intended to demonstrate proportioning, mixing, and transportation, of material produced in a full scale ready mix concrete batch plant. In addition, the material produced for the scale up test was characterized with respect to fresh properties, thermal properties, and compressive strength as a function of curing time.

  7. Scaling up community mobilisation through women's groups for maternal and neonatal health: Experiences from rural Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Nahar (Tasmin); K. Azad (Kishwar); B.H. Aumon (Bedowra Haq); L. Younes (Layla); S. Shaha (Sanjit); A. Kuddus (Abdul); A. Prost (Audrey); A.J. Houweling (Tanja); A. Costello (Anthony); E. Fottrell (Edward)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Program coverage is likely to be an important determinant of the effectiveness of community interventions to reduce neonatal mortality. Rigorous examination and documentation of methods to scale-up interventions and measure coverage are scarce, however. To address this knowle

  8. Introduction to SCALE-UP: Student-Centered Activities for Large Enrollment University Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beichner, Robert J.; Saul, Jeffery M.; Allain, Rhett J.; Deardorff, Duane L.; Abbott, David S.

    SCALE-UP is an extension of the highly successful IMPEC (Integrated Math, Physics, Engineering, and Chemistry) project, one of North Carolina State's curricular reform efforts undertaken as part of the SUCCEED coalition. The authors utilize the interactive, collaboratively based instruction that worked well in smaller class settings and find ways…

  9. Scaling up diarrhea prevention and treatment interventions: a Lives Saved Tool analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa L Fischer Walker

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diarrhea remains a leading cause of mortality among young children in low- and middle-income countries. Although the evidence for individual diarrhea prevention and treatment interventions is solid, the effect a comprehensive scale-up effort would have on diarrhea mortality has not been estimated. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We use the Lives Saved Tool (LiST to estimate the potential lives saved if two scale-up scenarios for key diarrhea interventions (oral rehydration salts [ORS], zinc, antibiotics for dysentery, rotavirus vaccine, vitamin A supplementation, basic water, sanitation, hygiene, and breastfeeding were implemented in the 68 high child mortality countries. We also conduct a simple costing exercise to estimate cost per capita and total costs for each scale-up scenario. Under the ambitious (feasible improvement in coverage of all interventions and universal (assumes near 100% coverage of all interventions scale-up scenarios, we demonstrate that diarrhea mortality can be reduced by 78% and 92%, respectively. With universal coverage nearly 5 million diarrheal deaths could be averted during the 5-year scale-up period for an additional cost of US$12.5 billion invested across 68 priority countries for individual-level prevention and treatment interventions, and an additional US$84.8 billion would be required for the addition of all water and sanitation interventions. CONCLUSION: Using currently available interventions, we demonstrate that with improved coverage, diarrheal deaths can be drastically reduced. If delivery strategy bottlenecks can be overcome and the international community can collectively deliver on the key strategies outlined in these scenarios, we will be one step closer to achieving success for the United Nations' Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG4 by 2015.

  10. Scaling-up voluntary medical male circumcision - what have we learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledikwe, Jenny H; Nyanga, Robert O; Hagon, Jaclyn; Grignon, Jessica S; Mpofu, Mulamuli; Semo, Bazghina-Werq

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the joint United Nations agency program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) recommended voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) as an add-on strategy for HIV prevention. Fourteen priority countries were tasked with scaling-up VMMC services to 80% of HIV-negative men aged 15-49 years by 2016, representing a combined target of 20 million circumcisions. By December 2012, approximately 3 million procedures had been conducted. Within the following year, there was marked improvement in the pace of the scale-up. During 2013, the total number of circumcisions performed nearly doubled, with approximately 6 million total circumcisions conducted by the end of the year, reaching 30% of the initial target. The purpose of this review article was to apply a systems thinking approach, using the WHO health systems building blocks as a framework to examine the factors influencing the scale-up of the VMMC programs from 2008-2013. Facilitators that accelerated the VMMC program scale-up included: country ownership; sustained political will; service delivery efficiencies, such as task shifting and task sharing; use of outreach and mobile services; disposable, prepackaged VMMC kits; external funding; and a standardized set of indicators for VMMC. A low demand for the procedure has been a major barrier to achieving circumcision targets, while weak supply chain management systems and the lack of adequate financial resources with a heavy reliance on donor support have also adversely affected scale-up. Health systems strengthening initiatives and innovations have progressively improved VMMC service delivery, but an understanding of the contextual barriers and the facilitators of demand for the procedure is critical in reaching targets. There is a need for countries implementing VMMC programs to share their experiences more frequently to identify and to enhance best practices by other programs. PMID:25336991

  11. 复合肥喷涂包裹尿素转鼓流化床试验装置的设计%Design of Experimental Unit of Rotary Drum Fluidization Bed for Spray Coating Urea with Compound Fertilizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石学勇; 王金铭; 王金刚

    2014-01-01

    Because rotary drum fluidization bed technology has advantages of low power consumption, good spraying effect, high product quality, compaction of equipment, great production capacity, and low investment, therefore, rotary drum fluidization bed process is chosen for spray coating urea with compound fertilizer experiment.The process calculation of rotary drum fluidization bed used in experiment is introduced, through calculating of heat balance and selection of major equipments, such as fluidization fan, rotary drum for coating, and spray nozzle, etc., the design of experimental unit is completed.%转鼓流化床技术具有动力消耗低、喷涂效果好、产品质量高、设备紧凑、生产能力大、投资低等诸多优势,为此,复合肥喷涂包裹尿素试验选定转鼓流化床工艺。介绍了试验所用转鼓流化床的工艺计算,通过热量衡算和对流化风机、包裹滚筒、喷头等主要设备的选型,完成了试验装置的设计。

  12. Scale-up and economic analysis of biodiesel production from municipal primary sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkiewicz, Magdalena; Torres, Carmen M; Jiménez, Laureano; Font, Josep; Bengoa, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    Municipal wastewater sludge is a promising lipid feedstock for biodiesel production, but the need to eliminate the high water content before lipid extraction is the main limitation for scaling up. This study evaluates the economic feasibility of biodiesel production directly from liquid primary sludge based on experimental data at laboratory scale. Computational tools were used for the modelling of the process scale-up and the different configurations of lipid extraction to optimise this step, as it is the most expensive. The operational variables with a major influence in the cost were the extraction time and the amount of solvent. The optimised extraction process had a break-even price of biodiesel of 1232 $/t, being economically competitive with the current cost of fossil diesel. The proposed biodiesel production process from waste sludge eliminates the expensive step of sludge drying, lowering the biodiesel price. PMID:27131292

  13. Scaled-up dual anode/cathode microbial fuel cell stack for actual ethanolamine wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Byung-Min; Heo, Yoon; Maitlo, Hubdar-Ali; Park, Joo-Yang

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this work was to develop the scale-up microbial fuel cell technology for actual ethanolamine wastewater treatment, dual anode/cathode MFC stacks connected in series to achieve any desired current, treatment capacity, and volume capacity. However, after feeding actual wastewater into the MFC, maximum power density decreased while the corresponding internal resistance increased. With continuous electricity production, a stack of eight MFCs in series achieved 96.05% of COD removal and 97.30% of ammonia removal at a flow rate of 15.98L/d (HRT 12h). The scaled-up dual anode/cathode MFC stack system in this research was demonstrated to treat actual ETA wastewater with the added benefit of harvesting electricity energy. PMID:26888335

  14. Pore-Water Extraction Scale-Up Study for the SX Tank Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Last, George V.; Lanigan, David C.

    2013-01-15

    The phenomena related to pore-water extraction from unsaturated sediments have been previously examined with limited laboratory experiments and numerical modeling. However, key scale-up issues have not yet been addressed. Laboratory experiments and numerical modeling were conducted to specifically examine pore-water extraction for sediment conditions relevant to the vadose zone beneath the SX Tank Farm at Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Available SX Tank Farm data were evaluated to generate a conceptual model of the subsurface for a targeted pore-water extraction application in areas with elevated moisture and Tc-99 concentration. The hydraulic properties of the types of porous media representative of the SX Tank Farm target application were determined using sediment mixtures prepared in the laboratory based on available borehole sediment particle size data. Numerical modeling was used as an evaluation tool for scale-up of pore-water extraction for targeted field applications.

  15. Voluntary medical male circumcision: an introduction to the cost, impact, and challenges of accelerated scaling up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Hankins

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Scaling up voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC for HIV prevention is cost saving and creates fiscal space in the future that otherwise would have been encumbered by antiretroviral treatment costs. An investment of US$1,500,000,000 between 2011 and 2015 to achieve 80% coverage in 13 priority countries in southern and eastern Africa will result in net savings of US$16,500,000,000. Strong political leadership, country ownership, and stakeholder engagement, along with effective demand creation, community mobilisation, and human resource deployment, are essential. This collection of articles on determining the cost and impact of VMMC for HIV prevention signposts the way forward to scaling up VMMC service delivery safely and efficiently to reap individual- and population-level benefits.

  16. Scale effects and scaling-up by geometric-optical model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This is a follow-up paper to our "Scale effect of Planck's law over nonisothermal blackbody surface".More examples are used to describe the scale effect in detail,and the scaling-up of Planck law over blackbody surface is further extended to three-dimension nonisothermal surface.This scaling-up results in a conceptual model for the directionality and spectral signature of thermal radiation at the scale of remote sensing pixels.This new model is also an improvement of Li-Strahler-Friedl conceptual model in a sense that the new model needs only statistic parameters at the pixel scale,without request of sub-pixel scale parameters as the LSF model does.

  17. Scale effects and scaling-up by geometric-optical model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小文; 王锦地; A.H.Strahler

    2000-01-01

    This is a follow-up paper to our "Scale effect of Planck’s law over nonisothermal blackbody surface". More examples are used to describe the scale effect in detail, and the scaling-up of Planck law over blackbody surface is further extended to three-dimension nonisothermal surface. This scaling-up results in a conceptual model for the directionality and spectral signature of thermal radiation at the scale of remote sensing pixels. This new model is also an improvement of Li-Strahler-Friedl conceptual model in a sense that the new model needs only statistic parameters at the pixel scale, without request of sub-pixel scale parameters as the LSF model does.

  18. Pretreatment optimization of Sorghum pioneer biomass for bioethanol production and its scale-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koradiya, Manoj; Duggirala, Srinivas; Tipre, Devayani; Dave, Shailesh

    2016-01-01

    Based on one parameter at a time, saccharification of delignified sorghum biomass by 4% and 70% v/v sulfuric acid resulted in maximum 30.8 and 33.8 g% sugar production from biomass respectively. The Box Behnken Design was applied for further optimization of acid hydrolysis. As a result of the designed experiment 36.3g% sugar production was achieved when 3% v/v H2SO4 treatment given for 60 min at 180°C. The process was scaled-up to treat 2 kg of biomass. During the screening of yeast cultures, isolate C, MK-I and N were found to be potent ethanol producers from sorghum hydrolyzate. Culture MK-I was the best so used for scale up of ethanol production up to 25 L capacity, which gave a yield of 0.49 g ethanol/g sugar from hydrolyzate obtained from 2 kg of sorghum biomass. PMID:26384087

  19. DS-MLR: Exploiting Double Separability for Scaling up Distributed Multinomial Logistic Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Raman, Parameswaran; Matsushima, Shin; ZHANG, XINHUA; Yun, Hyokun; Vishwanathan, S. V. N.

    2016-01-01

    Multinomial logistic regression is a popular tool in the arsenal of machine learning algorithms, yet scaling it to datasets with very large number of data points and classes has not been trivial. This is primarily because one needs to compute the log-partition function on every data point. This makes distributing the computation hard. In this paper, we present a distributed stochastic gradient descent based optimization method (DS-MLR) for scaling up multinomial logistic regression problems t...

  20. Reallocating risks and returns to scale up adoption of distributed electricity resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deployment of distributed electricity resources requires bringing together assets that belong to diverse and geographically diffuse owners. Using the example of distributed solar PV, we analyze the schemes used to encourage/induce owners of distributed assets to make them available for electricity generation. The dominant model in the U.S. is long term power purchase agreements (PPA) offered to owners/consumers by solar developers. We show that these agreements (mis)allocate the electricity price risk to owners/consumers and impose limitations on the scale up of distributed solar. By proper use of financial markets it is possible to shift the electricity price risk from owners/consumers to parties that are better positioned to manage it. The proposed contracts simplify the adoption decision for owners/consumers and can lead to a wider adoption. Removing barriers to scale up requires (i) eliminating the tight coupling between consumers and owners and (ii) rewarding the owners unambiguously for the assets they provide. These necessitate the transformation of the current intermediary firms into full-fledged distributed generators. We discuss the implications of such a transformation and argue that the broad outline of our analysis can be used to assess scale up schemes in other domains of distributed electricity resources as well. - Highlights: • We analyze schemes used to induce owners of distributed assets to make them available for electricity generation. • We show that power purchase agreements used in solar PV “misallocate” electricity price risk to owners/consumers. • We propose new contracts forms that shift price risk from consumers to parties that are better able to manage it. • Full-fledged distributed generators are created by unambiguously rewarding owners and de-coupling consumption/ownership. • We argue that our analysis can be used to assess scale up schemes in other domains of distributed electricity resources

  1. Scale-up of the production of highly reactive biogenic magnetite nanoparticles using Geobacter sulfurreducens

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, J M; Muhamadali, H.; Coker, V. S.; Cooper, J.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Although there are numerous examples of large-scale commercial microbial synthesis routes for organic bioproducts, few studies have addressed the obvious potential for microbial systems to produce inorganic functional biomaterials at scale. Here we address this by focusing on the production of nanoscale biomagnetite particles by the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens, which was scaled up successfully from laboratory- to pilot plant-scale production, while maintaining the surf...

  2. Scaling-up Local Development Initiatives: Brazil?s Food Procurement Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan Nehring; Ben McKay

    2013-01-01

    Brazil aims to eradicate extreme poverty in the country by scaling-up policy initiatives for ?productive inclusion? and incorporating all extreme poor households into the country?s non-contributory social protection scheme. Brasil sem Miséria (Brazil without Misery), targets the Brazilian population living below the extreme poverty line of R$70 (US$35) a month? approximately 16.2 million people (Gov. of Brazil, 2012). According to the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE) alm...

  3. Scaling up functional traits for ecosystem services with remote sensing: concepts and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelleira Martínez, Oscar J; Fremier, Alexander K; Günter, Sven; Ramos Bendaña, Zayra; Vierling, Lee; Galbraith, Sara M; Bosque-Pérez, Nilsa A; Ordoñez, Jenny C

    2016-07-01

    Ecosystem service-based management requires an accurate understanding of how human modification influences ecosystem processes and these relationships are most accurate when based on functional traits. Although trait variation is typically sampled at local scales, remote sensing methods can facilitate scaling up trait variation to regional scales needed for ecosystem service management. We review concepts and methods for scaling up plant and animal functional traits from local to regional spatial scales with the goal of assessing impacts of human modification on ecosystem processes and services. We focus our objectives on considerations and approaches for (1) conducting local plot-level sampling of trait variation and (2) scaling up trait variation to regional spatial scales using remotely sensed data. We show that sampling methods for scaling up traits need to account for the modification of trait variation due to land cover change and species introductions. Sampling intraspecific variation, stratification by land cover type or landscape context, or inference of traits from published sources may be necessary depending on the traits of interest. Passive and active remote sensing are useful for mapping plant phenological, chemical, and structural traits. Combining these methods can significantly improve their capacity for mapping plant trait variation. These methods can also be used to map landscape and vegetation structure in order to infer animal trait variation. Due to high context dependency, relationships between trait variation and remotely sensed data are not directly transferable across regions. We end our review with a brief synthesis of issues to consider and outlook for the development of these approaches. Research that relates typical functional trait metrics, such as the community-weighted mean, with remote sensing data and that relates variation in traits that cannot be remotely sensed to other proxies is needed. Our review narrows the gap between

  4. Funding and scale-up of HIV / AIDS services in Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Global HIV/AIDS Initiatives Network,

    2009-01-01

    This policy brief describes the funding for HIV/AIDS in Zambia focusing on the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS relief (PEPFAR), the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM) and the World Bank Multi Country AIDS program (MAP). It highlights the impact of this funding on scale-up of HIV/AIDS services and on non-HIV/AIDS services in Zambia.

  5. Scale-Up of Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Volatiles from Herbs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rochová, Kristina; Sajfrtová, Marie; Sovová, Helena

    Belgrade: Association of Chemical Engineers of Serbia , 2013 - (Skala, D.; Dekanski, A.), s. 60 ISBN 978-86-905111-1-2. [International Symposium on High Pressure Processes Technology /6./. Belgrade (RS), 08.09.2013-11.09.2013] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010578 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : extraction * kinetics * scale-up * volatile substances * composition Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  6. Scale up your instruction by sharing your resources: Deploy Wordpress as a learning object repository

    OpenAIRE

    O'Neill, Lindsay

    2016-01-01

    Librarians develop a tremendous amount of instructional materials when they prep for teaching and are often happy to share. If pooled, librarians’ existing materials could scale up an instruction program by saving prep time and eliminating redundant development efforts. Using the easy-to-learn platform Wordpress, I implemented a simple repository to facilitate storing, sharing, and discovery of instructional materials at my library. As a result, librarians reuse and adapt their colleagues’ wo...

  7. Scaling Up Handwashing Behavior : Findings from the Impact Evaluation Baseline Survey in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Chase, Claire; Do, Quy-Toan

    2010-01-01

    The goal of global scaling up handwashing is to reduce the risk of diarrhea and therefore increase household productivity by stimulating and sustaining the behavior of handwashing with soap at critical times in the lives of 5.4 million people in Peru, Senegal, Tanzania, and Vietnam, where the project has been implemented to date. The structure of this report proceeds as follows: In chapter...

  8. Scale-up of HIV Viral Load Monitoring--Seven Sub-Saharan African Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecher, Shirley; Ellenberger, Dennis; Kim, Andrea A; Fonjungo, Peter N; Agolory, Simon; Borget, Marie Yolande; Broyles, Laura; Carmona, Sergio; Chipungu, Geoffrey; De Cock, Kevin M; Deyde, Varough; Downer, Marie; Gupta, Sundeep; Kaplan, Jonathan E; Kiyaga, Charles; Knight, Nancy; MacLeod, William; Makumbi, Boniface; Muttai, Hellen; Mwangi, Christina; Mwangi, Jane W; Mwasekaga, Michael; Ng'Ang'A, Lucy W; Pillay, Yogan; Sarr, Abdoulaye; Sawadogo, Souleymane; Singer, Daniel; Stevens, Wendy; Toure, Christiane Adje; Nkengasong, John

    2015-11-27

    To achieve global targets for universal treatment set forth by the Joint United Nations Programme on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (UNAIDS), viral load monitoring for HIV-infected persons receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) must become the standard of care in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) (1). CDC and other U.S. government agencies, as part of the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, are supporting multiple countries in sub-Saharan Africa to change from the use of CD4 cell counts for monitoring of clinical response to ART to the use of viral load monitoring, which is the standard of care in developed countries. Viral load monitoring is the preferred method for immunologic monitoring because it enables earlier and more accurate detection of treatment failure before immunologic decline. This report highlights the initial successes and challenges of viral load monitoring in seven countries that have chosen to scale up viral load testing as a national monitoring strategy for patients on ART in response to World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations. Countries initiating viral load scale-up in 2014 observed increases in coverage after scale-up, and countries initiating in 2015 are anticipating similar trends. However, in six of the seven countries, viral load testing coverage in 2015 remained below target levels. Inefficient specimen transport, need for training, delays in procurement and distribution, and limited financial resources to support scale-up hindered progress. Country commitment and effective partnerships are essential to address the financial, operational, technical, and policy challenges of the rising demand for viral load monitoring. PMID:26605986

  9. Scale-up and evaluation of high solid ionic liquid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of switchgrass

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chenlin; Tanjore, Deepti; He, Wei; Wong, Jessica; Gardner, James L.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Simmons, Blake A.; Singh, Seema

    2013-01-01

    Background Ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment is receiving significant attention as a potential process that enables fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass and produces high yields of fermentable sugars suitable for the production of renewable fuels. However, successful optimization and scale up of IL pretreatment involves challenges, such as high solids loading, biomass handling and transfer, washing of pretreated solids and formation of inhibitors, which are not addressed during the developme...

  10. The costs of the French nuclear scale-up: A case of negative learning by doing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews the history and the economics of the French PWR program, which is arguably the most successful nuclear-scale up experience in an industrialized country. Key to this success was a unique institutional framework that allowed for centralized decision making, a high degree of standardization, and regulatory stability, epitomized by comparatively short reactor construction times. Drawing on largely unknown public records, the paper reveals for the first time both absolute as well as yearly and specific reactor costs and their evolution over time. Its most significant finding is that even this most successful nuclear scale-up was characterized by a substantial escalation of real-term construction costs. Conversely, operating costs have remained remarkably flat, despite lowered load factors resulting from the need for load modulation in a system where base-load nuclear power plants supply three quarters of electricity. The French nuclear case illustrates the perils of the assumption of robust learning effects resulting in lowered costs over time in the scale-up of large-scale, complex new energy supply technologies. The uncertainties in anticipated learning effects of new technologies might be much larger that often assumed, including also cases of 'negative learning' in which specific costs increase rather than decrease with accumulated experience.

  11. Nurse Family Partnership: Comparing Costs per Family in Randomized Trials Versus Scale-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ted R; Hendrie, Delia

    2015-12-01

    The literature that addresses cost differences between randomized trials and full-scale replications is quite sparse. This paper examines how costs differed among three randomized trials and six statewide scale-ups of nurse family partnership (NFP) intensive home visitation to low income first-time mothers. A literature review provided data on pertinent trials. At our request, six well-established programs reported their total expenditures. We adjusted the costs to national prices based on mean hourly wages for registered nurses and then inflated them to 2010 dollars. A centralized data system provided utilization. Replications had fewer home visits per family than trials (25 vs. 31, p = .05), lower costs per client ($8860 vs. $12,398, p = .01), and lower costs per visit ($354 vs. $400, p = .30). Sample size limited the significance of these differences. In this type of labor intensive program, costs probably were lower in scale-up than in randomized trials. Key cost drivers were attrition and the stable caseload size possible in an ongoing program. Our estimates reveal a wide variation in cost per visit across six state programs, which suggests that those planning replications should not expect a simple rule to guide cost estimations for scale-ups. Nevertheless, NFP replications probably achieved some economies of scale. PMID:26507844

  12. Evaluation of scale-up from analytical to preparative supercritical fluid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enmark, Martin; Åsberg, Dennis; Leek, Hanna; Öhlén, Kristina; Klarqvist, Magnus; Samuelsson, Jörgen; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2015-12-18

    An approach for reliable transfer from analytical to preparative scale supercritical fluid chromatography was evaluated. Here, we accounted for the conditions inside the columns as well as to the fact that most analytical instruments are volume-controlled while most preparative scale units are mass-controlled. The latter is a particular problem when performing pilot scale experiments and optimizations prior to scaling up to production scale. This was solved by measuring the mass flow, the pressure and the temperature on the analytical unit using external sensors. Thereafter, it was revealed with a design of experiments approach that the methanol fraction and the pressure are the two most important parameters to control for preserved retention throughout the scale-up; for preserved selectivity the temperature was most important in this particular system. Using this approach, the resulting chromatograms from the preparative unit agreed well with those from the analytical unit while keeping the same column length and particles size. A brief investigation on how the solute elution volume varies with the volumetric flow rate revealed a complex dependency on pressure, density and apparent methanol content. Since the methanol content is a parameter of great importance to control during the scale up, we must be careful when changing operational and column design conditions which generates deviations in pressure, density and methanol content between different columns. PMID:26615709

  13. Analysis and improvement of a scaled-up and stacked microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Arjan; Ter Heijne, Annemiek; Saakes, Michel; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Buisman, Cees J N

    2009-12-01

    Scaling up microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is inevitable when power outputs have to be obtained that can power electrical devices other than small sensors. This research has used a bipolar plate MFC stack of four cells with a total working volume of 20 L and a total membrane surface area of 2 m(2). The cathode limited MFC performance due to oxygen reduction rate and cell reversal. Furthermore, residence time distribution curves showed that bending membranes resulted in flow paths through which the catholyte could flow from inlet to outlet, while leaving the reactants unconverted. The cathode was improved by decreasing the pH, purging pure oxygen, and increasing the flow rate, which resulted in a 13-fold power density increase to 144 W m(-3) and a volumetric resistivity of only 1.2 mOmega m(3) per cell. Both results are major achievements compared to results currently published for laboratory and scaled-up MFCs. When designing a scaled-up MFC, it is important to ensure optimal contact between electrodes and substrate and to minimize the distances between electrodes. PMID:19943685

  14. Development and Scale Up Of a Chemical Process in Pharmaceutical Industry: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savita Belwal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Every process has its own significance and one has to study factors which impact to the process and its procedure to be followed. This paper is more concerned of how a process is scaled up from lab scale to pilot plant scale, which is the major step in any industry because moving directly towards manufacturing level consumes time and money. The report introduces about pharmaceutical industry and how it is different from the other industries and provides firsthand experience for all the engineers to explore the equipment, process and unit operations included in it. First aspect of scale up is safety and then comes economy, purity and optimums. It includes the process and its unit operations such as reactors, distillation, filtration, crystallization, drying and the equipment involving these operations. Consequently, the scale up rules, factors influenced strategies and other considerations are observed. To learn and understand the unit process and operations with their importance, a case study taking one of the stages of production is discussed here

  15. Differences in antiretroviral scale up in three South African provinces: the role of implementation management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Rensburg Dingie

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background South Africa’s antiretroviral programme is governed by defined national plans, establishing treatment targets and providing funding through ring-fenced conditional grants. However, in terms of the country’s quasi-federal constitution, provincial governments bear the main responsibility for provision of health care, and have a certain amount of autonomy and therefore choice in the way their HIV/AIDS programmes are implemented. Methods The paper is a comparative case study of the early management of ART scale up in three South African provincial governments – Western Cape, Gauteng and Free State – focusing on both operational and strategic dimensions. Drawing on surveys of models of ART care and analyses of the policy process conducted in the three provinces between 2005 and 2007, as well as a considerable body of grey and indexed literature on ART scale up in South Africa, it draws links between implementation processes and variations in provincial ART coverage (low, medium and high achieved in the three provinces. Results While they adopted similar chronic disease care approaches, the provinces differed with respect to political and managerial leadership of the programme, programme design, the balance between central standardisation and local flexibility, the effectiveness of monitoring and evaluation systems, and the nature and extent of external support and programme partnerships. Conclusions This case study points to the importance of sub-national programme processes and the influence of factors other than financing or human resource capacity, in understanding intervention scale up.

  16. Theoretical and Practical Issues That Are Relevant When Scaling Up hMSC Microcarrier Production Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jossen, Valentin; Schirmer, Cedric; Mostafa Sindi, Dolman; Eibl, Regine; Kraume, Matthias; Pörtner, Ralf; Eibl, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The potential of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) for allogeneic cell therapies has created a large amount of interest. However, this presupposes the availability of efficient scale-up procedures. Promising results have been reported for stirred bioreactors that operate with microcarriers. Recent publications focusing on microcarrier-based stirred bioreactors have demonstrated the successful use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and suspension criteria (N S1u , N S1) for rapidly scaling up hMSC expansions from mL- to pilot scale. Nevertheless, one obstacle may be the formation of large microcarrier-cell-aggregates, which may result in mass transfer limitations and inhomogeneous distributions of stem cells in the culture broth. The dependence of microcarrier-cell-aggregate formation on impeller speed and shear stress levels was investigated for human adipose derived stromal/stem cells (hASCs) at the spinner scale by recording the Sauter mean diameter (d 32) versus time. Cultivation at the suspension criteria provided d 32 values between 0.2 and 0.7 mm, the highest cell densities (1.25 × 10(6) cells mL(-1) hASCs), and the highest expansion factors (117.0 ± 4.7 on day 7), while maintaining the expression of specific surface markers. Furthermore, suitability of the suspension criterion N S1u was investigated for scaling up microcarrier-based processes in wave-mixed bioreactors for the first time. PMID:26981131

  17. Scaling Up Biomass Gasifier Use in India; BarriersInterventions & Remedies: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Ritesh U.Nrupekar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In India, work on gasifiers for energy applications started in the early 1980s. These efforts received a boost with the Department of Non-conventional Energy Sources‟ (DNES, latter MNES, now a ministry, MNRE dissemination program that was initiated in 1987. While this subsidy-based program was successful in placing about 1200 gasifier systems for irrigation pumping in the field, most of these units were non-operational soon after for lots of reasons. Despite all this, large-scale gasifier deployment has still not taken off in India. The fact that scale -up did not take place automatically even in cases where gasifiers are economically clearly feasible indicates that there are a number of issues to be considered and barriers to be overcome for successful large-scale deployment. To facilitate gasifier deployment among poorer and nonskilled users (i.e., unorganized, small-scale firms, rural areas; and lack of systematic programs targeted towards scale-up. Especially important is the fact that the particulars of implementing gasifier-based energy systems depend on the kind of application and context; therefore the approach has to be tailored to the specific application – this impedes the potential success of any single approach to scale-up.

  18. Quantity Versus Quality: A Survey Experiment to Improve the Network Scale-up Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feehan, Dennis M; Umubyeyi, Aline; Mahy, Mary; Hladik, Wolfgang; Salganik, Matthew J

    2016-04-15

    The network scale-up method is a promising technique that uses sampled social network data to estimate the sizes of epidemiologically important hidden populations, such as sex workers and people who inject illicit drugs. Although previous scale-up research has focused exclusively on networks of acquaintances, we show that the type of personal network about which survey respondents are asked to report is a potentially crucial parameter that researchers are free to vary. This generalization leads to a method that is more flexible and potentially more accurate. In 2011, we conducted a large, nationally representative survey experiment in Rwanda that randomized respondents to report about one of 2 different personal networks. Our results showed that asking respondents for less information can, somewhat surprisingly, produce more accurate size estimates. We also estimated the sizes of 4 key populations at risk for human immunodeficiency virus infection in Rwanda. Our estimates were higher than earlier estimates from Rwanda but lower than international benchmarks. Finally, in this article we develop a new sensitivity analysis framework and use it to assess the possible biases in our estimates. Our design can be customized and extended for other settings, enabling researchers to continue to improve the network scale-up method. PMID:27015875

  19. Scaling-up voluntary medical male circumcision – what have we learned?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ledikwe JH

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Jenny H Ledikwe,1,2,* Robert O Nyanga,1,* Jaclyn Hagon,2 Jessica S Grignon,1,2 Mulamuli Mpofu,1 Bazghina-werq Semo1,2 1International Training and Education Center for Health, Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana; 2Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA*These authors are joint first authorsAbstract: In 2007, the World Health Organization (WHO and the joint United Nations agency program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS recommended voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC as an add-on strategy for HIV prevention. Fourteen priority countries were tasked with scaling-up VMMC services to 80% of HIV-negative men aged 15–49 years by 2016, representing a combined target of 20 million circumcisions. By December 2012, approximately 3 million procedures had been conducted. Within the following year, there was marked improvement in the pace of the scale-up. During 2013, the total number of circumcisions performed nearly doubled, with approximately 6 million total circumcisions conducted by the end of the year, reaching 30% of the initial target. The purpose of this review article was to apply a systems thinking approach, using the WHO health systems building blocks as a framework to examine the factors influencing the scale-up of the VMMC programs from 2008–2013. Facilitators that accelerated the VMMC program scale-up included: country ownership; sustained political will; service delivery efficiencies, such as task shifting and task sharing; use of outreach and mobile services; disposable, prepackaged VMMC kits; external funding; and a standardized set of indicators for VMMC. A low demand for the procedure has been a major barrier to achieving circumcision targets, while weak supply chain management systems and the lack of adequate financial resources with a heavy reliance on donor support have also adversely affected scale-up. Health systems strengthening initiatives and innovations have progressively improved VMMC service delivery, but an

  20. Scale-up considerations relevant to experimental studies of nuclear waste-package behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results from a study that investigated whether testing large-scale nuclear waste-package assemblages was technically warranted are reported. It was recognized that the majority of the investigations for predicting waste-package performance to date have relied primarily on laboratory-scale experimentation. However, methods for the successful extrapolation of the results from such experiments, both geometrically and over time, to actual repository conditions have not been well defined. Because a well-developed scaling technology exists in the chemical-engineering discipline, it was presupposed that much of this technology could be applicable to the prediction of waste-package performance. A review of existing literature documented numerous examples where a consideration of scaling technology was important. It was concluded that much of the existing scale-up technology is applicable to the prediction of waste-package performance for both size and time extrapolations and that conducting scale-up studies may be technically merited. However, the applicability for investigating the complex chemical interactions needs further development. It was recognized that the complexity of the system, and the long time periods involved, renders a completely theoretical approach to performance prediction almost hopeless. However, a theoretical and experimental study was defined for investigating heat and fluid flow. It was concluded that conducting scale-up modeling and experimentation for waste-package performance predictions is possible using existing technology. A sequential series of scaling studies, both theoretical and experimental, will be required to formulate size and time extrapolations of waste-package performance

  1. Protein crystallization in stirred systems--scale-up via the maximum local energy dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smejkal, Benjamin; Helk, Bernhard; Rondeau, Jean-Michel; Anton, Sabine; Wilke, Angelika; Scheyerer, Peter; Fries, Jacqueline; Hekmat, Dariusch; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2013-07-01

    Macromolecular bioproducts like therapeutic proteins have usually been crystallized with µL-scale vapor diffusion experiments for structure determination by X-ray diffraction. Little systematic know-how exists for technical-scale protein crystallization in stirred vessels. In this study, the Fab-fragment of the therapeutic antibody Canakinumab was successfully crystallized in a stirred-tank reactor on a 6 mL-scale. A four times faster onset of crystallization of the Fab-fragment was observed compared to the non-agitated 10 µL-scale. Further studies on a liter-scale with lysozyme confirmed this effect. A 10 times faster onset of crystallization was observed in this case at an optimum stirrer speed. Commonly suggested scale-up criteria (i.e., minimum stirrer speed to keep the protein crystals in suspension or constant impeller tip speed) were shown not to be successful. Therefore, the criterion of constant maximum local energy dissipation was applied for scale-up of the stirred crystallization process for the first time. The maximum local energy dissipation was estimated by measuring the drop size distribution of an oil/surfactant/water emulsion in stirred-tank reactors on a 6 mL-, 100 mL-, and 1 L-scale. A comparable crystallization behavior was achieved in all stirred-tank reactors when the maximum local energy dissipation was kept constant for scale-up. A maximum local energy dissipation of 2.2 W kg(-1) was identified to be the optimum for lysozyme crystallization at all scales under study. PMID:23335375

  2. Formative evaluation of antiretroviral therapy scale-up efficiency in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Glenn; Ryan, Gery; Taylor, Stephanie

    2007-11-01

    With millions in need of HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the developing world, and scarce human and fiscal resources available, we conducted a formative evaluation of scale-up operations at clinics associated with AIDS Healthcare Foundation in Africa to identify lessons learned for improving scale-up efficiency. Site visits were made to six selected clinics in Uganda, Zambia, and South Africa, during which semistructured interviews with key stake-holders and observation of client flows and clinic operations were performed. This evaluation revealed the following lessons related to factors that are critical to efficient ART scale-up: (1) to ensure steady ART uptake, it is important to involve the community and community leaders in outreach, HIV education, and program decision-making; (2) minimizing bottlenecks to smooth patient flow requires efficient staff allocation to appropriate clinical duties, streamlined clinic visit schedule protocols, and tapping clients and the HIV community as a key source of labor; (3) to minimize clients dropping out of care, structures should be developed that enable clients to provide support and a "safety net" for helping each other remain in care; (4) computerized record management systems are essential for accurate antiretroviral inventory and dispensing records, quality assurance monitoring, and client enrollment records and visit scheduling; (5) effective organizational management and human resource policies are essential to maintain high job performance and satisfaction and limit burnout; (6) to maximize impact on social and economic health, it is important for ART programs to develop effective mechanisms for coordinating and referring clients to support service organizations. PMID:18240896

  3. Demonstrate Scale-up Procedure for Glass Composite Material (GCM) for Incorporation of Iodine Loaded AgZ.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenoff, Tina M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Garino, Terry J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Croes, Kenneth James [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rodriguez, Mark A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Two large size Glass Composite Material (GCM) waste forms containing AgI-MOR were fabricated. One contained methyl iodide-loaded AgI-MOR that was received from Idaho National Laboratory (INL, Test 5, Beds 1 – 3) and the other contained iodine vapor loaded AgIMOR that was received from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL, SHB 2/9/15 ). The composition for each GCM was 20 wt% AgI-MOR and 80 wt% Ferro EG2922 low sintering temperature glass along with enough added silver flake to prevent any I2 loss during the firing process. The silver flake amounts were 1.2 wt% for the GCM with the INL AgI-MOR and 3 wt% for the GCM contained the ORNL AgI-MOR. The GCMs, nominally 100 g, were first uniaxially pressed to 6.35 cm (2.5 inch) diameter disks then cold isostatically pressed, before firing in air to 550°C for 1hr. They were cooled slowly (1°C/min) from the firing temperature to avoid any cracking due to temperature gradients. The final GCMs were ~5 cm in diameter (~2 inches) and non-porous with densities of ~4.2 g/cm³. X-ray diffraction indicated that they consisted of the amorphous glass phase with small amounts of mordenite and AgI. Furthermore, the presence of the AgI was confirmed by X-ray fluorescence. Methodology for the scaled up production of GCMs to 6 inch diameter or larger is also presented.

  4. An integrated health sector response to violence against women in Malaysia: lessons for supporting scale up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombini Manuela

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaysia has been at the forefront of the development and scale up of One-Stop Crisis Centres (OSCC - an integrated health sector model that provides comprehensive care to women and children experiencing physical, emotional and sexual abuse. This study explored the strengths and challenges faced during the scaling up of the OSCC model to two States in Malaysia in order to identify lessons for supporting successful scale-up. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with health care providers, policy makers and key informants in 7 hospital facilities. This was complemented by a document analysis of hospital records and protocols. Data were coded and analysed using NVivo 7. Results The implementation of the OSCC model differed between hospital settings, with practise being influenced by organisational systems and constraints. Health providers generally tried to offer care to abused women, but they are not fully supported within their facility due to lack of training, time constraints, limited allocated budget, or lack of referral system to external support services. Non-specialised hospitals in both States struggled with a scarcity of specialised staff and limited referral options for abused women. Despite these challenges, even in more resource-constrained settings staff who took the initiative found it was possible to adapt to provide some level of OSCC services, such as referring women to local NGOs or community support groups, or training nurses to offer basic counselling. Conclusions The national implementation of OSCC provides a potentially important source of support for women experiencing violence. Our findings confirm that pilot interventions for health sector responses to gender based violence can be scaled up only when there is a sound health infrastructure in place – in other words a supportive health system. Furthermore, the successful replication of the OSCC model in other similar settings requires that the

  5. Process understanding for scale-up and manufacture of active ingredients

    CERN Document Server

    Houson, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Process Understanding is the underpinning knowledge that allows the manufacture of chemical entities to be carried out routinely, robustly and to the required standard of quality. This area has gained in importance over the last few years, particularly due to the recent impetus from the USA`s Food and Drug Administration. This book covers the multidisciplinary aspects required for successful process design, safety, modeling, scale-up, PAT, pilot plant implementation, plant design as well the rapidly expanding area of outsourcing. In discussing what process understanding means to differ

  6. Advanced modeling to accelerate the scale up of carbon capture technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David C.; Sun, XIN; Storlie, Curtis B.; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu

    2015-06-01

    In order to help meet the goals of the DOE carbon capture program, the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) was launched in early 2011 to develop, demonstrate, and deploy advanced computational tools and validated multi-scale models to reduce the time required to develop and scale-up new carbon capture technologies. This article focuses on essential elements related to the development and validation of multi-scale models in order to help minimize risk and maximize learning as new technologies progress from pilot to demonstration scale.

  7. On the hydrodynamics and the scale-up of flotation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In flotation machines, turbulence is process-determining. Macroturbulence is necessary for suspension, microturbulence controls the air dispersion, the rate of the particle-bubble collisions and the stresses on agglomerates. Consequently, the hydrodynamic optimization of flotation processes plays an important role for the flotation efficiency. In the paper the following aspects are considered: the turbulent microprocesses of flotation processes; the integral hydrodynamic characterization of flotation processes; correlations between particle size and optimum hydrodynamics; correlations between flocculation of fine particles and optimum-hydrodynamics; and hydrodynamic scale-up of flotation processes

  8. Issues associated with scaling up production of a lab demonstrated MEMS mass sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work reports on the development of a lab demonstrated resonant mass sensor towards mid-size production. The issues associated with scaling-up production of the microfabricated chip are discussed with particular focus on yield and device reproducibility, as well as the constraints imposed on the design and manufacturing of the device when packaging and integration must be taken into account. Issues of modal alignment and ambient operational pressure are discussed. Fabricated devices show a 4.81 Hz pg−1 mass sensitivity with a temperature sensitivity of typically 10 Hz °C−1. (paper)

  9. The scale-up and design of pressure hydrometallurgical process plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, F.; Vardill, W. D.; Trytten, L.

    1999-09-01

    This article reviews more than 45 years of experience in the scale-up of pressure hydrometallurgical processes, from the pioneering collaboration between Sherritt and Chemical Construction Company to current process development by their successor, Dynatec Corporation. The evolution of test work is discussed, from traditional pilot-plant operations using semicommercial equipment to small scale or minipiloting with equipment several thousand times smaller than commercial units. Nickel, uranium, zinc, and gold processes have been developed and successfully implemented in worldwide operations treating a variety of feed materials, including concentrates, ores, and mattes. Data on test work duration and the ramp-up of commercial plants are presented.

  10. Scaling Up Early Infant Male Circumcision: Lessons From the Kingdom of Swaziland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Laura; Benzerga, Wendy; Mirira, Munamato; Adamu, Tigistu; Shissler, Tracey; Bitchong, Raymond; Malaza, Mandla; Mamba, Makhosini; Mangara, Paul; Curran, Kelly; Khumalo, Thembisile; Mlambo, Phumzile; Njeuhmeli, Emmanuel; Maziya, Vusi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The government of the Kingdom of Swaziland recognizes that it must urgently scale up HIV prevention interventions, such as voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC). Swaziland has adopted a 2-phase approach to male circumcision scale-up. The catch-up phase prioritizes VMMC services for adolescents and adults, while the sustainability phase involves the establishment of early infant male circumcision (EIMC). Swaziland does not have a modern-day tradition of circumcision, and the VMMC program has met with client demand challenges. However, since the launch of the EIMC program in 2010, Swaziland now leads the Eastern and Southern Africa region in the scale-up of EIMC. Here we review Swaziland’s program and its successes and challenges. Methods: From February to May 2014, we collected data while preparing Swaziland’s “Male Circumcision Strategic and Operational Plan for HIV Prevention 2014–2018.” We conducted structured stakeholder focus group discussions and in-depth interviews, and we collected EIMC service delivery data from an implementing partner responsible for VMMC and EIMC service delivery. Data were summarized in consolidated narratives. Results: Between 2010 and 2014, trained providers performed more than 5,000 EIMCs in 11 health care facilities in Swaziland, and they reported no moderate or severe adverse events. According to a broad group of EIMC program stakeholders, an EIMC program needs robust support from facility, regional, and national leadership, both within and outside of HIV prevention coordination bodies, to promote institutionalization and ownership. Providers and health care managers in 3 of Swaziland’s 4 regional hospitals suggest that when EIMC is introduced into reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health platforms, dedicated staff attention can help ensure that EIMC is performed amid competing priorities. Creating informed demand from communities also supports EIMC as a service delivery priority

  11. First, Scale Up to the Robotic Turing Test, Then Worry About Feeling

    OpenAIRE

    Harnad, Stevan; Scherzer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Consciousness is feeling, and the problem of consciousness is the problem of explaining how and why some of the functions underlying some of our performance capacities are felt rather than just “functed.” But unless we are prepared to assign to feeling a telekinetic power (which all evidence contradicts), feeling cannot be assigned any causal power at all. We cannot explain how or why we feel. Hence the empirical target of cognitive science can only be to scale up to the robotic Turing Test, ...

  12. First, scale up to the robotic Turing test, then worry about feeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnad, Stevan; Scherzer, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Consciousness is feeling, and the problem of consciousness is the problem of explaining how and why some of the functions underlying some of our performance capacities are felt rather than just "functed." But unless we are prepared to assign to feeling a telekinetic power (which all evidence contradicts), feeling cannot be assigned any causal power at all. We cannot explain how or why we feel. Hence the empirical target of cognitive science can only be to scale up to the robotic Turing test, which is to explain all of our performance capacity, but without explaining consciousness or incorporating it in any way in our functional explanation. PMID:18930641

  13. Transmission expansion for renewable energy scale-up emerging lessons and recommendations

    CERN Document Server

    Madrigal, Marcelino

    2012-01-01

    In their efforts to increase the share of renewable in electricity grids to reducing emissions or increasing energy diversity, developed and developing countries are finding that a considerable scale-up of investments in transmission infrastructures will be necessary to achieve their goals. Renewable energy resources such as wind, solar, and hydro power, tend to be sited far from existing electricity grids and consumption centers. Achieving desired supply levels from these sources requires that networks be expanded to reach many sites and to ensuring the different supply variation patterns of

  14. SCALE-UP Your Astronomy and Physics Undergraduate Courses to Incorporate Heliophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawi, Ahlam N.; Cox, Amanda; Hoshino, Laura; Fitzgerald, Cullen; Cebulka, Rebecca; Rodriguez Garrigues, Alvar; Montgomery, Michele; Velissaris, Chris; Flitsiyan, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Although physics and astronomy courses include heliophysics topics, students still leave these courses without knowing what heliophysics is and how heliophysics relates to their daily lives. To meet goals of NASA's Living With a Star Program of incorporating heliophysics into undergraduate curriculum, UCF Physics has modified courses such as Astronomy (for non-science majors), Astrophysics, and SCALE-UP: Electricity and Magnetism for Engineers and Scientists to incorporate heliophysics topics. In this presentation, we discuss these incorporations and give examples that have been published in NASA Wavelength. In an associated poster, we present data on student learnin

  15. Scale-up of the production of highly reactive biogenic magnetite nanoparticles using Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J M; Muhamadali, H; Coker, V S; Cooper, J; Lloyd, J R

    2015-06-01

    Although there are numerous examples of large-scale commercial microbial synthesis routes for organic bioproducts, few studies have addressed the obvious potential for microbial systems to produce inorganic functional biomaterials at scale. Here we address this by focusing on the production of nanoscale biomagnetite particles by the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens, which was scaled up successfully from laboratory- to pilot plant-scale production, while maintaining the surface reactivity and magnetic properties which make this material well suited to commercial exploitation. At the largest scale tested, the bacterium was grown in a 50 l bioreactor, harvested and then inoculated into a buffer solution containing Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide and an electron donor and mediator, which promoted the formation of magnetite in under 24 h. This procedure was capable of producing up to 120 g of biomagnetite. The particle size distribution was maintained between 10 and 15 nm during scale-up of this second step from 10 ml to 10 l, with conserved magnetic properties and surface reactivity; the latter demonstrated by the reduction of Cr(VI). The process presented provides an environmentally benign route to magnetite production and serves as an alternative to harsher synthetic techniques, with the clear potential to be used to produce kilogram to tonne quantities. PMID:25972437

  16. Validation and scale-up of plasmid DNA purification by phenyl-boronic acid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, A Gabriela; Azevedo, Ana M; Aires-Barros, M Raquel; Prazeres, D Miguel F

    2012-11-01

    This study addresses the feasibility of scaling-up the removal of host cell impurities from plasmid DNA (pDNA)-containing Escherichia coli lysates by phenyl-boronic (PB) acid chromatography using columns packed with 7.6 and 15.2 cm(3) of controlled porous glass beads (CPG) derivatized with PB ligands. Equilibration was performed with water at 10 cm(3) /min and no conditioning of the lysate feed was required. At a ratio of lysate feed to adsorbent volume of 1.3, 93-96% of pDNA was recovered in the flow through while 66-71% of impurities remained bound (~2.5-fold purification). The entire sequence of loading, washing, elution, and re-equilibration was completed in 20 min. Run-to-run consistency was observed in terms of chromatogram features and performance (yield, purification factor, agarose electrophoresis) across the different amounts of adsorbent (0.75-15.2 cm(3) ) by performing successive injections of lysates prepared independently and containing 3.7 or 6.1 kbp plasmids. The column productivity at large scale was 4 dm(3) of alkaline lysate per hour per dm(3) of PB-CPG resin. The method is rapid, reproducible, simple, and straightforward to scale-up. Furthermore, it is capable of handling heavily contaminated samples, constituting a good alternative to purification techniques such as isopropanol precipitation, aqueous two-phase systems, and tangential flow filtration. PMID:23175141

  17. Semantic Representation and Scale-Up of Integrated Air Traffic Management Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Richard M.; Ranjan, Shubha; Wei, Mie; Eshow, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Each day, the global air transportation industry generates a vast amount of heterogeneous data from air carriers, air traffic control providers, and secondary aviation entities handling baggage, ticketing, catering, fuel delivery, and other services. Generally, these data are stored in isolated data systems, separated from each other by significant political, regulatory, economic, and technological divides. These realities aside, integrating aviation data into a single, queryable, big data store could enable insights leading to major efficiency, safety, and cost advantages. In this paper, we describe an implemented system for combining heterogeneous air traffic management data using semantic integration techniques. The system transforms data from its original disparate source formats into a unified semantic representation within an ontology-based triple store. Our initial prototype stores only a small sliver of air traffic data covering one day of operations at a major airport. The paper also describes our analysis of difficulties ahead as we prepare to scale up data storage to accommodate successively larger quantities of data -- eventually covering all US commercial domestic flights over an extended multi-year timeframe. We review several approaches to mitigating scale-up related query performance concerns.

  18. Scaling-up quantum heat engines efficiently via shortcuts to adiabaticity

    CERN Document Server

    Beau, M; del Campo, A

    2016-01-01

    The finite-time operation of a quantum heat engine that uses a single particle as a working medium generally increases the output power at the expense of inducing friction that lowers the cycle efficiency. We propose to scale up a quantum heat engine utilizing a many-particle working medium in combination with the use of shortcuts to adiabaticity to boost the nonadiabatic performance by eliminating quantum friction and reducing the cycle time. To this end, we first analyze the finite-time thermodynamics of a quantum Otto cycle implemented with a quantum fluid confined in a time-dependent harmonic trap. We show that nonadiabatic effects can be controlled and tailored to match the adiabatic performance using a variety of shortcuts to adiabaticity. As a result, the nonadiabatic dynamics of the scaled-up many-particle quantum heat engine exhibits no friction and the cycle can be run at maximum efficiency with a tunable output power. We demonstrate our results with a working medium consisting of particles with inv...

  19. Scaling up early infant diagnosis of HIV in Rwanda, 2008-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binagwaho, Agnes; Mugwaneza, Placidie; Irakoze, Ange Anitha; Nsanzimana, Sabin; Agbonyitor, Mawuena; Nutt, Cameron T; Wagner, Claire M; Rukundo, Alphonse; Ahayo, Anita; Drobac, Peter; Karema, Corine; Hinda, Ruton; Leung, Lucinda; Bandara, Sachini; Chopyak, Elena; Fawzi, Mary C Smith

    2013-01-01

    More than 390,000 children are newly infected with HIV each year, only 28 per cent of whom benefit from early infant diagnosis (EID). Rwanda's Ministry of Health identified several major challenges hindering EID scale-up in care of HIV-positive infants. It found poor counseling and follow-up by caregivers of HIV-exposed infants, lack of coordination with maternal and child health-care programs, and long delays between the collection of samples and return of results to the health facility and caregiver. By increasing geographic access, integrating EID with vaccination programs, and investing in a robust mobile phone reporting system, Rwanda increased population coverage of EID from approximately 28 to 72.4 per cent (and to 90.3 per cent within the prevention of mother to child transmission program) between 2008 and 2011. Turnaround time from sample collection to receipt of results at the originating health facility was reduced from 144 to 20 days. Rwanda rapidly scaled up and improved its EID program, but challenges persist for linking infected infants to care. PMID:23191941

  20. Scale-up technique of slurry pipelines-part 2: Numerical integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A kinetic energy turbulence model has been proposed for the computer flow simulation and scale-up of slurry pipelines. The numerical integration is performed by using a modified finite volume technique, with application to high-convective two-phase flows in two and three dimensions. The mixture kinetic energy and eddy viscosity turbulence models are compared. The one-equation eddy-viscosity turbulence model (ε/sub t/ - model) is formulated and applied for the multi-species particle slurry flow in cylindrical pipes. A modified finite volume technique is proposed for high convective transport equations, for one and two-phase flows. The integral formulation per volume yields surface and volume integrals, that are stored and counted only by interfaces using a multidimensional approach. The nonlinear distributions in volumes and on interfaces are approximated employing the derivatives in the normal and tangent directions to the bounding surfaces. Linear, analytical (upwind) and logarithmic laws of interpolations are considered for internal flows. The numerical approach was tested with good results for transport equations of momentum and various contaminants (solid particles, temperature, eddy-viscosity) in pipes. Experimental data for one and two-phase flows are compared to the integral finite volume predictions. The proposed finite volume technique can economically simulate complex flow situations encountered in the slurry pipeline scale-up applications

  1. Increasing power generation for scaling up single-chamber air cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Shaoan

    2011-03-01

    Scaling up microbial fuel cells (MFCs) requires a better understanding the importance of the different factors such as electrode surface area and reactor geometry relative to solution conditions such as conductivity and substrate concentration. It is shown here that the substrate concentration has significant effect on anode but not cathode performance, while the solution conductivity has a significant effect on the cathode but not the anode. The cathode surface area is always important for increasing power. Doubling the cathode size can increase power by 62% with domestic wastewater, but doubling the anode size increases power by 12%. Volumetric power density was shown to be a linear function of cathode specific surface area (ratio of cathode surface area to reactor volume), but the impact of cathode size on power generation depended on the substrate strength (COD) and conductivity. These results demonstrate the cathode specific surface area is the most critical factor for scaling-up MFCs to obtain high power densities. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Scaling-Up Quantum Heat Engines Efficiently via Shortcuts to Adiabaticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beau, Mathieu; Jaramillo, Juan; del Campo, Adolfo

    2016-04-01

    The finite-time operation of a quantum heat engine that uses a single particle as a working medium generally increases the output power at the expense of inducing friction that lowers the cycle efficiency. We propose to scale up a quantum heat engine utilizing a many-particle working medium in combination with the use of shortcuts to adiabaticity to boost the nonadiabatic performance by eliminating quantum friction and reducing the cycle time. To this end, we first analyze the finite-time thermodynamics of a quantum Otto cycle implemented with a quantum fluid confined in a time-dependent harmonic trap. We show that nonadiabatic effects can be controlled and tailored to match the adiabatic performance using a variety of shortcuts to adiabaticity. As a result, the nonadiabatic dynamics of the scaled-up many-particle quantum heat engine exhibits no friction and the cycle can be run at maximum efficiency with a tunable output power. We demonstrate our results with a working medium consisting of particles with inverse-square pairwise interactions, that includes noninteracting and hard-core bosons as limiting cases.

  3. Institutions and processes for scaling up renewables: Run-of-river hydropower in British Columbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dramatic scale-up of renewable energy over the coming decades is likely to pose significant challenges for coordinating land use allocation, environmental assessment, energy system planning and the design of greenhouse gas abatement policy. Of particular concern is the establishment of institutions and processes that enable consideration of multiple objectives and attributes, with adequate representation of affected interests, and without resulting in excessive delays in the development of renewable energy as part of a greenhouse gas abatement strategy. This paper uses the Canadian province of British Columbia as a case study for describing these challenges and the responses of policy makers seeking to rapidly scale-up renewables. Using evaluative criteria to assess this experience, we identify lessons that may be applicable to other jurisdictions seeking to quickly expand the production of renewable energy. These lessons include the design of institutions and processes that would likely be required in almost any jurisdiction with similar aims. - Research highlights: → Tension exists between mitigating climate change through substantial renewable energy development and the local environmental impacts associated with this development. → The deployment of renewable energy technologies required for climate change mitigation is likely to lead to intensifying conflicts over land-use. → For this deployment to be successful, institutions and processes must be able to integrate and consider trade-offs related to goals and interests at different scales of decision making.

  4. Scale-up of B-doped diamond anode system for electrochemical oxidation of phenol simulated wastewater in batch mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Xiuping [Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100871 (China); Ni Jinren, E-mail: nijinren@iee.pku.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100871 (China); Wei Junjun; Chen Pan [Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2011-10-30

    Scale-up of boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode system is critical to the practical application of electrochemical oxidation in bio-refractory organic wastewater treatment. In this study, the scale-up of BDD anode system was investigated on batch-mode electrochemical oxidation of phenol simulated wastewater. It was demonstrated that BDD anode system was successfully scaled up by 121 times without performance deterioration based on the COD and specific energy consumption (E{sub sp}) models in bath mode. The COD removal rate and E{sub sp} for the scaled-up BDD anode system through enlarging the total anode area while keeping similar configuration, remained at the similar level as those before being scaled up, under the same area/volume value, current density, retention time and wastewater characteristics. The COD and E{sub sp} models used to describe the smaller BDD anode system satisfactorily predicted the performance of the scaled-up BDD anode system. Under the suitable operating conditions, the COD of phenol simulated wastewater was reduced from 540 mg l{sup -1} to 130 mg l{sup -1} within 3 h with an E{sub sp} of only 34.76 kWh m{sup -3} in the scaled-up BDD anode system. These results demonstrate that BDD anode system is very promising in practical bio-refractory organic wastewater treatment.

  5. Scaling up watershed model parameters--Flow and load simulations of the Edisto River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feaster, Toby D.; Benedict, Stephen T.; Clark, Jimmy M.; Bradley, Paul M.; Conrads, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    The Edisto River is the longest and largest river system completely contained in South Carolina and is one of the longest free flowing blackwater rivers in the United States. The Edisto River basin also has fish-tissue mercury concentrations that are some of the highest recorded in the United States. As part of an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey to expand the understanding of relations among hydrologic, geochemical, and ecological processes that affect fish-tissue mercury concentrations within the Edisto River basin, analyses and simulations of the hydrology of the Edisto River basin were made with the topography-based hydrological model (TOPMODEL). The potential for scaling up a previous application of TOPMODEL for the McTier Creek watershed, which is a small headwater catchment to the Edisto River basin, was assessed. Scaling up was done in a step-wise process beginning with applying the calibration parameters, meteorological data, and topographic wetness index data from the McTier Creek TOPMODEL to the Edisto River TOPMODEL. Additional changes were made with subsequent simulations culminating in the best simulation, which included meteorological and topographic wetness index data from the Edisto River basin and updated calibration parameters for some of the TOPMODEL calibration parameters. Comparison of goodness-of-fit statistics between measured and simulated daily mean streamflow for the two models showed that with calibration, the Edisto River TOPMODEL produced slightly better results than the McTier Creek model, despite the significant difference in the drainage-area size at the outlet locations for the two models (30.7 and 2,725 square miles, respectively). Along with the TOPMODEL hydrologic simulations, a visualization tool (the Edisto River Data Viewer) was developed to help assess trends and influencing variables in the stream ecosystem. Incorporated into the visualization tool were the water-quality load models TOPLOAD, TOPLOAD-H, and LOADEST

  6. Scaling up cervical cancer screening in the midst of human papillomavirus vaccination advocacy in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teerawattananon Yot

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening tests for cervical cancer are effective in reducing the disease burden. In Thailand, a Pap smear program has been implemented throughout the country for 40 years. In 2008 the Ministry of Public Health (MoPH unexpectedly decided to scale up the coverage of free cervical cancer screening services, to meet an ambitious target. This study analyzes the processes and factors that drove this policy innovation in the area of cervical cancer control in Thailand. Methods In-depth interviews with key policy actors and review of relevant documents were conducted in 2009. Data analysis was guided by a framework, developed on public policy models and existing literature on scaling-up health care interventions. Results Between 2006 and 2008 international organizations and the vaccine industry advocated the introduction of Human Papillomavirus (HPV vaccine for the primary prevention of cervical cancer. Meanwhile, a local study suggested that the vaccine was considerably less cost-effective than cervical cancer screening in the Thai context. Then, from August to December 2008, the MoPH carried out a campaign to expand the coverage of its cervical cancer screening program, targeting one million women. The study reveals that several factors were influential in focusing the attention of policymakers on strengthening the screening services. These included the high burden of cervical cancer in Thailand, the launch of the HPV vaccine onto the global and domestic markets, the country’s political instability, and the dissemination of scientific evidence regarding the appropriateness of different options for cervical cancer prevention. Influenced by the country’s political crisis, the MoPH’s campaign was devised in a very short time. In the view of the responsible health officials, the campaign was not successful and indeed, did not achieve its ambitious target. Conclusion The Thai case study suggests that the political crisis was a

  7. Scale-up of Pore Scale Spatiotemporal CO2 Dissolution Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H.; Srinivasan, S.; Ovaysi, S.; Wheeler, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    One of the potential risks associated with subsurface storage of CO2 is potentially the seepage of CO2 through existing faults and the studies devoted to this topic show that geochemistry plays an important role in rendering these faults as effective conduits for CO2 movement while others show that mineralization due to CO2 injection can result in seep migration and flow channeling. Therefore, understanding the changes in reservoir flow dynamics with time due to geochemical alteration of the porous media and accurately scaling up these changes for representation in field scale models is important to engineer the CO2storage process. After CO2 is injected in a subsurface, dispersion results in mixing of CO2 with aqueous species present in in-situ brine. The reactions of the dissolved CO2 with rock minerals lead to dissolution and/or formation of precipitates which alter the pore structure by changing the porosity and the permeability. Scale-up of reservoir properties and flow response at a single snapshot of time has been described by other authors, however, scale-up for reactive processes cannot be correctly described just at a single snapshot of time. We use the concept of a Representative Elementary Volume (REV) to explore the scaling characteristics of the reactive transport process. We model the REV using a variance-based statistical approach using high-resolution pore-scale data. For comparison purposes, we also compute the REV for a conservative transport using 3-D pressure data. The REV for reactive process is modeled using three different types of data: CO2 concentration, fluid/matrix pore-network data and dissolution data. For simplicity, we consider the spatial variations along a 2-D slice at various times, rendering this a 3D spatiotemporal dataset. The results indicate that the REV in reservoir with reactive flow changes with time and is greater when compared to the REV for conservative flow. The change in REV with time for reservoirs with reactive flow

  8. Model of percolation leaching for non-weathered uranium bearing ores for scale up purpose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium bearing sandstone ore in Pa Lua area (Nong Son basin) is a kind of low uranium content ore. Technological method with high potential of application is percolation leaching. This article introduces the setting up a model of percolation leaching for non-weathered uranium bearing ores for scale up purpose. It is possible to calculate efficiency of leaching uranium from ores when changing technological parameters such as acid concentration, height of ore body and effect of differences in distribution of particle size. This tool can help calculation for the design of a system of ore processing to meet certain requirements on the yield to facilitate design and calculation for the pilot of uranium ore processing in the future. (author)

  9. Scaling up the production capacity of U-Mo powder by HMD process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent discovery that uranium alloys in metastable gamma phase can be hydrided at low temperatures and pressures have allowed developing the method of commuting bulk materials by milling the hydride to desired size and then dehydriding the powder. This process is called HMD (hydriding-milling-dehydriding) and needs an initial step of hydrogen incorporation to allow the alloy to be hydrided. This four step process has been conveniently set up for the production of U-7Mo powder for its use in nuclear fuels. Low equipment investment and low man power are needed for this achievement. The process is being analyzed in its scaling up for one kilogram batches and a 50 kilogram per year production capacity of U-Mo powder. (author)

  10. Evaluation of liquid-fed ceramic melter scale-up correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to determine the parameters governing factors of scale for liquid-fed ceramic melters (LFCMs) in order to design full-scale melters using smaller-scale melter data. Results of melter experiments conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) are presented for two feed compositions and five different liquid-fed ceramic melters. The melter performance data including nominal feed rate and glass melt rate are correlated as a function of melter surface area. Comparisons are made between the actual melt rate data and melt rates predicted by a cold cap heat transfer model. The heat transfer model could be used in scale-up calculations, but insufficient data are available on the cold cap characteristics. Experiments specifically designed to determine heat transfer parameters are needed to further develop the model. 17 refs

  11. Development, modelling, optimisation and scale-up of chromatographic purification of a therapeutic protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Jørgen; Hansen, Thomas Budde; Kidal, Steffen;

    2007-01-01

    Development of a chromatographic purification step proceeds through a number of stages. High-throughput screening techniques are used to identify suitable resins. This technique is also suitable for the design of a capture step and some intermediate chromatographic steps, but development and true...... by industry. The theory of residence time based scale-up is developed and applied. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....... chromatographic separations. Application of simulation of chromatographic processes supports innovation, efficiency and thus quality by design in biopharmaceutical development, manufacturing, and quality assurance and it enhances process understanding to facilitate innovation and risk-based regulatory decisions......Development of a chromatographic purification step proceeds through a number of stages. High-throughput screening techniques are used to identify suitable resins. This technique is also suitable for the design of a capture step and some intermediate chromatographic steps, but development and true...

  12. Scaling up ATLAS Database Release Technology for the LHC Long Run

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodin, M.; Nevski, P.; Vaniachine, A.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    To overcome scalability limitations in database access on the Grid, ATLAS introduced the Database Release technology replicating databases in files. For years Database Release technology assured scalable database access for Monte Carlo production on the Grid. Since previous CHEP, Database Release technology was used successfully in ATLAS data reprocessing on the Grid. Frozen Conditions DB snapshot guarantees reproducibility and transactional consistency isolating Grid data processing tasks from continuous conditions updates at the "live" Oracle server. Database Release technology fully satisfies the requirements of ALLAS data reprocessing and Monte Carlo production. We parallelized the Database Release build workflow to avoid linear dependency of the build time on the length of LHC data-taking period. In recent data reprocessing campaigns the build time was reduced by an order of magnitude thanks to a proven master-worker architecture used in the Google MapReduce. We describe further Database Release optimizations scaling up the technology for the LHC long run.

  13. Scaling up ATLAS Database Release Technology for the LHC Long Run

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To overcome scalability limitations in database access on the Grid, ATLAS introduced the Database Release technology replicating databases in files. For years Database Release technology assured scalable database access for Monte Carlo production on the Grid. Since previous CHEP, Database Release technology was used successfully in ATLAS data reprocessing on the Grid. Frozen Conditions DB snapshot guarantees reproducibility and transactional consistency isolating Grid data processing tasks from continuous conditions updates at the 'live' Oracle server. Database Release technology fully satisfies the requirements of ATLAS data reprocessing and Monte Carlo production. We parallelized the Database Release build workflow to avoid linear dependency of the build time on the length of LHC data-taking period. In recent data reprocessing campaigns the build time was reduced by an order of magnitude thanks to a proven master-worker architecture used in the Google MapReduce. We describe further Database Release optimizations scaling up the technology for the LHC long run.

  14. Processing parameters associated with scale-up of balloon film production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, D. M.; Harrison, I. R.

    1993-01-01

    A method is set forth for assessing strain-rate profiles that can be used to develop a scale-up theory for blown-film extrusion. Strain rates are evaluated by placing four ink dots on the stalk of an extruded bubble to follow the displacements of the dots as a function of time. The instantaneous Hencky strain is obtained with the displacement data and plotted for analysis. Specific attention is given to potential sources of error in the distance measurements and corrections for these complex bubble geometries. The method is shown to be effective for deriving strain-rate data related to different processing parameters for the production of balloon film. The strain rates can be compared to frostline height, blow-up ratio, and take-up ratio to optimize these processing variables.

  15. Scale-up of phosphate remobilization from sewage sludge in a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happe, Manuel; Sugnaux, Marc; Cachelin, Christian Pierre; Stauffer, Marc; Zufferey, Géraldine; Kahoun, Thomas; Salamin, Paul-André; Egli, Thomas; Comninellis, Christos; Grogg, Alain-François; Fischer, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate remobilization from digested sewage sludge containing iron phosphate was scaled-up in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). A 3litre triple chambered MFC was constructed. This reactor was operated as a microbial fuel cell and later as a microbial electrolysis cell to accelerate cathodic phosphate remobilization. Applying an additional voltage and exceeding native MFC power accelerated chemical base formation and the related phosphate remobilization rate. The electrolysis approach was extended using a platinum-RVC cathode. The pH rose to 12.6 and phosphate was recovered by 67% in 26h. This was significantly faster than using microbial fuel cell conditions. Shrinking core modelling particle fluid kinetics showed that the reaction resistance has to move inside the sewage sludge particle for considerable rate enhancement. Remobilized phosphate was subsequently precipitated as struvite and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry indicated low levels of cadmium, lead, and other metals as required by law for recycling fertilizers. PMID:26519694

  16. Process considerations for the scale-up and implementation of biocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufvesson, Pär; Fu, Wenjing; Jensen, Jacob Skibsted;

    2010-01-01

    biocatalysis in particular is a rather young technology. Although significant progress has been made in the implementation of new processes (especially in the pharmaceutical industry) no fixed methods for process design have been established to date. In this paper we present some of the considerations required......With increasing emphasis on renewable feed-stocks and green chemistry, biocatalytic processes will have an important role in the next generation of industrial processes for chemical production. However, in comparison with conventional industrial chemistry, the use of bioprocesses in general and...... to scale-up a biocatalytic process and some of the recently developed engineering tools available to assist in this procedure. The tools will have a decisive role in helping to identify bottlenecks in the biocatalytic development process and to justify where to put effort and resources....

  17. Scale up of 2,4-dichlorophenol removal from aqueous solutions using Brassica napus hairy roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: →B. napus hairy roots were effectively used for a large scale removal of 2,4-DCP. → High removal efficiencies were obtained (98%) in a short time (30 min). → Roots were re-used for six consecutive cycles with high efficiency. → Post removal solutions showed no toxicity. → This method could be used for continuous and safe treatment of phenolic effluents. - Abstract: Chlorophenols are harmful pollutants, frequently found in the effluents of several industries. For this reason, many environmental friendly technologies are being explored for their removal from industrial wastewaters. The aim of the present work was to study the scale up of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) removal from synthetic wastewater, using Brassica napus hairy roots and H2O2 in a discontinuous stirred tank reactor. We have analyzed some operational conditions, because the scale up of such process was poorly studied. High removal efficiencies were obtained (98%) in a short time (30 min). When roots were re-used for six consecutive cycles, 2,4-DCP removal efficiency decreased from 98 to 86%, in the last cycle. After the removal process, the solutions obtained from the reactor were assessed for their toxicity using an acute test with Lactuca sativa L. seeds. Results suggested that the treated solution was less toxic than the parent solution, because neither inhibition of lettuce germination nor effects in root and hypocotyl lengths were observed. Therefore, we provide evidence that Brassica napus hairy roots could be effectively used to detoxify solutions containing 2,4-DCP and they have considerable potential for a large scale removal of this pollutant. Thus, this study could help to design a method for continuous and safe treatment of effluents containing chlorophenols.

  18. Scale up of 2,4-dichlorophenol removal from aqueous solutions using Brassica napus hairy roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelini, Vanina A. [Departamento de Biologia Molecular, FCEFQN, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto, 5800 Rio Cuarto, Cordoba (Argentina); Orejas, Joaquin [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto, 5800 Rio Cuarto, Cordoba (Argentina); Medina, Maria I. [Departamento de Biologia Molecular, FCEFQN, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto, 5800 Rio Cuarto, Cordoba (Argentina); Agostini, Elizabeth, E-mail: eagostini@exa.unrc.edu.ar [Departamento de Biologia Molecular, FCEFQN, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto, 5800 Rio Cuarto, Cordoba (Argentina)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: {yields}B. napus hairy roots were effectively used for a large scale removal of 2,4-DCP. {yields} High removal efficiencies were obtained (98%) in a short time (30 min). {yields} Roots were re-used for six consecutive cycles with high efficiency. {yields} Post removal solutions showed no toxicity. {yields} This method could be used for continuous and safe treatment of phenolic effluents. - Abstract: Chlorophenols are harmful pollutants, frequently found in the effluents of several industries. For this reason, many environmental friendly technologies are being explored for their removal from industrial wastewaters. The aim of the present work was to study the scale up of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) removal from synthetic wastewater, using Brassica napus hairy roots and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in a discontinuous stirred tank reactor. We have analyzed some operational conditions, because the scale up of such process was poorly studied. High removal efficiencies were obtained (98%) in a short time (30 min). When roots were re-used for six consecutive cycles, 2,4-DCP removal efficiency decreased from 98 to 86%, in the last cycle. After the removal process, the solutions obtained from the reactor were assessed for their toxicity using an acute test with Lactuca sativa L. seeds. Results suggested that the treated solution was less toxic than the parent solution, because neither inhibition of lettuce germination nor effects in root and hypocotyl lengths were observed. Therefore, we provide evidence that Brassica napus hairy roots could be effectively used to detoxify solutions containing 2,4-DCP and they have considerable potential for a large scale removal of this pollutant. Thus, this study could help to design a method for continuous and safe treatment of effluents containing chlorophenols.

  19. Minnesota wood energy scale-up project 1994 establishment cost data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downing, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Pierce, R. [Champion International, Alexandria, MN (United States); Kroll, T. [Minnesota Department of Natural Resources-Forestry, St. Cloud, MN (United States)

    1996-03-18

    The Minnesota Wood Energy Scale-up Project began in late 1993 with the first trees planted in the spring of 1994. The purpose of the project is to track and monitor economic costs of planting, maintaining and monitoring larger scale commercial plantings. For 15 years, smaller scale research plantings of hybrid poplar have been used to screen for promising, high-yielding poplar clones. In this project 1000 acres of hybrid poplar trees were planted on Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) land near Alexandria, Minnesota in 1994. The fourteen landowners involved re-contracted with the CRP for five-year extensions of their existing 10-year contracts. These extended contracts will expire in 2001, when the plantings are 7 years old. The end use for the trees planted in the Minnesota Wood Energy Scale-up Project is undetermined. They will belong to the owner of the land on which they are planted. There are no current contracts in place for the wood these trees are projected to supply. The structure of the wood industry in the Minnesota has changed drastically over the past 5 years. Stumpage values for fiber have risen to more than $20 per cord in some areas raising the possibility that these trees could be used for fiber rather than energy. Several legislative mandates have forced the State of Minnesota to pursue renewable energy including biomass energy. These mandates, a potential need for an additional 1700 MW of power by 2008 by Northern States Power, and agricultural policies will all affect development of energy markets for wood produced much like agricultural crops. There has been a tremendous amount of local and international interest in the project. Contractual negotiations between area landowners, the CRP, a local Resource Conservation and Development District, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and others are currently underway for additional planting of 1000 acres in spring 1995.

  20. Trans-national scale-up of services in global health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilan Shahin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scaling up innovative healthcare programs offers a means to improve access, quality, and health equity across multiple health areas. Despite large numbers of promising projects, little is known about successful efforts to scale up. This study examines trans-national scale, whereby a program operates in two or more countries. Trans-national scale is a distinct measure that reflects opportunities to replicate healthcare programs in multiple countries, thereby providing services to broader populations. METHODS: Based on the Center for Health Market Innovations (CHMI database of nearly 1200 health programs, the study contrasts 116 programs that have achieved trans-national scale with 1,068 single-country programs. Data was collected on the programs' health focus, service activity, legal status, and funding sources, as well as the programs' locations (rural v. urban emphasis, and founding year; differences are reported with statistical significance. FINDINGS: This analysis examines 116 programs that have achieved trans-national scale (TNS across multiple disease areas and activity types. Compared to 1,068 single-country programs, we find that trans-nationally scaled programs are more donor-reliant; more likely to focus on targeted health needs such as HIV/AIDS, TB, malaria, or family planning rather than provide more comprehensive general care; and more likely to engage in activities that support healthcare services rather than provide direct clinical care. CONCLUSION: This work, based on a large data set of health programs, reports on trans-national scale with comparison to single-country programs. The work is a step towards understanding when programs are able to replicate their services as they attempt to expand health services for the poor across countries and health areas. A subset of these programs should be the subject of case studies to understand factors that affect the scaling process, particularly seeking to identify mechanisms

  1. Manufacturing process scale-up of optical grade transparent spinel ceramic at ArmorLine Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilman, Joseph; Voyles, John; Nick, Joseph; Shaffer, Lawrence

    2013-06-01

    While transparent Spinel ceramic's mechanical and optical characteristics are ideal for many Ultraviolet (UV), visible, Short-Wave Infrared (SWIR), Mid-Wave Infrared (MWIR), and multispectral sensor window applications, commercial adoption of the material has been hampered because the material has historically been available in relatively small sizes (one square foot per window or less), low volumes, unreliable supply, and with unreliable quality. Recent efforts, most notably by Technology Assessment and Transfer (TA and T), have scaled-up manufacturing processes and demonstrated the capability to produce larger windows on the order of two square feet, but with limited output not suitable for production type programs. ArmorLine Corporation licensed the hot-pressed Spinel manufacturing know-how of TA and T in 2009 with the goal of building the world's first dedicated full-scale Spinel production facility, enabling the supply of a reliable and sufficient volume of large Transparent Armor and Optical Grade Spinel plates. With over $20 million of private investment by J.F. Lehman and Company, ArmorLine has installed and commissioned the largest vacuum hot press in the world, the largest high-temperature/high-pressure hot isostatic press in the world, and supporting manufacturing processes within 75,000 square feet of manufacturing space. ArmorLine's equipment is capable of producing window blanks as large as 50" x 30" and the facility is capable of producing substantial volumes of material with its Lean configuration and 24/7 operation. Initial production capability was achieved in 2012. ArmorLine will discuss the challenges that were encountered during scale-up of the manufacturing processes, ArmorLine Optical Grade Spinel optical performance, and provide an overview of the facility and its capabilities.

  2. Do we have the right models for scaling up health services to achieve the Millennium Development Goals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Savitha

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is widespread agreement on the need for scaling up in the health sector to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs. But many countries are not on track to reach the MDG targets. The dominant approach used by global health initiatives promotes uniform interventions and targets, assuming that specific technical interventions tested in one country can be replicated across countries to rapidly expand coverage. Yet countries scale up health services and progress against the MDGs at very different rates. Global health initiatives need to take advantage of what has been learned about scaling up. Methods A systematic literature review was conducted to identify conceptual models for scaling up health in developing countries, with the articles assessed according to the practical concerns of how to scale up, including the planning, monitoring and implementation approaches. Results We identified six conceptual models for scaling up in health based on experience with expanding pilot projects and diffusion of innovations. They place importance on paying attention to enhancing organizational, functional, and political capabilities through experimentation and adaptation of strategies in addition to increasing the coverage and range of health services. These scaling up approaches focus on fostering sustainable institutions and the constructive engagement between end users and the provider and financing organizations. Conclusions The current approaches to scaling up health services to reach the MDGs are overly simplistic and not working adequately. Rather than relying on blueprint planning and raising funds, an approach characteristic of current global health efforts, experience with alternative models suggests that more promising pathways involve "learning by doing" in ways that engage key stakeholders, uses data to address constraints, and incorporates results from pilot projects. Such approaches should be applied to current

  3. Guidelines for the scale-up of an aqueous ceramic process: a case study of statistical process control

    OpenAIRE

    Mortara, L; Alcock, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    Process-scale up is the change from a feasibility study in a laboratory to a full-scale prototype production process. It is an important issue for the ceramics industry, but has been the subject of relatively little systematic research. This paper will show how certain manufacturing concepts used in a number of industries - can be applied to the scale up of a feasibility study level, aqueous tape casting process. In particular, it examines the elements of process standardisa...

  4. Treatment of arsenic contaminated water in a laboratory scale up-flow bio-column reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes the observations on the treatment of arsenic contaminated synthetic industrial effluent in a bio-column reactor. Ralstonia eutropha MTCC 2487 has been immobilized on the granular activated carbon (GAC) bed in the column reactor. The synthetic water sample containing As(T) (As(III):As(V) = 1:1), Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn at the initial concentrations of 25, 10, 2, 5, 10 ppm, respectively, was used. Concentrations of all the elements have been found to be reduced below their permissible limits in the treated water. The significant effect of empty bed contact time (EBCT) and bed height on the arsenic removal was observed in the initial stage. However, after some time of operation (approximately 3-4 days) no such effect was observed. Removal of As(III) and As(V) was almost similar after ∼2 days of operation. However, at the initial stage As(V) removal was slightly more than that of As(III). In absence of washing, after ∼4-5 days of operation, the bio-column reactor was observed to act as a GAC column reactor based on physico-chemical adsorption. Like arsenic, the percent removals of Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn also attained minimum after ∼1 day and increased significantly to the optimum value within 3-4 days of operation. Dissolved oxygen (DO) has been found to decrease along with the increasing bed height from the bottom. The pH of the solution in the reactor has increased slightly and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) has decreased with the time of operation

  5. Scale-up and design optimisation of anaerobic immobilised cell reactors for wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melidis, P.; Georgiou, D.; Aivasidis, A. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Demokritos University of Thrace, Xanthi (Greece)

    2003-07-01

    The legitimacy of model transfer in process technology has to date found no noteworthy influence on the design and dimensioning of immobilized cell bioreactors for anaerobic wastewater treatment. The latter still takes place solely on the basis of purely empirical rather than scientific considerations. However, it is possible to carry out design dimensioning on the basis of model theory considerations founded on process technology, as the examples of the design of fixed-bed-loop reactors and that of fluidized-bed reactors demonstrate. Together with the spatial separation of fermentative acid formation and methanogenesis (through a two-stage biology with two different microbial populations), a multi-stage design of methanisation through cascade connection of fixed-bed-loop reactors (for the narrowing of the residence time distribution) has proved particularly advantageous when applied to highly loaded and complex constituted wastewater. Technical reaction investigations on appropriately configured variants showed that for a COD conversion of 80-90% (wastewater from the foodstuffs industry), the reactor volume of the two-stage methanisation cascade could be reduced by 40-50% compared to that of the simply performed methanisation stage. (author)

  6. Fluidized-Bed Coating with Sodium Sulfate and PVA-TiO2, 3. The Role of Tackiness and the Tack Stokes Number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Peter Dybdahl; Bach, Poul; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2009-01-01

    In the first and second parts of this study [Hede, P. D.; Bach, P.; Jensen, A. D. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 2009, 48, 1893 and 1905], agglomeration tendencies were studied for two types of coatings: sodium sulfate and PVA-TiO2. Results showed that the agglomeration tendency is always lower for the salt...

  7. Task sharing in Zambia: HIV service scale-up compounds the human resource crisis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Aisling

    2010-09-17

    Abstract Background Considerable attention has been given by policy makers and researchers to the human resources for health crisis in Africa. However, little attention has been paid to quantifying health facility-level trends in health worker numbers, distribution and workload, despite growing demands on health workers due to the availability of new funds for HIV\\/AIDS control scale-up. This study analyses and reports trends in HIV and non-HIV ambulatory service workloads on clinical staff in urban and rural district level facilities. Methods Structured surveys of health facility managers, and health services covering 2005-07 were conducted in three districts of Zambia in 2008 (two urban and one rural), to fill this evidence gap. Intra-facility analyses were conducted, comparing trends in HIV and non-HIV service utilisation with staff trends. Results Clinical staff (doctors, nurses and nurse-midwives, and clinical officers) numbers and staff population densities fell slightly, with lower ratios of staff to population in the rural district. The ratios of antenatal care and family planning registrants to nurses\\/nurse-midwives were highest at baseline and increased further at the rural facilities over the three years, while daily outpatient department (OPD) workload in urban facilities fell below that in rural facilities. HIV workload, as measured by numbers of clients receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) and prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) per facility staff member, was highest in the capital city, but increased rapidly in all three districts. The analysis suggests evidence of task sharing, in that staff designated by managers as ART and PMTCT workers made up a higher proportion of frontline service providers by 2007. Conclusions This analysis of workforce patterns across 30 facilities in three districts of Zambia illustrates that the remarkable achievements in scaling-up HIV\\/AIDS service delivery has been on the back of sustained non

  8. Scaling up a Mobile Telemedicine Solution in Botswana: Keys to Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndlovu, Kagiso; Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Park, Elizabeth; Dikai, Zambo; Kovarik, Carrie L

    2014-01-01

    Effective health care delivery is significantly compromised in an environment where resources, both human and technical, are limited. Botswana's health care system is one of the many in the African continent with few specialized medical doctors, thereby posing a barrier to patients' access to health care services. In addition, the traditional landline and non-robust Information Technology (IT) network infrastructure characterized by slow bandwidth still dominates the health care system in Botswana. Upgrading of the landline IT infrastructure to meet today's health care demands is a tedious, long, and expensive process. Despite these challenges, there still lies hope in health care delivery utilizing wireless telecommunication services. Botswana has recently experienced tremendous growth in the mobile telecommunication industry coupled with an increase in the number of individually owned mobile devices. This growth inspired the Botswana-UPenn Partnership (BUP) to collaborate with local partners to explore using mobile devices as tools to improve access to specialized health care delivery. Pilot studies were conducted across four medical specialties, including radiology, oral medicine, dermatology, and cervical cancer screening. Findings from the studies became vital evidence in support of the first scale-up project of a mobile telemedicine solution in Botswana, also known as "Kgonafalo." Some technical and social challenges were encountered during the initial studies, such as malfunctioning of mobile devices, accidental damage of devices, and cultural misalignment between IT and healthcare providers. These challenges brought about lessons learnt, including a strong need for unwavering senior management support, establishment of solid local public-private partnerships, and efficient project sustainability plans. Sustainability milestones included the development and signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Botswana government and a private

  9. Task sharing in Zambia: HIV service scale-up compounds the human resource crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simbaya Joseph

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considerable attention has been given by policy makers and researchers to the human resources for health crisis in Africa. However, little attention has been paid to quantifying health facility-level trends in health worker numbers, distribution and workload, despite growing demands on health workers due to the availability of new funds for HIV/AIDS control scale-up. This study analyses and reports trends in HIV and non-HIV ambulatory service workloads on clinical staff in urban and rural district level facilities. Methods Structured surveys of health facility managers, and health services covering 2005-07 were conducted in three districts of Zambia in 2008 (two urban and one rural, to fill this evidence gap. Intra-facility analyses were conducted, comparing trends in HIV and non-HIV service utilisation with staff trends. Results Clinical staff (doctors, nurses and nurse-midwives, and clinical officers numbers and staff population densities fell slightly, with lower ratios of staff to population in the rural district. The ratios of antenatal care and family planning registrants to nurses/nurse-midwives were highest at baseline and increased further at the rural facilities over the three years, while daily outpatient department (OPD workload in urban facilities fell below that in rural facilities. HIV workload, as measured by numbers of clients receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART and prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT per facility staff member, was highest in the capital city, but increased rapidly in all three districts. The analysis suggests evidence of task sharing, in that staff designated by managers as ART and PMTCT workers made up a higher proportion of frontline service providers by 2007. Conclusions This analysis of workforce patterns across 30 facilities in three districts of Zambia illustrates that the remarkable achievements in scaling-up HIV/AIDS service delivery has been on the back of

  10. Scaling up and error analysis of transpiration for Populus euphratica in a desert riparian forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, J.; Li, W.; Feng, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Water consumption information of the forest stand is the most important factor for regional water resources management. However, water consumption of individual trees are usually measured based on the limited sample trees , so, it is an important issue how to realize eventual scaling up of data from a series of sample trees to entire stand. Estimation of sap flow flux density (Fd) and stand sapwood area (AS-stand) are among the most critical factors for determining forest stand transpiration using sap flow measurement. To estimate Fd, the various links in sap flow technology have great impact on the measurement of sap flow, to estimate AS-stand, an appropriate indirect technique for measuring each tree sapwood area (AS-tree) is required, because it is impossible to measure the AS-tree of all trees in a forest stand. In this study, Fd was measured in 2 mature P. euphratic trees at several radial depths, 0~10, 10~30mm, using sap flow sensors with the heat ratio method, the relationship model between AS-tree and stem diameter (DBH), growth model of AS-tree were established, using investigative original data of DBH, tree-age, and AS-tree. The results revealed that it can achieve scaling up of transpiration from sample trees to entire forest stand using AS-tree and Fd, however, the transpiration of forest stand (E) will be overvalued by 12.6% if using Fd of 0~10mm, and it will be underestimated by 25.3% if using Fd of 10~30mm, it implied that major uncertainties in mean stand Fd estimations are caused by radial variations in Fd. E will be obviously overvalued when the AS-stand is constant, this result imply that it is the key to improve the prediction accuracy that how to simulate the AS-stand changes in the day scale; They also showed that the potential errors in transpiration with a sample size of approximately ≥30 were almost stable for P.euphrtica, this suggests that to make an allometric equation it might be necessary to sample at least 30 trees.

  11. Executive Power and Scaled-Up Gender Subtexts in Australian Entrepreneurial Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Jill; Sawers, Naarah

    2015-01-01

    Deputy Vice Chancellor and Pro Vice Chancellor positions have proliferated in response to the global, corporatised university landscape [Scott, G., S. Bell, H. Coates, and L. Grebennikov. 2010. "Australian Higher Education Leaders in Times of Change: The Role of Pro Vice Chancellor and Deputy Vice Chancellor." "Journal of Higher…

  12. Scaling up the Fabrication of Mechanically-Robust Carbon Nanofiber Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Curtin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to identify and address the main challenges associated with fabricating large samples of carbon foams composed of interwoven networks of carbon nanofibers. Solutions to two difficulties related with the process of fabricating carbon foams, maximum foam size and catalyst cost, were developed. First, a simple physical method was invented to scale-up the constrained formation of fibrous nanostructures process (CoFFiN to fabricate relatively large foams. Specifically, a gas deflector system capable of maintaining conditions supportive of carbon nanofiber foam growth throughout a relatively large mold was developed. ANSYS CFX models were used to simulate the gas flow paths with and without deflectors; the data generated proved to be a very useful tool for the deflector design. Second, a simple method for selectively leaching the Pd catalyst material trapped in the foam during growth was successfully tested. Multiple techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, surface area measurements, and mechanical testing, were employed to characterize the foams generated in this study. All results confirmed that the larger foam samples preserve the basic characteristics: their interwoven nanofiber microstructure forms a low-density tridimensional solid with viscoelastic behavior. Fiber growth mechanisms are also discussed. Larger samples of mechanically-robust carbon nanofiber foams will enable the use of these materials as strain sensors, shock absorbers, selective absorbents for environmental remediation and electrodes for energy storage devices, among other applications.

  13. Destruction of nuclear organic waste by supercritical water oxidation. Scale-up of the process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to design and then define appropriate dimensions for a supercritical oxidation reactor, a 2D and 3D simulation of the fluid dynamics and heat transfer during the oxidation process has been performed. The solver used is a commercial code, Fluent 6.2. The turbulent flow field in the reactor, created by the stirrer is taken into account with a k-omega model and a swirl imposed to the fluid. In the 3D case the rotation of the stirrer can be modeled thanks to the sliding mesh model. The reactivity of the system is taken into account with a classical combustion model EDC. Comparisons with experimental temperature measurements validate the ability of the CFD modeling to simulate the supercritical water oxidation process. Simulation results provide us a view inside the reactor on the flow, temperature fields and the oxidation localization and development. Results indicate that the flow can be considered as piston-like, heat transfers are strongly enhanced by the stirring. Hence the scaling up of the reactor volume, to reach a treatment capacity of 1 Kg/h of pure organics, can be done regarding the necessary residence times and temperature distribution needed for a complete destruction of the organic matter. (authors)

  14. Magnetic properties and scale-up of nanostructured cobalt carbide permanent magnetic powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamanpour, Mehdi, E-mail: zamanpour.m@husky.neu.edu; Bennett, Steven; Taheri, Parisa; Chen, Yajie [Center for Microwave Magnetic Materials and Integrated Circuits, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Harris, Vincent G. [Center for Microwave Magnetic Materials and Integrated Circuits, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Co{sub x}C magnetic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized via a modified polyol process without using a rare-earth catalyst during the synthesis process. The present results show admixtures of Co{sub 2}C and Co{sub 3}C phases possessing magnetization values exceeding 45 emu/g and coercivity values exceeding 2.3 kOe at room temperature. Moreover, these experiments have illuminated the important role of surfactants, reaction temperature, and reaction duration on the crystallographic structure and magnetic properties of Co{sub x}C, while tetraethylene glycol was employed as a reducing agent. The role of the ratios of Co{sub 2}C and Co{sub 3}C phases in the admixture magnetic properties is discussed. The crystallographic structure and particle size of the Co{sub x}C nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. Vibrating sample magnetometry was used to determine magnetic properties. Scale-up of synthesis to more than 5 g per batch was demonstrated with no significant degradation of magnetic properties.

  15. Batch fermentation of black tea by kombucha: A contribution to scale-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malbaša Radomir V.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Local domestic Kombucha was used in fermentation of 1.5 g L-1 of black tea (Indian tea, " Vitamin ", Horgoš, Serbia and Montenegro, sweetened with approximately 70 g L'1 of sucrose. Inoculation was performed either with 10% or 15% (v/v of fermentation broth from previous process. The fermentation was conducted in geometrically similar vessels with 0.4 L, 0.8 L, 4 L and 8 L of substrate, at 22±1 °C for 28 days. The samples were analyzed after 3, 4 5, 6, 7, 10, 14 and 28 days, so that their pH values, content of total acids sucrose, glucose and fructose contents, as well as contents of ethanol and vitamin C were determined. Based on the experiment design, the response surface for the product pH, as a function of time, beverage volume and inoculum concentration, was defined in the form of a second-order polynomial. From the obtained response surface, a formula for scaling-up of the process was derived.

  16. Methadone Maintenance Therapy in Vietnam: An Overview and Scaling-Up Plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tam T. M. Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vietnam is among the countries with the highest rate of HIV transmission through injecting drug users. HIV prevalence among injecting drug users is 20% and up to 50% in many provinces. An estimated number of drug users in the country by the end of 2011 were 171,000 in which the most common is heroin (85%. Detoxification at home, community, and in rehabilitation centers have been the main modalities for managing heroin addiction until Methadone Maintenance Treatment (MMT was piloted in 2008. Recent reports have demonstrated positive treatment outcomes. Incidence of HIV was found remarkably low among patients on MMT. Treatment has significantly improved the quality of life as well as stability for society. The government has granted the Ministry of Health (MoH to expand Methadone treatment to at least 30 provinces to provide treatment for more than 80,000 drug users by 2015. The Vietnam Administration for HIV/AIDS Control (VAAC and MOH have outlined the role and responsibility of key departments at the central and local levels in implementing and maintaining MMT treatment. This paper will describe the achievements of the MMT pilot program and the scaling-up plan as well as strategies to ensure quality and sustainability and to overcome the challenges in the coming years.

  17. Materials Engineering and Scale Up of Fluid Phase Chemical Hydrogen Storage for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westman, Matthew P.; Chun, Jaehun; Choi, Young Joon; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2016-01-25

    Among candidates for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell automotive applications, ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) is considered to be one of the most promising materials due to its high hydrogen content of 14-16 wt% below 200°C and high volumetric density. In our previous paper, we selected AB in silicone oil as a role model for a slurry hydrogen storage system. Materials engineering properties were optimized by increasing solid loading by using an ultra-sonic process. In this paper, we proceeded to scale up to liter size batches with solid loadings up to 50 wt% (8 wt% H2) with dynamic viscosities less than 1000cP at 25°C. The use of a non-ionic surfactant, Triton X-15, shows significant promise in controlling the level of foaming produced during the thermal dehydrogenation of the AB. Through the development of new and efficient processing techniques and the ability to adequately control the foaming, stable homogenous slurries of high solid loading have been demonstrated as a viable hydrogen delivery source.

  18. Transforming Global Health by Improving the Science of Scale-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Margaret E; Yamey, Gavin; Angell, Sonia Y; Beith, Alix; Cotlear, Daniel; Guanais, Frederico; Jacobs, Lisa; Saxenian, Helen; Victora, Cesar; Goosby, Eric

    2016-03-01

    In its report Global Health 2035, the Commission on Investing in Health proposed that health investments can reduce mortality in nearly all low- and middle-income countries to very low levels, thereby averting 10 million deaths per year from 2035 onward. Many of these gains could be achieved through scale-up of existing technologies and health services. A key instrument to close this gap is policy and implementation research (PIR) that aims to produce generalizable evidence on what works to implement successful interventions at scale. Rigorously designed PIR promotes global learning and local accountability. Much greater national and global investments in PIR capacity will be required to enable the scaling of effective approaches and to prevent the recycling of failed ideas. Sample questions for the PIR research agenda include how to close the gap in the delivery of essential services to the poor, which population interventions for non-communicable diseases are most applicable in different contexts, and how to engage non-state actors in equitable provision of health services in the context of universal health coverage. PMID:26934704

  19. Mechanochemistry applied to reformulation and scale-up production of Ethionamide: Salt selection and solubility enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Cristiane C; da Silva, Cecilia C P; Pereira, Carla C S S; Rosa, Paulo C P; Ellena, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Ethionamide (ETH), a Biopharmaceutics Classification System class II drug, is a second-line drug manufactured as an oral dosage form by Pfizer to treat tuberculosis. Since its discovery in 1956, only one reformulation was proposed in 2005 as part of the efforts to improve its solubility. Due to the limited scientific research on active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) for the treatment of neglected diseases, we focused on the development of an approachable and green supramolecular synthesis protocol for the production of novel solid forms of ETH. Initially, three salts were crystal engineered and supramolecular synthesized via slow evaporation of the solvent: a saccharinate, a maleate and an oxalate. The crystal structures of all salts were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. In sequence, mechanochemical protocols for them were developed, being the scale-up production of the maleate salt successfully reproducible and confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction. Finally, a more complete solid-state characterization was carried out for the ETH maleate salt, including thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and equilibrium solubility at different dissolution media. Although ETH maleate is thermodynamically less stable than ETH, the equilibrium solubility results revealed that this novel salt is much more soluble in purified water than ETH, thus being a suitable new candidate for future formulations. PMID:26472469

  20. From powder to technical body: the undervalued science of catalyst scale up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sharon; Michels, Nina-Luisa; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2013-07-21

    Progress in catalysis has been, is, and will always be motivated by societal needs (e.g. environment, energy, chemicals, fuels), with the ultimate aim of improving process efficiency on a technical scale. Technical catalysts are often complex multicomponent millimetre-sized bodies consisting of active phases, supports, and numerous additives in shaped forms suitable for their commercial application. They can differ strongly in composition, structure, porosity, and performance from research catalysts, i.e. laboratory-developed materials constituted by a single bulk or supported active phase in powder form, which are the predominant focus of academic investigations. The industrial manufacture of heterogeneous catalysts, encompassing the upscaled preparation, formulation, and structuring, is encircled by secrecy and is decisive for the overall process viability. Yet despite the tremendous relevance, understanding the added complexity of these multicomponent systems and the consequences for the respective structure-property-function relationships has been largely neglected. Accordingly, our review examines the intricacies of the scale up of heterogeneous catalysts. While emphasising the lack of fundamental knowledge we point out the multiple functions that additives could provide by enhancing the mass and heat transfer properties, acting as co-catalysts, or imparting improved chemical, mechanical, or thermal stability. Recent exemplary studies developing rational approaches to prepare, characterise, and evaluate technical catalysts are analysed in detail and new directions for research in this field are put forward. PMID:23648466

  1. Advances in membrane emulsification. Part B: recent developments in modelling and scale-up approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyropoulos, Fotis; Lloyd, David M; Hancocks, Robin D; Pawlik, Aleksandra K

    2014-03-15

    Membrane emulsification is a promising process for formulating emulsions and particulates. It offers many advantages over conventional 'high-shear' processes with narrower size distribution products, higher batch repeatability and lower energy consumption commonly demonstrated at a small scale. Since the process was first introduced around 25 years ago, understanding of the underlying mechanisms involved during microstructure formation has advanced significantly leading to the development of modelling approaches that predict processing output; e.g. emulsion droplet size and throughput. The accuracy and ease of application of these models is important to allow for the development of design equations which can potentially facilitate scale-up of the process and meet the manufacturer's specific requirements. Part B of this review considers the advantages and disadvantages of a variety of models developed to predict droplet size, flow behaviour and other phenomena (namely droplet-droplet interactions), with presentation of the appropriate formulae where necessary. Furthermore, the advancement of the process towards an industrial scale is also highlighted with additional recommendations by the authors for future work. PMID:24122852

  2. Completing Pre-Pilot Tasks To Scale Up Biomass Fractionation Pretreatment Apparatus From Batch To Continuous

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick Wingerson

    2004-12-15

    PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) was the recipient of a $200,000 Invention and Innovations (I&I) grant from the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to complete prepilot tasks in order to scale up its patented biomass fractionation pretreatment apparatus from batch to continuous processing. The initial goal of the I&I program, as detailed in PureVision's original application to the DOE, was to develop the design criteria to build a small continuous biomass fractionation pilot apparatus utilizing a retrofitted extruder with a novel screw configuration to create multiple reaction zones, separated by dynamic plugs within the reaction chamber that support the continuous counter-flow of liquids and solids at elevated temperature and pressure. Although the ultimate results of this 27-month I&I program exceeded the initial expectations, some of the originally planned tasks were not completed due to a modification of direction in the program. PureVision achieved its primary milestone by establishing the design criteria for a continuous process development unit (PDU). In addition, PureVision was able to complete the procurement, assembly, and initiate shake down of the PDU at Western Research Institute (WRI) in Laramie, WY during August 2003 to February 2004. During the month of March 2004, PureVision and WRI performed initial testing of the continuous PDU at WRI.

  3. Transforming Global Health by Improving the Science of Scale-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Margaret E.; Yamey, Gavin; Angell, Sonia Y.; Beith, Alix; Cotlear, Daniel; Guanais, Frederico; Jacobs, Lisa; Saxenian, Helen; Victora, Cesar; Goosby, Eric

    2016-01-01

    In its report Global Health 2035, the Commission on Investing in Health proposed that health investments can reduce mortality in nearly all low- and middle-income countries to very low levels, thereby averting 10 million deaths per year from 2035 onward. Many of these gains could be achieved through scale-up of existing technologies and health services. A key instrument to close this gap is policy and implementation research (PIR) that aims to produce generalizable evidence on what works to implement successful interventions at scale. Rigorously designed PIR promotes global learning and local accountability. Much greater national and global investments in PIR capacity will be required to enable the scaling of effective approaches and to prevent the recycling of failed ideas. Sample questions for the PIR research agenda include how to close the gap in the delivery of essential services to the poor, which population interventions for non-communicable diseases are most applicable in different contexts, and how to engage non-state actors in equitable provision of health services in the context of universal health coverage. PMID:26934704

  4. Linear Nitramine (DNDA-57): Synthesis, Scale-Up, Characterization, and Quantitative Estimation by GC/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalakshmi, R.; Naik, N. H.; Gore, G. M.; Sikder, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Dinitro-diaza-alkanes (DNDA-57) are linear nitramine plasticizers and find use in low-temperature sensitivity coefficient propellants. DNDA-57 is a mixture of 2,4-dinitro-2,4-diazapentane (DNDA-5), 2,4-dinitro-2,4-diazahexane (DNDA-6), and 3,5-dinitro-3,5-diazaheptane (DNDA-7) with percentage composition of 40 ± 5%, 44 ± 5% and 11 ± 2%, respectively. The synthesis process of DNDA-57 was established with slight modification of the reaction parameters to obtain good yield and the process was scaled up. The synthesized compound was thoroughly characterized by spectroscopic as well as thermal methods. The present study emphasizes gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC/MS) characterization by electron impact (EI) mode and chemical ionization (CI) mode to determine the fragmentation pattern. Further, the identified components were confirmed with general characterization. The study reveals that DNDA-5, DNDA-6, and DNDA-7 follow identical decomposition pattern. The friction and impact sensitivity study unveils the insensitive nature of DNDA-57.

  5. Scale-up of industrial biodiesel production to 40 m3using a liquid lipase formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Jason; Nordblad, Mathias; Martel, Hannah H.;

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the scale-up from an 80 L fed-batch scale to 40 m3 along with the design of a 4 m3continuous process for enzymatic biodiesel production catalysed by NS-40116 (a liquid formulation of a modified Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase). Based on the analysis of actual pilot plant...... the fed-batch and CSTR cases. Given similar operating conditions, the CSTR operation on average, has a reaction time which is 1.3 times greater than the fed-batch operation. We also showed how the process metrics can be used to quickly estimate the selling price of the enzyme. Assuming a biodiesel selling...... price of 0.6 USD/kg and a one-time use of the enzyme (0.1% (w/woil) enzyme dosage); the enzyme can then be sold for 30 USD/kg which ensures that that the enzyme cost is not more than 5% of the biodiesel revenue. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved...

  6. Transforming Global Health by Improving the Science of Scale-Up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E Kruk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In its report Global Health 2035, the Commission on Investing in Health proposed that health investments can reduce mortality in nearly all low- and middle-income countries to very low levels, thereby averting 10 million deaths per year from 2035 onward. Many of these gains could be achieved through scale-up of existing technologies and health services. A key instrument to close this gap is policy and implementation research (PIR that aims to produce generalizable evidence on what works to implement successful interventions at scale. Rigorously designed PIR promotes global learning and local accountability. Much greater national and global investments in PIR capacity will be required to enable the scaling of effective approaches and to prevent the recycling of failed ideas. Sample questions for the PIR research agenda include how to close the gap in the delivery of essential services to the poor, which population interventions for non-communicable diseases are most applicable in different contexts, and how to engage non-state actors in equitable provision of health services in the context of universal health coverage.

  7. Isolation of prebiotic carbohydrates by supercritical fluid extraction. Scaling-up and economical feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montañés, F; Fornari, T; Olano, A; Ibáñez, E

    2012-08-10

    Production of prebiotic carbohydrates at competitive prices is a challenge nowadays since the well-established production processes involve many purification steps which are labour intensive and require important amounts of reagents and products thus increasing prebiotic's price. Several processes have been studied in our laboratory involving the use of Supercritical Fluid Technology to fractionate and purify carbohydrate solid mixtures. Research carried out at laboratory scale using theoretical mixtures (lactose/lactulose and galactose/tagatose), commercially available carbohydrate mixtures and carbohydrate mixtures produced by enzymatic transglycosylation and isomerized with complexating reagents demonstrated that purification of prebiotic carbohydrates was technically possible by supercritical fluid extraction. In the present work, the process optimized at laboratory scale to fractionate carbohydrate mixtures produced by enzymatic transglycosylation has been scaled-up to an industrial level and its economic feasibility has been simulated employing AspenONE(®) V7.3 software to obtain consistent data supporting the interest of a potential investment for prebiotics production at large scale using supercritical fluids. PMID:22560345

  8. Accelerated Reforms in Healthcare Financing: The Need to Scale up Private Sector Participation in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuoma John Ejughemre

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The health sector, a foremost service sector in Nigeria, faces a number of challenges; primarily, the persistent under-funding of the health sector by the Nigerian government as evidence reveals low allocations to the health sector and poor health system performance which are reflected in key health indices of the country.Notwithstanding, there is evidence that the private sector could be a key player in delivering health services and impacting health outcomes, including those related to healthcare financing. This underscores the need to optimize the role of private sector in complementing the government’s commitment to financing healthcare delivery and strengthening the health system in Nigeria. There are also concerns about uneven quality and affordability of private-driven health systems, which necessitates reforms aimed at regulation. Accordingly, the argument is that the benefits of leveraging the private sector in complementing the national government in healthcare financing outweigh the challenges, particularly in light of lean public resources and finite donor supports. This article, therefore, highlights the potential for the Nigerian government to scale up healthcare financing by leveraging private resources, innovations and expertise, while working to achieve the universal health coverage.

  9. Scaling Up the Production of Recombinant Antimicrobial Plantaricin E from a Heterologous Host, Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Gargi; Srivastava, Sheela

    2015-09-01

    Enhanced production of heterologously expressed plantaricin (plnE) from Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) was achieved from a small- to large-scale batch culture. Starting from a 15-ml shake-flask culture grown in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth, the protein expression could be scaled up using 50 ml, 100 ml, 1 l, and 2 l batch culture. Using similar condition, plantaricin E (PlnE) was successfully expressed in a 30-l stirred fermenter. The protein was expressed as TRX-(His)6-fusion protein and separated by Ni(2+) affinity chromatography. Growth in two complex media, LB and Terrific broth (TB), was optimized and compared for the production of PlnE, which was higher in LB in comparison with that of TB. In the fermenter, 140 and 180 mg of PlnE could be produced from 12 l of culture volume at 30 and 25 °C, respectively. The yield of heterologously purified PlnE was found to be 1.2-1.5%, which was much higher in comparison with the plantaricins produced from the native strain of Lactobacillus plantarum (0.3-0.7%). Overproduction of PlnE with the help of heterologous expression can overcome the constraint of the low yield from producer strain and provides an easy and low-cost strategy for large-scale production. PMID:26044056

  10. Polyethylene encapsulatin of nitrate salt wastes: Waste form stability, process scale-up, and economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A polyethylene encapsulation system for treatment of low-level radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Polyethylene has several advantages compared with conventional solidification/stabilization materials such as hydraulic cements. Waste can be encapsulated with greater efficiency and with better waste form performance than is possible with hydraulic cement. The properties of polyethylene relevant to its long-term durability in storage and disposal environments are reviewed. Response to specific potential failure mechanisms including biodegradation, radiation, chemical attack, flammability, environmental stress cracking, and photodegradation are examined. These data are supported by results from extensive waste form performance testing including compressive yield strength, water immersion, thermal cycling, leachability of radioactive and hazardous species, irradiation, biodegradation, and flammability. The bench-scale process has been successfully tested for application with a number of specific ''problem'' waste streams. Quality assurance and performance testing of the resulting waste form confirmed scale-up feasibility. Use of this system at Rocky Flats Plant can result in over 70% fewer drums processed and shipped for disposal, compared with optimal cement formulations. Based on the current Rocky Flats production of nitrate salt per year, polyethylene encapsulation can yield an estimated annual savings between $1.5 million and $2.7 million, compared with conventional hydraulic cement systems. 72 refs., 23 figs., 16 tabs

  11. The Fermi Bubbles as a Scaled-up Version of Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we treat the Fermi bubbles as a scaled-up version of supernova remnants (SNRs). The bubbles are created through activities of the super-massive black hole (SMBH) or starbursts at the Galactic center (GC). Cosmic-rays (CRs) are accelerated at the forward shocks of the bubbles like SNRs, which means that we cannot decide whether the bubbles were created by the SMBH or starbursts from the radiation from the CRs. We follow the evolution of CR distribution by solving a diffusion-advection equation, considering the reduction of the diffusion coefficient by CR streaming. In this model, gamma-rays are created through hadronic interaction between CR protons and the gas in the Galactic halo. In the GeV band, we can well reproduce the observed flat distribution of gamma-ray surface brightness, because some amount of gas is left behind the shock. The edge of the bubbles is fairly sharp owing to the high gas density behind the shock and the reduction of the diffusion coefficient there. The latter also contr...

  12. Progress in scale-up of second-generation HTS conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremendous progress has been recently made in the achievement of high-performance, high-speed, long-length second-generation (2G) HTS conductors. Using ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) MgO and metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), SuperPower has scaled up tape lengths to 427 m with a minimum critical current value of 191 A/cm corresponding to a critical current x length performance of 81,550 m. Tape speeds up to 120 m/h have been reached with IBAD MgO, up to 80 m/h with buffer deposition and up to 45 m/h with MOCVD, all in single pass processing of 12 mm wide tape. Critical current value of 227 A/cm has been achieved in a 203 m long tape produced in an all-high-speed fabrication process. Critical current values have been raised to 721 A/cm, 592 A/cm and 486 A/cm in short, reel-to-reel processed tape, over 1 m length and over 11.1 m, respectively, using thicker MOCVD HTS films. Finally, over 10,000 m of copper-stabilized, 4 mm wide conductor has been produced and tested for delivery to the Albany Cable project. The average critical current of the 10,000 m lot was 81 A

  13. Quantifying reactor safety margins. Pt. 5; Evaluation of scale-up capabilitiers of best estimate codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuber, N. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD (USA)); Wilson, G.E.; Duffey, R.B.; Katsma, K.R. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls (USA)); Boyack, B.E. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Catton, I. (California Univ., Los Angeles (USA)); Griffith, P. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (USA)); Lellouche, G.S.; Levy, S. (Levy (S.), Inc., Campbell, CA (USA)); Rohatgi, U.S.; Wulff, W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

    1990-05-01

    This paper presents the CSAU procedure and rational for: (1) Evaluating the capability of a best estimate code to scale-up processes from reduced scale test facilities to full scale nuclear power plants, and (2) Quantifying the effects of scale distortions and/or a limited data base, on code uncertainty to calculate a safety parameter of interest (for example peak clad temperature). To this end, the procedure uses and integrates information from test facility design and operation, from scenario processes and phenomena and from code documentation. A flow diagram of the procedure is presented together with the prescribed steps. To present the rationale and need for the procedure, the paper also summarizes the scaling techniques developed and used to design and operate loss of coolant accident related test facilities. The procedure is illustrated by applying it to TRAC-PF1/MOD1 calculations of a large break loss of coolant accident in a four loop Westinghouse pressurized water reactor. The application demonstrates that the procedure is systematic, traceable and practical. (orig.).

  14. Scaling-up essential neuropsychiatric services in Ethiopia: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Kirsten Bjerkreim; Chisholm, Dan; Fekadu, Abebaw; Johansson, Kjell Arne

    2016-05-01

    INTRODUCTION : There is an immense need for scaling-up neuropsychiatric care in low-income countries. Contextualized cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs) provide relevant information for local policies. The aim of this study is to perform a contextualized CEA of neuropsychiatric interventions in Ethiopia and to illustrate expected population health and budget impacts across neuropsychiatric disorders. METHODS : A mathematical population model (PopMod) was used to estimate intervention costs and effectiveness. Existing variables from a previous WHO-CHOICE regional CEA model were substantially revised. Treatments for depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and epilepsy were analysed. The best available local data on epidemiology, intervention efficacy, current and target coverage, resource prices and salaries were used. Data were obtained from expert opinion, local hospital information systems, the Ministry of Health and literature reviews. RESULTS : Treatment of epilepsy with a first generation antiepileptic drug is the most cost-effective treatment (US$ 321 per DALY adverted). Treatments for depression have mid-range values compared with other interventions (US$ 457-1026 per DALY adverted). Treatments for schizophrenia and bipolar disorders are least cost-effective (US$ 1168-3739 per DALY adverted). CONCLUSION : This analysis gives the Ethiopian government a comprehensive overview of the expected costs, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of introducing basic neuropsychiatric interventions. PMID:26491060

  15. SCALE UP OF CERAMIC WASTE FORMS FOR THE EBR-II SPENT FUEL TREATMENT PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew C. Morrison; Kenneth J. Bateman; Michael F. Simpson

    2010-11-01

    ABSTRACT SCALE UP OF CERAMIC WASTE FORMS FOR THE EBR-II SPENT FUEL TREATMENT PROCESS Matthew C. Morrison, Kenneth J. Bateman, Michael F. Simpson Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 The ceramic waste process is the intended method for disposing of waste salt electrolyte, which contains fission products from the fuel-processing electrorefiners (ER) at the INL. When mixed and processed with other materials, the waste salt can be stored in a durable ceramic waste form (CWF). The development of the CWF has recently progressed from small-scale testing and characterization to full-scale implementation and experimentation using surrogate materials in lieu of the ER electrolyte. Two full-scale (378 kg and 383 kg) CWF test runs have been successfully completed with final densities of 2.2 g/cm3 and 2.1 g/cm3, respectively. The purpose of the first CWF was to establish material preparation parameters. The emphasis of the second pre-qualification test run was to evaluate a preliminary multi-section CWF container design. Other considerations were to finalize material preparation parameters, measure the material height as it consolidates in the furnace, and identify when cracking occurs during the CWF cooldown process.

  16. Excellence in Physics Education Award: SCALE-UP, Student Centered Active Learning Environment with Upside-down Pedagogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beichner, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The Student-Centered Active Learning Environment with Upside-down Pedagogies (SCALE-UP) Project combines curricula and a specially-designed instructional space to enhance learning. SCALE-UP students practice communication and teamwork skills while performing activities that enhance their conceptual understanding and problem solving skills. This can be done with small or large classes and has been implemented at more than 250 institutions. Educational research indicates that students should collaborate on interesting tasks and be deeply involved with the material they are studying. SCALE-UP classtime is spent primarily on ``tangibles'' and ``ponderables''--hands-on measurements/observations and interesting questions. There are also computer simulations (called ``visibles'') and hypothesis-driven labs. Students sit at tables designed to facilitate group interactions. Instructors circulate and engage in Socratic dialogues. The setting looks like a banquet hall, with lively interactions nearly all the time. Impressive learning gains have been measured at institutions across the US and internationally. This talk describes today's students, how lecturing got started, what happens in a SCALE-UP classroom, and how the approach has spread. The SCALE-UP project has greatly benefitted from numerous Grants made by NSF and FIPSE to NCSU and other institutions.

  17. Act local, think global: how the Malawi experience of scaling up antiretroviral treatment has informed global policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Anthony D; Ford, Nathan; Jahn, Andreas; Schouten, Erik J; Libamba, Edwin; Chimbwandira, Frank; Maher, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    The scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Malawi was based on a public health approach adapted to its resource-poor setting, with principles and practices borrowed from the successful tuberculosis control framework. From 2004 to 2015, the number of new patients started on ART increased from about 3000 to over 820,000. Despite being a small country, Malawi has made a significant contribution to the 15 million people globally on ART and has also contributed policy and service delivery innovations that have supported international guidelines and scale up in other countries. The first set of global guidelines for scaling up ART released by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2002 focused on providing clinical guidance. In Malawi, the ART guidelines adopted from the outset a more operational and programmatic approach with recommendations on health systems and services that were needed to deliver HIV treatment to affected populations. Seven years after the start of national scale-up, Malawi launched a new strategy offering all HIV-infected pregnant women lifelong ART regardless of the CD4-cell count, named Option B+. This strategy was subsequently incorporated into a WHO programmatic guide in 2012 and WHO ART guidelines in 2013, and has since then been adopted by the majority of countries worldwide. In conclusion, the Malawi experience of ART scale-up has become a blueprint for a public health response to HIV and has informed international efforts to end the AIDS epidemic by 2030. PMID:27600800

  18. Comparison of a Traditional Teaching Model to the Scale-Up Teaching Model in Undergraduate Biology: A Mixed Method Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mears, Samantha

    This project compared a SCALE-UP teaching model to a traditional teaching model. Traditional teaching is now considered a poor motivator for student performance and interests, and the SCALE-UP model was proposed to combat these problems. SCALE-UP classrooms are designed to encourage cooperative learning as well as other active learning methods. The study looked at teacher and student opinions of the two models to determine which one they preferred and why. The study also compared the students' grades between the two classes to see if there was a difference between test scores, as well as learning gains for pre-test to post-test. Student and teacher behaviors were also quantified based on categories of engagement in class. The purpose of this study was to support the literature on the idea of a viable and better option to traditional lecture in the form of the SCALE-UP model. Based on the results, students prefer and enjoy a SCALE-UP classroom more than a traditional lecture. The students also performed better and learn more when compared to the traditional lecture class.

  19. Radio-isotope production scale-up at the University of Wisconsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickles, Robert Jerome [Univ of Wisconsin

    2014-06-19

    Our intent has been to scale up our production capacity for a subset of the NSAC-I list of radioisotopes in jeopardy, so as to make a significant impact on the projected national needs for Cu-64, Zr-89, Y-86, Ga-66, Br-76, I-124 and other radioisotopes that offer promise as PET synthons. The work-flow and milestones in this project have been compressed into a single year (Aug 1, 2012- July 31, 2013). The grant budget was virtually dominated by the purchase of a pair of dual-mini-cells that have made the scale-up possible, now permitting the Curie-level processing of Cu-64 and Zr-89 with greatly reduced radiation exposure. Mile stones: 1. We doubled our production of Cu-64 and Zr-89 during the grant period, both for local use and out-bound distribution to ≈ 30 labs nationwide. This involved the dove-tailing of beam schedules of both our PETtrace and legacy RDS cyclotron. 2. Implemented improved chemical separation of Zr-89, Ga-66, Y-86 and Sc-44, with remote, semi-automated dissolution, trap-and-release separation under LabView control in the two dual-mini-cells provided by this DOE grant. A key advance was to fit the chemical stream with miniature radiation detectors to confirm the transfer operations. 3. Implemented improved shipping of radioisotopes (Cu-64, Zr-89, Tc-95m, and Ho-163) with approved DOT 7A boxes, with a much-improved FedEx shipping success compared to our previous steel drums. 4. Implemented broad range quantitative trace metal analysis, employing a new microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometer (Agilent 4200) capable of ppb sensitivity across the periodic table. This new instrument will prove essential in bringing our radiometals into FDA compliance needing CoA’s for translational research in clinical trials. 5. Expanded our capabilities in target fabrication, with the purchase of a programmable 1600 oC inert gas tube furnace for the smelting of binary alloy target materials. A similar effort makes use of our RF induction furnace, allowing

  20. The Design and Scale-Up of Multiple-Impeller Fermenters for Liquid Film Controlled Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labík, L.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mechanically agitated gas-liquid contactors are frequently used in the chemical, food and biochemical industries as fermenters and as hydrogenation or chlorination reactors. However wide is the usage of such vessels, their design is not based on chemical engineering data, but is still rather empirical. Thus, it is highly desirable to have a tool for the rational design of agitated gas-liquid contactors that is based on fundamental chemical engineering parameters that are transferable to other systems and operating conditions. Focusing on liquid film-controlled processes and using the data from fermenters of different scales, we develop kLa correlations that are suitable for scale-up. First, we discuss how to determine the proper experimental kLa values, which are not distorted by other equipment parameters as is the gas residence time. We demonstrate the possible kLa distortion on the pilot-plant experimental data by comparing the results obtained by two different experimental techniques. Further, we present physically correct kLa data for fully non-coalescent (sodium sulphate solution batch. The data are presented both for laboratory and pilot-plant fermenters. We identify the process parameters, the values of which are dependent on the vessel scale when operated under the same power input per volume, and, using these parameters, we develop common kLa correlations suitable to describe the data for various scales of the vessel. The correlations developed reduce the uncertainty in predicting the volume of industrial scale fermenters from almost 1/2 to 1/4 of their total volume, thereby enabling significant reductions in both the initial costs, and operating costs.

  1. Scaling up nutrition in fragile and conflict-affected states: the pivotal role of governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Sebastian A J; Perez-Ferrer, Carolina; Griffiths, Andrew; Brunner, Eric

    2015-02-01

    Acute and chronic undernutrition undermine conditions for health, stability and socioeconomic development across the developing world. Although fragile and conflict-affected states have some of the highest rates of undernutrition globally, their response to the multilateral 'Scaling Up Nutrition' (SUN) initiative in its first two-year period was ambivalent. The purpose of this research was to investigate factors affecting fragile and conflict-affected states' engagement with SUN, and to examine what differentiated those fragile states that joined SUN in its first phase from those that did not. Drawing on global databases (Unicef, World Bank, UNDP), and qualitative country case studies (Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Sierra Leone, Pakistan and Yemen) we used bivariate logistic regressions and principal component analysis to assess social, economic and political factors across 41 fragile states looking for systematic differences between those that had signed up to SUN before March 2013 (n = 16), and those that had not (n = 25). While prevalence of malnutrition, health system functioning and level of citizen empowerment had little or no impact on a fragile state's likelihood of joining SUN, the quality of governance (QOG) strongly predicted accession. SUN-signatory fragile states scored systematically better on the World Bank's Country Policy and Institutional Assessment (CPIA) and the Worldwide Governance Indicators 'effectiveness of government' indices. We conclude that strengthening governance in fragile states may enhance their engagement with initiatives such as SUN, but also (recognising the potential for endogeneity), that the way aid is structured and delivered in fragile states may be an underlying determinant of whether and how governance in such contexts improves. The research demonstrates that more nuanced analysis of conditions within and among countries classed as 'fragile and conflict-affected' is both possible and necessary if aid

  2. Constraints to exclusive breastfeeding practice among breastfeeding mothers in Southwest Nigeria: implications for scaling up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agunbiade Ojo M

    2012-04-01

    , scaling up of exclusive breastfeeding among mothers requires concerted efforts at the macro, meso and micro levels of the Nigerian society.

  3. Protecting HIV information in countries scaling up HIV services: a baseline study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beck Eduard J

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individual-level data are needed to optimize clinical care and monitor and evaluate HIV services. Confidentiality and security of such data must be safeguarded to avoid stigmatization and discrimination of people living with HIV. We set out to assess the extent that countries scaling up HIV services have developed and implemented guidelines to protect the confidentiality and security of HIV information. Methods Questionnaires were sent to UNAIDS field staff in 98 middle- and lower-income countries, some reportedly with guidelines (G-countries and others intending to develop them (NG-countries. Responses were scored, aggregated and weighted to produce standard scores for six categories: information governance, country policies, data collection, data storage, data transfer and data access. Responses were analyzed using regression analyses for associations with national HIV prevalence, gross national income per capita, OECD income, receiving US PEPFAR funding, and being a G- or NG-country. Differences between G- and NG-countries were investigated using non-parametric methods. Results Higher information governance scores were observed for G-countries compared with NG-countries; no differences were observed between country policies or data collection categories. However, for data storage, data transfer and data access, G-countries had lower scores compared with NG-countries. No significant associations were observed between country score and HIV prevalence, per capita gross national income, OECD economic category, and whether countries had received PEPFAR funding. Conclusions Few countries, including G-countries, had developed comprehensive guidelines on protecting the confidentiality and security of HIV information. Countries must develop their own guidelines, using established frameworks to guide their efforts, and may require assistance in adapting, adopting and implementing them.

  4. Scaling-up of Energy Services Access in East Africa to achieve the Millennium Development Goals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvidson, Anders; Nordstroem, Mattias; Forslund, Helena; Syngellakis, Katerina; Marcel, Jean-Christian; Woodsworth, Gregory; Songela, Francis; Sawe, Estomih; Ngigi, Ashington; Macharia, Daniel; Ngoye, Elizabeth

    2006-06-15

    From the 13th to the 15th March 2006, the ENABLE team together with UNDP facilitated a three day consultative workshop hosted by the East African Community. The principal objective of this workshop was to facilitate the design of a regional energy access workplan and accompanying investment programmes to support the achievement of the millennium development goals. The workshop brought together almost 50 stakeholders from the East African region, representing various sectors (health, education, water, agriculture, environment, finance, etc.), organisations (public, private and NGOs) and donors, with the objective to identify and recommend actions that need to be undertaken in East Africa at regional, national and local levels in order to achieve the EAC Regional Energy Access Scale-up targets endorsed by the Ministers of Energy of Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda in August 2005. In order to generate new and substantive information during the three days, a highly interactive and participatory approach was used, where participants worked intensively in small groups with a set of questions which examined the issues and actions needed to achieve the four EAC Regional Energy Access Scale-up targets, as listed below: Target 1: Enable the use of modern fuels for 50% of those who at present use traditional biomass for cooking. Support efforts to develop and adopt the use of improved cook stoves, means to reduce indoor air pollution, and measures to increase sustainable biomass production. Target 2: Access to reliable modern energy services for all urban and peri-urban poor. Target 3: Electricity for services such as lighting, refrigeration, information and communication technology, and water treatment and supply for schools, clinics, hospitals and community centres. Target 4: Access to mechanical power within the community for all communities for productive uses. The main output from the workshop was a set of interventions for each of the energy access scale-up targets

  5. Scale-Up Testing-Foam as a Remedial Amendment Carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes results from intermediate-scale, two-dimensional testing of foam injection into sedimentary materials collected from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The testing was performed to evaluate the effects of delivery pressure, injection rate, foam stability, foam quality, and formation heterogeneities on the migration of foam, water, remediation amendment, and contaminants within a sedimentary volume. Testing was accomplished in a test bed that is configured in the form of two thin rectangular boxes. Each of the boxes holds approximately 135 liters (255 kilograms) of sediment. Foam was injected into each box through a segment of polyvinyl chloride slotted well casing, and air was extracted from the boxes through a similar system. Four sets of tests were conducted. During Test 1, both of the boxes were loaded in a homogeneous manner, while in Tests 2, 3, and 4, both of the boxes were loaded so as to contain two rectangular zones of heterogeneity. In addition, a zone of the sediment contained in the test bed used for Test 4 was augmented with uranium-rich calcite to produce a known concentration of uranium. The injection rate varied between the boxes during the Test 1 but was the same for each box during the final three tests. The foam generation formula for Tests 1 and 2 consisted of an aqueous solution of anionic surfactant. The foam generation formula used in Test 3 consisted of an aqueous solution of anionic surfactant and contained 25,000 milligrams per liter (mg/L) of phosphate in the form of a 9:1 mixture of sodium phosphate and sodium tripolyphosphate. The foam generating formula used in Test 4 consisted of an aqueous solution of an anionic surfactant and a nonionic surfactant and also contained 5,000 mg/L of phosphate as the aforementioned mixture. Subsequent to each of the four tests, the test beds were disassembled, and samples of the sediments were taken and analyzed for a number of parameters, depending on the specific

  6. Air and water pollution remediation. A fixed bed reactor made of UV lamps and glass fiber plates coated with TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esterkin, C.R.; Negro, A.C.; Alfano, O.M.; Cassano, A.E. [Inst. de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica, INTEC (UNL-CONICET), Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2003-07-01

    In a previous paper, the modeling and experimental verification of the radiation field inside a reactor made up of TiO{sub 2} coated, parallel, flat glass fiber meshes, bilaterally UV irradiated was accomplished. In this work, we study the degradation of tricloroethylene (TCE) in an air stream with different values of the pollutant feed concentration, under operating conditions where kinetic control of the process is established. A langmuir-hinshelwood type kinetic expression is proposed and the kinetic parameters are estimated. The results show good agreement between predictions derived from the kinetic expression and the experimental concentrations of TCE data at the exit of the reactor. (orig.)

  7. Fluidized bed heating process and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Capacitive electrical heating of a fluidized bed enables the individual solid particles within the bed to constitute the hottest portion thereof. This effect is achieved by applying an A. C. voltage potential between dielectric coated electrodes, one of which is advantageously the wall of the fluidized bed rejection zone, sufficient to create electrical currents in said particles so as to dissipate heat therein. In the decomposition of silane or halosilanes in a fluidized bed reaction zone, such heating enhances the desired deposition of silicon product on the surface of the seed particles within the fluidized bed and minimizes undesired coating of silicon on the wall of the reaction zone and the homogeneous formation of fine silicon powder within said zone.

  8. A numerical investigation of the scale-up effects on flow, heat transfer, and kinetics processes of FCC units.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S. L.

    1998-08-25

    Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) technology is the most important process used by the refinery industry to convert crude oil to valuable lighter products such as gasoline. Process development is generally very time consuming especially when a small pilot unit is being scaled-up to a large commercial unit because of the lack of information to aide in the design of scaled-up units. Such information can now be obtained by analysis based on the pilot scale measurements and computer simulation that includes controlling physics of the FCC system. A Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code, ICRKFLO, has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and has been successfully applied to the simulation of catalytic petroleum cracking risers. It employs hybrid hydrodynamic-chemical kinetic coupling techniques, enabling the analysis of an FCC unit with complex chemical reaction sets containing tens or hundreds of subspecies. The code has been continuously validated based on pilot-scale experimental data. It is now being used to investigate the effects of scaled-up FCC units. Among FCC operating conditions, the feed injection conditions are found to have a strong impact on the product yields of scaled-up FCC units. The feed injection conditions appear to affect flow and heat transfer patterns and the interaction of hydrodynamics and cracking kinetics causes the product yields to change accordingly.

  9. Collaboration, negotiation, and coalescence for interagency-collaborative teams to scale-up evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A; Fettes, Danielle L; Hurlburt, Michael S; Palinkas, Lawrence A; Gunderson, Lara; Willging, Cathleen E; Chaffin, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    Implementation and scale-up of evidence-based practices (EBPs) is often portrayed as involving multiple stakeholders collaborating harmoniously in the service of a shared vision. In practice, however, collaboration is a more complex process that may involve shared and competing interests and agendas, and negotiation. The present study examined the scale-up of an EBP across an entire service system using the Interagency Collaborative Team approach. Participants were key stakeholders in a large-scale county-wide implementation of an EBP to reduce child neglect, SafeCare. Semistructured interviews and/or focus groups were conducted with 54 individuals representing diverse constituents in the service system, followed by an iterative approach to coding and analysis of transcripts. The study was conceptualized using the Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment framework. Although community stakeholders eventually coalesced around implementation of SafeCare, several challenges affected the implementation process. These challenges included differing organizational cultures, strategies, and approaches to collaboration; competing priorities across levels of leadership; power struggles; and role ambiguity. Each of the factors identified influenced how stakeholders approached the EBP implementation process. System-wide scale-up of EBPs involves multiple stakeholders operating in a nexus of differing agendas, priorities, leadership styles, and negotiation strategies. The term collaboration may oversimplify the multifaceted nature of the scale-up process. Implementation efforts should openly acknowledge and consider this nexus when individual stakeholders and organizations enter into EBP implementation through collaborative processes. PMID:24611580

  10. Scale-Up of Safe & Civil Schools' Model for School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolkowski, Keith; Strycker, Lisa; Ward, Bryce

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the scale-up of a Safe & Civil Schools "Foundations: Establishing Positive Discipline Policies" positive behavioral interventions and supports initiative through 4 years of "real-world" implementation in a large urban school district. The study extends results from a previous randomized controlled trial…

  11. Scale up, optimization and stability analysis of Curcumin C3 complex-loaded nanoparticles for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Amalendu P

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nanoparticle based delivery of anticancer drugs have been widely investigated. However, a very important process for Research & Development in any pharmaceutical industry is scaling nanoparticle formulation techniques so as to produce large batches for preclinical and clinical trials. This process is not only critical but also difficult as it involves various formulation parameters to be modulated all in the same process. Methods In our present study, we formulated curcumin loaded poly (lactic acid-co-glycolic acid nanoparticles (PLGA-CURC. This improved the bioavailability of curcumin, a potent natural anticancer drug, making it suitable for cancer therapy. Post formulation, we optimized our process by Reponse Surface Methodology (RSM using Central Composite Design (CCD and scaled up the formulation process in four stages with final scale-up process yielding 5 g of curcumin loaded nanoparticles within the laboratory setup. The nanoparticles formed after scale-up process were characterized for particle size, drug loading and encapsulation efficiency, surface morphology, in vitro release kinetics and pharmacokinetics. Stability analysis and gamma sterilization were also carried out. Results Results revealed that that process scale-up is being mastered for elaboration to 5 g level. The mean nanoparticle size of the scaled up batch was found to be 158.5 ± 9.8 nm and the drug loading was determined to be 10.32 ± 1.4%. The in vitro release study illustrated a slow sustained release corresponding to 75% drug over a period of 10 days. The pharmacokinetic profile of PLGA-CURC in rats following i.v. administration showed two compartmental model with the area under the curve (AUC0-∞ being 6.139 mg/L h. Gamma sterilization showed no significant change in the particle size or drug loading of the nanoparticles. Stability analysis revealed long term physiochemical stability of the PLGA-CURC formulation. Conclusions A successful

  12. Impact of SCALE-UP on science teaching self-efficacy of students in general education science courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassani, Mary Kay Kuhr

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of two pedagogical models used in general education science on non-majors' science teaching self-efficacy. Science teaching self-efficacy can be influenced by inquiry and cooperative learning, through cognitive mechanisms described by Bandura (1997). The Student Centered Activities for Large Enrollment Undergraduate Programs (SCALE-UP) model of inquiry and cooperative learning incorporates cooperative learning and inquiry-guided learning in large enrollment combined lecture-laboratory classes (Oliver-Hoyo & Beichner, 2004). SCALE-UP was adopted by a small but rapidly growing public university in the southeastern United States in three undergraduate, general education science courses for non-science majors in the Fall 2006 and Spring 2007 semesters. Students in these courses were compared with students in three other general education science courses for non-science majors taught with the standard teaching model at the host university. The standard model combines lecture and laboratory in the same course, with smaller enrollments and utilizes cooperative learning. Science teaching self-efficacy was measured using the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument - B (STEBI-B; Bleicher, 2004). A science teaching self-efficacy score was computed from the Personal Science Teaching Efficacy (PTSE) factor of the instrument. Using non-parametric statistics, no significant difference was found between teaching models, between genders, within models, among instructors, or among courses. The number of previous science courses was significantly correlated with PTSE score. Student responses to open-ended questions indicated that students felt the larger enrollment in the SCALE-UP room reduced individual teacher attention but that the large round SCALE-UP tables promoted group interaction. Students responded positively to cooperative and hands-on activities, and would encourage inclusion of more such activities in all of the

  13. Solar thermal production of zinc - Final steps toward scale-up - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, A.

    2008-05-15

    A 10 kW receiver-reactor prototype (called ZIRRUS) was further improved and tested for the solar thermal de-composition of ZnO, which is the 1{sup st} step of the two-step water-splitting thermochemical ZnO/Zn cycle. The rotating cylindrical cavity was made of either sintered ZnO or sintered Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tiles placed on top of a multi-layer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based ceramics for thermal shock resistance, mechanical stability, gas diffusion barrier, and thermal insulation. Pre-heated Ar gas was injected for aerodynamic window protection and for minimizing recombination of product gases in the cavity. Experimentation was carried out at PSI's High-Flux Solar Simulator with the direct heating 10 kW reactor prototype subjected to peak radiative fluxes exceeding 5,800 suns. The reactor operated without incident for a total of more than 40 h at maximum temperatures - measured behind the ZnO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tiles - ranging from 1807-1907 K. Thermal dissociation of ZnO(s) near 2000 K was demonstrated for experimental runs over 4 h in transient ablation mode with up to nine semi-continuous feed cycles of ZnO particles. A working Zn/O{sub 2} separation device based on the rapid quenching of the Zn/O{sub 2} mixture is ready to be incorporated at the exit of the solar reactor. Zinc yields of up to 94% were obtained when using total Ar/Zn(g) dilution of 530 and a cooling rate of about 10{sup 5} K/s. The fully integrated solar reactor will be scaled up to the pilot scale of 100 kW. A newly developed reactor model that couples radiation, conduction, and convection heat transfer to the reaction kinetics will allow determining optimal operational conditions for matching the feeding rate to the reaction rate and for maximizing solar-to-chemical energy conversion efficiency. The 2{sup nd} step of the ZnO/Zn cycle has been experimentally demonstrated at ETH using an aerosol-flow reactor for in-situ formation and hydrolysis of Zn nanoparticles

  14. Impact monitoring of the national scale up of zinc treatment for childhood diarrhea in Bangladesh: repeat ecologic surveys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles P Larson

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Zinc treatment of childhood diarrhea has the potential to save 400,000 under-five lives per year in lesser developed countries. In 2004 the World Health Organization (WHO/UNICEF revised their clinical management of childhood diarrhea guidelines to include zinc. The aim of this study was to monitor the impact of the first national campaign to scale up zinc treatment of childhood diarrhea in Bangladesh. METHODS/FINDINGS: Between September 2006 to October 2008 seven repeated ecologic surveys were carried out in four representative population strata: mega-city urban slum and urban nonslum, municipal, and rural. Households of approximately 3,200 children with an active or recent case of diarrhea were enrolled in each survey round. Caretaker awareness of zinc as a treatment for childhood diarrhea by 10 mo following the mass media launch was attained in 90%, 74%, 66%, and 50% of urban nonslum, municipal, urban slum, and rural populations, respectively. By 23 mo into the campaign, approximately 25% of urban nonslum, 20% of municipal and urban slum, and 10% of rural under-five children were receiving zinc for the treatment of diarrhea. The scale-up campaign had no adverse effect on the use of oral rehydration salt (ORS. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term monitoring of scale-up programs identifies important gaps in coverage and provides the information necessary to document that intended outcomes are being attained and unintended consequences avoided. The scale-up of zinc treatment of childhood diarrhea rapidly attained widespread awareness, but actual use has lagged behind. Disparities in zinc coverage favoring higher income, urban households were identified, but these were gradually diminished over the two years of follow-up monitoring. The scale up campaign has not had any adverse effect on the use of ORS. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  15. Systems approach to monitoring and evaluation guides scale up of the Standard Days Method of family planning in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igras, Susan; Sinai, Irit; Mukabatsinda, Marie; Ngabo, Fidele; Jennings, Victoria; Lundgren, Rebecka

    2014-05-01

    There is no guarantee that a successful pilot program introducing a reproductive health innovation can also be expanded successfully to the national or regional level, because the scaling-up process is complex and multilayered. This article describes how a successful pilot program to integrate the Standard Days Method (SDM) of family planning into existing Ministry of Health services was scaled up nationally in Rwanda. Much of the success of the scale-up effort was due to systematic use of monitoring and evaluation (M&E) data from several sources to make midcourse corrections. Four lessons learned illustrate this crucially important approach. First, ongoing M&E data showed that provider training protocols and client materials that worked in the pilot phase did not work at scale; therefore, we simplified these materials to support integration into the national program. Second, triangulation of ongoing monitoring data with national health facility and population-based surveys revealed serious problems in supply chain mechanisms that affected SDM (and the accompanying CycleBeads client tool) availability and use; new procedures for ordering supplies and monitoring stockouts were instituted at the facility level. Third, supervision reports and special studies revealed that providers were imposing unnecessary medical barriers to SDM use; refresher training and revised supervision protocols improved provider practices. Finally, informal environmental scans, stakeholder interviews, and key events timelines identified shifting political and health policy environments that influenced scale-up outcomes; ongoing advocacy efforts are addressing these issues. The SDM scale-up experience in Rwanda confirms the importance of monitoring and evaluating programmatic efforts continuously, using a variety of data sources, to improve program outcomes. PMID:25276581

  16. Assembly-Controlled Permeability of Layer-by-Layer Polymeric Microcapsules Using a Tapered Fluidized Bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noi, Ka Fung; Roozmand, Ali; Björnmalm, Mattias; Richardson, Joseph J; Franks, George V; Caruso, Frank

    2015-12-23

    Nano- and microcapsules engineered through layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly are finding an increasingly large number of applications as catalysts, electrochemical biosensors, bioreactors, artificial cells and drug delivery vehicles. While centrifugation-based LbL assembly is the most common method for coating template particles and preparing capsules, it is a batch process and requires frequent intervention that renders the system challenging to automate and scale up. Here, we report the use of a tapered fluidized bed (TFB) for the preparation of multilayered polymer capsules. This is a significant improvement over our recent approach of fluidizing particles in cylindrical fluidized beds (CFB) for LbL assembly. We demonstrate that TFB is compatible with particles TFB LbL assembly were investigated. The obtained TFB microcapsules demonstrate increased film thickness and roughness compared with those prepared using centrifugation-based LbL assembly. Furthermore, PMASH microcapsules exhibit lower swelling and permeability when prepared via TFB LbL assembly compared with centrifugation-based LbL assembly due to enhanced multilayer deposition, entanglement, and cross-linking. Therefore, polymeric capsules fabricated via TFB LbL assembly may be useful for encapsulation and retention of relatively low molecular weight (∼20 kDa) hydrophilic biomacromolecules to passively or responsively release the payload for drug delivery applications. PMID:26651354

  17. Solids mixing in spouted beds

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, H. H.; Bridgwater, J.; Professor J. Bridgwater

    1981-01-01

    Many industrial processes require contact between particles and a fluid or spray in order to effect drying, coating or granulation. One device capable of contacting fluid and particles efficiently is a spouted bed in which a jet of fluid is injected into solid particles. This forms an open channel or spout and induces material circulation in a downward moving annulus. For the continuous throughput of solids, knowledge is required of the mixing and particle motions within th...

  18. Scale-Up Effects of CO2 Capture by Methyldiethanolamine (MDEA Solutions in Terms of Loading Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel P. Santos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, results from three different CO2 capture experimental scales (laboratory, pilot unit, and a larger pilot unit, using aqueous amine solutions of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA 20 wt %, are compared in terms of loading capacity. All three tested scales produced results regarding CO2 absorption using MDEA aqueous solutions, which were largely in accordance with the theoretical loading capacity of the used amine. Nevertheless, the observed differences between the theoretical and actual absorption behaviors of MDEA solutions for the different scales can be justified with the relative weight that process variables exhibit when the process is scaled up. Therefore, in order to achieve a correct scale-up of the process, simulations should be performed in order to define the best set of operational parameters in order to achieve high production yields and therefore more process profitability.

  19. Microalgal biohydrogen production considering light energy and mixing time as the two key features for scale-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oncel, S; Sabankay, M

    2012-10-01

    This study focuses on a scale-up procedure considering two vital parameters light energy and mixing for microalgae cultivation, taking Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as the model microorganism. Applying two stage hydrogen production protocol to 1L flat type and 2.5L tank type photobioreactors hydrogen production was investigated with constant light energy and mixing time. The conditions that provide the shortest transfer time to anaerobic culture (light energy; 2.96 kJ s(-1)m(-3) and mixing time; 1 min) and highest hydrogen production rate (light energy; 1.22 kJ s(-1)m(-3) and mixing time; 2.5 min) are applied to 5L photobioreactor. The final hydrogen production for 5L system after 192 h was measured as 195 ± 10 mL that is comparable with the other systems is a good validation for the scale-up procedure. PMID:22858490

  20. Scale-up of anaerobic 1,3-propanediol production by Clostridium butyricum DSP1 from crude glycerol

    OpenAIRE

    Szymanowska-Powałowska, Daria; Białas, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Background As the production of biofuels from raw materials continuously increases, optimization of production processes is necessary. A very important issue is the development of wasteless methods of biodiesel production. One way of utilization of glycerol generated in biodiesel production is its microbial conversion to 1,3-PD (1,3-propanediol). Results The study investigated the scale-up of 1,3-PD synthesis from crude glycerol by Clostridium butyricum. Batch fermentations were carried out i...

  1. Scale-up for model verification; design, modeling and control of an elastic parallel kinematic 6-DOFs manipulator

    OpenAIRE

    Huijts, Martijn; Brouwer, Dannis; van Dijk

    2009-01-01

    Manipulators with guidance constructions based on elastic mechanisms are of interest for the increasing number of precision vacuum applications. Previously, the design of an elastic MEMS-based 6-DOFs manipulator was presented. Characterization in six degrees of freedom (DOFs) of a manipulator the size of several square millimeters, however, is difficult. Therefore, a scaled-up version of the manipulator was built. This ‘macro’ version serves as a research platform for the verification of the ...

  2. The necessity for scale up in R and D: Approach for waste immobilization in cement by BNFL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The full scale processing of nuclear wastes immobilized in cement utilizes a wide range of chemical and physical parameters. The success of this work however, involves many factors and material properties which are affected by the actual scaling up processes. The paper outlines the approach and experience gained by British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) to recognize and evaluate the major factors involved in order to successfully produce large scale stable products acceptable to the appropriate regulatory bodies and suitable for long term disposal

  3. Generic and low dose antiretroviral therapy in adults and children: implication for scaling up treatment in resource limited settings

    OpenAIRE

    Ramautarsing Reshmie; Ananworanich Jintanat

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Although access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for the treatment of HIV has increased during the last decade, many patients are still in need of treatment. With limited funds to provide ART to millions of patients worldwide, there is a need for alternative ways to scale up ART in resource limited settings. This review provides an overview of pharmacokinetic, safety and efficacy studies of generic and reduced dose ART. The production of generic ART has greatly influenced the decline ...

  4. Scaling up stigma? The effects of antiretroviral roll-out on stigma and HIV testing. Early evidence from rural Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Roura, M.; Urassa, M; Busza, J; Mbata, D; Wringe, A; Zaba, B

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the interplay between antiretroviral therapy (ART) scale-up, different types of stigma and Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT) uptake 2 years after the introduction of free ART in a rural ward of Tanzania. Methods: Qualitative study using in-depth interviews and group activities with a purposive sample of 91 community leaders, 77 ART clients and 16 health providers. Data were analysed for recurrent themes using NVIVO-7 software. Results: The complex interplay bet...

  5. The Role of National Development Banks in Intermediating International Climate Finance to Scale Up Private Sector Investments

    OpenAIRE

    Diana Smallridge; Barbara Buchner; Chiara Trabacchi; Maria Netto; José Juan Gomes Lorenzo; Lucila Serra

    2012-01-01

    Significant investments are needed to support the global transition to a low-carbon, climate resilient future. Current finance flows fall short of global financing needs, and massive scaling up is needed to unlock additional financial resources and foster a sustainable investment pathway. Overcoming barriers to private sector investments is critical, and international climate finance can play a catalytic role in this regard. National development banks (NDBs) have a unique role in this context...

  6. Positive spill-over effects of ART scale up on wider health systems development: evidence from Ethiopia and Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasschaert Freya

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global health initiatives have enabled the scale up of antiretroviral treatment (ART over recent years. The impact of HIV-specific funds and programmes on non-HIV-related health services and health systems in genera has been debated extensively. Drawing on evidence from Malawi and Ethiopia, this article analyses the effects of ART scale-up interventions on human resources policies, service delivery and general health outcomes, and explores how synergies can be maximized. Methods Data from Malawi and Ethiopia were compiled between 2004 and 2009 and between 2005 and 2009, respectively. We developed a conceptual health systems framework for the analysis. We used the major changes in human resources policies as an entry point to explore the wider health systems changes. Results In both countries, the need for an HIV response triggered an overhaul of human resources policies. As a result, the health workforce at health facility and community level was reinforced. The impact of this human resources trend was felt beyond the scale up of ART services; it also contributed to an overall increase in functional health facilities providing curative, mother and child health, and ART services. In addition to a significant increase in ART coverage, we observed a remarkable rise in user rates of non-HIV health services and an improvement in overall health outcomes. Conclusions Interventions aimed at the expansion of ART services and improvement of long-term retention of patients in ART care can have positive spill-over effects on the health system. The responses of Malawi and Ethiopia to their human resources crises was exceptional in many respects, and some of the lessons learnt can be useful in other contexts. The case studies show the feasibility of obtaining improved health outcomes beyond HIV through scaled-up ART interventions when these are part of a long-term, system-wide health plan supported by all decision makers and funders.

  7. Exploring scale-up, spread, and sustainability: an instrumental case study tracing an innovation to enhance dysphagia care

    OpenAIRE

    Ilott, I.; Gerrish, K.; Pownall, S; Eltringham, S.; BOOTH, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Adoption, adaptation, scale-up, spread, and sustainability are ill-defined, undertheorised, and little-researched implementation science concepts. An instrumental case study will track the adoption and adaptation, or not, of a locally developed innovation about dysphagia as a patient safety issue. The case study will examine a conceptual framework with a continuum of spread comprising hierarchical control or ‘making it happen’, participatory adaptation or ‘help it happen’, and f...

  8. Scaling Up Access to Electricity : Pay-as-You-Go Plans in Off-Grid Energy Services

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, Alejandro; Bareisaite, Asta

    2015-01-01

    Although the payment models offered by off-grid energy companies are less flexible than those implemented with great success by mobile telephone companies, they may still have an important role to play in scaling up off-grid energy services for billions of people who lack access to electricity. More research is needed to assess the importance of flexible payments in attracting reliable low...

  9. Optimization of transient gene expression in mammalian cells and potential for scale-up using flow electroporation

    OpenAIRE

    Parham, Janet H.; Iannone, Marie A.; Overton, Laurie K.; Hutchins, Jeff T.

    1998-01-01

    The goals of this study were to identify mammalian cell lines which could be efficiently transiently-transfected and scaled-up for protein production. The transfection efficiencies of eight cell lines (NSO, NSO-TAg, CV-1, COS-7, CHO, CHO-TAg, HEK 293, and 293-EBNA) were measured using electroporation for DNA delivery and green fluorescent protein (Evans, 1996) as the reporter gene. In addition, we have evaluated the effects of stable expression of viral proteins, cell cycle manipulation, and ...

  10. Monoseptic cultivation of phototrophic microorganisms--development and scale-up of a photobioreactor system with thermal sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Christian; Steinau, Torsten; Gerbsch, Norbert; Buchholz, Rainer

    2003-07-01

    The use of phototrophic microorganisms as sources of biological active substances in photoautotrophic and mixotrophic cultivation modes requires an adequate cultivation system with thermal sterilization. A corresponding photobioreactor system in the 10, 25 and 100 l scales was developed. This "Medusa"-photobioreactor system represents a concept based on the air-lift loop principle, whose working volume is irradiated by external light sources. The incident irradiation can be varied by a light control system. An effective CO(2)/O(2) gas exchange is enabled due to the efficient supply with process gas by several gas supply nozzles within the system and a large degassing surface. Using a model to describe the growth characteristics of the organisms, the volumetric irradiation coefficient I(DX) was defined as scale-up parameter. On this basis the scale-up from 1 l bubble columns to the 10 and 100 l scales was realized. The scale-up was performed successfully with Chlorella salina as model organism. A maximum biomass concentration of 7.89 g (dry weight) l(-1) at a maximum specific growth rate of 0.058 h(-1) and a yield of 35 mg l(-1) h(-1) was obtained in a batch cultivation in the 100 l scale under photoautotrophic conditions with an initial biomass concentration of approx. 0.03 g l(-1). PMID:12919807

  11. Voluntary medical male circumcision: strategies for meeting the human resource needs of scale-up in southern and eastern Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Curran

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC reduces female-to-male HIV transmission by approximately 60%; modeling suggests that scaling up VMMC to 80% of men 15- to 49-years-old within five years would avert over 3.3 million new HIV infections in 14 high priority countries/regions in southern and eastern Africa by 2025 and would require 20.33 million circumcisions. However, the shortage of health professionals in these countries must be addressed to reach these proposed coverage levels. To identify human resource approaches that are being used to improve VMMC volume and efficiency, we looked at previous literature and conducted a program review. We identified surgical efficiencies, non-surgical efficiencies, task shifting, task sharing, temporary redeployment of public sector staff during VMMC campaign periods, expansion of the health workforce through recruitment of unemployed, recently retired, newly graduating, or on-leave health care workers, and the use of volunteer medical staff from other countries as approaches that address human resource constraints. Case studies from Kenya, Tanzania, and Swaziland illustrate several innovative responses to human resource challenges. Although the shortage of skilled personnel remains a major challenge to the rapid scale-up of VMMC in the 14 African priority countries/regions, health programs throughout the region may be able to replicate or adapt these approaches to scale up VMMC for public health impact.

  12. Up-scaling expectations among Pakistan's HIV bureaucrats: entrepreneurs of the self and job precariousness post-scale-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Ayaz

    2014-01-01

    Existing research has documented how the expansion of HIV programming has produced new subjectivities among the recipients of interventions. However, this paper contends that changes in politics, power and subjectivities may also be seen among the HIV bureaucracy in the decade of scale-up. One year's ethnographic fieldwork was conducted among AIDS control officials in Pakistan at a moment of rolling back a World Bank-financed Enhanced Programme. In 2003, the World Bank convinced the Musharraf regime to scale up the HIV response, offering a multimillion dollar soft loan package. I explore how the Enhanced Programme initiated government employees into a new transient work culture and turned the AIDS control programmes into a hybrid bureaucracy. However, the donor money did not last long and individuals' entrepreneurial abilities were tested in a time of crisis engendered by dependence on aid, leaving them precariously exposed to job insecurity, and undermining the continuity of AIDS prevention and treatment in the country. I do not offer a story of global 'best practices' thwarted by local 'lack of capacity', but an ethnographic critique of the transnational HIV apparatus and its neoliberal underpinning. I suggest that this Pakistan-derived analysis is more widely relevant in the post-scale-up decade. PMID:24387191

  13. Scale-up of Routine Viral Load Testing in Resource-Poor Settings: Current and Future Implementation Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Teri; Cohn, Jennifer; Bonner, Kimberly; Hargreaves, Sally

    2016-04-15

    Despite immense progress in antiretroviral therapy (ART) scale-up, many people still lack access to basic standards of care, with our ability to meet the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS 90-90-90 treatment targets for HIV/AIDS dependent on dramatic improvements in diagnostics. The World Health Organization recommends routine monitoring of ART effectiveness using viral load (VL) testing at 6 months and every 12 months, to monitor treatment adherence and minimize failure, and will publish its VL toolkit later this year. However, the cost and complexity of VL is preventing scale-up beyond developed countries and there is a lack of awareness among clinicians as to the long-term patient benefits and its role in prolonging the longevity of treatment programs. With developments in this diagnostic field rapidly evolving-including the recent improvements for accurately using dried blood spots and the imminent appearance to the market of point-of-care technologies offering decentralized diagnosis-we describe current barriers to VL testing in resource-limited settings. Effective scale-up can be achieved through health system and laboratory system strengthening and test price reductions, as well as tackling multiple programmatic and funding challenges. PMID:26743094

  14. Scale-up of BDD anode system for electrochemical oxidation of phenol simulated wastewater in continuous mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scale-up of boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode system is significant to the practical application of electrochemical oxidation in bio-refractory wastewater treatment. In this study, the performance of a smaller BDD anode (24 cm2) system in continuous mode electrochemical oxidation of phenol simulated wastewater was first investigated and well described by the response surface methodology (RSM). Furthermore, the RSM was extended to examine the scale-up feasibility of BDD anode systems with similar configurations. It was demonstrated that both COD degradation efficiency and specific energy consumption could be expected at the same level even as the system was enlarged over 100 times, which implied that BDD anode system could be successfully scaled up through controlling the same retention time, current density, initial COD, and conductivity conditions. Based on this study, a larger BDD anode (2904 cm2) system was constructed and systematic measurements were made on its performance in electrochemical oxidation of phenol simulated wastewater. Very good agreement was found between measured and predicted results by RSM. At the optimized conditions, the larger BDD anode system could easily reduce the COD of phenol simulated wastewater from 633 mg L-1 to 145 mg L-1 (-1, National Discharge Standard of China) during 80 min with specific energy consumption only 31 kWh kgCOD-1.

  15. Innovations in coating technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Sharareh S; Toegel, Stefan; Viernstein, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Despite representing one of the oldest pharmaceutical techniques, coating of dosage forms is still frequently used in pharmaceutical manufacturing. The aims of coating range from simply masking the taste or odour of drugs to the sophisticated controlling of site and rate of drug release. The high expectations for different coating technologies have required great efforts regarding the development of reproducible and controllable production processes. Basically, improvements in coating methods have focused on particle movement, spraying systems, and air and energy transport. Thereby, homogeneous distribution of coating material and increased drying efficiency should be accomplished in order to achieve high end product quality. Moreover, given the claim of the FDA to design the end product quality already during the manufacturing process (Quality by Design), the development of analytical methods for the analysis, management and control of coating processes has attracted special attention during recent years. The present review focuses on recent patents claiming improvements in pharmaceutical coating technology and intends to first familiarize the reader with the available procedures and to subsequently explain the application of different analytical tools. Aiming to structure this comprehensive field, coating technologies are primarily divided into pan and fluidized bed coating methods. Regarding pan coating procedures, pans rotating around inclined, horizontal and vertical axes are reviewed separately. On the other hand, fluidized bed technologies are subdivided into those involving fluidized and spouted beds. Then, continuous processing techniques and improvements in spraying systems are discussed in dedicated chapters. Finally, currently used analytical methods for the understanding and management of coating processes are reviewed in detail in the last section of the review. PMID:19075909

  16. The success factors of scaling-up Estonian sexual and reproductive health youth clinic network - from a grassroots initiative to a national programme 1991–2013

    OpenAIRE

    Kempers, J.P.; Ketting, E.; Chandra-Mouli, V.; T. Raudsepp

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A growing number of middle-income countries are scaling up youth-friendly sexual and reproductive health pilot projects to national level programmes. Yet, there are few case studies on successful national level scale-up of such programmes. Estonia is an excellent example of scale-up of a small grassroots adolescent sexual and reproductive health initiative to a national programme, which most likely contributed to improved adolescent sexual and reproductive health outcomes. This st...

  17. Scale-up of community-based malaria control can be achieved without degrading community health workers' service quality: the Village Malaria Worker project in Cambodia

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuoka Junko; Poudel Krishna C; Ly Po; Nguon Chea; Socheat Duong; Jimba Masamine

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Malaria control has been scaled up in many developing countries in their efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goals. Cambodia recently scaled up their Village Malaria Worker (VMW) project by substantially increasing the number of VMWs and expanding the project's health services to include treatment of fever, diarrhoea, and Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) in children under five. This study examined if the scale-up interfered with VMWs' service quality, actions, ...

  18. CIRCULATING MOVING BED COMBUSTION PROOF OF CONCEPT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jukkola, Glen

    2010-06-30

    Circulating Moving Bed (CMB) combustion technology has its roots in traditional circulating fluidized bed technology and involves a novel method of solid fuel combustion and heat transfer. CMB technology represents a step change in improved performance and cost relative to conventional PC and FBC boilers. The CMB heat exchanger preheats the energy cycle working fluid, steam or air, to the high temperature levels required in systems for advanced power generation. Unique features of the CMB are the reduction of the heat transfer surfaces by about 60% as a result of the enhanced heat transfer rates, flexibility of operation, and about 30% lower cost over existing technology. The CMB Phase I project ran from July 2001 through March 2003. Its objective was to continue development of the CMB technology with a series of proof of concept tests. The tests were conducted at a scale that provided design data for scale up to a demonstration plant. These objectives were met by conducting a series of experiments in ALSTOM Power’s Multi-use Test Facility (MTF). The MTF was modified to operate under CMB conditions of commercial interest. The objective of the tests were to evaluate gas-to-solids heat transfer in the upper furnace, assess agglomeration in the high temperature CMB bubbling bed, and evaluate solids-to-tube heat transfer in the moving bed heat exchanger. The Phase I program results showed that there are still some significant technical uncertainties that needed to be resolved before the technology can be confidently scaled up for a successful demonstration plant design. Work remained in three primary areas: • scale up of gas to solid heat transfer • high temperature finned surface design • the overall requirements of mechanical and process design. The CMB Phase II workscope built upon the results of Phase I and specifically addressed the remaining technical uncertainties. It included a scaled MTF heat transfer test to provide the necessary data to scale up gas

  19. TABLET COATING TECHNIQUES: CONCEPTS AND RECENT TRENDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Ankit

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tablet coating is a common pharmaceutical technique of applying a thin polymer-based film to a tablet or a granule containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs. Solid dosage forms are coated for a number of reasons, the most important of which is controlling the release profiles. The amount of coating on the surface of a tablet is critical to the effectiveness of the oral dosage form. Tablets are usually coated in horizontal rotating pans with the coating solution sprayed onto the free surface of the tablet bed. The advantages of tablet coating are taste masking, odour masking, physical and chemical protection, protects the drug from the gastric environment etc. There are various techniques for tablet coating such as sugar coating, film coating, and enteric coating. Recent trends in pharmaceutical technologies are the development of coating methods which overcomes the various disadvantages associated with solvent based coatings. In these latest technologies coating materials are directly coated onto the surface of solid dosage forms without using any solvent. Various solventless coatings are available such as electrostatic dry coating, magnetically assisted impaction coating, compression coating, hot melt coating, powder coating, and supercritical fluid coating. Supercell Coating Technology is a revolutionary tablet coating that accurately deposits controlled amounts of coating materials on tablets even if they are extremely hygroscopic or friable. Magnetically assisted impaction coating, electrostatic dry coating in solventless coatings, aqueous film coating and Supercell coating technology are also available recent technique of coating. An ideal tablet should be free from any visual defect or functional defect. The advancements and innovations in tablet manufacture have not decreased the problems, often encountered in the production, instead have increased the problems, mainly because of the complexities of tablet presses; and/or the

  20. The BeUpstanding ProgramTM: Scaling up the Stand Up Australia Workplace Intervention for Translation into Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve N Healy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Context and purpose: Too much sitting is now recognised as a common risk factor for several health outcomes, with the workplace identified as a key setting in which to address prolonged sitting time. The Stand Up Australia intervention was designed to reduce prolonged sitting in the workplace by addressing influences at multiple-levels, including the organisation, the environment, and the individual. Intervention success has been achieved within the context of randomised controlled trials, where research staff deliver several of the key intervention components. This study describes the initial step in the multi-phase process of scaling up the Stand Up Australia intervention for workplace translation. Methods: A research-government partnership was critical in funding and informing the prototype for the scaled up BeUpstanding programTM. Evidence, protocols and materials from Stand Up Australia were adapted in collaboration with funding partner Workplace Health and Safety Queensland to ensure consistency and compatibility with existing government frameworks and resources. In recognition of the key role of workplace champions in facilitating workplace health promotion programs, the BeUpstanding programTM is designed to be delivered through a stand-alone, free, website-based toolkit using a 'train the champion' approach. Key findings and significance: The BeUpstanding programTM was influenced by the increasing recognition of prolonged sitting as an emerging health issue as well as industry demand. The research-government partnership was critical in informing and resourcing the development of the scaled-up program.

  1. Scaling-up a public health innovation: a comparative study of post-abortion care in Bolivia and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Deborah L; Crane, Barbara B; Benson, Janie; Solo, Julie; Fetters, Tamara

    2007-06-01

    Post-abortion care (PAC), an innovation for treating women with complications of unsafe abortion, has been introduced in public health systems around the world since the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD). This article analyzes the process of scaling-up two of the three key elements of the original PAC model: providing prompt clinical treatment to women with abortion complications and offering post-abortion contraceptive counseling and methods in Bolivia and Mexico. The conceptual framework developed from this comparative analysis includes the environmental context for PAC scale-up; the major influences on start-up, expansion, and institutionalization of PAC; and the health, financial, and social impacts of institutionalization. Start-up in both Bolivia and Mexico was facilitated by innovative leaders or catalyzers who were committed to introducing PAC services into public health care settings, collaboration between international organizations and public health institutions, and financial resources. Important processes for successful PAC expansion included strengthening political commitment to PAC services through research, advocacy, and partnerships; improving health system capacity through training, supervision, and development of service guidelines; and facilitating health system access to essential technologies. Institutionalization of PAC has been more successful in Bolivia than Mexico, as measured by a series of proposed indicators. The positive health and financial impacts of PAC institutionalization have been partially measured in Bolivia and Mexico. Other hypotheses--that scaling-up PAC will significantly reduce maternal mortality and morbidity, decrease abortion-related stigma, and prepare the way for efforts to reform restrictive abortion laws and policies--have yet to be tested. PMID:17408826

  2. Coupling Research on the Process of Transfer of Surplus Labor Forces and Scaling-up of Farmland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of giving an overview of efficiency research on transformation of land from fragmentation to scale economy, by using the concept of coupling in physics, this paper expounds the behavior basis of transfer of surplus rural labor forces in China and transformation of land from fragmentation to scaling up, and analyzes behaviors of all parties and equilibrium outcomes in the three stages concerning the transformation of agricultural land from fragmentation to scaling up as follows. At the first stage of coupling, after multitudinous rural surplus labor forces emerge, the farmers begin to go to city seeking jobs. In this period, the amalgamation of land management has not occurred and the single farmer’s land has not yet concentrated. The total land area of single farmer has not yet increased and the total amount of farmers has not yet decreased. At the second stage of coupling, driven by living standards and income, multitudinous rural surplus labor forces begin to live in the city permanently in fact, and the scale management of rural land begins to arise. Foreign funded enterprises begin to enter agriculture, and the industrialization management of agriculture is equipped with the most fundamental conditions due to the occurrence of scaling up of land. At the third stage of coupling, the transfer of rural surplus labor forces basically ends. The property rights of agricultural land or the management forms also, in a large measure, concentrate. The obstacles to agricultural scaling-up management are solved fundamentally, and the income gap between urban areas and rural areas is narrowed. Urban-rural population migration is no longer the main form of China’s population migration. This stage has not yet been realized in China and it is the future state of villages. Finally, through the two cases researched by the predecessors, we verify the research results of the preceding two stages, which provides reliable reference for transformation of China

  3. Scale-up in laminar and transient regimes of a multi-stage stirrer, a CFD approach

    OpenAIRE

    Letellier, Bertrand; Xuereb, Catherine; Swaels, Philippe; Hobbes, Phillippe; Bertrand, Joël

    2002-01-01

    A multi-stage industrial agitator system adapted to the mixing of a mixture whose viscosity varies during the process has been characterized by using CFD. In the entire study the mixture is supposed to have a Newtonian behavior even though it is rarely the case. It is shown that the well-adapted propeller is able to e7ciently blend high viscous media provided the Reynolds number is not too low. A scale-up study of the agitated system has also been carried out by respecting the classi...

  4. Synthesis, scale-up, and characterization of 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagoria, P. F.

    1998-04-27

    We have synthesized 4OOg of the new, insensitive, energetic heterocycle, 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-l-oxide (LLM-105) with 81% the energy of HMX and excellent thermal stability. The synthesis is a three step reaction sequence from the commercially available starting material, 2,6-dichloropyrazine, with an overall yield of 36%. In this paper we will describe the scale-up of the synthesis of LLM- 105 and report on performance and shock sensitivity experiments performed on this material.

  5. Scaling up watershed model parameters: flow and load simulations of the Edisto River Basin, South Carolina, 2007-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feaster, Toby D.; Benedict, Stephen T.; Clark, Jimmy M.; Bradley, Paul M.; Conrads, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort by the U.S. Geological Survey to expand the understanding of relations among hydrologic, geochemical, and ecological processes that affect fish-tissue mercury concentrations within the Edisto River Basin, analyses and simulations of the hydrology of the Edisto River Basin were made using the topography-based hydrological model (TOPMODEL). A primary focus of the investigation was to assess the potential for scaling up a previous application of TOPMODEL for the McTier Creek watershed, which is a small headwater catchment to the Edisto River Basin. Scaling up was done in a step-wise manner, beginning with applying the calibration parameters, meteorological data, and topographic-wetness-index data from the McTier Creek TOPMODEL to the Edisto River TOPMODEL. Additional changes were made for subsequent simulations, culminating in the best simulation, which included meteorological and topographic wetness index data from the Edisto River Basin and updated calibration parameters for some of the TOPMODEL calibration parameters. The scaling-up process resulted in nine simulations being made. Simulation 7 best matched the streamflows at station 02175000, Edisto River near Givhans, SC, which was the downstream limit for the TOPMODEL setup, and was obtained by adjusting the scaling factor, including streamflow routing, and using NEXRAD precipitation data for the Edisto River Basin. The Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of model-fit efficiency and Pearson’s correlation coefficient for simulation 7 were 0.78 and 0.89, respectively. Comparison of goodness-of-fit statistics between measured and simulated daily mean streamflow for the McTier Creek and Edisto River models showed that with calibration, the Edisto River TOPMODEL produced slightly better results than the McTier Creek model, despite the substantial difference in the drainage-area size at the outlet locations for the two models (30.7 and 2,725 square miles, respectively). Along with the TOPMODEL

  6. Scale-up of community-based malaria control can be achieved without degrading community health workers' service quality: the Village Malaria Worker project in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuoka Junko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria control has been scaled up in many developing countries in their efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goals. Cambodia recently scaled up their Village Malaria Worker (VMW project by substantially increasing the number of VMWs and expanding the project's health services to include treatment of fever, diarrhoea, and Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI in children under five. This study examined if the scale-up interfered with VMWs' service quality, actions, and knowledge of malaria control, and analysed VMWs' overall achievements and perceptions of the newly added health services. Methods Structured interviews were conducted pre scale-up in February-March 2008 with 251 VMWs and post scale-up in July-August 2010 with 252 VMWs. Comparing the pre and post scale-up survey results (n = 195, changes were examined in terms of VMWs' 1 service quality, 2 malaria prevention and vector control actions, and 3 knowledge of malaria epidemiology and vector ecology. In addition, VMWs' newly added health services were descriptively analysed based on the post scale-up survey (n = 252. Results VMWs' service quality and actions significantly improved overall during the scale-up of the VMW project (mean index score: +0.805, p p p Conclusions The Cambodian experience clearly demonstrated that a nationwide scale-up of community-based malaria control can be achieved without degrading community health workers' service quality. The government's strategy to expand VMWs' health services, while providing sufficient training to maintain the quality of their original malaria control services, could have contributed to the improvement of VMW's service quality, actions, and knowledge in spite of the rapid scale-up of the project.

  7. Assessing the Impact of a Vinasse Pilot Plant Scale-Up on the Key Processes of the Ethanol Supply Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Ramos-Hernández

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the byproducts generated in the cane sugar production is molasses, which is used for ethanol distillation. However, one of the problems of distilleries is vinasse. Vinasse is highly water pollutant and is dumped untreated in lakes or rivers and damages the environment. The company FALA developed a pilot plant that uses vinasse to produce a type of livestock feed called MD60. In this paper, the impact of the pilot plant’s scale-up in the key processes of the company’s supply chain is analyzed. With the help of a sensitivity analysis, this study finds the values that would allow the company to improve its order fulfillment indicator and to increase profits, assuming an expected demand by the introduction of this new product into the market. The results show that (1 the pilot plant fulfills 32% of the orders, (2 according to the current vinasse storage capacity, it is possible to fulfill up to 77% of the orders by scaling up the pilot plant, (3 to satisfy 100% of the orders, it is necessary to use all the vinasse generated, and (4 the highest profit is reached by processing all the vinasse and by considering the upper sale price.

  8. An investigation of viscous-mediated coupling of crickets cercal hair sensors using a scaled up model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagirisamy, Pasupathy S.; Jeronimidis, George; Le Moàl, Valerie

    2009-08-01

    Viscous coupling between filiform hair sensors of insects and arthropods has gained considerable interest recently. Study of viscous coupling between hairs at micro scale with current technologies is proving difficult and hence the hair system has been physically scaled up by a factor of 100. For instance, a typical filiform hair of 10 μm diameter and 1000 μm length has been physically scaled up to 1 mm in diameter and 100mm in length. At the base, a rotational spring with a bonded strain gauge provides the restoring force and measures the angle of deflection of the model hair. These model hairs were used in a glycerol-filled aquarium where the velocity of flow and the fluid properties were determined by imposing the Reynolds numbers compatible with biological system. Experiments have been conducted by varying the separation distance and the relative position between the moveable model hairs, of different lengths and between the movable and rigid hairs of different lengths for the steady velocity flow with Reynolds numbers of 0.02 and 0.05. In this study, the viscous coupling between hairs has been characterised. The effect of the distance from the physical boundaries, such as tank walls has also been quantified (wall effect). The purpose of this investigation is to provide relevant information for the design of MEMS systems mimicking the cricket's hair array.

  9. Towards high power output of scaled-up benthic microbial fuel cells (BMFCs) using multiple electron collectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingchuan; Williams, Isaiah; Li, Yan; Wang, Lei; Bagtzoglou, Amvrossios; McCutcheon, Jeffrey; Li, Baikun

    2016-05-15

    This study aimed at achieving high power output of benthic microbial fuel cells (BMFCs) with novel geometric anode setups (inverted tube granular activated charcoal (IT-GAC) and carbon cloth roll (CCR)) and multiple anodes/electron collectors. The lab-scale tests showed the power density of IT-GAC and CCR anodes achieved at 2.92 and 2.55 W m(-2), the highest value ever reported in BMFCs. The power density of BMFCs substantially increased with electron collector number (titanium rods) in anodes. The connection of multiple electron collectors with multiple cathodes had much higher total voltage/current output than that with single cathode. The possibility of maintaining high power density at scaled-up BMFCs was explored by arranging multiple anodes in sediment. The compact configuration of multiple CCR anodes contacting each other did not deteriorate the performance of individual anodes, showing the feasibility of maximizing anode numbers per sediment footprint and achieving high power output. Multiple IT-GAC and CCR anodes with multiple collectors effectively utilized sediment at both horizontal and vertical directions and enhanced electron collection efficiency. This study demonstrated that bacterial adhesion and electron collection should be optimized on small anodes in order to maintain high power density and achieve high power output in the scaled-up BMFCs. PMID:26745789

  10. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a national neonatal hearing screening program in China: conditions for the scale-up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoyan Gai Tobe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2009, the Chinese Ministry of Health recommended scale-up of routine neonatal hearing screening - previously performed primarily only in select urban hospitals - throughout the entire country. METHODS: A decision analytical model for a simulated population of all live births in china was developed to compare the costs and health effects of five mutually exclusive interventions: 1 universal screening using Otoacoustic Emission (OAE and Automated Auditory Brainstem Response (AABR; 2 universal OAE; 3 targeted OAE and AABR; 4 targeted OAE; and 5 no screening. Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs were calculated for health effects. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Based on the cost-effectiveness and potential health outcomes, the optimal path for scale-up would be to start with targeted OAE and then expand to universal OAE and universal OAE plus AABR. Accessibility of screening, diagnosis, and intervention services significantly affect decision of the options. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, to achieve cost-effectiveness and best health outcomes of the NHS program, the accessibility of screening, diagnosis, and intervention services should be expanded to reach a larger population. The results are thus expected to be of particular benefit in terms of the 'rolling out' of the national plan.

  11. Improving health outcomes through concurrent HIV program scale-up and health system development in Rwanda: 20 years of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsanzimana, Sabin; Prabhu, Krishna; McDermott, Haley; Karita, Etienne; Forrest, Jamie I; Drobac, Peter; Farmer, Paul; Mills, Edward J; Binagwaho, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    The 1994 genocide against the Tutsi destroyed the health system in Rwanda. It is impressive that a small country like Rwanda has advanced its health system to the point of now offering near universal health insurance coverage. Through a series of strategic structural changes to its health system, catalyzed through international assistance, Rwanda has demonstrated a commitment towards improving patient and population health indicators. In particular, the rapid scale up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has become a great success story for Rwanda. The country achieved universal coverage of ART at a CD4 cell count of 200 cells/mm(3) in 2007 and increased the threshold for initiation of ART to ≤350 cells/mm(3) in 2008. Further, 2013 guidelines raised the threshold for initiation to ≤500 cells/mm(3) and suggest immediate therapy for key affected populations. In 2015, guidelines recommend offering immediate treatment to all patients. By reviewing the history of HIV and the scale-up of treatment delivery in Rwanda since the genocide, this paper highlights some of the key innovations of the Government of Rwanda and demonstrates the ways in which the national response to the HIV epidemic has catalyzed the implementation of interventions that have helped strengthen the overall health system. PMID:26354601

  12. Scaled up low-mass star formation in massive star-forming cores in the G333 giant molecular cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Wiles, B; Redman, M P; Cunningham, M R; Jones, P A; Burton, M G; Bronfman, L

    2016-01-01

    Three bright molecular line sources in G333 have recently been shown to exhibit signatures of infall. We describe a molecular line radiative transfer modelling process which is required to extract the infall signature from Mopra and Nanten2 data. The observed line profiles differ greatly between individual sources but are reproduced well by variations upon a common unified model where the outflow viewing angle is the most significant difference between the sources. The models and data together suggest that the observed properties of the high-mass star-forming regions such as infall, turbulence, and mass are consistent with scaled-up versions of the low-mass case with turbulent velocities that are supersonic and an order of magnitude larger than those found in low-mass star-forming regions. Using detailed radiative transfer modeling, we show that the G333 cores are essentially undergoing a scaled-up version of low mass star formation. This is an extension of earlier work in that the degree of infall and the ch...

  13. Progress in scale-up of second-generation high-temperature superconductors at SuperPower Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SuperPower is focused on scaling up second-generation (2-G) high-temperature superconductor (HTS) technology to pilot-scale manufacturing. The emphasis of this program is to develop R and D solutions for scale-up issues in pilot-scale operations to lay the foundation for a framework for large-scale manufacturing. Throughput continues to be increased in all process steps including substrate polishing, buffer and HTS deposition. 2-G HTS conductors have been produced in lengths up to 100 m. Process optimization with valuable information provided by several unique process control and quality-control tools has yielded performances of 6000-7000 A m (77 K, 0 T) in 50-100 m lengths using two HTS fabrication processes: metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Major progress has been made towards the development of practical conductor configurations. Modifications to the HTS fabrication process have resulted in enhanced performance in magnetic fields. Industrial slitting and electroplating processes have been successfully adopted to fabricate tapes in width of 4 mm and with copper stabilizer for cable and coil applications. SuperPower's conductor configuration has yielded excellent mechanical properties and overcurrent carrying capability. Over 60 m of such practical conductors with critical current over 100 A/cm-width have been delivered to Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. for prototype cable construction

  14. Experimental and numerical study of spouted bed fluif dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    C. R. Duarte; V. V. Murata; M. A. S. Barrozo

    2008-01-01

    Spouted beds, originally invented in Canada by Mathur and Gishler (1955) as an alternative to fluidized beds for handling coarse particles, are now widely studied in a variety of physical operations, such as drying, coating and granulation. In this work the particle velocity, minimum spouting flow rate and characteristic fluid-dynamic curves of the spouted bed were obtained using a Eulerian granular multiphase model. The computational work was significantly reduced for axisymmetric gas-solid ...

  15. Scaling up Copy Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xian; Dong, Xin Luna; Lyons, Kenneth B.; Meng, Weiyi; Srivastava, Divesh

    2015-01-01

    Recent research shows that copying is prevalent for Deep-Web data and considering copying can significantly improve truth finding from conflicting values. However, existing copy detection techniques do not scale for large sizes and numbers of data sources, so truth finding can be slowed down by one to two orders of magnitude compared with the corresponding techniques that do not consider copying. In this paper, we study {\\em how to improve scalability of copy detection on structured data}. Ou...

  16. Coated particle waste form development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coated particle waste forms have been developed as part of the multibarrier concept at Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the Alternative Waste Forms Program for the Department of Energy. Primary efforts were to coat simulated nuclear waste glass marbles and ceramic pellets with low-temperature pyrolytic carbon (LT-PyC) coatings via the process of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Fluidized bed (FB) coaters, screw agitated coaters (SAC), and rotating tube coaters were used. Coating temperatures were reduced by using catalysts and plasma activation. In general, the LT-PyC coatings did not provide the expected high leach resistance as previously measured for carbon alone. The coatings were friable and often spalled off the substrate. A totally different concept, thermal spray coating, was investigated at PNL as an alternative to CVD coating. Flame spray, wire gun, and plasma gun systems were evaluated using glass, ceramic, and metallic coating materials. Metal plasma spray coatings (Al, Sn, Zn, Pb) provided a two to three orders-of-magnitude increase in chemical durability. Because the aluminum coatings were porous, the superior leach resistance must be due to either a chemical interaction or to a pH buffer effect. Because they are complex, coated waste form processes rank low in process feasibility. Of all the possible coated particle processes, plasma sprayed marbles have the best rating. Carbon coating of pellets by CVD ranked ninth when compared with ten other processes. The plasma-spray-coated marble process ranked sixth out of eleven processes

  17. Coated particle waste form development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oma, K.H.; Buckwalter, C.Q.; Chick, L.A.

    1981-12-01

    Coated particle waste forms have been developed as part of the multibarrier concept at Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the Alternative Waste Forms Program for the Department of Energy. Primary efforts were to coat simulated nuclear waste glass marbles and ceramic pellets with low-temperature pyrolytic carbon (LT-PyC) coatings via the process of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Fluidized bed (FB) coaters, screw agitated coaters (SAC), and rotating tube coaters were used. Coating temperatures were reduced by using catalysts and plasma activation. In general, the LT-PyC coatings did not provide the expected high leach resistance as previously measured for carbon alone. The coatings were friable and often spalled off the substrate. A totally different concept, thermal spray coating, was investigated at PNL as an alternative to CVD coating. Flame spray, wire gun, and plasma gun systems were evaluated using glass, ceramic, and metallic coating materials. Metal plasma spray coatings (Al, Sn, Zn, Pb) provided a two to three orders-of-magnitude increase in chemical durability. Because the aluminum coatings were porous, the superior leach resistance must be due to either a chemical interaction or to a pH buffer effect. Because they are complex, coated waste form processes rank low in process feasibility. Of all the possible coated particle processes, plasma sprayed marbles have the best rating. Carbon coating of pellets by CVD ranked ninth when compared with ten other processes. The plasma-spray-coated marble process ranked sixth out of eleven processes.

  18. Scaling up proven public health interventions through a locally owned and sustained leadership development programme in rural Upper Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Joan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In 2002, the Egypt Ministry of Health and Population faced the challenge of improving access to and quality of services in rural Upper Egypt in the face of low morale among health workers and managers. From 1992 to 2000, the Ministry, with donor support, had succeeded in reducing the nationwide maternal mortality rate by 52%. Nevertheless, a gap remained between urban and rural areas. Case description In 2002, the Ministry, with funding from the United States Agency for International Development and assistance from Management Sciences for Health, introduced a Leadership Development Programme (LDP in Aswan Governorate. The programme aimed to improve health services in three districts by increasing managers' ability to create high performing teams and lead them to achieve results. The programme introduced leadership and management practices and a methodology for identifying and addressing service delivery challenges. Ten teams of health workers participated. Discussion and evaluation In 2003, after participation in the LDP, the districts of Aswan, Daraw and Kom Ombo increased the number of new family planning visits by 36%, 68% and 20%, respectively. The number of prenatal and postpartum visits also rose. After the United States funding ended, local doctors and nurses scaled up the programme to 184 health care facilities (training more than 1000 health workers. From 2005 to 2007, the Leadership Development Programme participants in Aswan Governorate focused on reducing the maternal mortality rate as their annual goal. They reduced it from 85.0 per 100,000 live births to 35.5 per 100,000. The reduction in maternal mortality rate was much greater than in similar governorates in Egypt. Managers and teams across Aswan demonstrated their ability to scale up effective public health interventions though their increased commitment and ownership of service challenges. Conclusions When teams learn and apply empowering leadership and

  19. Scaling up kangaroo mother care in South Africa: 'on-site' versus 'off-site' educational facilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rooyen Elise

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scaling up the implementation of new health care interventions can be challenging and demand intensive training or retraining of health workers. This paper reports on the results of testing the effectiveness of two different kinds of face-to-face facilitation used in conjunction with a well-designed educational package in the scaling up of kangaroo mother care. Methods Thirty-six hospitals in the Provinces of Gauteng and Mpumalanga in South Africa were targeted to implement kangaroo mother care and participated in the trial. The hospitals were paired with respect to their geographical location and annual number of births. One hospital in each pair was randomly allocated to receive either 'on-site' facilitation (Group A or 'off-site' facilitation (Group B. Hospitals in Group A received two on-site visits, whereas delegates from hospitals in Group B attended one off-site, 'hands-on' workshop at a training hospital. All hospitals were evaluated during a site visit six to eight months after attending an introductory workshop and were scored by means of an existing progress-monitoring tool with a scoring scale of 0–30. Successful implementation was regarded as demonstrating evidence of practice (score >10 during the site visit. Results There was no significant difference between the scores of Groups A and B (p = 0.633. Fifteen hospitals in Group A and 16 in Group B demonstrated evidence of practice. The median score for Group A was 16.52 (range 00.00–23.79 and that for Group B 14.76 (range 07.50–23.29. Conclusion A previous trial illustrated that the implementation of a new health care intervention could be scaled up by using a carefully designed educational package, combined with face-to-face facilitation by respected resource persons. This study demonstrated that the site of facilitation, either on site or at a centre of excellence, did not influence the ability of a hospital to implement KMC. The choice of outreach

  20. What are the barriers to scaling up health interventions in low and middle income countries? A qualitative study of academic leaders in implementation science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamey Gavin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most low and middle income countries (LMICs are currently not on track to reach the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs. One way to accelerate progress would be through the large-scale implementation of evidence-based health tools and interventions. This study aimed to: (a explore the barriers that have impeded such scale-up in LMICs, and (b lay out an “implementation research agenda”—a series of key research questions that need to be addressed in order to help overcome such barriers. Methods Interviews were conducted with fourteen key informants, all of whom are academic leaders in the field of implementation science, who were purposively selected for their expertise in scaling up in LMICs. Interviews were transcribed by hand and manually coded to look for emerging themes related to the two study aims. Barriers to scaling up, and unanswered research questions, were organized into six categories, representing different components of the scaling up process: attributes of the intervention; attributes of the implementers; scale-up approach; attributes of the adopting community; socio-political, fiscal, and cultural context; and research context. Results Factors impeding the success of scale-up that emerged from the key informant interviews, and which are areas for future investigation, include: complexity of the intervention and lack of technical consensus; limited human resource, leadership, management, and health systems capacity; poor application of proven diffusion techniques; lack of engagement of local implementers and of the adopting community; and inadequate integration of research into scale-up efforts. Conclusions Key steps in expanding the evidence base on implementation in LMICs include studying how to: simplify interventions; train “scale-up leaders” and health workers dedicated to scale-up; reach and engage communities; match the best delivery strategy to the specific health problem and

  1. Theoretical and experimental study of the effects of scale-up on mixing time for a stirred-tank bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bonvillani

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Mixing time is one of the criteria most widely used to characterize mixing intensity in bioprocesses. In bioreactors, mixing mainly depends on amount of energy consumed, reactor and stirrer shapes, airing speed and the rheology of the medium. In this work we experimentally determined the mixing times for a lab-scale bioreactor equipped with a stirrer propelled by two Rushton turbines. From these experiments we could obtain expressions to evaluate the effects of stirring speed, superficial gas velocity, specific power consumption and system geometry on mixing times under various flow regimes. The resulting correlations were employed to analyze the effect of scale-up on mixing times for the production of Staphylococcus aureus Smith.

  2. Power scale-up and propagation evolution of structured laser beams concentrated on 3D Lissajous parametric surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We systematically explore the power scale-up and propagation evolution of Lissajous structured beams in a lowly Nd-doped YVO4 laser with the off-axis pumping scheme. We experimentally found that the average output power can be up to 1.0 W for the output transmission in the range of 1.8–10% at an incident pump power of 6.2 W. It is also found that when the output transmission is greater than 5%, the spatial coherence is considerably reduced to lead to a feature of broken Lissajous figures in transverse patterns. Moreover, transverse patterns varying with propagation direction are remarkably measured to manifest the 3D characteristics of Lissajous structured beams. We also employ the formula of coherent states to make a comparison with experimental observations and to reveal the transverse momentum density varying with propagation direction. (letter)

  3. The long winding road of opioid substitution therapy implementation in South-East Asia: challenges to scale up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Reid

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The South-East Asia Region contains an estimated 400,000-500,000 people who inject drugs (PWID. HIV prevalence among PWID is commonly 20% or higher in Indonesia, Thailand, Myanmar and some regions of India. Opioid substitution therapy (OST is an important HIV prevention intervention in this part of the world. However, key challenges and barriers to scale up of OST exist, including: pervasive stigma and discrimination towards PWID; criminalisation of drug use overshadowing a public health response; lack of political will and national commitment; low financial investment; focus towards traditional treatment models of detoxification and rehabilitation; inadequate dosing of OST; and poor monitoring and evaluation of programmes. Our review of local evidence highlights that OST can be successful within the Asian context. Such evidence should be utilised more widely to advocate for policy change and increased political commitment to ensure OST reaches substantially more drug users.

  4. Small-scale field experiments accurately scale up to predict density dependence in reef fish populations at large scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Mark A; Forrester, Graham E

    2005-09-20

    Field experiments provide rigorous tests of ecological hypotheses but are usually limited to small spatial scales. It is thus unclear whether these findings extrapolate to larger scales relevant to conservation and management. We show that the results of experiments detecting density-dependent mortality of reef fish on small habitat patches scale up to have similar effects on much larger entire reefs that are the size of small marine reserves and approach the scale at which some reef fisheries operate. We suggest that accurate scaling is due to the type of species interaction causing local density dependence and the fact that localized events can be aggregated to describe larger-scale interactions with minimal distortion. Careful extrapolation from small-scale experiments identifying species interactions and their effects should improve our ability to predict the outcomes of alternative management strategies for coral reef fishes and their habitats. PMID:16150721

  5. Scaling-up microbial fuel cells: configuration and potential drop phenomenon at series connection of unit cells in shared anolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daehee; An, Junyeong; Kim, Bongkyu; Jang, Jae Kyung; Kim, Byung Hong; Chang, In Seop

    2012-06-01

    To scale-up microbial fuel cells (MFCs), installing multiple unit cells in a common reactor has been proposed; however, there has been a serious potential drop when connecting unit cells in series. To determine the source of the loss, a basic stack-MFC (BS-MFC) has been devised, and the results show that the phenomenon is due to ions on the anode electrode traveling through the electrolyte to be reduced at the cathode connected in series. As calculated by means of the percentage potential drop, the degree of potential drop decreased with an increase in the unit-cell distance. When the distance was increased from 1 to 8 cm, the percentage potential drop in BS-MFC1 decreased from 46.76 ± 0.90 to 45.08 ± 0.70 % and in BS-MFC2 from 46.41 ± 0.95 to 43.82 ± 2.23 %. As the p-value of the t-test was lower than 0.05, the difference was considered significant; however, if the unit cells are installed far enough from each other to avoid the potential drop phenomenon, the system will be less dense, consequently reducing the ratio of electrode area per volume of anode compartment and decreasing the power density of the system. Finally, this study suggests design criteria for scaling-up MFC systems: Multiple-electrode-installed MFCs are modularized, and the unit cells are connected in series across the module (connecting each unit cell does not share the anolyte). PMID:22570262

  6. Use of task-shifting to rapidly scale-up HIV treatment services: experiences from Lusaka, Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Harmony F

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The World Health Organization advocates task-shifting, the process of delegating clinical care functions from more specialized to less specialized health workers, as a strategy to achieve the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. However, there is a dearth of literature describing task shifting in sub-Saharan Africa, where services for antiretroviral therapy (ART have scaled up rapidly in the face of generalized human resource crises. As part of ART services expansion in Lusaka, Zambia, we implemented a comprehensive task-shifting program among existing health providers and community-based workers. Training begins with didactic sessions targeting specialized skill sets. This is followed by an intensive period of practical mentorship, where providers are paired with trainers before working independently. We provide on-going quality assessment using key indicators of clinical care quality at each site. Program performance is reviewed with clinic-based staff quarterly. When problems are identified, clinic staff members design and implement specific interventions to address targeted areas. From 2005 to 2007, we trained 516 health providers in adult HIV treatment; 270 in pediatric HIV treatment; 341 in adherence counseling; 91 in a specialty nurse "triage" course, and 93 in an intensive clinical mentorship program. On-going quality assessment demonstrated improvement across clinical care quality indicators, despite rapidly growing patient volumes. Our task-shifting strategy was designed to address current health care worker needs and to sustain ART scale-up activities. While this approach has been successful, long-term solutions to the human resource crisis are also urgently needed to expand the number of providers and to slow staff migration out of the region.

  7. Correlates of male circumcision in Eastern and Southern African countries: establishing a baseline prior to VMMC Scale-up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khai Hoan Tram

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the importance of male circumcision (MC prevalence to HIV prevention efforts in Eastern and Southern Africa, there has been no systematic analysis on the correlates of male circumcision. This analysis identifies correlates of MC in 12 countries in the region with available data. METHODS: Data from the male questionnaire of DHS surveys collected between 2006-2011 in Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe were analyzed. The dependent variable was self-reported male circumcision status. Independent variables included age, education, wealth quintile, place of residence, ethnicity, religion and region. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted separately for each country. RESULTS: MC prevalence ranged from 8.2 percent in Swaziland to 92.2 percent in Ethiopia. Bivariate analyses showed a consistent positive association between age (being older and male circumcision. Education, wealth quintile, and place of residence were either not significantly related or differed in the direction of the relationship by country. Multivariate logistic regression showed three variables consistently associated with MC status: age (being older, religion (being Muslim and ethnicity. DISCUSSION: These data were collected prior to the scale-up of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC programs in 11 of the 12 countries. As the VMMC scale-up intensifies in countries across Eastern and Southern Africa, the correlates of VMMC are likely to change, with (younger age and education emerging as key correlates of VMMC performed in medical settings. The centuries-long tradition among Muslims to circumcise should continue to favor MC among this group. Non-circumcising ethnicities may become more open to MC if promoted as a health practice for decreasing HIV risk.

  8. Human resource development and capacity-building during China's rapid scale-up of methadone maintenance treatment services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Li

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available PROBLEM: China's National Methadone Maintenance Treatment Programme (MMT has expanded from eight clinics serving approximately 1000 clients to 738 clinics that have served more than 340 000 clients cumulatively in only 8 years. This has created an enormous demand for trained providers. APPROACH: Human resource development and capacity building efforts have been conducted in China's National MMT Programme to create a supply of providers trained in administering MMT for opioid dependence. LOCAL SETTING: From 2004 to 2007, China's National MMT Programme faced several problems: inappropriately low methadone doses, poor compliance, high concurrent drug use and high drop-out rates among clients, and little experience, little training and high turnover rates among providers. RELEVANT CHANGES: Training programmes for individual providers and their trainers were redeveloped and expanded in 2008. Although programme performance metrics show an increase in patients' annual mean duration in treatment (93 days in 2004 versus 238 days in 2011, the increase in their mean daily methadone dose (from 47.2 mg in 2004 to 58.6 mg in 2011 is modest. LESSONS LEARNT: Some of the problems that can arise during the development, launch and scale-up of a major national public health effort, such as China's National MMT Programme, cannot be foreseen. Key to the programme's success so far have been the strong commitment on the part of China's government and the optimism and pragmatism of programme managers. Human resources development and capacity-building during scale-up have contributed to improved service quality in MMT treatment clinics and are critical to long-term success.

  9. Scale-up of organic reactions in ball mills: process intensification with regard to energy efficiency and economy of scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolle, Achim; Schmidt, Robert; Jacob, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    The scale-up of the Knoevenagel-condensation between vanillin and barbituric acid carried out in planetary ball mills is investigated from an engineering perspective. Generally, the reaction proceeded in the solid state without intermediate melting and afforded selectively only one product. The reaction has been used as a model to analyze the influence and relationship of different parameters related to operation in planetary ball mills. From the viewpoint of technological parameters the milling ball diameter, dMB, the filling degree with respect to the milling balls' packing, ΦMB,packing, and the filling degree of the substrates with respect to the void volume of the milling balls' packing, ΦGS, have been investigated at different reaction scales. It was found that milling balls with small dMB lead to higher yields within shorter reaction time, treaction, or lower rotation frequency, rpm. Thus, the lower limit is set considering the technology which is available for the separation of the milling balls from the product after the reaction. Regarding ΦMB,packing, results indicate that the optimal value is roughly 50% of the total milling beakers' volume, VB,total, independent of the reaction scale or reaction conditions. Thus, 30% of VB,total are taken by the milling balls. Increase of the initial batch sizes changes ΦGS significantly. However, within the investigated parameter range no negative influence on the yield was observed. Up to 50% of VB,total can be taken over by the substrates in addition to 30% for the total milling ball volume. Scale-up factors of 15 and 11 were realized considering the amount of substrates and the reactor volume, respectively. Beside technological parameters, variables which influence the process itself, treaction and rpm, were investigated also. Variation of those allowed to fine-tune the reaction conditions in order to maximize the yield and minimize the energy intensity. PMID:25406485

  10. Initial assessment of scaled-up sexually transmitted infection intervention in Himachal Pradesh under National AIDS Control Program - III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunite A Ganju

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : To assess the impact of scaled-up sexually transmitted infection (STI intervention under National AIDS Control Program (NACP III and to examine the profile of STI/RTI clinic (now named Suraksha Clinic attendees. Materials and Methods : A retrospective study by data analysis was done from April 2008 to March 2010. The scaled-up intervention comprised of (i adopting enhanced syndromic approach, (ii capacity building by appointing counselors and trainings of staff, (iii strengthening STI/RTI clinics by provision of logistics and privacy by civil works, and (iv supervisory support. The outcome which directly influenced service delivery was evaluated within this framework. Results : Sixteen "Suraksha Clinics" have been remodeled, equipped with supplies and laboratory set up. A total of 64,554 clinic visits were reported of which 27,317 [42%] attended the clinics for index STI/RTI complaint(s. Majority of the clients (44% were young, 25-44 years old. Male to female ratio was 1:1.8. In females, the commonest complaint was lower abdominal pain (25% and vaginal discharge (33%, the commonest syndrome. Amongst laboratory-confirmed STIs, 305 (1.4% attendees were positive for trichomoniasis, while bacterial vaginosis was corroborated in 230 (1.07% patients with clue cells. Amongst antenatal women, 251 were reactive for syphilis (≥1:8 dilutions. 10,579 partners of index STI/RTI patients were notified and partner management was attained to the level of 99%. Conclusion : Preliminary results show increased utilization of STI clinical services, though laboratory services need further strengthening. Continued supportive supervision and capacity building will enable skill development and quality monitoring.

  11. Scaled up low-mass star formation in massive star-forming cores in the G333 giant molecular cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, B.; Lo, N.; Redman, M. P.; Cunningham, M. R.; Jones, P. A.; Burton, M. G.; Bronfman, L.

    2016-06-01

    Three bright molecular line sources in G333 have recently been shown to exhibit signatures of infall. We describe a molecular line radiative transfer (RT) modelling process which is required to extract the infall signature from Mopra and Nanten2 data. The observed line profiles differ greatly between individual sources but are reproduced well by variations upon a common unified model where the outflow viewing angle is the most significant difference between the sources. The models and data together suggest that the observed properties of the high-mass star-forming regions such as infall, turbulence and mass are consistent with scaled-up versions of the low-mass case with turbulent velocities that are supersonic and an order of magnitude larger than those found in low-mass star-forming regions. Using detailed RT modelling, we show that the G333 cores are essentially undergoing a scaled-up version of low-mass star formation. This is an extension of earlier work in that the degree of infall and the chemical abundances are constrained by the RT modelling in a way that is not practical with a standard analysis of observational data. We also find high velocity infall and high infall mass rates, possibly suggesting accelerated collapse due to external pressure. Molecular depletion due to freeze-out on to dust grains in central regions of the cores is suggested by low molecular abundances of several species. Strong evidence for a local enhancement of 13C-bearing species towards the outflow cloud cores is discussed, consistent with the presence of shocks caused by the supersonic motions within them.

  12. Scaling up food production in the Upper Mississippi river basin: modeling impacts on water quality and nutrient cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, E. E.; Martin, P. A.; Schuble, T. J.; Yan, E.; Demissie, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Agricultural production imposes significant environmental stress on the landscape, both in the intensity and extent of agricultural activities. Among the most significant impacts, agriculture dominates the natural reactive nitrogen cycle, with excess reactive nitrogen leading to the degraded quality of inland and coastal waters. In the U.S., policymakers and stakeholders nationwide continue to debate strategies for decreasing environmental degradation from agricultural lands. Such strategies aim to optimize the balance among competing demands for food, fuel and ecosystem services. One such strategy increasingly discussed in the national debate is that of localizing food production around urban areas, developing what some have recently called “foodsheds”. However, the environmental impacts of localizing food production around population centers are not well-understood given the hard-to-generalize variety seen in management practices currently employed among local farms marketing food crops directly to consumers. As a first, landscape level study of potential impacts from scaling up this type of agriculture, we use the USDA Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model to quantify environmental impacts from developing foodsheds for all population centers in the Upper Mississippi river basin. Specifically, we focus on nutrient cycling and water quality impacts determining direct greenhouse gas emissions and changes to nutrient runoff from increased food production in this watershed. We investigate a variety of scenarios in which food production is scaled up to the regional level using different types of farm management practices, ranging from conventional production of fruits and vegetables, to production of these products from small-scale, diversified systems integrating conservation easements. In addition to impacts on nutrient cycling and water quality, we also characterize relative levels of productivity in conjunction with overall demand for food associated

  13. The impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) service scale-up on mechanisms of accountability in Zambian primary health centres: a case-based health systems analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Topp, Stephanie M.; Black, Jim; Morrow, Martha; Chipukuma, Julien M.; Van Damme, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Background Questions about the impact of large donor-funded HIV interventions on low- and middle-income countries’ health systems have been the subject of a number of expert commentaries, but comparatively few empirical research studies. Aimed at addressing a particular evidence gap vis-à-vis the influence of HIV service scale-up on micro-level health systems, this article examines the impact of HIV scale-up on mechanisms of accountability in Zambian primary health facilities. Methods Guided ...

  14. Experimental and numerical study of spouted bed fluif dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Duarte

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Spouted beds, originally invented in Canada by Mathur and Gishler (1955 as an alternative to fluidized beds for handling coarse particles, are now widely studied in a variety of physical operations, such as drying, coating and granulation. In this work the particle velocity, minimum spouting flow rate and characteristic fluid-dynamic curves of the spouted bed were obtained using a Eulerian granular multiphase model. The computational work was significantly reduced for axisymmetric gas-solid flows. The experimental data obtained in two spouted bed configurations, conical-cylindrical and two-dimensional, were compared with the simulated results, showing good agreement

  15. Scaling-up from an implementation trial to state-wide coverage: results from the preliminary Melbourne Diabetes Prevention Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janus Edward D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The successful Greater Green Triangle Diabetes Prevention Program (GGT DPP, a small implementation trial, has been scaled-up to the Victorian state-wide ‘Life!’ programme with over 10,000 individuals enrolled. The Melbourne Diabetes Prevention Study (MDPS is an evaluation of the translation from the GGT DPP to the Life! programme. We report results from the preliminary phase (pMDPS of this evaluation. Methods The pMDPS is a randomised controlled trial with 92 individuals aged 50 to 75 at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes randomised to Life! or usual care. Intervention consisted of six structured 90-minute group sessions: five fortnightly sessions and the final session at 8 months. Participants underwent anthropometric and laboratory tests at baseline and 12 months, and provided self-reported psychosocial, dietary, and physical activity measures. Intervention group participants additionally underwent these tests at 3 months. Paired t tests were used to analyse within-group changes over time. Chi-square tests were used to analyse differences between groups in goals met at 12 months. Differences between groups for changes over time were tested with generalised estimating equations and analysis of covariance. Results Intervention participants significantly improved at 12 months in mean body mass index (−0.98 kg/m2, standard error (SE = 0.26, weight (−2.65 kg, SE = 0.72, waist circumference (−7.45 cm, SE = 1.15, and systolic blood pressure (−3.18 mmHg, SE = 1.26, increased high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (0.07 mmol/l, SE = 0.03, reduced energy from total (−2.00%, SE = 0.78 and saturated fat (−1.54%, SE = 0.41, and increased fibre intake (1.98 g/1,000 kcal energy, SE = 0.47. In controls, oral glucose at 2 hours deteriorated (0.59 mmol/l, SE = 0.27. Only waist circumference reduced significantly (−4.02 cm, SE = 0.95. Intervention participants significantly

  16. Scale-up of Novel Low-Cost Carbon Fibers Leading to High-Volume Commercial Launch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, Mark A [The Dow Chemical Company

    2014-08-27

    The project started in September, 2012 with the goal of scaling up from the existing laboratory scale process for producing carbon fiber (CF) from polyolefin (PO) based precursor fiber using a Dow proprietary sulfonation-desulfonation stabilization process. The award was used to develop a process that was capable of producing market development quantities of CF from PO precursor fiber at a rate of 4 kg/h of CF. The CF would target properties that met or exceeded the Department of Energy (DOE) Vehicles Technology [1] standard; i.e., 172 GPa modulus and 1.72 GPa strength at greater than or equal to 1% strain. The Dow proprietary process was capable of meeting and exceeding these targets properties. Project DE-EE0005760 resulted from a Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Dow and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with support from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) and DOE. In the first budget period, the main goal was to design a sulfonation-desulfonation market development plant capable of stabilizing PO precursor fiber at a rate of 5 kg/h using a sulfonation solution. The detailed design, location, and cost estimate were determined as scheduled in the Project Management Plan (PMP). In parallel with this DOE award project was a fundamentals and economic evaluation funded by The Dow Chemical Company (Dow). The goal of the Dow sponsored project was to finalize the mass balances, energy balances, and levelized cost to produce CF using the Dow process. A Go-No-Go decision was scheduled in June, 2013 based on the findings of the DOE sponsored scale up project and the Dow sponsored project. In June, 2013, Dow made the No-Go decision to halt and abandon the Dow proprietary sulfonation-desulfonation process for stabilizing PO precursor fibers for the manufacturing of CF. This No-Go decision was identified in the original proposal and at the start of this project, and the decision was made as scheduled. The decision was based

  17. Scaling up stomatal conductance from leaf to canopy using a dual-leaf model for estimating crop evapotranspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Risheng; Kang, Shaozhong; Du, Taisheng; Hao, Xinmei; Zhang, Yanqun

    2014-01-01

    The dual-source Shuttleworth-Wallace model has been widely used to estimate and partition crop evapotranspiration (λET). Canopy stomatal conductance (Gsc), an essential parameter of the model, is often calculated by scaling up leaf stomatal conductance, considering the canopy as one single leaf in a so-called "big-leaf" model. However, Gsc can be overestimated or underestimated depending on leaf area index level in the big-leaf model, due to a non-linear stomatal response to light. A dual-leaf model, scaling up Gsc from leaf to canopy, was developed in this study. The non-linear stomata-light relationship was incorporated by dividing the canopy into sunlit and shaded fractions and calculating each fraction separately according to absorbed irradiances. The model includes: (1) the absorbed irradiance, determined by separately integrating the sunlit and shaded leaves with consideration of both beam and diffuse radiation; (2) leaf area for the sunlit and shaded fractions; and (3) a leaf conductance model that accounts for the response of stomata to PAR, vapor pressure deficit and available soil water. In contrast to the significant errors of Gsc in the big-leaf model, the predicted Gsc using the dual-leaf model had a high degree of data-model agreement; the slope of the linear regression between daytime predictions and measurements was 1.01 (R2 = 0.98), with RMSE of 0.6120 mm s-1 for four clear-sky days in different growth stages. The estimates of half-hourly λET using the dual-source dual-leaf model (DSDL) agreed well with measurements and the error was within 5% during two growing seasons of maize with differing hydrometeorological and management strategies. Moreover, the estimates of soil evaporation using the DSDL model closely matched actual measurements. Our results indicate that the DSDL model can produce more accurate estimation of Gsc and λET, compared to the big-leaf model, and thus is an effective alternative approach for estimating and partitioning

  18. Applying a framework for assessing the health system challenges to scaling up mHealth in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Natalie

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mobile phone technology has demonstrated the potential to improve health service delivery, but there is little guidance to inform decisions about acquiring and implementing mHealth technology at scale in health systems. Using the case of community-based health services (CBS in South Africa, we apply a framework to appraise the opportunities and challenges to effective implementation of mHealth at scale in health systems. Methods A qualitative study reviewed the benefits and challenges of mHealth in community-based services in South Africa, through a combination of key informant interviews, site visits to local projects and document reviews. Using a framework adapted from three approaches to reviewing sustainable information and communication technology (ICT, the lessons from local experience and elsewhere formed the basis of a wider consideration of scale up challenges in South Africa. Results Four key system dimensions were identified and assessed: government stewardship and the organisational, technological and financial systems. In South Africa, the opportunities for successful implementation of mHealth include the high prevalence of mobile phones, a supportive policy environment for eHealth, successful use of mHealth for CBS in a number of projects and a well-developed ICT industry. However there are weaknesses in other key health systems areas such as organisational culture and capacity for using health information for management, and the poor availability and use of ICT in primary health care. The technological challenges include the complexity of ensuring interoperability and integration of information systems and securing privacy of information. Finally, there are the challenges of sustainable financing required for large scale use of mobile phone technology in resource limited settings. Conclusion Against a background of a health system with a weak ICT environment and limited implementation capacity, it remains

  19. Surviving Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor will give you specific information about the duration of your bed rest. continue How Does Bed ... reading about high-risk pregnancy issues, learn about breastfeeding or how to encourage your child's development instead. ...

  20. Effect of wettability on scale-up of multiphase flow from core-scale to reservoir fine-grid-scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.C.; Mani, V.; Mohanty, K.K. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Typical field simulation grid-blocks are internally heterogeneous. The objective of this work is to study how the wettability of the rock affects its scale-up of multiphase flow properties from core-scale to fine-grid reservoir simulation scale ({approximately} 10{prime} x 10{prime} x 5{prime}). Reservoir models need another level of upscaling to coarse-grid simulation scale, which is not addressed here. Heterogeneity is modeled here as a correlated random field parameterized in terms of its variance and two-point variogram. Variogram models of both finite (spherical) and infinite (fractal) correlation length are included as special cases. Local core-scale porosity, permeability, capillary pressure function, relative permeability functions, and initial water saturation are assumed to be correlated. Water injection is simulated and effective flow properties and flow equations are calculated. For strongly water-wet media, capillarity has a stabilizing/homogenizing effect on multiphase flow. For small variance in permeability, and for small correlation length, effective relative permeability can be described by capillary equilibrium models. At higher variance and moderate correlation length, the average flow can be described by a dynamic relative permeability. As the oil wettability increases, the capillary stabilizing effect decreases and the deviation from this average flow increases. For fractal fields with large variance in permeability, effective relative permeability is not adequate in describing the flow.

  1. Scaling up ATLAS production system for the LHC Run 2 and beyond: project ProdSys2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodin, M.; De, K.; Garcia, J.; Navarro; Golubkov, D.; Klimentov, A.; Maeno, T.; Vaniachine, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Big Data processing needs of the ATLAS experiment grow continuously, as more data and more use cases emerge. For Big Data processing the ATLAS experiment adopted the data transformation approach, where software applications transform the input data into outputs. In the ATLAS production system, each data transformation is represented by a task, a collection of many jobs, submitted by the ATLAS workload management system (PanDA) and executed on the Grid. Our experience shows that the rate of task submission grows exponentially over the years. To scale up the ATLAS production system for new challenges, we started the ProdSys2 project. PanDA has been upgraded with the Job Execution and Definition Interface (JEDI). Patterns in ATLAS data transformation workflows composed of many tasks provided a scalable production system framework for template definitions of the many-tasks workflows. These workflows are being implemented in the Database Engine for Tasks (DEfT) that generates individual tasks for processing by JEDI. We report on the ATLAS experience with many-task workflow patterns in preparation for the LHC Run 2.

  2. Scaling up ATLAS production system for the LHC Run 2 and beyond: project ProdSys2

    CERN Document Server

    Borodin, Mikhail; The ATLAS collaboration; García Navarro, José Enrique; Golubkov, Dmitry; Klimentov, Alexei; Maeno, Tadashi; Vaniachine, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The Big Data processing needs of the ATLAS experiment grow continuously, as more data and more use cases emerge. For Big Data processing the ATLAS experiment adopted the data transformation approach, where software applications transform the input data into outputs. In the ATLAS production system, each data transformation is represented by a task, a collection of many jobs, submitted by the ATLAS workload management system (PanDA) and executed on the Grid. Our experience shows that the rate of tasks submission grows exponentially over the years. To scale up the ATLAS production system for new challenges, we started the ProdSys2 project. PanDA has been upgraded with the Job Execution and Definition Interface (JEDI). Patterns in ATLAS data transformation workflows composed of many tasks, provided a scalable production system framework for template definitions of the many-tasks workflows. These workflows are being implemented in the Database Engine for Tasks (DEfT) that generates individual tasks for processing ...

  3. Scale-up of the Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT Polymerization Using Continuous Flow Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Micic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A controlled radical polymerization process using the Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT approach was scaled up by a factor of 100 from a small laboratory scale of 5 mL to a preparative scale of 500 mL, using batch and continuous flow processing. The batch polymerizations were carried out in a series of different glass vessels, using either magnetic or overhead stirring, and different modes of heating: Microwave irradiation or conductive heating in an oil bath. The continuous process was conducted in a prototype tubular flow reactor, consisting of 6 mm ID stainless steel tubing, fitted with static mixers. Both reactor types were tested for polymerizations of the acid functional monomers acrylic acid and 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane-1-sulfonic acid in water at 80 °C with reaction times of 30 to 40 min. By monitoring the temperature during the exothermic polymerization process, it was observed that the type and size of reactor had a significant influence on the temperature profile of the reaction.

  4. Scaling-up Strategy as an Appropriate Approach for Sustainable New Town Development? Lessons from Wujin, Changzhou, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Chen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available China has achieved rapid urbanization and unprecedented economic booming over the past three decades. Numerous cities and towns dreamed of cloning the miracles of Shenzhen and Pudong, Shanghai, in terms of their international development. However, inappropriate development strategies have meant that the majority of fast expanding urban suburbs or newly developed towns suffer a high ratio of vacant dwellings in real estate markets and a massive loss of farmland. The frequent exposure of these empty cities to mass media or the public has urged urban governments to impose fiscal austerity. These unexpected and negative consequences of urban development have explicit conflicts with sustainability. This paper aims to provide a political economy view of these unsustainable outcomes of new development. To achieve this, the processes and agendas of new city or town planning in Wujin District, Changzhou City, are analyzed and evaluated from the perspective of scale theory. Extensive interviews conducted with local politicians at different levels, planners, real estate agents and local residents facilitate the interpretation of these processes and agendas. It is argued that the legends of Shenzhen and Pudong, Shanghai originate from a modified neoliberal capitalism intervention at the right time and place, with which other peer cities are not comparable. It is concluded that the scaling-up strategy is not appropriate for the local new town development of Wujin, which has led to unsustainable outcomes—empty cities and towns—and created important lessons for the sustainable development of Chinese cities.

  5. Implementation of the Community Health Assistant (CHA) Cadre in Zambia: A Process Evaluation to Guide Future Scale-Up Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Katharine D; Belete, Yekoyesew W; Phiri, Sydney Chauwa; Musonda, Mutinta; Kawesha, Elizabeth Chizema; Muleya, Evelyn Mutinta; Chibawe, Caroline Phiri; van den Broek, Jan Willem; Vosburg, Kathryn Bradford

    2016-04-01

    Universal health coverage requires an adequate health workforce, including community health workers (CHWs) to reach rural communities. To improve healthcare access in rural areas, in 2010 the Government of Zambia implemented a national CHW strategy that introduced a new cadre of healthcare workers called community health assistants (CHAs). After 1 year of training the pilot class of 307 CHAs deployed in September 2012. This paper presents findings from a process evaluation of the barriers and facilitators of implementation of the CHA pilot, along with how evidence was used to guide ongoing implementation and scale-up decisions. Qualitative inquiry was used to assess implementation during the first 6 months of the program rollout, with 43 in-depth individual and 32 small group interviews across five respondent types: CHAs, supervisors, volunteer CHWs, community members, and district leadership. Potential 'implementation moderators' were explored using deductive coding and thematic analysis of participant perspectives on community acceptance of CHAs, supervision support mechanisms, and coordination with volunteer CHWs, and health system integration of a new cadre. Community acceptance of CHAs was generally high, but coordination between CHAs and existing volunteer CHWs presented some challenges. The supervision support system was found to be inconsistent, limiting assurance of consistent quality care delivered by CHAs. Underlying health system weaknesses regarding drug supply and salary payments furthermore hindered incorporation of a new cadre within the national health system. Recommendations for implementation and future scale based on the process evaluation findings are discussed. PMID:26547550

  6. Using simulation and budget models to scale-up nitrogen leaching from field to region in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, E C; Yang, J Y; Gameda, S; De Jong, R

    2001-12-11

    Efforts are underway at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) to develop an integrated, nationally applicable, socioeconomic/biophysical modeling capability in order to predict the environmental impacts of policy and program scenarios. This paper outlines our Decision Support System (DSS), which integrates the IROWCN (Indicator of the Risk of Water Contamination by Nitrogen) index with the agricultural policy model CRAM (Canadian Regional Agricultural Model) and presents an outline of our methodology to provide independent assessments of the IROWCN results through the use of nitrogen (N) simulation models in select, data-rich areas. Three field-level models--DSSAT, N_ABLE, and EPIC--were evaluated using local measured data. The results show that all three dynamic models can be used to simulate biomass, grain yield, and soil N dynamics at the field level; but the accuracy of the models differ, suggesting that models need to be calibrated using local measured data before they are used in Canada. Further simulation of IROWCN in a maize field using N_ABLE showed that soil-mineral N levels are highly affected by the amount of fertilizer N applied and the time of year, meaning that fertilizer and manure N applications and weather data are crucial for improving IROWCN. Methods of scaling-up simulated IROWCN from field-level to soil-landscape polygons and CRAM regions are discussed. PMID:12805754

  7. Scale-up fermentation of oil palm empty fruit bunch to produce ruminant feed by radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scale-up fermentation and irradiation conditions of empty fruit bunch (EFB) of oil palm were examined to produce a large amount of fermented products for animal feeds. The EFB substrates pasteurized by irradiation were inoculated with Coprinus cinereus. After 1 month incubation, the crude fiber contents decreased to 20 - 38% and crude protein contents increased to 9 - 13% in small scale fermentation using conical flask (6 - 20 g EFB). In the case of fermentation using polypropylene bags with 400 g EFB, crude fiber and protein contents were 32 - 34% and 11 - 14%, respectively. A larger plastic container packed with 1.5 kg EFB fiber of 10cm thickness was used for mushroom cultivation. After harvest of mushroom (yields were about 250 g per container), the quality of residual substrates improved further as reflected by its crude fiber content of only 16 - 20%, crude protein content of 6 - 8%. These results show that a large volume of products are available under the good aeration by increasing the number of plastic bags or containers. For the irradiation of a lot of fermentation substrates, the advantage of 60Co gamma-ray and electron beam irradiator was also discussed. (author)

  8. Scaling up close-range surveys, a challenge for the generalization of as-built data in industrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hullo, J.-F.; Thibault, G.

    2014-06-01

    As-built CAD data reconstructed from Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) data are used for more than two decades by Electricité de France (EDF) to prepare maintenance operations in its facilities. But today, the big picture is renewed: "as-built virtual reality" must address a huge scale-up to provide data to an increasing number of applications. In this paper, we first present a wide multi-sensor multi-purpose scanning campaign performed in a 10 floor building of a power plant in 2013: 1083 TLS stations (about 40.109 3D points referenced under a 2 cm tolerance) and 1025 RGB panoramic images (340.106 pixels per point of view). As expected, this very large survey of high precision measurements in a complex environment stressed sensors and tools that were developed for more favourable conditions and smaller data sets. The whole survey process (tools and methods used from acquisition and processing to CAD reconstruction) underwent a detailed follow-up in order to state on the locks to a possible generalization to other buildings. Based on these recent feedbacks, we have highlighted some of these current bottlenecks in this paper: sensors denoising, automation in processes, data validation tools improvements, standardization of formats and (meta-) data structures.

  9. Scale-up synthesis of zinc borate from the reaction of zinc oxide and boric acid in aqueous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılınç, Mert; Çakal, Gaye Ö.; Yeşil, Sertan; Bayram, Göknur; Eroğlu, İnci; Özkar, Saim

    2010-11-01

    Synthesis of zinc borate was conducted in a laboratory and a pilot scale batch reactor to see the influence of process variables on the reaction parameters and the final product, 2ZnO·3B 2O 3·3.5H 2O. Effects of stirring speed, presence of baffles, amount of seed, particle size and purity of zinc oxide, and mole ratio of H 3BO 3:ZnO on the zinc borate formation reaction were examined at a constant temperature of 85 °C in a laboratory (4 L) and a pilot scale (85 L) reactor. Products obtained from the reaction in both reactors were characterized by chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, particle size distribution analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The kinetic data for the zinc borate production reaction was fit by using the logistic model. The results revealed that the specific reaction rate, a model parameter, decreases with increase in particle size of zinc oxide and the presence of baffles, but increases with increase in stirring speed and purity of zinc oxide; however, it is unaffected with the changes in the amount of seed and reactants ratio. The reaction completion time is unaffected by scaling-up.

  10. Characterization of the pneumatic behavior of a novel spouted bed apparatus

    OpenAIRE

    Gryczka, O.; Heinrich, S; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Mörl, L.; Werther, Joachim; Nowak, Wojciech; Wirth, Karl-Ernst; Hartge, Ernst-Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Recently the importance of spouted bed technology has significantly increased in the context of drying processes as well as granulation, agglomeration or coating processes. Particulate systems concerning very fine or non spherical particles that are difficult to fluidize, often cannot be treated in conventional fluidized beds. In contrast to those fluidized beds, the spouted bed technology with its specific flow structure offers the opportunity of stable fluidization under controlled conditio...

  11. NRF2011-EDU001-EL001 EduLab Project Scaling-up Reflections on Using Open Source Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Wee, Loo Kang; Lim, Ai Phing; Lye, Sze Yee

    2014-01-01

    eduLab (MOE, 2012b) is a key programme under the third MasterPlan for ICT in Education (mp3) where teachers with good ideas for an ICT-enhanced lesson or curriculum (learning with computer models through inquiry, example PhET (PhET, 2011) can come together to collaborate. eduLab aims to support teachers to develop, prototype and test-bed their lesson ideas (journey in 2012-2014) while ensuring that the results, in the form of complete lesson packages (see http://edulab.moe.edu.sg/edulab-progr...

  12. A Spouted Bed Reactor Monitoring System for Particulate Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conversion and coating of particle nuclear fuel is performed in spouted (fluidized) bed reactors. The reactor must be capable of operating at temperatures up to 2000 C in inert, flammable, and coating gas environments. The spouted bed reactor geometry is defined by a graphite retort with a 2.5 inch inside diameter, conical section with a 60o included angle, and a 4 mm gas inlet orifice diameter through which particles are removed from the reactor at the completion of each run. The particles may range from 200 (micro)m to 2 mm in diameter. Maintaining optimal gas flow rates slightly above the minimum spouting velocity throughout the duration of each run is complicated by the variation of particle size and density as conversion and/or coating reactions proceed in addition to gas composition and temperature variations. In order to achieve uniform particle coating, prevent agglomeration of the particle bed, and monitor the reaction progress, a spouted bed monitoring system was developed. The monitoring system includes a high-sensitivity, low-response time differential pressure transducer paired with a signal processing, data acquisition, and process control unit which allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor. The pressure transducer is mounted upstream of the spouted bed reactor gas inlet. The gas flow into the reactor induces motion of the particles in the bed and prevents the particles from draining from the reactor due to gravitational forces. Pressure fluctuations in the gas inlet stream are generated as the particles in the bed interact with the entering gas stream. The pressure fluctuations are produced by bulk movement of the bed, generation and movement of gas bubbles through the bed, and the individual motion of particles and particle subsets in the bed. The pressure fluctuations propagate upstream to the pressure transducer where they can be monitored. Pressure fluctuation, mean differential pressure, gas flow rate, reactor

  13. A Spouted Bed Reactor Monitoring System for Particulate Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. S. Wendt; R. L. Bewley; W. E. Windes

    2007-06-01

    Conversion and coating of particle nuclear fuel is performed in spouted (fluidized) bed reactors. The reactor must be capable of operating at temperatures up to 2000°C in inert, flammable, and coating gas environments. The spouted bed reactor geometry is defined by a graphite retort with a 2.5 inch inside diameter, conical section with a 60° included angle, and a 4 mm gas inlet orifice diameter through which particles are removed from the reactor at the completion of each run. The particles may range from 200 µm to 2 mm in diameter. Maintaining optimal gas flow rates slightly above the minimum spouting velocity throughout the duration of each run is complicated by the variation of particle size and density as conversion and/or coating reactions proceed in addition to gas composition and temperature variations. In order to achieve uniform particle coating, prevent agglomeration of the particle bed, and monitor the reaction progress, a spouted bed monitoring system was developed. The monitoring system includes a high-sensitivity, low-response time differential pressure transducer paired with a signal processing, data acquisition, and process control unit which allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor. The pressure transducer is mounted upstream of the spouted bed reactor gas inlet. The gas flow into the reactor induces motion of the particles in the bed and prevents the particles from draining from the reactor due to gravitational forces. Pressure fluctuations in the gas inlet stream are generated as the particles in the bed interact with the entering gas stream. The pressure fluctuations are produced by bulk movement of the bed, generation and movement of gas bubbles through the bed, and the individual motion of particles and particle subsets in the bed. The pressure fluctuations propagate upstream to the pressure transducer where they can be monitored. Pressure fluctuation, mean differential pressure, gas flow rate, reactor

  14. Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (Action Plan B3: Area 5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, J; Farrell, J; Crooks, G; Hellings, P; Bel, E H; Bewick, M; Chavannes, N H; de Sousa, J Correia; Cruz, A A; Haahtela, T; Joos, G; Khaltaev, N; Malva, J; Muraro, A; Nogues, M; Palkonen, S; Pedersen, S; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Samolinski, B; Strandberg, T; Valiulis, A; Yorgancioglu, A; Zuberbier, T; Bedbrook, A; Aberer, W; Adachi, M; Agusti, A; Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Ankri, J; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Ansotegui, I J; Anto, J M; Arnavielhe, S; Arshad, H; Bai, C; Baiardini, I; Bachert, C; Baigenzhin, A K; Barbara, C; Bateman, E D; Beghé, B; Kheder, A Ben; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bergmann, K C; Bieber, T; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Bjermer, L; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Boner, A L; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S; Boulet, L P; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Braido, F; Briggs, A H; Brightling, C E; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Burney, P G; Bush, A; Caballero-Fonseca, F; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M A; Calverley, P M; Camargos, P A M; Canonica, G W; Camuzat, T; Carlsen, K H; Carr, W; Carriazo, A; Casale, T; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Chatzi, L; Chen, Y Z; Chiron, R; Chkhartishvili, E; Chuchalin, A G; Chung, K F; Ciprandi, G; Cirule, I; Cox, L; Costa, D J; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; Darsow, U; De Carlo, G; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; De Manuel Keenoy, E; Demoly, P; Denburg, J A; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dray, G; Dubakiene, R; Durham, S R; Dykewicz, M S; El-Gamal, Y; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L M; Fletcher, M; Fiocchi, A; Fink Wagner, A; Fonseca, J; Fokkens, W J; Forastiere, F; Frith, P; Gaga, M; Gamkrelidze, A; Garces, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gemicioğlu, B; Gereda, J E; González Diaz, S; Gotua, M; Grisle, I; Grouse, L; Gutter, Z; Guzmán, M A; Heaney, L G; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Henderson, D; Hendry, A; Heinrich, J; Heve, D; Horak, F; Hourihane, J O' B; Howarth, P; Humbert, M; Hyland, M E; Illario, M; Ivancevich, J C; Jardim, J R; Jares, E J; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Julge, K; Jung, K S; Just, J; Kaidashev, I; Kaitov, M R; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Keil, T; Keith, P K; Klimek, L; Koffi N'Goran, B; Kolek, V; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Lambrecht, B; Lau, S; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Laune, D; Le, L T T; Lieberman, P; Lipworth, B; Li, J; Lodrup Carlsen, K; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Magard, Y; Magnan, A; Mahboub, B; Mair, A; Majer, I; Makela, M J; Manning, P; Mara, S; Marshall, G D; Masjedi, M R; Matignon, P; Maurer, M; Mavale-Manuel, S; Melén, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Meltzer, E O; Menzies-Gow, A; Merk, H; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Mohammad, G M Y; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; Mösges, R; Mullol, J; Nafti, S; Namazova-Baranova, L; Naclerio, R; Neou, A; Neffen, H; Nekam, K; Niggemann, B; Ninot, G; Nyembue, T D; O'Hehir, R E; Ohta, K; Okamoto, Y; Okubo, K; Ouedraogo, S; Paggiaro, P; Pali-Schöll, I; Panzner, P; Papadopoulos, N; Papi, A; Park, H S; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pawankar, R; Pengelly, R; Pfaar, O; Picard, R; Pigearias, B; Pin, I; Plavec, D; Poethig, D; Pohl, W; Popov, T A; Portejoie, F; Potter, P; Postma, D; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Raciborski, F; Radier Pontal, F; Repka-Ramirez, S; Reitamo, S; Rennard, S; Rodenas, F; Roberts, J; Roca, J; Rodriguez Mañas, L; Rolland, C; Roman Rodriguez, M; Romano, A; Rosado-Pinto, J; Rosario, N; Rosenwasser, L; Rottem, M; Ryan, D; Sanchez-Borges, M; Scadding, G K; Schunemann, H J; Serrano, E; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Schulz, H; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Simons, F E R; Sisul, J C; Skrindo, I; Smit, H A; Solé, D; Sooronbaev, T; Spranger, O; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Sunyer, J; Thijs, C; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valia, E; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; van Hage, M; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vellas, B; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Vichyanond, P; Viegi, G; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagenmann, M; Wallaert, B; Walker, S; Wang, D Y; Wahn, U; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Williams, S; Wright, J; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yusuf, O M; Zaidi, A; Zar, H J; Zernotti, M E; Zhang, L; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Mercier, J

    2016-01-01

    Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS integrated care pathways (ICPs), (2) the joint initiative between the Reference site MACVIA-LR (Contre les MAladies Chroniques pour un VIeillissement Actif) and ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma), (3) Commitments for Action to the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing and the AIRWAYS ICPs network. It is deployed in collaboration with the World Health Organization Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD). The European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing has proposed a 5-step framework for developing an individual scaling up strategy: (1) what to scale up: (1-a) databases of good practices, (1-b) assessment of viability of the scaling up of good practices, (1-c) classification of good practices for local replication and (2) how to scale up: (2-a) facilitating partnerships for scaling up, (2-b) implementation of key success factors and lessons learnt, including emerging technologies for individualised and predictive medicine. This strategy has already been applied to the chronic respiratory disease action plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. PMID:27478588

  15. Treatability and scale-up protocols for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon bioremediation of manufactured-gas-plant soils. Final report, September 1987-July 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes activities to develop a framework to reliably scale-up and apply challenging bioremediation processes to polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) soils. It includes: a discussion of the accuracy needed for competitive application of bioremediation; a framework and examples for treatability and scale-up protocols for selection, design and application of these processes; both batch and continuous testing protocols for developing predictive rate data; and special predictive relationships that may be used in process selection/scale-up. The work, coupled with subsequent work (as recommended) to develop an MGP soil desorption/diffusion protocol and new scale-up methods, and with subsequent scale-up testing should lead to the capability for improved selection of MGP sites for bioremediation and improved performance, success, and reliability of field applications. With this greater predictive reliability, bioremediation will be used more often in the field on the most favorable applications and its cost advantages over other remediation options will be realized

  16. TV Weathercasters as Climate Educators: Rationale, Evidence for Effectiveness, and Potential for Nationwide Scale-Up. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maibach, E.; Cullen, H. M.; Witte, J.

    2013-12-01

    local ramifications of climate change, their viewers learn. Our current attempts to scale-up the model on a limited basis - in one state as a field experiment, and elsewhere around the nation on an uncontrolled basis - are showing promise in terms of attracting an increasing numbers of participating weathercasters. Lastly, professional associations that represent TV weathercasters (AMS and NWA), and government agencies that produce climate and weather data for meteorologists (NOAA and NASA), are committed to help scale up this model so that all interested TV weathercasters have easy access to localized information through which to educate their viewers about local weather and related implications of climate change. In sum, by engaging and empowering TV weathercasters as climate educators, we seek to increase public understanding of the relationships among climate, climate variability, climate change, weather extremes and community vulnerability, and we believe this model has considerable potential.

  17. Establishing and Scaling-Up Clinical Social Franchise Networks: Lessons Learned From Marie Stopes International and Population Services International.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Sarah; Chakraborty, Nirali M; Hayes, Brendan; Mackay, Anna; Moon, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    In many low- and middle-income countries, a majority of people seek health care from the private sector. However, fragmentation, poor economies of scale, inadequate financing, political opposition, a bias toward curative services, and weak regulatory and quality control systems pose serious challenges for the private sector. Social franchising addresses a number of these challenges by organizing small, independent health care businesses into quality-assured networks. Global franchisors Marie Stopes International (MSI) and Population Services International (PSI) have rapidly scaled their family planning social franchising programs in recent years, jointly delivering over 10.8 million couple-years of protection (CYPs) in 2014-up 26% from 8.6 million CYPs just 1 year prior. Drawing on experience across MSI's 17 and PSI's 25 social franchise networks across Africa, Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean, this article documents the organizations' operational approaches, challenges faced, and solutions implemented. The organizations provide intensive capacity building and support for private-sector providers, including clinical training, branding, monitoring quality of franchised services, and commodity support. In addition, franchising programs engage providers and clients through behavior change communication (BCC) and demand generation activities to raise awareness and to attract clients, and they implement initiatives to ensure services are affordable for the lowest-income clients. Social franchise programs offer the private sector a collective platform to better engage government in health policy advocacy and for integrating into new public health care financing and procurement mechanisms. The future of social franchising will require developing approaches to scale-up and sustain the model cost-effectively, selectively integrating other health services into the franchise package, and being responsive to evolving health care financing approaches with the potential

  18. Scale-up of industrial biodiesel production to 40 m(3) using a liquid lipase formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Jason; Nordblad, Mathias; Martel, Hannah H; Chrabas, Brent; Wang, Huali; Nielsen, Per Munk; Woodley, John M

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the scale-up from an 80 L fed-batch scale to 40 m(3) along with the design of a 4 m(3) continuous process for enzymatic biodiesel production catalyzed by NS-40116 (a liquid formulation of a modified Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase). Based on the analysis of actual pilot plant data for the transesterification of used cooking oil and brown grease, we propose a method applying first order integral analysis to fed-batch data based on either the bound glycerol or free fatty acid content in the oil. This method greatly simplifies the modeling process and gives an indication of the effect of mixing at the various scales (80 L to 40 m(3) ) along with the prediction of the residence time needed to reach a desired conversion in a CSTR. Suitable process metrics reflecting commercial performance such as the reaction time, enzyme efficiency, and reactor productivity were evaluated for both the fed-batch and CSTR cases. Given similar operating conditions, the CSTR operation on average, has a reaction time which is 1.3 times greater than the fed-batch operation. We also showed how the process metrics can be used to quickly estimate the selling price of the enzyme. Assuming a biodiesel selling price of 0.6 USD/kg and a one-time use of the enzyme (0.1% (w/woil ) enzyme dosage); the enzyme can then be sold for 30 USD/kg which ensures that that the enzyme cost is not more than 5% of the biodiesel revenue. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1719-1728. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26806356

  19. Successful scaling-up of self-sustained pyrolysis of oil palm biomass under pool-type reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Juferi; Shirai, Yoshihito; Andou, Yoshito; Mohd Ali, Ahmad Amiruddin; Othman, Mohd Ridzuan; Ibrahim, Izzudin; Yamamoto, Akio; Yasuda, Nobuhiko; Hassan, Mohd Ali

    2016-02-01

    An appropriate technology for waste utilisation, especially for a large amount of abundant pressed-shredded oil palm empty fruit bunch (OFEFB), is important for the oil palm industry. Self-sustained pyrolysis, whereby oil palm biomass was combusted by itself to provide the heat for pyrolysis without an electrical heater, is more preferable owing to its simplicity, ease of operation and low energy requirement. In this study, biochar production under self-sustained pyrolysis of oil palm biomass in the form of oil palm empty fruit bunch was tested in a 3-t large-scale pool-type reactor. During the pyrolysis process, the biomass was loaded layer by layer when the smoke appeared on the top, to minimise the entrance of oxygen. This method had significantly increased the yield of biochar. In our previous report, we have tested on a 30-kg pilot-scale capacity under self-sustained pyrolysis and found that the higher heating value (HHV) obtained was 22.6-24.7 MJ kg(-1) with a 23.5%-25.0% yield. In this scaled-up study, a 3-t large-scale procedure produced HHV of 22.0-24.3 MJ kg(-1) with a 30%-34% yield based on a wet-weight basis. The maximum self-sustained pyrolysis temperature for the large-scale procedure can reach between 600 °C and 700 °C. We concluded that large-scale biochar production under self-sustained pyrolysis was successfully conducted owing to the comparable biochar produced, compared with medium-scale and other studies with an electrical heating element, making it an appropriate technology for waste utilisation, particularly for the oil palm industry. PMID:26612557

  20. Health and economic benefits of scaling up a home-based neonatal care package in rural India: a modelling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Arindam; Colson, Abigail R; Verma, Amit; Megiddo, Itamar; Ashok, Ashvin; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 900 000 newborn children die every year in India, accounting for 28% of neonatal deaths globally. In 2011, India introduced a home-based newborn care (HBNC) package to be delivered by community health workers across rural areas. We estimate the disease and economic burden that could be averted by scaling up the HBNC in rural India using IndiaSim, an agent-based simulation model, to examine two interventions. In the first intervention, the existing community health worker network begins providing HBNC for rural households without access to home- or facility-based newborn care, as introduced by India's recent programme. In the second intervention, we consider increased coverage of HBNC across India so that total coverage of neonatal care (HBNC or otherwise) in the rural areas of each state reaches at least 90%. We find that compared with a baseline of no coverage, providing the care package through the existing network of community health workers could avert 48 [95% uncertainty range (UR) 34-63] incident cases of severe neonatal morbidity and 5 (95% UR 4-7) related deaths, save $4411 (95% UR $3088-$5735) in out-of-pocket treatment costs, and provide $285 (95% UR $200-$371) in value of insurance per 1000 live births in rural India. Increasing the coverage of HBNC to 90% will avert an additional 9 (95% UR 7-12) incident cases, 1 death (95% UR 0.72-1.33), and $613 (95% UR $430-$797) in out-of-pocket expenditures, and provide $55 (95% UR $39-$72) in incremental value of insurance per 1000 live births. Intervention benefits are greater for lower socioeconomic groups and in the poorer states of Chhattisgarh, Uttarakhand, Bihar, Assam and Uttar Pradesh. PMID:26561440

  1. High throughput screening of particle conditioning operations: II. Evaluation of scale-up heuristics with prokaryotically expressed polysaccharide vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Aaron; Huffman, Ben; Berrill, Alex; Merchant, Nick; Godavarti, Ranga; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel; Coffman, Jonathan; Sunasara, Khurram; Mukhopadhyay, Tarit

    2015-08-01

    Multivalent polysaccharide conjugate vaccines are typically comprised of several different polysaccharides produced with distinct and complex production processes. Particle conditioning steps, such as precipitation and flocculation, may be used to aid the recovery and purification of such microbial vaccine products. An ultra scale-down approach to purify vaccine polysaccharides at the micro-scale would greatly enhance productivity, robustness, and speed the development of novel conjugate vaccines. In part one of this series, we described a modular and high throughput approach to develop particle conditioning processes (HTPC) for biologicals that combines flocculation, solids removal, and streamlined analytics. In this second part of the series, we applied HTPC to industrially relevant feedstreams comprised of capsular polysaccharides (CPS) from several bacterial species. The scalability of HTPC was evaluated between 0.8 mL and 13 L scales, with several different scaling methodologies examined. Clarification, polysaccharide yield, impurity clearance, and product quality achieved with HTPC were reproducible and comparable with larger scales. Particle sizing was the response with greatest sensitivity to differences in processing scale and enabled the identification of useful scaling rules. Scaling with constant impeller tip speed or power per volume in the impeller swept zone offered the most accurate scale up, with evidence that time integration of these values provided the optimal basis for scaling. The capability to develop a process at the micro-scale combined with evidence-based scaling metrics provide a significant advance for purification process development of vaccine processes. The USD system offers similar opportunities for HTPC of proteins and other complex biological molecules. PMID:25727194

  2. iCCM policy analysis: strategic contributions to understanding its character, design and scale up in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Asha; Rodríguez, Daniela C; Rasanathan, Kumanan; Brandes, Neal; Bennett, Sara

    2015-12-01

    Pneumonia, diarrhoea and malaria remain leading causes of death for children under 5 years of age and access to effective and appropriate treatment for sick children is extremely low where it is needed most. Integrated community case management (iCCM) enables community health workers to provide basic lifesaving treatment for sick children living in remote communities for these diseases. While many governments in sub-Saharan Africa recently changed policies to support iCCM, large variations in implementation remain. As a result, the collaboration represented in this supplement examined the policy processes underpinning iCCM through qualitative case study research in six purposively identified countries (Niger, Burkina Faso, Mali, Kenya, Malawi and Mozambique) and the global context. We introduce the supplement, by reviewing how policy analysis can inform: (a) how we frame iCCM and negotiate its boundaries, (b) how we tailor iCCM for national health systems and (c) how we foster accountability and learning for iCCM. In terms of framing, iCCM boundaries reflect how an array of actors use evidence to prioritize particular aspects of child mortality (lack of access to treatment), and how this underpins the ability to reach consensus and legitimate specific policy enterprises. When promoted at national level, contextual health system factors, such as the profile of CHWs and the history of primary health care, cannot be ignored. Adaptation to these contextual realities may lead to unintended consequences not forseen by technical or managerial expertize alone. Further scaling up of iCCM requires understanding of the political accountabilities involved, how ownership can be fostered and learning for improved policies and programs sustained. Collectively these articles demonstrate that iCCM, although often compartmentalized as a technical intervention, also reflects the larger and messier real world of health politics, policy and practice, for which policy analysis is vital

  3. Establishing and Scaling-Up Clinical Social Franchise Networks: Lessons Learned From Marie Stopes International and Population Services International

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Sarah; Chakraborty, Nirali M; Hayes, Brendan; Mackay, Anna; Moon, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    In many low- and middle-income countries, a majority of people seek health care from the private sector. However, fragmentation, poor economies of scale, inadequate financing, political opposition, a bias toward curative services, and weak regulatory and quality control systems pose serious challenges for the private sector. Social franchising addresses a number of these challenges by organizing small, independent health care businesses into quality-assured networks. Global franchisors Marie Stopes International (MSI) and Population Services International (PSI) have rapidly scaled their family planning social franchising programs in recent years, jointly delivering over 10.8 million couple-years of protection (CYPs) in 2014—up 26% from 8.6 million CYPs just 1 year prior. Drawing on experience across MSI’s 17 and PSI’s 25 social franchise networks across Africa, Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean, this article documents the organizations’ operational approaches, challenges faced, and solutions implemented. The organizations provide intensive capacity building and support for private-sector providers, including clinical training, branding, monitoring quality of franchised services, and commodity support. In addition, franchising programs engage providers and clients through behavior change communication (BCC) and demand generation activities to raise awareness and to attract clients, and they implement initiatives to ensure services are affordable for the lowest-income clients. Social franchise programs offer the private sector a collective platform to better engage government in health policy advocacy and for integrating into new public health care financing and procurement mechanisms. The future of social franchising will require developing approaches to scale-up and sustain the model cost-effectively, selectively integrating other health services into the franchise package, and being responsive to evolving health care financing approaches with the

  4. Top Ten Bed Bug Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have bed bugs, not fleas, ticks or other insects. You can compare your insect to the pictures on our Identifying bed bugs ... bedbugs Bed Bugs Home Learn about Bed Bugs — Characteristics of Bed Bugs — Finding Bed Bugs Protecting Your ...

  5. Pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1993, the pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR) was identified by ESKOM, the electric utility of South Africa, as a leading option for the installation of new generating capacity to their electric grid. This innovative nuclear power plant incorporates a closed cycle primary coolant system utilizing helium to transport heat energy directly from the modular pebble bed reactor to a recuperative power conversion unit with a single-shaft turbine/compressor/generator. This replacement of the steam cycle that is common in present nuclear power plants (NPP) with a direct gas cycle provides the benefits of simplification and a substantial increase in overall system efficiency with the attendant lowering of capital and operational costs. Although the historical development of this plant is interrelated to other types of high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs), the principle focus herein is on the pebble bed (spherical) fuel element type reactor. The long-term development of this reactor type began in Germany by the KFA Nuclear Research Center (now FZJ). Two pebble bed plants were constructed in Germany, the 46 MW(th)/15 MW(e) Arbeitsgemeinshaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) and the 750 MW(th)/296 MW(e) thorium high temperature reactor (THTR-300). Basically, these steam/electric plants validated the temperature and fission product retention capabilities of the ceramic (TRISO) coated fuel particle and the safety characteristics of the HTGR. Most notable of the operational achievements was with the AVR in sustaining longterm operation at an average core outlet temperature of 950 deg. C, and in demonstration of safety such as extended loss of forced cooling on the core. More details on the AVR and THTR-300 plants are provided The next evolution of the pebble bed plant began in the early 1980s with development of the modular reactor. This small reactor added the unique characteristic of being able to cool the core entirely by passive heat transfer mechanisms following postulated

  6. What Is Needed to Eradicate Lymphatic Filariasis? A Model-Based Assessment on the Impact of Scaling Up Mass Drug Administration Programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randee J Kastner

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis (LF is a neglected tropical disease for which more than a billion people in 73 countries are thought to be at-risk. At a global level, the efforts against LF are designed as an elimination program. However, current efforts appear to aim for elimination in some but not all endemic areas. With the 2020 goal of elimination looming, we set out to develop plausible scale-up scenarios to reach global elimination and eradication. We predict the duration of mass drug administration (MDA necessary to reach local elimination for a variety of transmission archetypes using an existing model of LF transmission, estimate the number of treatments required for each scenario, and consider implications of rapid scale-up.We have defined four scenarios that differ in their geographic coverage and rate of scale-up. For each scenario, country-specific simulations and calculations were performed that took into account the pre-intervention transmission intensity, the different vector genera, drug regimen, achieved level of population coverage, previous progress toward elimination, and potential programmatic delays due to mapping, operations, and administration.Our results indicate that eliminating LF by 2020 is unlikely. If MDA programs are drastically scaled up and expanded, the final round of MDA for LF eradication could be delivered in 2028 after 4,159 million treatments. However, if the current rate of scale-up is maintained, the final round of MDA to eradicate LF may not occur until 2050.Rapid scale-up of MDA will decrease the amount of time and treatments required to reach LF eradication. It may also propel the program towards success, as the risk of failure is likely to increase with extended program duration.

  7. Temporal trends in TB notification rates during ART scale-up in Cape Town: an ecological analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Hermans

    2015-09-01

    . Across sub-districts, infant HIV-positive TB decreased consistently whereas adult decreases varied. Conclusions: HIV-positive TB notification rates declined during a period of rapid scale-up of ART. Nevertheless, both HIV-positive and HIV-negative TB notification rates remained very high. Decreases among HIV positives were likely blunted by TB remaining a major entry to the ART programme and occurring after delayed ART initiation.

  8. Coating of particles at supercritical fluid conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, C. [BASF AG, GIC/P, D-67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany); Schreiber, R.; Werther, J.; Brunner, G. [Technical University Hamburg, D-21071 Hamburg (Germany)

    2004-09-01

    The combination of fluidized bed technology with supercritical carbon dioxide as fluidizing gas and as a solvent for the coating material enables the production of thin, even and solvent-free coatings. However the successful operation of such a coating process requires detailed knowledge of fluidization at supercritical fluid conditions. The results of the experiments show that the minimum fluidization velocity at supercritical fluid conditions can be predicted with satisfactory accuracy. The coating of different solids with paraffin results in thin layers (0.7-2 {mu}m), which are smooth and complete. Therefore, the coating of particles in fluidized beds operated with supercritical fluids can be considered as an alternative to existing coating technologies. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. WWC Review of the Report "Longitudinal Evaluation of a Scale-up Model for Teaching Mathematics with Trajectories and Technologies." What Works Clearinghouse Single Study Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The 2012 study, "Longitudinal Evaluation of a Scale-Up Model for Teaching Mathematics with Trajectories and Technologies," examined the effects of "Technology-enhanced, Research-based, Instruction, Assessment, and professional Development (TRIAD)," a math intervention for preschoolers that combines a curriculum, a…

  10. Optimisation of small series production and production scale-up scenarios of anode-supported intermediate-temperature planar SOFC single cells at Elcogen Ltd

    OpenAIRE

    Gurkin, Dmitri

    2011-01-01

    Distribution of production resources for continuous small series production of anode-supported intermediate-temperature planar SOFC single cells at Elcogen enterprise is improved. In addition, the author has developed the production scale-up scenarios for increasing the annual production volume of the above-mentioned SOFC single cells. Heildartexti er lokaður

  11. Reactive distillation : The front-runner of industrial process intensification - A full review of commercial applications, research, scale-up, design and operation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, G. Jan

    2007-01-01

    Most industrial scale reactive distillations (presently more than 150), operated worldwide today at capacities of 100-3000 ktonnes/y, and are reported in this paper. Most of these plants started up less than 15 years ago. The drivers, processes, systems, scale-up methods and partner collaborations f

  12. NRF2011-EDU001-EL001 EduLab Project Scaling-up Reflections on Using Open Source Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wee, Loo Kang; Lye, Sze Yee

    2014-01-01

    eduLab (MOE, 2012b) is a key programme under the third MasterPlan for ICT in Education (mp3) where teachers with good ideas for an ICT-enhanced lesson or curriculum (learning with computer models through inquiry, example PhET (PhET, 2011) can come together to collaborate. eduLab aims to support teachers to develop, prototype and test-bed their lesson ideas (journey in 2012-2014) while ensuring that the results, in the form of complete lesson packages (see http://edulab.moe.edu.sg/edulab-programmes/existing-projects third project), are scalable across schools to benefit the wider teaching community. Our models and lessons are downloadable here http://weelookang.blogspot.sg/2013/03/moe-excel-fest-2013-scaling.html We have collaborated with namely Professor Francisco Esquembre, Professor Fu-Kwun Hwang and Wolfgang Christian and created Open Source Computer Models on the topic of 1 Dimensional Collision (Loo Kang Wee, 2012b), Falling Magnet in Coil, Ripple Tank (Duffy, 2010; G. H. Goh et al., 2012; Ong, Ng, Goh, ...

  13. Research and design of 330 MW circulating fluidized bed boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xianbin; Shi, Zhenghai; Huang, Zhong [Thermal Power Research Institute, Xi' an (China); Jiang, Minhua [China Huaneg Group, Beijing (China); Yu, Long; Zhang, Yanjun; Wang, Fengjun; Zhang, Man [Harbin Boiler CO., Ltd, Harbin (China)

    2013-07-01

    Based on research and manufacture of 210MW circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler, the key technologies of large CFB boiler have been Research, the plan design of 330MW CFB boiler have been performed, construction design of key components and scaling up characteristics were analysed, The 330MW CFB boiler designed demonstration project has been put into commercial operation, It is the largest capacity CFB boiler operated in china now, Operation of 330MW CFB boiler was stable and good performance has been proved.

  14. The characteristics of bed agglomeration/defluidization in fluidized bed firing palm fruit bunch and rice straw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviors of bed particle agglomeration and defluidization were investigated during the combustion of oil palm bunch and rice straw in a laboratory scale bubbling fluidized bed reactor. The study focused on (1) the effects of fuel inorganic properties and operating variables on the bed agglomeration tendency and (2) the elucidation in the behaviors of fuel inorganic elements and the governing mode of the agglomeration. It was experimentally found that the defluidization caused by the bed agglomeration was clearly detectable from the decrease of measured bed pressure. The accumulation and growth of the agglomerates provided the partial to complete defluidization. The fuel inorganic composition was the significant influence on the bed agglomeration. The combustion of palm bunch showed higher in the bed agglomeration tendency than the straw combustion in every experimental condition. The defluidization was accelerated in response to the increase in bed temperature and bed particle size, and the decrease of air velocity and static bed height. In the SEM/EDS analysis, the agglomeration was attributed to the formation of the molten substance rich in silicon and fuel derived potassium, likely the potassium silicate compounds, which presented as the adhesive coating and bonding layer. The filling of irregularity on the bed particle surface by the liquid material to form the adhesive layer was dominated by the collision with burning fuel particles. The propagation/reaction inward the bed particles by some reactive constituents was found. The thermodynamic analysis on the ternary phase diagram corroborated that the formation of the liquid material derived from the fuel inorganic elements controlled the agglomeration; the large melt fraction in the adhesive materials at the observed bed temperature range (62–99%) was estimated. - Highlights: • The bed agglomeration was investigated during the FBC of palm bunch and rice straw. • Bed temperature, sand size, air

  15. Bed In Summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In winter I get up at night And dress by yellow candle-light. In summer, quite the other way, I have to go to bed by day. I have to go to bed and see The birds still hopping on the tree, Or hear the grown-up people' s feet Still going past me in the stree

  16. Fluidized bed incinerator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fluidized bed incinerator is being developed for burning rad contaminated solid and liquid waste materials. In situ neutralization of acid gases by the bed material, catalytic afterburning, and gas filtration are used to produce a clean flue gas without the use of aqueous scrubbing

  17. Edison's vacuum coating patents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the over one thousand patents bearing Thomas A. Edison's name are several for vacuum coating processes including chemical vapor deposition, evaporation, and sputter deposition. Beginning in 1880 Edison applied for patents that described carbon deposition processes that would now be called pyrolytic chemical vapor deposition. In 1884 Edison applied for a patent (granted in 1894) that described coating by evaporation in a vacuum by direct resistance heating or arc heating using a continuous current. Edison called the process 'electro vacuous deposition'. He prophetically wrote, 'the uses of the invention are almost infinite'. Edison also employed sputter deposition and in 1900 applied for a patent on a 'Process of Coating Phonograph Records'. Issued in 1902, the patent describes using a 'silent or brush electrical discharge' produced by an induction coil. The National Phonograph Company, one of Edison's many enterprises, used the sputtering process to deposit a thin layer of gold on wax phonograph cylinder masters that could then be electroplated to form molds to mass produce celluloid duplicates. The method was used for 20 years, from 1901 to 1921. It enabled the reproduction of cylinder grooves less than 0.001 in. deep at a density of 200 grooves per in. From 1913 to 1921, 10-in.-diameter Edison Diamond Disc phonograph records were made using the same method. Sputtering was abandoned in 1927, as it could not be scaled up to produce the 12 in. disks that were then introduced

  18. A uranium bed with ceramic body for tritium storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khapov, A.S.; Grishechkin, S.K.; Kiselev, V.G. [' All Russia Research Institute of Automatics' - FSUE VNIIA, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    It is widely recognized that ceramic coatings provide an attractive solution to lower tritium permeation in structural materials. Alumina based ceramic coatings have the highest permeation reduction factor for hydrogen. For this reason an attempt was made to apply crack-free low porous ceramics as a structural material of a bed body for tritium storage in a setup used for hydrogenating neutron tube targets at VNIIA. The present article introduces the design of the bed. This bed possesses essentially a lower hydrogen permeation factor than traditionally beds with stainless steel body. Bed heating in order to recover hydrogen from the bed is suggested to be implemented by high frequency induction means. Inductive heating allows decreasing the time necessary for tritium release from the bed as well as power consumption. Both of these factors mean less thermal power release into glove box where a setup for tritium handling is installed and thus causes fewer problems with pressure regulations inside the glove box. Inductive heating allows raising tritium sorbent material temperature up to melting point. The latter allows achieving nearly full tritium recovery.

  19. A uranium bed with ceramic body for tritium storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is widely recognized that ceramic coatings provide an attractive solution to lower tritium permeation in structural materials. Alumina based ceramic coatings have the highest permeation reduction factor for hydrogen. For this reason an attempt was made to apply crack-free low porous ceramics as a structural material of a bed body for tritium storage in a setup used for hydrogenating neutron tube targets at VNIIA. The present article introduces the design of the bed. This bed possesses essentially a lower hydrogen permeation factor than traditionally beds with stainless steel body. Bed heating in order to recover hydrogen from the bed is suggested to be implemented by high frequency induction means. Inductive heating allows decreasing the time necessary for tritium release from the bed as well as power consumption. Both of these factors mean less thermal power release into glove box where a setup for tritium handling is installed and thus causes fewer problems with pressure regulations inside the glove box. Inductive heating allows raising tritium sorbent material temperature up to melting point. The latter allows achieving nearly full tritium recovery

  20. Numerical Simulation of Asynchronous Simulated Moving Bed Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢建刚

    2004-01-01

    Asynchronous simulated moving bed chromatography (ASMBC), known also as the "VARICOL" process, is more efficient and flexible than the well-known and traditional simulated moving bed chromatography (SMBC). A detailed model of ASMBC, taking account of non-linear competitive isotherms, mass transfer parameters, and complex port switching schedule parameters, was developed to simulate the complex dynamics of ASMBC.The simulated performance is in close agreement with the experimental data of chiral separation reported in the literature. The simulation results show that ASMBC can achieve the performance similar to SMBC with fewer columns and can achieve better performance than SMBC with the same total column number. All design and operation parameters can be chosen correctly by numerical simulation. This detailed ASMBC model and the numerical technique are useful for design, operation, optimization and scale-up of ASMBC.

  1. Power scale-up of high-pulse-energy passively Q-switched Nd:YLF laser: influence of negative thermal lens enhanced by upconversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We develop a practical method to extend the power scale-up for a laser in a concave-plano cavity to be influenced by a large negative thermal lens. With the developed method, we successfully scale up the output power of a compact high-pulse-energy passively Q-switched Nd:YLF laser at 1053 nm with the Cr4+:YAG crystal as a saturable absorber. At an incident pump power of 12.6 W, the maximum output power under the optimum operation at 1053 nm reaches 2.61 W with a pulse width of 6 ns and a pulse repetition rate of 4.6 kHz. More importantly, we experimentally verify that the energy-transfer upconversion significantly enhances the negative focal length of thermal lens in the passively Q-switched Nd:YLF laser

  2. Reactive distillation: The front-runner of industrial process intensification - A full review of commercial applications, research, scale-up, design and operation

    OpenAIRE

    Harmsen, G. Jan

    2007-01-01

    Most industrial scale reactive distillations (presently more than 150), operated worldwide today at capacities of 100-3000 ktonnes/y, and are reported in this paper. Most of these plants started up less than 15 years ago. The drivers, processes, systems, scale-up methods and partner collaborations for this rapid invasion of a new process intensified technique are explained in this paper. The business drivers are (a) economical (prosperity): variable cost, capital expenditure and energy requir...

  3. Novel method for constructing a large-scale design space in lubrication process by using Bayesian estimation based on the reliability of a scale-up rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Jin; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Takayama, Kozo

    2012-01-01

    A reliable large-scale design space was constructed by integrating the reliability of a scale-up rule into the Bayesian estimation without enforcing a large-scale design of experiments (DoE). A small-scale DoE was conducted using various Froude numbers (X(1)) and blending times (X(2)) in the lubricant blending process for theophylline tablets. The response surfaces, design space, and their reliability of the compression rate of the powder mixture (Y(1)), tablet hardness (Y(2)), and dissolution rate (Y(3)) on a small scale were calculated using multivariate spline interpolation, a bootstrap resampling technique, and self-organizing map clustering. A constant Froude number was applied as a scale-up rule. Experiments were conducted at four different small scales with the same Froude number and blending time in order to determine the discrepancies in the response variables between the scales so as to indicate the reliability of the scale-up rule. Three experiments under an optimal condition and two experiments under other conditions were performed on a large scale. The response surfaces on the small scale were corrected to those on the large scale by Bayesian estimation using the large-scale results and the reliability of the scale-up rule. Large-scale experiments performed under three additional sets of conditions showed that the corrected design space was more reliable than the small-scale design space even when there was some discrepancy in the pharmaceutical quality between the manufacturing scales. This approach is useful for setting up a design space in pharmaceutical development when a DoE cannot be performed at a commercial large manufacturing scale. PMID:22976324

  4. Seventh meeting of the Global Alliance to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis: reaching the vision by scaling up, scaling down, and reaching out

    OpenAIRE

    Brady, Molly

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes the 7th meeting of the Global Alliance to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GAELF), Washington DC, November 18–19, 2012. The theme, “A Future Free of Lymphatic Filariasis: Reaching the Vision by Scaling Up, Scaling Down and Reaching Out”, emphasized new strategies and partnerships necessary to reach the 2020 goal of elimination of lymphatic filariasis (LF) as a public-health problem.

  5. Scaling-Up Access to Antiretroviral Therapy for Children: A Cohort Study Evaluating Care and Treatment at Mobile and Hospital-Affiliated HIV Clinics in Rural Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    van Dijk, Janneke H.; Moss, William J; Hamangaba, Francis; Munsanje, Bornface; Sutcliffe, Catherine G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Travel time and distance are barriers to care for HIV-infected children in rural sub-Saharan Africa. Decentralization of care is one strategy to scale-up access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), but few programs have been evaluated. We compared outcomes for children receiving care in mobile and hospital-affiliated HIV clinics in rural Zambia. Methods Outcomes were measured within an ongoing cohort study of HIV-infected children seeking care at Macha Hospital, Zambia from 2007 to 201...

  6. Seventh meeting of the Global Alliance to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis: reaching the vision by scaling up, scaling down, and reaching out

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes the 7th meeting of the Global Alliance to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GAELF), Washington DC, November 18–19, 2012. The theme, “A Future Free of Lymphatic Filariasis: Reaching the Vision by Scaling Up, Scaling Down and Reaching Out”, emphasized new strategies and partnerships necessary to reach the 2020 goal of elimination of lymphatic filariasis (LF) as a public-health problem. PMID:24450283

  7. Hospitalizations and Costs Incurred at the Facility Level after Scale-up of Malaria Control: Pre-Post Comparisons from Two Hospitals in Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Comfort, Alison B.; van Dijk, Janneke H.; Mharakurwa, Sungano; Stillman, Kathryn; Gabert, Rose; Korde, Sonali; Nachbar, Nancy; Derriennic, Yann; Musau, Stephen; Hamazakaza, Petan; Zyambo, Khozya D.; Zyongwe, Nancy M.; Hamainza, Busiku; Thuma, Philip E.

    2014-01-01

    There is little evidence on the impact of malaria control on the health system, particularly at the facility level. Using retrospective, longitudinal facility-level and patient record data from two hospitals in Zambia, we report a pre-post comparison of hospital admissions and outpatient visits for malaria and estimated costs incurred for malaria admissions before and after malaria control scale-up. The results show a substantial reduction in inpatient admissions and outpatient visits for mal...

  8. Scaling Up Youth-Focused Interventions in the Multi-Country HIV/AIDS Programs and Building Capacity of Civil Society Organizations, Case from Zambia : An Assessment Report

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2005-01-01

    Zambia is among countries with high HIV/AIDS prevalence, 16 percent among adult population aged 15 to 49 years. Prevalence among urban population is twice that of rural dwellers, 23 percent for urban and 11 percent for rural residents. Like other African countries, youth and women are the groups highly infected and affected by HIV/AIDS. As part of the scaling up effort, the World Bank (WB...

  9. Prising open the 'black box': An epistemological critique of discursive constructions of scaling up the provision of mental health care in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sara

    2015-09-01

    Global mental health research is increasingly highlighting the high levels of untreated mental illness in Africa and calling for the scaling-up of services in order to redress this situation. A particular model of care is being strongly advocated for such scale-up, and a recent explosion of research is providing guidelines for its implementation. This article seeks to open up the 'black box' of international research on scaling up the provision of mental health care in Africa, unearthing the hidden assumptions and power dynamics underpinning the knowledge produced. It insists that gaining a better understanding of care provision demands that we not only fill the gaps in knowledge but also problematize the assumptions upon which existing knowledge is based. This article demonstrates how two interrelated paradigms are strongly mediating research in this area - those of 'scientific evidence' and 'human rights'. Drawing on recent research within the sociology of scientific knowledge, and strands of postcolonial thought, it demonstrates how these paradigms are both underpinned by several contentious epistemological assumptions, assumptions which are deeply inserted within the epistemological order of Western modernity. The main argument is that through their shared ideological undertones of 'objectivity', 'universalism' and 'rationalism', these paradigms are potentially marginalizing other possibly important ways of thinking about care in Africa, ways which might not originate from modernist forms of consciousness. This article makes a plea for a more inclusive and plural archive of knowledge on scaling up mental health care in Africa, one which is more hospitable to diverse epistemological politics and moral landscapes. PMID:25406137

  10. Partnering to proceed: scaling up adolescent sexual reproductive health programmes in Tanzania. Operational research into the factors that influenced local government uptake and implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Bahati; Medard Lemmy; Kato Charles; Makokha Maende; Renju Jenny; Remes Pieter; Changalucha John; Obasi Angela

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Little is known about how to implement promising small-scale projects to reduce reproductive ill health and HIV vulnerability in young people on a large scale. This evaluation documents and explains how a partnership between a non-governmental organization (NGO) and local government authorities (LGAs) influenced the LGA-led scale-up of an innovative NGO programme in the wider context of a new national multisectoral AIDS strategy. Methods Four rounds of semi-structured inte...

  11. Production of Polygalacturonases by Aspergillus section Nigri Strains in a Fixed Bed Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Marília Maciel; Cristiane Ottoni; Cledir Santos; Nelson Lima; Keila Moreira; Cristina Souza-Motta

    2013-01-01

    Polygalacturonases (PG) are pectinolytic enzymes that have technological, functional and biological applications in food processing, fruit ripening and plant-fungus interactions, respectively. In the present, study a microtitre plate methodology was used for rapid screening of 61 isolates of fungi from Aspergillus section Nigri to assess production of endo- and exo-PG. Studies of scale-up were carried out in a fixed bed reactor operated under different parameters using the best producer strai...

  12. Lipase production by solid-state fermentation in fixed-bed bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Elisa d'Avila Costa Cavalcanti; Melissa Limoeiro Estrada Gutarra; Denise Maria Guimarães Freire; Leda dos Reis Castilho; Geraldo Lippel Sant'Anna Júnior

    2005-01-01

    In the present work, packed bed bioreactors were employed with the aim of increasing productivity and scaling up of lipase production using Penicillium simplicissimum in solid-state fermentation. The influence of temperature and air flow rate on enzyme production was evaluated employing statistical experimental design, and an empirical model was adjusted to the experimental data. It was shown that higher lipase activities could be achieved at lower temperatures and higher air flow rates. The ...

  13. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokkam, Ram [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  14. Design requirements for the supercritical water oxidation test bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the design requirements for the supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) test bed that will be located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The test bed will process a maximum of 50 gph of waste plus the required volume of cooling water. The test bed will evaluate the performance of a number of SCWO reactor designs. The goal of the project is to select a reactor that can be scaled up for use in a full-size waste treatment facility to process US Department of Energy mixed wastes. EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. will design and construct the SCWO test bed at the Water Reactor Research Test Facility (WRRTF), located in the northern region of the INEL. Private industry partners will develop and provide SCWO reactors to interface with the test bed. A number of reactor designs will be tested, including a transpiring wall, tube, and vessel-type reactor. The initial SCWO reactor evaluated will be a transpiring wall design. This design requirements report identifies parameters needed to proceed with preliminary and final design work for the SCWO test bed. A flow sheet and Process and Instrumentation Diagrams define the overall process and conditions of service and delineate equipment, piping, and instrumentation sizes and configuration Codes and standards that govern the safe engineering and design of systems and guidance that locates and interfaces test bed hardware are provided. Detailed technical requirements are addressed for design of piping, valves, instrumentation and control, vessels, tanks, pumps, electrical systems, and structural steel. The approach for conducting the preliminary and final designs and environmental and quality issues influencing the design are provided

  15. Studies on column size scale-up and flow profile in conical shape liquid chromatographic column of 10° by visualization method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan Wenna; Tan Feng; Guan Yafeng

    2006-01-01

    An improved visualization device made of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) was used to study the 3D flow profile inside conical columns of a 10° opening angle packed with C18 phase.The outside wall of the conical columns was rectangular in shape in order to improve the transparency property of the column wall and reduce the deformation of the image for better observation of the flow profiles of colored solutes inside the column.The influence of flow rate,particle size and shape on the flow profile of a colored band were studied on a 5-cm-long column and a scaled-up column of four fold in volume.It was found that the flow rates of the mobile phase had little influence on the flat flow profile of the iodine band while the properties of the stationary phase had a certain influence on them.We observed that the flow profiles of the scaled-up column were flat during the whole chromatographic process,and the efficiency and resolution of the column were also increased in accordance with theoretical prediction.The experimental results proved that the 10° conical columns can be proportionally scaled up while still keeping the flat flow profile,sample load per unit volume of packing material,and column efficiency,which are superior to the conventional column.

  16. Hollow Fiber Membrane Contactors for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture: A Scale-Up Study from Laboratory to Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrane contactors have been proposed for decades as a way to achieve intensified mass transfer processes. Post-combustion CO2 capture by absorption into a chemical solvent is one of the currently most intensively investigated topics in this area. Numerous studies have already been reported, unfortunately almost systematically on small, laboratory scale, modules. Given the level of flue gas flow rates which have to be treated for carbon capture applications, a consistent scale-up methodology is obviously needed for a rigorous engineering design. In this study, the possibilities and limitations of scale-up strategies for membrane contactors have been explored and will be discussed. Experiments (CO2 absorption from a gas mixture in a 30% wt MEA aqueous solution) have been performed both on mini-modules and at pilot scale (10 m2 membrane contactor module) based on PTFE hollow fibers. The results have been modelled utilizing a resistance in series approach. The only adjustable parameter is in fitting the simulations to experimental data is the membrane mass transfer coefficient (km), which logically plays a key role. The difficulties and uncertainties associated with scale-up computations from lab scale to pilot scale modules, with a particular emphasis on the km value, are presented and critically discussed. (authors)

  17. Characterization of the pneumatic behavior of a novel spouted bed apparatus with two adjustable gas inlets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gryczka, O.; Heinrich, S.; Miteva, V.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Jacob, M.; Mörl, L.

    2008-01-01

    Recently the importance of spouted bed technology has significantly increased in the context of drying processes as well as granulation, agglomeration or coating processes. Within this work the fluid dynamics of a novel spouted bed plant with two adjustable gas inlets is investigated. By analysis of

  18. Characteristics of flow in wet conical spouted beds of unequal-sized spherical Particles

    OpenAIRE

    M. S. Bacelos; PASSOS M. L.; J. T. Freire

    2008-01-01

    Interparticle forces, developed in wet spouted beds composed of a mixture of spherical particles with different size distributions, intensify particle segregation mechanisms interfering in gas distribution inside the bed and, consequently, in the spouting flow characteristics. Therefore, this paper is aimed at describing the effect of interparticle forces on the air-solid flow distribution in conical spouted beds of unequal-sized particles coated by a thin glycerol film. Experimental results ...

  19. Enuresis (Bed-Wetting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... get out of bed to go to the bathroom. When do most children achieve bladder control? Children ... ask questions about your child's daytime and nighttime bathroom habits. Then your doctor will do a physical ...

  20. Tapered bed bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Charles D.; Hancher, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    A vertically oriented conically shaped column is used as a fluidized bed bioreactor wherein biologically catalyzed reactions are conducted in a continuous manner. The column utilizes a packing material a support having attached thereto a biologically active catalytic material.

  1. Utilização do leito de jorro para a aplicação de revestimento entérico em cápsulas gelatinosas duras Utilization of a spouted bed for the application of enteric coating in hard gelatin capsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmarcio Zimmermann Martins

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Apresenta-se nesse trabalho um estudo da viabilidade da aplicação de revestimento gastro-resistente em cápsulas gelatinosas duras pelo processo leito de jorro. As variáveis investigadas foram: a razão entre a vazão mássica de suspensão de revestimento alimentada pela vazão de gás introduzida ao sistema (Ws/Wg, a razão entre a vazão de ar de jorro pela vazão correspondente à condição de jorro mínimo (Q/Qjm, massa inicial de cápsulas inseridas no equipamento (M0 e o tamanho das cápsulas (Tcaps. O processo e a qualidade do produto obtido foram analisados através da taxa de aumento de massa das cápsulas (K1, da eficiência de adesão durante a operação (·, ensaios de desintegração, ensaios de compressão e por microfotografias obtidas em microscópio eletrônico de varredura. Os experimentos foram realizados em um leito de jorro com coluna cilíndrica de 15 cm de diâmetro e base cônica com ângulo incluso de 40º. A análise dos resultados obtidos levou à determinação da melhor condição para a aplicação de revestimento de cápsulas: Ws/Wg = 0,0014 e Q/Qjm = 3,0, para ambas as massas de cápsulas introduzidas no sistema e tamanhos de cápsulas estudados. Os ensaios de desintegração mostraram que massas de revestimento superiores a 0,006 g/cm² proporcionam o efeito gastro-resistente.In this work is presented a study of the viability of the use of the spouted bed for application of the gastric resistant coating on hard gelatin capsules. The parameters studied were the ratio between the mass feed flow rate of the coating suspension to the mass feed flow rate of the gas introduced to the system, (Ws/Wg, the ratio between the flow rate of the spouting gas relative to the minimum spouting, (Q/Qjm, the mass of capsules loaded to the equipment, (M0 and the capsule's size, (Tcaps. The performance of the process as well as the coating quality were evaluated through the increase rate of the particle mass, (K1, by the

  2. Bed rest and immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Aviles, Hernan; Butel, Janet S.; Shearer, William T.; Niesel, David; Pandya, Utpal; Allen, Christopher; Ochs, Hans D.; Blancher, Antoine; Abbal, Michel

    2007-02-01

    Space flight has been shown to result in altered immune responses. The current study was designed to investigate this possibility by using the bed rest model of some space flight conditions. A large number of women are included as subjects in the study. The hypothesis being tested is: 60 days head-down tilt bed rest of humans will affect the immune system and resistance to infection. Blood, urine and saliva samples will be obtained from bed rest subjects prior to, at intervals during, and after completion of 60 days of head-down tilt bed rest. Leukocyte blastogenesis, cytokine production and virus reactivation will be assessed. The ability of the subjects to respond appropriately to immunization with the neoantigen bacteriophage φX-174 will also be determined. Bed rest is being carried out at MEDES, Toulouse France, and the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX. The studies to be carried out in France will also allow assessment of the effects of muscle/bone exercise and nutritional countermeasures on the immune system in addition to the effects of bed rest.

  3. Evaluating the effect of coating equipment on tablet film quality using terahertz pulsed imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaser, Miriam; Naelapaa, Kaisa; Gordon, Keith C;

    2013-01-01

    formulation under recommended process conditions (provided by the coating polymer supplier) were mapped individually to evaluate the effect of coating device on critical coating characteristics (coating thickness, surface morphology and density). Although the traditional coating quality parameter (weight gain......In this study, terahertz pulsed imaging (TPI) was employed to investigate the effect of the coating equipment (fluid bed and drum coater) on the structure of the applied film coating and subsequent dissolution behaviour. Six tablets from every batch coated with the same delayed release coating...

  4. Fluidised bed heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems that have arisen during the initial stages of development of fluidised bed boilers in which heat transfer surfaces are immersed in fluidised solids are discussed. The very high heat transfer coefficients that are obtained under these conditions can be exploited to reduce the total heat transfer surface to a fraction of that in normal boilers. However, with the high heat flux levels involved, tube stressing becomes more important and it is advantageous to use smaller diameter tubes. One of the initial problems was that the pumping power absorbed by the fluidised bed appeared to be high. The relative influence of the fluidising velocity (and the corresponding bed area), tube diameter, tube spacing, heat transfer coefficient and bed temperature on pumping power and overall cost was determined. This showed the importance of close tube packing and research was undertaken to see if this would adversely affect the heat transfer coefficient. Pressure operation also reduces the pumping power. Fouling and corrosion tests in beds burning coal suggest that higher temperatures could be reached reliably and cost studies show that, provided the better refractory metals are used, the cost of achieving higher temperatures is not unduly high. It now remains to demonstrate at large scale that the proposed systems are viable and that the methods incorporated to overcome start up and part lead running problems are satisfactory. The promising role of these heat transfer techniques in other applications is briefly discussed

  5. Rotating bed reactor for CLC: Bed characteristics dependencies on internal gas mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A mathematical model for the rotating CLC reactor has been developed. • The model reflects the gas distribution in the reactor during CLC operation. • Radial dispersion in the rotating bed is the main cause for internal gas mixing. • The model can be used to optimize the reactor design and particle characteristics. - Abstract: A newly designed continuous lab-scale rotating bed reactor for chemical looping combustion using CuO/Al2O3 oxygen carrier spheres and methane as fuel gives around 90% CH4 conversion and >90% CO2 capture efficiency based on converted methane at 800 °C. However, from a series of experiments using a broad range of operating conditions potential CO2 purities only in the range 20–65% were yielded, mostly due to nitrogen slip from the air side of the reactor into the effluent CO2 stream. A mathematical model was developed intending to understand the air-mixing phenomena. The model clearly reflects the gas slippage tendencies observed when varying the process conditions such as rotation frequency, gas flow and the flow if inert gas in the two sectors dividing the air and fuel side of the reactor. Based on the results, it is believed that significant improvements can be made to reduce gas mixing in future modified and scaled-up reactor versions

  6. Cost and impact of scaling up interventions to save lives of mothers and children: taking South Africa closer to MDGs 4 and 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lumbwe Chola

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: South Africa has made substantial progress on child and maternal mortality, yet many avoidable deaths of mothers and children still occur. This analysis identifies priority interventions to be scaled up nationally and projects the potential maternal and child lives saved. Design: We modelled the impact of maternal, newborn and child interventions using the Lives Saved Tools Projections to 2015 and used realistic coverage increases based on expert opinion considering recent policy change, financial and resource inputs, and observed coverage change. A scenario analysis was undertaken to test the impact of increasing intervention coverage to 95%. Results: By 2015, with realistic coverage, the maternal mortality ratio (MMR can reduce to 153 deaths per 100,000 and child mortality to 34 deaths per 1,000 live births. Fifteen interventions, including labour and delivery management, early HIV treatment in pregnancy, prevention of mother-to-child transmission and handwashing with soap, will save an additional 9,000 newborns and children and 1,000 mothers annually. An additional US$370 million (US$7 per capita will be required annually to scale up these interventions. When intervention coverage is increased to 95%, breastfeeding promotion becomes the top intervention, the MMR reduces to 116 and the child mortality ratio to 23. Conclusions: The 15 interventions identified were adopted by the National Department of Health, and the Health Minister launched a campaign to encourage Provincial Health Departments to scale up coverage. It is hoped that by focusing on implementing these 15 interventions at high quality, South Africa will reach Millennium Development Goal (MDG 4 soon after 2015 and MDG 5 several years later. Focus on HIV and TB during early antenatal care is essential. Strategic gains could be realised by targeting vulnerable populations and districts with the worst health outcomes. The analysis demonstrates the usefulness of priority

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Hepatitis C Prevalence Reduction with Antiviral Treatment Scale-Up in Persons Who Inject Drugs in Metropolitan Chicago.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desarae Echevarria

    Full Text Available New direct-acting antivirals (DAAs provide an opportunity to combat hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in persons who inject drugs (PWID. Here we use a mathematical model to predict the impact of a DAA-treatment scale-up on HCV prevalence among PWID and the estimated cost in metropolitan Chicago.To estimate the HCV antibody and HCV-RNA (chronic infection prevalence among the metropolitan Chicago PWID population, we used empirical data from three large epidemiological studies. Cost of DAAs is assumed $50,000 per person.Approximately 32,000 PWID reside in metropolitan Chicago with an estimated HCV-RNA prevalence of 47% or 15,040 cases. Approximately 22,000 PWID (69% of the total PWID population attend harm reduction (HR programs, such as syringe exchange programs, and have an estimated HCV-RNA prevalence of 30%. There are about 11,000 young PWID (<30 years old with an estimated HCV-RNA prevalence of 10% (PWID in these two subpopulations overlap. The model suggests that the following treatment scale-up is needed to reduce the baseline HCV-RNA prevalence by one-half over 10 years of treatment [cost per year, min-max in millions]: 35 per 1,000 [$50-$77] in the overall PWID population, 19 per 1,000 [$20-$26] for persons in HR programs, and 5 per 1,000 [$3-$4] for young PWID.Treatment scale-up could dramatically reduce the prevalence of chronic HCV infection among PWID in Chicago, who are the main reservoir for on-going HCV transmission. Focusing treatment on PWID attending HR programs and/or young PWID could have a significant impact on HCV prevalence in these subpopulations at an attainable cost.

  8. What is needed to eradicate lymphatic filariasis? : A model-based assessment on the impact of scaling up mass drug administration programs

    OpenAIRE

    Kastner, Randee J.; Stone, Christopher M.; Steinmann, Peter; Tanner, Marcel; Tediosi, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a neglected tropical disease for which more than a billion people in 73 countries are thought to be at-risk. At a global level, the efforts against LF are designed as an elimination program. However, current efforts appear to aim for elimination in some but not all endemic areas. With the 2020 goal of elimination looming, we set out to develop plausible scale-up scenarios to reach global elimination and eradication. We predict the duration of mass drug administrat...

  9. Monetary Policies for an MDG-Related Scaling up of ODA to Combat HIV/AIDS:Avoiding Dutch Disease Versus Supporting Fiscal Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Matías Vernengo

    2007-01-01

    This Conference Paper by Matias Vernengo was presented at the ?Global Conference on Gearing Macroeconomic Policies to Reverse the HIV/AIDS Epidemic?, jointly organized by UNDP?s HIV/AIDS Group and IPC and held in Brasilia, November 2006. It is part of an IPC-supported Research Programme on ?Macroeconomic Policies to Combat HIV/AIDS?. The paper maintains that the monetary policies best suited to manage the macroeconomic effects of an MDG-related scaling up of HIV/AIDS financing are those that ...

  10. Partnering to proceed: scaling up adolescent sexual reproductive health programmes in Tanzania. Operational research into the factors that influenced local government uptake and implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Bahati

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about how to implement promising small-scale projects to reduce reproductive ill health and HIV vulnerability in young people on a large scale. This evaluation documents and explains how a partnership between a non-governmental organization (NGO and local government authorities (LGAs influenced the LGA-led scale-up of an innovative NGO programme in the wider context of a new national multisectoral AIDS strategy. Methods Four rounds of semi-structured interviews with 82 key informants, 8 group discussions with 49 district trainers and supervisors (DTS, 8 participatory workshops involving 52 DTS, and participant observations of 80% of LGA-led and 100% of NGO-led meetings were conducted, to ascertain views on project components, flow of communication and decision-making and amount of time DTS utilized undertaking project activities. Results Despite a successful ten-fold scale-up of intervention activities in three years, full integration into LGA systems did not materialize. LGAs contributed significant human resources but limited finances; the NGO retained control over finances and decision-making and LGAs largely continued to view activities as NGO driven. Embedding of technical assistants (TAs in the LGAs contributed to capacity building among district implementers, but may paradoxically have hindered project integration, because TAs were unable to effectively transition from an implementing to a facilitating role. Operation of NGO administration and financial mechanisms also hindered integration into district systems. Conclusions Sustainable intervention scale-up requires operational, financial and psychological integration into local government mechanisms. This must include substantial time for district systems to try out implementation with only minimal NGO support and modest output targets. It must therefore go beyond the typical three- to four-year project cycles. Scale-up of NGO pilot projects of this

  11. Scaling up postabortion contraceptive service--results from a study conducted among women having unwanted pregnancies in urban and rural Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Vibeke; Yambesi, Fortunata; Kipingili, Rose

    2005-01-01

    and rural Tanzania and evaluates the outcome of a postabortion care intervention. METHODS: Data were collected among 781 women admitted with incomplete abortion in Dar es Salaam region (urban Tanzania) and 575 women in Kagera region (rural Tanzania). RESULTS: Sixty-seven percent of the women in urban...... Tanzania and 42% in rural Tanzania stated that their pregnancy was unwanted. Contraceptive acceptance among women with unwanted pregnancies was high; 93% in urban Tanzania and 71% in rural Tanzania left with a contraceptive method. CONCLUSION: The high proportion of women with unwanted pregnancies in urban...... and rural Tanzania underlines the need of scaling up postabortion contraceptive service....

  12. Fluidized bed apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The apparatus invented features and envelope with a cooling sleeve containing a treatment chamber with an escape duct, vacuum pump and intake pipes for a coating gas and a conveyor gas; these gases are sent into a special nozzle provided with a central passage for the coating gas and an annular outer passage for the conveyor gas which is heated on its way through, the nozzle being so designed that the gases do not mix until immediately before injection into the chamber. Such an apparatus can be used in particular to form coatings holding back fission products on nuclear fuel nuclei

  13. Conformal nanocoating of zirconia nanoparticles by atomic layer deposition in a fluidized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Luis F.; George, Steven M.; Weimer, Alan W.

    2005-07-01

    Primary zirconia nanoparticles were conformally coated with alumina ultrathin films using atomic layer deposition (ALD) in a fluidized bed reactor. Alternating doses of trimethylaluminium and water vapour were performed to deposit Al2O3 nanolayers on the surface of 26 nm zirconia nanoparticles. Transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was performed ex situ. Bulk Al2O3 vibrational modes were observed for coated particles after 50 and 70 cycles. Coated nanoparticles were also examined with transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Analysis revealed highly conformal and uniform alumina nanofilms throughout the surface of zirconia nanoparticles. The particle size distribution and surface area of the nanoparticles are not affected by the coating process. Primary nanoparticles are coated individually despite their high aggregation tendency during fluidization. The dynamic aggregation behaviour of zirconia nanoparticles in the fluidized bed plays a key role in the individual coating of nanoparticles.

  14. Remediation of ash problems in fluidised-bed combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuthaluru, H.B.; Zhang, D.K. [Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA (Australia). School of Chemical Engineering

    2001-03-01

    The paper reports the control methods for mitigating particle agglomeration and bed defluidisation during fluidised-bed combustion of low-rank coals. A laboratory scale spouted-bed combustion system is used to study the effectiveness of several control methods including the use of alternative bed materials, mineral additives, pretreatment of coal and coal blending. Sillimanite, bauxite, calcite and magnesite were used as alternative bed materials whereas mineral additives viz. clay, kaosil and bauxite were injected into the combustion system while burning South Australian low-rank coal at 800{degree}C. Samples of the same coal subjected to water-washing, Al pretreatment and Ca pretreatment are also tested in the spouted-bed combustor. In addition, experiments were conducted with several coal blends prepared at ratios of 50:50 and 90:10 from two lignites and one sub-bituminous coal. Experiments showed that all the control methods are effective to different extends in reducing ash problems and resulted in extended combustion operation. Tests with alternative bed materials and mineral additives showed trouble free-operation for longer periods (7-12 h at 800{degree}C) than with sand runs at the same bed temperature. Wet pretreatment and coal blending were also found to be effective and resulted in extended combustion operation (9-12 h at 800{degree}C). Chemical analyses indicated that formation of low temperature eutectics was suppressed by Al/Ca/Mg-rich phases in ash coating of bed particles. This was identified as the main mechanism for prevention of ash problems observed with the use of alternative bed materials, mineral additives, pretreated coals and coal blends. 23 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. in Spouted Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronislaw Buczek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Samples of active coke, fresh and spent after cleaning flue gases from communal waste incinerators, were investigated. The outer layers of both coke particles were separately removed by comminution in a spouted bed. The samples of both active cokes were analysed by means of densities, mercury porosimetry, and adsorption technique. Remaining cores were examined to determine the degree of consumption of coke by the sorption of hazardous emissions (SO2, HCl, and heavy metals through its bed. Differences in contamination levels within the porous structure of the particles were estimated. The study demonstrated the effectiveness of commercial active coke in the cleaning of flue gases.

  16. Uniform lab-scale biocatalytic nanoporous latex coatings for reactive microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosse, Jimmy L; Flickinger, Michael C

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes a method for generating uniform lab-scale biocatalytic nanoporous latex coatings. Nearly everything we come into contact with on a daily basis has been coated with some polymer material. High-speed waterborne polymer coating and ink-jet printing techniques are mature technologies. Methods for immobilizing microorganisms in lab-scale waterborne latex biocatalytic coatings draw on existing coating technologies for generating precision industrial paint and paper coatings and would therefore be amenable to scale up in future applications. An inherent problem for many lab-scale techniques is coating uniformity. The method described here has been developed to dramatically increase the uniformity of multiple individual small surface area coatings derived from a single coating template by minimizing edge effects due to emulsion drying adjacent to the edge of the mask. PMID:21553194

  17. A Review of Coated Conductor Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐永利; 时东陆

    2003-01-01

    The developments of coated conductor technology have been reviewed. It is shown that the critical current density of high-Tc wires can begreatly enhanced by using three-fold approaches: grain alignment, grain boundary doping, and optimization of the grain architecture. Major advances have been made in the last16 years mainly in three aspects: substrates, buffer layers and the YBCO layer. Cost is still the main concern for scale up, especially for the approach through vapor depositions, such as the PLD method. TFA-MOD or other CSD methods may be the trend to overcome cost and speed consideration during the scale up. However, high reliability and reproducibility will be the new focus for these techniques. Ni-alloy tapes seem to have advantages over pure Ni in terms of mechanicalstrength and oxidation resistance. Depositing a pure Ni layer on top of Ni-based alloys (such as Ni-Cr and Ni-W alloys) solves the problem of low strength ofNi and poor texture of Ni alloys. The RABiTS and IBAD are the two robust approaches for the texture generation. But the buffer materials and architectures being investigated remain unclear, though CeO2/YSZ/CeO2 and MgO are commonly used buffer layers for RABiTS and IBAD respectively. For the case where a buffer layer isunavoidable, a non-vacuum process would be suitable for low cost and scale up. However, none of the buffer layer fabrication processes through CSD has been demonstrated results good enough for long length coated conductor applications. While, a high Jc superconducting layer can be produced by TFA-MOD, which brings a bright future for coated conductors. Clearly, there are still many scientific and technological barriers to be overcome before any long length of high Jc coated conductor be produced commercially. But theoretical analyses and technological progress show the potential for the practical application of coatedconductor wires in the near future.

  18. Reductions in malaria and anaemia case and death burden at hospitals following scale-up of malaria control in Zanzibar, 1999-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseini Mehran

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Zanzibar, the Ministry of Health and partners accelerated malaria control from September 2003 onwards. The impact of the scale-up of insecticide-treated nets (ITN, indoor-residual spraying (IRS and artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT combined on malaria burden was assessed at six out of seven in-patient health facilities. Methods Numbers of outpatient and inpatient cases and deaths were compared between 2008 and the pre-intervention period 1999-2003. Reductions were estimated by segmented log-linear regression, adjusting the effect size for time trends during the pre-intervention period. Results In 2008, for all age groups combined, malaria deaths had fallen by an estimated 90% (95% confidence interval 55-98%(p Conclusions Scaling-up effective malaria interventions reduced malaria-related burden at health facilities by over 75% within 5 years. In high-malaria settings, intensified malaria control can substantially contribute to reaching the Millennium Development Goal 4 target of reducing under-five mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015.

  19. A qualitative assessment of participation in a rapid scale-up, diagonally-integrated MDG-related disease prevention campaign in Rural Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy De Ver Dye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many countries face severe scale-up barriers toward achievement of MDGs. We ascertained motivational and experiential dimensions of participation in a novel, rapid, "diagonal" Integrated Prevention Campaign (IPC in rural Kenya that provided prevention goods and services to 47,000 people within one week, aimed at rapidly moving the region toward MDG achievement. Specifically, the IPC provided interventions and commodities targeting disease burden reduction in HIV/AIDS, malaria, and water-borne illness. METHODS: Qualitative in-depth interviews (IDI were conducted with 34 people (18 living with HIV/AIDS and 16 not HIV-infected randomly selected from IPC attendees consenting to participate. Interviews were examined for themes and patterns to elucidate participant experience and motivation with IPC. FINDINGS: Participants report being primarily motivated to attend IPC to learn of their HIV status (through voluntary counseling and testing, and with receipt of prevention commodities (bednets, water filters, and condoms providing further incentive. Participants reported that they were satisfied with the IPC experience and offered suggestions to improve future campaigns. INTERPRETATION: Learning their HIV status motivated participants along with the incentive of a wider set of commodities that were rapidly deployed through IPC in this challenging region. The critical role of wanting to know their HIV status combined with commodity incentives may offer a new model for rapid scaled-up of prevention strategies that are wider in scope in rural Africa.

  20. Hollow Fiber Membrane Contactors for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture: A Scale-Up Study from Laboratory to Pilot Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chabanon E.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Membrane contactors have been proposed for decades as a way to achieve intensified mass transfer processes. Post-combustion CO2 capture by absorption into a chemical solvent is one of the currently most intensively investigated topics in this area. Numerous studies have already been reported, unfortunately almost systematically on small, laboratory scale, modules. Given the level of flue gas flow rates which have to be treated for carbon capture applications, a consistent scale-up methodology is obviously needed for a rigorous engineering design. In this study, the possibilities and limitations of scale-up strategies for membrane contactors have been explored and will be discussed. Experiments (CO2 absorption from a gas mixture in a 30%wt MEA aqueous solution have been performed both on mini-modules and at pilot scale (10 m2 membrane contactor module based on PTFE hollow fibers. The results have been modelled utilizing a resistance in series approach. The only adjustable parameter is in fitting the simulations to experimental data is the membrane mass transfer coefficient (km, which logically plays a key role. The difficulties and uncertainties associated with scaleup computations from lab scale to pilot scale modules, with a particular emphasis on the km value, are presented and critically discussed.

  1. First results of U3Si2 production and its relevance in the power scale-up of IPEN research reactor IEA-R1m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The own supply of LEU U3Si2 is crucial for IPEN, since the whole scale-up of IPEN MTR IEA-Rlm reactor will rely on it. The Brazilian request for radioisotopes production is fully linked with the already made power scale-up from 2 to 5 MW for this reactor. IPEN now depends on fuel element material upgrading from U3O8 towards LEU U3Si2. The fuel plate productive technology from the powdered material is already well established, only needing simple making of minor adjustments, but to reach the stage of producing U3Si2 we need a fully settled chemical pilot plant in order to reach a LEU UF4 productive routine. Complementing this process, it was also needed to scale down the previous practice of uranium magnesiothermic reduction to around a sub-critical safe uranium mass of approximately 3000g. To complete the metallurgical processing, it is being developed the production of U3Si2 in a vacuum induction furnace. Some experiments to get this intermetallic, using natural uranium, have already been carried out in order to build up a general idea of the future process of LEU U3Si2. These experiments are described in this paper and also some of the initial characterization results, such as the qualification pattern of the ingot. It is also discussed some new features of inhomogeneity of solidified phases that may be deleterious to future production routine. (author)

  2. Bed expansion crucible tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Am/Cm program will vitrify the americium and curium currently stored in F-canyon. A batch flowsheet has been developed (with non-radioactive surrogate feed in place of the F-canyon solution) and tested full-scale in the 5-inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM) facility at TNX. During a normal process run, a small bed expansion occurs when oxygen released from reduction of cerium (IV) oxide to cerium (III) oxide is trapped in highly viscous glass. The bed expansion is characterized by a foamy layer of glass that slowly expands as the oxygen is trapped and then dissipates when the viscosity of the foam becomes low enough to allow the oxygen to escape. Severe bed expansions were noted in the 5-inch CIM when re-heating after an interlock during the calcination phase of the heat cycle, escaping the confines of the melter vessel. In order to better understand the cause of the larger than normal bed expansion and to develop mitigating techniques, a series of three crucible tests were conducted

  3. Maximum spoutable bed height of spout-fluid bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenqi Zhong; Mingyao Zhang; Baosheng Jin [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Key Laboratory on Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education

    2006-11-15

    Experimental study on the maximum spoutable bed height of a spout-fluid bed (cross-section of 0.3 m x 0.03 m and height of 2 m) packed with Geldart group D particles has been carried out. The effects of particle size, spout nozzle size and fluidizing gas flow rate on the maximum spoutable bed height were studied. Experimental data were compared to some published experiments and predictions. The results show that the maximum spoutable bed height of spout-fluid bed decreases with increasing particle size and spout nozzle size, which appears the same trend to that of spouted beds. The increasing of fluidizing gas flow rate leads to a sharply decrease in the maximum spoutable bed height. The existent correlations of the maximum spoutable bed height in the literature were observed to involve large discrepancies. Additionally, the flow characteristics when bed materials deeper than the maximum spoutable height were summarized. Under this condition, the spout-fluid bed operated without a stable and coherent spout or fountain assembles the characteristics of jetting fluidized bed. Besides, the mechanisms of spout termination were investigated. It was found that slugging in the spout and growth of instabilities would cause the spout termination in spout-fluid bed.

  4. Scaling up Dynamic Topic Models

    OpenAIRE

    Bhadury, Arnab; Chen, Jianfei; Zhu, Jun; Liu, Shixia

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic topic models (DTMs) are very effective in discovering topics and capturing their evolution trends in time series data. To do posterior inference of DTMs, existing methods are all batch algorithms that scan the full dataset before each update of the model and make inexact variational approximations with mean-field assumptions. Due to a lack of a more scalable inference algorithm, despite the usefulness, DTMs have not captured large topic dynamics. This paper fills this research void, a...

  5. Getting Rid of Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... how you select a company. Related Information Collaborative Strategy on Bed Bugs - highlights ways that all levels of government, community, academia and private industry can work together to reduce bed bugs across ...

  6. Thorium utilization in a pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorium reserves in the earth's crust are much more than those of uranium, which today measure about 1.5 million tonnes of reasonably assured resources, plus 3 million tonnes of estimated additional resources. These large amount of thorium reserves, also available in Turkey encourages to focus on the utilization of thorium. The most remarkable applications of the use of thorium have been in high temperature reactors. The high temperature pebble bed reactor, which has been chosen as the basis for this study, is a close approximation of the thorium utilizing German reactor THTR. Pebble bed reactors have some unique features which are suitable to burn thorium. (i) The fuel is loaded in the form of coated particles, which are embedded in the graphite matrix of the fuel pebbles, allowing exceptionally high heavy metal burnups; and (ii) the continuous (on-line) fuel loading allows a high utilization factor. The criticality search of the pebble bed reactor is computed by the use of the SCALE4.4 code, CSASIX and KENOVa modules. And the in-core fuel management is computed via SCALE4.4 code, ORIGEN-S module

  7. An assessment of hepatitis B vaccine introduction in India: Lessons for roll out and scale up of new vaccines in immunization programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrakant Lahariya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatitis B vaccine was introduced in the Universal Immunization Program (UIP of 10 states of India in the year 2007-08. This assessment was planned and conducted to ascertain the reasons for low reported coverage of Hepatitis B (Hep B vaccine in comparison of similarly timed diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus (DPT vaccine; to identify operational and programmatic challenges in new vaccine introductions, and to derive lessons for further scale up of Hep B vaccination (or for introduction of any new vaccine in UIP of India. Materials and Methods: Purposive sampling with both quantitative and qualitative data collection. Two districts each were purposively selected from 5 of the 10 states, which introduced Hep B vaccine, in the year 2007-08. A protocol was devised and data was collected through desk review, in-depth interviews and on-site observation at state, districts and facility levels. The assessment was completed in December 2009. Results: Coverage with three doses of Hep B vaccine was lower than similarly timed three doses of DPT vaccine. Poor stock management ("stock outs or nil stocks" at various levels, incomplete recording and reporting, perceived high cost & related fear of wastage of vaccine in 10 dose vial, and incomplete knowledge amongst health functionaries about vaccination schedule were the main reasons cited for reported lower coverage. Hep B vaccine birth dose was introduced in only 3 of 5 states evaluated. The additional reasons for low Hep B birth dose coverage were lack of knowledge amongst Health Workers about birth dose administration, no mechanism for recording birth dose, and insufficient trainings, official communications, and coordination at various levels. Conclusions: This assessment documents challenges faced in the introduction of hepatitis B vaccine in UIP in India and summarizes the lessons learnt. It is concluded that for successful introduction and scale up of any new vaccine in national or state

  8. Scale-up from microtiter plate to laboratory fermenter: evaluation by online monitoring techniques of growth and protein expression in Escherichia coli and Hansenula polymorpha fermentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engelbrecht Christoph

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past decade, an enormous number of new bioprocesses have evolved in the biotechnology industry. These bioprocesses have to be developed fast and at a maximum productivity. Up to now, only few microbioreactors were developed to fulfill these demands and to facilitate sample processing. One predominant reaction platform is the shaken microtiter plate (MTP, which provides high-throughput at minimal expenses in time, money and work effort. By taking advantage of this simple and efficient microbioreactor array, a new online monitoring technique for biomass and fluorescence, called BioLector, has been recently developed. The combination of high-throughput and high information content makes the BioLector a very powerful tool in bioprocess development. Nevertheless, the scalabilty of results from the micro-scale to laboratory or even larger scales is very important for short development times. Therefore, engineering parameters regarding the reactor design and its operation conditions play an important role even on a micro-scale. In order to evaluate the scale-up from a microtiter plate scale (200 μL to a stirred tank fermenter scale (1.4 L, two standard microbial expression systems, Escherichia coli and Hansenula polymorpha, were fermented in parallel at both scales and compared with regard to the biomass and protein formation. Results Volumetric mass transfer coefficients (kLa ranging from 100 to 350 1/h were obtained in 96-well microtiter plates. Even with a suboptimal mass transfer condition in the microtiter plate compared to the stirred tank fermenter (kLa = 370-600 1/h, identical growth and protein expression kinetics were attained in bacteria and yeast fermentations. The bioprocess kinetics were evaluated by optical online measurements of biomass and protein concentrations exhibiting the same fermentation times and maximum signal deviations below 10% between the scales. In the experiments, the widely applied green

  9. The effect of interparticle cohesive forces on the simulation of fluid flow in spout-fluid beds

    OpenAIRE

    A. L. G. Trindade; PASSOS M. L.; E. F. Costa Jr; E. C. Biscaia Jr

    2004-01-01

    As reflected in the literature, solid-fluid flow characteristics in spouted beds can vary widely when particles are coated by a suspension. This work is aimed at describing the effect of interparticle forces on airflow distribution in conical spouted beds of inert particles coated by Eucalyptus black liquor. The simulator developed earlier is modified to incorporate this effect. Two corrective functions with adjustable parameters are introduced into the simulator gas-flow model to generate th...

  10. Scale up production of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA at different aeration, agitation and controlled dissolved oxygen levels in fermenter using Halomonas campisalis MCM B-1027

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav R Kshirsagar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Production of biodegradable plastic, polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA was demonstrated using culture of moderately haloakalitolerant Halomonas campisalis MCMB-1027. Production of PHA was carried out at different aeration (0.5-1, 1, and 1.5 vvm and agitation (100,150 and 200 rpm in 14 L fermenter. Maximum production of PHA was 40.69% on the basis of dry cell mass at 1 vvm and 100 rpm. Material balance over maltose revealed that aeration 1 vvm and agitation 100 rpm was optimum for conversion of utilized maltose into PHA. Controlled dissolved oxygen in the range 1-5% level during PHA accumulation phase facilitated to increase PHA content to 56.23%. A correlation equation was developed by fixing mass transfer coefficient (KLa and applied successfully for scale up production of PHA in 120 L fermenter. 1H NMR analysis showed percentage of HB and HV unit 95.83 and 4.17 respectively.

  11. Scale-up of mild gasification to be a process development unit mildgas 24 ton/day PDU design report. Final report, November 1991--July 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    From November 1991 to April 1996, Kerr McGee Coal Corporation (K-M Coal) led a project to develop the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) Mild Gasification (MILDGAS) process for near-term commercialization. The specific objectives of the program were to: design, construct, and operate a 24-tons/day adiabatic process development unit (PDU) to obtain process performance data suitable for further design scale-up; obtain large batches of coal-derived co-products for industrial evaluation; prepare a detailed design of a demonstration unit; and develop technical and economic plans for commercialization of the MILDGAS process. The project team for the PDU development program consisted of: K-M Coal, IGT, Bechtel Corporation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC), General Motors (GM), Pellet Technology Corporation (PTC), LTV Steel, Armco Steel, Reilly Industries, and Auto Research.

  12. Novel implementation research designs for scaling up global mental health care: overcoming translational challenges to address the world's leading cause of disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meffert, Susan M; Neylan, Thomas C; Chambers, David A; Verdeli, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Despite established knowledge that Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs) bear the majority of the world's burden of mental disorders, and more than a decade of efficacy research showing that the most common disorders, such as depression and anxiety, can be treated using readily available local personnel in LMICs to apply evidence-based treatments, there remains a massive mental health treatment gap, such that 75 % of those in LMICs never receive care. Here, we discuss the use of a new type of implementation science study design, the effectiveness-implementation hybrids, to speed the translation and scale up of mental health care in LMICs. We use our current study of Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) delivered by local personnel for depression and trauma-related disorders among HIV+ women in Kenya as an example of effectiveness-implementation hybrid design for mental health services research in LMICs. PMID:26958075

  13. Results of flotation scale-up from RTD function. Escalamiento de resultados de flotacion de minerales a traves de la funcion DTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magne, L.; Jofre, J.; Barria, J.; Menacho, J. (Centro de Investigacion MInera y Metalurgica, Santiago (Switzerland))

    1995-01-01

    A review on the main residence time distribution (RTD) models currently applied to flotation is presented. Perfect mix, plug flow, N perfect mix reactor in series and the general combined model are included. In flotation diagnosis the most required model is the N non perfect mix reactor in series (NPRS). As a invariant physical meaning is usually assigned to the different shift in time and intensity of the peaks, wrong conclusion may with regard to the real mix state and correct scaling-up of the flotation recovery. In the present paper the above situation is overcome by integrating semi batch results in an analytical way, with the assistance of the Garcia-Zuniga and Klimpel equations for the recovery and the NPRS model for the mix state. Highly accurate predictions at industrial scale are obtained as compared to other methods. (Author) 5 refs.

  14. Optimizing the solar photo-Fenton process in the treatment of contaminated water. Determination of intrinsic kinetic constants for scale-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Miguel [Universidad de Los Andes, Escuela Basica de Ingenieria, La Hechicera, Merida (Venezuela); Malato, Sixto [Plataforma Solar de Almeria, Tabernas (PSA) (Spain); Pulgarin, Cesar [Institute of Environmental Engineering, Laboratory for Environmental Biotechnology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Contreras, Sandra; Curco, David; Gimenez, Jaime; Esplugas, Santiago [Department d' Enginyeria Quimica i Metallurgia, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-10-01

    The elimination of aromatic compounds present in surface water by photo-Fenton with sunlight as the source of radiation was studied. The concentrations of Fe{sup 3+} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} are key factors for this process. A solar simulator and a prototype parabolic collector were used as laboratory-scale reactors to find the parameters of those key factors to be used in the CPC (compound parabolic collector) pilot plant reactor. The initial mineralization rate constant (k{sub obs}) was determined and evaluated at different Fe{sup 3+} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations to find the best values for maximum efficiency. In all the experiments the mineralization of an aqueous phenol solution was described by assuming a pseudo-first-order reaction. The intrinsic kinetic constants not dependent on the lighting conditions were also estimated for scale-up. (author)

  15. Recent advances in platinum monolayer electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction: Scale-up synthesis, structure and activity of Pt shells on Pd cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have established a scale-up synthesis method to produce gram-quantities of Pt monolayer electrocatalysts. The core-shell structure of the Pt/Pd/C electrocatalyst has been verified using the HAADF-STEM Z-contrast images, STEM/EELS, and STEM/EDS line profile analysis. The atomic structure of this electrocatalyst and formation of a Pt monolayer on Pd nanoparticle surfaces were examined using in situ EXAFS. The Pt mass activity of the Pt/Pd/C electrocatalyst for ORR is considerably higher than that of commercial Pt/C electrocatalysts. The results with Pt monolayer electrocatalysts may significantly impact science of electrocatalysis and fuel-cell technology, as they have demonstrated an exceptionally effective way of using Pt that can resolve problems of other approaches, including electrocatalysts' inadequate activity and high Pt content.

  16. Geomechanics of bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creep data from the literature search is reinterpreted by SGI, resulting in a better understanding of the temperature and stress state dependence of the octahedral creep rate and the octahedral shear strength. The concept of a transition strength between the elastic and the plastic states is in agreement with the data. The elastic and rheological properties of salt are described, and a set of constitutive equations is presented. The dependence of material properties on parameters such as temperature is considered. Findings on the permeability of salt are summarized, and the in-situ behavior of openings in bedded salt is described based on extensive engineering experience. A stress measuring system utilizing a finite element computer code is discussed. Geological factors affecting the stability of salt openings are considered, and the Stress Control Technique for designing stable openings in bedded salt formations is explained

  17. Choice of antiretroviral drugs for continued treatment scale-up in a public health approach: what more do we need to know?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Vitoria

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There have been several important developments in antiretroviral treatment in the past two years. Randomized clinical trials have been conducted to evaluate a lower dose of efavirenz (400 mg once daily. Integrase inhibitors such as dolutegravir have been approved for first-line treatment. A new formulation of tenofovir (alafenamide has been developed and has shown equivalent efficacy to tenofovir in randomized trials. Two-drug combination treatments have been evaluated in treatment-naïve and -experienced patients. The novel pharmacokinetic booster cobicistat has been compared to ritonavir in terms of pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety. The objective of this commentary is to assess recent developments in antiretroviral drug treatment to determine whether new treatments should be included in new international guidelines. Discussion: The use of first-line treatment with tenofovir and efavirenz at the standard 600 mg once-daily dose should remain the first-choice standard of care treatment. Evidence supporting a switch to efavirenz 400 mg once daily or integrase inhibitors is sufficient to consider these drugs as alternative first-line options, but more data are needed on their use in pregnant women and people with TB co-infection. The use of new formulations of tenofovir is currently too preliminary to justify immediate adoption and scale-up across HIV programmes in low- and middle-income countries. The evidence supporting use of two-drug combinations is not considered strong enough to justify changed recommendations from use of standard triple drug combinations. Cobicistat does not offer significant safety advantages over ritonavir as a pharmacokinetic booster. Conclusions: For continued scale-up of antiretroviral treatment in low- and middle-income countries, use of first-line triple combinations including efavirenz 600 mg once daily is supported by the largest evidence base. Additional studies are underway to evaluate new

  18. Application of Network Scale Up Method in the Estimation of Population Size for Men Who Have Sex with Men in Shanghai, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    Full Text Available Men who have sex with men (MSM are at high risk of HIV infection. For developing proper interventions, it is important to know the size of MSM population. However, size estimation of MSM populations is still a significant public health challenge due to high cost, hard to reach and stigma associated with the population.We aimed to estimate the social network size (c value in general population and the size of MSM population in Shanghai, China by using the net work scale-up method.A multistage random sampling was used to recruit participants aged from 18 to 60 years who had lived in Shanghai for at least 6 months. The "known population method" with adjustment of backward estimation and regression model was applied to estimate the c value. And the MSM population size was further estimated using an adjusted c value taking into account for the transmission effect through social respect level towards MSM.A total of 4017 participants were contacted for an interview, and 3907 participants met the inclusion criterion. The social network size (c value of participants was 236 after adjustment. The estimated size of MSM was 36354 (95% CI: 28489-44219 for the male Shanghaies aged 18 to 60 years, and the proportion of MSM among the total male population aged 18 to 60 years in Shanghai was 0.28%.We employed the network scale-up method and used a wide range of data sources to estimate the size of MSM population in Shanghai, which is useful for HIV prevention and intervention among the target population.

  19. Scale-Up Information for Gas-Phase Ammonia Treatment of Uranium in the Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site Central Plateau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Szecsody, James E.; Zhong, Lirong; Thomle, Jonathan N.; Johnson, Timothy C.

    2014-09-01

    Uranium is present in the vadose zone at the Hanford Central Plateau and is of concern for protection of groundwater. The Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau identified gas-phase treatment and geochemical manipulation as potentially effective treatment approaches for uranium and technetium in the Hanford Central Plateau vadose zone. Based on laboratory evaluation, use of ammonia vapor was selected as the most promising uranium treatment candidate for further development and field testing. While laboratory tests have shown that ammonia treatment effectively reduces the mobility of uranium, additional information is needed to enable deployment of this technology for remediation. Of importance for field applications are aspects of the technology associated with effective distribution of ammonia to a targeted treatment zone, understanding the fate of injected ammonia and its impact on subsurface conditions, and identifying effective monitoring approaches. In addition, information is needed to select equipment and operational parameters for a field design. As part of development efforts for the ammonia technology for remediation of vadose zone uranium contamination, field scale-up issues were identified and have been addressed through a series of laboratory and modeling efforts. This report presents a conceptual description for field application of the ammonia treatment process, engineering calculations to support treatment design, ammonia transport information, field application monitoring approaches, and a discussion of processes affecting the fate of ammonia in the subsurface. The report compiles this information from previous publications and from recent research and development activities. The intent of this report is to provide technical information about these scale-up elements to support the design and operation of a field test for the ammonia treatment technology.

  20. Test bed concentrator mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argoud, M. J.

    1980-05-01

    The test bed concentrator (TBC) was des point focusing distributed receiver (PFDR) systems. The reflective surface of the concentrator was fabricated using mirror facet designs and techniques. The facets are made by bonding mirrored glass to spherically-conducted substrates. Several aspects of earlier work were reevaluated for application to the TBC: optimum glass block size, material selection, environmental test, optical characteristics, and reliability. A detailed explanation of tooling, substrate preparation, testing techniques, and mirror assembly is presented.

  1. Coating of ceramic powders by chemical vapor deposition techniques (CVD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New ceramic materials with selected advanced properties can be designed by coating of ceramic powders prior to sintering. By variation of the core and coating material a large number of various powders and ceramic materials can be produced. Powders which react with the binder phase during sintering can be coated with stable materials. Thermal expansion of the ceramic materials can be adjusted by varying the coating thickness (ratio core/layer). Electrical and wear resistant properties can be optimized for electrical contacts. A fluidized bed reactor will be designed which allow the deposition of various coatings on ceramic powders. (author)

  2. Morbus Coats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förl, B.; Schmack, I.; Grossniklaus, H.E.; Rohrschneider, K.

    2010-01-01

    Der fortgeschrittene Morbus Coats stellt im Kleinkindalter eine der schwierigsten Differenzialdiagnosen zum Retinoblastom dar. Wir beschreiben die klinischen und histologischen Befunde zweier Jungen im Alter von 9 und 21 Monaten mit einseitiger Leukokorie. Trotz umfassender Diagnostik mittels Narkoseuntersuchung, MRT und Ultraschall konnte ein Retinoblastom nicht sicher ausgeschlossen werden, und es erfolgte eine Enukleation. Histologisch wurde die Diagnose eines Morbus Coats gesichert. Da eine differenzialdiagnostische Abgrenzung zwischen Morbus Coats und Retinoblastom schwierig sein kann, halten wir in zweifelhaften Fällen auch angesichts der eingeschränkten Visusprognose und potenzieller Sekundärkomplikationen beim fortgeschrittenen Morbus Coats eine Enukleation für indiziert. PMID:18299842

  3. Terahertz pulsed imaging as an advanced characterisation tool for film coatings--a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaser, Miriam; Gordon, Keith C; Strachan, Clare J;

    2013-01-01

    terahertz pulsed imaging (TPI). The ability of terahertz radiation to penetrate many pharmaceutical materials enables structural features of coated solid dosage forms to be probed at depth, which is not readily achievable with other established imaging techniques, e.g. near-infrared (NIR) and Raman...... spectroscopy. In this review TPI is introduced and various applications of the technique in pharmaceutical coating analysis are discussed. These include evaluation of coating thickness, uniformity, surface morphology, density, defects and buried structures as well as correlation between TPI measurements and...... drug release performance, coating process monitoring and scale up. Furthermore, challenges and limitations of the technique are discussed....

  4. 导向管喷动流化床中废弃印刷线路板的非金属颗粒包覆改性%Coating modification of non-metal particles of waste printed circuit boards in spout-fluid bed with draft tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢恒来; 吴曼; 赵军; 陈义忠; 郭庆杰

    2015-01-01

    以3-氨基丙基三乙氧基硅烷(KH-550)为改性剂,在导向管喷动流化床内对废弃印刷线路板的非金属颗粒(NPWPCB)进行包覆改性,研究了颗粒包覆过程中KH-550溶液(体积分数20%)用量、喷雾速率、雾化气速、床层温度及喷动气速等操作参数对NPWPCB改性效果的影响。以聚丙烯(PP)为基体、改性NPWPCB为填料,采用挤出注塑工艺制备了PP/NPWPCB复合材料。通过红外光谱图和扫描电子显微镜对改性前后NPWPCB表面官能团及复合材料冲击断面微观形貌的分析表明,KH-550可以增加NPWPCB与PP基体之间的界面黏结强度,提高PP/NPWPCB复合材料的力学性能。当KH-550溶液用量为75 ml、喷雾速率为3.2 cm·s−1、雾化气速为58.98 m·s−1、床层温度为80℃、喷动气速为29.49 m·s−1时,复合材料的弯曲、拉伸和冲击强度较改性前分别提高了15.07%、17.52%和16.32%。%Non-metal particles of waste printed circuit boards (NPWPCB) were modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (KH-550) by coating in a spout-fluid bed with draft tube. To obtain the range of operating parameters for the modification, the effects of KH-550 solution (20%(vol)) volume, spray rate, atomizing gas velocity, bed temperature, and spouting gas velocity on modification were evaluated. The modified NPWPCB were used as filler to fabricate PP/NPWPCB composites by extrusion and injection molding. The variations of the surface functional groups and the cross-section morphology were characterized by infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Modified NPWPCB improved the interface bonding between NPWPCB and PP, which enhanced the mechanical properties of PP/NPWPCB composites. At KH-550 solution (20%(vol)) volume of 75 ml, spray rate of 3.2 cm·s−1, atomizing gas velocity of 58.98 m·s−1, bed temperature of 80℃, and spouting gas velocity of 29.49 m·s−1, flexural strength, tensile strength, and impact

  5. Scale-up study on combustibility and emission formation with two biomass fuels (B quality wood and pepper plant residue) under BFB conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Atif Ahmed; de Jong, Wiebren; Jansens, Peter Johannes [Department of Process and Energy, Section Energy Technology, Faculty 3ME, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, NL-2628 CA, Delft (Netherlands); Aho, Martti; Vainikka, Pasi [VTT Processes, P.O. Box 1603, 40101 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Spliethoff, Hartmut [TU Munich, Lehrstuhl fuer Thermische Kraftanlagen, Boltzmannstrasse 15, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    Combustion of two biomass fuels: demolition wood (DW) and pepper plant residue (PPR), was investigated from an emission viewpoint in a 20 kW{sub th} fluidized bubbling bed reactor and a 1 MW{sub th} fluidized bubbling bed test boiler. Fluidization velocity and boiler output were varied in the larger facility whereas they were kept constant in the smaller reactor. Traditional flue gases were analyzed. In addition, impactor measurements were carried out to determine the mass flow of the finest fly ash and toxic elements. These measurements were compared with EU emission directives for biomass co-incineration. It was possible to combust DW without operational problems. However, the DW was contaminated with lead, which tended to get strongly enriched in the fine fly ash. Pb tends to be adsorbed on the measurement line surfaces stronger than many other toxic elements and therefore proved difficult to collect and measure. Enrichment of Pb in the fine fly ash can be weakened by co-firing DW with PPR. Increasing the share of PPR up to 50% markedly reduces the toxic metal concentration in the finest fly ash. This, however, leads to increased mass flow of fine fly ash and increases the potential risks of operational problems such as bed agglomeration and fouling. (author)

  6. Scale-up study on combustibility and emission formation with two biomass fuels (B quality wood and pepper plant residue) under BFB conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combustion of two biomass fuels: demolition wood (DW) and pepper plant residue (PPR), was investigated from an emission viewpoint in a 20 kWth fluidized bubbling bed reactor and a 1 MWth fluidized bubbling bed test boiler. Fluidization velocity and boiler output were varied in the larger facility whereas they were kept constant in the smaller reactor. Traditional flue gases were analyzed. In addition, impactor measurements were carried out to determine the mass flow of the finest fly ash and toxic elements. These measurements were compared with EU emission directives for biomass co-incineration. It was possible to combust DW without operational problems. However, the DW was contaminated with lead, which tended to get strongly enriched in the fine fly ash. Pb tends to be adsorbed on the measurement line surfaces stronger than many other toxic elements and therefore proved difficult to collect and measure. Enrichment of Pb in the fine fly ash can be weakened by co-firing DW with PPR. Increasing the share of PPR up to 50% markedly reduces the toxic metal concentration in the finest fly ash. This, however, leads to increased mass flow of fine fly ash and increases the potential risks of operational problems such as bed agglomeration and fouling

  7. Dependence of saltation parameters on bed roughness and bed porosity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kharlamova, Irina; Vlasák, Pavel

    Prague : ITAM AS CR, v. v. i., 2012 - (Náprstek, J.; Fischer, C.), s. 625-629 ISBN 978-80-86246-40-6. [Engineering Mechanics 2012 /18./. Svratka (CZ), 14.05.2012-17.05.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/09/1718 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : saltation parameters * saltation length * saltation height * bed structure * normal distribution of bed particles * bed roughness Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  8. Control methods for remediation of ash-related problems in fluidized-bed combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuthaluru, H.B.; Zhang, D.

    1999-07-01

    The paper reports on investigations into control methodologies for mitigating ash-related problems such as particle agglomeration and bed defluidization during fluidized-bed combustion of low-rank coals. A laboratory scale spouted bed combustor is used to study the effectiveness of control methodologies. In the present work, two control methods are investigated viz., the use of alternative bed materials and pretreatment of coal. Bauxite and calcined sillimanite are used as alternative bed materials in the spouted bed combustor while burning South Australian low-rank coal. Samples of the same coal subjected to Al pretreatment, water washing and acid washing are also tested in the spouted bed combustor. Experiments showed that both methods are effective to different extents in reducing ash-related problems. Tests with calcined sillimanite and bauxite (as the bed material) showed trouble free operation for longer periods (7--12 hr at 800 C and 3--5 hr at 850 C) than with sand runs at the same bed temperatures. Al pretreatment and water-washing were also found to be effective and resulted in extended combustion operation. Al enrichment in ash coating of bed particles has been identified as the main mechanism for prevention of agglomeration and defluidization by these control methodologies. For water-washing, the principal reason behind agglomeration and defluidization control is the reduction in sodium levels.

  9. Coal Bed Methane Primer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

    2005-05-25

    During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of

  10. Fluidised bed cereal cooking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man has been cooking food for thousands of years for a number of reasons: to improve flavour and palatability, sterilise, increase digestibility, improve texture and colour. Increasingly more advanced techniques are employed today in food production plants to engineer foods with many different properties. With this in mind manufacturers are constantly seeking to improve processing techniques and apply new or different technologies (such as microwaves, RF and extrusion) to develop foods with new properties (like puffed texture starches) and to increase process efficiencies (energy efficiency, water reduction). This thesis reports on work undertaken to demonstrate the potential to achieve high temperature starch conversion of whole wheat grains in a fluidised bed, thereby reducing the amount of water required and processing time. Specifically, wheat from the farm at 14% water content is cooked in a fluidised bed. The fluidised bed heats the wheat quickly by convective heating. In addition, energy can be delivered directly to the grain by microwave heating during fluidisation. Degree of starch conversion is determined by measuring the reduction in size of endotherm of reaction as observed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The fluidising gas, processing temperature and starting moisture content were varied in order to investigate their effect on the cooking process. A mathematical model based on energy and species concentration equations was developed to help understand the internal grain processes. The model coupled the thermal energy equation with water diffusion. The effect of water evaporation was represented as a thermal sink in the energy equation. Popular kinetic models from literature were adapted to predict the degree of starch conversion. The model gives solutions consistent with experimental data and physical intuition. A commercial computational fluid dynamics package was used to study simple airflow and particle tracks in the fluidisation column. A

  11. Optimization and scale-up of cell culture and purification processes for production of an adenovirus-vectored tuberculosis vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chun Fang; Jacob, Danielle; Zhu, Tao; Bernier, Alice; Shao, Zhongqi; Yu, Xuefeng; Patel, Mehul; Lanthier, Stephane; Kamen, Amine

    2016-06-17

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the second leading cause of death by infectious disease worldwide. The only available TB vaccine is the Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG). However, parenterally administered Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine confers only limited immune protection from pulmonary tuberculosis in humans. There is a need for developing effective boosting vaccination strategies. AdAg85A, an adenoviral vector expressing the mycobacterial protein Ag85A, is a new tuberculosis vaccine candidate, and has shown promising results in pre-clinical studies and phase I trial. This adenovirus vectored vaccine is produced using HEK 293 cell culture. Here we report on the optimization of cell culture conditions, scale-up of production and purification of the AdAg85A at different scales. Four commercial serum-free media were evaluated under various conditions for supporting the growth of HEK293 cell and production of AdAg85A. A culturing strategy was employed to take advantages of two culture media with respective strengths in supporting the cell growth and virus production, which enabled to maintain virus productivity at higher cell densities and resulted in more than two folds of increases in culture titer. The production of AdAg85A was successfully scaled up and validated at 60L bioreactor under the optimal conditions. The AdAg85A generated from the 3L and 60L bioreactor runs was purified through several purification steps. More than 98% of total cellular proteins was removed, over 60% of viral particles was recovered after the purification process, and purity of AdAg85A was similar to that of the ATCC VR-1516 Ad5 standard. Vaccination of mice with the purified AdAg85A demonstrated a very good level of Ag85A-specific antibody responses. The optimized production and purification conditions were transferred to a GMP facility for manufacturing of AdAg85A for generation of clinical grade material to support clinical trials. PMID:27154390

  12. Global challenges with scale-up of the integrated management of childhood illness strategy: results of a multi-country survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhe Lulu M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Integrated Management of Childhood Illness Strategy (IMCI, developed by WHO/UNICEF, aims to contribute to reducing childhood morbidity and mortality (MDG4 in resource-limited settings. Since 1996 more than 100 countries have adopted IMCI. IMCI case management training (ICMT is one of three IMCI components and training is usually residential over 11 consecutive days. Follow-up after ICMT is an essential part of training. We describe the barriers to rapid acceleration of ICMT and review country perspectives on how to address these barriers. Methods A multi-country exploratory cross-sectional questionnaire survey of in-service ICMT approaches, using quantitative and qualitative methods, was conducted in 2006-7: 27 countries were purposively selected from all six WHO regions. Data for this paper are from three questionnaires (QA, QB and QC, distributed to selected national focal IMCI persons/programme officers, course directors/facilitators and IMCI trainees respectively. QC only gathered data on experiences with IMCI follow-up. Results 33 QA, 163 QB and 272 QC were received. The commonest challenges to ICMT scale-up relate to funding (high cost and long duration of the residential ICMT, poor literacy of health workers, differing opinions about the role of IMCI in improving child health, lack of political support, frequent changes in staff or rules at Ministries of Health and lack of skilled facilitators. Countries addressed these challenges in several ways including increased advocacy, developing strategic linkages with other priorities, intensifying pre-service training, re-distribution of funds and shortening course duration. The commonest challenges to follow-up after ICMT were lack of funding (93.1% of respondents, inadequate funds for travelling or planning (75.9% and 44.8% respectively, lack of gas for travelling (41.4%, inadequately trained or few supervisors (41.4% and inadequate job aids for follow-up (27

  13. Emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations among antiretroviral-naïve HIV-1-infected patients after rapid scaling up of antiretroviral therapy in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungkanuparph Somnuek

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After rapid scaling up of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected patients, the data of primary HIV-1 drug resistance in Thailand is still limited. This study aims to determine the prevalence and associated factors of primary HIV-1 drug resistance in Thailand. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted among antiretroviral-naïve HIV-1-infected Thai patients from 2007 to 2010. HIV-1 subtypes and mutations were assayed by sequencing a region of HIV-1 pol gene. Surveillance drug resistance mutations recommended by the World Health Organization for surveillance of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance in 2009 were used in all analyses. Primary HIV-1 drug resistance was defined as the presence of one or more surveillance drug resistance mutations. Results Of 466 patients with a mean age of 38.8 years, 58.6% were males. Risks of HIV-1 infection included heterosexual (77.7%, homosexual (16.7%, and intravenous drug use (5.6%. Median (IQR CD4 cell count and HIV-1 RNA were 176 (42-317 cells/mm3 and 68,600 (19,515-220,330 copies/mL, respectively. HIV-1 subtypes were CRF01_AE (86.9%, B (8.6 and other recombinants (4.5%. The prevalence of primary HIV-1 drug resistance was 4.9%; most of these (73.9% had surveillance drug resistance mutations to only one class of antiretroviral drugs. The prevalence of patients with NRTI, NNRTI, and PI surveillance drug resistance mutations was 1.9%, 2.8% and 1.7%, respectively. From logistic regression analysis, there was no factor significantly associated with primary HIV-1 drug resistance. There was a trend toward higher prevalence in females [odds ratio 2.18; 95% confidence interval 0.896-5.304; p = 0.086]. Conclusions There is a significant emergence of primary HIV-1 drug resistance in Thailand after rapid scaling up of antiretroviral therapy. Although HIV-1 genotyping prior to antiretroviral therapy initiation is not routinely recommended in Thailand, our results raise concerns about the

  14. Pressure analysis in the fabrication process of TRISO UO{sub 2}-coated fuel particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Malin, E-mail: liumalin@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shao Youlin; Liu Bing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The pressure signals during the real TRISO UO2-coated fuel particle fabrication process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new relationship about the pressure drop change and the coated fuel particles properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed relationship is validated by experimental results during successive coating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A convenient method for monitoring the fluidized state during coating process. - Abstract: The pressure signals in the coating furnace are obtained experimentally from the TRISO UO{sub 2}-coated fuel particle fabrication process. The pressure signals during the coating process are analyzed and a simplified relationship about the pressure drop change due to the coated layer is proposed based on the spouted bed hydrodynamics. The change of pressure drop is found to be consistent with the change of the combination factor about particle density, bed density, particle diameter and static bed height, during the successive coating process of the buffer PyC, IPyC, SiC and OPyC layer. The newly proposed relationship is validated by the experimental values. Based on this relationship, a convenient method is proposed for real-time monitoring the fluidized state of the particles in a high-temperature coating process in the spouted bed. It can be found that the pressure signals analysis is an effective method to monitor the fluidized state on-line in the coating process at high temperature up to 1600 Degree-Sign C.

  15. Capacitively-Heated Fluidized Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mchale, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    Fluidized-bed chamber in which particles in bed are capacitively heated produces high yields of polycrystalline silicon for semiconductor devices. Deposition of unrecoverable silicon on chamber wall is reduced, and amount of recoverable silicon depositing on seed particles in bed is increased. Particles also have a size and density suitable for direct handling without consolidation, unlike silicon dust produced in heated-wall chambers.

  16. Chaotic Study in a Large Jetting Fluidized Bed with a Vertical Nozzle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@1 INTRODUCTION Jetting fluidized beds have been widely applied in such processes as catalytic and flame reactions, combustion and gasification of coal, treatment of waste, cleaning of dusty gases, coating and granulation[1-3]. The flow characteristics of jetting fiuidized beds are relevant to the stable gas jet and the high rates of heat transfer and mass transfer, and the fast chemical reaction pro cess near the gas distributor.

  17. A study of the fluid dynamics of the spouted bed using CFD

    OpenAIRE

    C. R. Duarte; V. V. Murata; M. A. S. Barrozo

    2005-01-01

    The spouted bed has been used in drying, granulation, catalytic polymerization, residue treatment and coating of several materials. Its success is attributed to its solids circulation characteristics and excellent gas-particle contact. In this work the pattern of solids and gas flows in a spouted bed was numerically simulated using a Eulerian multiphase model. The computational work was significantly reduced for axisymmetric gas-solids flows. The simulated velocity and voidage profiles were c...

  18. Sprayed coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, H. D.

    1980-03-01

    Thermal spraying is shown to be an efficient means for the protection of surface areas against elevated temperature, wear, corrosion, hot gas corrosion, and erosion in structural aircraft components. Particularly in jet engines, numerous parts are coated by flame, detonation, or plasma spraying techniques. The applied methods of flame, detonation, and plasma spraying are explained, as well as electric arc spraying. Possibilities for spray coatings which meet aircraft service requirements are discussed, as well as methods for quality control, especially nondestructive test methods. In particular, coating characteristics and properties obtained by different spray methods are described, and special attention is paid to low pressure plasma spraying.

  19. Meaningful change or more of the same? The Global Fund's new funding model and the politics of HIV scale-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapilashrami, Anuj; Hanefeld, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    As we enter the fourth decade of HIV and AIDS, sustainability of treatment and prevention programmes is a growing concern in an environment of shrinking resources. The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM) will be critical to maintaining current trajectories of scale-up and ultimately, ensuring access to HIV treatment and prevention for people in low/middle-income countries. The authors' prior research in India, Zambia and South Africa contributed evidence on the politics and impact of new institutional and funding arrangements, revealing a 'rhetoric-reality gap' in their impact on health systems, civil society participation, and achievement of population health. With its new funding strategy and disbursement model, the Fund proposes dramatic changes to its approach, emphasising value for money, greater fund predictability and flexibility and more proactive engagement in recipient countries, while foregrounding a human rights approach. This paper reviews the Fund's new strategy and examines its potential to respond to key criticisms concerning health systems impact, particularly the elite nature of this funding mechanism that generates competition between public and private sectors and marginalises local voices. The authors analyse strategy documents against their own research and published literature and reflect on whether the changes are likely to address challenges faced in bringing HIV programmes to scale and their likely effect on AIDS politics. PMID:24499023

  20. Facts from text: can text mining help to scale-up high-quality manual curation of gene products with ontologies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnenburg, Rainer; Wächter, Thomas; Plake, Conrad; Doms, Andreas; Schroeder, Michael

    2008-11-01

    The biomedical literature can be seen as a large integrated, but unstructured data repository. Extracting facts from literature and making them accessible is approached from two directions: manual curation efforts develop ontologies and vocabularies to annotate gene products based on statements in papers. Text mining aims to automatically identify entities and their relationships in text using information retrieval and natural language processing techniques. Manual curation is highly accurate but time consuming, and does not scale with the ever increasing growth of literature. Text mining as a high-throughput computational technique scales well, but is error-prone due to the complexity of natural language. How can both be married to combine scalability and accuracy? Here, we review the state-of-the-art text mining approaches that are relevant to annotation and discuss available online services analysing biomedical literature by means of text mining techniques, which could also be utilised by annotation projects. We then examine how far text mining has already been utilised in existing annotation projects and conclude how these techniques could be tightly integrated into the manual annotation process through novel authoring systems to scale-up high-quality manual curation. PMID:19060303

  1. Scaling up the chemical treatment of spent oil-in-water emulsions from a non-ferrous metal-processing plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević Vesna B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of spent oil-in-water emulsion (SOWE from a non-ferrous metal-processing plant by using aluminum sulfate and hydrated lime was studied to determine the purification efficiency, to optimize the operating conditions and to scale up the treatment process. The purification efficiency was estimated by comparing the compositions of the SOWE and the processed wastewater. The treatment efficiency does not depend on the type of mineral oil and filter aid. The optimum doses of aluminum sulfate and hydrated lime must be experimentally determined for each batch of SOWEs, but the results obtained at laboratory level are applicable at pilot level. The processed wastewater and the filter cake from the process can be safely disposed into public sewage systems and at municipal waste landfills, respectively. The purification efficiency was higher than 98% with respect to total suspended solids, chemical oxygen demand and oil and grease, and was comparable to the known treatment processes based on coagulation/flocculation followed by sedimentation.

  2. A novel wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain TSH1 in scaling-up of solid-state fermentation of ethanol from sweet sorghum stalks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Du

    Full Text Available The rising demand for bioethanol, the most common alternative to petroleum-derived fuel used worldwide, has encouraged a feedstock shift to non-food crops to reduce the competition for resources between food and energy production. Sweet sorghum has become one of the most promising non-food energy crops because of its high output and strong adaptive ability. However, the means by which sweet sorghum stalks can be cost-effectively utilized for ethanol fermentation in large-scale industrial production and commercialization remains unclear. In this study, we identified a novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, TSH1, from the soil in which sweet sorghum stalks were stored. This strain exhibited excellent ethanol fermentative capacity and ability to withstand stressful solid-state fermentation conditions. Furthermore, we gradually scaled up from a 500-mL flask to a 127-m3 rotary-drum fermenter and eventually constructed a 550-m3 rotary-drum fermentation system to establish an efficient industrial fermentation platform based on TSH1. The batch fermentations were completed in less than 20 hours, with up to 96 tons of crushed sweet sorghum stalks in the 550-m3 fermenter reaching 88% of relative theoretical ethanol yield (RTEY. These results collectively demonstrate that ethanol solid-state fermentation technology can be a highly efficient and low-cost solution for utilizing sweet sorghum, providing a feasible and economical means of developing non-food bioethanol.

  3. Scale-up protein separation on stainless steel wide bore toroidal columns in the type-J counter-current chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yue Hugh; Hewitson, Peter; van den Heuvel, Remco N A M; Zhao, Yan; Siebers, Rick P G; Zhuang, Ying-Ping; Sutherland, Ian

    2015-12-11

    Manufacturing high-value added biotech biopharmaceutical products (e.g. therapeutic proteins) requires quick-to-develop, GMP-compliant, easy-to-scale and cost effective preparatory chromatography technologies. In this work, we describe the construction and testing of a set of 5-mm inner diameter stainless steel toroidal columns for use on commercially available preparatory scale synchronous J-type counter-current chromatography (CCC) machinery. We used a 20.2m long column with an aqueous two-phase system containing 14% (w/w) PEG1000 and 14% (w/w) potassium phosphate at pH 7, and tested a sample loading of 5% column volume and a mobile phase flow rate of 20ml/min. We then satisfactorily demonstrated the potential for a weekly protein separation and preparation throughput of ca. 11g based on a normal weekly routine for separating a pair of model proteins by making five stacked injections on a single portion of stationary phase with no stripping. Compared to our previous 1.6mm bore PTFE toroidal column, the present columns enlarged the nominal column processing throughput by nearly 10. For an ideal model protein injection modality, we observed a scaling up factor of at least 21. The 2 scales of protein separation and purification steps were realized on the same commercial CCC device. PMID:25818556

  4. Roller compaction scale-up using roll width as scale factor and laser-based determined ribbon porosity as critical material attribute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allesø, Morten; Holm, René; Holm, Per

    2016-05-25

    Due to the complexity and difficulties associated with the mechanistic modeling of roller compaction process for scale-up, an innovative equipment approach is to keep roll diameter fixed between scales and instead vary the roll width. Assuming a fixed gap and roll force, this approach should create similar conditions for the nip regions of the two compactor scales, and thus result in a scale-reproducible ribbon porosity. In the present work a non-destructive laser-based technique was used to measure the ribbon porosity at-line with high precision and high accuracy as confirmed by an initial comparison to a well-established volume displacement oil intrusion method. The ribbon porosity was found to be scale-independent when comparing the average porosity of a group of ribbon samples (n=12) from small-scale (Mini-Pactor®) to large-scale (Macro-Pactor®). A higher standard deviation of ribbons fragment porosities from the large-scale roller compactor was attributed to minor variations in powder densification across the roll width. With the intention to reproduce ribbon porosity from one scale to the other, process settings of roll force and gap size applied to the Mini-Pactor® (and identified during formulation development) were therefore directly transferrable to subsequent commercial scale production on the Macro-Pactor®. This creates a better link between formulation development and tech transfer and decreases the number of batches needed to establish the parameter settings of the commercial process. PMID:26545485

  5. Variability of bed drag on cohesive beds under wave action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, Ilgar

    2016-01-01

    Drag force at the bed acting on water flow is a major control on water circulation and sediment transport. Bed drag has been thoroughly studied in sandy waters, but less so in muddy coastal waters. The variation of bed drag on a muddy shelf is investigated here using field observations of currents, waves, and sediment concentration collected during moderate wind and wave events. To estimate bottom shear stress and the bed drag coefficient, an indirect empirical method of logarithmic fitting to current velocity profiles (log-law), a bottom boundary layer model for combined wave-current flow, and a direct method that uses turbulent fluctuations of velocity are used. The overestimation by the log-law is significantly reduced by taking turbulence suppression due to sediment-induced stratification into account. The best agreement between the model and the direct estimates is obtained by using a hydraulic roughness of 10  m in the model. Direct estimate of bed drag on the muddy bed is found to have a decreasing trend with increasing current speed, and is estimated to be around 0.0025 in conditions where wave-induced flow is relatively weak. Bed drag shows an increase (up to fourfold) with increasing wave energy. These findings can be used to test the bed drag parameterizations in hydrodynamic and sediment transport models and the skills of these models in predicting flows in muddy environments.

  6. Scaling up manufacturing of ZnO thin layers for application in flexible dye-sensitized solar cells; Aufskalierung der Herstellung von ZnO-Duennschichten fuer die Anwendung in flexiblen farbstoffsensibilisierten Solarzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bittner, Florian

    2012-10-19

    to demonstrate the suitability for scale-up of the fabrication method of ZnO/eosin Y hybrid layers. This miniplant setup was characterised in detail and appropriate deposition parameters have been determined. Porous ZnO layers have been prepared successfully on FTO glass substrates on an area of 38.88 cm{sup 2} and on ITO-PET plastic substrates on an area of 34.56 cm{sup 2}. The suitability of the fabricated layers for the assembly of flexible dye-sensitized solar cells has been demonstrated by means of several operative modules. While these modules achieved decent conversion efficiencies of up to 2.58 % under low light intensities, strongly decreasing conversion efficiencies were observed with increasing light intensities. Too high series resistances have been identified as the cause. (orig.)

  7. Hard coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Dan, J.; Boving, H.; Hintermann, H.

    1993-01-01

    Hard, wear resistant and low friction coatings are presently produced on a world-wide basis, by different processes such as electrochemical or electroless methods, spray technologies, thermochemical, CVD and PVD. Some of the most advanced processes, especially those dedicated to thin film depositions, basically belong to CVD or PVD technologies, and will be looked at in more detail. The hard coatings mainly consist of oxides, nitrides, carbides, borides or carbon. Over the years, many process...

  8. The effect of interparticle cohesive forces on the simulation of fluid flow in spout-fluid beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trindade A. L. G.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available As reflected in the literature, solid-fluid flow characteristics in spouted beds can vary widely when particles are coated by a suspension. This work is aimed at describing the effect of interparticle forces on airflow distribution in conical spouted beds of inert particles coated by Eucalyptus black liquor. The simulator developed earlier is modified to incorporate this effect. Two corrective functions with adjustable parameters are introduced into the simulator gas-flow model to generate the minimum spouting conditions in beds wetted by this liquor. These functions are assumed to be dependent on characteristic suspension groups and bed height. Using the particle swarm optimization (PSO technique, expressions for these functions are obtained. Simulated results are presented and discussed to validate this technique. Implications of these results on drying Eucalyptus black liquor in conical spouted beds are analyzed.

  9. Tests of candidate materials for particle bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhenium metal hot frits and zirconium carbide-coated fuel particles appear suitable for use in flowing hydrogen to at least 2000 K, based on previous tests. Recent tests on alternate candidate cooled particle and frit materials are described. Silicon carbide-coated particles began to react with rhenium frit material at 1600 K, forming a molten silicide at 2000 K. Silicon carbide was extensively attacked by hydrogen at 2066 K for 30 minutes, losing 3.25% of its weight. Vitrous carbon was also rapidly attacked by hydrogen at 2123 K, losing 10% of its weight in two minutes. Long term material tests on candidate materials for closed cycle helium cooled particle bed fuel elements are also described. Surface imperfections were found on the surface of pyrocarbon-coated fuel particles after ninety days exposure to flowing (∼500 ppM) impure helium at 1143 K. The imperfections were superficial and did not affect particle strength

  10. Ability of bed bug-detecting canines to locate live bed bugs and viable bed bug eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfiester, Margie; Koehler, Philip G; Pereira, Roberto M

    2008-08-01

    The bed bug, Cimex lectularius L., like other bed bug species, is difficult to visually locate because it is cryptic. Detector dogs are useful for locating bed bugs because they use olfaction rather than vision. Dogs were trained to detect the bed bug (as few as one adult male or female) and viable bed bug eggs (five, collected 5-6 d after feeding) by using a modified food and verbal reward system. Their efficacy was tested with bed bugs and viable bed bug eggs placed in vented polyvinyl chloride containers. Dogs were able to discriminate bed bugs from Camponotus floridanus Buckley, Blattella germanica (L.), and Reticulitermes flavipes (Kollar), with a 97.5% positive indication rate (correct indication of bed bugs when present) and 0% false positives (incorrect indication of bed bugs when not present). Dogs also were able to discriminate live bed bugs and viable bed bug eggs from dead bed bugs, cast skins, and feces, with a 95% positive indication rate and a 3% false positive rate on bed bug feces. In a controlled experiment in hotel rooms, dogs were 98% accurate in locating live bed bugs. A pseudoscent prepared from pentane extraction of bed bugs was recognized by trained dogs as bed bug scent (100% indication). The pseudoscent could be used to facilitate detector dog training and quality assurance programs. If trained properly, dogs can be used effectively to locate live bed bugs and viable bed bug eggs. PMID:18767752

  11. Fluidized bed spray granulation: analysis of heat and mass transfers and dynamic particle populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Heinrich

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A model was developed taking into consideration the heat and mass transfer processes in liquid-sprayed fluidized beds. Such fluidized beds (FB are used for granulation, coating and agglomeration. Conclusions are drawn on the relevance of particle dispersion, spraying and drying to temperature and concentrations distributions. In extension, the model was coupled with a population balance model to describe the particle size distribution and the seeds formation for continuous external FBSG (fluidized bed spray granulation with non-classifying product discharge and a screening and milling unit in the seeds recycle. The effects of seeds formation on the stability of the process is discussed.

  12. LSP Composite Test Bed Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Arthur C.; Griess, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    This document provides standalone information for the Lightning Strike Protection (LSP) Composite Substrate Test Bed Design. A six-sheet drawing set is reproduced for reference, as is some additional descriptive information on suitable sensors and use of the test bed.

  13. Coating of pellets with micronized ethylcellulose particles by a dry powder coating technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearnchob, Nantharat; Bodmeier, Roland

    2003-12-11

    Pellets were coated with ethylcellulose powder to achieve extended release. The film forming ability of ethylcellulose powder and the effect of formulation factors (plasticizer type and concentration) and curing conditions (curing temperature and time) were investigated. The coating formulation was divided into two components consisting of a powder mixture (polymer plus talc) and a mixture of liquid materials (plasticizer plus binder solution), which were sprayed separately into the coating chamber of a fluidized bed coater (Glatt GPCG-1, Wurster insert). The coated pellets were oven-cured under different conditions (60-80 degrees C, 2-24 h) without and with humidity (100% relative humidity). Propranolol hydrochloride was used as a model drug, and drug release was studied in 0.1 N HCl at 37 degrees C (USP XXV paddle method). Despite the high glass transition temperature of ethylcellulose (133.4 degrees C), micronized ethylcellulose powder can be used for dry powder coating by adjusting the coating temperature, amount and type of plasticizer applied, and curing conditions. 40% plasticizer and a curing step (80 degrees C, 24 h) were required to achieve complete coalescence of the polymer particles and extended drug release of coated pellets. Although ethylcellulose-coated pellets had an uneven surface, extended drug release could be obtained with coating level of 15%. Because of its high glass transition temperature, ethylcellulose-coated pellets showed unchanged drug release profiles upon storage at room temperature for 3 years. PMID:14643971

  14. A comparative study of charcoal gasification in two types of spouted bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdul Salam, P. [Energy Field of Study, School of Environment, Resources and Development, Asian Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 4, Klongluang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Bhattacharya, S.C. [Energy Field of Study, School of Environment, Resources and Development, Asian Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 4, Klongluang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand)] e-mail: bhatta@ait.ac.th

    2006-03-01

    Gasification is considered to be a favourable method for converting a solid fuel into a more versatile gaseous fuel. Performance of a gasifier depends on the design of the gasifier, type of fuel used and air flow rate, etc. The applications of spouted bed for a variety of processes such as drying, coating, pyrolysis, gasification and combustion have been reported. Gasification of solid fuels in a spouted bed, which has certain potential advantages over other fluid bed configurations, appears to be an under-exploited technique so far. Central jet distributors are the most commonly used in the experimental studies that has been reported in the literature. Circular slit distributor is a new concept. This paper presents results of a comparative experimental study on air gasification of charcoal in central jet and circular slit inert sand spouted beds. The experiments were carried for an equivalence ratio of 0.25. The effect of spouting velocity and type of the distributor on the gasification performance were discussed. The steady state dense bed temperature varied between 979 and 1183 deg C for central jet spouted bed and between 964 and 1235 deg C for circular slit spouted bed. At higher spouting velocities, the gasification efficiency of the circular slit spouted bed was slightly more compared with that of central jet spouted bed.

  15. A comparative study of charcoal gasification in two types of spouted bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salam, P.A.; Bhattacharya, S.C. [Asian Institute of Technology, Pathumthani (Thailand). School of Environmental, Resources and Development

    2006-03-01

    Gasification is considered to be a favourable method for converting a solid fuel into a more versatile gaseous fuel. Performance of a gasifier depends on the design of the gasifier, type of fuel used and airflow rate, etc. The applications of spouted bed for a variety of processes such as drying, coating, pyrolysis, gasification and combustion have been reported. Gasification of solid fuels in a spouted bed, which has certain potential advantages over other fluid bed configurations, appears to be an under-exploited technique so far. Central jet distributors are the most commonly used in the experimental studies that has been reported in the literature. Circular slit distributor is a new concept. This paper presents results of a comparative experimental study on air gasification of charcoal in central jet and circular slit inert sand spouted beds. The experiments were carried for an equivalence ratio of 0.25. The effect of spouting velocity and type of the distributor on the gasification performance were discussed. The steady state dense bed temperature varied between 979 and 1183{sup o}C for central jet spouted bed and between 964 and 1235{sup o}C for circular slit spouted bed. At higher spouting velocities, the gasification efficiency of the circular slit spouted bed was slightly more compared with that of central jet spouted bed. (author)

  16. Challenges Facing Successful Scaling Up of Effective Screening for Cardiovascular Disease by Community Health Workers in Mexico and South Africa: Policy Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    S, Abrahams-Gessel; Denman, CA; TA, Gaziano; NS, Levitt; T, Puoane

    2016-01-01

    The integration of community health workers (CHWs) into primary and secondary prevention functions in health programs and services delivery in Mexico and South Africa has been demonstrated to be effective. Task-sharing related to adherence and treatment, from nurses to CHWs, has also been effectively demonstrated in these areas. HIV/AIDS and TB programs in South Africa have seen similar successes in task-sharing with CHWs in the areas of screening for risk and adherence to treatment. In the area of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), there is a policy commitment to integrating CHWs into primary health care programs at public health facilities in both Mexico and South Africa in the areas of reproductive health and infant health. Yet current programs utilizing CHWs are not integrated into existing primary health care services in a comprehensive manner for primary and secondary prevention of NCDs. In a recently completed study, CHWs were trained to perform the basic diagnostic function of primary screening to assess the risk of suffering a CVD-related event in the community using a non-laboratory risk assessment tool and referring persons at moderate to high risk to local government clinics, for further assessment and management by a nurse or physician. In this paper we compare the experience with this CVD screening study to successful programs in vaccination, reproductive health, HIV/AIDS, and TB specifically to identify the barriers we identified as limitations to replicating these programs in the area of CVD diagnosis and management. We review barriers impacting the effective translation of policy into practice, including scale up issues; training and certification issues; integrating CHW to existing primary care teams and health system; funding and resource gaps. Finally, we suggest policy recommendations to replicate the demonstrated success of programs utilizing task-sharing with CHWs in infectious diseases and reproductive health, to integrated programs in NCD

  17. Challenges to the scale-up of the Nigerian National Health Insurance Scheme: Public knowledge and opinions in urban Kano, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U M Lawan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : This study examined the challenges in the implementation and scale-up of the National Health insurance Scheme (NHIS in Nigeria. Materials and Methods : We designed this descriptive cross-sectional study to investigate the knowledge and opinions of 150 randomly selected adults in urban Kano regarding the NHIS. Data was analyzed using Epi Info™ 3.2.05 statistical software. Respondents′ knowledge of NHIS was scored and graded using a system adapted from previous studies. Results : The mean age of respondents was 39.1 ± 11.1 years, and the majority were currently married (76.7%, males (76.0%, had formal education (82.0%, and were civil servants (52.7%. More than half (52.0% of the respondents had poor knowledge of the NHIS. Respondents′ knowledge of NHIS did not differ significantly by age, sex, ethnicity, marital status, educational level, or occupation. Although the majority (74.7% opined that the NHIS is a good initiative, a significant proportion was pessimistic about the scheme: 31.3% said that it is a good scheme but not practicable and 28.0% felt that it is only for the rich. Conclusion : In view of the poor level of knowledge and the pessimism about the NHIS, the government/NHIS office should expedite the implementation of the package for the under-five children and/or the disabled to demonstrate the usefulness of the scheme. The Federal Ministry of Health, the NHIS, and the development partners should intensify efforts for public enlightenment, using electronic and print media as well as other traditional methods of communication.

  18. Proposal of a framework for scale-up life cycle inventory: A case of nanofibers for lithium iron phosphate cathode applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Bálint; Bachtin, Krystyna; Kiliç, Ali; Amor, Ben; Weil, Marcel

    2016-07-01

    Environmental assessments are crucial for the management of the environmental impacts of a product in a rapidly developing world. The design phase creates opportunities for acting on the environmental issues of products using life cycle assessment (LCA). However, the LCA is hampered by a lack of information originating from distinct scales along the product or technology value chain. Many studies have been undertaken to handle similar problems, but these studies are case-specific and do not analyze the development options in the initial design phase. Thus, systematic studies are needed to determine the possible scaling. Knowledge from such screening studies would open the door for developing new methods that can tackle a given scaling problem. The present article proposes a scale-up procedure that aims to generate a new life cycle inventory (LCI) on a theoretical industrial scale, based on information from laboratory experiments. Three techniques are described to obtain the new LCI. Investigation of a laboratory-scale procedure is discussed to find similar industrial processes as a benchmark for describing a theoretical large-scale production process. Furthermore, LCA was performed on a model system of nanofiber electrospinning for Li-ion battery cathode applications. The LCA results support material developers in identifying promising development pathways. For example, the present study pointed out the significant impacts of dimethylformamide on suspension preparation and the power requirements of distinct electrospinning subprocesses. Nanofiber-containing battery cells had greater environmental impacts than did the reference cell, although they had better electrochemical performance, such as better wettability of the electrode, improving the electrode's electrosorption capacity, and longer expected lifetime. Furthermore, material and energy recovery throughout the production chain could decrease the environmental impacts by 40% to 70%, making the nanofiber a

  19. Scale-up of a decentralized HIV treatment programme in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: does rapid expansion affect patient outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portia C Mutevedzi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the scale-up of a decentralized HIV treatment programme delivered through the primary health care system in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, and to assess trends in baseline characteristics and outcomes in the study population. METHODS: The programme started delivery of antiretroviral therapy (ART in October 2004. Information on all patients initiated on ART was captured in the programme database and follow-up status was updated monthly. All adult patients (> 16 years who initiated ART between October 2004 and September 2008 were included and stratified into 6-month groups. Clinical and sociodemographic characteristics were compared between the groups. Retention in care, mortality, loss to follow-up and virological outcomes were assessed at 12 months post-ART initiation. FINDINGS: A total of 5719 adults initiated on ART were included (67.9% female. Median baseline CD4+ lymphocyte count was 116 cells/μl (interquartile range, IQR: 53-173. There was an increase in the proportion of women who initiated ART while pregnant but no change in other baseline characteristics over time. Overall retention in care at 12 months was 84.0% (95% confidence interval, CI: 82.6-85.3; 10.9% died (95% CI: 9.8-12.0; 3.7% were lost to follow-up (95% CI: 3.0-4.4. Mortality was highest in the first 3 months after ART initiation: 30.1 deaths per 100 person-years (95% CI: 26.3-34.5. At 12 months 23.0% had a detectable viral load (> 25 copies/ml (95% CI: 19.5-25.5. CONCLUSION: Outcomes were not affected by rapid expansion of this decentralized HIV treatment programme. The relatively high rates of detectable viral load highlight the need for further efforts to improve the quality of services.

  20. Effect of RANS-Type Turbulence Models on Adiabatic Film Cooling Effectiveness over a Scaled Up Gas Turbine Blade Leading Edge Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepuri, Giridhara Babu; Talanki Puttarangasetty, Ashok Babu; Kolke, Deepak Kumar; Jesuraj, Felix

    2016-06-01

    Increasing the gas turbine inlet temperature is one of the key technologies in raising gas turbine engine power output. Film cooling is one of the efficient cooling techniques to cool the hot section components of a gas turbine engines in turn the turbine inlet temperature can be increased. This study aims at investigating the effect of RANS-type turbulence models on adiabatic film cooling effectiveness over a scaled up gas turbine blade leading edge surfaces. For the evaluation, five different two equation RANS-type turbulent models have been taken in consideration, which are available in the ANSYS-Fluent. For this analysis, the gas turbine blade leading edge configuration is generated using Solid Works. The meshing is done using ANSYS-Workbench Mesh and ANSYS-Fluent is used as a solver to solve the flow field. The considered gas turbine blade leading edge model is having five rows of film cooling circular holes, one at stagnation line and the two each on either side of stagnation line at 30° and 60° respectively. Each row has the five holes with the hole diameter of 4 mm, pitch of 21 mm arranged in staggered manner and has the hole injection angle of 30° in span wise direction. The experiments are carried in a subsonic cascade tunnel facility at heat transfer lab of CSIR-National Aerospace Laboratory with a Reynolds number of 1,00,000 based on leading edge diameter. From the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) evaluation it is found that K-ɛ Realizable model gives more acceptable results with the experimental values, compared to the other considered turbulence models for this type of geometries. Further the CFD evaluated results, using K-ɛ Realizable model at different blowing ratios are compared with the experimental results.