WorldWideScience

Sample records for beat world hunger

  1. Nuclear science for food security. IAEA says plant breeding technique can help beat world hunger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) today called for increased investment in a plant breeding technique that could bolster efforts aimed at pulling millions of people out of the hunger trap. IAEA scientists use radiation to produce improved high-yielding plants that adapt to harsh climate conditions such as drought or flood, or that are resistant to certain diseases and insect pests. Called mutation induction, the technique is safe, proven and cost-effective. It has been in use since the 1920s. 'The global nature of the food crisis is unprecedented. Families all around the world are struggling to feed themselves,' says Mohamed ElBaradei, Director General of the IAEA. 'To provide sustainable, long-term solutions, we must make use of all available resources. Selecting the crops that are better able to feed us is one of humankind's oldest sciences. But we've neglected to give it the support and investment it requires for universal application. The IAEA is urging a revival of nuclear crop breeding technologies to help tackle world hunger.' For decades the IAEA, in partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), has assisted its Member States to produce more, better and safer food. In plant breeding and genetics, its expertise is helping countries around the world to achieve enhanced agricultural output using nuclear technology. Already more than 3000 crop varieties of some 170 different plant species have been released through the direct intervention of the IAEA: they include barley that grows at 5000 meters (16,400 ft) and rice that thrives in saline soil. These varieties provide much needed food as well as millions of dollars in economic benefits for farmers and consumers, especially in developing countries. But with increased investment and broader application, the technology could positively impact the health and livelihood of even greater numbers of people. And as world hunger grows, the need has never been more urgent

  2. Confronting world hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, B

    1983-01-01

    In 1980, per capita food supplies were less than adequate in 53 developing countries. More than half of these were the predominantly rural, low income countries of South Asia, China, and Sub-Saharan Africa. Finding the proper balance between satisfying immediate human needs and building political and economic systems in which individuals can in the future acquire the means to satisfy their own requirements is the central issue facing those in the fight against world hunger. At the international level, developed countries have responded to world hunger by raising the minimum level of food aid provided when supplies are scarce and by creating a financing facility for cereal imports. The food and agriculture sector is receiving a highe priority than before in the allocation of international development assistance, and more attention is being given to the effects of both general food subsidies and targeted nutrition programs on future agricultural output. At the national level, over 40 developing countries have requested assistance from the World Food Council for the preparation of food sector strategies. Although such measures are important, they do not directly address local problems and individual needs. For example, dietary intake tends to be lower in urban than in rural households in Latin America at the same level of income. These urban groups require health and nutrition interventions that simultaneously address their immediate need for food, clean water, and health care and their more longterm need for employment. Longterm economic development that provides adequate income to all segments of the population is the best means to combat hunger, and income security also reduces incentives for large family size. The contribution of the international community should remain the transfer of resources and the provision of technical assistance. At the individual level, the need for targeted food distribution programs continues. Greater benefit can be obtained from

  3. Hunger: The World's Oldest Sorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Judith; Miller, Mark

    1985-01-01

    No human problem is older than starvation. Authorities agree that poverty and unequal distribution of resources are the basic causes of hunger. The hungry are ignored by the world because they have no political power and even less economic strength. How to build a world without hunger is discussed. (RM)

  4. Tackling World Hunger in an Elementary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnan, Caroline S.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a program, developed in a small Vermont elementary school, that centered on world hunger and global awareness by involving students in helping stop food waste during lunch. Community members and businesses pledged money as an incentive for stopping waste, and the money raised went to UNICEF. (MD)

  5. World Hunger Crisis Kit. Hope for the Hungry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woito, Robert, Ed.

    This booklet introduces the problem of world hunger and provides information, facts, and perspectives about the crisis. Section one presents the reader with the basic facts of the hunger crisis through a self-survey, a statistical study of the developed Oil Producing Export Countries (OPEC), and a one-page indication of what one would have to give…

  6. Transgenic Crops to Address Third World Hunger? A Critical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosset, Peter M.

    2005-01-01

    Industry and mainstream research and policy institutions often suggest that transgenic crop varieties can raise the productivity of poor third world farmers, feed the hungry, and reduce poverty. These claims are critically evaluated by examining global-hunger data, the constraints that affect the productivity of small farmers in the third world,…

  7. Politics of hunger to be topic of World Food Day international teleconference

    OpenAIRE

    Felker, Susan B.

    2004-01-01

    Why does the modern world food system fail to adequately feed some 800 million people?" This and other topics will be addressed during the 21st annual international World Food Day Teleconference, entitled "The Politics of Hunger: What's at Stake?

  8. GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISMS – A SOLUTION TO WORLD HUNGER?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Kaluđerović

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In 2011, GM crops were grown on 160 million hectares spread over 29 countries, on all continents, marking a 94-fold increase in the area since their first commercialization in 1996, and making it the fastest adopted crop technology in recent history. Main reasons for this expansion are, by the proponents of GM food, its safety, potential to revolutionize agriculture and benefit the farmers and consumers alike. On the other hand, there are indications that GMOs are harmful to the biodiversity and become eco-contaminants, and can, especially in the long terms, negatively affect the human health. Authors think that patenting of living organisms by the multinational companies is unacceptable and unfair from the bioethical perspective, not only because they tend to hold monopolies in production and trade of GM plants, but also because of their efforts to gain domination over the very life. Finally, analyses made by many scientists show that the thesis that "Gene Revolution" will resolve the problem of hunger in the world was not justified in the previous decade.

  9. Handling hunger strikers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    Hunger strikes are being used increasingly and not only by those with a political point to make. Whereas in the past, hunger strikes in the United Kingdom seemed mainly to be started by terrorist prisoners for political purposes, the most recent was begun by a Tamil convicted of murder, to protest his innocence. In the later stages of his strike, before calling it off, he was looked after at the Hammersmith Hospital. So it is not only prison doctors who need to know how to handle a hunger strike. The following guidelines, adopted by the 43rd World Medical Assembly in Malta in November 1991, are therefore a timely reminder of the doctor's duties during a hunger strike. PMID:16144144

  10. Synopsis: 2015 Global hunger index: Armed conflict and the challenge of hunger

    OpenAIRE

    von Grebmer, Klaus; Bernstein, Jill; Prasai, Nilam; Yin, Sandra; Yohannes, Yisehac; Towey, Olive; Sonntag, Andrea; Neubauer, Larissa; de Waal, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 Global Hunger Index (GHI) report—the tenth in an annual series—presents a multidimensional measure of national, regional, and global hunger. It shows that the world has made progress in reducing hunger since 2000, but still has a long way to go, with levels of hunger still serious or alarming in 52 countries. The theme of this year’s report is armed conflict and the challenge of hunger. Conflict and hunger are closely associated. Indeed, conflict is the main cause of persistent sever...

  11. Finger-to-Beat Coordination Skill of Non-dancers, Street Dancers, and the World Champion of a Street-Dance Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Akito; Fujii, Shinya; Okano, Masahiro; Kudo, Kazutoshi; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2016-01-01

    The coordination of body movements to a musical beat is a common feature of many dance styles. However, the auditory–motor coordination skills of dancers remain largely uninvestigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the auditory–motor coordination skills of non-dancers, street dancers, and the winner of a celebrated international street dance competition, while coordinating their rhythmic finger movements to a beat. The beat rate of a metronome increased from 1.0 to 3.7 Hz. The participants were asked to either flex or extend their index fingers on the beat in each condition. Under the extend-on-the-beat condition, both the dancers and non-dancers showed a spontaneous transition from the extend-on-the-beat to the flex-on-the-beat or to a phase wandering pattern. However, the critical frequency at which the transition occurred was significantly higher in the dancers (3.3 Hz) than in the non-dancers (2.6 Hz). Under the flex-on-the-beat condition, the dancers were able to maintain their coordination pattern more stably at high beat rates compared to the non-dancers. Furthermore, the world champion matched the timing of movement peak velocity to the beat across the different beat rates. This may give a sense of unity between the movement and the beat for the audience because the peak velocity of the rhythmic movement works as a temporal cue for the audiovisual synchrony perception. These results suggest that the skills of accomplished dancers lie in their small finger movements and that the sensorimotor learning of street dance is characterized by a stabilization of the coordination patterns, including the inhibition of an unintentional transition to other coordination patterns. PMID:27148148

  12. Finger-to-Beat Coordination Skill of Non-dancers, Street Dancers, and the World Champion of a Street-Dance Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Akito; Fujii, Shinya; Okano, Masahiro; Kudo, Kazutoshi; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2016-01-01

    The coordination of body movements to a musical beat is a common feature of many dance styles. However, the auditory-motor coordination skills of dancers remain largely uninvestigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the auditory-motor coordination skills of non-dancers, street dancers, and the winner of a celebrated international street dance competition, while coordinating their rhythmic finger movements to a beat. The beat rate of a metronome increased from 1.0 to 3.7 Hz. The participants were asked to either flex or extend their index fingers on the beat in each condition. Under the extend-on-the-beat condition, both the dancers and non-dancers showed a spontaneous transition from the extend-on-the-beat to the flex-on-the-beat or to a phase wandering pattern. However, the critical frequency at which the transition occurred was significantly higher in the dancers (3.3 Hz) than in the non-dancers (2.6 Hz). Under the flex-on-the-beat condition, the dancers were able to maintain their coordination pattern more stably at high beat rates compared to the non-dancers. Furthermore, the world champion matched the timing of movement peak velocity to the beat across the different beat rates. This may give a sense of unity between the movement and the beat for the audience because the peak velocity of the rhythmic movement works as a temporal cue for the audiovisual synchrony perception. These results suggest that the skills of accomplished dancers lie in their small finger movements and that the sensorimotor learning of street dance is characterized by a stabilization of the coordination patterns, including the inhibition of an unintentional transition to other coordination patterns. PMID:27148148

  13. Statistics Hacks Tips & Tools for Measuring the World and Beating the Odds

    CERN Document Server

    Frey, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Want to calculate the probability that an event will happen? Be able to spot fake data? Prove beyond doubt whether one thing causes another? Or learn to be a better gambler? You can do that and much more with 75 practical and fun hacks packed into Statistics Hacks. These cool tips, tricks, and mind-boggling solutions from the world of statistics, measurement, and research methods will not only amaze and entertain you, but will give you an advantage in several real-world situations-including business.

  14. Hunger and violence

    OpenAIRE

    Özenoğlu, Aliye; Ünal, Gökçe

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient deficiencies and disturbances in metabolism of neurotransmitters and hormones, induced by nutrient deficiencies, affect the behavior of individuals. In this review, the effect of deficiencies that occur in the body as a result of hunger on the formation of aggression and violent behavior are intended to be explained by biological processes. Articles published between the years 1993-2014 using keywords hunger, lack of nutrients, aggression, violence were scanned on Pubmed database, ho...

  15. "The Hunger Games" and Project-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Horizons, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Mary Mobley teaches English and Michael Chambers teaches world history at Manor New Technology High School, a STEM school, in Manor, Texas. In this article, they talk about how they used "The Hunger Games" by Suzanne Collins to teach their students about forms of government between World War I and World War II, and "Edutopia"…

  16. From the morality of living to the morality of sying: hunger strikes in Turkish prisons

    OpenAIRE

    Koçan, Gürcan; Kocan, Gurcan; Öncü, Ahmet; Oncu, Ahmet

    2006-01-01

    Political hunger strikes have been part of the debates on human rights in many countries around the world. This paper explores the preconditions for and motives behind hunger strikes in Turkey by conceiving the hunger strikers as a part of citizenship politics through which strikers not only express their views against certain common issues, but also declare total opposition to an unjust condition within their political community. The paper focuses on the question of why some such “citizens” ...

  17. Beat Dreams?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    2009-01-01

    Two of the founding members of the Beat Generation of the 1950s wrote dream books with almost identical titles: Jack Kerouac's Book of Dreams (1961) and William Burroughs' My Education: A Book of Dreams (1995). This paper queries the function of such dream books, both from a perspective of seeing...... dream writing as a confessional genre, and from the perspective of didacticism implicit in sharing one's dream life with one's readers. What role does memory, politics, fantasies and reality play in communicating with and via dreams?...

  18. The evolutionary psychology of hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shawaf, Laith

    2016-10-01

    An evolutionary psychological perspective suggests that emotions can be understood as coordinating mechanisms whose job is to regulate various psychological and physiological programs in the service of solving an adaptive problem. This paper suggests that it may also be fruitful to approach hunger from this coordinating mechanism perspective. To this end, I put forward an evolutionary task analysis of hunger, generating novel a priori hypotheses about the coordinating effects of hunger on psychological processes such as perception, attention, categorization, and memory. This approach appears empirically fruitful in that it yields a bounty of testable new hypotheses. PMID:27328100

  19. School Food Politics: The Complex Ecology of Hunger and Feeding in Schools around the World. Global Studies in Education, Volume 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Sarah A., Ed.; Weaver-Hightower, Marcus B., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The essays in "School Food Politics" explore the intersections of food and politics on all six of the inhabited continents of the world. Including electoral fights over universally free school meals in Korea, nutritional reforms to school dinners in England and canteens in Australia, teachers' and doctors' work on school feeding in Argentina, and…

  20. Concern About Hunger May Increase Receptivity to GMOs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, B Elijah; Conn, Caitlin C; Wiles, Jason R

    2016-07-01

    Due to a phenomenon known as the 'backfire effect', intuition-based opinions can be inadvertently strengthened by evidence-based counterarguments. Students' views on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) may be subject to this effect. We explored the impact of an empathetically accessible topic, world hunger, on receptivity to GMO technology as an alternative to direct evidence-based approaches. PMID:27246454

  1. Halving hunger: Meeting the first millennium development goal

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Shenggen

    2010-01-01

    "In 2000, the world’s leaders set a target of halving the percentage of hungry people between 1990 and 2015. This rather modest target constitutes part of the first Millennium Development Goal, which also calls for halving the proportion of people living in poverty and achieving full employment. However, the effort to meet the hunger target has swerved off track, and the world is getting farther and farther away from realizing this objective. The goal of halving hunger by 2015 can still be ac...

  2. Personal Concepts on "Hunger in Africa"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermaier, Gabriele; Schrufer, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    When discussing the topic "Hunger in Africa" with students, incorrect and biased ideas on the causes for hunger are revealed. In order to change the students' personal concepts it is necessary to become acquainted with their mental models. Therefore, a survey of Geography students' different personal theories concerning "Hunger in Africa" was…

  3. Bioethics in the Hunger Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kristin; Keller, Donna; Myers, Alyce

    2014-01-01

    In this guided inquiry, students investigate advantages and disadvantages of genetic engineering by integrating popular fiction into their study of bioethics. What are the effects of artificially created hybrid creatures on characters in "The Hunger Games" and in our society? What are the effects on and basic rights of the organisms…

  4. Neurophysiology of Hunger and Satiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Pauline M.; Ferguson, Alastair V.

    2008-01-01

    Hunger is defined as a strong desire or need for food while satiety is the condition of being full or gratified. The maintenance of energy homeostasis requires a balance between energy intake and energy expenditure. The regulation of food intake is a complex behavior. It requires discrete nuclei within the central nervous system (CNS) to detect…

  5. Beat-to-Beat Blood Pressure Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Jin

    2012-01-01

    This device provides non-invasive beat-to-beat blood pressure measurements and can be worn over the upper arm for prolonged durations. Phase and waveform analyses are performed on filtered proximal and distal photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms obtained from the brachial artery. The phase analysis is used primarily for the computation of the mean arterial pressure, while the waveform analysis is used primarily to obtain the pulse pressure. Real-time compliance estimate is used to refine both the mean arterial and pulse pressures to provide the beat-to-beat blood pressure measurement. This wearable physiological monitor can be used to continuously observe the beat-to-beat blood pressure (B3P). It can be used to monitor the effect of prolonged exposures to reduced gravitational environments and the effectiveness of various countermeasures. A number of researchers have used pulse wave velocity (PWV) of blood in the arteries to infer the beat-to-beat blood pressure. There has been documentation of relative success, but a device that is able to provide the required accuracy and repeatability has not yet been developed. It has been demonstrated that an accurate and repeatable blood pressure measurement can be obtained by measuring the phase change (e.g., phase velocity), amplitude change, and distortion of the PPG waveforms along the brachial artery. The approach is based on comparing the full PPG waveform between two points along the artery rather than measuring the time-of-flight. Minimizing the measurement separation and confining the measurement area to a single, well-defined artery allows the waveform to retain the general shape between the two measurement points. This allows signal processing of waveforms to determine the phase and amplitude changes.

  6. Hunger among Inuit children in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne C. Findlay

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives. Inuit populations may be at increased risk for experiencing poor nutrition or hunger due to limited access and availability to food. The prevalence and correlates of parental perceptions of hunger among a nationally representative sample of Inuit children in Canada have not yet been reported. Design. Data are from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS. Sociodemographic information, dietary behaviours and hunger status were parent-reported via a household interview for Inuit children aged 2–5 years (n=1,234. Prevalence of hunger was calculated among Inuit children by sociodemographic factors and by dietary behaviours. In addition, a multivariate logistic regression model was conducted to determine factors associated with parental perception of ever experiencing hunger. Results. The prevalence of Inuit children in Canada aged 2–5 years ever experiencing hunger was 24.4%. Children who were reported to have experienced hunger consumed milk and milk products (p<0.001; fish, eggs and meat (p<0.05; fruits (p<0.001; and vegetables (p<0.001 significantly less often than never-hungry children. Fast food and processed foods, soft drinks and juice, and salty snacks, sweets and desserts were consumed as often as never-hungry children (all p>0.05. The majority (81% of Inuit parents/guardians of ever-hungry children sought help from family or friends. Factors associated with an increased likelihood of experiencing hunger include sociodemographic characteristics (such as income and household size, living in an Inuit region and living in a community with cultural activities. Conclusion. About 1 in 4 Inuit children were reported by their parents to have experienced hunger, and hunger was associated with region, sociodemographic and community factors. Future research could further examine the impact of ever experiencing hunger on the health status of Inuit children and their families in Canada.

  7. Alleviating hidden hunger. Approaches that work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The world has come a long way in understanding the nature, magnitude and range of solutions to micronutrient malnutrition - often called 'hidden hunger'. The most sustainable solutions - that is those that are likely to be maintained in the long term - almost surely will include food-based approaches including diet diversity, food fortification and biofortification. Food fortification and biofortification could be some of the most cost-effective of all public health interventions and thus within the economic reach of even the world's poorest. In order to implement them in a sustainable manner, a combination of technical, operational, economic, behavioural and political factors need to be addressed. In some ways the technological issues are the easiest. Because of attention to research, we now have a variety of ways for both single and multiple micronutrients to reach the target population. We also know what is needed in order to ensure delivery systems. The key factor for continued success in reducing micronutrient malnutrition through fortification is a political commitment at the national and international level and creating effective public-private partnerships at the national level. The payoff for eliminating hidden hunger through nutrient fortification is enormous and few other public health interventions offer such a promising health, nutrition and economic success story. Nuclear and isotopic techniques are valuable tools in helping to meet the multifaceted challenges posed by nutritional disorders affecting the entire human life span (embryonic to elderly). Among the numerous applications available, isotopic techniques are uniquely well suited for targeting and tracking progress in food and nutrition development programmes (See box: How Nutrients are Tracked). These include: use of the stable isotopes of iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) as a kind of gold standard in studies of their bioavailability from foods; trace element bioavailability and pool sizes for

  8. New Mexico Campaigns Against Hunger and Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, Shami

    1972-01-01

    Describes the nutritional needs of individuals in New Mexico, and the efforts of the Nutrition Improvement Program (NIP) of the University of New Mexico School of Medicine at Albuquerque to remove hunger and malnutrition. (DM)

  9. Class on Fire: Using the Hunger Games Trilogy to Encourage Social Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Amber M.

    2012-01-01

    This article explores ways to utilize students' interest in fantasy literature to support critical literacy. Focusing on Suzanne Collins's The Hunger Games series (2008, 2009, 2010), the author addresses how elements of the trilogy relate to violent acts in our world, helping student understand that violence and brutality toward children is not…

  10. Wearable Beat to Beat Blood Pressure Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A key component of NASA's human exploration programs is a system that monitors the health of the crew during space missions. The wearable beat-to-beat blood...

  11. Off beat: pluralizing rhythm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Hoogstad; B. Stougaard Pedersen

    2013-01-01

    Off Beat: Pluralizing Rhythm draws attention to rhythm as a tool for analyzing various cultural objects. In fields as diverse as music, culture, nature, and economy, rhythm can be seen as a phenomenon that both connects and divides. It suggests a certain measure with which people, practices, and cul

  12. Hunger Games: What Are the Chances?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Sarah B.; Karp, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an activity based on the popular book and movie "The Hunger Games." The activity was designed to engage middle school students in using the mathematics found in the book. This activity provides a meaningful way to connect probability to a work of adolescent literature that related to, was interesting to, and motivated…

  13. beat a dead horse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕浙

    2005-01-01

    beat a dead horse的字面意思为“鞭打死马”。“鞭打死马”有什么作用?毫无疑问,一点意义也没有。因此,该习语的意思相当于中文的“徒劳,白费力气,白费口舌”。如:

  14. Optimal ciliary beating patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilfan, Andrej; Osterman, Natan

    2011-11-01

    We introduce a measure for energetic efficiency of single or collective biological cilia. We define the efficiency of a single cilium as Q2 / P , where Q is the volume flow rate of the pumped fluid and P is the dissipated power. For ciliary arrays, we define it as (ρQ) 2 / (ρP) , with ρ denoting the surface density of cilia. We then numerically determine the optimal beating patterns according to this criterion. For a single cilium optimization leads to curly, somewhat counterintuitive patterns. But when looking at a densely ciliated surface, the optimal patterns become remarkably similar to what is observed in microorganisms like Paramecium. The optimal beating pattern then consists of a fast effective stroke and a slow sweeping recovery stroke. Metachronal waves lead to a significantly higher efficiency than synchronous beating. Efficiency also increases with an increasing density of cilia up to the point where crowding becomes a problem. We finally relate the pumping efficiency of cilia to the swimming efficiency of a spherical microorganism and show that the experimentally estimated efficiency of Paramecium is surprisingly close to the theoretically possible optimum.

  15. The Geographical and Biophysical Correlates of Hunger and Infant Mortality: Lessons from CIESIN's Poverty Mapping Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sherbinin, A. M.; Balk, D.; Chen, R. S.; Levy, M.; Storeygard, A.

    2004-12-01

    This paper reports on a collection of recent efforts to integrate global spatial datasets and survey microdata to investigate drivers of hunger and infant mortality. They were motivated by a desire on the part of the United Nations Millennium Project to understand the conditions under which the world's poor and hungry live, for the purpose of improving the diagnosing the causes of poverty and hunger, designing interventions, and understanding the interactions among different Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). First, at the global level, it reports on a number of explorations that were undertaken to characterize the large-scale distribution of the world's poor in terms of climatic, topographic, land cover, ecosystem, and hydrologic factors. Second, at the regional level, it reports on an analysis of the correlates of hunger in Africa. Third, it reports on work combining survey microdata with spatial data in a study of infant mortality in West Africa. Lastly, it discusses ongoing work to combine these two scales at the continental and global scale in the context of drivers of hunger.

  16. Beliefs about wife beating: an exploratory study with Lebanese students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Nadine; Chang, Doris F; Ginges, Jeremy

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in understanding the sociocultural contexts and risk factors for domestic violence in the Arab world. This study provides an analysis of the religious, legal, and familial contexts of domestic violence in Lebanon and assesses contemporary attitudes toward women and wife beating in a sample of 206 Lebanese university students. Gender, patriarchal attitudes, religion, childhood experiences with family violence, and mother's employment status were investigated as predictors of attitudes toward wife beating. Consistent with feminist theories of wife abuse, gender and attitudes toward women's roles emerged as the strongest predictors of beliefs about wife beating. PMID:20445079

  17. Beat wave development work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first phase of experiments on beat wave acceleration have been completed at UCLA. Here we examined the suitability of a theta pinch as a plasma source. The beatwave was excited to amplitudes providing GeV/m-scale accelerating fields. However, trapped magnetic fields within the theta-pinch plasma hindered the injection of test particles. Optical diagnostics were developed to measure the accelerating gradient-length product which was found to be around 3 MeV. Future plans are also discussed. copyright 1989 American Institute of Physics

  18. On hunger and child mortality in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiha, Raghav; Kulkarni, Vani S; Pandey, Manoj K; Imai, Katsushi S

    2012-01-01

    Despite accelerated growth there is pervasive hunger, child undernutrition and mortality in India. Our analysis focuses on their determinants. Raising living standards alone will not reduce hunger and undernutrition. Reduction of rural/urban disparities, income inequality, consumer price stabilization, and mothers’ literacy all have roles of varying importance in different nutrition indicators. Somewhat surprisingly, public distribution system (PDS) do not have a significant effect on any of them. Generally, child undernutrition and mortality rise with poverty. Our analysis confirms that media exposure triggers public action, and helps avert child undernutrition and mortality. Drastic reduction of economic inequality is in fact key to averting child mortality, conditional upon a drastic reordering of social and economic arrangements. PMID:22451985

  19. The Second International Conference on Nutrition: Implications for Hidden Hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    The Second International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2) was jointly organized by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) and was held at the FAO Headquarters in Rome, Italy, from 19 to 21 November 2014. The ICN2 was a high-level intergovernmental meeting that focused global attention on addressing malnutrition in all its forms: undernutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies, overweight, and obesity. The ICN2 was held to specifically address the persistent and unacceptably high levels of malnutrition. Despite much progress in reducing hunger globally, 795 million people remain undernourished, over 2 billion people suffer from various micronutrient deficiencies, and an estimated 161 million children under 5 years of age are stunted, 99 million underweight, and 51 million wasted. Meanwhile, more than 600 million adults are obese. Global problems require global solutions. The ICN2 brought together national policy-makers from food, agriculture, health, education, social protection and other relevant sectors to address the complex problem of malnutrition through a multi-sectoral approach. Two outcome documents - the Rome Declaration on Nutrition and the Framework for Action - were endorsed by participating governments at the Conference, committing world leaders to establishing national policies aimed at eradicating malnutrition in all its forms and transforming food systems to make nutritious diets available to all. The Rome Declaration on Nutrition is a political statement of 10 commitments for more effective and coordinated action to improve nutrition, while the Framework for Action is a voluntary technical guide of 60 recommendations for the implementation of the political commitments. This chapter provides information on the ICN2 and its outcomes as well as follow-up activities. Emphasis is placed on the Rome Declaration on Nutrition and the Framework for Action, with special focus on hidden

  20. HEALTHY AGRICULTURE (Agricultura saludable®) Agricultural conversion to alleviate hunger and poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, Myriam

    2010-01-01

    Healthy agriculture: Agricultural conversion to alleviate hunger and poverty, is a concept, a Program and a brand, that Corporación Biotec and a group of institutions, companies and associations of producers are developing in Colombia, promoting a new culture of social, environmental and market competitiveness, in the production of food, mainly tropical fruits productive chains. Some world wide challenges, ask for biomass as raw material for different sectors: food security, energy supply and...

  1. The Faces of Hunger: The Educational Impact of Hunger on Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, Tracy G.; Morgan, Joseph John; Matsuura, Miki

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between students' living in poverty and academic underachievement challenges schools across the nation. Poverty is particularly prevalent among children with disabilities. One detrimental condition of poverty that directly affects student development and academic achievement is food insecurity and hunger. With the increasing…

  2. Crisis, poverty and hunger. Food sovereignty as an alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HIDALGO MORATAL, Moisés

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyse the causes behind the recent food crises (2008, 2011 through the study of the evolution of neo-liberal globalisation and the current world crisis. We seek the causes of hunger in factors such as the growing inequalities in income and the evolution of prices in world agricultural markets. We also analyse certain methods for measuring under-nourishment, with the aim of selecting those that we consider most coherent in order to to achieve this end, by making a number of critical observations on the subject. In accordance with various widely proven theories, we hold that food crises occur as a consequence of structural lack of the right to access to food, and not as a result of a non existent food shortage. In this context, we examine the alternative possibilities currently offered by food sovereignty, a concept that originates in international social movements and which has been found in the daily life of various rural areas, and is, at the same time, consistent with several critical theories originating from the academic world

  3. "Hunger Games"Feminist Narrative Resolve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Hui

    2016-01-01

    "The Hunger Games"is a personal heroine to type"I"perspective to expand public narrative fiction. Female Charac-ters in"see"in establishing their dominant position, while the male marginalization, and construction of the female conscious-ness. Personal type disclosed in the narrative voice has justifiably authority, but the female narrator in the narrative process will encounter all kinds of repression, the author let people keep their own voice, using the first-person narrative voice group spokes-men style, interior monologue strategy digestion Men authority, breaking the traditional patriarchal narrative traditions under the order issued roundabout way hidden female voice, access to authoritative narrative.

  4. Tasting calories differentially affects brain activation during hunger and satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijn, Inge; de Graaf, Cees; Smeets, Paul A M

    2015-02-15

    An important function of eating is ingesting energy. Our objectives were to assess whether oral exposure to caloric and non-caloric stimuli elicits discriminable responses in the brain and to determine in how far these responses are modulated by hunger state and sweetness. Thirty women tasted three stimuli in two motivational states (hunger and satiety) while their brain responses were measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging in a randomized crossover design. Stimuli were solutions of sucralose (sweet, no energy), maltodextrin (non-sweet, energy) and sucralose+maltodextrin (sweet, energy). We found no main effect of energy content and no interaction between energy content and sweetness. However, there was an interaction between hunger state and energy content in the median cingulate (bilaterally), ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior insula and thalamus. This indicates that the anterior insula and thalamus, areas in which hunger state and taste of a stimulus are integrated, also integrate hunger state with caloric content of a taste stimulus. Furthermore, in the median cingulate and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, tasting energy resulted in more activation during satiety compared to hunger. This finding indicates that these areas, which are known to be involved in processes that require approach and avoidance, are also involved in guiding ingestive behavior. In conclusion, our results suggest that energy sensing is a hunger state dependent process, in which the median cingulate, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior insula and thalamus play a central role by integrating hunger state with stimulus relevance. PMID:25449847

  5. Wealth geography, environment and hunger: small critic contribution to the current agrarian/agricultural model of the natural resources usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Walter Porto Gonçalves

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The text questions the geopolitical issue implied in the argument about hunger and the environment. It criticizes the current agrarian / agricultural model of the natural resources usage, stating it is a model of economic development of mild regions that has been imposed all over the world at a very high ecological, cultural and political cost. This model has faced the patrimonial, collective and community knowledge, characteristic of populations with distinct rationality from the occidental atomistic-individualistic one, with severe risks to the feeding safety. It analyzes the social-environmental consequences of the current agrarian / agricultural model, the contradictory results of the increase of the world capacity of food production, hunger in the world, the meanings of the Green Revolution from the seventies on, the social-environmental impacts of the agrarian business in the Brazilian cerrado and the complexity of the use of transgenic products. It criticizes the restricted ecological sustentation based on a political realism, and proposes a reflection upon a new rationality for the environmental challenge. It concludes that hunger is not a technical problem, for it does not happen because of the lack of food, but because of the way the food is produced and distributed. Today hunger lives with the provisions necessary to overcome itself.

  6. Beat Subterranean: Tactics of Assemblage and Worldmaking in Beat Generation Writing

    OpenAIRE

    Fazzino, Jimmy Michael

    2012-01-01

    My dissertation argues that the core beat trope of the subterranean can be developed as a productive means of literary analysis. I show that beat writers conceive of themselves and their work as existing within vast "underground" networks of radical and avant-garde art and literature, and by locating the beats within such assemblages, the subterranean offers, above all, a model for reconceptualizing beat geography. While the Beat Generation has been regarded as quintessentially American, beat...

  7. Food price volatility and hunger alleviation – can Cannes work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajkowicz Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent years have seen global food prices rise and become more volatile. Price surges in 2008 and 2011 held devastating consequences for hundreds of millions of people and negatively impacted many more. Today one billion people are hungry. The issue is a high priority for many international agencies and national governments. At the Cannes Summit in November 2011, the G20 leaders agreed to implement five objectives aiming to mitigate food price volatility and protect vulnerable persons. To succeed, the global community must now translate these high level policy objectives into practical actions. In this paper, we describe challenges and unresolved dilemmas before the global community in implementing these five objectives. The paper describes recent food price volatility trends and an evaluation of possible causes. Special attention is given to climate change and water scarcity, which have the potential to impact food prices to a much greater extent in coming decades. We conclude the world needs an improved knowledge base and new analytical capabilities, developed in parallel with the implementation of practical policy actions, to manage food price volatility and reduce hunger and malnutrition. This requires major innovations and paradigm shifts by the global community.

  8. Changing perceptions of hunger on a high nutrient density diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaser Dale

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People overeat because their hunger directs them to consume more calories than they require. The purpose of this study was to analyze the changes in experience and perception of hunger before and after participants shifted from their previous usual diet to a high nutrient density diet. Methods This was a descriptive study conducted with 768 participants primarily living in the United States who had changed their dietary habits from a low micronutrient to a high micronutrient diet. Participants completed a survey rating various dimensions of hunger (physical symptoms, emotional symptoms, and location when on their previous usual diet versus the high micronutrient density diet. Statistical analysis was conducted using non-parametric tests. Results Highly significant differences were found between the two diets in relation to all physical and emotional symptoms as well as the location of hunger. Hunger was not an unpleasant experience while on the high nutrient density diet, was well tolerated and occurred with less frequency even when meals were skipped. Nearly 80% of respondents reported that their experience of hunger had changed since starting the high nutrient density diet, with 51% reporting a dramatic or complete change in their experience of hunger. Conclusions A high micronutrient density diet mitigates the unpleasant aspects of the experience of hunger even though it is lower in calories. Hunger is one of the major impediments to successful weight loss. Our findings suggest that it is not simply the caloric content, but more importantly, the micronutrient density of a diet that influences the experience of hunger. It appears that a high nutrient density diet, after an initial phase of adjustment during which a person experiences "toxic hunger" due to withdrawal from pro-inflammatory foods, can result in a sustainable eating pattern that leads to weight loss and improved health. A high nutrient density diet provides

  9. Doppler Beats or Interference Fringes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Paul S.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the following: another version of Doppler beats; alternate proof of spin-1 sin-1/2 problems; some mechanisms related to Dirac's strings; Doppler redshift in oblique approach of source and observer; undergraduate experiment on noise thermometry; use of the time evolution operator; resolution of an entropy maximization controversy;…

  10. By Any Beat Necessary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skøtt, Bo

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation examines sociocultural community identity processes. Initially, I have studied how cultural strategies of different eras – since the Ministry of Culture Affaires was established in 1961 – have endeavoured to include social move-ments in a national, monocultural concept of culture...... community handles the identity shifts originated by various cultural strategies. The way identity shifts are handled by members of a given sociocultural community is analyzed on the basis of a series of micro sociological processes in which activists, among others, become conscious of themselves and each...... in natural science which among other things is reflected in formation thinking, focus on engaged life processes and interest in the subjects’ world life, their practices as well as everyday routines. The thesis is not based on one, unified theory, but lets the activists’ narrative topics guide the choice...

  11. Musicians' Perception of Beat in Monotonic Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Assesses musicians' perceptions of beat in monotonic stimuli and attempts to define empirically the range of perceived beat tempo in music. Subjects performed a metric pulse in response to periodic stimulus tones. Results indicate a relatively narrow range within which beats are perceived by trained musicians. (LS)

  12. Electrical Brain Responses to Beat Irregularities in Two Cases of Beat Deafness

    OpenAIRE

    Mathias, Brian; Lidji, Pascale; Honing, Henkjan; Palmer, Caroline; Peretz, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Beat deafness, a recently documented form of congenital amusia, provides a unique window into functional specialization of neural circuitry for the processing of musical stimuli: Beat-deaf individuals exhibit deficits that are specific to the detection of a regular beat in music and the ability to move along with a beat. Studies on the neural underpinnings of beat processing in the general population suggest that the auditory system is capable of pre-attentively generating a predictive model ...

  13. Hyper-homeostatic learning of anticipatory hunger in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvandi, Soghra; Booth, David A; Thibault, Louise

    2007-11-23

    Anticipatory hunger is a learnt increase in intake of food having a flavour or texture that predicts a long fast. This learning was studied in rats trained on a single food or a choice between protein-rich and carbohydrate-rich foods, presented for 1.5 h after 3 h without maintenance food at the start of the dark phase. Eight training cycles provided a pseudo-random sequence of 3 h and 10 h post-prandial fasts with a day on maintenance food between each training fast. The measure of anticipatory hunger is the difference over one 4-day cycle between the intake of test food having an odour predictive of the longer fast (TL) and intake of food with an odour cuing to the shorter fast (TS). Previous experiments showed that conditioning of preference for the odour before the shorter fast competes with learning to avoid hunger during the longer fast (anticipatory hunger), generating a cubic or quartic contrast. TL minus TS showed a strong cubic trend over 8 training cycles with both single and choice meals. There was a switch from preference for the short-fast odour at cycle 2 (TL-TS=-0.86 g) to a peak of anticipatory hunger at cycle 6 (TL-TS=1.57 g). We conclude that anticipatory hunger is learnt when a choice is given between protein-rich and carbohydrate-rich foods as well as on a single food. In addition, since anticipatory hunger extinguishes itself, such learning improves on negative-feedback homeostasis with a feed-forward "hyper-homeostatic" mechanism. PMID:17540415

  14. World Food Day Curriculum, Grades K-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Janet

    Hunger and malnutrition lead to the deaths of 13-18 million people a year; 75 percent of these victims are children. World Food Day was created to focus attention on the world's food and farm problems and to encourage the world's people to become directly involved in the solution of these problems. It is sponsored jointly by the United Nations…

  15. Beating phantasies: Mourned and unmourned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antinucci, Giuseppina

    2016-06-01

    This paper intends to explore the organizing function and fate of sado-masochistic phantasies in their fixed form, in the psychic life of patients who have suffered early traumas, due to environmental vicissitudes and maternal psychopathology. The theoretical starting point is provided by the Novicks' research into transitory and permanent beating phantasies in adult and child patients, their onset and their psychic function, based on an examination of Freud's paper 'A child is being beaten'. In this text Freud achieves an unprecedented syncretism, locating the phantasy at the intersection between the oedipal complex, which is a vertical structure organizing sexual and generational differences, and the fraternal dimension, which is horizontal and organizes the lateral relationship with that similar but different other who is the sibling. Reporting in some detail material from the analyses of two young women, whose clinical presentation and early traumas show some similarities, the author puts in the context of the analytic work the emerging of the sado-masochistic phantasies, emphasizing their use and function in the transference-countertransference interplay. The beating phantasies shore up a precarious sense of self, threatened with psychic depletion and death, in identification with the absent mother of early infancy. An overly close relationship with a sibling, experienced as a narcissistic double, compounds the clinical picture, to establish the triangle formed by the parent(s) and two children which features in the beating phantasy. Finally, the author explores the contribution of ameliorating factors, such as alternative identificatory figures, constitutional endowment and capacity for sublimation, to account for the different fate of the fixed beating phantasies. PMID:26602362

  16. Abstract Possible: The Birmingham Beat

    OpenAIRE

    Bergman, Aeron; Salinas, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Gruppeutstilling. Samarbeidspartner: Alejandra Salinas. ABSTRACT YOUR SHIT IS Video loop and billboard. Eastside Projects, Birmingham UK Abstract Possible: The Birmingham Beat Curated by Maria Lind 6 October - 1 December 2012. Invited artists: José León Cerrillo, Zachary Formwalt, Goldin+Senneby, Wade Guyton, Yelena Popova, Alejandra Salinas and Aeron Bergman. Visningssted: Eastside Projects, Birmingham, UK. Se også: http://eastsideprojects.org/past/abstract-possible

  17. Plasma Beat-Wave Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Christopher E.

    2002-04-01

    Among all the advanced accelerator concepts that use lasers as the power source, most of the effort to date has been with the idea of using a laser pulse to excite a accelerating mode in a plasma. Within this area, there are a variety of approaches for creating the accelerating mode, as indicated by the other talks in this session. What is common to these approaches is the physics of how a laser pulse pushes on plasma electrons to organize electron-density perturbations, the sources of the ultra-high (> GeV/M) accelerating gradients. It is the "ponderomotive force", proportional to the local gradient of the of the laser intensity, that pushes plasma electrons forward (on the leading edge of the pulse) and backwards (on the trailing edge) which leads to harmonic motion of the electrons. As the laser pulse moves through the plasma at group velocity Vg c, the oscillating electrons show up macroscopically as a plasma mode or wave with frequency w equal to the plasma frequency and k = w/Vg. For short laser pulses, this is the Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) concept. Closely related is the Plasma Beat-Wave Acceleration (PBWA) concept. Here, the laser pulse that perturbs the plasma is composed of two closely-spaced frequencies that "beat", i.e., periodically constructively and destructively interfere, forming an electromagnetic beat wave. One can visualize this as a train of short pulses. If this beating frequency is set to the plasma frequency, then each pulse in the train will reinforce the density perturbation caused by the previous pulse. The principal advantage of multiple pulses driving up the plasma wave as opposed to a single pulse is in efficiency, allowing for the production of relatively large diameter (more 1-D like) accelerating modes. In this talk I will discuss past, current and planned PBWA experiments which are taking place at UCLA, RAL in England, and LULI in France.

  18. Quantum-beat Auger spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Song Bin

    2015-01-01

    The concept of nonlinear quantum-beat pump-probe Auger spectroscopy is introduced by discussing a relatively simple four-level model system. We consider a coherent wave packet involving two low-lying states that was prepared by an appropriate pump pulse. This wave packet is subsequently probed by a weak, time-delayed probe pulse with nearly resonant coupling to a core-excited state of the atomic or molecular system. The resonant Auger spectra are then studied as a function of the duration of the probe pulse and the time delay. With a bandwidth of the probe pulse approaching the energy spread of the wave packet, the Auger yields and spectra show quantum beats as a function of pump-probe delay. An analytic theory for the quantum-beat Auger spectroscopy will be presented, which allows for the reconstruction of the wave packet by analyzing the delaydependent Auger spectra. The possibility of extending this method to a more complex manifold of electronic and vibrational energy levels is also discussed.

  19. Losing the beat: deficits in temporal coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Caroline; Lidji, Pascale; Peretz, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Tapping or clapping to an auditory beat, an easy task for most individuals, reveals precise temporal synchronization with auditory patterns such as music, even in the presence of temporal fluctuations. Most models of beat-tracking rely on the theoretical concept of pulse: a perceived regular beat generated by an internal oscillation that forms the foundation of entrainment abilities. Although tapping to the beat is a natural sensorimotor activity for most individuals, not everyone can track an auditory beat. Recently, the case of Mathieu was documented (Phillips-Silver et al. 2011 Neuropsychologia 49, 961–969. (doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2011.02.002)). Mathieu presented himself as having difficulty following a beat and exhibited synchronization failures. We examined beat-tracking in normal control participants, Mathieu, and a second beat-deaf individual, who tapped with an auditory metronome in which unpredictable perturbations were introduced to disrupt entrainment. Both beat-deaf cases exhibited failures in error correction in response to the perturbation task while exhibiting normal spontaneous motor tempi (in the absence of an auditory stimulus), supporting a deficit specific to perception–action coupling. A damped harmonic oscillator model was applied to the temporal adaptation responses; the model's parameters of relaxation time and endogenous frequency accounted for differences between the beat-deaf cases as well as the control group individuals. PMID:25385783

  20. Losing the beat: deficits in temporal coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Caroline; Lidji, Pascale; Peretz, Isabelle

    2014-12-19

    Tapping or clapping to an auditory beat, an easy task for most individuals, reveals precise temporal synchronization with auditory patterns such as music, even in the presence of temporal fluctuations. Most models of beat-tracking rely on the theoretical concept of pulse: a perceived regular beat generated by an internal oscillation that forms the foundation of entrainment abilities. Although tapping to the beat is a natural sensorimotor activity for most individuals, not everyone can track an auditory beat. Recently, the case of Mathieu was documented (Phillips-Silver et al. 2011 Neuropsychologia 49, 961-969. (doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2011.02.002)). Mathieu presented himself as having difficulty following a beat and exhibited synchronization failures. We examined beat-tracking in normal control participants, Mathieu, and a second beat-deaf individual, who tapped with an auditory metronome in which unpredictable perturbations were introduced to disrupt entrainment. Both beat-deaf cases exhibited failures in error correction in response to the perturbation task while exhibiting normal spontaneous motor tempi (in the absence of an auditory stimulus), supporting a deficit specific to perception-action coupling. A damped harmonic oscillator model was applied to the temporal adaptation responses; the model's parameters of relaxation time and endogenous frequency accounted for differences between the beat-deaf cases as well as the control group individuals. PMID:25385783

  1. Synopses: Welthunger-Index 2015: Hunger und bewaffnete Konflikte

    OpenAIRE

    von Grebmer, Klaus; Bernstein, Jill; Prasai, Nilam; Yin, Sandra; Yohannes, Yisehac; Towey, Olive; Sonntag, Andrea; Neubauer, Larissa; de Waal, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Der Welthunger-Index (WHI) 2015 ist der zehnte in einer Reihe jährlicher Berichte, in denen die Hungersituation weltweit, nach Regionen und auf Länderebene mithilfe eines multidimensionalen Ansatzs dargestellt wird. Er zeigt, dass weltweit seit dem Jahr 2000 Fortschritte bei der Bekämpfung von Hunger erzielt wurden, dass aber angesichts noch immer „ernster“ oder „sehr ernster“ Hungerwerte in 52 Ländern nach wie vor viel zu tun bleibt. Das Thema des vorliegenden Berichts lautet „Hunger und bew...

  2. M. Paryz on Gavin Jones’s American Hungers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Gavin Jones. American Hungers. The Problem of Poverty in U.S. Literature, 1840-1945. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2008. 20/21 Series. ISBN: 978-0-691-12753-8.American Hungers. The Problem of Poverty in U.S. Literature, 1840-1945 by Gavin Jones is an insightful study of the ways of representing poverty in selected works by Herman Melville, Edith Wharton, Theodore Dreiser, James Agee, and Richard Wright.  The choice of authors for discussion perhaps suggests a limited scope...

  3. Real and metaphorical hunger: the case of The Divergent Trilogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Paravano

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The present contribution investigates how the issue of hunger becomes a means of expressing and communicating personal and social identity in Veronica Roth’s best seller trilogy Divergent (2011-13. Roth portrays a dystopian future developing a multifaceted concept of hunger, both real and figurative, and using food as a cultural metaphor. The trilogy is set in a post-apocalyptic Chicago, whose population is divided into five allegorical factions, according to a number of personal and social characteristics. The life of each faction seems to be based on a form of metaphorical hunger: those who pursue selflessness and altruism belong to Abnegation, peace and harmony to Amity, honesty and truth to Candor, danger and adventure to Dauntless, and knowledge and power to Erudite. Those people who are excluded become factionless: they are outcasts who live their life in extreme poverty and experience real physical hunger. On the other hand, I will show how the numerous references to food and eating pervading the novels help to map the characters’ personalities and identities as single individuals and as groups.

  4. Tasting calories differentially affects brain activation during hunger and satiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijn, van I.; Graaf, de C.; Smeets, P.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    An important function of eating is ingesting energy. Our objectives were to assess whether oral exposure to caloric and non-caloric stimuli elicits discriminable responses in the brain and to determine in how far these responses are modulated by hunger state and sweetness. Thirty women tasted three

  5. Hunger state affects both olfactory abilities and gustatory sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanci, Deniz; Altun, Huseyin

    2016-07-01

    Chemical senses such as odor, taste and appearance are directly related with appetite. Understanding the relation between appetite and flavor is getting more important due to increasing number of obese patients worldwide. The literature on the studies investigating the change in olfactory abilities and gustatory sensitivity mostly performed using food-related odors and tastes rather than standardized tests were developed to study olfaction and gustation. Therefore, results are inconsistent and the relationship between olfactory and gustatory sensitivity with respect to the actual state of human satiety is still not completely understood. Here, for the first time in literature, we investigated the change in both olfactory abilities and gustatory sensitivity in hunger and in satiety using 123 subjects (37 men, 86 women; mean age 31.4 years, age range 21-41 years). The standardized Sniffin' Sticks Extended Test and Taste Strips were used for olfactory testing and gustatory sensitivity, respectively. TDI score (range 1-48) was calculated as the collective scores of odor threshold (T), odor discrimination (D) and odor identification (I). The evaluation was performed in two successive days where the hunger state of test subjects was confirmed by blood glucose test strips (mean blood glucose level 90.0 ± 5.6 mg/dl in hunger and 131.4 ± 8.1 mg/dl in satiety). The results indicated statistically significant decrease in olfaction in satiety compared to hunger (mean TDI 39.3 ± 1.1 in hunger, 37.4 ± 1.1 in satiety, p < 0.001). The comparison of gustatory sensitivity indicated significantly higher sensitivity to sweet, sour and salty in hunger (p < 0.001), but significantly higher sensitivity to bitter tastant in satiety (p < 0.001). With this prospective study, we were able to show that both olfactory abilities and gustatory sensitivity were affected by hunger state. PMID:25744049

  6. Possible instabilities in the beat wave accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article the concept of the beat wave accelerator is studied with emphasis put on the plasma physics. An important effect is the relativistic nature of the electrons oscillating in the electric field of the beat wave. Various instabilities are presented which could limit the overall efficiency of the accelerating process. (author)

  7. 5 Ways to Beat Pre-performance Nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Who Cuts? 5 Ways to Beat Pre-performance Nerves KidsHealth > For Teens > 5 Ways to Beat Pre- ... nervios anticipatorios 5 Ways to Beat Pre-performance Nerves Lots of people stress out about talking in ...

  8. Elastic interactions synchronize beating in cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ohad; Safran, Samuel A

    2016-07-13

    Motivated by recent experimental results, we study theoretically the synchronization of the beating phase and frequency of two nearby cardiomyocyte cells. Each cell is represented as an oscillating force dipole in an infinite, viscoelastic medium and the propagation of the elastic signal within the medium is predicted. We examine the steady-state beating of two nearby cells, and show that elastic interactions result in forces that synchronize the phase and frequency of beating in a manner that depends on their mutual orientation. The theory predicts both in-phase and anti-phase steady-state beating depending on the relative cell orientations, as well as how synchronized beating varies with substrate elasticity and the inter-cell distance. These results suggest how mechanics plays a role in cardiac efficiency, and may be relevant for the design of cardiomyocyte based micro devices and other biomedical applications. PMID:27352146

  9. Hunger, U.S.A.: A Report by the Citizens' Board of Inquiry into Hunger and Malnutrition in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968

    The findings of the Citizen's Board of Inquiry are that: (1) hunger and malnutrition affect millions of Americans and are increasing in severity each year; (2) infant deaths, organic brain damage, retarded growth and learning rates, increased vulnerability to disease, withdrawal, apathy, alienation, frustration, and violence result from hunger and…

  10. Electrical Brain Responses to Beat Irregularities in Two Cases of Beat Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Brian; Lidji, Pascale; Honing, Henkjan; Palmer, Caroline; Peretz, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Beat deafness, a recently documented form of congenital amusia, provides a unique window into functional specialization of neural circuitry for the processing of musical stimuli: Beat-deaf individuals exhibit deficits that are specific to the detection of a regular beat in music and the ability to move along with a beat. Studies on the neural underpinnings of beat processing in the general population suggest that the auditory system is capable of pre-attentively generating a predictive model of upcoming sounds in a rhythmic pattern, subserved largely within auditory cortex and reflected in mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3 event-related potential (ERP) components. The current study examined these neural correlates of beat perception in two beat-deaf individuals, Mathieu and Marjorie, and a group of control participants under conditions in which auditory stimuli were either attended or ignored. Compared to control participants, Mathieu demonstrated reduced behavioral sensitivity to beat omissions in metrical patterns, and Marjorie showed a bias to identify irregular patterns as regular. ERP responses to beat omissions reveal an intact pre-attentive system for processing beat irregularities in cases of beat deafness, reflected in the MMN component, and provide partial support for abnormalities in later cognitive stages of beat processing, reflected in an unreliable P3b component exhibited by Mathieu-but not Marjorie-compared to control participants. P3 abnormalities observed in the current study resemble P3 abnormalities exhibited by individuals with pitch-based amusia, and are consistent with attention or auditory-motor coupling accounts of deficits in beat perception. PMID:26941591

  11. Electrical brain responses to beat irregularities in two cases of beat deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian eMathias

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Beat deafness, a recently documented form of congenital amusia, provides a unique window into functional specialization of neural circuitry for the processing of musical stimuli: Beat-deaf individuals exhibit deficits that are specific to the detection of a regular beat in music and the ability to move along with a beat. Studies on the neural underpinnings of beat processing in the general population suggest that the auditory system is capable of pre-attentively generating a predictive model of upcoming sounds in a rhythmic pattern, subserved largely within auditory cortex and reflected in mismatch negativity (MMN and P3 event-related potential (ERP components. The current study examined these neural correlates of beat perception in two beat-deaf individuals, Mathieu and Marjorie, and a group of control participants under conditions in which auditory stimuli were either attended or ignored. Compared to control participants, Mathieu demonstrated reduced behavioral sensitivity to beat omissions in metrical patterns, and Marjorie showed a bias to identify irregular patterns as regular. ERP responses to beat omissions reveal an intact pre-attentive system for processing beat irregularities in cases of beat deafness, reflected in the MMN component, and provide partial support for abnormalities in later cognitive stages of beat processing, reflected in an unreliable P3b component exhibited by Mathieu – but not Marjorie – compared to control participants. P3 abnormalities observed in the current study resemble P3 abnormalities exhibited by individuals with pitch-based amusia, and are consistent with attention or auditory-motor coupling accounts of deficits in beat perception.

  12. The Year of the Rat ends - time to fight hunger!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meerburg, Bastiaan G; Singleton, Grant R; Leirs, Herwig

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the importance of ecologically based rodent management in the light of the current food crisis, and the potential effects of this approach on the position of the undernourished. Hunger and food prices are on the rise owing to shortages that can be traced to reasons such as...... climatic extremes, use of crops for biofuels, reduced growth in yields which lag behind population growth, reduced world stocks and lack of sufficient investment in maintaining the irrigation infrastructure. For the undernourished this is problematic as they are most vulnerable to the rise in food prices....... Very often, agricultural experts focus on an increase in agricultural production to reduce food prices. It is postulated in this article that almost 280 million undernourished could additionally benefit if more attention were paid to reducing pre- and post-harvest losses by rodents. Moreover, rodent...

  13. Gender Performativity in The Handmaid's Tale and The Hunger Games

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkvik, Anette

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is about female characters and gender in two dystopian novels, The Handmaid’s Tale and the contemporary phenomenon The Hunger Games, and how they relate to each other and to men. The larger focus will be on individual freedom through gender performance through the references to the romance plot, thus emphasizing gender as a social construct. Further this work explores how the gender performance we see in both works emphasizes an exaggerated female gendered persona, but in complete...

  14. Predicting Hunger: The Effects of Appetite and Delay on Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read; van Leeuwen B

    1998-11-01

    Preferences often fluctuate as a result of transient changes in hunger and other visceral states. When current decisions have delayed consequences, the preferences that should be relevant are those that will prevail when the consequences occur. However, consistent with the notion of an intrapersonal empathy gap (Loewenstein, 1996) we find that an individual's current state of appetite has a significant effect on choices that apply to the future. Participants in our study made advance choices between healthy and unhealthy snacks (i.e., fruit and junk food) that they would receive in 1 week when they were either hungry (late in the afternoon) or satisfied (immediately after lunch). In 1 week, at the appointed time, they made an immediate choice, an opportunity to change their advance choice. Our main predictions were strongly confirmed. First, advance choices were influenced by current hunger as well as future hunger: hungry participants chose more unhealthy snacks than did satisfied ones. Second, participants were dynamically inconsistent: they chose far more unhealthy snacks for immediate choice than for advance choice. An additional hypothesis related to gender differences was also confirmed. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9831521

  15. On the beating of reinforcement pulp

    OpenAIRE

    Hiltunen, Eero

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to gain a better understanding of the effect of reinforcement pulp beating on the strength of mechanical pulp-dominated paper. The main purpose of reinforcement pulp beating is to improve the runnability of paper. The first objective of this study was to maximize the runnability related strength properties by beating. It was assumed that the flaw-resisting ability of paper correlates with the runnability of the dry paper web. In-plane fracture properties were assumed ...

  16. Energy hunger has not been satisfied

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This short article discusses the results of a study made by the Royal Dutch/Shell Group on the way world energy requirements could possibly develop in the future. Two scenarios presented by the study - 'Dynamics as usual' and 'The Spirit of the Coming Age' - are discussed. They tackle the questions of how long fossil energy reserves will last and which new energy resources will replace them. The role of natural gas as a way of bridging the gap between oil and renewables is discussed, as is global energy consumption, which is permanently increasing. According to Shell, renewable forms of energy are catching up, but, in the next twenty years, can only compete with oil, gas and coal when their costs are reduced or when new quality attributes are discovered or new applications are developed

  17. An Unwilling Partnership With the Great Society Part II: Physicians Discover Malnutrition, Hunger and the Politics of Hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deShazo, Richard D; Smith, Robert; Minor, Wilson F Bill; Skipworth, Leigh Baldwin

    2016-07-01

    The civil rights and social legislation of the Great Society following the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was slow to provide relief for black in the South. Mississippi Senator James Eastland led an effort to defund Head Start, including his state's program, Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM), a program with a strong medical component. A senatorial committee, including Robert Kennedy, came to investigate CDGM in 1967. The unimaginable poverty, hunger, malnutrition and chronic disease found in black families was vehemently denied by Eastland. Visits of physician groups then corroborated the findings. The Mississippi delegation made sure that food relief never came and funding for CDGM ceased. Health services were lost to 6000 impoverished children. The epic television documentary, Hunger in America, soon premiered on network television. It triggered ongoing efforts to address health disparities, including implementation of the National Nutrition and Health Survey (NHANES). Similar physician leadership is needed to address the lasting health disparities in our country. PMID:27432045

  18. Different Rebellions--The and the Angry Beat Generation Man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧国芳

    2012-01-01

    The Beat Generation (BG) and the Angry Man (AYM) both emerged after the Second World War. Thus, the misunderstanding of the two has existed for a long time. Large quantities of people called the BG the American Angry Young Man. Undoubtedly, the two resembled each other to some extent. However, the BG and the AYM can't be treated alike, for their differences far outweighed their similarities. This paper aims to analyze their differences in many aspects like the national environment and their memberships, which consequently led to other differences such as the differences in essences, features, influence and finale.

  19. High Blood Pressure: Keep the Beat Recipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Blood Pressure Keep the Beat Recipes Past Issues / Fall 2011 ... National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute To Improve Blood Pressure, Try the DASH Diet If you're one ...

  20. Visualizing acoustical beats with a smartphones

    CERN Document Server

    Giménez, Marcos H; Castro-Palacio, Juan C; Gómez-Tejedor, José A; Monsoriu, Juan A

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a new Physics laboratory experiment on Acoustics beats is presented. We have designed a simple experimental setup to study superposition of sound waves of slightly different frequencies (acoustic beat). The microphone of a smartphone is used to capture the sound waves emitted by two equidistant speakers from the mobile which are at the same time connected to two AC generators. The smartphone is used as a measuring instrument. By means of a simple and free AndroidTM application, the sound level (in dB) as a function of time is measured and exported to a .csv format file. Applying common graphing analysis and a fitting procedure, the frequency of the beat is obtained. The beat frequencies as obtained from the smartphone data are compared with the difference of the frequencies set at the AC generator. A very good agreement is obtained being the percentage discrepancies within 1 %.

  1. Beating Depression …Help Is Available

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Beating Depression …Help Is Available Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table ... treatments are available from your physician. Types of Depression Just like other illnesses, such as heart disease, ...

  2. Heart Beat Classification Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Khazaee

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel system to classify three types of electrocardiogram beats, namely normal beats and two manifestations of heart arrhythmia. This system includes three main modules: a feature extraction module, a classifier module, and an optimization module. In the feature extraction module, a proper set combining the shape features and timing features is proposed as the efficient characteristic of the patterns. In the classifier module, a multi-class support vector machine (SVM)-b...

  3. Analysis of spiritual pressure of the Beat Generation in On the Road

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘英波

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to make an analysis of the double spiritual pressure of the Beat Generation in On the Road. Through the analysis, it shows the readers an actual American society after the World War II, and spiritual pressures that American young people meet.

  4. The impact of binaural beats on creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan A. Reedijk

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Human creativity relies on a multitude of cognitive processes, some of which are influenced by the neurotransmitter dopamine. This suggests that creativity could be enhanced by interventions that either modulate the production or transmission of dopamine directly, or affect dopamine-driven processes. In the current study we hypothesized that creativity can be influenced by means of binaural beats, an auditory illusion that is considered a form of cognitive entrainment that operates through stimulating neuronal phase locking. We aimed to investigate whether binaural beats affect creative performance at all, whether they affect divergent thinking, convergent thinking, or both, and whether possible effects may be mediated by the individual striatal dopamine level. Binaural beats were presented at alpha and gamma frequency. Participants completed a divergent and a convergent thinking task to assess two important functions of creativity, and filled out the Positive And Negative Affect Scale – mood State questionnaire (PANAS-S and affect grid to measure current mood. Dopamine levels in the striatum were estimated using spontaneous eye blink rates (EBRs. Results showed that binaural beats, regardless of the presented frequency, can affect divergent but not convergent thinking. Individuals with low EBRs mostly benefitted from alpha binaural beat stimulation, while individuals with high EBR were unaffected or even impaired by both alpha and gamma binaural beats. This suggests that binaural beats, and possibly other forms of cognitive entrainment, are not suited for a one-size-fits-all approach, and that individual cognitive-control systems need to be taken into account when studying cognitive enhancement methods.

  5. Proarrhythmic electrical remodelling is associated with increased beat-to-beat variability of repolarisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Oros, Avram; Schoenmakers, Marieke; van Opstal, Jurren M; Maas, Joep N; Beekman, Jet D M; Vos, Marc A

    2007-01-01

    Acquired long-QT syndrome in combination with increased beat-to-beat variability of repolarisation duration (BVR) is associated with lethal torsades de pointes arrhythmias (TdP) in dogs with remodelled heart after atrioventricular block (AVB). We evaluated the relative contributions of bradycardi...

  6. LHC news November 30, 2009 - LHC beats world energy record!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions

    2009-01-01

    On Sunday Nov 29th 2009, the LHC operators managed to reach for the first time the record energy of 1.08 TeV with one beam. A few hours later, on Mon Nov. 30 at 00:44 they managed to circulate both beams at the record energy of 1.18 TeV for 45 minutes.

  7. Agricultural Growth, Rural Poverty and Hunger In Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Otieno, Zipora Awuor

    2008-01-01

    The long-term reduction of hunger and poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa remains one of the great challenges for the International development community. Poverty in Africa is predominately rural, majority of the poor people live in rural areas and are dependent on food production through farming or livestock keeping for most of their livelihood. It is estimated that over two hundred million people in Sub-Saharan Africa live in extreme poverty and among these are the rural poor in Eastern and South...

  8. Optical Beat-Wave Experiment on CTIX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Robert; Hwang, David; Liu, Fei; Zhu, Ben; Evans, Russell

    2009-11-01

    By launching intense electromagnetic waves at differing frequencies, a wave at the beat (difference) frequency can be created within a region of plasma. The beat wave is efficiently damped, and electron current generated, if the beat frequency is close to local plasma frequency, and if phase velocity is close to electron thermal velocity. Beat-wave acceleration of plasma electrons was previously demonstrated at low plasma density [1]. At the higher densities of the CTIX compact-toroid accelerator, plasma frequencies are such that CO2 lasers (f 30 THz) are a cost-effective driver. An experiment is being prepared to test beat-wave current drive using two TEA CO2 lasers on CTIX. The experiment will test models of wave mixing, quasilinear modification of the velocity distribution, and amplification of seed current by plasma kinetic effects. An application of the methods developed may be standoff current generation in a target plasma. Experimental issues to be addressed include: precisely-timed production of the compressed, target plasma; grating tuning of the CO2 lasers for frequency selection; high-peak-power, simultaneous operation of TEA lasers, design of optics; optical and plasma diagnostics. Initial results will be presented.[4pt] [1] Rogers, J. H. and Hwang, D. Q., Phys. Rev. Lett. v68 p3877 (1992).

  9. Alimentary Epigenetics: A Developmental Psychobiological Systems View of the Perception of Hunger, Thirst and Satiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshaw, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Hunger, thirst and satiety have an enormous influence on cognition, behavior and development, yet we often take for granted that they are simply inborn or innate. Converging data and theory from both comparative and human domains, however, supports the conclusion that the phenomena hunger, thirst and satiety are not innate but rather emerge…

  10. Social modeling effects on snack intake among young men: The role of hunger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, R.C.J.; Herman, C.P.; Larsen, J.K.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether young men adjusted their snack-food intake to that of a same-sex eating companion. Additionally, hunger was assessed as a possible moderating variable. A total of 59 young men (M age = 21.73) participated. An interaction between participants’ hunger and confederate's inta

  11. Acoustical sensing of cardiomyocyte cluster beating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •An example of the application of QCM-D to live cell studies. •Detection of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte cluster beating. •Clusters were studied in a thin liquid film and in a large liquid volume. •The QCM-D beating profile provides an individual fingerprint of the hPS-CMCs. -- Abstract: Spontaneously beating human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes clusters (CMCs) represent an excellent in vitro tool for studies of human cardiomyocyte function and for pharmacological cardiac safety assessment. Such testing typically requires highly trained operators, precision plating, or large cell quantities, and there is a demand for real-time, label-free monitoring of small cell quantities, especially rare cells and tissue-like structures. Array formats based on sensing of electrical or optical properties of cells are being developed and in use by the pharmaceutical industry. A potential alternative to these techniques is represented by the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) technique, which is an acoustic surface sensitive technique that measures changes in mass and viscoelastic properties close to the sensor surface (from nm to μm). There is an increasing number of studies where QCM-D has successfully been applied to monitor properties of cells and cellular processes. In the present study, we show that spontaneous beating of CMCs on QCM-D sensors can be clearly detected, both in the frequency and the dissipation signals. Beating rates in the range of 66–168 bpm for CMCs were detected and confirmed by simultaneous light microscopy. The QCM-D beating profile was found to provide individual fingerprints of the hPS-CMCs. The presented results point towards acoustical assays for evaluation cardiotoxicity

  12. Beat Noise Limitation in Coherent Time-Spreading OCDMA Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ken-ichi; Kitayama; Koji; Mutsushima

    2003-01-01

    The BER performance of the coherent time-spreading OCDMA network is analyzed by considering the MAI and beat noises as well as the other additive noises. The influence and solution for the beat noise issue are discussed.

  13. Heat Beats Cold for Treating Jellyfish Stings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158584.html Heat Beats Cold for Treating Jellyfish Stings Evidence favors hot water or hot packs to ease pain ... 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- If you're unlucky enough to suffer a jellyfish sting, new research says that heat is better than cold for easing the pain. ...

  14. THz radiation by beating Langmuir waves

    CERN Document Server

    Son, S; Park, J Y

    2013-01-01

    An intense terahertz (THz) radiation generated by the beating of two Langmuir waves, which are excited by the forward Raman scattering, is analyzed theoretically. The radiation energy per shot can be as high as 0.1 J, with the duration of 10 pico-second. Appropriate plasma density and the laser characteristics are examined.

  15. Quantum beats of the rigid rotor

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalski, K.; Rembieliński, J.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics is investigated of a free particle on a sphere (rigid rotor or rotator) that is initially in a coherent state. The instability of coherent states with respect to the free evolution leads to nontrivial time-development of averages of observables representing the position of a particle on a sphere that can be interpreted as quantum beats.

  16. Mechanical communication in cardiac cell synchronized beating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsan, Ido; Drori, Stavit; Lewis, Yair E.; Cohen, Shlomi; Tzlil, Shelly

    2016-05-01

    Cell-cell communication, which enables cells to coordinate their activity and is essential for growth, development and function, is usually ascribed a chemical or electrical origin. However, cells can exert forces and respond to environment elasticity and to mechanical deformations created by their neighbours. The extent to which this mechanosensing ability facilitates intercellular communication remains unclear. Here we demonstrate mechanical communication between cells directly for the first time, providing evidence for a long-range interaction that induces long-lasting alterations in interacting cells. We show that an isolated cardiac cell can be trained to beat at a given frequency by mechanically stimulating the underlying substrate. Deformations are induced using an oscillatory mechanical probe that mimics the deformations generated by a beating neighbouring cardiac cell. Unlike electrical field stimulation, the probe-induced beating rate is maintained by the cell for an hour after the stimulation stops, implying that long-term modifications occur within the cell. These long-term alterations provide a mechanism for cells that communicate mechanically to be less variable in their electromechanical delay. Mechanical coupling between cells therefore ensures that the final outcome of action potential pacing is synchronized beating. We further show that the contractile machinery is essential for mechanical communication.

  17. Beat gestures modulate auditory integration in speech perception

    OpenAIRE

    Biau, Emmanuel; Soto-Faraco, Salvador, 1970-

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous beat gestures are an integral part of the paralinguistic context during face-to-face conversations. Here we investigated the time course of beat-speech integration in speech perception by measuring ERPs evoked by words pronounced with or without an accompanying beat gesture, while participants watched a spoken discourse. Words accompanied by beats elicited a positive shift in ERPs at an early sensory stage (before 100 ms) and at a later time window coinciding with the auditory com...

  18. Death House Desiderata: A Hunger for Justice, Unsated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Johnson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The death penalty lives on in America, with some 1350 prisoners put to death since 1976, when the modern American death penalty was reborn. Most prisoners get a last meal of their choice, though that choice is constrained by cost and, often, the stock in the prison kitchen. Last meals can be thought of as brief moments of autonomy in a relentlessly dehumanizing execution process. They also entail a distinctive cruelty. At their lowest point, prisoners seek comfort food but are never comforted. This meal is no entre to a relationship, but instead a recipe for abandonment. Dignity is nowhere to be found on the death house menu. Yet hope lingers, even here; human beings, it seems, cannot live or die without hope. Justice, the most profound human hunger, goes unsated by design.

  19. Cardiac beat-to-beat alternations driven by unusual spiral waves

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Tae Yun; Woo, Sung-Jae; Hwang, Seong-min; Hong, Jin Hee; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2007-01-01

    Alternans, a beat-to-beat temporal alternation in the sequence of heartbeats, is a known precursor of the development of cardiac fibrillation, leading to sudden cardiac death. The equally important precursor of cardiac arrhythmias is the rotating spiral wave of electro-mechanical activity, or reentry, on the heart tissue. Here, we show that these two seemingly different phenomena can have a remarkable relationship. In well controlled in vitro tissue cultures, isotropic populations of rat vent...

  20. Left ventricular beat to beat performance in atrial fibrillation: dependence on contractility, preload, and afterload

    OpenAIRE

    Muntinga, H; Gosselink, A; Blanksma, P; De Kam, P J; van der Wall, E; Crijns, H.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess independent determinants of beat to beat variation in left ventricular performance during atrial fibrillation.
DESIGN—Prospective study.
SETTING—University hospital.
PATIENTS—Seven patients with chronic non-valvar atrial fibrillation.
INTERVENTIONS—Invasive and non-invasive haemodynamic variables were assessed using a non-imaging computerised nuclear probe, a balloon tipped flow directed catheter, and a non-invasive fingertip blood pressure measurement system linked to a p...

  1. Beat Gestures Modulate Auditory Integration in Speech Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biau, Emmanuel; Soto-Faraco, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous beat gestures are an integral part of the paralinguistic context during face-to-face conversations. Here we investigated the time course of beat-speech integration in speech perception by measuring ERPs evoked by words pronounced with or without an accompanying beat gesture, while participants watched a spoken discourse. Words…

  2. Finger beat-to-beat blood pressure responses to successive hand elevations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raamat, R; Jagomägi, K; Talts, J; Mäger, I

    2009-06-01

    We investigated finger beat-to-beat blood pressure responses to a series of successive hand elevations in 14 normal volunteers. By passive elevation of the hand by 40 cm and lowering it again after a minute, calibrated hydrostatic pressure changes were induced in the finger arteries of the subjects. Three successive procedures with a 2-min interval between them were performed. Transitions between positions were completed smoothly over a 10-s period. Non-invasive beat-to-beat mean arterial pressure (MAP) in the finger arteries was measured by applying the servo-oscillometric physiograph (University of Tartu, Estonia). A good agreement between the evoked MAP changes during all the three hand elevations (-31.2, -30.4 and -30.0 mmHg, respectively) and the calculated hydrostatic pressure change (-31.0 mmHg) was obtained. The height difference of approximately 40 cm and rate of 4-5 cm/s can be recommended for the hand elevation test, greater postural changes and higher rates may diminish agreement between the measured blood pressure response and the corresponding hydrostatic pressure change. The applied hydrostatic test may be helpful for assessing the accuracy of beat-to-beat finger blood pressure measurement. PMID:19027338

  3. Detrended fluctuation analysis of non-stationary cardiac beat-to-beat interval of sick infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindan, Rathinaswamy B.; Massaro, An N.; Al-Shargabi, Tareq; Niforatos Andescavage, Nickie; Chang, Taeun; Glass, Penny; du Plessis, Adre J.

    2014-11-01

    We performed detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) of cardiac beat-to-beat intervals (RRis) collected from sick newborn infants over 1-4 day periods. We calculated four different metrics from the DFA fluctuation function: the DFA exponents αL (>40 beats up to one-fourth of the record length), αs (15-30 beats), root-mean-square (RMS) fluctuation on a short-time scale (20-50 beats), and RMS fluctuation on a long-time scale (110-150 beats). Except αL , all metrics clearly distinguished two groups of newborn infants (favourable vs. adverse) with well-characterized outcomes. However, the RMS fluctuations distinguished the two groups more consistently over time compared to αS . Furthermore, RMS distinguished the RRi of the two groups earlier compared to the DFA exponent. In all the three measures, the favourable outcome group displayed higher values, indicating a higher magnitude of (auto-)correlation and variability, thus normal physiology, compared to the adverse outcome group.

  4. Beat that Word: How Listeners Integrate Beat Gesture and Focus in Multimodal Speech Discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Diana; Chu, Mingyuan; Wang, Lin; Özyürek, Asli; Hagoort, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Communication is facilitated when listeners allocate their attention to important information (focus) in the message, a process called "information structure." Linguistic cues like the preceding context and pitch accent help listeners to identify focused information. In multimodal communication, relevant information can be emphasized by nonverbal cues like beat gestures, which represent rhythmic nonmeaningful hand movements. Recent studies have found that linguistic and nonverbal attention cues are integrated independently in single sentences. However, it is possible that these two cues interact when information is embedded in context, because context allows listeners to predict what information is important. In an ERP study, we tested this hypothesis and asked listeners to view videos capturing a dialogue. In the critical sentence, focused and nonfocused words were accompanied by beat gestures, grooming hand movements, or no gestures. ERP results showed that focused words are processed more attentively than nonfocused words as reflected in an N1 and P300 component. Hand movements also captured attention and elicited a P300 component. Importantly, beat gesture and focus interacted in a late time window of 600-900 msec relative to target word onset, giving rise to a late positivity when nonfocused words were accompanied by beat gestures. Our results show that listeners integrate beat gesture with the focus of the message and that integration costs arise when beat gesture falls on nonfocused information. This suggests that beat gestures fulfill a unique focusing function in multimodal discourse processing and that they have to be integrated with the information structure of the message. PMID:27027421

  5. Modeling of Nonlinear Beat Signals of TAE's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Berk, Herbert; Breizman, Boris; Zheng, Linjin

    2012-03-01

    Experiments on Alcator C-Mod reveal Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) together with signals at various beat frequencies, including those at twice the mode frequency. The beat frequencies are sidebands driven by quadratic nonlinear terms in the MHD equations. These nonlinear sidebands have not yet been quantified by any existing codes. We extend the AEGIS code to capture nonlinear effects by treating the nonlinear terms as a driving source in the linear MHD solver. Our goal is to compute the spatial structure of the sidebands for realistic geometry and q-profile, which can be directly compared with experiment in order to interpret the phase contrast imaging diagnostic measurements and to enable the quantitative determination of the Alfven wave amplitude in the plasma core

  6. Heart Beat Classification Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Khazaee

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel system to classify three types of electrocardiogram beats, namely normal beats and two manifestations of heart arrhythmia. This system includes three main modules: a feature extraction module, a classifier module, and an optimization module. In the feature extraction module, a proper set combining the shape features and timing features is proposed as the efficient characteristic of the patterns. In the classifier module, a multi-class support vector machine (SVM-based classifier is proposed. For the optimization module, a particle swarm optimization algorithm is proposed to search for the best value of the SVM parameters and upstream by looking for the best subset of features that feed the classifier. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm has very high recognition accuracy. This high efficiency is achieved with only little features, which have been selected using particle swarm optimizer.

  7. Scenarios for the risk of hunger in the twenty-first century using Shared Socioeconomic Pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shared socioeconomic pathways (SSPs) are being developed internationally for cross-sectoral assessments of climate change impacts, adaptation, and mitigation. These are five scenarios that include both qualitative and quantitative information for mitigation and adaptation challenges to climate change. In this study, we quantified scenarios for the risk of hunger in the 21st century using SSPs, and clarified elements that influence future hunger risk. There were two primary findings: (1) risk of hunger in the 21st-century greatly differed among five SSPs; and (2) population growth, improvement in the equality of food distribution within a country, and increases in food consumption mainly driven by income growth greatly influenced future hunger risk and were important elements in its long-term assessment. (letter)

  8. The relation of hedonic hunger and restrained eating to lateralized frontal activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, S R; Feig, E H; Kounios, J; Erickson, B; Berkowitz, S; Lowe, M R

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetrical alpha activation in the prefrontal cortex (frontal asymmetry) in electroencephalography (EEG) has been related to eating behavior. Prior studies linked dietary restraint with right frontal asymmetry [1] and disinhibition with left frontal asymmetry [2]. The current study simultaneously assessed restrained eating and hedonic hunger (drive for food reward in the absence of hunger) in relation to frontal asymmetry. Resting-state EEG and measures of restrained eating (Revised Restraint Scale; RRS) and hedonic hunger (Power of Food Scale; PFS) were assessed in 61 non-obese adults. Individually, hedonic hunger predicted left asymmetry. However, PFS and RRS were correlated (r=0.48, pmotivation both to consume and to avoid consuming highly palatable foods. PMID:27133731

  9. Local Food, Global Hunger three-day event to be held at Virginia Tech

    OpenAIRE

    Brunais, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    For three days, community members can join with students, faculty, and staff on and off Virginia Tech's campus to explore issues ranging from sustainable local agriculture to short- and long-term ideas to address global hunger.

  10. Narratives of Food Insecurity in Tippecanoe County, Indiana: Economic Constraints in Local Meanings of Hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Mohan Jyoti; Hingson, LaReina; Anaele, Agaptus; Sen, Soumitro; Jones, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    Food insecurity and its most extreme form, hunger, have increased exponentially in the United States since 2006. This essay seeks to contribute to our understanding of hunger by attending to the context of the financial crisis as an organizing frame for understanding local meanings of hunger. Within a broader framework of the culture-centered approach (CCA) that works to identify and develop locally rooted solutions to food insecurity, we describe through locally grounded stories of food insecurity the financial climate where large percentages of U.S. households have been cast into poverty because of the crash of an unregulated economy. These local understandings of hunger in the context of the economy offer entry points for organizing a food-insecure coalition that seeks to address the stigma around food insecurity. PMID:26512625

  11. Robotic Catheters for Beating Heart Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kesner, Samuel Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Compliant and flexible cardiac catheters provide direct access to the inside of the heart via the vascular system without requiring clinicians to stop the heart or open the chest. However, the fast motion of the intracardiac structures makes it difficult to modify and repair the cardiac tissue in a controlled and safe manner. In addition, rigid robotic tools for beating heart surgery require the chest to be opened and the heart exposed, making the procedures highly invasive. The novel robot...

  12. Newborn infants detect the beat in music

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler, I.; Háden, G.P.; Ladinig, O.; Sziller, I.; Honing, H.

    2009-01-01

    To shed light on how humans can learn to understand music, we need to discover what the perceptual capabilities with which infants are born. Beat induction, the detection of a regular pulse in an auditory signal, is considered a fundamental human trait that, arguably, played a decisive role in the origin of music. Theorists are divided on the issue whether this ability is innate or learned. We show that newborn infants develop expectation for the onset of rhythmic cycles (the downbeat), even ...

  13. Wanting a bit(e) of everything. The role of hunger in variety seeking.

    OpenAIRE

    Goukens, Caroline; Dewitte, Siegfried; Pandelaere, Mario; Warlop, Luk

    2005-01-01

    We examined whether consumers seek more or less variety when shopping on an empty stomach. The data show that hunger increases variety seeking when consumers make multiple food choices at once. In a first study, participants in the hungry condition selected a more varied flavor set than satiated participants. Food attractiveness mediated the hunger effect. In study 2, we manipulated food attractiveness by the presence of stale food. In study 3, we increased variety seeking by introducing an a...

  14. Addressing Child Hunger and Obesity in Indian Country: Report to Congress.

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Gordon; Vanessa Oddo

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes current statistics on hunger, obesity, and type II diabetes among children living in Indian Country, American Indian reservations, and other tribal lands. It offers comparable statistics for the general population. It also describes how the U.S. Department of Agriculture's nutrition programs serve children in Indian Country and how provisions of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 and other recent initiatives might improve these services.

  15. Paradox and Alienation in Kafka’s short story—A Hunger Artist

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄雅芬; 熊美玲

    2014-01-01

    A Hunger Artist, one of Franz Kafka’s favorite works, arouses critics’ great attention.Paradox permeates the entire story and is vividly displayed in it.Alienation is the major theme of the story.On the other hand, the short story traces out a tragedy of the hunger artist’s struggle, which is also an actual portraiture of author’s life.

  16. Greater hunger and less restraint predict weight loss success with phentermine treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Elizabeth A.; McNair, Bryan; Bechtell, Jamie L.; Ferland, Annie; Cornier, Marc-Andre; Eckel, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Phentermine is thought to cause weight loss through a reduction in hunger. We hypothesized that higher hunger ratings would predict greater weight loss with phentermine. Design and Methods This is an observational pilot study in which all subjects were treated with phentermine for 8 weeks and appetite and eating behaviors were measured at baseline and week 8. Outcomes were compared in subjects with ≥5% vs

  17. Addressing Child Hunger and Obesity in Indian Country: Report to Congress

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes current statistics on hunger, obesity, and type II diabetes among children living in Indian Country, American Indian reservations, and other tribal lands. It offers comparable statistics for the general population. It also describes how the U.S. Department of Agriculture's nutrition programs serve children in Indian Country and how provisions of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 and other recent initiatives might improve these services.

  18. Beat-to-beat left ventricular performance in atrial fibrillation: radionuclide assessment with the computerized nuclear probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is wide beat-to-beat variability in cycle length and left ventricular performance in patients with atrial fibrillation. In this study, left ventricular ejection fraction and relative left ventricular volumes were evaluated on a beat-to-beat basis with the computerized nuclear probe, an instrument with sufficiently high sensitivity to allow continuous evaluation of the radionuclide time-activity curve. Of 18 patients with atrial fibrillation, 5 had mitral stenosis, 6 had mitral regurgitation, and 7 had coronary artery disease. Fifty consecutive beats were analyzed in each patient. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction ranged from 17 to 51%. There was substantial beat-to-beat variation in cycle length and left ventricular ejection fraction in all patients, including those with marked left ventricular dysfunction. In 14 patients who also underwent multiple gated cardiac blood pool imaging, there was an excellent correlation between mean ejection fraction derived from the nuclear probe and gated ejection fraction obtained by gamma camera imaging (r . 0.90). Based on beat-to-beat analysis, left ventricular function was dependent on relative end-diastolic volume and multiple preceding cycle lengths, but not preceding end-systolic volumes. This study demonstrates that a single value for left ventricular ejection fraction does not adequately characterize left ventricular function in patients with atrial fibrillation. Furthermore, both the mean beat-to-beat and the gated ejection fraction may underestimate left ventricular performance at rest in such patients

  19. The Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT): a battery for assessing beat perception and production and their dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Shinya; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2013-01-01

    Humans have the abilities to perceive, produce, and synchronize with a musical beat, yet there are widespread individual differences. To investigate these abilities and to determine if a dissociation between beat perception and production exists, we developed the Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT), a new battery that assesses beat perception and production abilities. H-BAT consists of four subtests: (1) music tapping test (MTT), (2) beat saliency test (BST), (3) beat interval test (BIT), and (4) beat finding and interval test (BFIT). MTT measures the degree of tapping synchronization with the beat of music, whereas BST, BIT, and BFIT measure perception and production thresholds via psychophysical adaptive stair-case methods. We administered the H-BAT on thirty individuals and investigated the performance distribution across these individuals in each subtest. There was a wide distribution in individual abilities to tap in synchrony with the beat of music during the MTT. The degree of synchronization consistency was negatively correlated with thresholds in the BST, BIT, and BFIT: a lower degree of synchronization was associated with higher perception and production thresholds. H-BAT can be a useful tool in determining an individual's ability to perceive and produce a beat within a single session. PMID:24324421

  20. The Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT: A Battery for Assessing Beat Perception and Production and their Dissociation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottfried Schlaug

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Humans have the abilities to perceive, produce, and synchronize with a musical beat, yet there are widespread individual differences. To investigate these abilities and to determine if a dissociation between beat perception and production exists, we developed the Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT, a new battery that assesses beat perception and production abilities. H-BAT consists of four subtests: 1 music tapping test (MTT, 2 beat saliency test (BST, 3 beat interval test (BIT, and 4 beat finding and interval test (BFIT. MTT measures the degree of tapping synchronization with the beat of music, whereas BST, BIT, and BFIT measure perception and production thresholds via psychophysical adaptive stair-case methods. We administered the H-BAT on thirty individuals and investigated the performance distribution across these individuals in each subtest. There was a wide distribution in individual abilities to tap in synchrony with the beat of music during the MTT. The degree of synchronization consistency was negatively correlated with thresholds in the BST, BIT, and BFIT: a lower degree of synchronization was associated with higher perception and production thresholds. H-BAT can be a useful tool in determining an individual’s ability to perceive and produce a beat within a single session.

  1. Attosecond Quantum-Beat Spectroscopy in Helium

    CERN Document Server

    Shivaram, Niranjan; Timmers, Henry; Sandhu, Arvinder

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of electron wavepackets determines the course of many physical and chemical phenomena and attosecond spectroscopy aims to measure and control such dynamics in real-time. Here, we investigate radial electron wavepacket motion in Helium by using an XUV attosecond pulse train to prepare a coherent superposition of excited states and a delayed femtosecond IR pulse to ionize them. Quantum beat signals observed in the high resolution photoelectron spectrogram allow us to follow the field-free evolution of the bound electron wavepacket and determine the time-dependent ionization dynamics of the low-lying 2p state.

  2. Beats on the Table: Beat Writing in the Chicago Review and Big Table

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaap van der Bent

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false NL X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Kleine literaire tijdschriften, zogenaamde little magazines, hebben een belangrijke rol gespeeld bij de doorbraak, in de loop van de jaren vijftig, van de Amerikaanse Beat Generation. Aangezien grotere uitgeverijen en de gevestigde tijdschriften lange tijd terugschrokken voor de zowel inhoudelijk als formeel van de norm afwijkende uitingen van de Beats, verscheen hun werk aanvankelijk vooral in kleinere tijdschriften als de twee waaraan in dit artikel aandacht wordt besteed: de Chicago Review en Big Table. Aan de hand van een beschrijving van de inhoud van deze twee tijdschriften wordt geprobeerd duidelijk te maken hoe het werk van de Beat Generation zich in deze tijdschriften gaandeweg een eigen plaats verwierf. Speciale aandacht wordt besteed aan de rol van de redacteuren Irving Rosenthal en Paul Carroll; door zijn uitgekiende strategie om voor het omstreden werk van Beat-auteur William S. Burroughs geleidelijk een steeds grotere plaats in te ruimen, bepaalde vooral Rosenthal het veranderende karakter van de Chicago Review. De veranderingen bij dat tijdschrift verliepen niet zonder slag of stoot en waren voor de eigenaar ervan, de University of Chicago, op een gegeven moment aanleiding om de Chicago Review aan censuur te onderwerpen. Ook deze censuur en de reactie erop, de oprichting van Big Table, worden in het artikel belicht.

  3. Our Divided World: Poverty, Hunger & Overpopulation. Our Only Earth Series. A Curriculum for Global Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKisson, Micki; MacRae-Campbell, Linda

    Both humanity and nature have suffered greatly from human insensitivity. Not only are the natural resources of the earth being depleted and its air, land and water polluted, the financial resources of humanity are being wasted on destructive expenditures. The "Our Only Earth" series is an integrated science, language arts, and social studies…

  4. Stark quantum beat spectroscopy of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We derive analytical expressions for Stark quantum beat signals of polyatomic molecules and discuss them with regard to molecular and geometrical parameters. The general treatment is specified for near prolate asymmetric rotor molecules and a method for determining rotational constants and all components of the dipole moment of electronically excited polyatomic molecules is presented. The method is tested and illustrated for the vibrationless S1 state of deuterated propynal (HCtriple bondCCDO, Cs symmetry) and its lowest frequency non-totally symmetric state 121. The results of the vibrationless state are compared with structural data reported in the literature. For the 121 state we obtain A=1.5004(43) cm-1, B=0.16131(34) cm-1, C=0.14623(34) cm-1, and the components of the electric dipole moment in the molecular plane μa=-0.88(2) D, μb=1.03(2) D. Furthermore, it is shown that the modulation depth of Stark quantum beat signals can be utilized to quantify the contribution of the individual components of the transition moment to the total emission. (orig.)

  5. The chemical composition of Galactic beat Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtyukh, V.; Lemasle, B.; Chekhonadskikh, F.; Bono, G.; Matsunaga, N.; Yushchenko, A.; Anderson, R. I.; Belik, S.; da Silva, R.; Inno, L.

    2016-08-01

    We determine the metallicity and detailed chemical abundances (α, iron-peak and neutron-capture elements) for the almost complete (18/24) sample of Galactic double mode Cepheids (also called beat Cepheids). Double mode Cepheids are Cepheids that pulsate in two modes simultaneously. We calibrate a new relation between their metallicity and their period ratio P1/P0. This linear relation allows to determine the metallicity of bimodal Cepheids with an accuracy of 0.03 dex in the range of [Fe/H] from +0.2 to -0.5 dex. By extrapolating the relation to Magellanic Clouds beat Cepheids, we provide their metallicity distribution function. Moreover, by using this relation, we also provide the first metallicity estimate for two double-mode F/1O Cepheids located in and beyond the Galactic bulge. Finally, we report the discovery of a super-Lithium rich double mode Cepheid V371 Per which has a Lithium abundance of logA(Li) = 3.54 ± 0.09 dex. Along with V1033 Cyg (which is an ordinary classical Cepheid), it is the second known Cepheid of such type in the Galaxy.

  6. Time-domain analysis of beat-to-beat variability of repolarization morphology in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burattini, L; Zareba, W

    1999-01-01

    There is growing evidence that beat-to-beat changes in ventricular repolarization contribute to increased vulnerability to ventricular arrhythmias. Beat-to-beat repolarization variability is usually measured in the electrocardiogram (ECG) by tracking consecutive QT or RT intervals. However, these measurements strongly depend on the accurate identification of T-wave endpoints, and they do not reflect changes in repolarization morphology. In this article, we propose a new computerized time-domain method to measure beat-to-beat variability of repolarization morphology without the need to identify T-wave endpoints. The repolarization correlation index (RCI) is computed for each beat to determine the difference between the morphology of repolarization within a heart-rate dependent repolarization window compared to a template (median) repolarization morphology. The repolarization variability index (RVI) describes the mean value of repolarization correlation in a studied ECG recording. To validate our method, we analyzed repolarization variability in 128-beat segments from Holter ECG recordings of 42 ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) patients compared to 36 healthy subjects. The ICM patients had significantly higher values of RVI than healthy subjects (in lead X: 0.045 +/- 0.035 vs. 0.024 +/- 0.010, respectively; P 0.044). No significant correlation was found between the RVI values and the magnitude of heart rate, heart rate variability, QTc interval duration, or ejection fraction in studied ICM patients. In conclusion, our time-domain method, based on computation of repolarization correlation indices for consecutive beats, provides a new approach to quantify beat-to-beat variability of repolarization morphology without the need to identify T-wave endpoints. PMID:10688321

  7. Communicating hunger and satiation in the first 2 years of life: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Janet; Hugh-Jones, Siobhan; Caton, Samantha; Vereijken, Carel; Weenen, Hugo; Hetherington, Marion

    2016-04-01

    Responsive feeding has been identified as important in preventing overconsumption by infants. However, this is predicated on an assumption that parents recognise and respond to infant feeding cues. Despite this, relatively little is understood about how infants engage parental feeding responses. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review was to identify what is known about infant communication of hunger and satiation and what issues impact on the expression and perception of these states. A search of Medline, CINAHL, Web of Science, PsycINFO, Science Direct and Maternal and Infant care produced 27 papers. Eligibility criteria included peer reviewed qualitative and/or quantitative publications on feeding behaviours, hunger, and satiation/satiety cues of typically developing children in the first 2 years of life. Papers published between 1966 and 2013 were included in the review. The review revealed that feeding cues and behaviours are shaped by numerous issues, such as infants' physical attributes, individual psychological factors and environmental factors. Meanwhile, infant characteristics, external cues and mothers' own characteristics affect how feeding cues are perceived. The existing literature provides insights into many aspects of hunger and satiation in infancy; however, there are significant gaps in our knowledge. There is a lack of validated tools for measuring hunger and satiation, a need to understand how different infant characteristics impact on feeding behaviour and a need to extricate the respective contributions of infant and maternal characteristics to perceptions of hunger and satiation. Further research is also recommended to differentiate between feeding driven by liking and that driven by hunger. PMID:26620159

  8. Beat Perception and Sociability: Evidence from Williams Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D; Dykens, Elisabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Beat perception in music has been proposed to be a human universal that may have its origins in adaptive processes involving temporal entrainment such as social communication and interaction. We examined beat perception skills in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder. Musical interest and hypersociability are two prominent aspects of the WS phenotype although actual musical and social skills are variable. On a group level, beat and meter perception skills were poorer in WS than in age-matched peers though there was significant individual variability. Cognitive ability, sound processing style, and musical training predicted beat and meter perception performance in WS. Moreover, we found significant relationships between beat and meter perception and adaptive communication and socialization skills in WS. Results have implications for understanding the role of predictive timing in both music and social interactions in the general population, and suggest music as a promising avenue for addressing social communication difficulties in WS. PMID:27378982

  9. Beat Perception and Sociability: Evidence from Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Beat perception in music has been proposed to be a human universal that may have its origins in adaptive processes involving temporal entrainment such as social communication and interaction. We examined beat perception skills in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder. Musical interest and hypersociability are two prominent aspects of the WS phenotype although actual musical and social skills are variable. On a group level, beat and meter perception skills were poorer in WS than in age-matched peers though there was significant individual variability. Cognitive ability, sound processing style, and musical training predicted beat and meter perception performance in WS. Moreover, we found significant relationships between beat and meter perception and adaptive communication and socialization skills in WS. Results have implications for understanding the role of predictive timing in both music and social interactions in the general population, and suggest music as a promising avenue for addressing social communication difficulties in WS. PMID:27378982

  10. 77 FR 30294 - Award of a Single Source Cooperative Agreement Grant to the Congressional Hunger Center in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... support a Bill Emerson National Hunger Fellow who will work on hunger and obesity issues for young... programs in the Office of Child Care (OCC), OCC Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting... communicate with other agencies on child-focused nutrition programs. There is currently no individual in...

  11. Nonlinear amplitude dynamics in flagellar beating

    CERN Document Server

    Oriola, David; Casademunt, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    The physical basis of flagellar and ciliary beating is a major problem in biology which is still far from completely understood. The fundamental cytoskeleton structure of cilia and flagella is the axoneme, a cylindrical array of microtubule doublets connected by passive crosslinkers and dynein motor proteins. The complex interplay of these elements leads to the generation of self-organized bending waves. Although many mathematical models have been proposed to understand this process, few attempts have been made to assess the role of dyneins on the nonlinear nature of the axoneme. Here, we investigate the nonlinear dynamics of flagella by considering an axonemal sliding control mechanism for dynein activity. This approach unveils the nonlinear selection of the oscillation amplitudes, which are typically either missed or prescribed in mathematical models. The explicit set of nonlinear equations are derived and solved numerically. Our analysis reveals the spatiotemporal dynamics of dynein populations and flagell...

  12. Hunger and Food Insecurity in Nairobi's Slums: An assessment using IRT models'

    OpenAIRE

    Faye, Ousmane; BASCHIERI Angela; Falkingham, Jane; Muindi, Kanyiva

    2010-01-01

    Although linked to poverty as conditions reflecting inadequate access to resources to obtain food, issues such as hunger and food insecurity have seldom been recognized as important in urban settings. Overall, little is known about the prevalence and magnitude of hunger and food insecurity in most cities. Yet, in sub-Saharan Africa where the majority of urban dwellers live on less than one dollar a day, it is obvious a large proportion of the urban population must be satisfied with just one m...

  13. Evaluation of the beat-to-beat detection accuracy of PulseOn wearable optical heart rate monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parak, Jakub; Tarniceriu, Adrian; Renevey, Philippe; Bertschi, Mattia; Delgado-Gonzalo, Ricard; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2015-08-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) provides significant information about the health status of an individual. Optical heart rate monitoring is a comfortable alternative to ECG based heart rate monitoring. However, most available optical heart rate monitoring devices do not supply beat-to-beat detection accuracy required by proper HRV analysis. We evaluate the beat-to-beat detection accuracy of a recent wrist-worn optical heart rate monitoring device, PulseOn (PO). Ten subjects (8 male and 2 female; 35.9±10.3 years old) participated in the study. HRV was recorded with PO and Firstbeat Bodyguard 2 (BG2) device, which was used as an ECG based reference. HRV was recorded during sleep. As compared to BG2, PO detected on average 99.57% of the heartbeats (0.43% of beats missed) and had 0.72% extra beat detection rate, with 5.94 ms mean absolute error (MAE) in beat-to-beat intervals (RRI) as compared to the ECG based RRI BG2. Mean RMSSD difference between PO and BG2 derived HRV was 3.1 ms. Therefore, PO provides an accurate method for long term HRV monitoring during sleep. PMID:26738173

  14. Gimme the beat: assessment of low frequency beat noise for drilling rig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilawchuk, Steven; Froment, Patrick [aci Acoustical Consultants Inc. (Canada)], email: stevenb@aciacoustical.com, email: patrickf@aciacoustical.com

    2011-07-01

    The concern of an Alberta resident over the noise level from a drilling rig led to a low frequency noise impact assessment being done by an acoustic consulting firm. This paper describes the investigation that was conducted to determine the low frequency noise source, evaluate its sound emission levels and spectra, and propose mitigation options. Noise measurements were made over several days, with a sound level meter and additionally, a weather monitoring station was also used. Analysis showed low frequency tonal noise at the residential location, resulting in an overall sound level exceeding the permissible sound level imposed by the Alberta noise regulating bodies. Moreover, a beat phenomenon was observed, and after detailed investigation of possible sources, it was established that shale shakers were responsible for the low frequency noise and the beat phenomenon, a fact verified by beat theory. Due to the temporary nature of the drilling rig's operation, no thorough mitigation options could be proposed but a simple stop gap solution for the shale shakers allowed the reduction of low frequency tonal noise.

  15. Food security in a world without borders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haen, Hartwig; Thompson, Brian

    2003-01-01

    The alleviation of poverty and the eradication of hunger and malnutrition are within reach. Considerable progress has been made over the past thirty years in reducing the numbers of the hungry, and projections over the next thirty years suggest that this progress will continue. The majority of developing countries have participated in this progress and have improved nutrition but there are significant regional differences. The current challenge is to build upon and accelerate the progress already made. Everyone is involved in this struggle against hunger and malnutrition, and to achieve these goals, global partnerships to enhance co-operation and co-ordination are being strengthened. Successful country experiences for improving food security and nutrition have demonstrated the importance of peace, political stability, and stable economic growth. There is also the need for increased foreign investment and increased ODA, particularly for African agriculture, debt relief, the better integration of LDCs in the global economy, their more secure access to markets and more equitable terms of trade, enhanced South-South co-operation, training and research and new high-yield and drought-resistant crop varieties. While all these have been commented on and recognised before, we must close the credibility gap in our political will by honouring our existing commitments for providing tangible benefits at the local level. For globalisation, the key issue is how the aggregate benefits of globalisation will be distributed and how to translate this into better nutrition. The LDCs, which are the most vulnerable and disadvantaged members of the international community, should be at the centre of this drive towards food security and take genuine ownership of policies, initiatives and activities to improve development. At the same time we need to succeed in making the developed world more aware of and responsive to the conditions of the LDCs. The most effective way to improve nutrition

  16. Robust inter-beat interval estimation in cardiac vibration signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliable and accurate estimation of instantaneous frequencies of physiological rhythms, such as heart rate, is critical for many healthcare applications. Robust estimation is especially challenging when novel unobtrusive sensors are used for continuous health monitoring in uncontrolled environments, because these sensors can create significant amounts of potentially unreliable data. We propose a new flexible algorithm for the robust estimation of local (beat-to-beat) intervals from cardiac vibration signals, specifically ballistocardiograms (BCGs), recorded by an unobtrusive bed-mounted sensor. This sensor allows the measurement of motions of the body which are caused by cardiac activity. Our method requires neither a training phase nor any prior knowledge about the morphology of the heart beats in the analyzed waveforms. Instead, three short-time estimators are combined using a Bayesian approach to continuously estimate the inter-beat intervals. We have validated our method on over-night BCG recordings from 33 subjects (8 normal, 25 insomniacs). On this dataset, containing approximately one million heart beats, our method achieved a mean beat-to-beat interval error of 0.78% with a coverage of 72.69%. (paper)

  17. Energetics of synchronized states in three-dimensional beating flagella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettot, Clément; Lauga, Eric

    2011-12-01

    During collective locomotion, beating flagella of spermatozoa interact hydrodynamically and are observed experimentally to synchronize. G. I. Taylor used a small-amplitude two-dimensional sheet model to show that the rate at which swimmers do work against the fluid is minimal for in-phase beating. We use a semianalytical approach based on hydrodynamic reflections to extend these results to the small-amplitude three-dimensional beating of infinite flagellar filaments. We first consider a configuration of two parallel filaments. In the case where the beating of both flagella occurs in the same plane as that defined by their axis, in-phase beating is found to lead to an overall minimum of energy dissipation, while opposite-phase leads to a maximum. If we allow the orientation of the beating planes to vary, we find that the minimum of energy dissipation is obtained for either the in-phase or opposite-phase conformation, in a manner that depends on the flagella orientation and their relative distance. We further characterize numerically the set of optimal relative orientations. Quantitatively analogous results are obtained using a simple model based on the beating of two spheres interacting hydrodynamically in the far field. Exploiting the linearity of Stokes equation, we then extend our results to the case of three beating flagella in an aligned and triangular conformation. Consistent with Taylor’s two-dimensional work, our results suggest that, from a hydrodynamic standpoint, it is more energetically favorable for spermatozoa with three-dimensional flagella to swim close to each other and with synchronized, parallel, in-phase beating.

  18. Foraging behavior of larval cod ( Gadus morhua ) influenced by prey density and hunger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter

    1995-01-01

    decreased their prey size selectivity. Behavioural response was to a large degree determined by the level of hunger, represented by the number of newly ingested prey in the gut. The findings show that cod larvae have a flexible response to changes in feeding conditions and imply that larvae can grow and...

  19. Professional ethics in extreme circumstances: responsibilities of attending physicians and healthcare providers in hunger strikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmak, Nurbay

    2015-08-01

    Hunger strikes potentially present a serious challenge for attending physicians. Though rare, in certain cases, a conflict can occur between the obligations of beneficence and autonomy. On the one hand, physicians have a duty to preserve life, which entails intervening in a hunger strike before the hunger striker loses his life. On the other hand, physicians' duty to respect autonomy implies that attending physicians have to respect hunger strikers' decisions to refuse nutrition. International medical guidelines state that physicians should follow the strikers' unpressured advance directives. When physicians encounter an unconscious striker, in the absence of reliable advance directives, the guidelines advise physicians to make a decision on the basis of the patient's values, previously expressed wishes, and best interests. I argue that if there are no advance directives and the striker has already lost his competence, the physician has the responsibility to resuscitate the striker. Once the striker regains his decision-making capacity, he should be asked about his decision. If he is determined to continue fasting and refuses treatment, the physician has a moral obligation to respect this decisions and follow his advance directives. PMID:26194871

  20. Adult Perceptions of Pain and Hunger Cries: A Synchrony of Arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeskind, Philip Sanford; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Male and female nonparent adults rated tape-recordings of initial, middle, and final 10-second segments of pain and hunger cries on four 7-point Likert-type scale items describing how urgent, arousing, aversive, and sick cry segments sounded. Results suggest that different segments of cries resulting from the same stimulus provide different…

  1. [Scientific production in nutrition and the public perception of hunger and eating in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Marília; Lucatelli, Márcio

    2006-08-01

    There is a contradiction between the perceptions held by different sectors of the Establishment with regard to the questions of hunger and nutrition in Brazil. On the one hand, the flagship of the present Brazilian government's social policy is the "Fome Zero" program. This program is based on the notion that the condition of hunger is socially relevant in this country. On the other hand, the scientific community in the field of nutrition has, through epidemiological studies, highlighted obesity as one of the most serious public health problems in Brazil. The reason why the public perception is dissociated from the production of knowledge on this subject has old roots that are related to the difficulties in institutionalizing science in Brazil. This has been reflected in a relative lack of legitimacy for scientific discourse. The new factor in this situation is the attainment of greater international visibility by the scientific community in nutritional de epidemiology. The future of the practical application of the results from nutritional epidemiology research in Brazil depends on the dynamics of the political agenda regarding hunger and nutrition, and of the sectors associated with this. The objective of this study was to explore this situation by means of analyzing scientometric data on the scientific production, historical data and documents relating to discourse about hunger. PMID:16924308

  2. Bulimics' responses to food cravings: is binge-eating a product of hunger or emotional state?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, A; Hill, A; Waller, G

    2001-08-01

    This study examined the roles of hunger, food craving and mood in the binge-eating episodes of bulimic patients, and identified the critical factors involved in the processes surrounding binge-eating episodes that follow cravings. This was a prospective study of the binge-eating behaviour of 15 women with bulimia nervosa. The participants used food intake diaries and Craving Records to self-monitor their nutritional behaviour, hunger levels and affective state. Cravings leading to a binge were associated with higher tension, lower mood and lower hunger than those cravings not leading to a binge. Levels of tension and hunger were the critical discriminating variables. The findings of the study support empirical evidence and models of emotional blocking in binge-eating behaviour and challenge the current cognitive starve-binge models of bulimia. The role of food cravings in the emotional blocking model is discussed in terms of a classically conditioned motivational state. Implications for treatment are addressed. PMID:11480829

  3. Harvesting the Bounty of Citizenship: The Fight against Hunger and Poverty in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, John W., II; Landim, Leilah

    1995-01-01

    The Citizens' Campaign Against Hunger and Poverty and For Life is a nongovernmental organization in Brazil that recruited and organized more than three million volunteers to distribute food baskets, support gardening and water projects, provide basic health care, create jobs, assist homeless children, and encourage local and state governments to…

  4. Hunger dependence of electrical brain self-stimulation in the pigeon

    OpenAIRE

    Delius, Juan; Pellander, Kirsti

    1982-01-01

    Contrary to recent evidence, further data showing that intracranial self-stimulation behaviour in the pigeon is frequently hunger-dependent is reported. A compilation of reinforcing brain loci in the pigeon suggests an association with two dopaminergic systems, the paleostriatal complex and the nucleus basalis system, the latter being known to be involved in the control of feeding.

  5. Dwelling in Possibilities: Our Students' Spectacular Hunger for Life Makes Them Radically Vulnerable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmundson, Mark

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how today's student generation has a spectacular hunger for life and more life. They want to study, travel, make friends, make more friends, read everything (superfast), take in all the movies, listen to every hot band, keep up with everyone they've ever known. They live to multiply possibilities. The author…

  6. Professional Networks among Rural School Food Service Directors Implementing the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubker Cornish, Disa; Askelson, Natoshia M.; Golembiewski, Elizabeth H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study was designed to explore the professional networks of rural school food service directors (FSD), the resources they use for implementing the Healthy, Hunger-free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA), and their needs for information and support to continue to implement successfully. Methods: Rural FSD participated in an in-depth…

  7. THE EFFECTS OF EXERCISE ON FOOD INTAKE AND HUNGER: RELATIONSHIP WITH ACYLATED GHRELIN AND LEPTIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serife Vatansever-Ozen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of a long bout of aerobic exercise on hunger and energy intake and circulating levels of leptin and acylated ghrelin. Ten healthy male subjects undertook two, 4 h trials in a randomized crossover design. In the exercise trial subjects ran for 105 min at 50% of maximal oxygen uptake and the last 15 min at 70% of maximal oxygen uptake followed by a 120 min rest period. In the control trial, subjects rested for 4 h. Subjects consumed a buffet test meal at 180 min during each trial. Hunger ratings, acylated ghrelin, leptin, glucose and insulin concentrations were measured at 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 h. No differences were found at baseline values for hunger, acylated ghrelin, leptin, insulin and glucose for both trials (p > 0.05. The estimated energy expenditure of the exercise trial was 1550 ± 136 kcal. Exercise did not change subsequent absolute energy intake, but produced a significant decrease (p < 0.05 in relative energy intake. A two-way ANOVA revealed a significant (p < 0. 05 interaction effect for hunger and acylated ghrelin. In conclusion, this exercise regimen had a positive effect on reducing appetite which is related to reduced acylated ghrelin responses over time. This finding lends support for a role of exercise in weight management

  8. Insects, Food, and Hunger: The Paradox of Plenty for U.S. Entomology, 1920-1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, John H.

    1983-01-01

    Explores the relationship between invention/innovation in pest control practices, food supply, and hunger in the United States from 1920-1970. Includes discussions of the nature, development, and use of insecticides, control of specific pests, and public arguments over the safety of residues leading to search for nonchemical methods of control.…

  9. School Lunch Quality Following Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine; Bergman, Ethan A.; Englund, Tim; Ogan, Dana; Barbee, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study investigates the effect of meal component changes by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA) on school lunch quality and consumption in elementary school students, grade 2-5 before and after the HHFKA guidelines were implemented in July 2012 using the Healthy Eating Index. Methods: In Spring 2012, before…

  10. Investigation of beat-waves generation with high efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for generating high power beating radio-frequency wave with high conversion efficiency is proposed. Based on Cherenkov radiation, two longitudinal resonant modes are excited simultaneously and interacted with intense electron beam synchronously. An experiment was carried out and beat-waves with an average power of about 2.3 GW, frequencies of 9.29 GHz and 10.31 GHz, and efficiency of about 40% were obtained. Through controlling the electron energy, the amplitude proportions of the two resonant modes are altered, and different beat-wave patterns are formed

  11. Quantum beats in fluorescence for multi-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For Λ-type three-level atomic systems we have clarified using diagram that (1) it is impossible to observe quantum beats due to the ground state sublevels by measuring the time dependence of the fluorescence intensity, and (2) why it is physically possible to observe and how we can observe quantum beats in the ground state sublevels by using fluorescence. Generalization of the results shows that we can determine from which state (the ground state or the excited state) the quantum beats are originated. Analytical result is shown for four-level atomic systems.

  12. Modulational instability in the beat-wave generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coupling of a large amplitude plasmon, generated by the beat-wave process, to ion acoustic waves may lead to modulational or decay instabilities, which are investigated. A general dispersion relation obtainable from Zakharov equations predicts large growth rates (∼ ωsub(pi) for short wavelength modulations. To avoid these, extremely short pulse lengths are required in the beat-wave experiments. Due to the very long wavelength of the beat-plasmon, the decay instability is not likely below the keV-temperatures. (author)

  13. On Ambivalence of the Beat Generation through the Main Character Holden in The Catcher in the Rye

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈明利

    2014-01-01

    J. D. Sailinger was a famous English writer in 20th century. He is one of the representatives of the beat generation. In his novel The Catcher in the Rye, he uses a 16-year-old boy to speak out to the public about what the beat generation fears. Holden, as the main character in the novel, is not the typical sixteen-year-old boy. Holden has many characteristics that are not typical of anyone. He is very afraid of growing up. He feels the adult world is“phony,” everyone and everything are associated with it. Holden never actually states that he is afraid of growing up, or that he hates the idea of it, instead he expresses his resistance to become an adult by making the adult world into a place full of “phony,” dishonest, and shallow people, and comparing it to the honest, innocent, and fun world where a child lives. Sailinger uses the symbols to important ideas, and the most important symbol is Holden’s idea of being the catcher in the rye. The Catcher in the Rye is one of the famous works of the modern world. This thesis attempts to make an understanding of the beat generation and the current generations, and tries to find a way to solve the problems we are facing today.

  14. The effect of hunger on the acoustic individuality in begging calls of a colonially breeding weaver bird

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacot Alain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In colonially breeding birds, the ability to discriminate between individuals is often essential. During post-fledging care, parents have to recognize their own offspring among many other unrelated chicks in the breeding colony. It is well known that fledglings and food-provisioning parents of many bird species use contact calls to convey their identity. These calls are also often used as hunger-related signals of need in young birds. Here, we investigate how such calls incorporate signals of need and at the same time act as reliable indicators of each chick's identity. Results In a field study, we experimentally manipulated the hunger level of colonially breeding Jackson's golden-backed weaver (Ploceus jacksoni nestlings close to fledging and investigated its effects on acoustic call parameters. Some acoustic parameters that were related to the time-frequency pattern showed high individuality and were largely unaffected by a nestling's state of hunger. However, the majority of call parameters were significantly affected by hunger. Interestingly, most of these acoustic parameters showed both consistent changes with hunger and high between-individual differences, i.e. potential for individual recognition. Conclusion The results indicate that individual recognition processes can be based on static, hunger-independent call parameters, but also on dynamic hunger-related parameters that show high individuality. Furthermore, these signal properties suggest that the assessment of signals of need can be improved if the signal value is referenced to a chick's vocal spectrum.

  15. Beating diffraction limit in an absorptive superlens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Meng; Chan, Che Ting

    2013-03-01

    It is well known that a slab with both permittivity and permeability equals -1+i δ can achieve super resolution and its mechanism can be understood with the idea of complementary material. In practice, meta-materials are always absorptive and the absorption sets an upper limit for the image resolution. Here, we study the image formation of stratified complementary slabs in the time domain. Instead of only one slab of super lens, we consider a stack of AB structured complementary slabs, where A is a super lens and B is normal material. We show that the superlens stack can beat the diffraction limit even in the presence of loss if the source has a time-dependent intensity profile. We derived a general analytical expression for the group velocity of an arbitrary k component including evanescent waves near frequency where ``complementary'' is satisfied and the analytical results can explain the super solution in the presence of loss. And our results shows that, with a Gaussian shaped pulse illumination, the image resolution can be improved by about 45% relative to harmonic illumination for the same system.

  16. "'Jackin’ for Beats'": DJing for Citation Critique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Craig

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A challenge in teaching English composition is helping students envision plagiarism as “borrowing” – showing love to author(s and/or text(s that further their argument(s, versus “stealing” – biting someone’s style and words. Alastair Pennycook (1996 and Sarah Wakefield (2006 have contributed pieces to the elaborate plagiarism/citation puzzle, while Houston Baker situated the hip-hop DJ in seminal text Black Studies, Rap and the Academy (1993. Merging these moments introduces critical questions: Did Diddy invent “the remix” or become the illest beat-biter ever? How did DJ/Producers Pete Rock and Large Professor pay homage to previous musical genres to further hip-hop remix production without just taking 4-8 bar samples, copying sources and claiming unethical ownership? And how can this discussion provide students a window into citation conversations? This article will remix these “texts” to introduce the idea of DJ Rhetoric to discuss plagiarism. Through the lens of the hip-hop DJ in writing classrooms, one can foster an appreciation of the difference between “love and theft” in student citation. This article will couple examples from hip-hop music/culture while simultaneously remixing interviews from various hip-hop DJ/producers to help answer these difficult questions.

  17. Selective particle capture by asynchronously beating cilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-12-01

    Selective particle filtration is fundamental in many engineering and biological systems. For example, many aquatic microorganisms use filter feeding to capture food particles from the surrounding fluid, using motile cilia. One of the capture strategies is to use the same cilia to generate feeding currents and to intercept particles when the particles are on the downstream side of the cilia. Here, we develop a 3D computational model of ciliary bands interacting with flow suspended particles and calculate particle trajectories for a range of particle sizes. Consistent with experimental observations, we find optimal particle sizes that maximize capture rate. The optimal size depends nonlinearly on cilia spacing and cilia coordination, synchronous vs. asynchronous. These parameters affect the cilia-generated flow field, which in turn affects particle trajectories. The low capture rate of smaller particles is due to the particles' inability to cross the flow streamlines of neighboring cilia. Meanwhile, large particles have difficulty entering the sub-ciliary region once advected downstream, also resulting in low capture rates. The optimal range of particle sizes is enhanced when cilia beat asynchronously. These findings have potentially important implications on the design and use of biomimetic cilia in processes such as particle sorting in microfluidic devices.

  18. Feathering collisions in beating reed simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Tamara; Abel, Jonathan S.; Smith, Julius O.

    2003-10-01

    Pressure controlled valves are the primary sound production mechanisms for woodwind and brass musical instruments, as well as for many bioacoustic vocal systems such as the larynx and syrinx (the vocal organ in birds). During sound production, air flow sets a reed or membrane into motion creating a variable height in the valve channel and, potentially, periodically closing the channel completely. Depending on how this event is handled, an abrupt termination of air flow between open and closed states can cause undesirable discontinuities and inaccuracies in a discrete-time simulation-particularly at relatively low audio sampling rates. A solution was developed by re-examining the behavior of the differential equation governing volume flow through a pressure-controlled valve, paying particular attention to this rather troublesome transition. A closed-form solution for the time evolution of volume flow is given and used to derive an update for volume flow. The result is a smoother, more accurate, and nearly alias-free transition from open to closed. ``Feathered collisions'' of this nature can refine the sound quality produced by the numerical simulation of beating reeds, such as in clarinets, at typical audio sampling rates.

  19. Mercury Beating Heart: Modifications to the Classical Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najdoski, Metodija; Mirceski, Valentin; Petrusevski, Vladimir M.; Demiri, Sani

    2007-01-01

    The mercury beating heart (MBH) is a commonly performed experiment, which is based on varying oxidizing agents and substituting other metals for iron. Various modified versions of the classical demonstration of the experiment are presented.

  20. "Keep the Beat": Healthy Blood Pressure Helps Prevent Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Keep the Beat": Healthy Blood Pressure Helps Prevent Heart Disease Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of Contents Your ... a condition that also increases the chance of heart disease and stroke. High blood pressure is especially common ...

  1. Race May Influence Risk for Irregular Heart Beat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158687.html Race May Influence Risk for Irregular Heart Beat Whites ... between the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation and race, a new study says. Whites with heart failure ...

  2. Modulation of attosecond beating in resonant two-photon ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Galán, Álvaro J; Martín, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the photoelectron attosecond beating at the basis of RABBIT (Reconstruction of Attosecond Beating By Interference of Two-photon transitions) in the presence of autoionizing states. We show that, as a harmonic traverses a resonance, its sidebands exhibit a peaked phase shift as well as a modulation of the beating frequency itself. Furthermore, the beating between two resonant paths persists even when the pump and the probe pulses do not overlap, thus providing a sensitive non-holographic interferometric means to reconstruct coherent metastable wave packets. We characterize these phenomena quantitatively with a general finite-pulse analytical model that accounts for the effect of both intermediate and final resonances on two-photon processes, at a negligible computational cost. The model predictions are in excellent agreement with those of accurate ab initio calculations for the helium atom in the region of the N=2 doubly excited states.

  3. Situating Hunger and Fullness Through the Lived Body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillersdal, Line

    two years, the thesis offers insights into both the obvious differences and the perhaps less-obvious similarities between the norms and values related to eating practices, as observed among three very different groups of Danes: namely, gastric-bypass patients; young military recruits; and the...... the world, and the material properties of food that affect all of us humans....

  4. Coupling Between Pecking and Heart Beat in Pigeons

    OpenAIRE

    Delius, Juan; Lindenblatt, Ulrike; Lombardi, Celia

    1986-01-01

    The electrocardiogram of pigeons was recorded while they pecked an impact transducer under operant control according to a variable ratio schedule. An analysis of the records in terms of crossaverages between heart beats and pecks. the quasi-equivalents of crosscorrelation functions, revealed that pecks and heart beats tend to coincide temporally at above chance levels according to patterns that vary from individual to individual pigeon. The mechanisms and the functions of the coupling are dis...

  5. Hunger In Los Angeles County Affects Over 200,000 Low-Income Adults, Another 560,000 At Risk

    OpenAIRE

    DiSogra, Charles A.; Yen, Wei; Flood, Michael; Ramirez, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    Compiled with data from the 2001 California Health Interview Survey, this study found that more than three-quarters of a million low-income adults in Los Angeles County have a difficult time reliably putting enough food on the table and thus are considered "food insecure." Among these adults, 214,000 suffer from hunger and another 561,000 live at risk for hunger day to day. Most importantly, the study found that food insecurity and hunger are found in all parts of the county. Food insecurity ...

  6. Beat-to-beat analysis method for magnetocardiographic recordings during interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multichannel magnetocardiography (MCG) during exercise testing has been shown to detect myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease. Previous studies on exercise MCG have focused on one or few time intervals during the recovery period and only a fragment of the data available has been utilized. We present a method for beat-to-beat analysis and parametrization of the MCG signal. The method can be used for studying and quantifying the changes induced in the MCG by interventions. We test the method with data recorded in bicycle exercise testing in healthy volunteers and patients with coronary artery disease. Information in all cardiac cycles recorded during the recovery period of exercise MCG testing is, for the first time, utilized in the signal analysis. Exercise-induced myocardial ischaemia was detected by heart rate adjustment of change in magnetic field map orientation. In addition to the ST segment, the T wave in the MCG was also found to provide information related to myocardial ischaemia. The method of analysis efficiently utilizes the spatial and temporal properties of multichannel MCG mapping, providing a new tool for detecting and quantifying fast phenomena during interventional MCG studies. The method can also be applied to an on-line analysis of MCG data. (author)

  7. Beat-to-beat evaluation of left ventricular ejection in cardiac arrhythmias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional multi-gated cardiac blood pool studies suffer from two kinds of superimpositions: the spatial overlapping of various heart chambers and the temporal superimposition of a large number of cardiac cycles. The first problem can be partially solved by first pass techniques or by emission tomography. For the second one, which is specially critical arrhythmias, the single probe device (''nuclear stethoscope'') represents an original solution. Patients with normal cardiac rythm and patients presenting various kinds of cardiac rythm alterations were examined using a commercial ''nuclear stethoscope''. Some characteristic results achieved in these cases, were presented. For blood pool labeling, 20 mCi of 99mTc albumin was injected. The single probe detector was then positioned over the left ventricular area. The beat-to-beat left ventricular activity curve was then recorded for several minutes on paper in the same time as the E.C.G. signal. In cases with irregular cardiac rythm, the multigated techniques yield an average value of left ventricular ejection. Due to the relatively constant duration of systole, the superimposition of cycles may be valid during contration: differences mainly appear during diastole. But, as it could be demonstrated using the ''nuclear stethoscope'', individual cycles can show a large variability of ejection and average ejection fraction is only a very partial aspect of the real cardiac function

  8. Beat-to-beat analysis method for magnetocardiographic recordings during interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takala, P. [Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering, Helsinki University of Technology, FIN-02015 HUT (Finland)]|[BioMag Laboratory, Medical Engineering Centre, Helsinki University Central Hospital, FIN-00029 HUCH (Finland). E-mail: panu.takala@hut.fi; Montonen, J.; Nenonen, J.; Katila, T. [Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering, Helsinki University of Technology, FIN-02015 HUT (Finland); BioMag Laboratory, Medical Engineering Centre, Helsinki University Central Hospital, FIN-00029 HUCH (Finland); Haenninen, H.; Maekijaervi, M.; Toivonen, L. [BioMag Laboratory, Medical Engineering Centre, Helsinki University Central Hospital, FIN-00029 HUCH (Finland); Division of Cardiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, FIN-00029 HUCH (Finland)

    2001-04-01

    Multichannel magnetocardiography (MCG) during exercise testing has been shown to detect myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease. Previous studies on exercise MCG have focused on one or few time intervals during the recovery period and only a fragment of the data available has been utilized. We present a method for beat-to-beat analysis and parametrization of the MCG signal. The method can be used for studying and quantifying the changes induced in the MCG by interventions. We test the method with data recorded in bicycle exercise testing in healthy volunteers and patients with coronary artery disease. Information in all cardiac cycles recorded during the recovery period of exercise MCG testing is, for the first time, utilized in the signal analysis. Exercise-induced myocardial ischaemia was detected by heart rate adjustment of change in magnetic field map orientation. In addition to the ST segment, the T wave in the MCG was also found to provide information related to myocardial ischaemia. The method of analysis efficiently utilizes the spatial and temporal properties of multichannel MCG mapping, providing a new tool for detecting and quantifying fast phenomena during interventional MCG studies. The method can also be applied to an on-line analysis of MCG data. (author)

  9. Beat-to-beat assessment of left ventricular ejection in atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beat-to-beat left ventricular ejection was evaluated in a group of 20 patients with chronic atrial fibrillation using a computerized single probe detector. The reference group consisted of 10 patients with sinus rhythm. For each patient 30 successive cardiac cycles were analyzed and the relative variations of four parameters were assessed: R-R interval, diastolic and systolic time intervals, and ejection amplitude, corresponding to the left ventricular stroke volume. The mean variations were respectively 3.4%, 10.4%, 8.4%, and 11.8% in patients with sinus rhythm, and 21.9%, 37.9%, 10.6% and 30.5% in patients with artrial fibrillation. This demonstrates that changes in ejection are mainly related to the duration of the filling phase, with nearly constant systolic times. Correlations between R-R intervals and systolic ejection amplitudes were highly significant (P<0.001) in patients with atrial fibrillation in 85% of cases. This information complements the average ejection fraction obtained from multiple cycle superimposition. (orig.)

  10. [Non-heart-beating donors are ineligible].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heide, W

    2016-02-01

    The death of the donor is a mandatory prerequisite for organ transplantation (dead donor rule) worldwide. It is a medical, legal and ethical consensus to accept the concept of brain death, as first proposed in 1968 by the ad hoc committee of the Harvard Medical School, as a certain criterion of death. In isolated cases where the diagnosis of brain death was claimed to be wrong, it could be demonstrated that the diagnostic procedure for brain death had not been correctly performed. In March 2014 a joint statement by the German neuromedical societies emphasized that 1) the diagnosis of brain death is one of the safest diagnoses in medicine if performed according to accepted medical standards and criteria and 2) the concept of non-heart-beating donors (NHBD, i. e. organ donation after an arbitrarily defined duration of circulatory and cardiac arrest) practiced in some European countries must be absolutely rejected because it implicates a high risk of diagnostic error. According to the current literature it is unclear at what time cardiac and circulatory arrest is irreversible and leads to irreversible cessation of all functions of the entire brain including the brainstem, even though clinical signs of cessation of brain functions are always found after 10 min. Furthermore, is it often an arbitrary decision to exactly define the duration of cardiac arrest if continuous echocardiographic monitoring has not been carried out from the very beginning. Last but not least there are ethical concerns against the concept of NHBD because it might influence therapeutic efforts to resuscitate a patient with cardiac arrest. Therefore, the German Medical Council (BÄK) has repeatedly rejected the concept of NHBD for organ transplantation since 1995. PMID:26830897

  11. Effects of hunger level and tube diameter on thefeeding behavior of teat-fed dairy calves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskin, Mette S; Skjøth, Flemming; Jensen, Margit Bak

    2010-01-01

    via esophageal tube before feeding; increased, in which calves were fed half milk ration at the previous feeding, or control, in which calves were fed normal ration at the previous feeding) on feeding behavior of calves fed via different tube diameters (6.0, 3.0, or 1.5 mm). Behavior observed during a...... 40-min period after morning milk feeding on d 7, 9, and 11 of testing is reported. No significant interactions between tube diameter and hunger level on behavior were found. Reduced tube diameter led to increased latency to empty the teat bucket, increased duration of nutritive sucking, and decreased...... sucking and butting when hunger was increased. The results suggest that nonnutritive sucking is a more sensitive indicator than drinking rate of changes in feeding motivation. Consequently, reduction in nonnutritive sucking might be a new candidate in the search for behavioral indicators of disease in...

  12. What Makes Her Tick? : Katniss Everdeen's Use of Defense Mechanisms in The Hunger Games

    OpenAIRE

    Ramberg, Malin

    2012-01-01

    This essay deals with the character Katniss Everdeen in the novel The Hunger Games by SuzanneCollins. The essay shows that Katniss' behavior and actions in the novel can be explained byshowing her use of defense mechanisms, and that from a psychoanalytical perspective, she iscompletely logical in the way she acts. The defense mechanisms Katniss uses are withdrawal,reaction formation, altruistic surrender, intellectualization, and suppression. The behavior Katnissillustrates due to her use of ...

  13. The Hunger Games Viral Marketing Campaign : A Study of Viral Marketing and Fan Labor

    OpenAIRE

    Ilar, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    This essay examines Lionsgate’s viral marketing campaign for The Hunger Games (Gary Ross, 2012) and the marketing teams’ use of new marketing techniques and the online fan base. The essay also asks the question to what extent the fans’ participation in Lionsgate’s marketing campaign can be called fan labor. The study is based on a film industrial perspective and academic literature that deals with film marketing, the film industry, fandom and digital labor. The material used for the analysis ...

  14. Hunger, science, and politics: FAO, WHO, and Unicef nutrition policies, 1945-1978

    OpenAIRE

    Ruxin, J. N.

    1996-01-01

    Out of the chaos of W.W.II emerged three United Nations agencies-FAO, WHO, and Unicef-endowed with the joint responsibility to help conquer hunger and malnutrition. Seminal nutritional research before the war along with idealistic policy makers and nutritionists afterwards set the stage for the first international initiatives to address nutritional issues in developing countries. This dissertation relies mainly on an array of primary sources and oral histories to elucidate the ...

  15. An Assessment of Microfinance in Vietnam as An Innovative Mechanism for Poverty Alleviation and Hunger Eradication

    OpenAIRE

    Vu, Chi

    2009-01-01

    The topic of microfinance has increasingly attracted much attention from both researchers and practitioners for its significant contribution in the combat against poverty and hunger. In developing nations with high poverty rates, microfinance is highly regarded for its innovative mechanism in compared to traditional aid methods. Following this realization, this paper aims to investigate microfinance sector in Vietnam, a poor country that has been widely known to achieve striking successes in ...

  16. Universal food security program and nutritional intake: Evidence from the hunger prone KBK districts in Odisha

    OpenAIRE

    Andaleeb Rahman

    2015-01-01

    This article provides evidence on the role of consumer food subsidies in improving nutritional intake and diet quality by evaluating the expansion of the government food assistance program coverage in the hunger prone state of Odisha in India. In 8 districts of Odisha, popularly known as the Kalahandi-Balangir-Koraput (KBK) region which is notable for extreme poverty and starvation deaths, the government did away with the targeted food assistance program in 2008 and made the scheme universal....

  17. Hunger and associated harms among injection drug users in an urban Canadian setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anema Aranka

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Food insufficiency is often associated with health risks and adverse outcomes among marginalized populations. However, little is known about correlates of food insufficiency among injection drug users (IDU. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study to examine the prevalence and correlates of self-reported hunger in a large cohort of IDU in Vancouver, Canada. Food insufficiency was defined as reporting "I am hungry, but don't eat because I can't afford enough food". Logistic regression was used to determine independent socio-demographic and drug-use characteristics associated with food insufficiency. Results Among 1,053 participants, 681 (64.7% reported being hungry and unable to afford enough food. Self-reported hunger was independently associated with: unstable housing (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.68, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.20 - 2.36, spending ≥ $50/day on drugs (AOR: 1.43, 95% CI: 1.06 - 1.91, and symptoms of depression (AOR: 3.32, 95% CI: 2.45 - 4.48. Conclusion These findings suggest that IDU in this setting would likely benefit from interventions that work to improve access to food and social support services, including addiction treatment programs which may reduce the adverse effect of ongoing drug use on hunger.

  18. Beat & beyond : memoir, myth and visual arts in women of the beat generation = Más allá del "Beat": memoria, mito y arte visual en las mujeres de la generación beat

    OpenAIRE

    Encarnación Pinedo, Estíbaliz

    2016-01-01

    El objetivo de esta tesis doctoral es revaluar el trabajo de las mujeres de la Generación Beat dentro de un discurso artístico y literario post(Beat) o más allá de lo “Beat.” El capítulo dos, en el que se analizan once memorias, se centra en el dilema entre lo personal y lo literario y sirve para delinear el contexto socio-político y artístico en el que las autoras escribieron. A través del análisis de temas comunes a las distintas memorias (la escritura, los roles de género, y la conexión co...

  19. Continuing studies of the plasma beat wave accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a proposal for the release of third year funds for the ''Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator'' program (PBWA) at UCLA under the direction of Professor C. Joshi. This report is also a summary of progress on this project since March 1990; i.e., the date of the last report to the DOE. Once again we note that although the program is for historical reasons called the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator Program, our group is active in all areas of applications of lasers and plasmas in future high energy accelerators. These are as follows: heat gradient plasma structures; excited by plasma beat wave technique; laser wake field technique; and plasma wake field technique. Development of a photoinjector-driven, 20 MeV linac; and theoretical studies of the plasma lens and use of plasmas at the final focus

  20. On readout of vibrational qubits using quantum beats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Readout of the final states of qubits is a crucial step towards implementing quantum computation in experiment. Although not scalable to large numbers of qubits per molecule, computational studies show that molecular vibrations could provide a significant (factor 2–5 in the literature) increase in the number of qubits compared to two-level systems. In this theoretical work, we explore the process of readout from vibrational qubits in thiophosgene molecule, SCCl2, using quantum beat oscillations. The quantum beats are measured by first exciting the superposition of the qubit-encoding vibrational states to the electronically excited readout state with variable time-delay pulses. The resulting oscillation of population of the readout state is then detected as a function of time delay. In principle, fitting the quantum beat signal by an analytical expression should allow extracting the values of probability amplitudes and the relative phases of the vibrational qubit states. However, we found that if this procedure is implemented using the standard analytic expression for quantum beats, a non-negligible phase error is obtained. We discuss the origin and properties of this phase error, and propose a new analytical expression to correct the phase error. The corrected expression fits the quantum beat signal very accurately, which may permit reading out the final state of vibrational qubits in experiments by combining the analytic fitting expression with numerical modelling of the readout process. The new expression is also useful as a simple model for fitting any quantum beat experiments where more accurate phase information is desired

  1. The load-response of the flagellar beat

    CERN Document Server

    Klindt, Gary S; Wanger, Christian; Friedrich, Benjamin M

    2016-01-01

    Cilia and flagella exhibit regular bending waves that perform mechanical work on the surrounding fluid, to propel cellular swimmers and pump fluids inside organisms. Here, we quantify a force-velocity relationship of the beating flagellum, by exposing flagellated \\emph{Chlamydomonas} cells to controlled microfluidic flows. A simple theory of flagellar limit-cycle oscillations, calibrated by measurements in the absence of flow, reproduces this relationship quantitatively. We derive a link between the chemo-mechanical efficiency of the flagellar beat and its ability to synchronize to oscillatory flows.

  2. Can We Learn to Beat the Best Stock

    CERN Document Server

    Borodin, A; Gogan, V; 10.1613/jair.1336

    2011-01-01

    A novel algorithm for actively trading stocks is presented. While traditional expert advice and "universal" algorithms (as well as standard technical trading heuristics) attempt to predict winners or trends, our approach relies on predictable statistical relations between all pairs of stocks in the market. Our empirical results on historical markets provide strong evidence that this type of technical trading can "beat the market" and moreover, can beat the best stock in the market. In doing so we utilize a new idea for smoothing critical parameters in the context of expert learning.

  3. Refugees and displaced persons. War, hunger, and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toole, M J; Waldman, R J

    1993-08-01

    The number of refugees and internally displaced persons in need of protection and assistance has increased from 30 million in 1990 to more than 43 million today. War and civil strife have been largely responsible for this epidemic of mass migration that has affected almost every region of the world, including Europe. Since 1990, crude death rates (CDRs) during the early influx of refugees who crossed international borders have been somewhat lower than CDRs reported earlier among Cambodian and Ethiopian refugees. Nevertheless, CDRs among refugees arriving in Ethiopia, Kenya, Nepal, Malawi, and Zimbabwe since 1990 ranged from five to 12 times the baseline CDRs in the countries of origin. Among internally displaced populations in northern Iraq, Somalia, and Sudan, CDRs were extremely high, ranging from 12 to 25 times the baseline CDRs for the nondisplaced. Among both refugees and internally displaced persons, death rates among children less than 5 years of age were far higher than among older children and adults. In Bangladesh, the death rate in female Rohingya refugees was several times higher than in males. Preventable conditions such as diarrheal disease, measles, and acute respiratory infections, exacerbated often by malnutrition, caused most deaths. Although relief programs for refugees have improved since 1990, the situation among the internally displaced may have worsened. The international community should intervene earlier in the evolution of complex disasters involving civil war, human rights abuses, food shortages, and mass displacement. Relief programs need to be based on sound health and nutrition information and should focus on the provision of adequate shelter, food, water, sanitation, and public health programs that prevent mortality from diarrhea, measles, and other communicable diseases, especially among young children and women. PMID:8331759

  4. Analysis of ependymal ciliary beat pattern and beat frequency using high speed imaging: comparison with the photomultiplier and photodiode methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Callaghan Chris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to compare beat frequency measurements of ependymal cilia made by digital high speed imaging to those obtained using the photomultiplier and modified photodiode techniques. Using high speed video analysis the relationship of the power and recover strokes was also determined. Methods Ciliated strips of ependyma attached to slices from the brain of Wistar rats were incubated at 30°C and observed using a ×50 water immersion lens. Ciliary beat frequency was measured using each of the three techniques: the high speed video, photodiode and photomultiplier. Readings were repeated after 30 minutes incubation at 37°C. Ependymal cilia were observed in slow motion and the precise movement of cilia during the recovery stroke relative to the path travelled during the power stroke was measured. Results The mean (95% confidence intervals beat frequencies determined by the high speed video, photomultiplier and photodiode at 30°C were 27.7 (26.6 to 28.8, 25.5 (24.4 to 26.6 and 20.8 (20.4 to 21.3 Hz, respectively. The mean (95% confidence intervals beat frequencies determined by the high speed video, photomultiplier and photodiode at 37°C were 36.4 (34 to 39.5, 38.4 (36.8 to 39.9 and 18.8 (16.9 to 20.5 Hz. The inter and intra observer reliability for measurement of ciliary beat frequency was 3.8% and 1%, respectively. Ependymal cilia were observed to move in a planar fashion during the power and recovery strokes with a maximum deviation to the right of the midline of 12.1(11.8 to 13.0° during the power stroke and 12.6(11.6 to 13.6° to the left of the midline during the recovery stroke. Conclusion The photodiode technique greatly underestimates ciliary beat frequency and should not be used to measure ependymal ciliary beat frequency at the temperatures studied. Ciliary beat frequency from the high speed video and photomultiplier techniques cannot be used interchangeably. Ependymal cilia had minimal deviation to

  5. Using Science and Much More to Beat the Flood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Claire

    2014-01-01

    The Beat the Flood challenge involves designing and building a model flood-proof home, which is then tested in "flood" conditions. It is set on the fictitious Watu Island. The children form teams, with each team member being assigned a responsibility for the duration of the task--team leader, chief recorder, and resource manager. This…

  6. Theory of beat wave excitation in an inhomogeneous plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory of beat wave excitation in a slightly inhomogeneous plasma is presented. While the theory is general it applies directly to the experiments performed in Alaska by the ionospheric heating facilities HIPAS [High Power Auroral Simulation, Radio Sci. 25, 1269 (1990)] and HAARP [High Frequency Active Auroral Research Project, Geophys. Res. Lett. 25, 257 (1998)]. A ray tracing (WKB) formalism appropriate for computations is developed. The computational implementation of this formalism and extensive results will be presented in a follow up to this paper. Also the beat wave excitation of upper-hybrid waves is investigated analytically. The complicated trajectories of these waves in the plasma are described. When this beat wave reaches the plasma wave resonance it can, in the HIPAS-HAARP experiments, attain nonlinear amplitude. The electrostatic upper-hybrid waves are trapped around the density maximum of the ionosphere. This trapping is investigated in detail. Beat wave pumping of the trapped modes is possible using HAARP and HIPAS or with split beams from HAARP

  7. Phase Shifting and the Beating of Complex Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeports, David

    2011-01-01

    At the introductory level, the demonstration and analysis of sound beating is usually limited to the superposition of two purely sinusoidal waves with equal amplitudes and very similar frequencies. Under such conditions, an observer hears the periodic variation of the loudness of a sound with an unchanging timbre. On the other hand, when complex…

  8. Beat-wave accelerator studies at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study carried out in 1982-83 at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory to examine how one might use the beat-wave principle to construct a useful high energy accelerator is reviewed, and comments are made on later developments. A number of problems are evident to which solutions cannot at present be foreseen. (author)

  9. Perceptions of Conducting: Accuracy in Detecting Modulated Beat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittin, Ruth V.

    1992-01-01

    Presents findings of a study of viewers' ability to detect changes in conducting beat patterns. Reports that music education majors were significantly better able to detect tempo decreases than increases and better able than nonmajors to detect decreases. Indicates that nonmajors were better able than majors to identify tempo increases. (SG)

  10. Beam cooling by using laser-undulator beat wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-Hamiltonian manipulation of internal structure of phase space of charged particle beams can result in much faster cooling than the conventional stochastic cooling. The longitudinal emittance reduction is accomplished by the ponderomotive force of the beat between the undulator and the laser adjusted appropriate in its broadband spectrum through feedback at each turn. (author)

  11. Testing the Beat Frequency Model of Horizontal Branch Qpos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Paul

    The beat frequency modulated accretion (BFMA) model requires strong correlations in the horizontal branch quasiperiodic oscillations (HBO) and low frequency noise (LFN) amplitudes on time scales HBO and LFN amplitude predicted by the BFMA model and constrain some of the free observable parameters in the model. Any HBO model must account for these properties.

  12. Efficiency of brainwave entrainment by binaural beats in reducing anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Alipoor

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anxiety is a fundamental phenomenon that is a common symptom in all mental disorders. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of brainwave entrainment on anxiety reduction using binaural beats. Methods: In this experimental double-blind study, 30 employees were selected from an engineering research firm through random sampling and replacement and divided into two groups: control group and experimental group. All participants completed the Spielberger’s State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. Then, the experimental group listened to binaural beats which was recorded on a non-vocal piece of music for 4 weeks, 3 sessions each week. Each session lasted about 20 minutes. At the same time, the control group listened to the background music without any entrainment sound. At the end, both groups completed the anxiety questionnaire and the anxiety scores of both groups obtained before and after intervention were analyzed by ANCOVA. Results: The findings showed that the brainwave entrainment using binaural beats led to the significant reduction of state anxiety (P<0.001 and trait anxiety (P<0.018. Conclusion: Brainwave entrainment using binaural beats is an effective factor in decreasing state and trait anxiety; so, it can be used to reduce anxiety in mental health centers.

  13. Reduced Order Dead-Beat Observers for a Bioreactor

    CERN Document Server

    Karafyllis, Iasson

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the strong observability property and the reduced-order dead-beat observer design problem for a continuous bioreactor. New relationships between coexistence and strong observability, and checkable sufficient conditions for strong observability, are established for a chemostat with two competing microbial species. Furthermore, the dynamic output feedback stabilization problem is solved for the case of one species.

  14. Factors associated with wife beating in Egypt: Analysis of two surveys (1995 and 2005)

    OpenAIRE

    Dhaher Enas; Labeeb Shokria; Mikolajczyk Rafael T; Akmatov Manas K; Khan Md Mobarak

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Wife beating is an important public health problem in many developing countries. We assessed the rates of wife beating and examined factors associated with wife beating in 1995 and 2005 in Egypt. Methods We used data from two Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) conducted in Egypt in 1995 and 2005 using multistage household sampling. Data related to wife beating included information from 7122 women in 1995 and 5612 women in 2005. Logistic regression was used to analyze fac...

  15. Finding the beat: a neural perspective across humans and non-human primates

    OpenAIRE

    Merchant, Hugo; Grahn, Jessica; Trainor, Laurel; Rohrmeier, Martin; Fitch, W. Tecumseh

    2015-01-01

    Humans possess an ability to perceive and synchronize movements to the beat in music (‘beat perception and synchronization’), and recent neuroscientific data have offered new insights into this beat-finding capacity at multiple neural levels. Here, we review and compare behavioural and neural data on temporal and sequential processing during beat perception and entrainment tasks in macaques (including direct neural recording and local field potential (LFP)) and humans (including fMRI, EEG and...

  16. Blessed are those that hunger and thirst for righteousness: Sharpening the ethical dimension of prophetic preaching in a context of corruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fritz W. de Wet

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of corruption has enormous negative consequences for the ideal of an orderly and peaceful society. Corruption does not only have a destructive impact on socio-economic life, but also on human relationships, value systems and vision for life. With this research the authors described the role of the ethical dimension of prophetic preaching in addressing the apparent lack of righteousness as it manifests in a context of corruption in the South African society. The problem field was explored with the focus on an apparent lack of vision and willingness to hunger and thirst for righteousness in the current manifestation of corruption in the South African society. Normative perspectives from Scripture (attempting to voice the impact of Jesus� words in the Beatitudes, with the focus on Matthew 5�6 were discussed. It is reasoned that Jesus� words pneumatologically proved to be essential in developing a sharpened and action-inducing vision of the righteousness of the kingdom of God breaking through in the praxis of a society struggling with the effects of corruption. The research culminated in the formulation of preliminary homiletic theory with a view to a vision for a kind of prophetic preaching that will be able to activate the consciousness of hungering and thirsting for the righteousness of God�s kingdom and lead the believer in a life culminating in blessed nourishment. The ethical dimension of prophetic preaching is anchored in the eschatological sphere, aimed at making the perceiver conscious of the distinct presence of the King, calling his people to a blessed presence in this world and empowering them with his promise of restoration of an abundant life for all.

  17. Mild cold effects on hunger, food intake, satiety and skin temperature in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Langeveld

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Mild cold exposure increases energy expenditure and can influence energy balance, but at the same time it does not increase appetite and energy intake. Objective To quantify dermal insulative cold response, we assessed thermal comfort and skin temperatures changes by infrared thermography. Methods We exposed healthy volunteers to either a single episode of environmental mild cold or thermoneutrality. We measured hunger sensation and actual free food intake. After a thermoneutral overnight stay, five males and five females were exposed to either 18°C (mild cold or 24°C (thermoneutrality for 2.5 h. Metabolic rate, vital signs, skin temperature, blood biochemistry, cold and hunger scores were measured at baseline and for every 30 min during the temperature intervention. This was followed by an ad libitum meal to obtain the actual desired energy intake after cold exposure. Results We could replicate the cold-induced increase in REE. But no differences were detected in hunger, food intake, or satiety after mild cold exposure compared with thermoneutrality. After long-term cold exposure, high cold sensation scores were reported, which were negatively correlated with thermogenesis. Skin temperature in the sternal area was tightly correlated with the increase in energy expenditure. Conclusions It is concluded that short-term mild cold exposure increases energy expenditure without changes in food intake. Mild cold exposure resulted in significant thermal discomfort, which was negatively correlated with the increase in energy expenditure. Moreover, there is a great between-subject variability in cold response. These data provide further insights on cold exposure as an anti-obesity measure.

  18. Correlations in heart beat data as quantitative characterization of heart pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correlation between heart pathology and statistical properties of heart beat data has been studied. It is shown that heart beat data has different scaling behavior for healthy and disease cases. Possibilities to develop new monitoring technique based on the permanent control of the correlations in heart beat data are discussed. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  19. 76 FR 14737 - Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) Request for Grant Proposals: One Beat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ... of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) Request for Grant Proposals: One Beat Announcement Type... opportunities. One Beat is a programmatic refinement of the existing Fiscal Year 2010 Cultural Visitors program..., professional enrichment, and artistic production. By concentrating on music, One Beat seeks to combine...

  20. Poor synchronization to the beat may result from deficient auditory-motor mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowiński, Jakub; Dalla Bella, Simone

    2013-08-01

    Moving to the beat of music is natural and spontaneous for humans. Yet some individuals, so-called 'beat deaf', may differ from the majority by being unable to synchronize their movements to musical beat. This condition was recently described in Mathieu (Phillips-Silver et al. (2011). Neuropsychologia, 49, 961-969), a beat-deaf individual, showing inaccurate motor synchronization to the beat accompanied by poor beat perception, with spared pitch processing. It has been suggested that beat deafness is the outcome of impoverished beat perception. Deficient synchronization to the beat, however, may also result from inaccurate mapping of the perceived beat to movement. To test this possibility, we asked 99 non-musicians to synchronize with musical and non-musical stimuli via hand tapping. Ten among them who revealed particularly poor synchronization were submitted to a thorough assessment of motor synchronization to various pacing stimuli and of beat perception. Four participants showed poor synchronization in absence of poor pitch perception; moreover, among them, two individuals were unable to synchronize to music, in spite of unimpaired detection of small durational deviations in musical and non-musical sequences, and normal rhythm discrimination. This mismatch of perception and action points toward disrupted auditory-motor mapping as the key impairment accounting for poor synchronization to the beat. PMID:23838002

  1. Agricultural Extension for the Invisible Actors in Hunger Drama in Rural Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Egbuna, Ngozi

    2005-01-01

    It is now an undisputable fact that rural women farmers produce more than half of all the food grown in Nigeria. They are mainly responsibility for providing food for their families as they plant, harvest and fish, gather fuel wood, fetch water, cook as well as process and sell foodstuffs. This paper describes them as invisible actors in the hunger drama because though they feed the nation, they have little or no access to factors of production that boost productivity such as extension servic...

  2. Effect of rye bread breakfasts on subjective hunger and satiety: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersson Roger

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies report that dietary fibre from different sources promotes the feeling of satiety and suppresses hunger. However, results for cereal fibre from rye are essentially lacking. The aim of the present study was to investigate subjective appetite during 8 h after intake of iso-caloric rye bread breakfasts varying in rye dietary fibre composition and content. Methods The study was divided into two parts. The first part (n = 16 compared the satiating effect of iso-caloric bread breakfasts including different milling fractions of rye (bran, intermediate fraction (B4 and sifted flour. The second part (n = 16 investigated the dose-response effect of rye bran and intermediate rye fraction, each providing 5 or 8 g of dietary fibre per iso-caloric bread breakfast. Both study parts used a wheat bread breakfast as reference and a randomised, within-subject comparison design. Appetite (hunger, satiety and desire to eat was rated regularly from just before breakfast at 08:00 until 16:00. Amount, type and timing of food and drink intake were standardised during the study period. Results The Milling fractions study showed that each of the rye breakfasts resulted in a suppressed appetite during the time period before lunch (08:30–12:00 compared with the wheat reference bread breakfast. At a comparison between the rye bread breakfasts the one with rye bran induced the strongest effect on satiety. In the afternoon the effect from all three rye bread breakfasts could still be seen as a decreased hunger and desire to eat compared to the wheat reference bread breakfast. In the Dose-response study both levels of rye bran and the lower level of intermediate rye fraction resulted in an increased satiety before lunch compared with the wheat reference bread breakfast. Neither the variation in composition between the milling fractions nor the different doses resulted in significant differences in any of the appetite ratings when compared

  3. Effects of different exercise intensities on energy expenditure and hunger sensation in young adults

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner Luiz do Prado; Manoel da Cunha Costa; Pedro Rogério da Silva Neves; Tatiana Acioli Lins

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acute and short-term effects of differentaerobic exercise intensities on postexercise energy expenditure, respiratory exchange ratio (RER),and hunger sensation in young adults. Twenty healthy, physically active (>6 months) young menof normal weight (22.41±1.76 kg/m²) participated in this study. All subjects were randomly submittedto four experimental conditions: control (no exercise); LIE, low-intensity exercise (40% ofVO2peak); MIE, exercise of mo...

  4. Use of seismocardiogram for the beat-to-beat assessment of the Pulse Transit Time: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rienzo, Marco; Vaini, Emanuele; Lombardi, Prospero

    2015-08-01

    We propose a new methodology for the estimation of Pulse Transit Time, PTT, based on the use of the seismocardiogram for the identification of the aortic valve opening, AO. This method has been implemented to obtain a first description of the AO-derived PTT beat-to-beat variability at rest and during the recovery after a cycloergometer exercise at 25W and 100W, its relation with systolic blood pressure, S(BP), and its difference with respect to variability of the Pulse Arrival Time, PAT (i.e. the BP transit time estimated by considering the ECG R peak instead of AO as proximal site). Our preliminary data indicate that 1) the fast components of the PTT variability are only marginally influenced by respiration; 2) only the slower components of the PTT variability are correlated with systolic BP; 3) major differences exist in the dynamics of PTT and PAT, being PAT variability significantly larger and importantly influenced by the beat-to-beat changes occurring in the Pre Ejection Period. PMID:26737949

  5. A review of beat-to-beat vectorcardiographic (VCG) parameters for analyzing repolarization variability in ECG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Muhammad A; Abbott, Derek

    2016-02-01

    Elevated ventricular repolarization lability is believed to be linked to the risk of ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation. However, ventricular repolarization is a complex electrical phenomenon, and abnormalities in ventricular repolarization are not completely understood. To evaluate repolarization lability, vectorcardiography (VCG) is an alternative approach where the electrocardiographic (ECG) signal can be considered as possessing both magnitude and direction. Recent research has shown that VCG is advantageous over ECG signal analysis for identification of repolarization abnormality. One of the key reasons is that the VCG approach does not rely on exact identification of the T-wave offset, which improves the reproducibility of the VCG technique. However, beat-to-beat variability in VCG is an emerging area for the investigation of repolarization abnormality though not yet fully realized. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to explore the techniques, findings, and efficacy of beat-to-beat VCG parameters for analyzing repolarization lability, which may have potential utility for further study. PMID:25992510

  6. World Literature - World Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offering their own twenty-first-century perspectives - across generations, nationalities and disciplines -, the contributors to this anthology explore the idea of world literature for what it may add of new connections and itineraries to the study of literature and culture today. Covering a vast ...... historical material these essays, by a diverse group of scholars, examine the pioneers of world literature and the roles played by translation, migration and literary institutions in the circulation and reception of both national and cosmopolitan literatures....

  7. Free trade – a priority issue of G-20 summits after the world economy went into recession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ph. D. Alina-Petronela Haller

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The world economy has been greatly affected by the current recession. All countries have suffered regardless of their level of development. Given that global problems require global solutions, world powers have met at summits of the G-20 forum, in order to determine the causes of the recession and adopt the most relevant measures to overcome the crisis and to correct other imbalances (e.g. environmental issues, hunger existing in the world.

  8. Free trade – a priority issue of G-20 summits after the world economy went into recession

    OpenAIRE

    Alina-Petronela Haller

    2011-01-01

    The world economy has been greatly affected by the current recession. All countries have suffered regardless of their level of development. Given that global problems require global solutions, world powers have met at summits of the G-20 forum, in order to determine the causes of the recession and adopt the most relevant measures to overcome the crisis and to correct other imbalances (e.g. environmental issues, hunger) existing in the world.

  9. Free trade – a priority issue of G-20 summits after the world economy went into recession

    OpenAIRE

    Ph. D. Alina-Petronela Haller

    2010-01-01

    The world economy has been greatly affected by the current recession. All countries have suffered regardless of their level of development. Given that global problems require global solutions, world powers have met at summits of the G-20 forum, in order to determine the causes of the recession and adopt the most relevant measures to overcome the crisis and to correct other imbalances (e.g. environmental issues, hunger) existing in the world.

  10. Proportion of insoluble fibre in the diet affects behaviour and hunger in broiler breeders growing at similar rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birte Lindstrøm; Thodberg, Karen; Malmkvist, Jens;

    2011-01-01

    litter quality. Birds on diet H2 continued to show foraging behaviour throughout the day, and were more frequently engaged in dust bathing and other comfort behaviour. This experiment indicates that high-fibre diets can alleviate the feeling of hunger currently experienced by broiler breeders, and a high......With a view to alleviate the feeling of hunger in broiler breeders, different types of fibre sources were used in high-fibre diets to increase feed quantity while limiting growth to industry recommended levels. Using scatter feeding, three diets (C1: commercial control diet, 1 × fibre content, 80......, birds fed C1 ate significantly faster and showed a higher compensatory feed intake than birds on diets H2 and L2, indicating that the two high-fibre diets did reduce the level of hunger experienced by the birds. Behavioural observations carried out at 14 weeks of age showed high levels of tail pecking...

  11. Beat-to-beat systolic time-interval measurement from heart sounds and ECG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systolic time intervals are highly correlated to fundamental cardiac functions. Several studies have shown that these measurements have significant diagnostic and prognostic value in heart failure condition and are adequate for long-term patient follow-up and disease management. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using heart sound (HS) to accurately measure the opening and closing moments of the aortic heart valve. These moments are crucial to define the main systolic timings of the heart cycle, i.e. pre-ejection period (PEP) and left ventricular ejection time (LVET). We introduce an algorithm for automatic extraction of PEP and LVET using HS and electrocardiogram. PEP is estimated with a Bayesian approach using the signal's instantaneous amplitude and patient-specific time intervals between atrio-ventricular valve closure and aortic valve opening. As for LVET, since the aortic valve closure corresponds to the start of the S2 HS component, we base LVET estimation on the detection of the S2 onset. A comparative assessment of the main systolic time intervals is performed using synchronous signal acquisitions of the current gold standard in cardiac time-interval measurement, i.e. echocardiography, and HS. The algorithms were evaluated on a healthy population, as well as on a group of subjects with different cardiovascular diseases (CVD). In the healthy group, from a set of 942 heartbeats, the proposed algorithm achieved 7.66 ± 5.92 ms absolute PEP estimation error. For LVET, the absolute estimation error was 11.39 ± 8.98 ms. For the CVD population, 404 beats were used, leading to 11.86 ± 8.30 and 17.51 ± 17.21 ms absolute PEP and LVET errors, respectively. The results achieved in this study suggest that HS can be used to accurately estimate LVET and PEP. (paper)

  12. Hyperglycaemia attenuates the gastrokinetic effect of erythromycin and affects the perception of postprandial hunger in normal subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Recent studies have demonstrated that acute changes in the blood glucose concentration may affect gastrointestinal motor function and the perception of sensations arising from the gastrointestinal tract. Erythromycin has been shown to accelerate gastric emptying in both normal subjects and patients with diabetes mellitus. The major aims of this study were to determine in normal subjects whether the effects of erythromycin on gastric emptying, and perceptions of hunger and fullness are modified by the blood glucose concentration. 10 normal subjects (aged 20-39 yr) underwent concurrent measurement of gastric emptying, blood glucose, hunger and fullness on four separate occasions: twice during euglycaemia (∼4 mmol/L) and twice during hyperglycaemia (∼15 mmol/L). Either erythromycin (3 mg/kg) or saline (0.9%) was administered intravenously immediately before ingestion of a radioisotopically labelled solid meal. Gastric emptying was slower (P<0.0001) during hyperglycaemia when compared to euglycaemia after both erythromycin and saline administration. Erythromycin accelerated the post-lag emptying rate during euglycaemia (P<0.05), but not hyperglycaemia. Hunger decreased (P<0.001) and fullness increased (P<0.001) after the meal Postprandial hunger was less (P<0.05) and fullness greater (P<0.05 during hyperglycaemia after saline infusion, but not after erythromycin. Hunger was greater after erythromycin when compared to saline during both hyperglycaemia and euglycaemia (P<0.05). In conclusion, at a blood glucose concentration of ∼15 mmol/L when compared to euglycaemia: (i) after administration of erythromycin (3 mg/kg IV) gastric emptying of a solid meal is much slower, (ii) the effect of erythromycin on gastric emptying of a solid meal is attenuated and (iii) the perception of postprandial hunger is reduced and that of fullness increased

  13. Hyperglycaemia attenuates the gastrokinetic effect of erythromycin and affects the perception of postprandial hunger in normal subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.L.; Berry, M.; Kong, M.F.; Kwiatek, M.; Samsom, M.; Horowitz, M. [University of South Australia, SA (Australia). School of Medicine Radiation]|[Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA (Australia). Department of Medicine

    1998-06-01

    Full text: Recent studies have demonstrated that acute changes in the blood glucose concentration may affect gastrointestinal motor function and the perception of sensations arising from the gastrointestinal tract. Erythromycin has been shown to accelerate gastric emptying in both normal subjects and patients with diabetes mellitus. The major aims of this study were to determine in normal subjects whether the effects of erythromycin on gastric emptying, and perceptions of hunger and fullness are modified by the blood glucose concentration. 10 normal subjects (aged 20-39 yr) underwent concurrent measurement of gastric emptying, blood glucose, hunger and fullness on four separate occasions: twice during euglycaemia ({approx}4 mmol/L) and twice during hyperglycaemia ({approx}15 mmol/L). Either erythromycin (3 mg/kg) or saline (0.9%) was administered intravenously immediately before ingestion of a radioisotopically labelled solid meal. Gastric emptying was slower (P<0.0001) during hyperglycaemia when compared to euglycaemia after both erythromycin and saline administration. Erythromycin accelerated the post-lag emptying rate during euglycaemia (P<0.05), but not hyperglycaemia. Hunger decreased (P<0.001) and fullness increased (P<0.001) after the meal Postprandial hunger was less (P<0.05) and fullness greater (P<0.05) during hyperglycaemia after saline infusion, but not after erythromycin. Hunger was greater after erythromycin when compared to saline during both hyperglycaemia and euglycaemia (P<0.05). In conclusion, at a blood glucose concentration of {approx}15 mmol/L when compared to euglycaemia: (i) after administration of erythromycin (3 mg/kg IV) gastric emptying of a solid meal is much slower, (ii) the effect of erythromycin on gastric emptying of a solid meal is attenuated and (iii) the perception of postprandial hunger is reduced and that of fullness increased

  14. Fighting hunger through small scale farming? : Investigating the farm size-productivity relationship in Zambian food production.

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis I use Zambia as a country case to discuss the role small-scale agriculture can play in achieving the MDG no. 1 on halving the proportion of people suffering from hunger. Within the field of agricultural development there is an ongoing debate concerning the future of small-scale farming in developing economies. The question is whether small-scale, owner-occupied farms can play a vital role in fighting hunger and poverty, or if further development of large mechanized farms is nee...

  15. Delayed discounting and hedonic hunger in the prediction of lab-based eating behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Alice V; Howard, Janna; Lowe, Michael R

    2015-12-01

    Research suggests that characteristics identified in obese individuals, such as impulsive decision-making and hedonic hunger, may exist in nonobese populations. This study examined the independent and interactive effects of impulsive decision-making (measured via delay discounting, DD) and hedonic hunger (assessed with the Power of Food Scale, PFS) on food intake. Female participants (N=78) ate a self-determined amount of plain oatmeal, completed self-report measures and the delay discounting task, and participated in a sham taste test of palatable sweet and salty foods. Unexpectedly, PFS and DD scores interacted to predict consumption of the total amount of food consumed, and of oatmeal alone, but not of snack food alone. High-PFS participants consumed more when also high in DD, while low-PFS participants showed the opposite pattern of consumption. The findings identify variables that may increase propensity toward overconsumption and potential weight gain; future research is necessary to evaluate the utility of these constructs to predict increases in BMI over time. PMID:26183899

  16. Latino Autobiography, the Aesthetic, and Political Criticism: The Case of Hunger of Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Durán

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This 2003 essay, entitled “Latino Autobiography, the Aesthetic, and Political Criticism: The Case of Hunger of Memory,” was previously published in Nor Shall Diamond Die: American Studies in Honour of Javier Coy, edited by Carme Manuel and Paul Scott Derrick (Valencia: Biblioteca Javier Coy d’estudis nord-americans, Universitat de València. In a fierce defense of the aesthetic properties of the ethnic autobiography, Isabel Durán, “as an outsider” to the politics of “Chicano” critics working in the US (“I am Spanish, and live in Spain”, argues that certain politicized critical approaches to ethnic autobiography inside the US have insisted on an identity politics that reads ethnic or minority writing as “good” if and only if it is “obedient” to the critic’s political ideology, regardless of its aesthetic value as art. Proposing a “renewed theory of the aesthetic,” Durán offers a strong refutation of Ramón Saldívar’s critical assessment of Richard Rodriguez’s Hunger of Memory, while simultaneously demonstrating how a transnational American Studies produces very different intellectual concerns.

  17. Emergence of Synchronized Beating during the Regrowth of Eukaryotic Flagella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.; Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan

    2011-09-01

    A fundamental issue in the biology of eukaryotic flagella is the origin of synchronized beating observed in tissues and organisms containing multiple flagella. Recent studies of the biflagellate unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii provided the first evidence that the interflagellar coupling responsible for synchronization is of hydrodynamic origin. To investigate this mechanism in detail, we study here synchronization in Chlamydomonas as its flagella slowly regrow after mechanically induced self-scission. The duration of synchronized intervals is found to be strongly dependent on flagellar length. Analysis within a stochastic model of coupled phase oscillators is used to extract the length dependence of the interflagellar coupling and the intrinsic beat frequencies of the two flagella. Physical and biological considerations that may explain these results are proposed.

  18. Finding the ciliary beating pattern with optimal efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Osterman, Natan

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a measure for energetic efficiency of biological cilia acting individually or collectively and numerically determine the optimal beating patterns according to this criterion. Maximizing the efficiency of a single cilium leads to curly, often symmetric and somewhat counterintuitive patterns. But when looking at a densely ciliated surface, the optimal patterns become remarkably similar to what is observed in microorganisms like Paramecium. The optimal beating pattern then consists of a fast effective stroke and a slow sweeping recovery stroke. Metachronal coordination is essential for efficient pumping and the highest efficiency is achieved with antiplectic waves. Efficiency also increases with an increasing density of cilia up to the point where crowding becomes a problem. We finally relate the pumping efficiency of cilia to the swimming efficiency of a spherical microorganism and show that the experimentally estimated efficiency of Paramecium is surprisingly close to the theoretically possible op...

  19. Auxiliary measures to assess factors related to food insecurity: Preliminary testing and baseline characteristics of newly designed hunger-coping scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinard, Courtney; Smith, Teresa M; Calloway, Eric E; Fricke, Hollyanne E; Bertmann, Farryl M; Yaroch, Amy L

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe the development and preliminary testing of new scales to assess hunger-coping behaviors in a very low-income population. Very low-income adults (≥ 19 years), caregivers to at least one child (n = 306) completed a survey in a community setting (e.g., libraries). The survey included novel items assessing hunger-coping behaviors (e.g., trade-offs to purchase food, strategies to stretch and obtain food), food insecurity status, and physiological hunger. Internal consistency of hunger-coping scales, one-way ANOVAs, post-hoc analyses, Spearman's correlations among variables. Respondents were 75% female, 51% African American, 34% White, and 15% Hispanic, and 73% earned <$20,000/year. Four scales emerged: hunger-coping trade-offs, financial coping strategies, rationing coping strategies, and physiological adult hunger symptoms. All scales demonstrated acceptable internal consistency (α/KR-20 = 0.70-0.90). Predictive, construct, and content validity were demonstrated by correlations between hunger-coping scales and food insecurity (FI), measured with the USDA 6-item HFSSM (rs = 0.42-0.68, ps < 0.001). Higher levels of hunger-coping trade-offs (F(2,297) = 42.54, p < 0.001), financial coping strategies (F(2,287) = 70.77, p < 0.001), and rationing coping strategies (F(2,284) = 69.19, p < 0.001), corresponded with increasing levels of FI. These preliminary results support use of newly developed hunger-coping scales in a very low-income population and can compliment traditional food security measures to inform hunger prevention policy and programming. PMID:27462530

  20. Does Corporate Governance Matter in Meeting and Beating Analysts’ Forecasts

    OpenAIRE

    Soumaya Ben Malek Maztoul

    2014-01-01

    Meeting and beating analysts’ forecast has received substantial attention, most of studies investigate twoprinciples problems: the valuation and value relevance of meeting and tools used to achieve benchmarks. Thisresearch is different, we investigate whether internal corporate governance impacts on meeting and beatinganalysts’ forecasts and consistently do it, we also examine if these attributes alleviate opportunistic behavior.This paper contributes to the growing literature on earnings ben...

  1. Robotic Motion Compensation for Beating Heart Intracardiac Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Howe, Robert D.; Yuen, Shelten G.; Kettler, Daniel T.; Notovny, Paul M.; Plowes, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    3D ultrasound imaging has enabled minimally invasive, beating heart intracardiac procedures. However, rapid heart motion poses a serious challenge to the surgeon that is compounded by significant time delays and noise in 3D ultrasound. This paper investigates the concept of using a one-degree-of-freedom motion compensation system to synchronize with tissue motions that may be approximated by 1D motion models. We characterize the motion of the mitral valve annulus and show that it is well appr...

  2. A waveguide polarization toolset design based on mode beating

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchings, D.C.; Holmes, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    A toolset of waveguide elements is examined, which can be combined to produce polarization functional devices in a single contiguous waveguide. In particular, waveguide implementations of an optical isolator and a polarization modulator are discussed. The waveguide elements, i.e., quasi-phase-matched nonreciprocal polarization mode converter, reciprocal polarization mode converter (R-PMC), and a differential phase shifter, are all based on mode beating. A universal 3-dB R-PMC specification is...

  3. Coordinated Beating of Algal Flagella is Mediated by Basal Coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Kirsty Y.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2015-01-01

    In a great many of the contexts in which groups of cilia or flagella are found they exhibit synchronized behavior. This includes phase-locking, as seen in $Chlamydomonas$ flagella, and metachronal wave formation in the ciliary arrays of $Paramecium$ or in the respiratory cilia of higher organisms. Since the observations by Gray and Rothschild of phase synchrony of nearby swimming spermatozoa, it has been a working hypothesis that synchrony arises from hydrodynamic interactions between beating...

  4. Observation of chaotic beats in a driven memristive Chua's circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Ahamed, A. Ishaq; Srinivasan, K.; Murali, K.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a time varying resistive circuit realising the action of an active three segment piecewise linear flux controlled memristor is proposed. Using this as the nonlinearity, a driven Chua's circuit is implemented. The phenomenon of chaotic beats in this circuit is observed for a suitable choice of parameters. The memristor acts as a chaotically time varying resistor (CTVR), switching between a less conductive OFF state and a more conductive ON state. This chaotic switching is govern...

  5. Beat-Event Detection in Action Movie Franchises

    OpenAIRE

    Potapov, Danila; Douze, Matthijs; Revaud, Jerome; Harchaoui, Zaid; Schmid, Cordelia

    2015-01-01

    While important advances were recently made towards temporally localizing and recognizing specific human actions or activities in videos, efficient detection and classification of long video chunks belonging to semantically defined categories such as "pursuit" or "romance" remains challenging.We introduce a new dataset, Action Movie Franchises, consisting of a collection of Hollywood action movie franchises. We define 11 non-exclusive semantic categories - called beat-categories - that are br...

  6. Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010: An Opportunity for School Nurses to Make a Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Jessica L.; Galon, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Implementation of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 will provide an opportunity for school nurses to intervene in the serious childhood obesity problem in the United States. Major changes in the management of the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) will likely challenge schools yet may provide the impetus for a collaborative effort by the…

  7. Metabolic and cognitive coefficients in the development of hunger sensations after pure macronutrient ingestion in the morning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Karina; Colombani, Paolo C; Wenk, Caspar

    2004-02-01

    The effect of pure carbohydrate, protein and fat ingestion on different aspects of short-term satiety and their relation to metabolic and cognitive performance indices were studied in 15 healthy male students. Subjects were tested in three sessions for short-term changes in blood indices, indirect calorimetry, different aspects of hunger sensations as well as mood and objective cognitive performance using a repeated-measures, counterbalanced cross-over design. Measurements were made after an overnight fast before and hourly during 3 h after macronutrient ingestion. Preloads were isoenergetic (1670 kJ) spoonable creams with similar sensory properties of either pure carbohydrates, protein or fat. Overall 'desire to eat' and 'gastric emptiness' represented principal components for overall 'hunger' ratings, which were larger after fat and carbohydrate compared with protein ingestion. In the first hour, the hunger suppression of carbohydrates was similar to that of protein and related to changes in beta-hydroxybutyrate and insulin concentrations accompanied with a preference for carbohydrate-rich food. In the third hour, it was similar to the low satiating power of fat and related to diet-induced thermogenesis together with a preference for protein-rich food. For all macronutrients feelings of 'energy' were negatively related to hunger sensations, whereas objective cognitive performance was positively related. Our findings suggest that the subjective satiating effect of carbohydrates seems to change with time in relation to postprandial metabolic changes, presumably mainly dependent on the glycemic response and diet-induced thermogenesis. PMID:15036783

  8. Redefining the functional roles of the gastrointestinal migrating motor complex and motilin in small bacterial overgrowth and hunger signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloose, Eveline; Tack, Jan

    2016-02-15

    During the fasting state the upper gastrointestinal tract exhibits a specific periodic migrating contraction pattern that is known as the migrating motor complex (MMC). Three different phases can be distinguished during the MMC. Phase III of the MMC is the most active of the three and can start either in the stomach or small intestine. Historically this pattern was designated to be the housekeeper of the gut since disturbances in the pattern were associated with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth; however, its role in the involvement of hunger sensations was already hinted in the beginning of the 20th century by both Cannon (Cannon W, Washburn A. Am J Physiol 29: 441-454, 1912) and Carlson (Carlson A. The Control of Hunger in Health and Disease. Chicago, IL: Univ. of Chicago Press, 1916). The discovery of motilin in 1973 shed more light on the control mechanisms of the MMC. Motilin plasma levels fluctuate together with the phases of the MMC and induce phase III contractions with a gastric onset. Recent research suggests that these motilin-induced phase III contractions signal hunger in healthy subjects and that this system is disturbed in morbidly obese patients. This minireview describes the functions of the MMC in the gut and its regulatory role in controlling hunger sensations. PMID:26660537

  9. Social Welfare and the Psychology of Food Sharing: Short-Term Hunger Increases Support for Social Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Michael Bang; Aarøe, Lene; Jensen, Niels Holm;

    2014-01-01

    -term fluctuations in hunger. Using theories in evolutionary psychology, we predict that hungry individuals will be greedier and take more resources from others while also attempting to induce others to share by signaling cooperative intentions and expressing support for sharing, including evolutionarily novel forms...

  10. Aversive viscerally referred states and thirst accompanying the sating of hunger motivation by rapid digestion of glucosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, David A; O'Leary, Gemma; Li, Lixiang; Higgs, Suzanne

    2011-03-01

    Associative conditioning of satiety indicates that concentrated maltodextrin (cMD) may induce a mildly aversive visceral signal within 20 min of its ingestion, as well as satiating normally. Individuals' awareness of this adverse state was tested on ratings of statistically distinct descriptions of factors liable to suppress hunger, whether distressing or comfortably satisfying. Wanted amount of a food and the pleasantness of eating it correlated highly for each of five foods, once again refuting the widespread presumption that "pleasant" refers to sensory pleasure; hence, as in previous reports, suppression of hunger was measured as a reduction of the averaged pleasantness of functionally related foods. At 20 min after the start of ingestion of a small meal on a near-empty stomach, cMD reliably reduced hunger. The greatest influence on hunger, besides normal sating, was thirst, but there were also tendencies to nausea and bloat, although all less than after a full sized meal. Visceral processes shortly after a meal can create dissociable conscious states, only one of which is satiety for food. PMID:21118700

  11. "Reforms Looked Really Good on Paper": Rural Food Service Responses to the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Disa; Askelson, Natoshia; Golembiewski, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHKA) required schools to make changes to meals provided to children. Rural school districts have limited resources, with increased obesity rates and local food insecurity. In this study we sought to understand the perceptions of rural food service directors and the barriers to implementing…

  12. Reduction of ciliary beat frequency in vitro by sputum from patients with bronchiectasis: a serine proteinase effect.

    OpenAIRE

    Smallman, L A; Hill, S. L.; Stockley, R A

    1984-01-01

    We have examined the effect of adding elastase positive sputum from six patients with purulent bronchiectasis on the ciliary beat frequency of nasal epithelium from normal subjects. Control studies of cilia suspended in tissue culture medium showed little change in ciliary beat frequency over six hours. Cilia incubated in elastase positive secretions, however, showed a considerable decrease in ciliary beat frequency over the period, falling from a mean of 13 X 40 beats/second to 6 X 78 beats/...

  13. Depressed affect and dietary restraint in adolescent boys' and girls' eating in the absence of hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Nichole R; Shomaker, Lauren B; Pickworth, Courtney K; Grygorenko, Mariya V; Radin, Rachel M; Vannucci, Anna; Shank, Lisa M; Brady, Sheila M; Courville, Amber B; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-08-01

    Data suggest that depressed affect and dietary restraint are related to disinhibited eating patterns in children and adults. Yet, experimental research has not determined to what extent depressed affect acutely affects eating in the absence of physiological hunger (EAH) in adolescents. In the current between-subjects experimental study, we measured EAH in 182 adolescent (13-17 y) girls (65%) and boys as ad libitum palatable snack food intake after youth ate to satiety from a buffet meal. Just prior to EAH, participants were randomly assigned to view either a sad or neutral film clip. Dietary restraint was measured with the Eating Disorder Examination. Adolescents who viewed the sad film clip reported small but significant increases in state depressed affect relative to adolescents who viewed the neutral film clip (p affective state and dietary restraint, is required to elucidate how state affect may interact with dietary restraint to influence EAH during adolescence. PMID:25936291

  14. Violence in Pop-Culture Media and The Hunger Games as a Prime Artifact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Benson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses the Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA methodology to analyze the meanings conveyed in relation to violence in Suzanne Collins' popular novel The Hunger Games and its film. As a representational popular­culture artifact marketed to young adults and teens, it is a primary example for the exposure of this age group to the levels of violence regularly displayed in contemporary popular media. This analysis seeks to critique the assertion that the types of violent exposure in the novel and the film are possibly inappropriate for the audience targeted. A new wave of attention and awareness on the part of producers of popular media and people of contemporary society alike is necessary.

  15. Hunger, food and drink in Brazilian popular music: a brief overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vasconcelos, Francisco de Assis Guedes; Vasconcelos, Mariana Perrelli; de Vasconcelos, Iris Helena Guedes

    2015-01-01

    The article reflects on how the themes of hunger, consumption of soft drinks and consumption of beans and rice are addressed in Brazilian popular music. We investigate the years of military dictatorship (1964-1985). The focus of the analysis is on the so-called protest song, a musical genre characterized by aesthetic, cultural, political, ideological and social criticism to military rule. The study of the ideology and philosophy of language of Mikhail Bakhtin is the theoretical reference; especially his concepts of "ideological sign" and "word." Analysis reveals that the protest song portrayed elements of the economic, political and social contexts and led to the diffusion of healthy or unhealthy eating habits or ideologies, contributing to the construction of the Brazilian dietary identity. PMID:26331641

  16. The Role of Food and Nutrition System Approaches in Tackling Hidden Hunger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emile Frison

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the World’s greatest challenges is to secure sufficient and healthy food for all, and to do so in an environmentally sustainable manner. This review explores the interrelationships of food, health, and environment, and their role in addressing chronic micronutrient deficiencies, also known as “hidden hunger”, affecting over two billion people worldwide. While the complexity and underlying determinants of undernutrition have been well-understood for decades, the scaling of food and nutrition system approaches that combine sustainable agriculture aimed at improved diet diversity and livelihoods have been limited in their development and implementation. However, an integrated system approach to reduce hidden hunger could potentially serve as a sustainable opportunity.

  17. Human health and nutrition: How isotopes are helping to overcome ''hidden hunger''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a number of ways, the work of the IAEA is contributing to efforts directed at overcoming hidden hunger and other nutrition problems. The rationale for the IAEA's involvement is twofold. First, adequate nutrition is an essential component of any strategy for improving health, and the IAEA's Statute specifically identifies ''enlarging the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity'' as the major objective of programmes. Second, isotope techniques have a wide variety of applications -some of them unique - for targeted research in human nutrition, for assessing nutritional status, and for monitoring the effectiveness of nutritional intervention programmes. This article provides a brief overview of these techniques and their main applications in areas of human nutrition

  18. Dietary fibre added to very low calorie diet reduces hunger and alleviates constipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, A; Vrist, E; Quaade, F

    1990-01-01

    To examine whether supplement of dietary fibre may improve compliance to a very low calorie diet (VLCD) a nutrition powder providing 388 kcal/day (men: 466 kcal/day) was compared with a similar version containing plant fibre 30 g/day. Twenty-two obese patients entered the study. After a baseline...... supplement (fibre effect, P less than 0.01). No effect of fibre supplementation to VLCD was found on satiety, consistency of faeces and flatulence. The supplement of dietary fibre did not influence plasma concentrations of divalent cations as calcium, iron or magnesium, nor did it add any lowering effect on...... plasma glucose, cholesterol or triglyceride to that of VLCD. In conclusion, the supplement of dietary fibre to VLCD may improve compliance by reducing hunger and increasing the number of bowel movements, without impairment of absorption of divalent cations....

  19. Metabolic regulation and behavior: how hunger produces arousal - an insect study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicher, Dieter

    2007-12-01

    The metabolic state affects the level of general activity of an organism. Satiety is related to relaxation while hunger is coupled to elevated activity which supports the chance to balance the energy deficiency. The unrestricted food availability in modern industrial nations along with no required locomotor activity are risk factors to develop disorders such as obesity. One of the strategies to find new targets for future treatment of metabolic disorders in men is to gain detailed knowledge of molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis in less complex, i.e. invertebrate systems. This review reports recent molecular studies in insects about how hunger signals may be linked to global activation. Adipokinetic peptide hormones (AKHs) are the insect counterpart to the mammalian glucagon. They are released upon lack of energy and mobilize internal fuel reserves. In addition, AKHs stimulate the locomotor activity which involves their activity within the central nervous system. In the cockroach Periplaneta americana various neurons express the AKH receptor. Some of these, the dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons belonging to a general arousal system, release the biogenic amine octopamine, the insect counterpart to mammalian adrenergic hormones. The two Periplaneta AKHs activate Gs proteins, and AKH I also potently activates Gq proteins. AKH I and - less effectively - AKH II accelerate spiking of DUM neurons via an increase of a pacemaking Ca2+ current. Systemically injected AKH I stimulates locomotion in contrast to AKH II. This behavioral difference corresponds to the different effectiveness of the AKHs on the level of G-proteins. PMID:18220952

  20. World law

    OpenAIRE

    Harold J. Berman; Robert W. Woodruff; James Barr Ames

    1999-01-01

    In the third millennium of the Christian era, which is characterised by the emergence of a world economy and eventually a world society, the concept of world law is needed to embrace not only the traditional disciplines of public international law, and comparative law, but also the common underlying legal principles applicable in world trade, world finance, transnational transfer of technology and other fields of world economic law, as well as in such emerging fields as the protection of the ...

  1. Dynamic curvature regulation accounts for the symmetric and asymmetric beats of Chlamydomonas flagella

    CERN Document Server

    Sartori, Pablo; Scholich, Andre; Jülicher, Frank; Howard, Jonathon

    2015-01-01

    Axonemal dyneins are the molecular motors responsible for the beating of cilia and flagella. These motors generate sliding forces between adjacent microtubule doublets within the axoneme, the motile cytoskeletal structure inside the flagellum. To create regular, oscillatory beating patterns, the activities of the axonemal dyneins must be coordinated both spatially and temporally. It is thought that coordination is mediated by stresses or strains that build up within the moving axoneme, but it is not known which components of stress or strain are involved, nor how they feed back on the dyneins. To answer this question, we used isolated, reactivate axonemes of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas as a model system. We derived a theory for beat regulation in a two-dimensional model of the axoneme. We then tested the theory by measuring the beat waveforms of wild type axonemes, which have asymmetric beats, and mutant axonemes, in which the beat is nearly symmetric, using high-precision spatial and temporal imaging....

  2. The BeatHealth Project: Considerations When Moving Technology from the Lab to the Wider World

    OpenAIRE

    Timoney, Joseph; Villing, Rudi; Lazzarini, Victor; Conway, Eoghan; Dawid, Czesak

    2015-01-01

    ‘Beathealth’ is an EU‐funded collaborative research project. The project consortium brings together scientific researchers from four different EU countries: Montpellier University and CHRU in France, Ghent University in Belgium, NUI Maynooth in Ireland and Technalia in Spain. The objective of the research is to harness the power of rhythm to realise new technology applications that can assist us to achieve better health. Furthermore, for those with declining physical health, such as Parkinson...

  3. Erasing the World's Slow Stain: Strategies to Beat Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Christopher; Williams, Brian G.; Espinal, Marcos A.; Raviglione, Mario C.

    2002-03-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR) is perceived as a growing hazard to human health worldwide. Judgments about the true scale of the problem, and strategies for containing it, need to come from a balanced appraisal of the epidemiological evidence. We conclude in this review that MDR is, and will probably remain, a locally severe problem; that epidemics can be prevented by fully exploiting the potential of standard short-course chemotherapy (SCC) based on cheap and safe first-line drugs; and that best-practice SCC may even reduce the incidence of MDR where it has already become endemic. On the basis of the available, imperfect data, we recommend a three-part response to the threat of MDR: widespread implementation of SCC as the cornerstone of good tuberculosis control, improved resistance testing and surveillance, and the careful introduction of second-line drugs after a sound evaluation of cost, effectiveness, and feasibility.

  4. Individual differences in beat perception affect gait responses to low- and high-groove music.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ann eLeow

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Slowed gait in Parkinson’s disease (PD patients can be improved when patients synchronize footsteps to isochronous metronome cues, but limited retention of such improvements suggest that permanent cueing regimes are needed for long-term improvements. If so, music might make permanent cueing regimes more pleasant, improving adherence; however, music cueing requires patients to synchronize movements to the beat, which might be difficult for PD patients who tend to show weak beat perception. One solution may be to use high groove music, which has high beat salience that may facilitate synchronization, and affective properties which may improve motivation to move. As a first step in understanding how beat perception affects gait in complex neurological disorders, we examined how beat perception ability affected gait in neurotypical adults. Synchronization performance and gait parameters were assessed as healthy young adults with strong or weak beat perception synchronized to low groove music, high groove music, and metronome cues. High groove music was predicted to elicit better synchronization than low groove music, due to its higher beat salience. Two musical tempi, or rates, were used: (1 preferred tempo: beat rate matched to preferred step rate and (2 faster tempo: beat rate adjusted to 22.5% faster than preferred step rate. For both strong and weak beat-perceivers, synchronization performance was best with metronome cues, followed by high groove music, and worst with low groove music. In addition, high groove music elicited longer and faster steps than low groove music, both at preferred tempo and at faster tempo. Low groove music was particularly detrimental to gait in weak beat-perceivers, who showed slower and shorter steps compared to uncued walking. The findings show that individual differences in beat perception affect gait when synchronizing footsteps to music, and have implications for using music in gait rehabilitation.

  5. Individual differences in beat perception affect gait responses to low- and high-groove music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, Li-Ann; Parrott, Taylor; Grahn, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    Slowed gait in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) can be improved when patients synchronize footsteps to isochronous metronome cues, but limited retention of such improvements suggest that permanent cueing regimes are needed for long-term improvements. If so, music might make permanent cueing regimes more pleasant, improving adherence; however, music cueing requires patients to synchronize movements to the "beat," which might be difficult for patients with PD who tend to show weak beat perception. One solution may be to use high-groove music, which has high beat salience that may facilitate synchronization, and affective properties, which may improve motivation to move. As a first step to understanding how beat perception affects gait in complex neurological disorders, we examined how beat perception ability affected gait in neurotypical adults. Synchronization performance and gait parameters were assessed as healthy young adults with strong or weak beat perception synchronized to low-groove music, high-groove music, and metronome cues. High-groove music was predicted to elicit better synchronization than low-groove music, due to its higher beat salience. Two musical tempi, or rates, were used: (1) preferred tempo: beat rate matched to preferred step rate and (2) faster tempo: beat rate adjusted to 22.5% faster than preferred step rate. For both strong and weak beat-perceivers, synchronization performance was best with metronome cues, followed by high-groove music, and worst with low-groove music. In addition, high-groove music elicited longer and faster steps than low-groove music, both at preferred tempo and at faster tempo. Low-groove music was particularly detrimental to gait in weak beat-perceivers, who showed slower and shorter steps compared to uncued walking. The findings show that individual differences in beat perception affect gait when synchronizing footsteps to music, and have implications for using music in gait rehabilitation. PMID:25374521

  6. A High-Density EEG Investigation into Steady State Binaural Beat Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Goodin, Peter; Ciorciari, Joseph; Baker, Kate; Carrey, Anne-Marie; Harper, Michelle; Kaufman, Jordy

    2012-01-01

    Binaural beats are an auditory phenomenon that has been suggested to alter physiological and cognitive processes including vigilance and brainwave entrainment. Some personality traits measured by the NEO Five Factor Model have been found to alter entrainment using pulsing light stimuli, but as yet no studies have examined if this occurs using steady state presentation of binaural beats for a relatively short presentation of two minutes. This study aimed to examine if binaural beat stimulation...

  7. Matrix Organisation : The design of cross-beat teamwork in newsrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Grubenmann, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Confronted by increased internal and external complexity, traditional forms of newswork have reached their limits. Journalistic start-ups, such as Quartz and NZZ.at, form emerging editorial teams around "obsessions" or "phenomena" to gain cross-beat perspectives of complex issues such as climate change, the financial crisis or the refugee crisis. Legacy media experimenting with cross-beat newswork see themselves confronted by challenges arising predominantly from beat structures. Consequently...

  8. Beating of Coupled Ultraviolet Light Modes in Zinc Oxide Nanoresonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirra, M.; Feneberg, M.; Prinz, G. M.; Reiser, A.; Röder, T.; Thonke, K.; Sauer, R.

    2009-02-01

    Periodic spatial intensity modulations of near-band-gap luminescence light at 3.36 eV photon energy are reported in nanometer-sized resonators of single zinc oxide nanorods. These modulations are observed when the luminescence light, due to excitonic recombination, is excited by a focused low-energy electron beam scanned along the rods. The acceleration energy of only 2 keV allows for a spatial resolution of a few ten nanometers. Numerical calculations based on the theory of dielectric cylindrical waveguides are performed identifying the intensity modulations as beating patterns of coupled TE01 and TM01 modes in the nanoresonator.

  9. Space-Time Localization and Registration on the Beating Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Nathan A.; Waugh, Kevin; Liu, Tian Yu Tommy; Zenati, Marco A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for localizing a miniature epicardial crawling robot, HeartLander, on the beating heart using only 6-degree-of-freedom position measurements from an electromagnetic position tracker and a dynamic surface model of the heart. Using only this information, motion and observation models of the system are developed such that a particle filter can accurately estimate not only the location of the robot on the surface of the heart, but also the pose of the heart in the ...

  10. Modulation of attosecond beating by resonant two-photon transition

    CERN Document Server

    Galán, Álvaro Jiménez; Martín, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytical model that characterizes two-photon transitions in the presence of autoionising states. We applied this model to interpret resonant RABITT spectra, and show that, as a harmonic traverses a resonance, the phase of the sideband beating significantly varies with photon energy. This phase variation is generally very different from the $\\pi$ jump observed in previous works, in which the direct path contribution was negligible. We illustrate the possible phase profiles arising in resonant two-photon transitions with an intuitive geometrical representation.

  11. Modulation of Attosecond Beating by Resonant Two-Photon Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Galán, Álvaro; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    We present an analytical model that characterizes two-photon transitions in the presence of autoionising states. We applied this model to interpret resonant RABITT spectra, and show that, as a harmonic traverses a resonance, the phase of the sideband beating significantly varies with photon energy. This phase variation is generally very different from the π jump observed in previous works, in which the direct path contribution was negligible. We illustrate the possible phase profiles arising in resonant two-photon transitions with an intuitive geometrical representation.

  12. Can compressed sensing beat the Nyquist sampling rate?

    CERN Document Server

    Yaroslavsky, L

    2015-01-01

    Data saving capability of "Compressed sensing (sampling)" in signal discretization is disputed and found to be far below the theoretical upper bound defined by the signal sparsity. On a simple and intuitive example, it is demonstrated that, in a realistic scenario for signals that are believed to be sparse, one can achieve a substantially larger saving than compressing sensing can. It is also shown that frequent assertions in the literature that "Compressed sensing" can beat the Nyquist sampling approach are misleading substitution of terms and are rooted in misinterpretation of the sampling theory.

  13. Run to the Beat: Sport and music for the masses

    OpenAIRE

    Karageorghis, CI

    2013-01-01

    Run to the Beat is a half marathon event that is accompanied by live and pre-recorded music. The author was involved with the event as the lead consultant in the period 2007-2010. This case study examines the genesis of the event, the science on which it was predicated and how it was received by participating runners and the media. The primary driver for the event was the 2007 ban on personal listening devices by the International Amateur Athletics Federation, which outraged recreational runn...

  14. Digital Processing of Beat Note Signals from Optical Frequency Synthesizers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čížek, Martin; Šmíd, Radek; Buchta, Zdeněk; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    Gothenburg: Chalmers University of Technology, 2012, s. 409-411. [European frequency and time forum 2012. Gothenburg (SE), 23.04.2012-27.04.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP102/11/P819; GA ČR GAP102/10/1813; GA ČR(CZ) GPP102/12/P962; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06007 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : digital processing of beat note signals * femtosecond optical frequency comb * digital servo-loop techniques * digital signal processing Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  15. Enhanced Timing Abilities in Percussionists Generalize to Rhythms Without a Musical Beat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Cameron

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability to entrain movements to music is arguably universal, but it is unclear how specialized training may influence this. Previous research suggests that percussionists have superior temporal precision in perception and production tasks. Such superiority may be limited to temporal sequences that resemble real music or, alternatively, may generalize to musically implausible sequences. To test this, percussionists and nonpercussionists completed two tasks that used rhythmic sequences varying in musical plausibility. In the beat tapping task, participants tapped with the beat of a rhythmic sequence over 3 stages: finding the beat (as an initial sequence played, continuation of the beat (as a second sequence was introduced and played simultaneously, and switching to a second beat (the initial sequence finished, leaving only the second. The metres of the two sequences were either congruent or incongruent, as were their tempi (minimum inter-onset intervals. In the rhythm reproduction task, participants reproduced rhythms of four types, ranging from high to low musical plausibility: Metric simple rhythms induced a strong sense of the beat, metric complex rhythms induced a weaker sense of the beat, nonmetric rhythms had no beat, and jittered nonmetric rhythms also had no beat as well as low temporal predictability. For both tasks, percussionists performed more accurately than nonpercussionists. In addition, both groups were better with musically plausible than implausible conditions. Overall, the percussionists’ superior abilities to entrain to, and reproduce, rhythms generalized to musically implausible sequences.

  16. Enhanced timing abilities in percussionists generalize to rhythms without a musical beat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Daniel J.; Grahn, Jessica A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to entrain movements to music is arguably universal, but it is unclear how specialized training may influence this. Previous research suggests that percussionists have superior temporal precision in perception and production tasks. Such superiority may be limited to temporal sequences that resemble real music or, alternatively, may generalize to musically implausible sequences. To test this, percussionists and nonpercussionists completed two tasks that used rhythmic sequences varying in musical plausibility. In the beat tapping task, participants tapped with the beat of a rhythmic sequence over 3 stages: finding the beat (as an initial sequence played), continuation of the beat (as a second sequence was introduced and played simultaneously), and switching to a second beat (the initial sequence finished, leaving only the second). The meters of the two sequences were either congruent or incongruent, as were their tempi (minimum inter-onset intervals). In the rhythm reproduction task, participants reproduced rhythms of four types, ranging from high to low musical plausibility: Metric simple rhythms induced a strong sense of the beat, metric complex rhythms induced a weaker sense of the beat, nonmetric rhythms had no beat, and jittered nonmetric rhythms also had no beat as well as low temporal predictability. For both tasks, percussionists performed more accurately than nonpercussionists. In addition, both groups were better with musically plausible than implausible conditions. Overall, the percussionists' superior abilities to entrain to, and reproduce, rhythms generalized to musically implausible sequences. PMID:25540617

  17. The World of Organic Agriculture – Statistics and Emerging Trends (Session at the BIOFACH 2015)

    OpenAIRE

    Arbenz, Markus; Willer, Helga; Lernoud, Julia; Huber, Beate; Amarjit, Sahota

    2015-01-01

    The World of Organic Agriculture – Statistics and Emerging Trends (Session at the BIOFACH 2015) Presentations - Introduction (Markus Arbenz) - Organic Agriculture Worldwide: Current Statistics (Helga Willer, Julia Lernoud) - The World of Organic Agriculture: Regulations and Certification Emerging Trends 2015 (Beate Huber, Christiane Mannigel) - Global survey on Voluntary Sustainability Standards (VSS) (Julia Lernoud, Helga Willer) - Global Organic Food & Drink: Market Update...

  18. Efficient heart beat detection using embedded system electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Oh, Sechang; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2014-04-01

    The present day bio-technical field concentrates on developing various types of innovative ambulatory and wearable devices to monitor several bio-physical, physio-pathological, bio-electrical and bio-potential factors to assess a human body's health condition without intruding quotidian activities. One of the most important aspects of this evolving technology is monitoring heart beat rate and electrocardiogram (ECG) from which many other subsidiary results can be derived. Conventionally, the devices and systems consumes a lot of power since the acquired signals are always processed on the receiver end. Because of this back end processing, the unprocessed raw data is transmitted resulting in usage of more power, memory and processing time. This paper proposes an innovative technique where the acquired signals are processed by a microcontroller in the front end of the module and just the processed signal is then transmitted wirelessly to the display unit. Therefore, power consumption is considerably reduced and clearer data analysis is performed within the module. This also avoids the need for the user to be educated about usage of the device and signal/system analysis, since only the number of heart beats will displayed at the user end. Additionally, the proposed concept also eradicates the other disadvantages like obtrusiveness, high power consumption and size. To demonstrate the above said factors, a commercial controller board was used to extend the monitoring method by using the saved ECG data from a computer.

  19. Unraveling the nature of coherent beatings in chlorosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dostál, Jakub [Department of Chemical Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Prague (Czech Republic); Mančal, Tomáš; Pšenčík, Jakub [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Prague (Czech Republic); Vácha, František [Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia, Branišovská 31, 370 05 České Budějovice (Czech Republic); Zigmantas, Donatas, E-mail: donatas.zigmantas@chemphys.lu.se [Department of Chemical Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-03-21

    Coherent two-dimensional (2D) spectroscopy at 80 K was used to study chlorosomes isolated from green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. Two distinct processes in the evolution of the 2D spectrum are observed. The first being exciton diffusion, seen in the change of the spectral shape occurring on a 100-fs timescale, and the second being vibrational coherences, realized through coherent beatings with frequencies of 91 and 145 cm{sup −1} that are dephased during the first 1.2 ps. The distribution of the oscillation amplitude in the 2D spectra is independent of the evolution of the 2D spectral shape. This implies that the diffusion energy transfer process does not transfer coherences within the chlorosome. Remarkably, the oscillatory pattern observed in the negative regions of the 2D spectrum (dominated by the excited state absorption) is a mirror image of the oscillations found in the positive part (originating from the stimulated emission and ground state bleach). This observation is surprising since it is expected that coherences in the electronic ground and excited states are generated with the same probability and the latter dephase faster in the presence of fast diffusion. Moreover, the relative amplitude of coherent beatings is rather high compared to non-oscillatory signal despite the reported low values of the Huang-Rhys factors. The origin of these effects is discussed in terms of the vibronic and Herzberg-Teller couplings.

  20. QRS template matching for recognition of ventricular ectopic beats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasteva, Vessela; Jekova, Irena

    2007-12-01

    We propose a quasi real-time method for discrimination of ventricular ectopic beats from both supraventricular and paced beats in the electrocardiogram (ECG). The heartbeat waveforms were evaluated within a fixed-length window around the fiducial points (100 ms before, 450 ms after). Our algorithm was designed to operate with minimal expert intervention and we define that the operator is required only to initially select up to three 'normal' heartbeats (the most frequently seen supraventricular or paced complexes). These were named original QRS templates and their copies were substituted continuously throughout the ECG analysis to capture slight variations in the heartbeat waveforms of the patient's sustained rhythm. The method is based on matching of the evaluated heartbeat with the QRS templates by a complex set of ECG descriptors, including maximal cross-correlation, area difference and frequency spectrum difference. Temporal features were added by analyzing the R-R intervals. The classification criteria were trained by statistical assessment of the ECG descriptors calculated for all heartbeats in MIT-BIH Supraventricular Arrhythmia Database. The performance of the classifiers was tested on the independent MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database. The achieved unbiased accuracy is represented by sensitivity of 98.4% and specificity of 98.86%, both being competitive to other published studies. The provided computationally efficient techniques enable the fast post-recording analysis of lengthy Holter-monitor ECG recordings, as well as they can serve as a quasi real-time detection method embedded into surface ECG monitors. PMID:17805974

  1. Robust estimation of the motile cilia beating frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meste, O; Brau, F; Guyon, A

    2015-10-01

    The estimation of the cilia beating frequency (CBF) is of great interest in understanding how the CBF modulates liquid fluxes and how it is controlled by the ciliated cell intra- and/or extracellular medium composition in physiological processes. Motion artifacts and camera defaults may hinder the computation of the frequency variations during long-lasting experiments. We have developed a new analysis approach consisting of a preliminary corrective step (removal of a grid pattern on the image sequence and shift compensation), followed by a harmonic model of the observed cilia using a maximum likelihood estimator framework. It is shown that a more accurate estimation of the frequency can be obtained by averaging the squared Fourier transform of individual pixels followed by a particular summation over the different frequencies, namely the compressed spectrum. Robustness of the proposed method over traditional approaches is shown by several examples and simulations. The method is then applied to images of samples containing ciliated ependymal cells located in the third cerebral ventricle of mouse brains, showing that even small variations in CBF in response to changes in the amount of oxygenation, pH or glucose were clearly visible in the computed frequencies. As a conclusion, this method reveals a fine metabolic tuning of the cilia beating in ependimocytes lining the third cerebral ventricle. Such regulations are likely to participate in homeostatic mechanisms regulating CSF movements and brain energy supply. PMID:26215519

  2. The role of the basal ganglia in beat perception: neuroimaging and neuropsychological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahn, Jessica A

    2009-07-01

    Perception of musical rhythms is culturally universal. Despite this special status, relatively little is known about the neurobiology of rhythm perception, particularly with respect to beat processing. Findings are presented here from a series of studies that have specifically examined the neural basis of beat perception, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and studying patients with Parkinson's disease. fMRI data indicate that novel beat-based sequences robustly activate the basal ganglia when compared to irregular, nonbeat sequences. Furthermore, although most healthy participants find it much easier to discriminate changes in beat-based sequences compared to irregular sequences, Parkinson's disease patients fail to show the same degree of benefit. Taken together, these data suggest that the basal ganglia are performing a crucial function in beat processing. The results of an additional fMRI study indicate that the role of the basal ganglia is strongly linked to internal generation of the beat. Basal ganglia activity is greater when participants listen to rhythms in which internal generation of the beat is required, as opposed to rhythms with strongly externally cued beats. Functional connectivity between part of the basal ganglia (the putamen) and cortical motor areas (premotor and supplementary motor areas) is also higher during perception of beat rhythms compared to nonbeat rhythms. Increased connectivity between cortical motor and auditory areas is found in those with musical training. The findings from these converging methods strongly implicate the basal ganglia in processing a regular beat, particularly when internal generation of the beat is required. PMID:19673753

  3. Food Insecurity with Hunger Is Associated with Obesity among HIV-Infected and at Risk Women in Bronx, NY

    OpenAIRE

    Nicole Sirotin; Hoover, Donald R.; Qiuhu Shi; Kathryn Anastos; Weiser, Sheri D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Food insecurity, insufficient quality and quantity of nutritionally adequate food, affects millions of people in the United States (US) yearly, with over 18 million Americans reporting hunger. Food insecurity is associated with obesity in the general population. Due to the increasing prevalence of obesity and risk factors for cardiovascular disease among HIV-infected women, we sought to determine the relationship between food insecurity and obesity in this cohort of urban, HIV-infe...

  4. Moderate-intensity exercise affects perceived hunger and fullness but not appetite-related hormones in late pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guelfi, Kym J; Halse, Rhiannon E

    2013-11-01

    The effect of exercise on appetite and appetite-related hormones during pregnancy is not known. This study found that 30 min of moderate-intensity stationary cycling transiently attenuated hunger and increased fullness in late gestational women (n = 12). Exercise did not affect perceived appetite or appetite-related hormones in response to subsequent caloric consumption. These observations suggest that appetite responses do not intrinsically compensate for the additional energy expenditure induced by exercise, at least in the short term. PMID:24053524

  5. Beat sampling accuracy in estimating spruce spider mite (Acari: Tetranychidae) populations and injury on juniper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrewsbury, Paula M; Hardin, Mark R

    2004-08-01

    The use of a standardized beat sampling method for estimating spruce spider mite, Oligonychus ununguis (Jacobi) (Acari: Tetranychidae), densities on a widely used evergreen ornamental plant species, Juniperus chinensis variety 'Sargentii' A. Henry (Cupressaceae), was examined. There was a significant positive relationship between total spruce spider mite densities and spider mite densities from beat sampling on juniper. The slope and intercept of the relationship may be used by pest managers to predict total spider mite densities on plants from beat sample counts. Beat sampling dramatically underestimates the total number of spider mites on a foliage sample. The relationships between spruce spider mite feeding injury and spider mite density estimates from beat sampling juniper foliage and total spider mite counts on foliage were also examined. There was a significant positive relationship between spruce spider mite density as estimated from beat sampling and injury to the plants. There was a similar positive relationship between the total number of spruce spider mites and injury to the plants, suggesting that a pest manager could use beat sampling counts to estimate plant injury and related thresholds. These findings have important implications to decision-making for spruce spider mite control, especially as it relates to threshold levels and determining rates of predator releases. Further assessment of the effectiveness of beat and other sampling methods across multiple spider mite- host plant associations needs to be examined to enable pest managers to select sampling plans that are feasible and reliable. PMID:15384359

  6. 77 FR 17060 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Beat Down Blood Pressure Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Beat Down Blood Pressure Challenge... years, announces the launch of the Beat Down Blood Pressure Video Challenge. This challenge is an open... consumer e-health tools to manage high blood pressure. Health care providers are also encouraged to...

  7. 77 FR 19015 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Beat Down Blood Pressure Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Beat Down Blood Pressure Challenge... Health and Human Services (HHS) published a notice in the Federal Register (77 FR 17060) announcing requirements and registration for a Beat Down Blood Pressure Video Challenge. This challenge will not be...

  8. Keeping the Beat: A Large Sample Study of Bouncing and Clapping to Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranchant, Pauline; Vuvan, Dominique T.; Peretz, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of humans move in time with a musical beat. This behaviour has been mostly studied through finger-tapping synchronization. Here, we evaluate naturalistic synchronization responses to music–bouncing and clapping–in 100 university students. Their ability to match the period of their bounces and claps to those of a metronome and musical clips varying in beat saliency was assessed. In general, clapping was better synchronized with the beat than bouncing, suggesting that the choice of a specific movement type is an important factor to consider in the study of sensorimotor synchronization processes. Performance improved as a function of beat saliency, indicating that beat abstraction plays a significant role in synchronization. Fourteen percent of the population exhibited marked difficulties with matching the beat. Yet, at a group level, poor synchronizers showed similar sensitivity to movement type and beat saliency as normal synchronizers. These results suggest the presence of quantitative rather than qualitative variations when losing the beat. PMID:27471854

  9. Modification of the algorithm for beat tracking of a musical melody

    OpenAIRE

    Khachai, M. Y.; Kobylkin, K. S.; Khachai, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    A new efficient modification of the known heuristic algorithm for real-time beat tracking is proposed. An improved formula for updating the relative frequencies of time intervals between adjacent onsets is used in the modification. The algorithm has shown good performance on the MIREX Beat Tracking test base. © 2013 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.

  10. Beat processing is pre-attentive for metrically simple rhythms with clear accents: an ERP study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleur L Bouwer

    Full Text Available The perception of a regular beat is fundamental to music processing. Here we examine whether the detection of a regular beat is pre-attentive for metrically simple, acoustically varying stimuli using the mismatch negativity (MMN, an ERP response elicited by violations of acoustic regularity irrespective of whether subjects are attending to the stimuli. Both musicians and non-musicians were presented with a varying rhythm with a clear accent structure in which occasionally a sound was omitted. We compared the MMN response to the omission of identical sounds in different metrical positions. Most importantly, we found that omissions in strong metrical positions, on the beat, elicited higher amplitude MMN responses than omissions in weak metrical positions, not on the beat. This suggests that the detection of a beat is pre-attentive when highly beat inducing stimuli are used. No effects of musical expertise were found. Our results suggest that for metrically simple rhythms with clear accents beat processing does not require attention or musical expertise. In addition, we discuss how the use of acoustically varying stimuli may influence ERP results when studying beat processing.

  11. Beat processing is pre-attentive for metrically simple rhythms with clear accents: an ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwer, Fleur L; Van Zuijen, Titia L; Honing, Henkjan

    2014-01-01

    The perception of a regular beat is fundamental to music processing. Here we examine whether the detection of a regular beat is pre-attentive for metrically simple, acoustically varying stimuli using the mismatch negativity (MMN), an ERP response elicited by violations of acoustic regularity irrespective of whether subjects are attending to the stimuli. Both musicians and non-musicians were presented with a varying rhythm with a clear accent structure in which occasionally a sound was omitted. We compared the MMN response to the omission of identical sounds in different metrical positions. Most importantly, we found that omissions in strong metrical positions, on the beat, elicited higher amplitude MMN responses than omissions in weak metrical positions, not on the beat. This suggests that the detection of a beat is pre-attentive when highly beat inducing stimuli are used. No effects of musical expertise were found. Our results suggest that for metrically simple rhythms with clear accents beat processing does not require attention or musical expertise. In addition, we discuss how the use of acoustically varying stimuli may influence ERP results when studying beat processing. PMID:24870123

  12. Beat processing is pre-attentive for metrically simple rhythms with clear accents: An ERP study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.L. Bouwer; T.L. van Zuijen; H. Honing

    2014-01-01

    The perception of a regular beat is fundamental to music processing. Here we examine whether the detection of a regular beat is pre-attentive for metrically simple, acoustically varying stimuli using the mismatch negativity (MMN), an ERP response elicited by violations of acoustic regularity irrespe

  13. Childhood circumstances and adult outcomes: Evidence from World War II

    OpenAIRE

    Enkelejda Havari; Franco Peracchi

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the effects of episodes of stress, poor health, financial hardship and hunger earlier in life on education and health in later life. As a source of identification, we exploit the huge temporal and regional variation of war-related events in Europe during the period from the beginning of the Spanish Civil War in 1936 to the end of World War II in 1945. We focus on the cohorts born between 1930 and 1954 in 13 European countries, and combine the available historical informatio...

  14. Influence of two breakfast meals differing in glycemic load on satiety, hunger, and energy intake in preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganji Vijay

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycemic load (GL is the product of glycemic index of a food and amount of available carbohydrate in that food divided by 100. GL represents quality and quantity of dietary carbohydrate. Little is known about the role of GL in hunger, satiety, and food intake in preschool children. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of two breakfast meals differing in GL on hunger, satiety, and subsequent food intake at lunch in preschool children aged 4-6 y. Methods Twenty three subjects consumed low-GL (LGL and high-GL (HGL breakfast meals according to a randomized crossover design followed by an ad libitum lunch 4 h after consumption of breakfast. Children were asked to consume meals until they are full. Each treatment was repeated twice in non-consecutive days and data were averaged. Results Children in LGL group consumed significantly lower amounts of GL, total carbohydrate, energy, energy density, and dietary fiber and higher amounts of protein and fat at the breakfast compared to those in HGL group. Prior to lunch, children were hungrier in the HGL intervention group compared to the LGL intervention group (P Conclusions Decreased hunger in children prior to lunch in LGL group is likely due to higher protein and fat content of LGL breakfast. Diets that are low in GL can be recommended as part of healthy diet for preschool children.

  15. Algorithm for identifying and separating beats from arterial pulse records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentinuzzi Max E

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This project was designed as an epidemiological aid-selecting tool for a small country health center with the general objective of screening out possible coronary patients. Peripheral artery function can be non-invasively evaluated by impedance plethysmography. Changes in these vessels appear as good predictors of future coronary behavior. Impedance plethysmography detects volume variations after simple occlusive maneuvers that may show indicative modifications in arterial/venous responses. Averaging of a series of pulses is needed and this, in turn, requires proper determination of the beginning and end of each beat. Thus, the objective here is to describe an algorithm to identify and separate out beats from a plethysmographic record. A secondary objective was to compare the output given by human operators against the algorithm. Methods The identification algorithm detected the beat's onset and end on the basis of the maximum rising phase, the choice of possible ventricular systolic starting points considering cardiac frequency, and the adjustment of some tolerance values to optimize the behavior. Out of 800 patients in the study, 40 occlusive records (supradiastolic- subsystolic were randomly selected without any preliminary diagnosis. Radial impedance plethysmographic pulse and standard ECG were recorded digitizing and storing the data. Cardiac frequency was estimated with the Power Density Function and, thereafter, the signal was derived twice, followed by binarization of the first derivative and rectification of the second derivative. The product of the two latter results led to a weighing signal from which the cycles' onsets and ends were established. Weighed and frequency filters are needed along with the pre-establishment of their respective tolerances. Out of the 40 records, 30 seconds strands were randomly chosen to be analyzed by the algorithm and by two operators. Sensitivity and accuracy were calculated by means

  16. Direct visualization of mechanical beats by means of an oscillating smartphone

    CERN Document Server

    Giménez, Marcos H; Monsoriu, Juan A

    2016-01-01

    The resonance phenomenon is widely known from Physics courses. Qualitatively speaking, it takes place in a driven oscillating system whenever the driven frequency approaches the natural frequency. It is when the amplitude of the oscillations become maximal. Very closely related to this phenomenon, there is another which is very surprising too. It takes place when the driven and natural frequencies of the system are slightly different and interfere constructively and destructively, forming the so called beats. The frequency of the beats is just the difference of the interfering waves frequencies. Beats are very noticeable in acoustic systems. We all have probably perceived them in the form of periodic ups and downs in the sound intensity volume. There are several works in this journal on visualizing the beats in acoustic systems. For instance, the microphone and the speaker of two mobile devices were used in previous work to analyze the acoustic beat produced by two signals of close frequencies. The formation ...

  17. Simple non-invasive analysis of embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes beating in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaszkiewicz, Katarzyna Anna; Sýkorová, Dominika; Karas, Pavel; Kudová, Jana; Kohút, Lukáš; Binó, Lucia; Večeřa, Josef; Víteček, Jan; Kubala, Lukáš; Pacherník, Jiří

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of digital video output enables the non-invasive screening of various active biological processes. For the monitoring and computing of the beating parameters of cardiomyocytes in vitro, CB Analyser (cardiomyocyte beating analyser) software was developed. This software is based on image analysis of the video recording of beating cardiomyocytes. CB Analyser was tested using cardiomyocytes derived from mouse embryonic stem cells at different stages of cardiomyogenesis. We observed that during differentiation (from day 18), the beat peak width decreased, which corresponded to the increased speed of an individual pulse. However, the beating frequency did not change. Further, the effects of epinephrine modulating mature cardiomyocyte functions were tested to validate the CB Analyser analysis. In conclusion, data show that CB Analyser is a useful tool for evaluating the functions of both developing and mature cardiomyocytes under various conditions in vitro.

  18. Amusic does not mean unmusical: beat perception and synchronization ability despite pitch deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips-Silver, Jessica; Toiviainen, Petri; Gosselin, Nathalie; Peretz, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Pitch deafness, the most commonly known form of congenital amusia, refers to a severe deficit in musical pitch processing (i.e., melody discrimination and recognition) that can leave time processing--including rhythm, metre, and "feeling the beat"--preserved. In Experiment 1, we show that by presenting musical excerpts in nonpitched drum timbres, rather than pitched piano tones, amusics show normal metre recognition. Experiment 2 reveals that body movement influences amusics' interpretation of the beat of an ambiguous drum rhythm. Experiment 3 and a subsequent exploratory study show an ability to synchronize movement to the beat of popular dance music and potential for improvement when given a modest amount of practice. Together the present results are consistent with the idea that rhythm and beat processing are spared in pitch deafness--that is, being pitch-deaf does not mean one is beat-deaf. In the context of drum music especially, amusics can be musical. PMID:24344816

  19. Signaling hunger through aggression—the regulation of foraging in a primitively eusocial wasp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamba, Shakti; Chandrasekhar, K.; Gadagkar, Raghavendra

    2008-07-01

    Primitively eusocial wasps are generally headed by behaviorally dominant queens who use their aggression to suppress worker reproduction. In contrast, queens in the primitively eusocial wasp Ropalidia marginata are strikingly docile and non-aggressive. However, workers exhibit dominance-subordinate interactions among themselves. These interactions do not appear to reflect reproductive competition because there is no correlation between the relative position of an individual in the dominance hierarchy of the colony and the likelihood that she will succeed a lost/removed queen. Based on the observation that foraging continues unaltered in the absence of the queen and the correlation between dominance behavior and foraging, we have previously suggested that dominance-subordinate interactions among workers in R. marginata have been co-opted to serve the function of decentralized, self-organized regulation of foraging. This idea has been supported by an earlier experimental study where it was found that a reduced demand for food led to a significant decrease in dominance behavior. In this study, we perform the converse experiment, demonstrate that dominance behavior increases under conditions of starvation, and thus provide further evidence in support of the hypothesis that intranidal workers signal hunger through aggression.

  20. Synchronization using environmental coupling in mercury beating heart oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Tanu; Montoya, Fernando; Rivera, M.; Tajima, Shunsuke; Nakabayashi, Seiichiro; Parmananda, P.

    2016-06-01

    We report synchronization of Mercury Beating Heart (MBH) oscillators using the environmental coupling mechanism. This mechanism involves interaction of the oscillators with a common medium/environment such that the oscillators do not interact among themselves. In the present work, we chose a modified MBH system as the common environment. In the absence of coupling, this modified system does not exhibit self sustained oscillations. It was observed that, as a result of the coupling of the MBH oscillators with this common environment, the electrical and the mechanical activities of both the oscillators synchronized simultaneously. Experimental results indicate the emergence of both lag and the complete synchronization in the MBH oscillators. Simulations of the phase oscillators were carried out in order to better understand the experimental observations.

  1. Numerical modeling of surf beat generated by moving breakpoint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    As an important hydrodynamic phenomenon in the nearshore zone, the cross-shore surf beat is numerically studied in this paper with a fully nonlinear Boussinesq-type model, which resolves the primary wave motion as well as the long waves. Compared with the classical Boussinesq equations, the equations adopted here allow for improved linear dispersion characteristics. Wave breaking and run-up in the swash zone are included in the numerical model. Mutual interactions between short waves and long waves are inherent in the model. The numerical study of long waves is based on bichromatic wave groups with a wide range of mean frequencies, group frequencies and modulation rates. The cross-shore variation in the amplitudes of short waves and long waves is investigated. The model results are compared with laboratory experiments from the literature and good agreement is found.

  2. The quantum beat principles and applications of atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Major, F

    2007-01-01

    This work attempts to convey a broad understanding of the physical principles underlying the workings of these quantum-based atomic clocks, with introductory chapters placing them in context with the early development of mechanical clocks and the introduction of electronic time-keeping as embodied in the quartz-controlled clocks. While the book makes no pretense at being a history of atomic clocks, it nevertheless takes a historical perspective in its treatment of the subject. Intended for nonspecialists with some knowledge of physics or engineering, The Quantum Beat covers a wide range of salient topics relevant to atomic clocks, treated in a broad intuitive manner with a minimum of mathematical formalism. Detailed descriptions are given of the design principles of the rubidium, cesium, hydrogen maser, and mercury ion standards; the revolutionary changes that the advent of the laser has made possible, such as laser cooling, optical pumping, the formation of "optical molasses," and the cesium "fountain" stand...

  3. Mapping of Human Heart Beat Dynamics by Atomic Magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, A.; Bison, G.; Wynands, R.

    2005-05-01

    Stimulated by recent progress in laser-based optical magnetometry and in developments of powerful signal denoising techniques we initiated the development of a low-cost laser-driven optically pumped magnetometer (OPM) for biomagnetic applications. The OPM uses optically pumped cesium atoms in glass cells of a few cm3. Its sensitivity (<70 fT in 1 Hz bandwidth), bandwidth (140 Hz), and spatial resolution (cm) were optimized for the two-dimensional mapping of the magnetic field produced above the chest by the beating human heart. Signal averaging using an electrocardiographic signal as a reference and gradiometric detection reduces residual noise significantly so that the dynamics of the heart field can be displayed a movie. We discuss the principle of the technique and give a status report on ongoing work towards the development of a multichannel device.

  4. Ion channels and beating heart: the players and the music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Antzelevitch

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Soft gentle music accompanies us throughout our lifetime; it is the music of our heart beating. Although at times it is questionable as to who serves as conductor of the orchestra, there is little doubt that our ion channels are the main players. Whenever one of them plays too loudly, too softly or simply off key, disharmony results, sometimes leading to total disruption of the rate and rhythm. Ion channels can disrupt the music of our heart by different mechanisms. Sometimes their function is correct, but their expression is altered by underlying cardiac diseases (i.e. heart failure; sometimes the defect is in their structure, because of an underlying genetic defect, and in this case a channelopathy is present.

  5. Impact Analysis of Narrow Loom Beat-up Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurudeen A. Raji

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The study considers the impulse-momentum method for the analysis of the narrow loom with impulsive force and discontinuous velocities. The system equation of motion is analyzed to determine the main body velocities used for the system variables without introducing rotational coordinates or the turning effect of the system follower on the beater. Discontinuities in the velocity are observed when an impact force results from the beat-up action of the beater on the weft-yarn. Formulation between the velocity jump and displacement is presented for the system response. The impact phenomenon is characterized by the rise in the system velocity resulting from the vibration propagation through the system. The velocity is observed to increase as the system displacement response increases. This is typical of a high speed mechanism of this type mostly used in the textile industry if not controlled.

  6. Banding and Step-Stair Artifacts on the Cardiac-CT Caused By Pseudo-Ectopic Beats

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Amolak; Sethi, Yash; Watkins, Sonya; Youtsey, Angela; Thomas, Angie

    2009-01-01

    Step-stair and banding artifacts may result from irregular ventricular rhythm caused by atrial fibrillation or premature ectopic ventricular contractions. In the case reported here, severe banding and misalignment artifacts occurred due to electrocardiographic noise mimicking ectopic beats. Severe EKG noise or pseudo-ectopic beats may cause rare but serious artifacts during cardiac-CT acquisition. Vendor-provided software for correcting ectopic beats can be used to remove pseudo-ectopic beats...

  7. Real-Time Analysis of Beats in Music for Entertainment Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Der Lin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The dancing actions for entertainment robots are usually designed in advance and saved in a database according to the beats and rhythm of the given music. This research is devoted to developing a real-time algorithm that can detect the primary information of the music needed for the actions of entertainment robots. The computation of the proposed algorithm is very efficient and can satisfy the requirement of real-time processing by a digital signal controller. The digitized music signal is first normalized to make the algorithm robust for miscellaneous music volume. Next, the primary features of the beat for the music are extracted. Based on the extracted features, the algorithm will then identify the occurrence of beats in the music through the use of an optimized classifier. From the accumulated information of the timing for the beats, the algorithm can provide the predicted timing information of the next beat through regression analysis. The type and tempo of the given music can also be derived thereafter. The entertainment robot can thus move or dance according to the information derived by the algorithm. A graphical user interface (GUI program in LabVIEW is also utilized to observe and verify the analysis results. In this study, the ratio for correct beat detection is greater than 90%. The prediction ratio for the correct timing of beats is over 80%, and it is 100% correct for both music type and music tempo.

  8. Disentangling beat perception from sequential learning and examining the influence of attention and musical abilities on ERP responses to rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwer, Fleur L; Werner, Carola M; Knetemann, Myrthe; Honing, Henkjan

    2016-05-01

    Beat perception is the ability to perceive temporal regularity in musical rhythm. When a beat is perceived, predictions about upcoming events can be generated. These predictions can influence processing of subsequent rhythmic events. However, statistical learning of the order of sounds in a sequence can also affect processing of rhythmic events and must be differentiated from beat perception. In the current study, using EEG, we examined the effects of attention and musical abilities on beat perception. To ensure we measured beat perception and not absolute perception of temporal intervals, we used alternating loud and soft tones to create a rhythm with two hierarchical metrical levels. To control for sequential learning of the order of the different sounds, we used temporally regular (isochronous) and jittered rhythmic sequences. The order of sounds was identical in both conditions, but only the regular condition allowed for the perception of a beat. Unexpected intensity decrements were introduced on the beat and offbeat. In the regular condition, both beat perception and sequential learning were expected to enhance detection of these deviants on the beat. In the jittered condition, only sequential learning was expected to affect processing of the deviants. ERP responses to deviants were larger on the beat than offbeat in both conditions. Importantly, this difference was larger in the regular condition than in the jittered condition, suggesting that beat perception influenced responses to rhythmic events in addition to sequential learning. The influence of beat perception was present both with and without attention directed at the rhythm. Moreover, beat perception as measured with ERPs correlated with musical abilities, but only when attention was directed at the stimuli. Our study shows that beat perception is possible when attention is not directed at a rhythm. In addition, our results suggest that attention may mediate the influence of musical abilities on beat

  9. The evolutionary neuroscience of musical beat perception: the Action Simulation for Auditory Prediction (ASAP hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddh D. Patel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Every human culture has some form of music with a beat: a perceived periodic pulse that structures the perception of musical rhythm and which serves as a framework for synchronized movement to music. What are the neural mechanisms of musical beat perception, and how did they evolve? One view, which dates back to Darwin and implicitly informs some current models of beat perception, is that the relevant neural mechanisms are relatively general and are widespread among animal species. On the basis of recent neural and cross-species data on musical beat processing, this paper argues for a different view. Here we argue that beat perception is a complex brain function involving temporally-precise communication between auditory regions and motor planning regions of the cortex (even in the absence of overt movement. More specifically, we propose that simulation of periodic movement in motor planning regions provides a neural signal that helps the auditory system predict the timing of upcoming beats. This action simulation for auditory prediction (ASAP hypothesis leads to testable predictions. We further suggest that ASAP relies on dorsal auditory pathway connections between auditory regions and motor planning regions via the parietal cortex, and suggest that these connections may be stronger in humans than in nonhuman primates due to the evolution of vocal learning in our lineage. This suggestion motivates cross-species research to determine which species are capable of human-like beat perception, i.e., beat perception that involves accurate temporal prediction of beat times across a fairly broad range of tempi.

  10. Wing-beat coupling between flying locust pairs: preferred phase and lift enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camhi; Sumbre; Wendler

    1995-01-01

    Pairs of locusts flying in tandem in a wind tunnel are known to couple their wing-beats intermittently. The rhythmically oscillating air flow from the front locust's wing-beat, detected by the rear individual, appears to convey the timing information for coupling. Three predictions of this arrangement were tested quantitatively in this study. (1) Given that the oscillating air flow has a wavelength of 7.5 cm, placing the rear locust 7.5 or 15 cm behind the front one should produce the same phase of coupling, whereas placing it at an intermediate distance of 11 cm should produce an opposite phase. (2) At any distance, the preferred phase at which wing-beat coupling occurs should depend, in part, on the difference in the wing-beat frequencies of the two locusts just before the coupling began. (3) At the moment that the wing-beats of the two locusts become coupled, a change should be observed consistently in the wing-beat frequency of the rear individual only. Each of these three predictions was fulfilled. We also recorded the instantaneous lift of the rear locust by tethering it to a laser torque meter. Lift varied with the phase of the wing-beats between the two locusts. For a given distance between the two locusts, lift was greater by a mean of 16 % of the locust's body mass at those phases where coupling most commonly occurred than at opposite phases. This lift effect was seen even if the wing-beats of the two locusts drifted through these preferred phases without actually coupling. These results are discussed in terms of a possible energetic advantage conferred to the rear locust by flying in tandem and by coupling its flight rhythm to the leader's wing-beat. PMID:9318863

  11. Chick Begging Calls Reflect Degree of Hunger in Three Auk Species (Charadriiformes: Alcidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna V Klenova

    Full Text Available Begging behaviour is an important element in the parent-offspring conflict; it has been studied in many avian species. However, the majority of the studies have been entirely based on the call counts, and they agreed that vocal activity was a good indicator of chick's nutritional need and/or condition. Fewer researches were dedicated to the temporal-frequency variables of the begging calls themselves and they showed contrary results. Here begging behaviour in three burrow nested, uniparous species of auks (Alcidae was studied. These objects provide an opportunity to study the signalling value of begging calls in the absence of important confounding factors such as nestling competition and predation pressure. I recorded calls of individual chicks in two conditions: during natural feeding and after experimental four-hour food deprivation. I found that almost all measured acoustic variables contain information about the chick's state in all studied species. The hungry chicks produced calls higher in fundamental frequency and power variables and at higher calling rate compared to naturally feeding chicks. The effect of food deprivation on most acoustic variables exceeded both the effects of individuality and species. In all studied species, the frequency variables were stronger affected by hunger than the calling rate and call durations. I suppose that such strong change of acoustic variables after food deprivation can be explained by absence of vocal individual identification in these birds. As parents do not need to check individuality of the chick in the burrow, which they find visually during the day time, the chicks could use all of the acoustic variables to communicate about their nutritional needs.

  12. Chick Begging Calls Reflect Degree of Hunger in Three Auk Species (Charadriiformes: Alcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenova, Anna V

    2015-01-01

    Begging behaviour is an important element in the parent-offspring conflict; it has been studied in many avian species. However, the majority of the studies have been entirely based on the call counts, and they agreed that vocal activity was a good indicator of chick's nutritional need and/or condition. Fewer researches were dedicated to the temporal-frequency variables of the begging calls themselves and they showed contrary results. Here begging behaviour in three burrow nested, uniparous species of auks (Alcidae) was studied. These objects provide an opportunity to study the signalling value of begging calls in the absence of important confounding factors such as nestling competition and predation pressure. I recorded calls of individual chicks in two conditions: during natural feeding and after experimental four-hour food deprivation. I found that almost all measured acoustic variables contain information about the chick's state in all studied species. The hungry chicks produced calls higher in fundamental frequency and power variables and at higher calling rate compared to naturally feeding chicks. The effect of food deprivation on most acoustic variables exceeded both the effects of individuality and species. In all studied species, the frequency variables were stronger affected by hunger than the calling rate and call durations. I suppose that such strong change of acoustic variables after food deprivation can be explained by absence of vocal individual identification in these birds. As parents do not need to check individuality of the chick in the burrow, which they find visually during the day time, the chicks could use all of the acoustic variables to communicate about their nutritional needs. PMID:26536362

  13. How to Achieve Transparency in Public-Private Partnerships Engaged in Hunger and Malnutrition Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggersdorfer, Manfred; Bird, Julia K

    2016-01-01

    Multi-stakeholder partnerships are important facilitators of improving nutrition in developing countries to achieve the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals. Often, the role of industry is challenged and questions are raised as to the ethics of involving for-profit companies in humanitarian projects. The Second International Conference on Nutrition placed great emphasis on the role of the private sector, including industry, in multi-stakeholder partnerships to reduce hunger and malnutrition. Governments have to establish regulatory frameworks and institutions to guarantee fair competition and invest in infrastructure that makes investments for private companies attractive, eventually leading to economic growth. Civil society organizations can contribute by delivering nutrition interventions and behavioral change-related communication to consumers, providing capacity, and holding governments and private sector organizations accountable. Industry provides technical support, innovation, and access to markets and the supply chain. The greatest progress and impact can be achieved if all stakeholders cooperate in multi-stakeholder partnerships aimed at improving nutrition, thereby strengthening local economies and reducing poverty and inequality. Successful examples of public-private partnerships exist, as well as examples in which these partnerships did not achieve mutually agreed objectives. The key requirements for productive alliances between industry and civil society organizations are the establishment of rules of engagement, transparency and mutual accountability. The Global Social Observatory performed a consultation on conflicts of interest related to the Scaling Up Nutrition movement and provided recommendations to prevent, identify, manage and monitor potential conflicts of interest. Multi-stakeholder partnerships can be successful models in improving nutrition if they meet societal demand with transparent decision-making and execution. Solutions to

  14. Pituitary Adenylate-Cyclase Activating Polypeptide Regulates Hunger- and Palatability-Induced Binge Eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Matthew M; Maunze, Brian; Block, Megan E; Frenkel, Mogen M; Reilly, Michael J; Kim, Eugene; Chen, Yao; Li, Yan; Baker, David A; Liu, Qing-Song; Choi, SuJean

    2016-01-01

    While pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) signaling in the hypothalamic ventromedial nuclei (VMN) has been shown to regulate feeding, a challenge in unmasking a role for this peptide in obesity is that excess feeding can involve numerous mechanisms including homeostatic (hunger) and hedonic-related (palatability) drives. In these studies, we first isolated distinct feeding drives by developing a novel model of binge behavior in which homeostatic-driven feeding was temporally separated from feeding driven by food palatability. We found that stimulation of the VMN, achieved by local microinjections of AMPA, decreased standard chow consumption in food-restricted rats (e.g., homeostatic feeding); surprisingly, this manipulation failed to alter palatable food consumption in satiated rats (e.g., hedonic feeding). In contrast, inhibition of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), through local microinjections of GABA receptor agonists baclofen and muscimol, decreased hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. PACAP microinjections produced the site-specific changes in synaptic transmission needed to decrease feeding via VMN or NAc circuitry. PACAP into the NAc mimicked the actions of GABA agonists by reducing hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. In contrast, PACAP into the VMN mimicked the actions of AMPA by decreasing homeostatic feeding without affecting hedonic feeding. Slice electrophysiology recordings verified PACAP excitation of VMN neurons and inhibition of NAc neurons. These data suggest that the VMN and NAc regulate distinct circuits giving rise to unique feeding drives, but that both can be regulated by the neuropeptide PACAP to potentially curb excessive eating stemming from either drive. PMID:27597817

  15. Quantum beat and entanglement of multi-qubits interacting with a common reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The qubits can be entangled when they interact with a common Ohmic reservoir. We analyze how the reservoir-induced entanglement of qubits can be observed as the beat signal in the decay curve of the macroscopic polarization. The origin of this effect is the Lamb phase shift on the qubit array. We quantify the amount of the reservoir-induced entanglement and show how to experimentally evaluate it from the decay curve of the macroscopic polarization. We discuss how the beat signal can be discriminated from the other kinds of beat signals. We also show that our analysis can be used to estimate the reservoir characteristics

  16. Activating and Relaxing Music Entrains the Speed of Beat Synchronized Walking

    OpenAIRE

    Leman, Marc; Moelants, Dirk; Varewyck, Matthias; Styns, Frederik; van Noorden, Leon; Martens, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by a theory of embodied music cognition, we investigate whether music can entrain the speed of beat synchronized walking. If human walking is in synchrony with the beat and all musical stimuli have the same duration and the same tempo, then differences in walking speed can only be the result of music-induced differences in stride length, thus reflecting the vigor or physical strength of the movement. Participants walked in an open field in synchrony with the beat of 52 different musi...

  17. Quantum beats in the field ionization of Rydberg atoms in the presence of magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoric, Vincent C.; Hastings, Hannah; Carroll, Thomas J.; Noel, Michael W.

    2016-05-01

    By exciting a coherent superposition and varying its phase evolution, quantum beats in the selective field ionization of Rydberg atoms have been observed. Here, we present a study exploring the effect of electric and magnetic fields on quantum beats. Beginning with a single excited state, a coherent superposition is created by a short electric field pulse in the presence of a static magnetic field. The resulting quantum beats are then observed in the field ionization spectrum. Additionally, millimeter-wave spectroscopy is used to probe the state populations in this superposition. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 1205895 and No. 1205897.

  18. Underdiagnosis of malnutrition in infants and young children in Rwanda: implications for attainment of the Millennium Development Goal to end poverty and hunger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binagwaho Agnès

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Progress towards the first Millennium Development Goal (MDG1 to end poverty and hunger has lagged behind attainment of other MDGs due to chronic poverty and worldwide inequity in access to adequate health care, food, clean water, and sanitation. Despite ongoing challenges, Rwanda has experienced economic progress and the expansion of the national public health system during the past 20 years. However, protein-energy malnutrition in children under five is still a major concern for physicians and government officials in Rwanda. Approximately 45% of children under the age of five in Rwanda suffer from chronic malnutrition, and one in four is undernourished. For years, health facilities in Rwanda have used incorrect growth references for measuring nutritional status of children despite the adoption of new standards by the World Health Organization in 2006. Under incorrect growth references used in Rwanda, a number of children under five who were severely underweight were not identified, and therefore were not treated for malnutrition, thus potentially contributing to the under five mortality rate. Given that one in ten children suffer from malnutrition worldwide, it is imperative that all countries with a burden of malnutrition adopt the most up-to-date international standards for measuring malnutrition, and that the problem is brought to the forefront of international public health initiatives. For low income countries in the process of improving economic conditions, as Rwanda is, increasing the identification and treatment of malnutrition can promote the advancement of MDG1 as well as physical and cognitive development in children, which is imperative for advancing future economic progress.

  19. Does Corporate Governance Matter in Meeting and Beating Analysts’ Forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumaya Ben Malek Maztoul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Meeting and beating analysts’ forecast has received substantial attention, most of studies investigate twoprinciples problems: the valuation and value relevance of meeting and tools used to achieve benchmarks. Thisresearch is different, we investigate whether internal corporate governance impacts on meeting and beatinganalysts’ forecasts and consistently do it, we also examine if these attributes alleviate opportunistic behavior.This paper contributes to the growing literature on earnings benchmarks, it targets to be more specified thanprevious ones by considering governance attributes without an index. Using a logistic regression models, wedocument that ‘small’ institutional investors and incentive compensation incite managers to meet analysts’forecasts contrarily to debt and board activity. We find that consistently meeting is harder to realize and affectedby governance attributes. Moreover, results indicate that stock options are associated with opportunisticmanagerial activities while institutional ownership temperate it.This study is important for investors who must be more attentive about financial signals like meeting analysts’forecasts that may be affected by opportunistic managerial behavior. Furthermore, findings indicate thatregulation affect this tendency which reveal the importance of regulators in increasing the transparency offinancial market.

  20. Non-heart-beating organ donation in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraci, P M; Sepe, V

    2011-06-01

    In 2007 the non-heart-beating organ donation (NHBD) "Programma Alba" (Sunrise Programme) started in Pavia, Italy. The initial plan was to cut down waiting list for kidney transplantation, while its final aim is to shorten organ transplantation waiting lists. When compared to European countries and the USA, the Italian NHBD program has taken longer to get established. Initially Italian physicians were not entirely aware of the NHBD organ viability for transplantation, furthermore ethical issues and the need to regulate medical requirements to Italian law slowed down the NHBD program. In particular, Italian legislation provides for death ascertainment after irreversible cardiac arrest, 20-minute flat electrocardiogram. This no-touch period is longer when compared to worldwide legislation, and organ viability has been a main concern for Italian transplant doctors over the years. However, recent data let up to 40-minute warm ischemia time to preserve organ viability; this has encouraged Pavia's group to establish the NHBD "Programma Alba". It was designed according to Italian legislation from death diagnosis to graft placement, from this perspective must the significant role of the Transplant coordinator be recognized. Since 2007 seven kidneys have been gathered from seven NHBD. Of these, six NHBD kidneys have been transplanted. Currently, four patients are out of dialysis. This report is a detailed description of NHBD "Programma Alba" and its preliminary results. PMID:21617625

  1. Long beating wavelength in the Schwarz-Hora effect

    CERN Document Server

    Morokov, Y N

    1997-01-01

    Thirty years ago, H.Schwarz has attempted to modulate an electron beam with optical frequency. When a 50-keV electron beam crossed a thin crystalline dielectric film illuminated with laser light, electrons produced the electron-diffraction pattern not only at a fluorescent target but also at a nonfluorescent target. In the latter case the pattern was of the same color as the laser light (the Schwarz-Hora effect). This effect was discussed extensively in the early 1970s. However, since 1972 no reports on the results of further attempts to repeat those experiments in other groups have appeared, while the failures of the initial such attempts have been explained by Schwarz. The analysis of the literature shows there are several unresolved up to now contradictions between the theory and the Schwarz experiments. In this work we consider the interpretation of the long-wavelength spatial beating of the Schwarz-Hora radiation. A more accurate expression for the spatial period has been obtained, taking into account th...

  2. Automatic analysis of ciliary beat frequency using optical flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figl, Michael; Lechner, Manuel; Werther, Tobias; Horak, Fritz; Hummel, Johann; Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) can be a useful parameter for diagnosis of several diseases, as e.g. primary ciliary dyskinesia. (PCD). CBF computation is usually done using manual evaluation of high speed video sequences, a tedious, observer dependent, and not very accurate procedure. We used the OpenCV's pyramidal implementation of the Lukas-Kanade algorithm for optical flow computation and applied this to certain objects to follow the movements. The objects were chosen by their contrast applying the corner detection by Shi and Tomasi. Discrimination between background/noise and cilia by a frequency histogram allowed to compute the CBF. Frequency analysis was done using the Fourier transform in matlab. The correct number of Fourier summands was found by the slope in an approximation curve. The method showed to be usable to distinguish between healthy and diseased samples. However there remain difficulties in automatically identifying the cilia, and also in finding enough high contrast cilia in the image. Furthermore the some of the higher contrast cilia are lost (and sometimes found) by the method, an easy way to distinguish the correct sub-path of a point's path have yet to be found in the case where the slope methods doesn't work.

  3. Coordinated Beating of Algal Flagella is Mediated by Basal Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Kirsty; Goldstein, Raymond

    Cilia or flagella often exhibit synchronized behavior. This includes phase-locking, as seen in Chlamydomonas, and metachronal wave formation in the respiratory cilia of higher organisms. Since the observations by Gray and Rothschild of phase synchrony of nearby swimming spermatozoa, it has been a working hypothesis that synchrony arises from hydrodynamic interactions between beating filaments. Recent work on the dynamics of physically separated pairs of flagella isolated from the multicellular alga Volvox has shown that hydrodynamic coupling alone is sufficient for synchrony. However, the situation is more complex when considering multiple flagella on a single cell. We suggest that a mechanism, internal to the cell, provides an additional flagellar coupling. For instance, flagella of Chlamydomonas mutants deficient in filamentary connections between basal bodies are found to display markedly different synchronization from the wildtype. Diverse flagellar coordination strategies found in quadri-, octo- and hexadecaflagellates reveal further evidence that intracellular couplings between flagellar basal bodies compete with hydrodynamic interactions to determine the precise form of flagellar synchronization in unicellular algae.

  4. Experiences of Latino Immigrant Families in North Carolina Help Explain Elevated Levels of Food Insecurity and Hunger1

    OpenAIRE

    Quandt, Sara A.; Shoaf, John I.; Tapia, Janeth; Hernández-Pelletier, Mercedes; Clark, Heather M.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    Household food insecurity is higher among minority households in the U.S., but few data exist on households of recent minority immigrants, in part because such households are difficult to sample. Four studies of a total of 317 Latino immigrant families were conducted in different regions and during different seasons in North Carolina. A Spanish translation of the 18-item U.S. Food Security Survey Module was used to assess the prevalence of food insecurity and hunger. In 3 of the studies, a to...

  5. Short-term beat-to-beat variability of the QT interval is increased and correlates with parameters of left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosz, Andrea; Baczkó, István; Nagy, Viktória; Gavallér, Henriette; Csanády, Miklós; Forster, Tamás; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András; Lengyel, Csaba; Sepp, Róbert

    2015-09-01

    Stratification models for the prediction of sudden cardiac death (SCD) are inappropriate in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We investigated conventional electrocardiogram (ECG) repolarization parameters and the beat-to-beat short-term QT interval variability (QT-STV), a new parameter of proarrhythmic risk, in 37 patients with HCM (21 males, average age 48 ± 15 years). Resting ECGs were recorded for 5 min and the frequency corrected QT interval (QTc), QT dispersion (QTd), beat-to-beat short-term variability of QT interval (QT-STV), and the duration of terminal part of T waves (Tpeak-Tend) were calculated. While all repolarization parameters were significantly increased in patients with HCM compared with the controls (QTc, 488 ± 61 vs. 434 ± 23 ms, p < 0.0001; QT-STV, 4.5 ± 2 vs. 3.2 ± 1 ms, p = 0.0002; Tpeak-Tend duration, 107 ± 27 vs. 91 ± 10 ms, p = 0.0015; QTd, 47 ± 17 vs. 34 ± 9 ms, p = 0.0002), QT-STV had the highest relative increase (+41%). QT-STV also showed the best correlation with indices of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, i.e., maximal LV wall thickness normalized for body surface area (BSA; r = 0.461, p = 0.004) or LV mass (determined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging) normalized for BSA (r = 0.455, p = 0.015). In summary, beat-to-beat QT-STV showed the most marked increase in patients with HCM and may represent a novel marker that merits further testing for increased SCD risk in HCM. PMID:26313025

  6. Beat synchronization predicts neural speech encoding and reading readiness in preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff Carr, Kali; White-Schwoch, Travis; Tierney, Adam T; Strait, Dana L; Kraus, Nina

    2014-10-01

    Temporal cues are important for discerning word boundaries and syllable segments in speech; their perception facilitates language acquisition and development. Beat synchronization and neural encoding of speech reflect precision in processing temporal cues and have been linked to reading skills. In poor readers, diminished neural precision may contribute to rhythmic and phonological deficits. Here we establish links between beat synchronization and speech processing in children who have not yet begun to read: preschoolers who can entrain to an external beat have more faithful neural encoding of temporal modulations in speech and score higher on tests of early language skills. In summary, we propose precise neural encoding of temporal modulations as a key mechanism underlying reading acquisition. Because beat synchronization abilities emerge at an early age, these findings may inform strategies for early detection of and intervention for language-based learning disabilities. PMID:25246562

  7. Observation of Quantum Beat in Rb by Parametric Four-Wave Mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Chang-Jun; HE Jun-Fang; XUE Bing; ZHAI Xue-Jun

    2007-01-01

    @@ Two coupled parametric four-wave-mixing processes in Rb atoms are studied using perturbation theory, which reveals clear evidence of the appearance of quantum beat at 608cm-1, corresponding to the energy difference of the 7s - 5d states of Rb atoms, in the parametric four-wave-mixing signals. A pump-probe technique is utilized to observe the quantum beat. Time-varying characteristics of the quantum beat are investigated using time-dependent Fourier transform. The results show that the time-varying characteristics of the quantum beat not only offers a sensitive detecting method for observing the decay of atomic wave packets, but also provides a potential tool for monitoring the dissociation of molecules.

  8. Feedback in a cavity QED system for control of quantum beats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cimmarusti A.D.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Conditional measurements on the undriven mode of a two-mode cavity QED system prepare a coherent superposition of ground states which generate quantum beats. The continuous system drive induces decoherence through the phase interruptions from Rayleigh scattering, which manifests as a decrease of the beat amplitude and an increase of the frequency of oscillation. We report recent experiments that implement a simple feedback mechanism to protect the quantum beat. We continuously drive the system until a photon is detected, heralding the presence of a coherent superposition. We then turn off the drive and let the superposition evolve in the dark, protecting it against decoherence. At a later time we reinstate the drive to measure the amplitude, phase, and frequency of the beats. The amplitude can increase by more than fifty percent, while the frequency is unchanged by the feedback.

  9. The Effect of Dopaminergic Medication on Beat-Based Auditory Timing in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Daniel J; Pickett, Kristen A; Earhart, Gammon M; Grahn, Jessica A

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) adversely affects timing abilities. Beat-based timing is a mechanism that times events relative to a regular interval, such as the "beat" in musical rhythm, and is impaired in PD. It is unknown if dopaminergic medication influences beat-based timing in PD. Here, we tested beat-based timing over two sessions in participants with PD (OFF then ON dopaminergic medication) and in unmedicated control participants. People with PD and control participants completed two tasks. The first was a discrimination task in which participants compared two rhythms and determined whether they were the same or different. Rhythms either had a beat structure (metric simple rhythms) or did not (metric complex rhythms), as in previous studies. Discrimination accuracy was analyzed to test for the effects of beat structure, as well as differences between participants with PD and controls, and effects of medication (PD group only). The second task was the Beat Alignment Test (BAT), in which participants listened to music with regular tones superimposed, and responded as to whether the tones were "ON" or "OFF" the beat of the music. Accuracy was analyzed to test for differences between participants with PD and controls, and for an effect of medication in patients. Both patients and controls discriminated metric simple rhythms better than metric complex rhythms. Controls also improved at the discrimination task in the second vs. first session, whereas people with PD did not. For participants with PD, the difference in performance between metric simple and metric complex rhythms was greater (sensitivity to changes in simple rhythms increased and sensitivity to changes in complex rhythms decreased) when ON vs. OFF medication. Performance also worsened with disease severity. For the BAT, no group differences or effects of medication were found. Overall, these findings suggest that timing is impaired in PD, and that dopaminergic medication influences beat-based and non-beat

  10. The Effect of Dopaminergic Medication on Beat-Based Auditory Timing in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Cameron

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD adversely affects timing abilities. Beat-based timing is a mechanism that times events relative to a regular interval, such as the ‘beat’ in musical rhythm, and is impaired in PD. It is unknown if dopaminergic medication influences beat-based timing in PD. Here we tested beat-based timing over two sessions in participants with PD (OFF then ON dopaminergic medication, and unmedicated control participants. People with PD and control participants completed two tasks. The first was a discrimination task in which participants compared two rhythms and determined whether they were the same or different. Rhythms either had a beat structure (metric simple rhythms, or did not (metric complex rhythms, as in previous studies. Discrimination accuracy was analyzed to test for the effects of beat structure, as well as differences between participants with PD and controls, and effects of medication (PD group only. The second task was the Beat Alignment Test (BAT, in which participants listened to music with regular tones superimposed, and responded as to whether the tones were ‘on’ or ‘off’ the beat of the music. Accuracy was analyzed to test for differences between participants with PD and controls, and for an effect of medication in patients.Both patients and controls discriminated metric simple rhythms better than metric complex rhythms. Controls also improved at the discrimination task in the second vs. first session, whereas people with PD did not. For participants with PD, the difference in performance between metric simple and metric complex rhythms was greater (sensitivity to changes in simple rhythms increased and sensitivity to changes in complex rhythms decreased when ON vs. OFF medication. Performance also worsened with disease severity. For the Beat Alignment Test, no group differences or effects of medication were found. Overall, these findings suggest that timing is impaired in PD, and that dopaminergic

  11. Superhabitable Worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, René

    2014-01-01

    To be habitable, a world (planet or moon) does not need to be located in the stellar habitable zone (HZ), and worlds in the HZ are not necessarily habitable. Here, we illustrate how tidal heating can render terrestrial or icy worlds habitable beyond the stellar HZ. Scientists have developed a language that neglects the possible existence of worlds that offer more benign environments to life than Earth does. We call these objects "superhabitable" and discuss in which contexts this term could be used, that is to say, which worlds tend to be more habitable than Earth. In an appendix, we show why the principle of mediocracy cannot be used to logically explain why Earth should be a particularly habitable planet or why other inhabited worlds should be Earth-like. Superhabitable worlds must be considered for future follow-up observations of signs of extraterrestrial life. Considering a range of physical effects, we conclude that they will tend to be slightly older and more massive than Earth and that their host star...

  12. GENERAL: Stochastic Alternating Dynamics for Synchronous EAD-Like Beating Rhythms in Cultured Cardiac Myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Hui-Min; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Ding, Xue-Li; Yang, Ming-Hao; Gu, Hua-Guang; Ren, Wei

    2009-11-01

    Dissolved cardiac myocytes can couple together and generate synchronous beatings in culture. We observed a synchronized early after-depolarization(EAD)-like rhythm in cultured cardiac myocytes and reproduced the experimental observation in a network mathematical model whose dynamics are close to a Hopf bifurcation. The mechanism for this EAD-like rhythm is attributed to noised-induced stochastic alternatings between the focus and the limit cycle. These results provide novel understandings for pathological heart rhythms like the early immature beatings.

  13. ECG Morphological Variability in Beat Space for Risk Stratification After Acute Coronary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yun; Syed, Zeeshan; Scirica, Benjamin M.; Morrow, David A; Guttag, John V.; Stultz, Collin M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Identification of patients who are at high risk of adverse cardiovascular events after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) remains a major challenge in clinical cardiology. We hypothesized that quantifying variability in electrocardiogram (ECG) morphology may improve risk stratification post‐ACS. Methods and Results: We developed a new metric to quantify beat‐to‐beat morphologic changes in the ECG: morphologic variability in beat space (MVB), and compared our metric to published ECG ...

  14. Research on Surimi Beat Break Parameters and Shaping Process for Simulation Products of Shelled Shrimps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei He

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the production process of simulation products of shelled shrimps. Through the determination experiment of gel strength, the process parameter, the optimal period of beat break, is drawn in white silver carp surimi beat break which is suitable for simulation shelled shrimps. Using CATIA V5 R16, reverse design and manufacture of simulation shelled shrimps mould die is completed.

  15. Quasi-phase-matching of high-order-harmonic generation using multimode polarization beating

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Lewis Z.; O'Keeffe, Kevin; Hooker, Simon M.

    2013-01-01

    The generalization of quasi-phase-matching using polarization beating and of multimode quasi-phase-matching (MMQPM) for the generation of high-order harmonics is explored, and a method for achieving polarization beating is proposed. If two (and in principle more) modes of a waveguide are excited, modulation of the intensity, phase, and/or polarization of the guided radiation will be achieved. By appropriately matching the period of this modulation to the coherence length, quasi-phase-matching...

  16. Ultrarelativistic effects on parametric instabilities of beat waves in a transversely magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of relativistic effects on the parametric instabilities of large amplitude beat waves in a transversely magnetized plasma has been investigated. The relativistic Vlasov equation in gyrokinetic variables has been employed to find the nonlinear response of the plasma electrons. It is noticed that the extreme relativistic consideration does not have any significant effects on the various parametric instabilities of the beat waves in the plasma. (author). 11 refs

  17. Simulation of Ectopic Pacemakers in the Heart: Multiple Ectopic Beats Generated by Reentry inside Fibrotic Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Gouvêa de Barros; Rodrigo Weber dos Santos; Marcelo Lobosco; Sergio Alonso

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of nonconducting media, mimicking cardiac fibrosis, in two models of cardiac tissue produces the formation of ectopic beats. The fraction of nonconducting media in comparison with the fraction of healthy myocytes and the topological distribution of cells determines the probability of ectopic beat generation. First, a detailed subcellular microscopic model that accounts for the microstructure of the cardiac tissue is constructed and employed for the numerical simulation of action...

  18. A Kinematic Approach for Efficient and Robust Simulation of the Cardiac Beating Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Ijiri, Takashi; Ashihara, Takashi; Umetani, Nobuyuki; Igarashi, Takeo; Haraguchi, Ryo; Yokota, Hideo; Nakazawa, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Computer simulation techniques for cardiac beating motions potentially have many applications and a broad audience. However, most existing methods require enormous computational costs and often show unstable behavior for extreme parameter sets, which interrupts smooth simulation study and make it difficult to apply them to interactive applications. To address this issue, we present an efficient and robust framework for simulating the cardiac beating motion. The global cardiac motion is genera...

  19. Individual Differences in Beat Perception Affect Gait Responses to Low- and High-Groove Music

    OpenAIRE

    Leow, Li-Ann; Parrott, Taylor; Grahn, Jessica A.

    2014-01-01

    Slowed gait in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) can be improved when patients synchronize footsteps to isochronous metronome cues, but limited retention of such improvements suggest that permanent cueing regimes are needed for long-term improvements. If so, music might make permanent cueing regimes more pleasant, improving adherence; however, music cueing requires patients to synchronize movements to the “beat,” which might be difficult for patients with PD who tend to show weak beat pe...

  20. Finding the beat: a neural perspective across humans and non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Hugo; Grahn, Jessica; Trainor, Laurel; Rohrmeier, Martin; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2015-03-19

    Humans possess an ability to perceive and synchronize movements to the beat in music ('beat perception and synchronization'), and recent neuroscientific data have offered new insights into this beat-finding capacity at multiple neural levels. Here, we review and compare behavioural and neural data on temporal and sequential processing during beat perception and entrainment tasks in macaques (including direct neural recording and local field potential (LFP)) and humans (including fMRI, EEG and MEG). These abilities rest upon a distributed set of circuits that include the motor cortico-basal-ganglia-thalamo-cortical (mCBGT) circuit, where the supplementary motor cortex (SMA) and the putamen are critical cortical and subcortical nodes, respectively. In addition, a cortical loop between motor and auditory areas, connected through delta and beta oscillatory activity, is deeply involved in these behaviours, with motor regions providing the predictive timing needed for the perception of, and entrainment to, musical rhythms. The neural discharge rate and the LFP oscillatory activity in the gamma- and beta-bands in the putamen and SMA of monkeys are tuned to the duration of intervals produced during a beat synchronization-continuation task (SCT). Hence, the tempo during beat synchronization is represented by different interval-tuned cells that are activated depending on the produced interval. In addition, cells in these areas are tuned to the serial-order elements of the SCT. Thus, the underpinnings of beat synchronization are intrinsically linked to the dynamics of cell populations tuned for duration and serial order throughout the mCBGT. We suggest that a cross-species comparison of behaviours and the neural circuits supporting them sets the stage for a new generation of neurally grounded computational models for beat perception and synchronization. PMID:25646516

  1. Individual differences in beat perception affect gait responses to low- and high-groove music.

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Ann eLeow; Taylor eParrott; Grahn, Jessica A.

    2014-01-01

    Slowed gait in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients can be improved when patients synchronize footsteps to isochronous metronome cues, but limited retention of such improvements suggest that permanent cueing regimes are needed for long-term improvements. If so, music might make permanent cueing regimes more pleasant, improving adherence; however, music cueing requires patients to synchronize movements to the beat, which might be difficult for PD patients who tend to show weak beat perception. On...

  2. Stochastic Alternating Dynamics for Synchronous EAD-Like Beating Rhythms in Cultured Cardiac Myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ning; ZHANG Hui-Min; LIU Zhi-Qiang; DING Xue-Li; YANG Ming-Hao; GU Hua-Guang; REN Wei

    2009-01-01

    Dissolved cardiac myocytes can couple together and generate synchronous beatings in culture. We observed a synchronized early after-depolarization(EAD)-like rhythm in cultured cardiac myocytes and reproduced the experimental observation in a network mathematical model whose dynamics are close to a Hopf bifurcation. The mechanism for this EAD-like rhythm is attributed to noised-induced stochastic alternatings between the focus and the limit cycle. These results provide novel understandings for pathological heart rhythms like the early immature beatings.

  3. The antagonistic metabolite of GLP-1, GLP-1 (9-36)amide, does not influence gastric emptying and hunger sensations in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagell, Carl Frederic; Pedersen, Jan F; Holst, Jens Juul

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 (7-36)amide) is an intestinal hormone that is released in response to meal ingestion. GLP-1 reduces postprandial gastric and exocrine pancreatic secretion and is believed to inhibit gastric emptying. Furthermore, GLP-1 may play a role in hunger and thirst......-36)amide (5 pmol/kg body wt/min) resulting in supraphysiological concentrations. RESULTS: Infusion of GLP-1 (9-36)amide had no effect on gastric emptying or the sensation of hunger compared to saline. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggests that the rapid formation of the antagonistic metabolite does...... not influence gastric emptying and hunger ratings in humans even when it is present in supraphysiological concentrations....

  4. A high-density EEG investigation into steady state binaural beat stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Goodin

    Full Text Available Binaural beats are an auditory phenomenon that has been suggested to alter physiological and cognitive processes including vigilance and brainwave entrainment. Some personality traits measured by the NEO Five Factor Model have been found to alter entrainment using pulsing light stimuli, but as yet no studies have examined if this occurs using steady state presentation of binaural beats for a relatively short presentation of two minutes. This study aimed to examine if binaural beat stimulation altered vigilance or cortical frequencies and if personality traits were involved. Thirty-one participants were played binaural beat stimuli designed to elicit a response at either the Theta (7 Hz or Beta (16 Hz frequency bands while undertaking a zero-back vigilance task. EEG was recorded from a high-density electrode cap. No significant differences were found in vigilance or cortical frequency power during binaural beat stimulation compared to a white noise control period. Furthermore, no significant relationships were detected between the above and the Big Five personality traits. This suggests a short presentation of steady state binaural beats are not sufficient to alter vigilance or entrain cortical frequencies at the two bands examined and that certain personality traits were not more susceptible than others.

  5. A high-density EEG investigation into steady state binaural beat stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodin, Peter; Ciorciari, Joseph; Baker, Kate; Carey, Anne-Marie; Carrey, Anne-Marie; Harper, Michelle; Kaufman, Jordy

    2012-01-01

    Binaural beats are an auditory phenomenon that has been suggested to alter physiological and cognitive processes including vigilance and brainwave entrainment. Some personality traits measured by the NEO Five Factor Model have been found to alter entrainment using pulsing light stimuli, but as yet no studies have examined if this occurs using steady state presentation of binaural beats for a relatively short presentation of two minutes. This study aimed to examine if binaural beat stimulation altered vigilance or cortical frequencies and if personality traits were involved. Thirty-one participants were played binaural beat stimuli designed to elicit a response at either the Theta (7 Hz) or Beta (16 Hz) frequency bands while undertaking a zero-back vigilance task. EEG was recorded from a high-density electrode cap. No significant differences were found in vigilance or cortical frequency power during binaural beat stimulation compared to a white noise control period. Furthermore, no significant relationships were detected between the above and the Big Five personality traits. This suggests a short presentation of steady state binaural beats are not sufficient to alter vigilance or entrain cortical frequencies at the two bands examined and that certain personality traits were not more susceptible than others. PMID:22496862

  6. World Wind

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — World Wind allows any user to zoom from satellite altitude into any place on Earth, leveraging high resolution LandSat imagery and SRTM elevation data to experience...

  7. Virtual Worlds

    OpenAIRE

    Novák, František

    2009-01-01

    The bachelor's thesis is focused on highlighting the development of virtual worlds. The paper summarizes the evolution of virtual reality. Current virtual worlds are compared in fundamental aspects, such as sociology, economics and education. Social sphere describes the interaction in virtual reality and its specialities. Economical sphere is focused on comparison of real and virtual economies, including their economic indicators. Educational sphere describes the sciences, which are best usea...

  8. World science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the Third World Network of Scientific Organizations (TWNSO), established last year with its headquarters in Trieste, Italy, is to promote the role of science and technology in developing countries. TWNSO, under the presidency of Abdus Salam, is an offshoot of the Third World Academy of Sciences, which has pushed the cause of international scientific collaboration since its establishment in 1983. (orig./HSI).

  9. And May the Odds Be Always in Your Favour: What "The Hunger Games"-Trilogy Can Teach Us about Today's Marketing Academia

    OpenAIRE

    Wohlfeil, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Some consumer researchers suggested in the 1980s that fictional novels and artworks would tell us more about consumer behaviour, life and the human condition than scientific papers in our top-tier journals. Following in their tradition, this critical paper argues that “The Hunger Games”-trilogy provides a perfect mirror for The Publishing Games that haunt marketing academia in recent years. Just like the Hunger Games are the means by which the Capitol’s ruling elite subdues Panem’s wider popu...

  10. Repeated sense of hunger leads to the development of visceral obesity and metabolic syndrome in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Min Han

    Full Text Available Obesity-related disorders, especially metabolic syndrome, contribute to 2.8 million deaths each year worldwide, with significantly increasing morbidity. Eating at regular times and proper food quantity are crucial for maintaining a healthy status. However, many people in developed countries do not follow a regular eating schedule due to a busy lifestyle. Herein, we show that a repeated sense of hunger leads to a high risk of developing visceral obesity and metabolic syndrome in a mouse model (both 3-week and 6-week-old age, 10 mice in each group. The ad libitum (AL group (normal eating pattern and the food restriction (FR group (alternate-day partially food restriction by given only 1/3 of average amount were compared after 8-week experimental period. The total food consumption in the FR group was lower than in the AL group, however, the FR group showed a metabolic syndrome-like condition with significant fat accumulation in adipose tissues. Consequently, the repeated sense of hunger induced the typical characteristics of metabolic syndrome in an animal model; a distinct visceral obesity, hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia and hepatic steatosis. Furthermore, we found that specifically leptin, a major metabolic hormone, played a major role in the development of these pathological disorders. Our study indicated the importance of regular eating habits besides controlling calorie intake.

  11. Repeated Sense of Hunger Leads to the Development of Visceral Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jong-Min; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Lee, Jin-Seok; Choi, Min-Kyung; Kim, Young-Ae; Son, Chang-Gue

    2014-01-01

    Obesity-related disorders, especially metabolic syndrome, contribute to 2.8 million deaths each year worldwide, with significantly increasing morbidity. Eating at regular times and proper food quantity are crucial for maintaining a healthy status. However, many people in developed countries do not follow a regular eating schedule due to a busy lifestyle. Herein, we show that a repeated sense of hunger leads to a high risk of developing visceral obesity and metabolic syndrome in a mouse model (both 3-week and 6-week-old age, 10 mice in each group). The ad libitum (AL) group (normal eating pattern) and the food restriction (FR) group (alternate-day partially food restriction by given only 1/3 of average amount) were compared after 8-week experimental period. The total food consumption in the FR group was lower than in the AL group, however, the FR group showed a metabolic syndrome-like condition with significant fat accumulation in adipose tissues. Consequently, the repeated sense of hunger induced the typical characteristics of metabolic syndrome in an animal model; a distinct visceral obesity, hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia and hepatic steatosis. Furthermore, we found that specifically leptin, a major metabolic hormone, played a major role in the development of these pathological disorders. Our study indicated the importance of regular eating habits besides controlling calorie intake. PMID:24879081

  12. Mode beating and heterodyning of monolithically integrated semiconductor ring lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chiyu

    Monolithically integrated semiconductor ring lasers (SRLs) are attractive optical sources for optoelectronic integrated circuits (OEICs) because they do not require any feedback elements, do not have parts exposed to external ambient, and can operate in a traveling-wave mode. They are promising candidates for wavelength filtering, unidirectional traveling-wave operation, and multiplexing/demultiplexing applications. Ring lasers can also be used as ultrashort pulse generators using various mode-locking schemes and as active gyro components. However, the SRL is a very complicated dynamic system, which requires more investigations to understand the performance regarding details of the design and fabrication. As a part of NASA-supported project "Monolithically Integrated Semiconductor Ring Laser Gyro for Space Applications", this dissertation research was focused on design and characterization of a novel monolithically integrated rotation sensor based on two large-size independent SRLs. Numerical modeling based on the beam propagation method (BPM) was used to design the fabrication parameters for the single-mode ridge-waveguide ring cavity and directional coupler waveguides. The mode internal coupling in single lateral-mode laser diodes with InGaAs/GaAs material system was investigated by optical experiments and numerical modeling. To gain the understanding of the SRL performance, optical and electrical characterization was performed on fabricated SRLs. Particular emphasis was placed on the study of optical and radio frequency (RF) beating spectra of longitudinal modes of ring lasers. RF measurements provide high accuracy in the diagnosis of laser oscillation parameters by purely electronic means, particularly in the measurement of the group index and its dependence on current and temperature. Theoretical analysis based on the effective index method provides good agreement between the experimental data and numerical calculations. Finally, optical heterodyning spectra

  13. Ammonia excretion in mytilid mussels is facilitated by ciliary beating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, J; Himmerkus, N; Holland, N; Sartoris, F J; Bleich, M; Tresguerres, M

    2016-08-01

    The excretion of nitrogenous waste products in the form of ammonia (NH3) and ammonium (NH4 (+)) is a fundamental process in aquatic organisms. For mytilid bivalves, little is known about the mechanisms and sites of excretion. This study investigated the localization and the mechanisms of ammonia excretion in mytilid mussels. An Rh protein was found to be abundantly expressed in the apical cell membrane of the plicate organ, which was previously described as a solely respiratory organ. The Rh protein was also expressed in the gill, although at significantly lower concentrations, but was not detectable in mussel kidney. Furthermore, NH3/NH4 (+) was not enriched in the urine, suggesting that kidneys are not involved in active NH3/NH4 (+) excretion. Exposure to elevated seawater pH of 8.5 transiently reduced NH3/NH4 (+) excretion rates, but they returned to control values following 24 h acclimation. These mussels had increased abundance of V-type H(+)-ATPase in the apical membranes of plicate organ cells; however, NH3/NH4 (+) excretion rates were not affected by the V-type H(+)-ATPase specific inhibitor concanamycin A (100 nmol l(-1)). In contrast, inhibition of ciliary beating with dopamine and increased seawater viscosity significantly reduced NH3 excretion rates under control pH (8.0). These results suggest that NH3/NH4 (+) excretion in mytilid mussels takes place by passive NH3 diffusion across respiratory epithelia via the Rh protein, facilitated by the water current produced for filter feeding, which prevents accumulation of NH3 in the boundary layer. This mechanism would be energy efficient for sessile organisms, as they already generate water currents for filter feeding. PMID:27489216

  14. World energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three major concerns face mankind's future: the impending energy crisis as caused by the depletion of the world's fossil fuel reserves, world atmospheric pollution as caused by the burning of these fuels, and mankind's destruction if the vast energy contained in nuclear weapons stockpiles is released in a global conflict. This paper describes an ambitious, combined solution to these problems by the use of deep underground detonations of thermonuclear devices/bombs to provide a virtually pollution free, world energy source into the far distant future, while achieving a significant increase in mutual trust between the superpowers and all nations. The key is believed to be thermonuclear geothermal stimulation to produce the electrical power needed for a hydrogen economy

  15. Extracting fetal heart beats from maternal abdominal recordings: selection of the optimal principal components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents a systematic comparison of different approaches to the automated selection of the principal components (PC) which optimise the detection of maternal and fetal heart beats from non-invasive maternal abdominal recordings. A public database of 75 4-channel non-invasive maternal abdominal recordings was used for training the algorithm. Four methods were developed and assessed to determine the optimal PC: (1) power spectral distribution, (2) root mean square, (3) sample entropy, and (4) QRS template. The sensitivity of the performance of the algorithm to large-amplitude noise removal (by wavelet de-noising) and maternal beat cancellation methods were also assessed. The accuracy of maternal and fetal beat detection was assessed against reference annotations and quantified using the detection accuracy score F1 [2*PPV*Se / (PPV + Se)], sensitivity (Se), and positive predictive value (PPV). The best performing implementation was assessed on a test dataset of 100 recordings and the agreement between the computed and the reference fetal heart rate (fHR) and fetal RR (fRR) time series quantified. The best performance for detecting maternal beats (F1 99.3%, Se 99.0%, PPV 99.7%) was obtained when using the QRS template method to select the optimal maternal PC and applying wavelet de-noising. The best performance for detecting fetal beats (F1 89.8%, Se 89.3%, PPV 90.5%) was obtained when the optimal fetal PC was selected using the sample entropy method and utilising a fixed-length time window for the cancellation of the maternal beats. The performance on the test dataset was 142.7 beats2/min2 for fHR and 19.9 ms for fRR, ranking respectively 14 and 17 (out of 29) when compared to the other algorithms presented at the Physionet Challenge 2013. (paper)

  16. Fourier analysis of wing beat signals: assessing the effects of genetic alterations of flight muscle structure in Diptera.

    OpenAIRE

    Hyatt, C J; Maughan, D W

    1994-01-01

    A method for determining and analyzing the wing beat frequency in Diptera is presented. This method uses an optical tachometer to measure Diptera wing movement during flight. The resulting signal from the optical measurement is analyzed using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) technique, and the dominant frequency peak in the Fourier spectrum is selected as the wing beat frequency. Also described is a method for determining quantitatively the degree of variability of the wing beat frequency about...

  17. World armament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summary of consequences on: Armament expenditure of the world, arms trade, arms race and nuclear weapon arsenals, nuclear weapon proliferation, nuclear safety controls, nuclear carrier systems, international nuclear trade, nuclear weapon accidents, chemical wars, war law, ecological wars, armament limitations. (HP)

  18. World Englishes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张严心; 周丽

    2014-01-01

    In the current days, the search for information and the need for global communication have already promoted English from being the language of people in different countries as the international language. This essay will give some arguments about the inevitability of variety of world Englishes and its characteristics, and then explain that what Standard English is and examples about the standards in English.

  19. Distraction, not hunger, is associated with lower mood and lower perceived work performance on fast compared to non-fast days during intermittent fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, Katherine M; Baker, Stephanie

    2015-06-01

    Using a repeated measures design, 16 females recorded hunger, distraction, mood and perceived work performance on two consecutive fast days, on two earlier and on two subsequent consecutive non-fast days, during intermittent fasting. Using regression analyses, low positive mood was associated with higher distraction (β = -0.38, p intermittent fasting-type regimes. PMID:26032787

  20. "Are You Done?" Child Care Providers' Verbal Communication at Mealtimes that Reinforce or Hinder Children's Internal Cues of Hunger and Satiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Samantha A.; Branen, Laurel J.; Fletcher, Janice; Price, Elizabeth; Johnson, Susan L.; Sigman-Grant, Madeleine

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the verbal communication of child care providers regarding preschool children's internal and non-internal hunger and satiation cues. Methods: Video observation transcripts of Head Start staff (n=29) at licensed child care centers in Colorado, Idaho, and Nevada were analyzed for common themes. Results: Adults' verbal…

  1. The Backpack Food Program's Effects on U.S. Elementary Students' Hunger and On-Task Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, Meghan E.; Sifers, Sarah K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the BackPack Food Program's effectiveness in combating students' hunger over the weekends and school breaks, as well as analyze the program's effects on students' on-task behavior in the classroom. Additionally, this study examined program satisfaction from students,…

  2. 'Confessing out the soul to conform to the rhythm of thought': a reading of Allen Ginsberg’s Beat poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kruger

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Much critical writing about the Beat Movement has focused on the strong interrelationship between the literary and social discourses within and around the movement. However, the study of Beat literature also necessitates an awareness of its position within the literary discourse of the twentieth century. Beat writing may be seen as standing in the unstable, shifting territory between two equally unstable, shifting literary movements: modernism and postmodernism. Beat poetry pits itself against high modernism and the New Critical tradition, draws upon some aspects of early avant-garde modernism, and simultaneously remoulds these aspects into what may be regarded as the beginnings of postmodernism in the USA. This article presents a reading of Allen Ginsberg’s Beat poetry against this literary-historical background. A brief general overview of some of the key characteristics of Beat poetry is given, followed by a discussion of a number of Beat poems, organised around some salient features of Ginsberg’s Beat poetry that may be linked to Beat poetry’s position in the transition from modernism to postmodernism.

  3. Independent Control of the Static and Dynamic Components of the Chlamydomonas Flagellar Beat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Veikko F; Sartori, Pablo; Friedrich, Benjamin M; Jülicher, Frank; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-04-25

    When the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii swims, it uses the breaststroke beat of its two flagella to pull itself forward [1]. The flagellar waveform can be decomposed into a static component, corresponding to an asymmetric time-averaged shape, and a dynamic component, corresponding to the time-varying wave [2]. Extreme lightening conditions photoshock the cell, converting the breaststroke beat into a symmetric sperm-like beat, which causes a reversal of the direction of swimming [3]. Waveform conversion is achieved by a reduction in magnitude of the static component, whereas the dynamic component remains unchanged [2]. The coupling between static and dynamic components, however, is poorly understood, and it is not known whether the static component requires the dynamic component or whether it can exist independently. We used isolated and reactivated axonemes [4] to investigate the relation between the two beat components. We discovered that, when reactivated in the presence of low ATP concentrations, axonemes displayed the static beat component in absence of the dynamic component. Furthermore, we found that the amplitudes of the two components depend on ATP in qualitatively different ways. These results show that the decomposition into static and dynamic components is not just a mathematical concept but that the two components can independently control different aspects of cell motility: the static component controls swimming direction, whereas the dynamic component provides propulsion. PMID:27040779

  4. 4D ultrasound and 3D MRI registration of beating heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To realize intra-cardiac surgery without cardio-pulmonary bypass, a medical imaging technique with both high image quality and data acquisition rate that is fast enough to follow heart beat movements is required. In this research, we proposed a method that utilized the image quality of MRI and the speed of ultrasound. We developed a 4D image reconstruction method using image registration of 3D MRI and 4D ultrasound images. The registration method consists of rigid registration between 3D MRI and 3D ultrasound with the same heart beat phase, and non-rigid registration between 3D ultrasound images from different heart beat phases. Non-rigid registration was performed with B-spline based registration using variable spring model. In phantom experiment using balloon phantom, registration accuracy was less than 2 mm for total heart volume variation range of 10%. We applied our registration method on 3D MRI and 4D ultrasound images of a volunteer's beating heart data and confirmed through visual observation that heart beat pattern was well reproduced. (orig.)

  5. Soda-anthraquinone pulping of palm oil empty fruit bunches and beating of the resulting pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, L; Serrano, L; Rodríguez, A; Sánchez, R

    2009-02-01

    The influence of soda-anthraquinone pulping variables (temperature, time and soda concentration) and beating (number of PFI beating revolution) of palm oil empty fruit bunches (EFB) on the resulting paper sheets was studied, with a view to identifying the optimum operating conditions. Equations were derived that reproduced the properties of the paper sheets with errors less than 10-12% in 90-95% of cases. An optimum compromise was found as regards operating conditions (15% soda, 170 degrees C, 70 min and 2400 number of PFI beating revolutions) that provided paper properties departing by less than 12% from their optimum values (59.63 Nm/g tensile index, 4.48% stretch, 4.17 kN/g burst index and 7.20 m Nm(2)/g tear index), and a beating grade of 47.5 degrees SR, acceptable to obtain paper sheets. Because these conditions involve a lower soda, temperature, time and beating than those required to maximize the studied paper properties, they can save chemical reagents, energy and immobilized capital for industrial facilities. On the other hand, the stretch properties of these pulp beaten are higher than those of others non-wood pulps, as wheat straw and olive wood. PMID:18815028

  6. Integrar sociedade e natureza na luta contra a fome no século XXI Integrating society and nature in the struggle against hunger in the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Abramovay

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A compreensão do mundo contemporâneo exige um olhar naturalista do qual a obra de Josué de Castro é uma das mais importantes expressões: pensar de maneira articulada a vida social e a reprodução do ambiente natural em que se apóia - incluindo aí a natureza do próprio homem, seu corpo - é a pedra de toque do método geográfico praticado em Geografia da Fome. Esse método é importante não apenas para estudar aquelas regiões onde a fome se abate severamente sobre a vida da população, mas oferece uma importante chave de leitura dos problemas alimentares que se anunciam para o século XXI, quando a população mundial deverá ter um aumento de quase 50%. Os desafios produtivos dos próximos anos - que este artigo procura expor de maneira sumária - não poderão ser enfrentados com base nas técnicas que caracterizaram a Revolução Verde. Eles exigem uma compreensão refinada dos vínculos entre sistemas sociais e sistemas ecológicos, para a qual a obra de Josué de Castro é uma inspiração fundamental.Understanding the contemporary world requires a naturalist view, wherein the work of Josué de Castro is one of the most important expressions: taking a comprehensive approach to social life and reproduction of the natural environment that supports it - including the nature of humans themselves, their bodies - is the cornerstone of the geographic method practiced in Geografia da Fome [The Geography of Hunger]. This method is important for studying regions where hunger severely afflicts the populations, and also offers an important key for interpreting the food problems that are forecast for the 21st century, when the world population is expected to increase by nearly 50%. The food production challenges in the coming years - and which this article discusses briefly - cannot be solved with the techniques that characterized the so-called Green Revolution. Rather, they require a more refined understanding of the links between the

  7. Local School Wellness Policy Implementation Under the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-29

    This final rule requires all local educational agencies that participate in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs to meet expanded local school wellness policy requirements consistent with the requirements set forth in section 204 of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. The final rule requires each local educational agency to establish minimum content requirements for the local school wellness policies, ensure stakeholder participation in the development and updates of such policies, and periodically assess and disclose to the public schools' compliance with the local school wellness policies. These regulations are expected to result in local school wellness policies that strengthen the ability of a local educational agency to create a school nutrition environment that promotes students' health, well-being, and ability to learn. In addition, these regulations will increase transparency for the public with regard to school wellness policies and contribute to integrity in the school nutrition program. PMID:27476196

  8. Wavelet Entropy as a Measure of Ventricular Beat Suppression from the Electrocardiogram in Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Langley

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel method of quantifying the effectiveness of the suppression of ventricular activity from electrocardiograms (ECGs in atrial fibrillation is proposed. The temporal distribution of the energy of wavelet coefficients is quantified by wavelet entropy at each ventricular beat. More effective ventricular activity suppression yields increased entropies at scales dominated by the ventricular and atrial components of the ECG. Two studies are undertaken to demonstrate the efficacy of the method: first, using synthesised ECGs with controlled levels of residual ventricular activity, and second, using patient recordings with ventricular activity suppressed by an average beat template subtraction algorithm. In both cases wavelet entropy is shown to be a good measure of the effectiveness of ventricular beat suppression.

  9. RULE BASED CLASSIFICATION OF ISCHEMIC ECG BEATS USING ANT-MINER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Murugan,

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial ischemia is the most common cardiac disease and is characterized by a high risk of sudden cardiac death. The accurate ischemic episode detection, where a sequence of cardiac beats is assessed, is based on the correct detection of ischemic beats. In this paper, a data mining approach, association rule based classification using Ant-Miner algorithm is proposed for automatic detection of ischemic ECG beats. The proposed work has two steps: initially the noise is removed and the features are extracted from the ECG signals. With these features, the Ant-Miner is applied to extract the rules. European Society of Cardiology ST-T database of ECGbeats is used to analyze the performance of our proposed method with the existing. The greater accuracy of the proposed method shows its high performance than the existing.

  10. Beta beat correction and improvement in Indus-2 storage ring performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The periodicity restoration or the beta beat correction is an important step to enhance the operational performance of any storage ring in terms of the better injection efficiency and improved beam lifetime etc. A method of linear beam optics from closed orbit has been used for the beta beat correction in Indus-2 store ring, where 26 power supplies driving the 72 quadrupoles are used as a degree of freedoms. In this method, the measured response matrix is fitted to the theoretical orbit response matrix and deviations of the quadrupole strengths are determined. Correction of these deviation in strengths are applied in the operating machine through the power supplies driving the quadrupoles. We will discuss the method used for the beta beat correction in Indus-2 storage ring and will present the effects of the correction on the injection efficiency and beam lifetime. (author)

  11. Recent results on the beat wave acceleration of externally injected electrons on a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA) two laser beams of slightly different frequencies resonantly beat in a plasma in such a way that their frequency and wavenumber differences correspond to the plasma wave frequency and wavenumber. The amplitude-modulated electromagnetic wave envelope of the laser pulse exerts a periodic nonlinear force on the plasma electrons, causing them to bunch. The resulting space-charge wave can have a phase velocity nearly equal to the speed of light. If an electron bunch is injected with a velocity close to this it can be trapped and accelerated. The UCLA program investigating PBWA has found that tunnel or multi-photon ionized plasmas a re homogeneous enough for coherent macroscopic acceleration. The laser pulse should be short, and the peak laser intensity should be such that Iλ2 ∼ 2 x 1016 W/cm2 μm2 in order to get substantial beat wave amplitudes. tab., 3 refs

  12. On the Interaction of Two Beating Electrostatic Waves with Plasma Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malá, Z.

    2002-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of the interaction of particles with two beating plasma waves. We follow the instructional article by Ott and Dum. According to them, the sum of wave actions during the interaction is constant, supposing the effect of trapped particles on the beat can be neglected. In the present paper, this problem is solved more generally, just for the case of trapped and also untrapped particles in the wave. Our study shows that the sum of wave actions is constant also in the case when the influence of the trapped particles on the amplitudes of two waves was considered. On the contrary this conclusion is not valid if it is supposed that two original waves are amplitude modulated e.g. by the influence of the interaction of the beat with particles.

  13. A novel type of self-beating cardiomyocytes in adult mouse ventricles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to investigate the presence of resident heart cells that are distinct from terminally-differentiated cardiomyocytes. Adult mouse heart was coronary perfused with collagenase, and ventricles were excised and further digested. After spinning cardiomyocyte-containing fractions down, the supernatant fraction was collected and cultured without adding any chemicals. Two to five days after plating, some of rounded cells adhered to the culture dish, gradually changed their shape and then started self-beating. These self-beating cells did not appreciably proliferate but underwent a further morphological maturation process to form highly branched shapes with many projections. These cells were mostly multinucleated, well sarcomeric-organized and expressed cardiac marker proteins, defined as atypically-shaped cardiomyocytes (ACMs). Patch-clamp experiments revealed that ACMs exhibited spontaneous action potentials arising from the preceding slow diastolic depolarization. We thus found a novel type of resident heart cells in adult cardiac ventricles that spontaneously develop into self-beating cardiomyocytes.

  14. Probing an Excited-State Atomic Transition Using Hyperfine Quantum Beat Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wade, Christopher G; Keaveney, James; Adams, Charles S; Weatherill, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method to observe the dynamics of an excited-state transition in a room temperature atomic vapor using hyperfine quantum beats. Our experiment using cesium atoms consists of a pulsed excitation of the D2 transition, and continuous-wave driving of an excited-state transition from the 6P$_{3/2}$ state to the 7S$_{1/2}$ state. We observe quantum beats in the fluorescence from the 6P$_{3/2}$ state which are modified by the driving of the excited-state transition. The Fourier spectrum of the beat signal yields evidence of Autler-Townes splitting of the 6P$_{3/2}$, F = 5 hyperfine level and Rabi oscillations on the excited-state transition. A detailed model provides qualitative agreement with the data, giving insight to the physical processes involved.

  15. Modulational instability and its consequences for the beat-wave accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modulational instability caused by the coupling of a Langmuir wave to the ion motion is investigated in the domain of large v/sub L//V/sub te/>1 ratios, where v/sub L/ and v/sub t//sub e/ denote the pump Langmuir-wave quiver velocity and the electron thermal velocity, respectively. A convenient approximate expression for the growth rate is given for v/sub L//v/sub te/<50(A/Z)/sup 1/6/. The limitation of the beat plasmon growth due to the modulational instability is studied in the context of plasma beat wave experiments and the maximum beat plasmon amplitude is determined numerically

  16. Terahertz beat oscillation of plasmonic electrons interacting with femtosecond light pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinping; He, Jianfang; Wang, Yimeng; Liu, Feifei

    2016-01-01

    Plasmon resonance in nanostructured metals is in essence collective oscillation of free electrons, which is driven by optical electric fields and oscillates at nearly the same frequency as the excitation photons. This is the basic physics for the currently extensively interested topics in optical metamaterials, optical switching, and logic optical “circuits” with potential applications in optical communication and optical computation. We present here an interference effect between photons and plasmon electrons, which is observed as multi-cycle beat-oscillation. The beat frequency is in the range of 3~4 THz, which is equal to the difference between optical frequency of the photons and oscillation frequency of the plasmon electrons. Such beat oscillation evolves in a time scale of more than 1 ps, which is much longer than the optical pulse length, implying interaction between photons and pure damping plasmon-electrons. The discovered mechanisms might be important for exploring new approaches for THz generation.

  17. Cross-Cultural Influences on Rhythm Processing: Reproduction, Discrimination, and Beat Tapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Cameron

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The structures of musical rhythm differ between cultures, despite the fact that the ability to synchronize one’s movements to musical rhythms appears to be universal. To measure the influence of culture on rhythm processing, we tested East African and North American adults on the perception, production, and beat tapping of rhythms derived from East African and Western music. To assess rhythm perception, participants identified whether pairs of rhythms were same or different. To assess rhythm production, participants reproduced rhythms after hearing them. To assess beat tapping, participants tapped the beat along with repeated rhythms. We expected that performance in all three tasks would be influenced both by the culture of the participant and by the culture of the rhythm. Specifically, we predicted that a participant’s ability to discriminate, reproduce, and accurately tap the beat would be better for rhythms from their own culture than for rhythms from another culture. In the rhythm discrimination task, there were no differences in discriminating culturally familiar and unfamiliar rhythms. In the rhythm reproduction task, both groups reproduced East African rhythms more accurately than Western rhythms, but East African participants also showed an effect of cultural familiarity, leading to a significant interaction. In the beat tapping task, participants in both groups tapped the beat more accurately for culturally familiar than unfamiliar rhythms. The results demonstrate that culture does influence the processing of musical rhythm. In terms of the function of musical rhythm, our results are consistent with theories that musical rhythm enables synchronization. Musical rhythm may foster musical cultural identity by enabling within-group synchronization to music, perhaps supporting social cohesion.

  18. Activating and relaxing music entrains the speed of beat synchronized walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Leman

    Full Text Available Inspired by a theory of embodied music cognition, we investigate whether music can entrain the speed of beat synchronized walking. If human walking is in synchrony with the beat and all musical stimuli have the same duration and the same tempo, then differences in walking speed can only be the result of music-induced differences in stride length, thus reflecting the vigor or physical strength of the movement. Participants walked in an open field in synchrony with the beat of 52 different musical stimuli all having a tempo of 130 beats per minute and a meter of 4 beats. The walking speed was measured as the walked distance during a time interval of 30 seconds. The results reveal that some music is 'activating' in the sense that it increases the speed, and some music is 'relaxing' in the sense that it decreases the speed, compared to the spontaneous walked speed in response to metronome stimuli. Participants are consistent in their observation of qualitative differences between the relaxing and activating musical stimuli. Using regression analysis, it was possible to set up a predictive model using only four sonic features that explain 60% of the variance. The sonic features capture variation in loudness and pitch patterns at periods of three, four and six beats, suggesting that expressive patterns in music are responsible for the effect. The mechanism may be attributed to an attentional shift, a subliminal audio-motor entrainment mechanism, or an arousal effect, but further study is needed to figure this out. Overall, the study supports the hypothesis that recurrent patterns of fluctuation affecting the binary meter strength of the music may entrain the vigor of the movement. The study opens up new perspectives for understanding the relationship between entrainment and expressiveness, with the possibility to develop applications that can be used in domains such as sports and physical rehabilitation.

  19. Activating and relaxing music entrains the speed of beat synchronized walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leman, Marc; Moelants, Dirk; Varewyck, Matthias; Styns, Frederik; van Noorden, Leon; Martens, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by a theory of embodied music cognition, we investigate whether music can entrain the speed of beat synchronized walking. If human walking is in synchrony with the beat and all musical stimuli have the same duration and the same tempo, then differences in walking speed can only be the result of music-induced differences in stride length, thus reflecting the vigor or physical strength of the movement. Participants walked in an open field in synchrony with the beat of 52 different musical stimuli all having a tempo of 130 beats per minute and a meter of 4 beats. The walking speed was measured as the walked distance during a time interval of 30 seconds. The results reveal that some music is 'activating' in the sense that it increases the speed, and some music is 'relaxing' in the sense that it decreases the speed, compared to the spontaneous walked speed in response to metronome stimuli. Participants are consistent in their observation of qualitative differences between the relaxing and activating musical stimuli. Using regression analysis, it was possible to set up a predictive model using only four sonic features that explain 60% of the variance. The sonic features capture variation in loudness and pitch patterns at periods of three, four and six beats, suggesting that expressive patterns in music are responsible for the effect. The mechanism may be attributed to an attentional shift, a subliminal audio-motor entrainment mechanism, or an arousal effect, but further study is needed to figure this out. Overall, the study supports the hypothesis that recurrent patterns of fluctuation affecting the binary meter strength of the music may entrain the vigor of the movement. The study opens up new perspectives for understanding the relationship between entrainment and expressiveness, with the possibility to develop applications that can be used in domains such as sports and physical rehabilitation. PMID:23874469

  20. Beating and insulting children as a risk for adult cancer, cardiac disease and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Michael E; Alkhalaf, Ahmed M; Whalley, Ben

    2013-12-01

    The use of physical punishment for children is associated with poor psychological and behavioral outcomes, but the causal pathway is controversial, and the effects on later physical health unknown. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of asthma, cancer, and cardiac patients (150 in each category, 75 male) recruited from outpatient clinics and 250 healthy controls (125 male). All participants were 40-60 years old and citizens of Saudi Arabia, where the use of beating and insults is an acceptable parenting style. Demographic data and recalled frequency of beatings and insults as a child were assessed on an 8-point scale. Beating and insults were highly correlated (ρ = 0.846). Propensity score matching was used to control for demographic differences between the disease and healthy groups. After controlling for differences, more frequent beating (once or more per month) and insults were associated with a significantly increased risk for cancer (RR = 1.7), cardiac disease (RR = 1.3) and asthma (RR = 1.6), with evidence of increased risk for cancer and asthma with beating frequency of once every 6 months or more. Our results show that a threatening parenting style of beating and insults is associated with increased risk for somatic disease, possibly because this form of parenting induces stress. Our findings are consistent with previous research showing that child abuse and other early life stressors adversely affect adult somatic health, but provide evidence that the pathogenic effects occur also with chronic minor stress. A stress-inducing parenting style, even when normative, has long term adverse health consequences. PMID:23054177

  1. Odor detection in Manduca sexta is optimized when odor stimuli are pulsed at a frequency matching the wing beat during flight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin C Daly

    Full Text Available Sensory systems sample the external world actively, within the context of self-motion induced disturbances. Mammals sample olfactory cues within the context of respiratory cycles and have adapted to process olfactory information within the time frame of a single sniff cycle. In plume tracking insects, it remains unknown whether olfactory processing is adapted to wing beating, which causes similar physical effects as sniffing. To explore this we first characterized the physical properties of our odor delivery system using hotwire anemometry and photo ionization detection, which confirmed that odor stimuli were temporally structured. Electroantennograms confirmed that pulse trains were tracked physiologically. Next, we quantified odor detection in moths in a series of psychophysical experiments to determine whether pulsing odor affected acuity. Moths were first conditioned to respond to a target odorant using Pavlovian olfactory conditioning. At 24 and 48 h after conditioning, moths were tested with a dilution series of the conditioned odor. On separate days odor was presented either continuously or as 20 Hz pulse trains to simulate wing beating effects. We varied pulse train duty cycle, olfactometer outflow velocity, pulsing method, and odor. Results of these studies, established that detection was enhanced when odors were pulsed. Higher velocity and briefer pulses also enhanced detection. Post hoc analysis indicated enhanced detection was the result of a significantly lower behavioral response to blank stimuli when presented as pulse trains. Since blank responses are a measure of false positive responses, this suggests that the olfactory system makes fewer errors (i.e. is more reliable when odors are experienced as pulse trains. We therefore postulate that the olfactory system of Manduca sexta may have evolved mechanisms to enhance odor detection during flight, where the effects of wing beating represent the norm. This system may even exploit

  2. Off-momentum beta-beat correction in the RHIC proton run

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Y.; Bai, M.; Fischer, W.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; White, S.

    2012-05-20

    In this article, we will review the techniques to measure the off-momentum {beta}-beat and the correction algorithms with the chromatic arc sextupoles in RHIC. We will focus on the measurement and correction of the off-momentum {beta}*-beat at the interaction points. The off-momentum {beta}* is measured with the quadrupole strength change and a high resolution phase lock loop tune meter. The results of off-momentum {beta}* correction performed in a dedicated beam experiment in the 2012 RHIC 250 GeV polarized proton run are presented.

  3. Possible parametric instabilities of beat waves in a transversely magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of an external magnetic field on the various possible parametric instabilities of the longitudinal beat wave at the difference frequency of two incident laser beams in a hot plasma has been thoeretically investigated. The kinetic equation is employed to obtain the nonlinear response of the magnetized electrons due to the nonlinear coupling of the beat wave with the low-frequency electrostatic plasma modes. It is noted that the growth rates of the three-wave and the four-wave parametric instabilities can be influenced by the external transverse magnetic field. (author). 20 refs, 3 figs

  4. Beat frequency stabilization between two HCN lasers by phase locked loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency stabilization circuit using a phase locked loop (PLL) was developed to stabilize a beat frequency of HCN laser interferometer in the JFT-2M tokamak. The application of this frequency stabilization circuit is to observe waves and density fluctuations in plasmas by laser scattering measurement. The frequency resolution of PLL is less than 10 kHz. The lock range obtained experimentally is about 1 MHz and its value is high enough to stabilize the beat frequency between two HCN lasers. The present PLL circuit can be applied to the scattering experiment in JFT-2M. (author)

  5. Model for hydrodynamic synchronization of beating cilia in a viscoelastic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Thomas; Fu, Henry

    2010-03-01

    The synchronization of beating flagella or cilia is important for swimming microorganisms such as Chlamydomonas as well as transport processes such as the clearing of foreign bodies from the airway. Many of these situations involve Newtonian fluids, but some such as the airway involve viscoelastic fluids. A hypothesis currently under intense investigation is that hydrodynamic interactions between nearby beating cilia lead to synchronization. Theoretical studies of simple models consisting of orbiting spheres in Newtonian liquids show that the spheres lock phases when they are subject to suitable normal forces. This talk describes a theoretical study of how synchronization arises in viscoelastic fluids.

  6. Terahertz generation by beating two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terahertz (THz) radiation generated by beating of two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma is discussed theoretically. The critical angle between the two Langmuir waves and the critical wave-length (wave vector) of Langmuir waves for generating THz radiation are obtained analytically. Furthermore, the maximum radiation energy is obtained. We find that the critical angle, the critical wave-length, and the generated radiation energy strongly depend on plasma temperature and wave-length of the Langmuir waves. That is, the THz radiation generated by beating of two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma can be controlled by adjusting the plasma temperature and the Langmuir wave-length

  7. Terahertz generation by beating two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Qiao, Xin; Cheng, Li-Hong; Tang, Rong-An; Zhang, Ai-Xia; Xue, Ju-Kui, E-mail: xuejk@nwnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Atomic & Molecular Physics and Functional Materials of Gansu Province, College of Physics and Electronics Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Terahertz (THz) radiation generated by beating of two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma is discussed theoretically. The critical angle between the two Langmuir waves and the critical wave-length (wave vector) of Langmuir waves for generating THz radiation are obtained analytically. Furthermore, the maximum radiation energy is obtained. We find that the critical angle, the critical wave-length, and the generated radiation energy strongly depend on plasma temperature and wave-length of the Langmuir waves. That is, the THz radiation generated by beating of two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma can be controlled by adjusting the plasma temperature and the Langmuir wave-length.

  8. Hybrid dead-beat observers for a class of nonlinear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Karafyllis, Iasson

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the reduced-order or full-order, dead-beat observer problem for a class of nonlinear systems, linear in the unmeasured states. A novel hybrid observer design strategy is proposed, with the help of the notion of strong observability in finite time. The proposed methodology is applied to a batch reactor, for which a hybrid dead-beat observer is obtained in the absence of the precise measurements of the concentration variables. Moreover, the observer is used for the estimation of the frequency of a sinusoidal signal. The results show that accurate estimations can be provided even if the signal is corrupted by high frequency noise.

  9. Mnemonic Effect of Iconic Gesture and Beat Gesture in Adults and Children: Is Meaning in Gesture Important for Memory Recall?

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Wing Chee; Chen-Hui, Colin Sim; Wei-Shan, Julie Low

    2012-01-01

    Abundant research has shown that encoding meaningful gesture, such as an iconic gesture, enhances memory. This paper asked whether gesture needs to carry meaning to improve memory recall by comparing the mnemonic effect of meaningful (i.e., iconic gestures) and nonmeaningful gestures (i.e., beat gestures). Beat gestures involve simple motoric…

  10. Comment on "Human Time-Frequency Acuity Beats the Fourier Uncertainty Principle"

    OpenAIRE

    Thekkadath, G. S.; Spanner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the initial article [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 044301 (2013), arXiv:1208.4611] it was claimed that human hearing can beat the Fourier uncertainty principle. In this Comment, we demonstrate that the experiment designed and implemented in the original article was ill-chosen to test Fourier uncertainty in human hearing.

  11. Should Individual Investors Use Technical Trading Rules to Attempt to Beat the Market?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S. Coe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Despite widespread academic acceptance of the Efficient Markets Hypothesis, some stock traders still use technical trading rules in an attempt to beat the market. Approach: This study looked at four trading rules, namely, the arithmetic moving average, the relative strength index, a stochastic oscillator and its moving average. These trading rules compare the relationship of current prices to past price patterns to generate a signal when to buy and sell stocks. The trading rules were tested over the years 2000-2009, a period of time that exhibited bull and bear markets, to determine if traders could actively trade a stock and beat a passive investment strategy. Results: We tested the four trading rules against the 576 stocks that comprise the S&P 100, the NASDAQ 100 and the S&P Midcap 400. The results proved discouraging to that strategy, in that no one trading rule consistently beat the market. Conclusion/Recommendations: Since technical trading rules cannot be used to consistently beat a long-term buy and hold strategy, we recommend that investors first use fundamental analysis to select stocks and then apply a technical trading rule to enhance potential trading gains.

  12. Tagasiviitavad tõendid: teine pilk pilditeadusele / Beat Wyss ; intervjueerinud Ivar-Kristjan Hein

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Wyss, Beat, 1947-

    2011-01-01

    Intervjuus Karlsruhe kunsti- ja disainiülikooli kunstiajaloo ja meediateooria professori Beat Wyssiga on teemaks Zürichis tema juhitav uurimisprojekt, mille keskmes on Venezia biennaal Ida-Euroopa riikide positsioonilt, tema EKA Kunstiteaduse Instituudi doktorantidele peetud seminar "Tagasiviitavad tõendid. Teine pilk pilditeadusele", tema kaasaegse kunsti universaalsed põhimõtted

  13. Amplitude differences least squares method applied to temporal cardiac beat alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, R. O.; Laciar, E.; Valentinuzzi, M. E.

    2007-11-01

    High resolution averaged ECG is an important diagnostic technique in post-infarcted and/or chagasic patients with high risk of ventricular tachycardia (VT). It calls for precise determination of the synchronism point (fiducial point) in each beat to be averaged. Cross-correlation (CC) between each detected beat and a reference beat is, by and large, the standard alignment procedure. However, the fiducial point determination is not precise in records contaminated with high levels of noise. Herein, we propose an alignment procedure based on the least squares calculation of the amplitude differences (LSAD) between the ECG samples and a reference or template beat. Both techniques, CC and LSAD, were tested in high resolution ECG's corrupted with white noise and 50 Hz line interference of varying amplitudes (RMS range: 0-100μV). Results point out that LSDA produced a lower alignment error in all contaminated records while in those blurred by power line interference better results were found only within the 0-40 μV range. It is concluded that the proposed method represents a valid alignment alternative.

  14. The Patterns of Music: Young Children Learning Mathematics through Beat, Rhythm, and Melody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Kamile; Geist, Eugene A.; Kuznik, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Research on music and music therapy suggests that math and music are related in the brain from very early in life. Musical elements such as steady beat, rhythm, melody, and tempo possess inherent mathematical principles such as spatial properties, sequencing, counting, patterning, and one-to-one correspondence. With new understanding about the…

  15. Beate Müllerová, východoněmecká literatura a cenzura

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlíček, Tomáš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 4 (2009), s. 531-533. ISSN 0009-0468 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90560517 Keywords : East German literature * Müller, Beate * censorship Subject RIV: AJ - Letters, Mass-media, Audiovision

  16. Beat Keeping in a Sea Lion as Coupled Oscillation: Implications for Comparative Understanding of Human Rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A Rouse

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human capacity for entraining movement to external rhythms—i.e., beat keeping—is ubiquitous, but its evolutionary history and neural underpinnings remain a mystery. Recent findings of entrainment to simple and complex rhythms in non-human animals pave the way for a novel comparative approach to assess the origins and mechanisms of rhythmic behavior. The most reliable non-human beat keeper to date is a California sea lion, Ronan, who was trained to match head movements to isochronous repeating stimuli and showed spontaneous generalization of this ability to novel tempos and to the complex rhythms of music. Does Ronan’s performance rely on the same neural mechanisms as human rhythmic behavior? In the current study, we presented Ronan with simple rhythmic stimuli at novel tempos. On some trials, we introduced perturbations, altering either tempo or phase in the middle of a presentation. Ronan quickly adjusted her behavior following all perturbations, recovering her consistent phase and tempo relationships to the stimulus within a few beats. Ronan’s performance was consistent with predictions of mathematical models describing coupled oscillation: a model relying solely on phase coupling strongly matched her behavior, and the model was further improved with the addition of period coupling. These findings are the clearest evidence yet for parity in human and non-human beat keeping and support the view that the human ability to perceive and move in time to rhythm may be rooted in broadly conserved neural mechanisms.

  17. Effects of Movement, Tempo, and Gender on Steady Beat Performance of Kindergarten Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Paige

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this research were to discover the effects of manual (hand) and pedal (foot) movements, tempo, and gender on steady beat accuracy. Participants (N = 119) consisted of male (n = 63) and female (n = 56) kindergarten students randomly divided into two groups, counterbalanced with regard to school, homeroom, and gender. Participants…

  18. Quantum beats in photoluminescence of InP quantum dots in electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydov, V.; Ren, H.W.; Sugisaki, M. [ERATO, JST, Tsukuba (Japan). Single Quantum Dot Project; Fedorov, A.V. [Vavilov State Optical Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ignatiev, I.V.; Kozin, I.E. [ERATO, JST, Tsukuba (Japan). Single Quantum Dot Project; Sankt-Peterburgskij Univ. (Russian Federation). Research Inst. of Physics; Sugou, S. [ERATO, JST, Tsukuba (Japan). Single Quantum Dot Project; NEC Corp., Tsukuba (Japan). Opto-Electronics Research Labs.; Masumoto, Y. [ERATO, JST, Tsukuba (Japan). Single Quantum Dot Project; Tsukuba Univ., Sakura, Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Physics

    2001-03-08

    The photoluminescence (PL) kinetics of heterostructures with InP self-assembled quantum dots are studied under quasi-resonant pulse excitation in the presence of an external electric field. An oscillatory behavior of the PL kinetics is shown to arise due to quantum beats of the radiative states. A model of the coherent excitation of nonresonant PL is proposed. (orig.)

  19. Beat Keeping in a Sea Lion As Coupled Oscillation: Implications for Comparative Understanding of Human Rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Andrew A; Cook, Peter F; Large, Edward W; Reichmuth, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Human capacity for entraining movement to external rhythms-i.e., beat keeping-is ubiquitous, but its evolutionary history and neural underpinnings remain a mystery. Recent findings of entrainment to simple and complex rhythms in non-human animals pave the way for a novel comparative approach to assess the origins and mechanisms of rhythmic behavior. The most reliable non-human beat keeper to date is a California sea lion, Ronan, who was trained to match head movements to isochronous repeating stimuli and showed spontaneous generalization of this ability to novel tempos and to the complex rhythms of music. Does Ronan's performance rely on the same neural mechanisms as human rhythmic behavior? In the current study, we presented Ronan with simple rhythmic stimuli at novel tempos. On some trials, we introduced "perturbations," altering either tempo or phase in the middle of a presentation. Ronan quickly adjusted her behavior following all perturbations, recovering her consistent phase and tempo relationships to the stimulus within a few beats. Ronan's performance was consistent with predictions of mathematical models describing coupled oscillation: a model relying solely on phase coupling strongly matched her behavior, and the model was further improved with the addition of period coupling. These findings are the clearest evidence yet for parity in human and non-human beat keeping and support the view that the human ability to perceive and move in time to rhythm may be rooted in broadly conserved neural mechanisms. PMID:27375418

  20. Sideband and quantum-beat measurements with sup(129m)Te and 57Co sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sideband intensities and quantum beats were measured for recoillessly emitted gamma rays as a function of the vibration frequency of quartz crystals on which sources of sup(129m)Te and 57Co were deposited. At most frequencies a low degree of coherence of the vibrations of the source nuclei was observed. (Auth.)

  1. Siim Nestor soovitab : Stereo ÖÖ. Mutant Disco. Beats from the Vault. Turbodisko / Siim Nestor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nestor, Siim, 1974-

    2006-01-01

    Oma debüütalbumit "Migration" tutvustav ameerika diskor Alex Attias üritustel "Stereo ÖÖ" 19. mail Tallinnas Von Krahlis. Üritustest "Mutant Disco" 19. mail Tallinnas klubis Privé ja Tartus 20. mail klubis Illusion, "Beats from the Vault" 19. mail Tallinnas klubis Võit ja "Turbodisko" 20. mail Tallinnas klubis KuKu

  2. Wavelength of ocean waves and surf beat at duck from array measurements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Menon, H.B.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Jog, P.D.; Almeida, A.M.

    Wavelength of ocean waves and surf beat (infra gravity waves) has for the first time been computed as a function of frequency from different combinations of non-collinear 3-gauge arrays. Data at the 15-gauge polygonal array at 8 m depth at Duck...

  3. Movement in Steady Beat: Learning on the Move, Ages 3-7. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikart, Phyllis S.

    The ability to feel and maintain steady, rhythmic beat is important for children to develop in early childhood and will assist them in mastering concepts in language and literacy, mathematics, and other content areas as well as increase body coordination and related physical abilities. Designed as an activity supplement to High Scope movement and…

  4. Shell worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kenneth I.; Kennedy, Robert G., III; Fields, David E.

    2013-02-01

    The traditional concept of terraforming assumes ready availability of candidate planets with acceptable qualities: orbiting a star in its "Goldilocks zone", liquid water, enough mass, years longer than days, magnetic field, etc. But even stipulating affordable interstellar travel, we still might never find a good candidate elsewhere. Whatever we found likely would require centuries of heavy terraforming, just as Mars or Venus would here. Our increasing appreciation of the ubiquity of life suggests that any terra nova would already possess it. We would then face the dilemma of introducing alien life forms (us, our microbes) into another living world. Instead, we propose a novel method to create habitable environments for humanity by enclosing airless, sterile, otherwise useless planets, moons, and even large asteroids within engineered shells, which avoids the conundrum. These shells are subject to two opposing internal stresses: compression due to the primary's gravity, and tension from atmospheric pressure contained inside. By careful design, these two cancel each other resulting in zero net shell stress. Beneath the shell an Earth-like environment could be created similar in almost all respects to that of Home, except for gravity, regardless of the distance to the sun or other star. Englobing a small planet, moon, or even a dwarf planet like Ceres, would require astronomical amounts of material (quadrillions of tons) and energy, plus a great deal of time. It would be a quantum leap in difficulty over building Dyson Dots or industrializing our solar system, perhaps comparable to a mission across interstellar space with a living crew within their lifetime. But when accomplished, these constructs would be complete (albeit small) worlds, not merely large habitats. They could be stable across historic timescales, possibly geologic. Each would contain a full, self-sustaining ecology, which might evolve in curious directions over time. This has interesting implications

  5. Food Security and Staple Crops. Staple Food Around the World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of more than 50,000 edible plant species in the world, only a few hundred contribute significantly to our food supplies. Almost all of the world’s food energy intake is satisfied by just a few crop plants. Rice, maize and wheat make up two-thirds of this already small group of foods. These three grains are the staple foods for more than four billion people both as a source of nutrition and income. A staple crop, by definition, dominates the major part of our diet and supplies a major proportion of our energy and nutrient needs. If staple crops are threatened by drought, pests or nutrient-poor soils, hunger and poverty can rise dramatically.

  6. Lack of beat isochrony disrupts motor performance in a child drummer prodigy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrugia Nicolas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have focused on coupling between perception and action (e.g., via finger tapping, and more generally on entrainment, in average musicians and non-musicians. Yet, little is known about the effects of entrainment on timing and movement kinematics in individuals exhibiting outstanding rhythmical abilities. In this study we examined the effect of beat isochrony on the performance of IF, a 7-year-old child drummer prodigy. IF displayed very early (at 3-4 years of age outstanding musical abilities, and exceptional sensorimotor synchronization. To assess whether temporal regularity of the underlying beat (i.e., isochrony during music playing affects IF’s performance we tested IF and a “control” group (i.e., children from music schools with 1-to1.5 years of percussion training in a motion capture study. Participants imitated a short 6-note isochronous metrical pattern (Strong-weak-weak-Strong-weak-weak on a percussion pad under four conditions. In the first condition the pattern was imitated repeatedly along with a metronome. In the second condition, the pattern was repeated but with a break in between repetitions, together with a metronome. In the third condition, similar breaks were introduced, but disrupting beat isochrony (i.e., with an irregular, though predictable, metronome. Finally, in the fourth condition break durations were random. IF exhibited higher temporal accuracy than controls with an isochronous metronome. However, his performance was much less accurate with disrupted beat isochrony. This was accompanied by overall differences between IF and controls in movement kinematics in terms of movement amplitude, and anticipation times. Enhanced performance in the presence of an isochronous beat, as opposed to lack of isochrony, suggests that motor entrainment may act as a marker of musical expertise early during development.

  7. Measuring Neural Entrainment to Beat and Meter in Infants: Effects of Music Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirelli, Laura K.; Spinelli, Christina; Nozaradan, Sylvie; Trainor, Laurel J.

    2016-01-01

    Caregivers often engage in musical interactions with their infants. For example, parents across cultures sing lullabies and playsongs to their infants from birth. Behavioral studies indicate that infants not only extract beat information, but also group these beats into metrical hierarchies by as early as 6 months of age. However, it is not known how this is accomplished in the infant brain. An EEG frequency-tagging approach has been used successfully with adults to measure neural entrainment to auditory rhythms. The current study is the first to use this technique with infants in order to investigate how infants' brains encode rhythms. Furthermore, we examine how infant and parent music background is associated with individual differences in rhythm encoding. In Experiment 1, EEG was recorded while 7-month-old infants listened to an ambiguous rhythmic pattern that could be perceived to be in two different meters. In Experiment 2, EEG was recorded while 15-month-old infants listened to a rhythmic pattern with an unambiguous meter. In both age groups, information about music background (parent music training, infant music classes, hours of music listening) was collected. Both age groups showed clear EEG responses frequency-locked to the rhythms, at frequencies corresponding to both beat and meter. For the younger infants (Experiment 1), the amplitudes at duple meter frequencies were selectively enhanced for infants enrolled in music classes compared to those who had not engaged in such classes. For the older infants (Experiment 2), amplitudes at beat and meter frequencies were larger for infants with musically-trained compared to musically-untrained parents. These results suggest that the frequency-tagging method is sensitive to individual differences in beat and meter processing in infancy and could be used to track developmental changes. PMID:27252619

  8. Uncovering beat deafness: detecting rhythm disorders with synchronized finger tapping and perceptual timing tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Bella, Simone; Sowiński, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    A set of behavioral tasks for assessing perceptual and sensorimotor timing abilities in the general population (i.e., non-musicians) is presented here with the goal of uncovering rhythm disorders, such as beat deafness. Beat deafness is characterized by poor performance in perceiving durations in auditory rhythmic patterns or poor synchronization of movement with auditory rhythms (e.g., with musical beats). These tasks include the synchronization of finger tapping to the beat of simple and complex auditory stimuli and the detection of rhythmic irregularities (anisochrony detection task) embedded in the same stimuli. These tests, which are easy to administer, include an assessment of both perceptual and sensorimotor timing abilities under different conditions (e.g., beat rates and types of auditory material) and are based on the same auditory stimuli, ranging from a simple metronome to a complex musical excerpt. The analysis of synchronized tapping data is performed with circular statistics, which provide reliable measures of synchronization accuracy (e.g., the difference between the timing of the taps and the timing of the pacing stimuli) and consistency. Circular statistics on tapping data are particularly well-suited for detecting individual differences in the general population. Synchronized tapping and anisochrony detection are sensitive measures for identifying profiles of rhythm disorders and have been used with success to uncover cases of poor synchronization with spared perceptual timing. This systematic assessment of perceptual and sensorimotor timing can be extended to populations of patients with brain damage, neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Parkinson's disease), and developmental disorders (e.g., Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder). PMID:25867797

  9. Multi-component based cross correlation beat detection in electrocardiogram analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owens Frank J

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The first stage in computerised processing of the electrocardiogram is beat detection. This involves identifying all cardiac cycles and locating the position of the beginning and end of each of the identifiable waveform components. The accuracy at which beat detection is performed has significant impact on the overall classification performance, hence efforts are still being made to improve this process. Methods A new beat detection approach is proposed based on the fundamentals of cross correlation and compared with two benchmarking approaches of non-syntactic and cross correlation beat detection. The new approach can be considered to be a multi-component based variant of traditional cross correlation where each of the individual inter-wave components are sought in isolation as opposed to being sought in one complete process. Each of three techniques were compared based on their performance in detecting the P wave, QRS complex and T wave in addition to onset and offset markers for 3000 cardiac cycles. Results Results indicated that the approach of multi-component based cross correlation exceeded the performance of the two benchmarking techniques by firstly correctly detecting more cardiac cycles and secondly provided the most accurate marker insertion in 7 out of the 8 categories tested. Conclusion The main benefit of the multi-component based cross correlation algorithm is seen to be firstly its ability to successfully detect cardiac cycles and secondly the accurate insertion of the beat markers based on pre-defined values as opposed to performing individual gradient searches for wave onsets and offsets following fiducial point location.

  10. A Buffett turns to farming in Africa: Warren's son Howard has quietly become a player in the fight against global hunger

    OpenAIRE

    Kilman, S.; Thurow, R.

    2009-01-01

    Metadata only record Warren Buffet's fourth son, Howard Buffet is an unassuming Illinois soybean and corn farmer. However, he plays a behind the scenes role in the global war against hunger. With a small portion of his father's fortune he spends much of the year traveling through Africa. Mr. Buffett is looking for ways to help African farmers increase their harvests without increasing their costs, thus his interest in developing plants that resist disease and drought.

  11. Possible role for growth hormone in suppressing acylated ghrelin and hunger ratings during and after intermittent exercise of different intensities in obese individuals.

    OpenAIRE

    Majid Gholipour; Mohamad Reza Kordi; Mohamad Taghikhani; Ali Asghar Ravasi; Abas Ali Gaeini; Arezoo Tabrizi

    2014-01-01

    Body weight is influenced by both food intake and energy expenditure. Acylated ghrelin enhances appetite, and its circulating level is suppressed by growth hormone. Data on the acylated ghrelin responses to exercise of different intensities in obese individuals are currently not available. This study examined the effects of an intermittent exercise protocol on acylated ghrelin levels and hunger ratings in obese people. Nine inactive male ran on the treadmill at 0900 with progressive intensiti...

  12. A spatially explicit assessment of current and future hotspots of hunger in Sub-Saharan Africa in the context of global change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junguo; Fritz, Steffen; van Wesenbeeck, C. F. A.; Fuchs, Michael; You, Liangzhi; Obersteiner, Michael; Yang, Hong

    2008-12-01

    Hunger knows no boundaries or borders. While much research has focused on undernutrition on a national scale, this report evaluates it at subnational levels for Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) to pinpoint hotspots where the greatest challenges exist. Undernutrition is assessed with a spatial resolution of 30 arc-minutes by investigating anthropometric data on weight and length of individuals. The impact of climate change on production of six major crops (cassava, maize, wheat, sorghum, rice and millet) is analyzed with a GIS-based Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (GEPIC) model with the same spatial resolution. Future hotspots of hunger are projected in the context of the anticipated climate, social, economic, and bio-physical changes. The results show that some regions in northern and southwestern Nigeria, Sudan and Angola with a currently high number of people with undernutrition might be able to improve their food security situation mainly through increasing purchasing power. In the near future, regions located in Ethiopia, Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi, southwestern Niger, and Madagascar are likely to remain hotspots of food insecurity, while regions located in Tanzania, Mozambique and the Democratic Republic of Congo might face more serious undernutrition. It is likely that both the groups of regions will suffer from lower capacity of importing food as well as lower per capita calorie availability, while the latter group will probably have sharper reduction in per capita calorie availability. Special attention must be paid to the hotspot areas in order to meet the hunger alleviation goals in SSA.

  13. Power generation prior food safety? Biomass in the conflict area of energy security and hunger crisis; Energieerzeugung vor Ernaehrungssicherung? Biomasse im Spannungsfeld von Energiesicherung und Hungerkrise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Monika C.M. (ed.)

    2011-07-01

    Within the international meeting of the Evangelische Akademie Loccum (Rehburg-Loccum, Federal Republic of Germany) at 13rd to 15th May, 2009 the following lectures were held: (1) Biomass - Energy of the future (Daniela Thraen); (2) Bio energy and cultivation of energy crops in Lower Saxony. State of the art and perspectives (Gerd Carsten Hoeher); (3) Bioenergy and food security project in FAO (Mirella Salvatore); (4) Appetite for hunger and competition in land use (Elmar Altvater); (5) Biodiesel poles in Northeast Brasilia. Efficiencies and experiences of a project for the integration of small farmers into the national Biodiesel program (Stefan Goertz); (6) Bioenergy in Africa: Chance to overcome energy poverty or driver of hunger (Hamimu Hongo); (7) Cultivation of Jatropha for direct utilization of oil: Win-Win situation for small farmers and companies? (Lorenz Kirchner); (8) Energy security by means of sufficient power generation. Energy and fuels from biomass result in renaissance of the agriculture and offer chances for fight against poverty and for avoidance of hunger to developing countries (Nasir El Bassam).

  14. Stochasticity intrinsic to coupled-clock mechanisms underlies beat-to-beat variability of spontaneous action potential firing in sinoatrial node pacemaker cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniv, Yael; Lyashkov, Alexey E.; Sirenko, Syevda; Okamoto, Yosuke; Guiriba, Toni-Rose; Ziman, Bruce D.; Morrell, Christopher H.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the spontaneous action potential (AP) of isolated sinoatrial node cells (SANC) is regulated by a system of stochastic mechanisms embodied within two clocks: ryanodine receptors of the “Ca2+ clock” within the sarcoplasmic reticulum, spontaneously activate during diastole and discharge local Ca2+ releases (LCRs) beneath the cell surface membrane; clock crosstalk occurs as LCRs activate an inward Na+/Ca2+ exchanger current (INCX), which together with If and decay of K+ channels prompts the “M clock,” the ensemble of sarcolemmal-electrogenic molecules, to generate APs. Prolongation of the average LCR period accompanies prolongation of the average AP beating interval (BI). Moreover, prolongation of the average AP BI accompanies increased AP BI variability. We hypothesized that both the average AP BI and AP BI variability are dependent upon stochasticity of clock mechanisms reported by the variability of LCR period. We perturbed the coupled-clock system by directly inhibiting the M clock by ivabradine (IVA) or the Ca2+ clock by cyclopiazonic acid (CPA). When either clock is perturbed by IVA (3, 10 and 30μM), which has no direct effect on Ca2+ cycling, or CPA ( 0.5 and 5μM), which has no direct effect on the M clock ion channels, the clock system failed to achieve the basal AP BI and both AP BI and AP BI variability increased. The changes in average LCR period and its variability in response to perturbations of the coupled-clock system were correlated with changes in AP beating interval and AP beating interval variability. We conclude that the stochasticity within the coupled-clock system affects and is affected by the AP BI firing rate and rhythm via modulation of the effectiveness of clock coupling. PMID:25257916

  15. Quantum beat spectroscopy: stimulated emission probe of hyperfine quantum beats in the atomic Cs 8p $^{2}P_{3/2}$ level

    CERN Document Server

    Bayram, S B; Popov, O I; Guney, C; Havey, M D; Boyle, W P

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of hyperfine polarization quantum beats are used determine the magnetic dipole (A) and electric quadrupole (B) coupling constants in the excited atomic Cs 8p level. The experimental approach is a novel combination of pulsed optical pumping and time-delayed stimulated emission probing of the excited level. From the measured evolution of the atomic linear polarization degree as a function of probe delay time, we determine the hyperfine coupling constants A = 7.42(6) MHz and B = 0.14(29) MHz.

  16. Novel, single-beat approach for determining both end-systolic pressure–dimension relationship and preload recruitable stroke work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inuzuka, Ryo; Kass, David A; Senzaki, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    Objective The end-systolic pressure–dimension relationship (ESPDR) and the preload recruitable stroke work (PRSW) relationship are load-insensitive measures of contractility, but their clinical application has been limited by the need to record multiple beats over a wide volume range. In this study, we therefore sought to validate a new method to concomitantly determine the ESPDR and the PRSW relationship from a single beat. Methods Pressure–dimension loops were recorded in 14 conscious dogs under various haemodynamic and pathological conditions. Multiple-beat PRSW relationship was determined for its slope (Mw) and for a dimension-axis intercept (Dw). The ESPDR represented by the formula , was estimated from a steady-state, single-beat late-systolic pressure–dimension relationship. The single-beat Mw was determined as an end-systolic pressure when the end-systolic dimension was equal to Dw. Results A strong correlation was observed between multiple-beat and single-beat ESPDRs (zero-stress dimension; r=0.98, p<0.0001). The single-beat estimation of Mw calculated using the wall thickness was strongly correlated with the actual Mw (r=0.93, p<0.0001) and was sensitive enough to detect the change in contractility by dobutamine infusion (p<0.001) and by tachycardia-induced heart failure (p<0.001). Similar results were obtained for Mw estimated without information on wall thickness. Conclusions Mw can be interpreted as an end-systolic pressure when the end-systolic dimension is equal to Dw. By using the non-linear ESPDR, accurate single-beat estimation of the ESPDR and Mw is possible even without information on wall thickness. These results should enhance the applicability of pressure–volume framework to clinical medicine. PMID:27347424

  17. Return of hunger following a relatively high carbohydrate breakfast is associated with earlier recorded glucose peak and nadir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler-Laney, Paula C.; Morrison, Shannon A.; Goree, Laura Lee T.; Ellis, Amy C.; Casazza, Krista; Desmond, Renee; Gower, Barbara A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that a breakfast meal with high carbohydrate/ low fat results in an earlier increase in postprandial glucose and insulin, a greater decrease below baseline in postprandial glucose, and an earlier return of appetite, compared to a low carbohydrate/high fat meal. Design Overweight but otherwise healthy adults (n=64) were maintained on one of two eucaloric diets: high carbohydrate/low fat (HC/LF; 55:27:18% kcals from carbohydrate: fat: protein) versus low carbohydrate/high fat (LC/HF; 43:39:18% kcals from carbohydrate: fat: protein). After 4 weeks of acclimation to the diets, participants underwent a meal test during which circulating glucose and insulin and self-reported hunger and fullness, were measured before and after consumption of breakfast from their assigned diets. Results The LC/HF meal resulted in a later time at the highest and lowest recorded glucose, higher glucose concentrations at 3 and 4 hours post-meal, and lower insulin incremental area under the curve. Participants consuming the LC/HF meal reported lower appetite 3 and 4 hours following the meal, a response that was associated with the timing of the highest and lowest recorded glucose. Conclusions Modest increases in meal carbohydrate content at the expense of fat content may facilitate weight gain over the long-term by contributing to an earlier rise and fall of postprandial glucose concentrations and an earlier return of appetite. PMID:24819342

  18. The Use of Green Leaf Membranes to Promote Appetite Control, Suppress Hedonic Hunger and Loose Body Weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte; Albertsson, Per-Åke

    2015-09-01

    On-going research aims at answering the question, which satiety signal is the most potent or which combination of satiety signals is the most potent to stop eating. There is also an aim at finding certain food items or food additives that could be used to specifically reduce food intake therapeutically. Therapeutic attempts to normalize body weight and glycaemia with single agents alone have generally been disappointing. The success of bariatric surgery illustrates the rationale of using several hormones to treat obesity and type-2-diabetes. We have found that certain components from green leaves, the thylakoids, when given orally have a similar rationale in inducing the release of several gut hormones at the same time. In this way satiety is promoted and hunger suppressed, leading to loss of body weight and body fat. The mechanism is a reduced rate of intestinal lipid hydrolysis, allowing the lipolytic products to reach the distal intestine and release satiety hormones. The thylakoids also regulate glucose uptake in the intestine and influences microbiota composition in the intestine in a prebiotic direction. Using thylakoids is a novel strategy for treatment and prevention of obesity. PMID:26115760

  19. Nutrients and behaviour: research strategies for the investigation of taste characteristics, food preferences, hunger sensations and eating patterns in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, A J; Blundell, J E

    Although, as described elsewhere in this report, the consumption of particular nutrients can modify behaviors that are not directly related to eating, it seems highly likely that the main function of nutrient-induced changes in neurotransmitter synthesis is to provide the brain with information about what has been eaten, which the brain can then utilize in deciding what to eat next. This chapter summarizes research strategies and techniques which have been used to assess the effects of drugs and diseases on appetite and food consumption, and which might also be useful in exploring the effects of particular nutrients. Crude measures of total food intake and of global hunger ratings are probably too insensitive to reveal the subtle effects of many nutrients. Some alternative procedures allow the assessment of particular aspects of feeding behaviour, (e.g. food or nutrient choice), and of the relationships between such behaviour and the individual's metabolic and physiological state, sensory functions, taste hedonics, and affective response to foods. PMID:6764938

  20. Fome, desnutrição e cidadania: inclusão social e direitos humanos Hunger, malnutrition and citizenship: social inclusion and human rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Luiz Schieck Valente

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available O artigo faz uma análise crítica do debate atual no Brasil sobre os conceitos de fome e desnutrição e das suas implicações para o processo de elaboração de políticas públicas no país. Fome e desnutrição são eventos relacionados, mas de natureza distinta. Os riscos da redução da fome às suas dimensões estritamente biológicas ou econômicas, para fins de mensuração, são discutidos em relação ao possível impacto sobre a promoção e realização do Direito Humano à Alimentação. Propõe-se o fortalecimento da ótica dos Direitos Humanos na discussão sobre o tema no Brasil. Esta abordagem colabora para uma conceituação mais abrangente e integrada de fome e desnutrição. Ao mesmo tempo, define titularidades, papéis e obrigações do Estado e de diferentes atores sociais que permitem a elaboração de políticas públicas cujas metas e desempenho possam ser monitorados mais facilmente pela sociedade civil. É feita uma breve análise da política de combate à fome do novo governo federal e sugestões são apresentadas para debate.The paper develops analysis of the ongoing debate in Brazil on the concepts of hunger and malnutrition and of its implications for the elaboration of Public Policies in the country. Hunger and malnutrition are related events, but of distinct nature. The risks of reducing hunger to its strictly biological or economic dimensions, for measurement purposes, are discussed in relation to the possible impact on the promotion and realization of the Human Right to Food. The strengthening of the Human Rights based approach to the theme in Brazil is proposed as it allows for a more encompassing and integrated concept of hunger and malnutrition. The paper also discusses the entitlements and roles of different social actors and right related state obligations, which allow for the elaboration of public policies with goals and performance that can be easily monitored by civil society. A brief analysis of the

  1. The water-energy-food-climate-economics nexus: solving hunger and resource scarcity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, U.

    2011-12-01

    A nexus refers to the core or to interconnectivity across issues. Addressing the boundary interactions of traditional sectors in an interconnected world as human activities change the physical boundaries of land and climate is an emerging academic and governance discourse. Through contrasting examples from the US and India, I shed light on the descriptive aspects of these connections and feedbacks that define potential impacts or traps for societies, and ponder whether a massive conceptual or numerical Earth System Model can help inform outcomes, or whether there are dominant links at particular scales (physical, social, economic or biological) that characterize the emergent dynamics and define critical equilibrium or transient solutions in certain places. However, the real question is what next given the definition of the nexus? Here, I argue that given the current valuation and management structure of different resource sectors and the associated information flows and sensitivities, the interlinked energy-climate issues can emerge as useful drivers of improved productivity in water-food systems, thus promoting resource and environmental sustainability while promoting economic development. Thus, levers can be found that help steer the course of these complex interacting systems towards desirable sectoral outcomes.

  2. Value of beat-to-beat blood pressure changes, detected by pulse transit time, in the management of the obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitson, D J; Stradling, J R

    1998-09-01

    Two important aspects of a respiratory sleep study are a measure of inspiratory effort and an estimate of the number of arousals. These can be derived from an indirect estimate of beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP), pulse transit time (PTT). This study investigated the reproducibility of inspiratory BP falls (reflecting inspiratory effort), and BP arousals derived from PTT, and the contribution they could make to the management of the obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS). Overnight PTT was recorded at home in 40 patients being investigated for OSAHS, and a second PTT recording was made in the sleep laboratory with full polysomnography. Patients were divided into three groups according to the severity of their sleep disorder, and a third PTT recording was made at home in 13 patients subsequently established on nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). The reproducibility between the home and laboratory studies was reasonable (r=0.87 for inspiratory BP falls, r=0.81 for BP arousals). Both derivatives showed a clear progression through the three patient groups, which returned to normal on treatment. The differences between the groups were significant (p4% arterial oxygen saturation dip rate and electroencephalography micro-arousals at dividing patients into two groups, either requiring nasal CPAP or not requiring CPAP. Pulse transit time can provide a noninvasive estimate of inspiratory effort and a measure of arousals that together document disease severity and response to treatment and may be useful in managing obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome. PMID:9762800

  3. The Food Crisis and Food Security: Towards a New World Food Order?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Golay

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The worst food crisis since 1974 broke out in 2007-08. Higher world market prices of food commodities (especially wheat, rice, soya and maize sparked an unprecedented increase in the number of hungry people. Despite moderately lower prices since the summer of 2008, the number of the hungry continued to rise in 2009. This food crisis has placed the fight against hunger on the international agenda. Since March 2008 governments UN agencies and many social movements have adopted positions on the causes of the crisis and the means to address it. Unfortunately, while these parties are trying to coordinate their activities and suggest new approaches, the old recipes for producing more food are often brought up. Contradictory proposals are made and the thought given to the causes underlying hunger and the food crisis (social, economic and political discrimination and exclusion has gone largely unheeded. The first Millennium Development Goal, which calls for cutting the percentage of hungry people by half by 2015, is clearly out of reach. But the food crisis might lead to a new world food order based on the three pillars of food assistance, food security and the right to food.

  4. Pulsed Frequency Shifted Feedback Laser for Accurate Long Distance Measurements: Beat Order Determination

    CERN Document Server

    Pique, Jean-Paul

    2012-01-01

    Long-distance measurements (10 m - 1000 m) with an accuracy of 10-7 is a challenge for many applications. We show that it is achievable with Frequency Shifted Feedback (FSF) laser interferometry technique, provided that the determination of the radio frequency beat order be made without ambiguity and on a time scale compatible with atmospheric applications. Using the pulsed-FSF laser that we developed for laser guide star application, we propose and test, up to 240 m, a simple method for measuring the beat order in real time. The moving-comb and Yatsenko models are also discussed. The first of these models fails to interpret our long-distance interferometry results. We show that the accuracy of long-distance measurements depends primarily on the stabilization of the acoustic frequency of the modulator.

  5. Drive and the Action Calculation of GetLLM, in Beta-Beat.src

    CERN Document Server

    Sherman, Alexander Charles

    2013-01-01

    The Beta-Beat.src program is used to analyze data collected by Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) in accelerators at CERN. The Beams department at CERN uses it to study the behaviour of a beam as it traverses an accelerator, and in particular the LHC. Two pieces of code in Beta-Beat.src are “drive”, a C/C++ program, and “GetLLM”, a python program. This report described the modification of the drive code to be compatible with windows and take advantage of elements of C++, as well as a change in the calculation of the action in GetLLM to reduce its relative uncertainty. The dynamic aperture is recalculated with the new action and sees a reduction in its uncertainty.

  6. Built Environment and Active Transport to School (BEATS) Study: protocol for a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Mandic, Sandra; Williams, John; Moore, Antoni; Hopkins, Debbie; Flaherty, Charlotte; Wilson, Gordon; García Bengoechea, Enrique; Spence, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Active transport to school (ATS) is a convenient way to increase physical activity and undertake an environmentally sustainable travel practice. The Built Environment and Active Transport to School (BEATS) Study examines ATS in adolescents in Dunedin, New Zealand, using ecological models for active transport that account for individual, social, environmental and policy factors. The study objectives are to: (1) understand the reasons behind adolescents and their parents' choice of...

  7. Nonlinear Spatial Landau Damping of Plasma Waves Beating at Plasma Angular Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabantsev, A. A.; Driscoll, C. F.

    2014-10-01

    Experiments on pure electron plasmas characterize the nonlinear beat between two counter-propagating plasma waves, and the spatial Landau damping of the beat wave at the wave/rotation critical radius. The two plasma waves are (mθ = 1 ,kz = 1 , ω =ω* +/-ω1) , giving the beat wave with (mθ = 2 , ω = 2ω*) . The beat wave is resonant with the plasma rotation Ω (r) at radius r* where Ω (r*) =ω* . The net effect of this resonance is an energy exchange through wave-particle interaction between the two primary plasma waves and the background plasma rotation. Initial excitation of only one of the waves leads first to its fast sharing of energy with the other wave, and then followed by a slower combined decay of both waves. In contrast, initial excitation of both waves to (approximately) the same amplitude leads to three alternative scenarios: 1) both plasma waves may show the slow and synchronous decay evolution; 2) one of the waves may decay faster, with temporarily arrested decay of the other; 3) it may switch back and forth (seemingly randomly) between the first two types of evolution. Interestingly, wave/particle energy flow can be reversed when the plasma density profile is made to have a positive density gradient at r*. In this case, spontaneous excitation (instability) of both ω =ω* +/-ω1 plasma waves is observed. Supported by NSF/DoE Partnership Grants PHY-0903877 and DE-SC000245, and DOE/HEDLP Grant DE-SC0008693.

  8. Quasi-phase-matching of high-order-harmonic generation using polarization beating in optical waveguides

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Lewis Z.; O'Keeffe, Kevin; Hooker, Simon M.

    2013-01-01

    A scheme for quasi-phase-matching high-harmonic generation is proposed in which polarization beating within a hollow core birefringent waveguide modulates the generation of harmonics. The evolution of the polarization of a laser pulse propagating in a birefringent waveguide is calculated and is shown to periodically modulate the harmonic generation process. The optimum conditions for achieving quasi-phase-matching using this scheme are explored and the growth of the harmonic intensity as a fu...

  9. Semisupervised ECG Ventricular Beat Classification With Novelty Detection Based on Switching Kalman Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Julien; Behar, Joachim; Sayadi, Omid; Nemati, Shamim; Johnson, Alistair E W; Clifford, Gari D

    2015-09-01

    Automatic processing and accurate diagnosis of pathological electrocardiogram (ECG) signals remains a challenge. As long-term ECG recordings continue to increase in prevalence, driven partly by the ease of remote monitoring technology usage, the need to automate ECG analysis continues to grow. In previous studies, a model-based ECG filtering approach to ECG data from healthy subjects has been applied to facilitate accurate online filtering and analysis of physiological signals. We propose an extension of this approach, which models not only normal and ventricular heartbeats, but also morphologies not previously encountered. A switching Kalman filter approach is introduced to enable the automatic selection of the most likely mode (beat type), while simultaneously filtering the signal using appropriate prior knowledge. Novelty detection is also made possible by incorporating a third mode for the detection of unknown (not previously observed) morphologies, and denoted as X-factor. This new approach is compared to state-of-the-art techniques for the ventricular heartbeat classification in the MIT-BIH arrhythmia and Incart databases. F1 scores of 98.3% and 99.5% were found on each database, respectively, which are superior to other published algorithms' results reported on the same databases. Only 3% of all the beats were discarded as X-factor, and the majority of these beats contained high levels of noise. The proposed technique demonstrates accurate beat classification in the presence of previously unseen (and unlearned) morphologies and noise, and provides an automated method for morphological analysis of arbitrary (unknown) ECG leads. PMID:25680203

  10. Pro/con ethics debate: is nonheart-beating organ donation ethically acceptable?

    OpenAIRE

    Whetstine, Leslie; Bowman, Kerry; Hawryluck, Laura

    2002-01-01

    This pro/con debate explores the ethical issues surrounding nonheart-beating organ donation (NHBD), a source of considerable controversy. It is estimated that NHBD can increase the number of organs available for transplant by 25% at a time of great need. However, should NHBD be ethically acceptable? In support of NHBD, it may be acceptable practice if there is a separation of the rationale to withdraw life support/to withhold cardiopulmonary resuscitation from the decision to recover organs, ...

  11. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: evaluation using cilia beat frequency assessment via spectral analysis of digital microscopy images

    OpenAIRE

    Olm, Mary A. K.; Kögler, João E.; Macchione, Mariangela; Shoemark, Amelia; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Rodrigues, Joaquim C.

    2011-01-01

    Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) measurements provide valuable information for diagnosing of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). We developed a system for measuring CBF, used it in association with electron microscopy to diagnose PCD, and then analyzed characteristics of PCD patients.1 The CBF measurement system was based on power spectra measured through digital imaging. Twenty-four patients suspected of having PCD (age 1–19 yr) were selected from a group of 75 children and adolescents with pneumo...

  12. Self-beating artificial cells: design of cross-linked polymersomes showing self-oscillating motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamate, Ryota; Ueki, Takeshi; Yoshida, Ryo

    2015-02-01

    Biomimetic cross-linked polymersomes that exhibit a self-beating motion without any on-off switching are developed. The polymersomes are made from a well-defined synthetic thermoresponsive diblock copolymer, and the thermoresponsive segment includes ruthenium catalysts for the oscillatory chemical reaction and vinylidene groups to cross-link the polymersomes. Autonomous volume and shape oscillations of the cross-linked polymersomes are realized following redox changes of the catalysts. PMID:25504232

  13. Examining cross-database global training to evaluate five different methods for ventricular beat classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection of ventricular beats in the holter recording is a task of great importance since it can direct clinicians toward the parts of the electrocardiogram record that might be crucial for determining the final diagnosis. Although there already exists a fair amount of research work dealing with ventricular beat detection in holter recordings, the vast majority uses a local training approach, which is highly disputable from the point of view of any practical—real-life—application. In this paper, we compare five well-known methods: a classical decision tree approach and its variant with fuzzy rules, a self-organizing map clustering method with template matching for classification, a back-propagation neural network and a support vector machine classifier, all examined using the same global cross-database approach for training and testing. For this task two databases were used—the MIT–BIH database and the AHA database. Both databases are required for testing any newly developed algorithms for holter beat classification that is going to be deployed in the EU market. According to cross-database global training, when the classifier is trained with the beats from the records of one database then the records from the other database are used for testing. The results of all the methods are compared and evaluated using the measures of sensitivity and specificity. The support vector machine classifier is the best classifier from the five we tested, achieving an average sensitivity of 87.20% and an average specificity of 91.57%, which outperforms nearly all the published algorithms when applied in the context of a similar global training approach

  14. Dual ipsilateral renal transplantation from a non-heart-beating donor.

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatti, Aftab A.; Navarro, Alex; Gok, Mohammad A.; Wilson, Colin H.; Asher, John; Wong, Yew Toh; Hua, Mi; Talbot, David

    2005-01-01

    A case is described where both kidneys from non-heart-beating (expanded criteria) donors were dual transplanted ipsilaterally. Although both kidneys passed viability tests on the Newcastle machine preservation system and biomarkers' evaluation, there were logistical issues where the cold ischaemic time was too protracted necessitating the transplantation of both kidneys into one recipient. The recipient had satisfactory outcome with the Cockcroft-Gault creatinine clearance of 72.47 (36.29 ml/...

  15. Real-Time Analysis of Beats in Music for Entertainment Robots

    OpenAIRE

    Yue-Der Lin; Ting-Tsao Wu; Yu-Ren Chen; Yen-Ting Lin; Wen-Hsiu Chen; Shih-Fan Wang; Jinghom Chakhap

    2012-01-01

    The dancing actions for entertainment robots are usually designed in advance and saved in a database according to the beats and rhythm of the given music. This research is devoted to developing a real-time algorithm that can detect the primary information of the music needed for the actions of entertainment robots. The computation of the proposed algorithm is very efficient and can satisfy the requirement of real-time processing by a digital signal controller. The digitized music signal is fi...

  16. Heymericus de Campo: Dyalogus super Reuelacionibus beate Birgitte : A Critical Edition with an Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Fredriksson Adman, Anna

    2003-01-01

    This dissertation contains an edition of Dyalogus super Reuelacionibus beate Birgitte, which is a discussion and defence of the Revelations (Reuelaciones) of St. Birgitta of Sweden (ca. 1303-1373). In legal proceedings at the Council of Basle (1431-1449), the Reuelaciones were accused of heresy, examined and defended. Among the defenders was Heymericus de Campo (1395-1460), who at that time was professor of theology at the University of Cologne. In addition to the formal examination reports, ...

  17. Metal particulate matter components affect gene expression and beat frequency of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Donald W; Cascio, Wayne E; Brackhan, Joseph A; Devlin, Robert B

    2004-05-01

    Soluble particulate matter (PM) components (e.g., metals) have the potential to be absorbed into the bloodstream and transported to the heart where they might induce the expression of inflammatory cytokines and remodel electrical properties. We exposed cultured rat ventricular myocytes to similar concentrations of two metals [zinc (Zn) and vanadium (V)] found commonly in PM and measured changes in spontaneous beat rate. We found statistically significant reductions in spontaneous beat rate after both short-term (4-hr) and long-term (24-hr) exposures, with a more substantial effect seen with Zn. We also measured the expression of genes associated with inflammation and a number of sarcolemmal proteins associated with electrical impulse conduction. Exposure to Zn or V (6.25-50 microM) for 6 hr produced significant increases in IL-6, IL-1 alpha, heat shock protein 70, and connexin 43 (Cx43). After 24 hr exposure, Zn induced significant changes in the gene expression of Kv4.2 and KvLQt (potassium channel proteins), the alpha 1 subunit of the L-type calcium channel, and Cx43, as well as IL-6 and IL-1 alpha. In contrast, V produced a greater effect on Cx43 and affected only one ion channel (KvLQT1). These results show that exposure of rat cardiac myocytes to noncytotoxic concentrations of Zn and V alter spontaneous beat rate as well as the expression of ion channels and sarcolemmal proteins relevant to electrical remodeling and slowing of spontaneous beat rate, with Zn producing a more profound effect. As such, these data suggest that the cardiac effects of PM are largely determined by the relative metal composition of particles. PMID:15159208

  18. Predicting Excess Stock Returns Out of Sample: Can Anything Beat the Historical Average?

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, John; Thompson, Samuel P.

    2008-01-01

    Goyal and Welch (2007) argue that the historical average excess stock return forecasts future excess stock returns better than regressions of excess returns on predictor variables. In this article, we show that many predictive regressions beat the historical average return, once weak restrictions are imposed on the signs of coefficients and return forecasts. The out-of-sample explanatory power is small, but nonetheless is economically meaningful for mean-variance investors. Even better result...

  19. Examining cross-database global training to evaluate five different methods for ventricular beat classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudácek, V; Georgoulas, G; Lhotská, L; Stylios, C; Petrík, M; Cepek, M

    2009-07-01

    The detection of ventricular beats in the holter recording is a task of great importance since it can direct clinicians toward the parts of the electrocardiogram record that might be crucial for determining the final diagnosis. Although there already exists a fair amount of research work dealing with ventricular beat detection in holter recordings, the vast majority uses a local training approach, which is highly disputable from the point of view of any practical-real-life-application. In this paper, we compare five well-known methods: a classical decision tree approach and its variant with fuzzy rules, a self-organizing map clustering method with template matching for classification, a back-propagation neural network and a support vector machine classifier, all examined using the same global cross-database approach for training and testing. For this task two databases were used-the MIT-BIH database and the AHA database. Both databases are required for testing any newly developed algorithms for holter beat classification that is going to be deployed in the EU market. According to cross-database global training, when the classifier is trained with the beats from the records of one database then the records from the other database are used for testing. The results of all the methods are compared and evaluated using the measures of sensitivity and specificity. The support vector machine classifier is the best classifier from the five we tested, achieving an average sensitivity of 87.20% and an average specificity of 91.57%, which outperforms nearly all the published algorithms when applied in the context of a similar global training approach. PMID:19525571

  20. HealthLines: Quick Tips for Seasonal Health, Safety and Fun... "Ah, when the sun beats down…"

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Photo courtesy of Vitality Communications "Ah, when the sun beats down …" The National Cancer Institute estimates there ... risk at least twice a day and closely watch them for signs of heat exhaustion or heat ...

  1. Proof-of-principle experiment of the vacuum beat wave accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vacuum beat wave accelerator (VBWA) is discussed and design parameters for proof-of-principle experiment are presented. The VBWA utilizes two focused laser beams of differing wavelengths to generate a beat wave that can impart a net acceleration to charged particles. Theory and simulations show that the single-stage energy gain of the VBWA is limited by diffraction of the laser beams, particle slippage in phase and velocity, and radial walk-off. In the simulations the particles are synchronous with the beat wave for a short interval of time and the energy gain has the nature of an impulse delivered near the focal region. Simulations also show that the problem of radial walk-off may be ameliorated by using a converging beam of particles. For terawatt-level laser beams, with wavelengths 1 μm and 0.5 μm, and a 4.5 MeV finite-emittance electron beam the energy can be increased to ∼12.5MeV in a non-synchronous interaction over a distance of under 4 mm, with a peak acceleration gradient >15GeV/m and an estimated trapping fraction of -1%. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  2. Beating frequency and amplitude modulation of the piano tone due to coupling of tones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartling, Bo

    2005-04-01

    The influence on a piano tone from weak coexcitation of damped adjacent tones due to coupling via the bridge is studied. The frequency and amplitude modulation of the sound resulting from coexcitation of one strong and one or two weak tones is analyzed. One weak tone causes frequency and amplitude modulation of the sound, and two weak tones produce beating frequency and amplitude modulation, where the beatings of the two modulations are of opposite phase. By digital recording of the sound of piano tones, the appearance of these phenomena is verified. The audibility of the observed frequency and amplitude modulation is discussed in terms of previously determined detection thresholds. The beating character of both frequency and amplitude modulations, however, distinguishes the phenomena from those previously studied and prompts further psychoacoustic investigations. It is shown that detuning of unison strings may significantly increase the frequency deviation of the frequency modulation in conjunction with affected amplitude modulation. The modulatory effects of coupling to adjacent tones therefore may possibly be utilized in the tuning process. A coupling of tones analogous to the situation in a piano may arise in other stringed musical instruments transferring string vibrations to a soundboard via a bridge. .

  3. Coherent laser control in attosecond sum-frequency polarization beats using twin noisy driving fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the phase-conjugate polarization interference between two-pathway excitations, we obtained an analytic closed form for the second-order or fourth-order Markovian stochastic correlation of the V three-level sum-frequency polarization beat (SFPB) in attosecond scale. Novel interferometric oscillatory behavior is exposed in terms of radiation-radiation, radiation-matter, and matter-matter polarization beats. The phase-coherent control of the light beams in the SFPB is subtle. When the laser has broadband linewidth, the homodyne detected SFPB signal shows resonant-nonresonant cross correlation, a drastic difference for three Markovian stochastic fields, and the autocorrelation of the SFPB exhibits hybrid radiation-matter detuning terahertz damping oscillation. As an attosecond ultrafast modulation process, it can be extended intrinsically to any sum frequency of energy levels. It has been also found that the asymmetric behaviors of the polarization beat signals due to the unbalanced controllable dispersion effects between the two arms of interferometer do not affect the overall accuracy in case using the SFPB to measure the Doppler-free energy-level sum of two excited states

  4. ZumBeat: Evaluation of a Zumba Dance Intervention in Postmenopausal Overweight Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Rossmeissl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical inactivity is a major public health concern since it increases individuals’ risk of morbidity and mortality. A subgroup at particular risk is postmenopausal overweight women. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and effect of a 12-week ZumBeat dance intervention on cardiorespiratory fitness and psychosocial health. Postmenopausal women with a body mass index (BMI >30 kg/m2 or a waist circumference >94 cm who were not regularly physically active were asked to complete a 12-week ZumBeat dance intervention with instructed and home-based self-training sessions. Before and after the intervention, peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak was assessed on a treadmill; and body composition and several psychometric parameters (including quality of life, sports-related barriers and menopausal symptoms were investigated. Of 17 women (median age: 54 years; median BMI: 30 kg/m2 enrolled in the study, 14 completed the study. There was no apparent change in VO2peak after the 12-week intervention period (average change score: −0.5 mL/kg/min; 95% confidence interval: −1.0, 0.1; but, quality of life had increased, and sports-related barriers and menopausal symptoms had decreased. A 12-week ZumBeat dance intervention may not suffice to increase cardiorespiratory fitness in postmenopausal overweight women, but it increases women’s quality of life.

  5. A Quadratic Nonlinear Prediction-Based Heart Motion Model Following Control Algorithm in Robotic-Assisted Beating Heart Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Fan Liang; Xiaofeng Meng

    2013-01-01

    Off‐pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery outperforms the traditional on‐pump surgery because the assisted robotic tools can cancel the relative motion between the beating heart and the robotic tools, which reduces post‐surgery complications for patients. The challenge for the robot assisted tool when tracking the beating heart is the abrupt change caused by the nonlinear nature of heart motion and high precision surgery requirements. A characteristic analysis of 3D heart motion data thro...

  6. Effect of trimetazidine and glucose- insulin-potassium use on myocard during beating heart coronary artery bypass surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ercan, Abdulkadir; Velioğlu, Yusuf; Ercan, Arzu; Gürbüz, Orçun; Özkan, Hakan; Karal, İlker Hasan; Biçer, Murat; Ener, Serdar

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This prospective, randomised, controlled, clinical study was planned to determine the effect of trimetazidine and glucose - insulin - potassium (GIK) on myocardial ischemia-rep­erfusion during beating heart coronary artery bypass surgery. Materials and methods: Patients (n=45) with coronary artery disease who required beating heart coronary artery bypass grafting were randomly allocated into three groups. Patients in group 1 (n=15) was recevied trimetazidine (20 mg x 3...

  7. Effect of trimetazidine and glucose- insulin-potassium use on myocard during beating heart coronary artery bypass surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulkadir Ercan; Yusuf Velioğlu; Arzu Ercan; Orçun Gürbüz; Hakan Özkan; İlker Hasan Karal; Murat Biçer; Serdar Ener

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This prospective, randomised, controlled, clinical study was planned to determine the effect of trimetazidine and glucose - insulin - potassium (GIK) on myocardial ischemia-reperfusion during beating heart coronary artery bypass surgery.Materials and methods: Patients (n=45) with coronary artery disease who required beating heart coronary artery bypass grafting were randomly allocated into three groups. Patients in group 1 (n=15) was recevied trimetazidine (20 mg x 3 per day) 7 da...

  8. Beats and expansion of two-component Bose–Einstein condensates in the Thomas–Fermi limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A unique feature of multi-component Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) is the possibility of beating frequencies in collective oscillations. We analytically determine this beating frequency for the two-component BEC in one-dimension. We also show that the Thomas–Fermi approximation, where the quantum pressure is neglected, describes well the expansion of the two-component condensate released from an harmonic trap. (paper)

  9. In vitro detection of cardiotoxins or neurotoxins affecting ion channels or pumps using beating cardiomyocytes as alternative for animal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Jonathan; Hendriksen, Peter J M; de Haan, Laura H J; Koning, Rosella; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Bovee, Toine F H

    2015-03-01

    The present study investigated if and to what extent murine stem cell-derived beating cardiomyocytes within embryoid bodies can be used as a broad screening in vitro assay for neurotoxicity testing, replacing for example in vivo tests for marine neurotoxins. Effect of nine model compounds, acting on either the Na(+), K(+), or Ca(2+) channels or the Na(+)/K(+) ATP-ase pump, on the beating was assessed. Diphenhydramine, veratridine, isradipine, verapamil and ouabain induced specific beating arrests that were reversible and none of the concentrations tested induced cytotoxicity. Three K(+) channel blockers, amiodarone, clofilium and sematilide, and the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase pump inhibitor digoxin had no specific effect on the beating. In addition, two marine neurotoxins i.e. saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin elicited specific beating arrests in cardiomyocytes. Comparison of the results obtained with cardiomyocytes to those obtained with the neuroblastoma neuro-2a assay revealed that the cardiomyocytes were generally somewhat more sensitive for the model compounds affecting Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels, but less sensitive for the compounds affecting K(+) channels. The stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes were not as sensitive as the neuroblastoma neuro-2a assay for saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin. It is concluded that the murine stem cell-derived beating cardiomyocytes provide a sensitive model for detection of specific neurotoxins and that the neuroblastoma neuro-2a assay may be a more promising cell-based assay for the screening of marine biotoxins. PMID:25479353

  10. The acute effects of intermittent treadmill running on hunger and plasma acylated ghrelin concentration in individuals with obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholipour M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Body weight is regulated by both food intake and energy expenditure. Ghrelin, a hormone produced by the stomach and pancreas, enhances appetite. This study was undertaken to determine the effects of intermittent treadmill running on acylated ghrelin and appetite in individuals with obesity."n"nMethods : Nine inactive male students, with a mean age of 20.56±0.48 yrs, a body mass index of 32.68±0.84 kg/m2 and a maximum oxygen uptake of 34.21±1.48 ml/kg/min, participated in the study in two trials (control and exercise in a counterbalanced, randomized design. The protocol included intermittent running with a constant intensity at 65% of VO2 max on a treadmill. Blood samples were collected before, during, and 2h after cessation of the exercise."n"nResults : Acylated ghrelin concentrations and hunger ratings decreased significantly in the second phase and remained lower than baseline (P=0.006 and P=0.002, respectively at the end of the exercise. The total area under the curve values and hunger ratings (all P<0.0005 were significantly lower in the exercise trial compared with the control state. Similarly, growth hormone rose significantly at the second phase and remained higher than baseline (P=0.033 at the

  11. Possible role for growth hormone in suppressing acylated ghrelin and hunger ratings during and after intermittent exercise of different intensities in obese individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Gholipour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Body weight is influenced by both food intake and energy expenditure. Acylated ghrelin enhances appetite, and its circulating level is suppressed by growth hormone. Data on the acylated ghrelin responses to exercise of different intensities in obese individuals are currently not available. This study examined the effects of an intermittent exercise protocol on acylated ghrelin levels and hunger ratings in obese people. Nine inactive male ran on the treadmill at 0900 with progressive intensities of 50, 60, 70, and 80% of VO2max for 10, 10, 5, and 2 min respectively. Blood samples were collected before the exercise at 0845 (-15 min as the resting values, after each workload (10, 23, 31, and 36 min during exercise, and at 30, 60, and 120 min thereafter. The control trial was conducted under identical conditions with the exception of exercise. Compared to the baseline, both acylated ghrelin levels and hunger ratings were suppressed at 70% of VO2max during exercise (17.74 vs. 9.80 pmol/L and 4.84 vs. 2.96 unit respectively and remained significantly lower than the control trial 2 h after the cessation of exercise (13.95 vs. 20.32 pmol/L and 3.33 vs. 6.04 unit, respectively. Growth Hormone increased during the exercise period and peaked at 80% of VO2max. These findings indicate that acylated ghrelin concentrations and hunger ratings are suppressed during exercise and two hours thereafter in obese individuals, and it is possible that Growth Hormone caused the suppression of acylated ghrelin.

  12. Supplementation by thylakoids to a high carbohydrate meal decreases feelings of hunger, elevates CCK levels and prevents postprandial hypoglycaemia in overweight women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenblom, Eva-Lena; Montelius, Caroline; Östbring, Karolina;

    2013-01-01

    Thylakoids are chlorophyll-containing membranes in chloroplasts that have been isolated from green leaves. It has been previously shown that thylakoids supplemented with a high-fat meal can affect cholecystokinin (CCK), ghrelin, insulin and blood lipids in humans, and can act to suppress food...... intake and prevent body weight gain in rodents. This study investigates the addition of thylakoids to a high carbohydrate meal and its effects upon hunger motivation and fullness, and the levels of glucose, insulin, CCK, ghrelin and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha in overweight women. Twenty...

  13. Between Early Literary Modernism and Contemporary Post-Postmodernism--Jan Kj(ae)rstad Rewrites Knut Hamsun's Novel Hunger 100 Years Later

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Knut Brynhildsvoll

    2005-01-01

    The article is a comparative study in Knut Hamsun's novel Hunger (1890) and Jan Kj(a)rstad's novel The Brink (1990), focusing on similar motives, topics and references from the point of view of early modernism and post-post-modernism. It sheds light on aesthetic problems concerning how to deal literary with existential and metaphysical questions viewed against the background of changing historical and philosophical experiences and new ways of poetic expression. The article points out the resemblances and differences between the novels and shows how two of the front figures of modern Scandinavian literature meet the challenges of renewing the traditional forms of writing.

  14. Flag beat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trento, Stefano; Serafin, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    rhythm, generate a continuous sound feedback and control the pitch of a piece of music. An evaluation test of the device has been performed with fourteen kids in a kindergarten. Results and observations showed that kids preferred the algorithms based on the exploration of the music rhythm and on pitch...

  15. Skipped Beats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the atria (upper chambers), it is called a premature atrial contraction (PAC). If it arises from the ventricles (lower chambers), it is called premature ventricular contraction (PVC). In most cases, neither is ...

  16. Robust algorithm to locate heart beats from multiple physiological waveforms by individual signal detector voting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeotti, Loriano; Scully, Christopher G; Vicente, Jose; Johannesen, Lars; Strauss, David G

    2015-08-01

    Alarm fatigue is a top medical device hazard in patient monitoring that could be reduced by merging physiological information from multiple sensors, minimizing the impact of a single sensor failing. We developed a heart beat detection algorithm that utilizes multi-modal physiological signals (e.g. electrocardiogram, blood pressure, stroke volume, photoplethysmogram and electro-encephalogram) by merging the heart beats obtained from signal-specific detectors. We used the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014 training set to develop the algorithm, and we refined it with a mix of signals from the multiparameter intelligent monitoring in intensive care (MIMIC II) database and artificially disrupted waveforms. The algorithm had an average sensitivity of 95.67% and positive predictive value (PPV) of 92.28% when applied to the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014 200 record training set. On a refined dataset obtained by removing 5 records with arrhythmias and inconsistent reference annotations we obtained an average sensitivity of 97.43% and PPV of 94.17%. Algorithm performance was assessed with the Physionet Challenge 2014 test set that consisted of 200 records (each up to 10 min length) containing multiple physiological signals and reference annotations verified by the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014 organizers. Our algorithm had a sensitivity of 92.74% and PPV of 87.37% computed over all annotated beats, and a record average sensitivity of 91.08%, PPV of 86.96% and an overall score (average of all 4 measures) of 89.53%. Our algorithm is an example of a data fusion approach that can improve patient monitoring and reduce false alarms by reducing the effect of individual signal failures. PMID:26218439

  17. Adolescent childbearing and women's attitudes towards wife beating in 25 sub-Saharan African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindin, Michelle J

    2014-08-01

    Preventing unwanted adolescent pregnancy is key for keeping girls in school, leading to a more productive and healthier workforce in sub-Saharan Africa. Gender norms are an important indicator of the status of women and more conservative gender norms are associated with experiencing domestic violence, and poorer maternal and reproductive health care. This paper examines the association between adolescent childbearing and norms towards wife beating in sub-Saharan Africa, and the role of education in moderating this association. Data come from the most recent Demographic and Health Surveys-nationally representative cross-sectional surveys conducted every 5 years. Country-by-country multivariable logistic regressions were conducted in 25 countries, and country and regional estimates were obtained using meta-analytical techniques. More than half of sub-Saharan African adolescents have a child, with levels ranging from 23% in Rwanda to 69% in Niger. Between 12 and 87% of women believed wife beating is acceptable. In 20 of the 25 countries, women with a birth during adolescence were significantly more likely to believe wife beating is justified [OR = 1.39; 95% confidence interval (CI) 130-1.39]. After multivariate adjustment, the overall finding remains statistically significant [AOR = 1.09; 95% CI 105-1:13]. Education attenuates the observed association. Overall, the effects are strongest and most consistent in West Africa. Results suggest that women who have an adolescent birth more likely to hold more conservative attitudes. Working with adolescents to improve their attitudes on relationship expectations and the importance of furthering their education even after a pregnancy could be integrated into life skills and sexual education curricula. PMID:24158508

  18. COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF METHODS FOR BONE MARROW HARVESTING FROM NON-HEART BEATING DONORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sh. Hubutija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare the effectiveness of different methods for bone marrow (BM harvesting from non-heart beating donors taking into account the number and the quality of collected hematopoietic stem cells (HSC. Materials and methods. The study was performed on 43 non-heart beating donors. For BM harvesting two bone marrow aspiration needles were installed in each iliac bone. The needles were installed in one bone connected to closed system, combined with surgical suction and volumetric pump. BM aspiration was performed using different values for vacuum and combining with perfusion solution into the bone. The volume, the number of nucleated cells (NC, HSC and cell viability were evaluated in the obtained samples. Results. Compared with the standard mode the usage of vacuum 0.6–0.7 atm increased the collection of NC by 65.6%, HSC 87%, and did not reduce their viability. Using a vacuum of 0.9 atm reduced the amount of collected HSC and damaged cells. While using combined aspiration and perfusion of BM HSC were prepared at more than 86.2%, but the viability of the cells was lower than under the standard aspiration. Having coherently performed a standard aspiration and aspiration with perfusion from one iliac bone 407.2 ± 46.7 ml BM, 8.0 ± 0.8 × 109  NC and 194.2 ± 20.8 × 106  HSC were harvested. The proportion of viable cells was not less than 75.2 ± 3.2%. Conclusion. Method of BM harvesting implying coherently performing aspiration and aspiration-perfusion with the usage of vacuum 0.6–0.7 atm allows to prepare more progenitor cells without losing their quality. As a result, from one non-heart beating donor different types of progenitor cells can be collected in the amount sufficient for systemic infusion in adult patient.

  19. Cavity length dependence of mode beating in passively Q-switched Nd-solid state lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zameroski, Nathan D.; Wanke, Michael; Bossert, David

    2013-03-01

    The temporal intensity profile of pulse(s) from passively Q-switched and passively Q-switched mode locked (QSML) solid-state lasers is known to be dependent on cavity length. In this work, the pulse width, modulation depth, and beat frequencies of a Nd:Cr:GSGG laser using a Cr+4:YAG passive Q-switch are investigated as function cavity length. Measured temporal widths are linearly correlated with cavity length but generally 3-5 ns larger than theoretical predictions. Some cavity lengths exhibit pulse profiles with no modulation while other lengths exhibit complete amplitude modulation. The observed beat frequencies at certain cavity lengths cannot be accounted for with passively QSML models in which the pulse train repetition rate is τRT-1, τRT= round-trip time. They can be explained, however, by including coupled cavity mode-locking effects. A theoretical model developed for a two section coupled cavity semiconductor laser is adapted to a solid-state laser to interpret measured beat frequencies. We also numerically evaluate the temporal criterion required to achieve temporally smooth Q-switched pulses, versus cavity length and pump rate. We show that in flash lamp pumped systems, the difference in buildup time between longitudinal modes is largely dependent on the pump rate. In applications where short pulse delay is important, the pumping rate may limit the ability to achieve temporally smooth pulses in passively Q-switched lasers. Simulations support trends in experimental data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Dual-source CT coronary angiography in patients with premature heart-beats: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) coronary angiography in a population with premature heart-beats. Methods: Seventy patients with suspected coronary artery disease and premature heart-beats were routinely imaged on a DSCT scanner (Somatom Definition, Siemens AG, Germany). The images were reconstmcted before and after ECG editing. Two readers independently assessed image quality of all coronary segments using a four-point grading scale from excellent (1) to non-assessable (4). The results of the two groups were compared with a paired t-test, and a P value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The mean heart rate during examination ranged from 49 to 111 bpm[ mean(70.7±12.4) bpm]. Twenty-eight of 70 patients with relatively small variability of the heart rate [(41.0±18.4) bpm] got diagnostic image quality without ECG editing. In other 42 patients with larger variability of the heart rate [(71.4±28.7) bpm], the mean image quality scores were 2.09±1.27 and 1.50±0.79 before and after ECG editing, there was a significant difference (t= 13.764, P2=121.846, P<0.01). Finally, the diagnostic image accounted 98.0% (1014/1035) in all segments of 70 patients. Conclusion: DSCT can provide diagnostic images for patients with premature heart-beats. The image quality in patients with larger variability of the heart rate can be significantly improved through ECG editing. (authors)

  1. Effects of the BEAT Cancer physical activity behavior change intervention on physical activity, aerobic fitness, and quality of life in breast cancer survivors: a multicenter randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Laura Q.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Anton, Philip M.; Hopkins-Price, Patricia; Verhulst, Steven; Vicari, Sandra K.; Robbs, Randall S.; Mocharnuk, Robert; McAuley, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Most breast cancer survivors (BCS) are not meeting recommended physical activity guidelines. Here, we report the effects of the Better Exercise Adherence after Treatment for Cancer (BEAT Cancer) behavior change intervention on physical activity, aerobic fitness, and quality of life (QoL). We randomized 222 post-primary treatment BCS to the 3-month intervention (BEAT Cancer) or usual care (UC). BEAT Cancer combined supervised exercise, face-to-face counseling, and group discussions with taperi...

  2. Optical signal to noise ratio improvement through unbalanced noise beating in phase-sensitive parametric amplifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Malik, R.; Kumpera, A.; Olsson, S.L.I.; Andrekson, P. A.; Karlsson, M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the beating of signal and idler waves, which have imbalanced signal to noise ratios, in a phase-sensitive parametric amplifier. Imbalanced signal to noise ratios are achieved in two ways; first by imbalanced noise loading; second by varying idler to signal input power ratio. In the case of imbalanced noise loading the phase-sensitive amplifier improved the signal to noise ratio from 3 to 6 dB, and in the case of varying idler to signal input power ratio, the signal to noise rat...

  3. Jury acquits seven prison guards in beating of HIV-positive inmate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-03-19

    Seven guards from the Charlotte Correctional Institution were acquitted of beating and harassing an HIV-positive inmate, [name removed] was transferred to that prison because he bit a guard in the face at another prison. He later attempted suicide and slowly bled to death while shackled to a bed. Prosecutor Doug Molloy said [name removed] was harassed from the moment he arrived, and slashed his own wrist after 3 days of abuse. The jurors found insufficient evidence to convict the seven with conspiring to deny [name removed] his civil rights. Three other corrections officers, who also faced charges, testified for the prosecution. PMID:11366445

  4. Metachronal beating of cilia under the influence of Casson fluid and magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Khan, Zafar Hayat

    2015-03-01

    Metachronal beating of cilia under the influence of Casson fluid and magnetic field is considered. The model for cilia literature is modelled for the first time. The governing coupled equations are constructed under long wavelength and low Reynold's number approximation. Exact solutions are evaluated for stream function and pressure gradient. The important results in this study are the variation of the Hartmann number M, Casson fluid parameter ζ. The velocity field increases due to the increase in Hartmann number M near the channel walls while velocity field decreases at the center of the channel. Comparative study is also made for Casson fluid with Newtonian fluid.

  5. Myocardial revascularization using on-pump beating heart among patients with left ventricular dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isleem Ismail

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives On-pump beating heart technique for myocardial revascularization has been used successfully among both low and high risk patients. Its application among low ejection fraction patients is limited. The aim of our study is to evaluate this technique among patients with low ejection fraction and to compare results with off-pump bypass technique. Methods This retrospective study includes 137 patients with ejection fraction below 0.35 who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass surgery. 39 patients underwent myocardial revascularization using on-pump beating heart (ONCAB/BH, while 98 patients had off-pump beating heart (OPCAB. Different preoperative, operative and postoperative variables were evaluated among both groups. Results Patients profiles and risk factors were similar among both groups, except for the number of patients undergoing redo CABG which was significantly higher among ONCAB/BH (13% vs 3%; p = 0.025. Ejection fraction (EF varied from 10-34%. The mean EF for patients who underwent ONCAB/BH was 28 ± 6 in comparison to 26 ± 5 for OPCAB patients (P = 0.093. Predicted risk for surgery according to EuroSCORE was similar among both groups (P = 0.443. The number of grafts performed per patient was significantly more among patients who underwent ONCAB/BH (2.2 ± 0.7 Vs 1.7 ± 0.7; P = 0.002. Completeness of revascularization was significantly greater in the ONCAB/BH patients (72% Vs 46%, P = 0.015. The incidence of hospital mortality and combined major morbidity was more among ONCAB/BH in comparison to OPCAB, but the difference was not significant. However, the incidence of blood loss, ventricular arrythmias, inotropic support, ICU, hospital stay and blood transfusion were significantly greater among patients who underwent ONCAB/BH. Conclusions On-pump beating heart technique can be used in myocardial revascularization among patients with left ventricular dysfunction. The technique was found to be associated with better

  6. Short and long time blood pressure, heart beat and respiratory oscillation control analysed by XYt graphs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Kára, T.; Lanfranchi, P.; Souček, M.

    Brno: University of Technology VUTIUM Press, 2002 - (Kozumplík, J.; Provazník, I.; Jan, J.), s. 226 - 229 ISBN 80-214-2633-0. ISSN 1211-412X. [BIOSIGNAL 2002. Brno (CZ), 25.06.2002-28.06.2002] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/00/1262; GA ČR GA102/02/1339 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : heart beat interactions * autonomic nervous system * respiration monitoring Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  7. Is "Compressed Sensing" compressive? Can it beat the Nyquist Sampling Approach?

    CERN Document Server

    Yaroslavsky, L

    2015-01-01

    Measurement redundancy required for sampling and restoration of signals/images using "Compressed sensing (sampling)" techniques is compared with that of their more traditional alternatives. It is shown that "Compressed sensing" is not more compressive than the conventional sampling and that it is inferior in this respect to other available methods of sampling with reduced redundancy such as DPCM coding or random sparse sampling and restoration of image band-limited approximations. It is also shown that assertions that "Compressed sensing" can beat the Nyquist sampling approach are rooted in misinterpretation of the sampling theory.

  8. Neuro-adaptive control in beating heart surgery based on the viscoelastic tissue model

    OpenAIRE

    Setareh Rezakhani; Mehdi Aliyari Shoorehdeli; Azam Ghasemi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of 3D heart motion in beating heart surgery is resolved by proposing a parallel force-motion controller. Motion controller is designed based on neuro-adaptive approach to compensate 3D heart motion and deal with uncertainity in dynamic parameters, while an implicit force control is implemented by considering a viscoelastic tissue model. Stability analysis is proved through Lypanov’s stability theory and Barballet’s lemma. Simulation results, for D2M2 robot, which is...

  9. Laser beat wave resonant terahertz generation in a magnetized plasma channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhasin, Lalita; Tripathi, V. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Kumar, Pawan, E-mail: kumarpawan-30@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Raj Kumar Goel Institute of Technology, Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh 201003 (India)

    2016-02-15

    Resonant excitation of terahertz (THz) radiation by nonlinear mixing of two lasers in a ripple-free self created plasma channel is investigated. The channel has a transverse static magnetic field and supports a THz X-mode with phase velocity close to the speed of light in vacuum when the frequency of the mode is close to plasma frequency on the channel axis and its value decreases with the intensity of lasers. The THz is resonantly driven by the laser beat wave ponderomotive force. The THz amplitude scales almost three half power of the intensity of lasers as the width of the THz eigen mode shrinks with laser intensity.

  10. Neuro-adaptive control in beating heart surgery based on the viscoelastic tissue model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Rezakhani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of 3D heart motion in beating heart surgery is resolved by proposing a parallel force-motion controller. Motion controller is designed based on neuro-adaptive approach to compensate 3D heart motion and deal with uncertainity in dynamic parameters, while an implicit force control is implemented by considering a viscoelastic tissue model. Stability analysis is proved through Lypanov’s stability theory and Barballet’s lemma. Simulation results, for D2M2 robot, which is done in nominal case and viscoelastic parameter mismatches demonstrate the robust performance of the controller.

  11. Predicting the Equity Premium Out of Sample: Can Anything Beat the Historical Average?

    OpenAIRE

    John Y. Campbell; Samuel B. Thompson

    2005-01-01

    A number of variables are correlated with subsequent returns on the aggregate US stock market in the 20th Century. Some of these variables are stock market valuation ratios, others reflect patterns in corporate finance or the levels of short- and long-term interest rates. Amit Goyal and Ivo Welch (2004) have argued that in-sample correlations conceal a systematic failure of these variables out of sample: None are able to beat a simple forecast based on the historical average stock return. In ...

  12. Figures of merit for self-beating filtered microwave photonic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Daniel; Gasulla, Ivana; Capmany, José; Fandiño, Javier S; Muñoz, Pascual; Alavi, Hossein

    2016-05-01

    We present a model to compute the figures of merit of self-beating Microwave Photonic systems, a novel class of systems that work on a self-homodyne fashion by sharing the same laser source for information bearing and local oscillator tasks. General and simplified expressions are given and, as an example, we have considered their application to the design of a tunable RF MWP BS/UE front end for band selection, based on a Chebyshev Type-II optical filter. The applicability and usefulness of the model are also discussed. PMID:27137619

  13. Observation of Atom-Wave Beats Using a Kerr Modulator for Atom Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Décamps, B; Gillot, J; Vigué, J; Gauguet, A; Büchner, M

    2016-02-01

    A phase modulation puts the atom in a coherent superposition of quantum states with different kinetic energies. We have detected the interference of such modulated waves at the output of our atom interferometer, and we have observed beats at the difference of the modulation frequencies and its harmonics, in good agreement with theory. The phase modulations were produced by a Kerr phase modulator, i.e., by the propagation of the atom wave in a time-dependent electric field. An extension of this technique to electron interferometry should open the way to very high temporal resolution in electron microscopy. PMID:26894710

  14. An efficient method of addressing ectopic beats: new insight into data preprocessing of heart rate variability analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng WEN; Fang-tian HE

    2011-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is affected by ectopic beats.An efficient method was proposed to deal with the ectopic beats.The method was based on trend correlation of the heart timing signal.Predictor of R-R interval (RRI) value at ectopic beat time was constructed by the weight calculation and the slope estimation of preceding normal RRI.The type of ectopic beat was detected and replaced by the predictor of RRI.The performance of the simulated signal after ectopic correction was tested by the standard value using power spectrum density (PSD) estimation,whereas the results of clinical data with ectopic beats were compared with the adjacent ectopic-free data.The result showed the frequency indexes after ectopy corrected had less error than other methods with the test of simulated signal and clinical data.It indicated our method could improve the PSD estimation in HRV analysis.The method had advantages of high accuracy and real time properties to recover the sinus node modulation.

  15. Functional MRI of Challenging Food Choices: Forced Choice between Equally Liked High- and Low-Calorie Foods in the Absence of Hunger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisette Charbonnier

    Full Text Available We are continuously exposed to food and during the day we make many food choices. These choices play an important role in the regulation of food intake and thereby in weight management. Therefore, it is important to obtain more insight into the mechanisms that underlie these choices. While several food choice functional MRI (fMRI studies have been conducted, the effect of energy content on neural responses during food choice has, to our knowledge, not been investigated before. Our objective was to examine brain responses during food choices between equally liked high- and low-calorie foods in the absence of hunger. During a 10-min fMRI scan 19 normal weight volunteers performed a forced-choice task. Food pairs were matched on individual liking but differed in perceived and actual caloric content (high-low. Food choice compared with non-food choice elicited stronger unilateral activation in the left insula, superior temporal sulcus, posterior cingulate gyrus and (precuneus. This suggests that the food stimuli were more salient despite subject's low motivation to eat. The right superior temporal sulcus (STS was the only region that exhibited greater activation for high versus low calorie food choices between foods matched on liking. Together with previous studies, this suggests that STS activation during food evaluation and choice may reflect the food's biological relevance independent of food preference. This novel finding warrants further research into the effects of hunger state and weight status on STS, which may provide a marker of biological relevance.

  16. Hunger and Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... foods to get the right nutrients. Vegetarians and vegans, for example, should make sure they get enough ... Child Folic Acid and Pregnancy Iron-Deficiency Anemia Vegan Food Guide Your Child's Weight Healthy Eating Failure ...

  17. Hunger and Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TOPIC Becoming a Vegetarian Are Detox Diets Safe? Eating Disorders Anemia Celiac Disease Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend Reprint Guidelines Share this page using: What are these? Note: Clicking these links will take you to a site outside of ...

  18. Daughters on Hunger Strike

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Wan-lih Chang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay explores the embattled interactions between mothers and daughters in the stories by Edna O’Brien, Mary Lavin, Éilís Ní Dhuibhne and Mary Leland. This conflict involves an underlying distorted intimacy between women within a patriarchal Irish context. The daughter in the stories seeks to rebel against the ‘choking love’ of the tyrannical ‘patriarchal mother’ through a symbolic anorexia, in which the daughter rejects the mother’s food or the food associated with the mother. The mother is also shown to feel ambivalent and resistant towards the daughter’s attempt to break from her dependence upon the mother. The conflict and resistance between mothers and daughters in these stories can be evaluated against the framework of the patriarchal context in which women as mothers are silenced and made powerless in front of the ‘Father,’ and therefore, this resistance can be interpreted as a reaction to this patriarchal ideology and its framework in Irish society. The lost bond between older and younger women needs to be rediscovered and restored by a realisation of patriarchal ideology and furthermore, identification with female subjectivity. This identification between women seems to act as a source of redemption for women of different generations, which results in both liberating themselves from the patriarchal dogma.

  19. Multi-channel System for Beat to Beat QT Interval Variability and its Use in Screening for Coronary Artery Disease and Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starc, V.; Schlegel, T. T.; Arenare, B.; Greco, E. C.; DePalma, J. L.; Nunez, T.; Medina, R.; Jugo, D.; Rahman, M. A.; Delgado, R.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the ability of beat-to-beat QT interval variability (QTV) and related parameters to differentiate healthy individuals from patients with obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) and cardiomyopathy (CM). For this purpose we developed a PC-based ECG software program that in real time, acquires, analyzes and displays QTV in each of the eight independent channels that constitute the 12-lead conventional ECG. The system also analyzes and displays the QTV from QT interval signals that are derived from multiple channels and from singular value decomposition (SVD) to substantially reduce the effect of noise and other artifacts on the QTV results. It also provides other useful SVD-related parameters such as the normalized 3-dimensional volume of the T wave (nTV) = 100*(rho(sub 2)*rho(sub 3)rho(sub 1^2). Advanced high-fidelity 12-lead ECG tests (approx. 5-min supine) were first performed on a "training set" of 99 individuals: 33 with ischemic or dilated CM and low ejection fraction (EF less than 40%); 33 with catheterization-proven obstructive CAD but normal EF; and 33 age-/gender-matched healthy controls. All QTV parameters that were studied for their accuracy in detecting CM and CAD significantly differentiated both CM and CAD from controls (p less than 0.0001). Retrospective areas under the ROC curve (AUC) of SDNN-QTV, rmsSD-QTV, and QTV Index (QTVI) for CM vs. controls in the lead V5 were 0.85, 0.90, and 0.99, respectively, and those for CAD vs. controls in the lead II were 0.82, 0.82, and 0.89. Other advanced ECG parameters, such as HFQRS RAZ score, LF Lomb of RRV or QRS-T angle, differentiated both CM and CAD from controls less significantly, with the respective AUC values of 0.89, 0.88 and 0.98 for CM vs. controls, and 0.73, 0.71 and 0.80 for CAD vs. controls. QTV parameters (especially QTVI, which is QTV as indexed to RRV) were, diagnostically speaking, amongst the best performing of the advanced ECG techniques studied thus far.

  20. Metachronal beating of cilia under the influence of Casson fluid and magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher, E-mail: noreensher@yahoo.com [DBS and H, CEME, National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Khan, Zafar Hayat [Department of Mathematics, University of Malakand, Chakdara, Dir (Lower), Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (Pakistan)

    2015-03-15

    Metachronal beating of cilia under the influence of Casson fluid and magnetic field is considered. The model for cilia literature is modelled for the first time. The governing coupled equations are constructed under long wavelength and low Reynold's number approximation. Exact solutions are evaluated for stream function and pressure gradient. The important results in this study are the variation of the Hartmann number M, Casson fluid parameter ζ. The velocity field increases due to the increase in Hartmann number M near the channel walls while velocity field decreases at the center of the channel. Comparative study is also made for Casson fluid with Newtonian fluid. - Highlights: • Metachronal beating of cilia under the influence of Casson fluid and magnetic field is considered. • The model for cilia literature is modelled for the first time. • Exact solutions are evaluated for stream function and pressure gradient. • The important results in this study are the variation of the Hartmann number M, Casson fluid parameter ζ. • Comparative study is also made for Casson fluid with Newtonian fluid.

  1. Validation of four-dimensional ultrasound for targeting in minimally-invasive beating-heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Danielle F.; Wiles, Andrew D.; Moore, John; Wedlake, Chris; Gobbi, David G.; Peters, Terry M.

    2009-02-01

    Ultrasound is garnering significant interest as an imaging modality for surgical guidance, due to its affordability, real-time temporal resolution and ease of integration into the operating room. Minimally-invasive intracardiac surgery performed on the beating-heart prevents direct vision of the surgical target, and procedures such as mitral valve replacement and atrial septal defect closure would benefit from intraoperative ultrasound imaging. We propose that placing 4D ultrasound within an augmented reality environment, along with a patient-specific cardiac model and virtual representations of tracked surgical tools, will create a visually intuitive platform with sufficient image information to safely and accurately repair tissue within the beating heart. However, the quality of the imaging parameters, spatial calibration, temporal calibration and ECG-gating must be well characterized before any 4D ultrasound system can be used clinically to guide the treatment of moving structures. In this paper, we describe a comprehensive accuracy assessment framework that can be used to evaluate the performance of 4D ultrasound systems while imaging moving targets. We image a dynamic phantom that is comprised of a simple robot and a tracked phantom to which point-source, distance and spherical objects of known construction can be attached. We also follow our protocol to evaluate 4D ultrasound images generated in real-time by reconstructing ECG-gated 2D ultrasound images acquired from a tracked multiplanar transesophageal probe. Likewise, our evaluation framework allows any type of 4D ultrasound to be quantitatively assessed.

  2. Optical beat interference noise reduction in OFDMA optical access link using self-homodyne balanced detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sang-Min; Won, Yong-Yuk; Han, Sang-Kook

    2013-12-01

    A Novel technique for reducing the OBI noise in optical OFDMA-PON uplink is presented. OFDMA is a multipleaccess/ multiplexing scheme that can provide multiplexing operation of user data streams onto the downlink sub-channels and uplink multiple access by means of dividing OFDM subcarriers as sub-channels. The main issue of high-speed, single-wavelength upstream OFDMA-PON arises from optical beating interference noise. Because the sub-channels are allocated dynamically to multiple access users over same nominal wavelength, it generates the optical beating interference among upstream signals. In this paper, we proposed a novel scheme using self-homodyne balanced detection in the optical line terminal (OLT) to reduce OBI noise which is generated in the uplink transmission of OFDMA-PON system. When multiple OFDMA sub-channels over the same nominal wavelength are received at the same time in the proposed architecture, OBI noises can be removed using balanced detection. Using discrete multitone modulation (DMT) to generate real valued OFDM signals, the proposed technique is verified through experimental demonstration.

  3. Intermode beating mode-locking technique for O-band mixed-cascaded Raman fiber lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhengqian; Zhong, Min; Xiong, Fengfu; Wu, Duanduan; Huang, Yizhong; Li, Yingyue; Le, Lili; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping

    2015-02-15

    A novel intermode beating mode-locking (IBML) technique combined with a cascaded Raman process is proposed to mode-lock an O-band two-cascaded Raman fiber laser. Using a 980-m-long phosphosilicate fiber pumped by a 1064 nm laser, the second-order Raman oscillation at 1319 nm is generated by the mixed-cascaded Raman shifts of P2O5 and SiO2. By precisely matching the intermode beating frequencies of the 1064 nm pump laser and the second-order Raman cavity frequency, harmonic mode-locking at 1319 nm is initiated. The dynamic process of the IBML operation in the cascaded Raman laser is experimentally investigated. The 131st-order harmonic mode-locking with a repetition rate of 27.247 MHz is very stable with the radio-frequency (RF) signal-to-noise ratio of >56  dB and the RF supermode-suppression ratio of >43  dB. The mode-locked pulses with the square profile are confirmed as the noise-like pulses by an autocorrelator. The IBML technique, in combination with the cascaded Raman process, could offer an exciting new prospect for obtaining simple, compact, and arbitrary-wavelength mode-locked laser sources. PMID:25680135

  4. Non-linear modelling of beat Cepheids: Resonant and non-resonant models

    CERN Document Server

    Smolec, R

    2010-01-01

    The phenomenon of double-periodic Cepheid pulsation is still poorly understood. Recently we rediscussed the problem of modelling the double-periodic pulsation with non-linear hydrocodes. We showed that the published non-resonant double-mode models are incorrect, because they exclude the negative buoyancy effects. Aims. We continue our efforts to verify whether the Kuhfuss one-equation convection model with negative buoyancy included can reproduce the double-periodic Cepheid pulsation. Methods. Using the direct time integration hydrocode, which implements the Kuhfuss convection model, we search for stable double-periodic Cepheid models. We search for models pulsating in both fundamental and first overtone modes (F+1O), as well as in the two lowest order overtones (1O+2O). In the latter case, we focus on reproducing double-overtone Cepheids of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Results. We have found full amplitude non-linear beat Cepheid models of both types, F+1O and 1O+2O. In the case of F+1O models, the beat...

  5. Comparison of hemodynamic responses to dexmedetomidine versus esmolol in patients undergoing beating heart surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdel Rahman Salem M.D,* Mostafa Elhamamsy M.D

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available adrenergic agonists decrease sympathetic tone with ensuing attenuation of neuroendocrine and hemodynamic responses to anesthesia and surgery. Also, administration of beta -adrenergic antagonists contributes to prophylaxis against hypertension, tachycardia and myocardial ischemia and myocardial protection during cardiac surgery. The effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX, a highly specific alpha -adrenergic agonist, on these responses have not yet been fully reported in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Esmolol (ESM is a cardioselective, short-acting -blocking agent. Previous studies have established the effectiveness of esmolol in the reduction of hemodynamic responses during anesthetic induction. Aim: The study of hemodynamic responses of dexmedetomidine and esmolol and their effects on the anesthetic requirements during anesthesia in beating heart surgery. Methods: Forty patients scheduled for elective beating heart surgery received a !thereaf"#$%!&'" end of surgery in the ESM group. Total intravenous anesthesia using fentanyl, cisatracurium a"( -* +of surgery. Hemodynamics measured included heart rate, mean arterial pressure, filling pressures, cardiac index, systemic and pulmonary vascular resistances. The incidence of hypotension, hypertension, tachycardia, bradycardia, dysrhythmias, ST segment changes, total anesthetics requirements, muscle rigidity and postoperative shivering were recorded. Results: #$%",-.&/ 0*! 0 ! l/min/m ( 1 ! + 2

  6. Adult murine skeletal muscle contains cells that can differentiate into beating cardiomyocytes in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve O Winitsky

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available It has long been held as scientific fact that soon after birth, cardiomyocytes cease dividing, thus explaining the limited restoration of cardiac function after a heart attack. Recent demonstrations of cardiac myocyte differentiation observed in vitro or after in vivo transplantation of adult stem cells from blood, fat, skeletal muscle, or heart have challenged this view. Analysis of these studies has been complicated by the large disparity in the magnitude of effects seen by different groups and obscured by the recently appreciated process of in vivo stem-cell fusion. We now show a novel population of nonsatellite cells in adult murine skeletal muscle that progress under standard primary cell-culture conditions to autonomously beating cardiomyocytes. Their differentiation into beating cardiomyocytes is characterized here by video microscopy, confocal-detected calcium transients, electron microscopy, immunofluorescent cardiac-specific markers, and single-cell patch recordings of cardiac action potentials. Within 2 d after tail-vein injection of these marked cells into a mouse model of acute infarction, the marked cells are visible in the heart. By 6 d they begin to differentiate without fusing to recipient cardiac cells. Three months later, the tagged cells are visible as striated heart muscle restricted to the region of the cardiac infarct.

  7. BER Analysis Using Beat Probability Method of 3D Optical CDMA Networks with Double Balanced Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ta Yen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes novel three-dimensional (3D matrices of wavelength/time/spatial code for code-division multiple-access (OCDMA networks, with a double balanced detection mechanism. We construct 3D carrier-hopping prime/modified prime (CHP/MP codes by extending a two-dimensional (2D CHP code integrated with a one-dimensional (1D MP code. The corresponding coder/decoder pairs were based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs and tunable optical delay lines integrated with splitters/combiners. System performance was enhanced by the low cross correlation properties of the 3D code designed to avoid the beat noise phenomenon. The CHP/MP code cardinality increased significantly compared to the CHP code under the same bit error rate (BER. The results indicate that the 3D code method can enhance system performance because both the beating terms and multiple-access interference (MAI were reduced by the double balanced detection mechanism. Additionally, the optical component can also be relaxed for high transmission scenery.

  8. Metachronal beating of cilia under the influence of Casson fluid and magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metachronal beating of cilia under the influence of Casson fluid and magnetic field is considered. The model for cilia literature is modelled for the first time. The governing coupled equations are constructed under long wavelength and low Reynold's number approximation. Exact solutions are evaluated for stream function and pressure gradient. The important results in this study are the variation of the Hartmann number M, Casson fluid parameter ζ. The velocity field increases due to the increase in Hartmann number M near the channel walls while velocity field decreases at the center of the channel. Comparative study is also made for Casson fluid with Newtonian fluid. - Highlights: • Metachronal beating of cilia under the influence of Casson fluid and magnetic field is considered. • The model for cilia literature is modelled for the first time. • Exact solutions are evaluated for stream function and pressure gradient. • The important results in this study are the variation of the Hartmann number M, Casson fluid parameter ζ. • Comparative study is also made for Casson fluid with Newtonian fluid

  9. Measurement of ciliary beat frequency using ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jason J.; Jing, Joseph C.; Su, Erica; Badger, Christopher; Coughlan, Carolyn A.; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2016-02-01

    Ciliated epithelial cells populate up to 80% of the surface area of the human airway and are responsible for mucociliary transport, which is the key protective mechanism that provides the first line of defense in the respiratory tract. Cilia beat in a rhythmic pattern and may be easily affected by allergens, pollutants, and pathogens, altering ciliary beat frequency (CBF) subsequently. Diseases including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and primary ciliary dyskinesia may also decrease CBF. CBF is therefore a critical component of respiratory health. The current clinical method of measuring CBF is phase-contrast microscopy, which involves a tissue biopsy obtained via brushing of the nasal cavity. While this method is minimally invasive, the tissue sample must be oriented to display its profile view, making the visualization of a single layer of cilia challenging. In addition, the conventional method requires subjective analysis of CBF, e.g., manually counting by visual inspection. On the contrary, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used to study the retina in ophthalmology as well as vasculature in cardiology, and offers higher resolution than conventional computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Based on this technology, our lab specifically developed an ultra-high resolution OCT system to image the microstructure of the ciliated epithelial cells. Doppler analysis was also performed to determine CBF. Lastly, we also developed a program that utilizes fast Fourier transform to determine CBF under phase-contrast microscopy, providing a more objective method compared to the current method.

  10. Combining neural networks and ANFIS classifiers for supervised examining of electrocardiogram beats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Mehrdad

    2013-11-01

    Abstract In this paper, the supervised classification of the electrocardiogram (ECG) beats based on the fusion of several intelligent learning machines is described. For classification of ECG heartbeats, first, the QRS complexes are delineated by an efficient algorithm so as to identify the fiducial and J-locations of each complex. For each delineated QRS complex, a feature vector is established based on the geometrical properties of the complex waveform and its associated discrete-wavelet transform. Next, three different multi-layer perceptron back-propagation (MLP-BP) networks are trained with different topologies and intrinsic parameters. Afterwards, the outputs of MLP-BPs are used as the new feature space elements for training three adaptive fuzzy network inference systems (ANFIS) in order to increase the final accuracy. At the end, the outputs of ANFIS classifiers are voted based on majority for each input sample. The method was applied to seven arrhythmias (Normal, LBBB, RBBB, PVC, APB, VE, VF) which belong to the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database and the average accuracy value Acc=98.28% was achieved for the beat-level. Also, the proposed method was assessed to five arrhythmias (Normal, LBBB, RBBB, PVC, APB) according to validation standards of the American Heart Association (AHA) at record (subject) level and the average accuracy value Acc=73.39% was achieved. To evaluate performance quality of the new proposed hybrid learning machine, the obtained results were compared with similar peer-reviewed studies in this area. PMID:24044548

  11. On the development of German beating-reed organ pipes during the 19th century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braasch, Jonas

    2001-05-01

    In the 19th century organ literature, it is often claimed that German organ builders generally adapted the way of building their beating-reed pipes after being influenced by new developments from England and France. To investigate whether this hypothesis is true or false, the reed-pipe sounds of several German historic organs and an English organ by Henry Willis were measured and analyzed. The outcome of the analysis, however, cannot confirm the given hypothesis. Organ builders of the 18th century, such as Gottfried Silbermann for example, were already able to build beating-reed pipes similar in sound to the pipes that are used nowadays in Germany. It is noteworthy that Silbermann used closed shallots in some of his stops, although they are thought to be one of the main inventions in the English and French organ reforms. The use of higher wind pressures, which is also a main part of this reform, on the other hand, never became a common standard in Germany, as was the case for France and Great Britain.

  12. Glucagon Increases Beating Rate but Not Contractility in Rat Right Atrium. Comparison with Isoproterenol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Merino

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the chronotropic and inotropic responses to glucagon in spontaneously beating isolated right atria of rat heart. For comparison, we also investigated the effects resulting from stimulating β-adrenoceptors with isoproterenol in this tissue. Isoproterenol increased both atrial frequency and contractility but glucagon only enhanced atrial rate. The transcript levels of glucagon receptors were about three times higher in sinoatrial node than in the atrial myocardium. Chronotropic responses to glucagon and isoproterenol were blunted by the funny current (If inhibitor ZD 7288. Inhibitors of protein kinase A, H-89 and KT-5720 reduced the chronotropic response to glucagon but not to isoproterenol. Inhibition of ryanodine receptors and calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (important regulators of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release, with ruthenium red and KN-62 respectively, failed to alter chronotropic responses of either glucagon or isoproterenol. Non selective inhibition of phosphodiesterase (PDE with 3-isobutylmethylxantine or selective inhibition of PDE3 or PDE4 with cilostamide or rolipram respectively did not affect chronotropic effects of glucagon or isoproterenol. Our results indicate that glucagon increases beating rate but not contractility in rat right atria which could be a consequence of lower levels of glucagon receptors in atrial myocardium than in sinoatrial node. Chronotropic responses to glucagon or isoproterenol are mediated by If current but not by sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release, neither are regulated by PDE activity.

  13. The Beat to Read: A Cross-Lingual Link between Rhythmic Regularity Perception and Reading Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekius, Annike; Cope, Thomas E.; Grube, Manon

    2016-01-01

    This work assesses one specific aspect of the relationship between auditory rhythm cognition and language skill: regularity perception. In a group of 26 adult participants, native speakers of 11 different native languages, we demonstrate a strong and significant correlation between the ability to detect a “roughly” regular beat and rapid automatized naming (RAN) as a measure of language skill (Spearman's rho, −0.47, p < 0.01). There was no such robust relationship for the “mirror image” task of irregularity detection, i.e., the ability to detect ongoing small deviations from a regular beat. The correlation between RAN and regularity detection remained significant after partialling out performance on the irregularity detection task (rho, −0.41, p, 0.022), non-verbal IQ (rho, −0.37, p < 0.05), or musical expertise (rho, −0.31, p < 0.05). Whilst being consistent with the “shared resources model” in terms of rhythm as a common basis of language and music, evolutionarily as well as in individual development, the results also document how two related rhythm processing abilities relate differently to language skill. Specifically, the results support a universal relationship between rhythmic regularity detection and reading skill that is robust to accounting for differences in fluid intelligence and musical expertise, and transcends language-specific differences in speech rhythm.

  14. Fetal beat detection in abdominal ECG recordings: global and time adaptive approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a method for location of fetal QRS in maternal abdominal ECG recordings. This method’s initial, global approach was proposed in the context of the 2013 PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge where it was tested on the 447 four channel one-minute recordings. The first step is filtering to eliminate baseline wander and high frequency noise. Upon detection, maternal QRS is removed on each channel using a filter applied to the other three channels. Next we locate fetal QRS on each channel and select the channel with the best set of detections. The method was awarded the third-best score in the Challenge event 1 with 278.755 (beats/minute) and the fourth-best score on event 2 with 28.201 ms. The 5 min long recordings of the Abdominal and Direct Fetal ECG Database were used to further test the method. This database contains five recordings obtained from women in labor. Results in these longer recordings were not satisfactory. This appears to be particularly the case in recordings with a more clearly non-stationary nature. In a new approach to our method, some changes are introduced. Two features are updated over time: the filter used to eliminate maternal QRS and the channel used to detect fetal beats. These changes significantly improved the QRS detection performance on longer recordings, but the scores on the 1 minute Challenge recordings were degraded. (paper)

  15. Valve Replacement Performed on the Beating Heart with Continuous Retrograde Coronary Sinus Isothermic Blood Perfusion Combined with Coronary Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Saim Demirtürk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An operation on the beating heart was planned for a 60-year-old woman who applied to our clinic with aortic stenosis, three vessel coronary artery disease and poor left ventricular function. There are reports about beating heart valve surgery perfomed alone or combined with coronary artery bypass operations using continuous retrograde coronary sinus isothermic blood perfusion in patients with poor ventricle. We performed a coronary revascularization process for three-vessel disease on the pump beating heart and aortic valve replacement under cross-clamp using continuous retrograde coronary sinus isothermic blood perfusion in the same session. She was discharged on the sixth postoperative day after an uneventful recovery. She is well and active 24 months after the operation. Valve replacement using the retrograde coronary sinus isothermic blood perfusion technique due to its protective effect on the already borderline myocardial functions in patients with poor ventricles is a useful and clinically successful method.

  16. Teaching World Religions without Teaching "World Religions"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locklin, Reid B.; Tiemeier, Tracy; Vento, Johann M.

    2012-01-01

    Tomoko Masuzawa and a number of other contemporary scholars have recently problematized the categories of "religion" and "world religions" and, in some cases, called for its abandonment altogether as a discipline of scholarly study. In this collaborative essay, we respond to this critique by highlighting three attempts to teach world religions…

  17. METRIC OF VIRTUAL WORLDS

    OpenAIRE

    Trunev A. P.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the hypothesis of a plurality of parallel and virtual worlds. It is assumed that sentient beings in each virtual world reach a stage of development that can create a virtual world to simulate the history of their own development. In this case, the virtual worlds are nested within each other, which put a severe restriction on the possible geometry of space-time. Discussed the draft geometry virtual worlds consistently displayed from one world to another. It is shown that in this...

  18. Josué de Castro e a Geografia da Fome no Brasil Josué de Castro and The Geography of Hunger in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de Assis Guedes de Vasconcelos

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é realizar uma releitura do clássico Geografia da Fome, publicado pela primeira vez em 1946. Realiza-se uma síntese dos mapas das cinco áreas alimentares e das principais carências nutricionais existentes no Brasil, de acordo com o delineamento realizado por Josué de Castro. Nos dias atuais, ao perfil epidemiológico nutricional desenhado por Josué de Castro, caracterizado pelas carências nutricionais (desnutrição, hipovitaminoses, bócio endêmico, anemia ferropriva etc., sobrepuseram-se as doenças crônicas não-transmissíveis (obesidade, diabetes, dislipidemias etc.. Entretanto, a questão da complexa e paradoxal problemática da fome permanece como uma temática recorrente no Brasil. Diante de alguns dilemas da atualidade, tais como aqueles que dizem respeito à sustentabilidade ecológica do planeta e à garantia do direito humano à alimentação, torna-se imperante reacender a luta defendida por Josué de Castro pela adoção de um modelo de desenvolvimento econômico sustentável e uma sociedade sem miséria e sem fome.The aim of this article is to reinterpret the classic work Geografia da Fome [The Geography of Hunger], first published in 1946. The article provides a summary of the five food area maps and the main nutritional deficiencies in Brazil, based on Josué de Castro's original conception. Currently, the nutritional epidemiological profile identified by Josué de Castro, characterized by nutritional deficiencies (malnutrition, vitamin deficiencies, endemic goiter, iron deficiency anemia, etc., overlap with chronic non-communicable diseases (obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemias, etc.. However, the complex and paradoxical issue of hunger is a persistently recurrent theme in Brazil. Given a series of current dilemmas, including the planet's ecological sustainability and the need to guarantee the human right to adequate, healthy nutrition, it is urgent to reawaken the struggle led by Josué de Castro

  19. Virtual World Security Inspection

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas Charles Patterson; Michael Hobbs

    2012-01-01

    Virtual property theft is a serious problem that exists in virtual worlds. Legitimate users of these worlds invest considerable amounts of time, effort and real-world money into obtaining virtual property, but unfortunately, are becoming victims of theft in high numbers. It is reported that there are over 1 billion registered users of virtual worlds containing virtual property items worth an estimated US$50 billion dollars. The problem of virtual property theft is complex, involving many lega...

  20. Suicide in the World

    OpenAIRE

    Peeter Värnik

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Over the past 20 years the WHO has considerably improved world mortality data. There are still shortcomings but more countries now report data and world-wide estimates are regularly made. Methods: Data about mortality have been retrieved from the WHO world database. Worldwide injury mortality estimates for 2008 as well as trends of the suicide rate from 1950 to 2009 were analysed. Results: Suicides in the world amount to 782 thousand in 2008 according to the WHO estimate, which ...

  1. High-sensitive Optical Pulse-Shape Characterization using a Beating-Contrast-Measurement Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Roncin, Vincent; Millaud, Audrey; Cramer, Romain; Jaouën, Yves; Simon, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Ultrahigh-speed optical transmission technology, such as optical time domain multiplexing or optical signal processing is a key point for increasing the communication capacity. The system performances are strongly related to pulse properties. We present an original method dedicated to short pulse-shape characterization with high repetition rate using standard optical telecommunications equipments. Its principle is based on temporal measurement of the contrast produced by the beating of two delayed optical pulses in a high bandwidth photo detector. This technique returns firstly reliable information on the pulse-shape, such as pulse width, shape and pedestal. Simulation and experimental results evaluate the high-sensitivity and the high-resolution of the technique allowing the measurement of pulse extinction ratio up to 20 dB with typical timing resolution of about 100 fs. The compatibility of the technique with high repetition rate pulse measurement offers an efficient tool for short pulse analysis.

  2. [New approach in the surgical treatment of mitral regurgitation: beating heart transapical neochord implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttkay, Tamás; Jancsó, Gábor; Gombocz, Károly; Gasz, Balázs

    2016-05-01

    Severe mitral regurgitation due to prolapse of the valve demands early surgical intervention. Recently artificial chord implantation is the prefered solution, which requires cardioplegia and application of cardiopulmonary bypass using the left atrial approach. Transoesophageal echocardiography guided transapical neochord implantation is an emerging new technique for the treatment of mitral regurgitation. It enables the operation through left minithoracotomy on beating heart using a special instrument introduced into the left ventricle. Acute procedural success rates in different centres vary between 86 and 100%. According to reports, 92% of the patients do not require additional intervention at the 3-month follow-up. Continuous integration of data resulting improved outcomes supports the hope that this novel, less-invasive technique will be applied widely for the treatment of mitral regurgitation. PMID:27106725

  3. Excitation of plasmons and phonons by two transverse electromagnetic waves beating in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beating of two transverse electromagnetic waves in a plasma on a longitudinal wave (plasmon, phonon) is demonstrated experimentally with a double microwave bench in the X band. The detection of the coupling is made by two methods: (a) a direct absorption method on one pump wave; (b) an heterodyne scattering of a third wave in near absorption condition. These methods are optimal in the sense that the first one allows the detection of the whole action transfer between the pumps (Manley-Rowe relations for convective damping), while in the second case the scattered wave is the spatially antiphase conjugate of pump wave 2 for a wave 3 close to pump wave 1

  4. Efficiency of dispersive wave generation from a dual-frequency beat signal

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, K E; Xu, Y Q; Genty, G; Murdoch, S G

    2016-01-01

    The emission of dispersive waves (DWs) by temporal solitons can be described as a cascaded four-wave mixing process triggered by a pair of monochromatic continuous waves (CWs). We report experimental and numerical results demonstrating that the efficiency of this process is strongly and non-trivially affected by the frequency detuning of the CW pump lasers. We explain our results by showing that individual cycles of the input dual-frequency beat signal can evolve as higher-order solitons whose temporal compression and soliton fission govern the DW efficiency. Analytical predictions based on the detuning dependence of the soliton order are shown to be in excellent agreement with experimental and numerical observations.

  5. Observation of Quantum Beating from Two Coupled Parametric Six-Wave Mixing Signals in Rb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Chang-Jun; HE Jun-Fang; ZHAI Xue-Jun; XUE Bing

    2008-01-01

    Two processes of coupled difference-frequency axially phase-matched parametric six-wave mixing are carried out in Rb vapour by two-photon excitation using fs laser pulses, and parametric six-wave mixing signals in the infrared and near infrared regime are detected. The infrared parametric six-wave mixing signals are up-converted into the visible spectral range by sum-frequency mixing with the pump laser in a LiI03 crystal. Moreover, quantum beating at 608cm-1, corresponding to the 7s - 5d energy difference in Rb, is observed from the sum-frequency signal at 495 nm. As a result, we obtain modulated light signals in the visible, near infrared and infrared spectral ranges, and study the interference between 7s and 5d states of Rb.

  6. Statistics of quantum beats in the time dependence of the neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokopets, G.A.; Prokopets, A.G. [National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Physics and Mathematics Department, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2011-12-15

    The numerical calculations of the delay time distributions for the neutron scattering have been carried out. The scattering of the short wave packet of neutrons with the broad energy interval 500-800 keV by {sup 58}Ni nuclei has been studied. The decay curves and average times of the compound scattering were found as for the forward scattering as for the specific spin-parity states. The time oscillations of the decay curves were identified as quantum beats that were caused by the interference of the excited resonance set. The statistical analysis of the frequency spectra of the decay curves oscillations has been carried out. The behavior of the examined statistical observables turns out to be close to the Poisson law. (orig.)

  7. Statistics of quantum beats in the time dependence of the neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The numerical calculations of the delay time distributions for the neutron scattering have been carried out. The scattering of the short wave packet of neutrons with the broad energy interval 500-800 keV by 58Ni nuclei has been studied. The decay curves and average times of the compound scattering were found as for the forward scattering as for the specific spin-parity states. The time oscillations of the decay curves were identified as quantum beats that were caused by the interference of the excited resonance set. The statistical analysis of the frequency spectra of the decay curves oscillations has been carried out. The behavior of the examined statistical observables turns out to be close to the Poisson law. (orig.)

  8. Influence of ectopic heart beats in gated ventricular blood-pool studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct data collection from ventricular blood-pool studies were stored in frame mode in a computer and by means of a modified tape recorder, the blood-pool image and ECG were recorded on tape. At the end of the study the tape data were replayed into the computer. The ECG signal was passed through a trigger circuit that detected the R wave which was sampled by the computer once every msec. Contractions outside of the desired range could be rejected along with the subsequent contraction. Of seven patients whose calculated ejection fractions were changed by more than 0.03, all had frequent (one in 20) ectopic contractions. The distorted ventricular volume curves were effectively restructured by the constraining procedure, changing the end-systolic volume and EF. Computer modeling showed a linear relationship between the percent of ectopic contractions and the underestimate of ejection fraction. One ectopic beat in ten led to a 5% underestimate of EF

  9. Design a Wearable Device for Blood Oxygen Concentration and Temporal Heart Beat Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Cho Zin; Barsoum, Nader; Ing, Wong Kiing

    2010-06-01

    The wireless network technology is increasingly important in healthcare as a result of the aging population and the tendency to acquire chronic disease such as heart attack, high blood pressure amongst the elderly. A wireless sensor network system that has the capability to monitor physiological sign such as SpO2 (Saturation of Arterial Oxygen) and heart beat rate in real-time from the human's body is highlighted in this study. This research is to design a prototype sensor network hardware, which consists of microcontroller PIC18F series and transceiver unit. The sensor is corporate into a wearable body sensor network which is small in size and easy to use. The sensor allows a non invasive, real time method to provide information regarding the health of the body. This enables a more efficient and economical means for managing the health care of the population.

  10. Measurement on Camber Deformation of Wings of Free-flying Dragonflies and Beating-flying Dragonflies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deqiang Song; Lijiang Zeng

    2004-01-01

    The knowledge of wing orientation and deformation during flapping flight is necessary for a complete aerodynamic analysis, but to date those kinematic features have not been simultaneously quantified for free-flying insects. A projected comb-fringe (PCF) method has been developed for measuring spanwise camber changes on free-flying dragonflies and on beating-flying dragonflies through the course of a wingbeat, which bases on projecting a fringe pattern over the whole measurement area and then measuring the wing deformation from the distorted fringe pattern. Experimental results demonstrate substantial camber changes both along the wingspan and through the course of a wingbeat. The ratio of camber deformation to chord length for hind wing is up to 0.11 at 75% spanwise with a flapping angle of -0.66 degree for a free-flying dragonfly.

  11. Digital approach to stabilizing optical frequency combs and beat notes of CW lasers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čížek, Martin; Číp, Ondřej; Šmíd, Radek; Hrabina, Jan; Mikel, Břetislav; Lazar, Josef

    Bellingham: SPIE, 2013, 89161H:1-6. ISSN 0277-786X. [International Symposium on Precision Mechanical Measurements /6./. Guiyang (CN), 10.10.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP102/11/P819; GA MPO FR-TI2/705; GA MPO FR-TI1/241; GA TA ČR TA01010995; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA03010663; GA MV VG20132015124; GA MŠk EE2.4.31.0016; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA03010835 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Optical frequency combs * Digital signal processing * Software-defined radio * Beat note * Stabilization Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  12. Disorder-Induced Quantum Beats in Two-Dimensional Spectra of Excitonically Coupled Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkus, Vytautas; Dong, Hui; Fleming, Graham R; Abramavicius, Darius; Valkunas, Leonas

    2016-01-21

    Quantum superposition of molecular electronic states is very fragile because of thermal energy fluctuations and the static conformational disorder induced by the intimate surrounding of constituent molecules of the system. However, the nature of the long-lived quantum beats, observed in time-resolved spectra of molecular aggregates at physiological conditions, is still being debated. We present our study of the conditions when long-lived electronic quantum coherences originating from recently proposed inhomogeneous broadening mechanism are enhanced and reflected in the two-dimensional electronic spectra of the excitonically coupled molecular dimer. We show that depending on the amount of inhomogeneous broadening, the excitonically coupled molecular system can establish long-lived electronic coherences, caused by a disordered subensemble, for which the dephasing due to static energy disorder becomes significantly reduced. On the basis of these considerations, we present explanations for why the electronic or vibrational coherences were or were not observed in a range of recent experiments. PMID:26720834

  13. Generation of Electron Bunches at Low Repetition Rates Using a Beat-Frequency Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poelker, Matt; Grames, Joseph; Hansknecht, John; Kazimi, Reza; Musson, John

    2007-05-01

    Even at a continuous wave facility such as CEBAF at Jefferson Lab, an electron beam with long time intervals (tens of ns) between individual bunches can be useful, for example to isolate sources of background via time of flight detection or to measure the energy of neutral particles that cannot be separated with a magnetic field. This paper describes a demonstrated method to quickly and easily deliver bunches with repetition rates of 20 to 100 MHz corresponding to time intervals between 10 to 50 ns (respectively). This is accomplished by changing the ON/OFF frequency of the RF-pulsed drive laser by a small amount (f/f < 20%), resulting in a bunch frequency equal to the beat frequency between the radio frequencies of the drive laser and the photoinjector chopper system.

  14. Virtual Worlds? "Outlook Good"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelton, AJ

    2008-01-01

    Many people believed that virtual worlds would end up like the eight-track audiotape: a memory of something no longer used (or useful). Yet today there are hundreds of higher education institutions represented in three-dimensional (3D) virtual worlds such as Active Worlds and Second Life. The movement toward the virtual realm as a viable teaching…

  15. World Council-OMEP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Margaret

    1990-01-01

    Details the 1990 meeting of the World Council of the World Organization for Early Childhood Education (OMEP) in Lagos, Nigeria. OMEP's Statement to the World Summit for Children is provided. The conditions of Nigerian children and female children in India are considered. (BG)

  16. Heart beat detection in multimodal physiological data using a hidden semi-Markov model and signal quality indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A F Pimentel, Marco; Santos, Mauro D; Springer, David B; Clifford, Gari D

    2015-08-01

    Accurate heart beat detection in signals acquired from intensive care unit (ICU) patients is necessary for establishing both normality and detecting abnormal events. Detection is normally performed by analysing the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal, and alarms are triggered when parameters derived from this signal exceed preset or variable thresholds. However, due to noisy and missing data, these alarms are frequently deemed to be false positives, and therefore ignored by clinical staff. The fusion of features derived from other signals, such as the arterial blood pressure (ABP) or the photoplethysmogram (PPG), has the potential to reduce such false alarms. In order to leverage the highly correlated temporal nature of the physiological signals, a hidden semi-Markov model (HSMM) approach, which uses the intra- and inter-beat depolarization interval, was designed to detect heart beats in such data. Features based on the wavelet transform, signal gradient and signal quality indices were extracted from the ECG and ABP waveforms for use in the HSMM framework. The presented method achieved an overall score of 89.13% on the hidden/test data set provided by the Physionet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014: Robust Detection of Heart Beats in Multimodal Data. PMID:26218536

  17. Quantitative measurements of acoustical beats by means of the 'improper' use of sound card software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganci, S [Museo di Fisica e Meteo-sismologia ' G Sanguineti-G Leonardini' , Piazza N S dell' Orto, 8, 16043 Chiavari (Italy)

    2007-11-15

    Low-cost experiments on acoustical beats are carried out on a personal computer using standard software for a sound card in a non-canonical way, which provides a useful teaching method for a traditional classroom experiment. (letters and comments)

  18. Operative correction of judoists’ training loads on the base of on-line monitoring of heart beats rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yong Qiang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: ensure increase of effectiveness of training process’s control by means of operative correction of training loads of different qualification judo wrestlers’ heart beats rate indicators. Material: the research was conducted on the base of Brest SCJSOR № 1. Judo wrestlers of different sport qualification (age 17-19 years old, n=15 participated in the research. Monitoring of judo wrestlers’ heart beats rate was carried out with the help of system “Polar”. Results: we have found factorial structure of functional fitness in every profile of sportsmen. Model characteristics of judo wrestlers were supplemented with the most important sides of functional fitness. Analysis of indicators of restoration effectiveness indicators (REI in both groups of judo wrestlers showed high level of organism’s responsiveness to training load of special and power orientation in comparison with speed power load. We have worked out algorithm of operative correction of training loads by indicators of heart beats rate in training process, depending on orientation and intensity of loads’ physiological influence on judo wrestler. Conclusions: Telemetric on-line monitoring of sportsman’s heart beats rate and calculation of REI permit to objectively assess effectiveness of training’s construction and of micro-cycle in total and detect in due time the trend to development of over-loading and failure of adaptation.

  19. How Methodology Decisions Affect the Variability of Schools Identified as Beating the Odds. REL 2015-071.rev

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yasuyo; Weinstock, Phyllis; Chan, Vincent; Meyers, Coby; Gerdeman, R. Dean; Brandt, W. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A number of states and school districts have identified schools that perform better than expected, given the populations they serve, in order to recognize school performance or to learn from local school practices and policies. These schools have been labeled "beating the odds," "high-performing/high-poverty,"…

  20. Sideband and quantum-beat measurements with sup(129m)Te and /sup 57/Co sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voorthuysen, E.H. du Marchie van; Zhang, G.L.; Waard, H. de (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands))

    1983-12-01

    Sideband intensities and quantum beats were measured for recoillessly emitted gamma rays as a function of the vibration frequency of quartz crystals on which sources of sup(129m)Te and /sup 57/Co were deposited. At most frequencies a low degree of coherence of the vibrations of the source nuclei was observed.