WorldWideScience

Sample records for beams department head

  1. 2 February 2010-Bristol University Vice-Chancellor E. Thomas visiting SM18 hall with Beams Department Head P. Collier and Technology Department Senior Engineer R. Veness; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    Caption for photograph 1239013 from left to right: University of Bristol and CMS Collaboration D. Newbold; University of Bristol Team Leader and LHCb Collaboration N. Brook; Bristol University Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Research G. Orpen; Beams Department Head P. Collier; Bristol University Vice-Chancellor E. Thomas;Technology Department Senior Engineer R. Veness in the SM18 hall.

  2. 23rd June 2010 - University of Bristol Head of the Aerospace Engineering Department and Professor of Aerospace Dynamics N. Lieven visiting CERN control centre with Beams Department Head P. Collier, visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with R. Veness and CMS control centre with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli and CMS User J. Goldstein.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2010-01-01

    23rd June 2010 - University of Bristol Head of the Aerospace Engineering Department and Professor of Aerospace Dynamics N. Lieven visiting CERN control centre with Beams Department Head P. Collier, visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with R. Veness and CMS control centre with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli and CMS User J. Goldstein.

  3. 18 January 2011 - The British Royal Academy of Engineering in the LHC tunnel with CMS Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli and Beams Department Head P. Collier; in the CERN Control Centre with P. Collier and LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2011-01-01

    18 January 2011 - The British Royal Academy of Engineering in the LHC tunnel with CMS Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli and Beams Department Head P. Collier; in the CERN Control Centre with P. Collier and LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry.

  4. 9 April 2013 - Minister for Universities and Science United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland D. Willetts in the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton and in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Beams Department Head P. Collier. Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers, Editor at the Communication Group K. Kahle and Beams Department Engineer R. Veness present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    9 April 2013 - Minister for Universities and Science United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland D. Willetts in the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton and in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Beams Department Head P. Collier. Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers, Editor at the Communication Group K. Kahle and Beams Department Engineer R. Veness present.

  5. 1st September 2010 - British Vice-Chancellor, Liverpool University Sir Newby and Lady Newby signing the Guest Book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with P. Cruikshank; accompanied by Beams Department Head P. Collier and Liverpool University T. Bowcock and P. Allport.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    1st September 2010 - British Vice-Chancellor, Liverpool University Sir Newby and Lady Newby signing the Guest Book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with P. Cruikshank; accompanied by Beams Department Head P. Collier and Liverpool University T. Bowcock and P. Allport.

  6. Head of Department of Mechanical Engineering appointed

    OpenAIRE

    Nystrom, Lynn A.

    2004-01-01

    Kenneth S. Ball, professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, will become the head of the Department of Mechanical Engineering in Virginia Tech's College of Engineering Aug. 1.

  7. 7th February 2011 - Scottish Cabinet Secretary for Education and Lifelong Learning M. Russell MSP signing the guest book with Beams Department Head P. Collier and Adviser J. Ellis

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    01-17:Scottish Cabinet Secretary for Education and Lifelong Learning M. Russell MSP signing the guest book with Beams Department Head P. Collier and Adviser J. Ellis 18-22: Teachers and Pupils signing the guest book 23-27: visiting the CERN control centre with P. Collier 28-32: visiting the LHCb underground area 33-74: visitng the ATLAS underground area Other members of the delegation: Chief Scientific Adviser to the Scottish Government and Chair in Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of Aberdeen A. Glover; Assistant Private Secretary M. Gallagher; Associate Director Institute for Gravitational Research, University of Glasgow J.Hough.

  8. Department-Head Leadership for School Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leithwood, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    This review of research was prompted by the widespread belief that at least in a significant number of secondary schools, department heads are an underutilized, if not untapped, source of instructional leadership, the type of leadership critical to secondary-school improvement initiatives. Forty-two methodologically diverse empirical studies were…

  9. Department Heads' Self-Perception of their Leadership Styles at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the self-perception of department heads about their own leadership styles at Jimma University. The study employed descriptive survey method and used quantitative approach. Department heads were source of data. Using availability sampling technique, all 51 department heads ...

  10. 23 April 2010 - Her Majesty’s Ambassador to Switzerland and Liechtenstein, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, S. Gillett CMG CVO, accompanied by Beams Department Head P. Collier, visiting the ATLAS control room with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson, University of Birmingham, D. Charlton and signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    23 April 2010 - Her Majesty’s Ambassador to Switzerland and Liechtenstein, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, S. Gillett CMG CVO, accompanied by Beams Department Head P. Collier, visiting the ATLAS control room with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson, University of Birmingham, D. Charlton and signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

  11. 15 January 2010 - Vice-Chancellor & Chief Executive C. Snowden, University of Surrey, United Kingdom and Mrs Snowden visiting ALICE exhibition and experimental undeground area with Collabortion Spokesperson J. Schukraft and Beams Department Head P. Collier; Signature of the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    15 January 2010 - Vice-Chancellor & Chief Executive C. Snowden, University of Surrey, United Kingdom and Mrs Snowden visiting ALICE exhibition and experimental undeground area with Collabortion Spokesperson J. Schukraft and Beams Department Head P. Collier; Signature of the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  12. Anne-Sylvie Catherin, Head of the Human Resources Department

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Anne-Sylvie Catherin has been appointed Head of the Human Resources Department with effect from 1 August 2009. Mrs Catherin is a lawyer specialized in International Administration and joined CERN in 1996 as legal advisor within the Office of the HR Department Head. After having been promoted to the position of Group Leader responsible for social and statutory conditions in 2000, Mrs Catherin was appointed Deputy of the Head of the Human Resources Department and Group Leader responsible for Strategy, Management and Development from 2005 to date. Since 2005, she has also served as a member of CCP and TREF. In the execution of her mandate as Deputy HR Department Head, Mrs Catherin closely assisted the HR Department Head in the organization of the Department and in devising new HR policies and strategies. She played an instrumental role in the last five-yearly review and in the revision of the Staff Rules and Regulations.

  13. Barbara Ryder to head Department of Computer Science

    OpenAIRE

    Daniilidi, Christina

    2008-01-01

    Barbara G. Ryder, professor of computer science at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, will become the computer science department head at Virginia Tech, starting in fall 2008. She is the first woman to serve as a department head in the history of the nationally ranked College of Engineering.

  14. Measuring How the Head of Department Measures Up: Development of an Evaluation Framework for the Head of Department Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Chad

    2011-01-01

    The head of department position has been an integral role in the organisational structure of colleges and universities for over a hundred years. Recently, many institutions of higher education have called on department heads to provide advancing quality management and leadership to academic units in response to an increasingly complex and…

  15. Limitations due to strong head-on beam-beam interactions (MD 1434)

    CERN Document Server

    Buffat, Xavier; Iadarola, Giovanni; Papadopoulou, Parthena Stefania; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Pellegrini, Dario; Pojer, Mirko; Crockford, Guy; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Trad, Georges; Barranco Garcia, Javier; Pieloni, Tatiana; Tambasco, Claudia; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    The results of an experiment aiming at probing the limitations due to strong head on beam-beam interactions are reported. It is shown that the loss rates significantly increase when moving the working point up and down the diagonal, possibly due to effects of the 10th and/or 14th order resonances. Those limitations are tighter for bunches with larger beam-beam parameters, a maximum total beam-beam tune shift just below 0.02 could be reached.

  16. Simulation of Head-on Beam-Beam Limitations in Future High Energy Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Buffat, Xavier; Florio, Adrien; Pieloni, Tatiana; Tambasco, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The Future Circular Hadron Collider (FCC-hh) project calls for studies in a new regime of beam-beam interactions. While the emittance damping due to synchrotron radiation is still slower than in past or existing lepton colliders, it is significantly larger than in other hadron colliders. The slow reduction of the emittance is profitable for higher luminosity in term of transverse beam size at the interaction points and also to mitigate long-range beam-beam effects, potentially allowing for a reduction of the crossing angle between the beams during the operation. In such conditions, the strength of head-on beam-beam interactions increases, potentially limiting the beam brightness. 4D weak-strong and strong-strong simulations are performed in order to assess these limitations.

  17. Evaluation of Head Trauma Cases in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alim Cokuk

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study, we aimed to determine the epidemiological characteristics, morbidity and mortality rates of patients admitted to the emergency department with head trauma. Material and Methods: In this study, ambulatory and hospitalized patients over the age of 18 brought to the Emergency Department because of head trauma between 01.12.2009 - 31.12.2010 were analyzed retrospectively. Patient data were recorded to standard data entry form. SPSS 17.0 package program was used for statistical analysis of data. The statistical significance level of all tests was p <0.05. Results: 5200 patients were included in this study. The average age of the patients was 39.97 ± 16.66 years. 4682'si patients (90 % were discharged from the emergency department. The most common reason for admission to the emergency department was falls (41.81 % in the discharged patients. 518 (10 % patients were hospitalized. Gender of these patients was 110 female (21:24% and 408 male (78.76%. 256 patients (48.35% were injured as a result of a traffic accident. 201(38.8% of the cerebral CT were reported as normal and 89 (17.2% of the cerebral CT were reported as traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in hospitalized patients. The fracture of lumbar spine (12 % was detected as an additional pathological disease in patients. 75 patients hospitalized because of head trauma (14.5% had died (1.44 % of all patients. Cervical spine fracture was the most common (14 patients, 18.68 % additional pathology in patients who died. Thoracic trauma was detected as the second most common (13 patients, 17.33 % additional pathology. Conclusion: Most of the patients admitted to the emergency department with head injury had a minor trauma. Patients can be discharged from the emergency department after a thorough physical examination and simple medical intervention. Most of the head injury patients admitted to hospital were male. The most common reason of the patients with head injury admitted to

  18. Status of RHIC head-on beam-beam compensation project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W.; Anerella, M.; Beebe, E.; Bruno, D.; Gassner, D.M.; Gu, X.; Gupta, R.C.; Hock, J.; Jain, A.K.; Lambiase, R.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Montag, C.; Oerter, B.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.I.; Raparia, D.; Tan, Y.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, W.

    2011-03-28

    Two electron lenses are under construction for RHIC to partially compensate the head-on beam-beam effect in order to increase both the peak and average luminosities. The final design of the overall system is reported as well as the status of the component design, acquisition, and manufacturing. An overview of the RHIC head-on beam-beam compensation project is given in [1], and more details in [2]. With 2 head-on beam-beam interactions in IP6 and IP8, a third interaction with a low-energy electron beam is added near IP10 to partially compensate the the head-on beam-beam effect. Two electron lenses are under construction, one for each ring. Both will be located in a region common to both beams, but each lens will act only on one beam. With head-on beam-beam compensation up to a factor of two improvement in luminosity is expected together with a polarized source upgrade. The current RHIC polarized proton performance is documented in Ref. [4]. An electron lens (Fig. 1) consists of an DC electron gun, warm solenoids to focus the electron beam during transport, a superconducting main solenoid in which the interaction with the proton beam occurs, steering magnets, a collector, and instrumentation. The main developments in the last year are given below. The experimental program for polarized program at 100 GeV was expected to be finished by the time the electron lenses are commissioned. However, decadal plans by the RHIC experiments STAR and PHENIX show a continuing interest at both 100 GeV and 250 GeV, and a larger proton beam size has been accommodated in the design (Tab. 1). Over the last year beam and lattice parameters were optimized, and RHIC proton lattices are under development for optimized electron lens performance. The effect of the electron lens magnetic structure on the proton beam was evaluated, and found to be correctable. Experiments were done in RHIC and the Tevatron.

  19. Strategies for mitigating the ionization-induced beam head erosion problem in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. An

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Strategies for mitigating ionization-induced beam head erosion in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA are explored when the plasma and the wake are both formed by the transverse electric field of the beam itself. Beam head erosion can occur in a preformed plasma because of a lack of focusing force from the wake at the rising edge (head of the beam due to the finite inertia of the electrons. When the plasma is produced by field ionization from the space charge field of the beam, the head erosion is significantly exacerbated due to the gradual recession (in the beam frame of the 100% ionization contour. Beam particles in front of the ionization front cannot be focused (guided causing them to expand as in vacuum. When they expand, the location of the ionization front recedes such that even more beam particles are completely unguided. Eventually this process terminates the wake formation prematurely, i.e., well before the beam is depleted of its energy. Ionization-induced head erosion can be mitigated by controlling the beam parameters (emittance, charge, and energy and/or the plasma conditions. In this paper we explore how the latter can be optimized so as to extend the beam propagation distance and thereby increase the energy gain. In particular we show that, by using a combination of the alkali atoms of the lowest practical ionization potential (Cs for plasma formation and a precursor laser pulse to generate a narrow plasma filament in front of the beam, the head erosion rate can be dramatically reduced. Simulation results show that in the upcoming “two-bunch PWFA experiments” on the FACET facility at SLAC national accelerator laboratory the energy gain of the trailing beam can be up to 10 times larger for the given parameters when employing these techniques. Comparison of the effect of beam head erosion in preformed and ionization produced plasmas is also presented.

  20. Head-on and long-range beam-beam tune shift spread in the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, G.

    1993-01-01

    The head-on and long-range incoherent tune shifts for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) are estimated using the numerical integration of the analytical expression coming from the first order in the perturbation strength. The variation of the tune shift as a function of the displacements of the charged particle in the vertical and horizontal planes is studied with the nominal parameters for the SSC. A scaling expression is obtained for the parameters involved in the beam-beam tune shifts, which allows the author to predict the effect in the incoherent tune shift spread under changes in these parameters

  1. Head Trauma Patients Presented To Emergency Department; an Epidemiologic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Arash Forouzan; Kambiz Masoumi; Hassan Motamed; Alireza Teimouri; Hassan Barzegari; Behzad Zohrevandi; Fatemeh Rasouli

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Traumatic brain injuries are among the most important causes of mortality and disability. Since there is a lot of controversy regarding discharge of head trauma patients, especially those with mild traumatic brain injuries, this study was designed aiming to evaluate traumatic brain injuries from an epidemiologic point of view. Methods: In this retrospective cross-sectional study, patients with isolated head trauma, and all those who underwent computed tomography (CT) were includ...

  2. Clarifying the Coaching Roles: Principal, Department Head, Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, James

    1991-01-01

    Coaching occurs in many fields, including music, drama, and various sports activities. Building a "coaching" metaphor might help clarify differences in coaching roles that principals and teachers find confusing. Most head coaches recognize that responsible evaluation is more helpful than absolute power in helping each player be the best…

  3. Head Trauma Patients Presented To Emergency Department; an Epidemiologic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Forouzan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic brain injuries are among the most important causes of mortality and disability. Since there is a lot of controversy regarding discharge of head trauma patients, especially those with mild traumatic brain injuries, this study was designed aiming to evaluate traumatic brain injuries from an epidemiologic point of view. Methods: In this retrospective cross-sectional study, patients with isolated head trauma, and all those who underwent computed tomography (CT were included using convenience sampling. Demographic data and final diagnosis of the patients were extracted from their medical profile, and were analyzed using SPSS 21 and appropriate statistical tests. Results: 786 patients with the mean age of 24 ± 16.8 years (range: 0.5 – 75 were evaluated (67.8% male. 42 patients (5.3% had abnormal CT scan and were hospitalized. 7 of them (16.7% of hospitalized, 3.3% of low-risk, and 0.9% of all patients were in the group categorized as low-risk regarding probability of brain injuries. 12 (1.5% participants needed surgery, 2 of which (0.9% were initially categorized as low-risk. Vomiting was significantly more in patients with abnormal CT scan (45.2% compared to those who had normal CT scan (19.6% (p = 0.0001. No significant difference was detected between the 2 groups in other symptoms. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that by making decisions based on clinical findings alone, there is a probability of about 3.3% error in management of head trauma patients. In addition, 0.9% of the patients initially categorized as low-risk, needed surgical intervention in the end.

  4. Leadership Style Head of Polytechnic Department and Regard with to Work Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamaludin, Nur Hasliza Binti; Naim, Nor Azlin Binti; Khamis, Nur Azzarina Binti; Zakaria, Normah Binti

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to look at the leadership style of the heads of departments in technical education and its relationship to the work culture among lecturers Polytechnic Sultan Abdul Halim Mu'adzam Shah in Jitra, Kedah. This research is very important to the head of polytechnic and lecture to work in the good condition with the good leadership. This…

  5. Richard C. Benson, Penn State department head, to lead College of Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Hincker, Lawrence

    2005-01-01

    University Provost Mark C. McNamee announces the appointment of Richard C. Benson, as Virginia Tech's next dean of the College of Engineering. Benson currently heads the Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering at Penn State University.

  6. Head injuries in youth soccer players presenting to the emergency department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, W; Streight, S; Simpson, K; Brison, R; Cusimano, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: There has been recent concern about neuropsychological injuries experienced by soccer players, particularly related to the purposeful heading of the ball. There are few population based analyses examining whether this is a legitimate concern. Objectives: To explore, using an existing injury surveillance system, one of many parts of this issue: acute injuries requiring emergency medical care experienced by youth soccer players. Methods: Descriptive epidemiological analysis of emergency department injury surveillance data (1996–2001) for youths aged 10–24 years from the Kingston sites of the Canadian Hospital Injury Reporting and Prevention Program. Results: A total of 1714 cases of soccer injury were identified (mean 286 a year); 235 (13.7%) involved diagnoses of injuries to the head. Leading mechanical factors resulting in head injury were contact with other players or persons (153/235; 65.1%) and balls (62/235; 26.4%). Heading was reported in 4/62 (6%) of the ball contact injuries, and attempted heading was reported in 15/153 (9.8%) of the cases involving person to person contact. Unspecified head to head contact between players was reported in 39 cases. Conclusions: Minor head injuries that result in emergency medical treatment do not happen often in youth soccer, and very few can be attributed to the purposeful heading of the ball. Player contact injuries appear to be a more important injury control concern. This study informs one of many aspects of the soccer heading injury debate. PMID:15793093

  7. Emittance Growth of the LHC Beam due to the Effect of Head-on Beam-Beam Interaction and Ground Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, T

    2000-01-01

    The influence of ground motion on the LHC beam is estimated by applying the existing theories of particle diffusion due to a weak-strong beam-beam collision with random offset at the interaction point. Noise at odd harmonics of the betatron frequency contributes significantly to particle diffusion. Extrapolating the characteristics of the random offset from the ground motion spectrum at the LHC site shows a fast fall-off with frequency and the amplitude is very small even at the first harmonic. We find that the head-on beam-beam force in the weak-strong approximation and ground motion by themselves do not induce significant diffusion over the lifetime of the beam.

  8. Cross-wake force and correlated head-tail instability in beam-beam collisions with a large crossing angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroo, Nami; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Oide, Katsunobu; Zhou, Demin; Zimmermann, Frank

    2018-03-01

    This paper discusses novel coherent beam-beam instability in collisions with a large crossing angle. The instability appears in the correlated head-tail motion of two colliding beams. A cross-wake force, which is localized at the collision point, is introduced to represent the head-tail correlation between colliding beams. A mode-coupling theory based on this localized cross-wake force enables us to explain the correlated heal-tail instability. The use of a collision scheme with a large crossing angle is becoming popular in the design of electron-positron colliders. An example thereof is the SuperKEKB project, in which a collision with a large crossing angle is performed to boost the luminosity to 0.8 ×1036 cm-2 s-1 . Future circular colliders will also be designed with a large crossing angle. Strong-strong simulations, which have shown the first coherent head-tail instability, can limit the performance of proposed future colliders. The mechanism whereby this instability occurs is mode coupling due to the cross-wake force. This instability may affect all collider designs based on the crab waist scheme.

  9. Read/write characteristics of focused-ion-beam-etched heads for perpendicular magnetic recording media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboi, S.; Matsutera, H.; Ishi, T.; Ishiwata, N.; Ohashi, K.

    2001-01-01

    The read/write characteristics for perpendicular magnetic recording media of focused-ion-beam (FIB)-etched recording heads were investigated. It was found that the trailing edge of an FIB-etched head produces a higher gradient in the magnetic field perpendicular to the medium than a head which has not been etched. The signal-to-noise ratio of the medium increased with the FIB-etched write gap. A high-Bs and thin pole increased the magnetic field's gradient in the perpendicular direction, resulting in excellent read/write characteristics

  10. An Exploratory Study of the Conflict Management Styles of Department Heads in a Research University Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Christine A.; Algert, Nancy E.

    2007-01-01

    Conflict in the university setting is an inherent component of academic life. Leaders spend more than 40% of their time managing conflict. Department heads are in a unique position--they encounter conflict from individuals they manage and from others to whom they report such as a senior administrator in the position of dean. There are very few…

  11. Training Programmes for Heads of Academic Departments at the University of Oslo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Lis

    1989-01-01

    A discussion of the University of Oslo's training programs for department heads describes their design, content, frequency, and methods. These administrators' roles are examined and the importance of higher level support of the programs is stressed. Reluctance to participate and special problems in applying content of the programs are discussed.…

  12. Identifying the Training Needs of Heads of Department in a Newly Established University in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Lan Huong

    2012-01-01

    Although middle-level academic managers really need training in order to perform their roles adequately in the very changing context of higher education, little formal training is provided, particularly in less developed countries. This paper identifies the training needs of Heads of Department in a newly established university in Vietnam as a…

  13. Comparing the Leadership Styles of Two Heads of Department at Carnelian School: Comparative Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parascandalo, Marthese

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to compare and contrast the Leadership Styles of two Heads of Department who work at Carnelian Secondary School (anonymized). It augments a previous paper (Parascandalo 2011) which examined the role of the middle leader in secondary schools in educational literature. The investigation by means of two…

  14. The Epidemiology of Pediatric Head Injury Treated Outside of Hospital Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogg, Cheryl K; Haring, R Sterling; Xu, Likang; Canner, Joseph K; AlSulaim, Hatim A; Hashmi, Zain G; Salim, Ali; Engineer, Lilly D; Haider, Adil H; Bell, Jeneita M; Schneider, Eric B

    2018-03-01

    Although head trauma-related deaths, hospitalizations, and emergency department visits are well characterized, few studies describe pediatric patients presenting outside of emergency departments. We compared the epidemiology and extent of healthcare-seeking pediatric (0-17 years) patients presenting in outpatient settings with those of patients seeking nonhospitalized emergency department care. We used MarketScan Medicaid and commercial claims, 2004-2013, to identify patients managed in two outpatient settings (physician's offices/clinics, urgent care) and the emergency department. We then examined differences in demographic and injury-specific factors, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-defined head trauma diagnoses, the extent of and reasons for post-index visit ambulatory care use within 30/90/180 days, and annual and monthly variations in head trauma trends. Outpatient incidence rates in 2013 provided estimates of the nationwide US outpatient burden. A total of 1,683,097 index visits were included, representing a nationwide burden in 2013 of 844,660 outpatient cases, a number that encompassed 51% of healthcare-seeking head trauma that year and that substantially increased in magnitude from 2004 to 2013. Two-thirds (68%) were managed in outpatient settings. While demographic distributions varied with index-visit location, injury-specific factors were comparable. Seasonal spikes appeared to coincide with school sports. There is an urgent need to better understand the natural history of head trauma in the >800,000 pediatric patients presenting each year for outpatient care. These outpatient injuries, which are more than double the number of head trauma cases recorded in the hospital-affiliated settings, illustrate the potential importance of expanding inclusion criteria in surveillance and prevention efforts designed to address this critical issue.

  15. A survey of techniques to reduce and manage external beam radiation-induced xerostomia in British oncology and radiotherapy departments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macknelly, Andrew [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital (United Kingdom); Day, Jane [Faculty of Health, Wellbeing and Science, University Campus Suffolk, Waterfront Building, Neptune Quay, Ipswich (United Kingdom)], E-mail: j.day@ucs.ac.uk

    2009-11-15

    Xerostomia is the most common side effect of external beam radiotherapy to the head and neck [Anand A, Jain J, Negi P, Chaudhoory A, Sinha S, Choudhury P, et-al. Can dose reduction to one parotid gland prevent xerostomia? - A feasibility study for locally advanced head and neck cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical Oncology 2006;18(6):497-504.]. A survey was carried out in British oncology departments to determine what treatment regimes, to minimise xerostomia, are used for patients with head-and-neck cancers treated with external beam radiotherapy. A semi-structured questionnaire consisting of both quantitative and qualitative questions was designed that asked departments which of the identified methods they used, why a method might not be currently employed, and whether its use had ever been considered. The study found that there are wide disparities between the techniques employed by oncology departments to avoid and reduce xerostomia in patients with cancers of the head and neck. The National Institute of Clinical Health and Excellence, [National Institute for Clinical Health and Excellence (NICE). Improving outcomes in head and neck cancers: the manual. London: Office of Public Sector Information; 2004.] for example, recommends that patients are given dental care and dietary advice but some departments did not appear to be doing this. Less than half of departments stated that they offer complementary therapies and less than 40% prescribed pilocarpine, a saliva-stimulant. Only two respondents stated that they use amifostine, a radioprotector, during radiotherapy treatment to the head and neck. The results also suggested a move toward using Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) for treating head-and-neck cancers which offers better normal tissue sparing than three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. [Anand A, Jain J, Negi P, Chaudhoory A, Sinha S, Choudhury P, et al. Can dose reduction to one parotid gland prevent xerostomia

  16. A survey of techniques to reduce and manage external beam radiation-induced xerostomia in British oncology and radiotherapy departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macknelly, Andrew; Day, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Xerostomia is the most common side effect of external beam radiotherapy to the head and neck [Anand A, Jain J, Negi P, Chaudhoory A, Sinha S, Choudhury P, et-al. Can dose reduction to one parotid gland prevent xerostomia? - A feasibility study for locally advanced head and neck cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical Oncology 2006;18(6):497-504.]. A survey was carried out in British oncology departments to determine what treatment regimes, to minimise xerostomia, are used for patients with head-and-neck cancers treated with external beam radiotherapy. A semi-structured questionnaire consisting of both quantitative and qualitative questions was designed that asked departments which of the identified methods they used, why a method might not be currently employed, and whether its use had ever been considered. The study found that there are wide disparities between the techniques employed by oncology departments to avoid and reduce xerostomia in patients with cancers of the head and neck. The National Institute of Clinical Health and Excellence, [National Institute for Clinical Health and Excellence (NICE). Improving outcomes in head and neck cancers: the manual. London: Office of Public Sector Information; 2004.] for example, recommends that patients are given dental care and dietary advice but some departments did not appear to be doing this. Less than half of departments stated that they offer complementary therapies and less than 40% prescribed pilocarpine, a saliva-stimulant. Only two respondents stated that they use amifostine, a radioprotector, during radiotherapy treatment to the head and neck. The results also suggested a move toward using Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) for treating head-and-neck cancers which offers better normal tissue sparing than three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. [Anand A, Jain J, Negi P, Chaudhoory A, Sinha S, Choudhury P, et al. Can dose reduction to one parotid gland prevent xerostomia

  17. Compensation of head-on beam-beam induced resonance driving terms and tune spread in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Fischer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A head-on beam-beam compensation scheme was implemented for operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC at Brookhaven National Laboratory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 264801 (2015PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.115.264801]. The compensation consists of electron lenses for the reduction of the beam-beam induced tune spread, and a lattice for the minimization of beam-beam generated resonance driving terms. We describe the implementations of the lattice and electron lenses, and report on measurements of lattice properties and the effect of the electron lenses on the hadron beam.

  18. Performance of Focused Ion Beam Trimmed Yoke-Type Magnetoresistive Heads for Magnetic Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips, G.N.; Eisenberg, M.; Eisenberg, Martin; Draaisma, Eddie A.; Abelmann, Leon; Lodder, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Thin-film yoke-type magnetoresistive (MR) tape heads with eight channels have been used for scanning mag-netoresistance microscopy. The NiFe read flux guides of the channels have been trimmed down from 12 um to widths varying between 5 um and 100 nm by focused ion-beam milling with Ga+ions. The

  19. Matching extended-SSD electron beams to multileaf collimated photon beams in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel, Jared; Stewart, Allan; Satory, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Matching the penumbra of a 6 MeV electron beam to the penumbra of a 6 MV photon beam is a dose optimization challenge, especially when the electron beam is applied from an extended source-to-surface distance (SSD), as in the case of some head and neck treatments. Traditionally low melting point alloy blocks have been used to define the photon beam shielding over the spinal cord region. However, these are inherently time consuming to construct and employ in the clinical situation. Multileaf collimators (MLCs) provide a fast and reproducible shielding option but generate geometrically nonconformal approximations to the desired beam edge definition. The effects of substituting Cerrobend for the MLC shielding mode in the context of beam matching with extended-SSD electron beams are the subject of this investigation. Methods: Relative dose beam data from a Varian EX 2100 linear accelerator were acquired in a water tank under the 6 MeV electron beam at both standard and extended-SSD and under the 6 MV photon beam defined by Cerrobend and a number of MLC stepping regimes. The effect of increasing the electron beam SSD on the beam penumbra was assessed. MLC stepping was also assessed in terms of the effects on both the mean photon beam penumbra and the intraleaf dose-profile nonuniformity relative to the MLC midleaf. Computational techniques were used to combine the beam data so as to simulate composite relative dosimetry in the water tank, allowing fine control of beam abutment gap variation. Idealized volumetric dosimetry was generated based on the percentage depth-dose data for the beam modes and the abutment geometries involved. Comparison was made between each composite dosimetry dataset and the relevant ideal dosimetry dataset by way of subtraction. Results: Weighted dose-difference volume histograms (DDVHs) were produced, and these, in turn, summed to provide an overall dosimetry score for each abutment and shielding type/angle combination. Increasing the

  20. Investigating the management information needs of academic Heads of Department: a Critical Success Factors approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Green

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a research project in the Department of Information Studies at the University of Sheffield. With funding from the British Library Research and Development Department a critical success factors-based investigation of the management information needs of academic Heads of Department in an number of English universities was undertaken in 1994/1995, following publication of the results of a pilot study byPellow and Wilson (1993. Senior academic staff, university administrators and librarians in sixteen universities were interviewed between December, 1994 and March, 1995. Collation of data and analysis of results have been completed

  1. Communication skills of heads of departments: verbal, listening, and feedback skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Yadollah; Barati, Majid

    2011-11-04

    Managers' communication skills are one of the most important topics in educational sector of universities of medical sciences and may have considerable effect on faculty members and employees. This study was per-formed to determine the level of communication skills (verbal, listening, feed-back) of the heads of department of faculties and its relation with some demo-graphic variables. This cross-sectional study was conducted from June 2009 to January 2010. We enrolled all of the heads of departments (N=60) in Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, western Iran. The participants received a self-administered 24-item questionnaire in Likert format (six general items and 18 items related to communication skills). Data were analyzed with SPSS software using Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests. The average scores of verbal, listening and feedback communication were 22.5, 16.1 and 21.1, respectively. Accordingly, 78.3% of participants in verbal communication, 16.7% in listening communication and 73.3% in feedback communication had high status. There were significant differences between the average score of listening skills and age (P=0.013) as well as gender (P=0.042). In addition, there was a significant statistical difference between verbal skills and gender (P=0.021). The overall communication skills of more than half of the heads of departments were moderate. This needs designing some programs for improving department managers' communication skills.

  2. Minor Head Trauma in the Pediatric Emergency Department: Decision Making Nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrangelo, Mario; Midulla, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Minor head trauma is one of the leading causes of accessing pediatric emergency departments; however, only a limited number of patients develops clinically relevant brain injuries. The aim of this review is to provide physicians a clinical pathway for managing pediatric minor head trauma. A Pubmed/Medline search was conducted through the following entries: "minor head trauma", "mild head trauma", "minor head injury", "mild head injury" or "acute head trauma". All the studies including pediatric samples between 2000 and 2015 were considered for a critical review. A few articles written before 2000 were analyzed for their relevance. The Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) algorithm identified children with a very low risk for clinically relevant brain injuries (normal mental status, no loss of consciousness, no vomiting, non-severe injury mechanism, no signs of basilar skull fracture, no severe headache, no evident clinical worsening over time and no multiple symptoms) and offered the only validated clinical prediction rule to select candidates for CT scans. Other proposed clinical prediction rules (including NEXUS II, CHALICE and CATCH), that were not validated, have a lower sensitivity than PECARN algorithm. Skull X-ray, cerebral magnetic resonance and cranial ultrasonography could provide useful information in selected cases. The critical use of PECARN rule represents the best validated clinical tool for the early identification of children with a clinically relevant brain injury. Its application should be integrated with physician experience and judgement, parental compliance and clinical observation. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy of flux beam formation in hard disk write heads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkass, Robert A. J.; Spicer, Timothy M.; Burgos Parra, Erick; Hicken, Robert J.; Bashir, Muhammad A.; Gubbins, Mark A.; Czoschke, Peter J.; Lopusnik, Radek

    2016-01-01

    To meet growing data storage needs, the density of data stored on hard disk drives must increase. In pursuit of this aim, the magnetodynamics of the hard disk write head must be characterized and understood, particularly the process of “flux beaming.” In this study, seven different configurations of perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) write heads were imaged using time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy, revealing their detailed dynamic magnetic state during the write process. It was found that the precise position and number of driving coils can significantly alter the formation of flux beams during the write process. These results are applicable to the design and understanding of current PMR and next-generation heat-assisted magnetic recording devices, as well as being relevant to other magnetic devices.

  4. Metal Artifact Reduction in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Head and Neck Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpics, Mark; Johnson, Paul; Patel, Rakesh; Surucu, Murat; Choi, Mehee; Emami, Bahman; Roeske, John C

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate a method for reducing metal artifacts, arising from dental fillings, on cone-beam computed tomography images. A projection interpolation algorithm is applied to cone-beam computed tomography images containing metal artifacts from dental fillings. This technique involves identifying metal regions in individual cone-beam computed tomography projections and interpolating the surrounding values to remove the metal from the projection data. Axial cone-beam computed tomography images are then reconstructed, resulting in a reduction in the streak artifacts produced by the metal. Both phantom and patient imaging data are used to evaluate this technique. The interpolation substitution technique successfully reduced metal artifacts in all cases. Corrected images had fewer or no streak artifacts compared to their noncorrected counterparts. Quantitatively, regions of interest containing the artifacts showed reduced variance in the corrected images versus the uncorrected images. Average pixel values in regions of interest around the metal object were also closer in value to nonmetal regions after artifact reduction. Artifact correction tended to perform better on patient images with less complex metal objects versus those with multiple large dental fillings. The interpolation substitution is potentially an efficient and effective technique for reducing metal artifacts caused by dental fillings on cone-beam computed tomography image. This technique may be effective in reducing such artifacts in patients with head and neck cancer receiving daily image-guided radiotherapy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies: Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    This memorandum, issued on February 22, 2013 by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and directed to the heads of executive departments and agencies, calls for all federal agencies that are engaged in research and developmen...

  6. A solution to the shortage of nursing faculty: awareness and understanding of the leadership style of the nursing department head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Daria M; Martin, Barbara N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine if there was a relationship between the leadership style of the nursing department head and the level of professional satisfaction and organizational commitment by nursing faculty members. The survey instrument was designed to measure the department heads' leadership style as perceived by the nursing faculty and assess the nursing faculty members' level of professional satisfaction and organizational commitment. Five schools of nursing in 2 Midwestern states, with a total of 52 full-time baccalaureate nursing faculty, were the focus of the inquiry. Findings support statistically significant relationships between the 3 variables of department head leadership, organizational commitment, and professional satisfaction. Implications for leadership style exhibited by the nursing department head are discussed.

  7. Radiation dose evaluation of dental cone beam computed tomography using an anthropomorphic adult head phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jay; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Ho, Chang-hung; Liu, Yan-Lin; Chang, Yuan-Jen; Min Chao, Max; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2014-11-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides high-resolution tomographic images and has been gradually used in clinical practice. Thus, it is important to examine the amount of radiation dose resulting from dental CBCT examinations. In this study, we developed an in-house anthropomorphic adult head phantom to evaluate the level of effective dose. The anthropomorphic phantom was made of acrylic and filled with plaster to replace the bony tissue. The contour of the head was extracted from a set of adult computed tomography (CT) images. Different combinations of the scanning parameters of CBCT were applied. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the absorbed doses at 19 locations in the head and neck regions. The effective doses measured using the proposed phantom at 65, 75, and 85 kVp in the D-mode were 72.23, 100.31, and 134.29 μSv, respectively. In the I-mode, the effective doses were 108.24, 190.99, and 246.48 μSv, respectively. The maximum percent error between the doses measured by the proposed phantom and the Rando phantom was l4.90%. Therefore, the proposed anthropomorphic adult head phantom is applicable for assessing the radiation dose resulting from clinical dental CBCT.

  8. Curriculum leadership in action : A tale of four community college Heads of Department leading a curriculum development project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albashiry, N.M.; Voogt, J.M.; Pieters, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    College Heads of Department (HoDs) are increasingly expected to perform more curriculum-leadership tasks, maintaining and advancing the department curriculum, especially in developing countries. However, in practice, HoDs are reported to pay little attention to this aspect of their job due to

  9. Curriculum Leadership in Action: A Tale of Four Community College Heads of Department Leading a Curriculum Development Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albashiry, Nabeel M.; Voogt, Joke M.; Pieters, Jules M.

    2016-01-01

    College Heads of Department (HoDs) are increasingly expected to perform more curriculum-leadership tasks, maintaining and advancing the department curriculum, especially in developing countries. However, in practice, HoDs are reported to pay little attention to this aspect of their job due to several factors--one of which is a lack of professional…

  10. Guardian availability in children evaluated in the emergency department for blunt head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, James F; Holubkov, Richard; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2009-01-01

    Enrolling children in research studies in the emergency department (ED) is typically dependent on the presence of a guardian to provide written informed consent. The objectives were to determine the rate of guardian availability during the initial ED evaluation of children with nontrivial blunt head trauma, to identify the reasons why a guardian is unavailable, and to compare clinical factors in patients with and without a guardian present during initial ED evaluation. This was a prospective study of children (guardian during the initial ED evaluation. For those children for whom the guardian was not available during the initial ED evaluation, the physicians completing the data forms documented the reasons for the absence. The authors enrolled 602 patients, of whom 271 (45%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 41% to 49%) did not have a guardian available during the initial ED evaluation. In these 271 patients, 261 had reasons documented for lack of guardian availability, 43 of whom had multiple reasons. The most common of these was that the guardian did not ride in the ambulance (51%). Those patients without a guardian available were more likely to be older (mean age, 11.4 years vs. 7.6 years; p guardian presence. Nearly one-half of children with nontrivial blunt head trauma evaluated in the ED may not have a guardian available during their initial ED evaluation. Patients whose guardians are not available at the time of initial ED evaluation are older and have more severe mechanisms of injury and more serious head trauma. ED research studies of pediatric trauma patients that require written informed consent from a guardian at the time of initial ED evaluation and treatment may have difficulty enrolling targeted sample size numbers and will likely be limited by enrollment bias.

  11. Critical appraisal of a conformal head and neck cancer irradiation avoiding electron beams and field matching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogliata, Antonella; Cozzi, Luca; Bieri, Sabine; Bernier, Jacques

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: In head and neck cancer patients, spinal chains are usually irradiated by a combination of photon and electron beams, requiring high precision in field matching. This study compares a conventional treatment approach where two lateral photon beams are combined to direct electron fields, to a conformal radiotherapy based on five photon fields, covering the whole neck. Methods and Materials: A comparative analysis of dose distributions and dose-volume histograms was carried out in patients with locally advanced head and neck tumors, for which planning target volumes (PTV) were outlined from the base of the skull down to the supraclavicular region. The prescribed dose to PTV (excluding booster irradiation) was 54 Gy, with spinal dose constraint not exceeding 75% of the total dose, whatever the technique. Results: For the new five-field technique, minimum and maximum point doses showed mean deviations, on five patients entered in the study, of 84% and 113% from the ICRU prescription point. In the conventional treatment, the corresponding figures were 73% and 112%, respectively. A positioning error analysis (isocenter displacement of 2 mm, in all directions) did not elicit any systematic difference in five-field treatment plans while hot spots were found with electron fields. Conclusions: The five-field technique appears routinely feasible and compares favorably with the conventional mixed photon- and electron-therapy approach, especially in regard to its better compliance with dose homogeneity requirements and a reduced risk in dose inhomogeneity related to field matching and patient positioning

  12. [Mild head injury in children and adults. Diagnostic challenges in the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidel, B A; Lindner, T; Wolf, S; Bogner, V; Steinbeck, A; Börner, N; Peiser, C; Audebert, H J; Biberthaler, P; Kanz, K-G

    2015-01-01

    Mild head injuries are one of the most frequent reasons for attending emergency departments and are particularly challenging in different ways. While clinically important injuries are infrequent, delayed or missed injuries may lead to fatal consequences. The initial mostly inconspicuous appearance may not reflect the degree of intracranial injury and computed tomography (CT) is necessary to rule out covert injuries. Furthermore, infants and young children with a lack of or rudimentary cognitive and language development are challenging, especially for those examiners not familiar with pediatric care. Established check lists of clinical risk factors for children and adults regarding traumatic brain injuries allow specific and rational decision-making for cranial CT imaging. Clinically important intracranial injuries can be reliably detected and unnecessary radiation exposure avoided at the same time.

  13. [Mild head injury in children and adults: Diagnostic challenges in the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidel, B A; Lindner, T; Wolf, S; Bogner, V; Steinbeck, A; Börner, N; Peiser, C; Audebert, H J; Biberthaler, P; Kanz, K-G

    2015-06-01

    Mild head injuries are one of the most frequent reasons for attending emergency departments and are particularly challenging in different ways. While clinically important injuries are infrequent, delayed or missed injuries may lead to fatal consequences. The initial mostly inconspicuous appearance may not reflect the degree of intracranial injury and computed tomography (CT) is necessary to rule out covert injuries. Furthermore, infants and young children with a lack of or rudimentary cognitive and language development are challenging, especially for those examiners not familiar with pediatric care. Established check lists of clinical risk factors for children and adults regarding traumatic brain injuries allow specific and rational decision-making for cranial CT imaging. Clinically important intracranial injuries can be reliably detected and unnecessary radiation exposure avoided at the same time.

  14. Sir William Burnett (1779-1861), professional head of the Royal Naval Medical Department and entrepreneur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Christopher

    2004-08-01

    Sir William Burnett (1779-1861) had an active career as a Royal Navy surgeon in the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, including service at the battles of St Vincent, the Nile and Trafalgar. From 1822 to 1855 he was professional head of the Royal Naval Medical Department, when he provided effective leadership in a time of great change. Although his official work earned him the reputation of a "hard-working, unimaginative, somewhat harsh man", his correspondence shows a very humane centre under the official carapace. His official performance and reputation were both eroded towards the end of his career by his determined promotion of zinc chloride, for which he held lucrative patents.

  15. Treatment of Head and Neck Paragangliomas With External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupin, Charles, E-mail: c.dupin@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Department of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Institut Bergonié, Bordeaux (France); Lang, Philippe [Department of Radiotherapy, Pitié Salpétrière, Paris (France); Dessard-Diana, Bernadette [Department of Radiotherapy, Hopital Européen Georges Pompidou, Paris (France); Simon, Jean-Marc; Cuenca, Xavier; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Feuvret, Loïc [Department of Radiotherapy, Pitié Salpétrière, Paris (France)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess the outcomes of radiation therapy in patients with head and neck paragangliomas. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2009, 66 patients with 81 head and neck paragangliomas were treated by conventional external beam radiation therapy in 25 fractions at a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 41.4-68 Gy). One case was malignant. The median gross target volume and planning target volume were 30 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.9-243 cm{sup 3}) and 116 cm{sup 3} (range, 24-731 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Median age was 57.4 years (range, 15-84 years). Eleven patients had multicentric lesions, and 8 had family histories of paraganglioma. Paragangliomas were located in the temporal bone, the carotid body, and the glomus vagal in 51, 18, and 10 patients, respectively. Forty-six patients had exclusive radiation therapy, and 20 had salvage radiation therapy. The median follow-up was 4.1 years (range, 0.1-21.2 years). Results: One patient had a recurrence of temporal bone paraganglioma 8 years after treatment. The actuarial local control rates were 100% at 5 years and 98.7% at 10 years. Patients with multifocal tumors and family histories were significantly younger (42 years vs 58 years [P=.002] and 37 years vs 58 years [P=.0003], respectively). The association between family predisposition and multifocality was significant (P<.001). Two patients had cause-specific death within the 6 months after irradiation. During radiation therapy, 9 patients required hospitalization for weight loss, nausea, mucositis, or ophthalmic zoster. Two late vascular complications occurred (middle cerebral artery and carotid stenosis), and 2 late radiation-related meningiomas appeared 15 and 18 years after treatment. Conclusion: Conventional external beam radiation therapy is an effective and safe treatment option that achieves excellent local control; it should be considered as a first-line treatment of choice for head and neck paragangliomas.

  16. Clinical implementation of intraoperative cone-beam CT in head and neck surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, M. J.; Chan, H.; Nithiananthan, S.; Qiu, J.; Barker, E.; Bachar, G.; Dixon, B. J.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-03-01

    A prototype mobile C-arm for cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been translated to a prospective clinical trial in head and neck surgery. The flat-panel CBCT C-arm was developed in collaboration with Siemens Healthcare, and demonstrates both sub-mm spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility at low radiation dose (e.g., <1/5th of a typical diagnostic head CT). CBCT images are available ~15 seconds after scan completion (~1 min acquisition) and reviewed at bedside using custom 3D visualization software based on the open-source Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK). The CBCT C-arm has been successfully deployed in 15 head and neck cases and streamlined into the surgical environment using human factors engineering methods and expert feedback from surgeons, nurses, and anesthetists. Intraoperative imaging is implemented in a manner that maintains operating field sterility, reduces image artifacts (e.g., carbon fiber OR table) and minimizes radiation exposure. Image reviews conducted with surgical staff indicate bony detail and soft-tissue visualization sufficient for intraoperative guidance, with additional artifact management (e.g., metal, scatter) promising further improvements. Clinical trial deployment suggests a role for intraoperative CBCT in guiding complex head and neck surgical tasks, including planning mandible and maxilla resection margins, guiding subcranial and endonasal approaches to skull base tumours, and verifying maxillofacial reconstruction alignment. Ongoing translational research into complimentary image-guidance subsystems include novel methods for real-time tool tracking, fusion of endoscopic video and CBCT, and deformable registration of preoperative volumes and planning contours with intraoperative CBCT.

  17. 28 October 2013- Former US Vice President A. Gore signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry, Head of International Relations R. Voss, Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and CMS Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    28 October 2013- Former US Vice President A. Gore signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry, Head of International Relations R. Voss, Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and CMS Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela.

  18. Radiology resident evaluation of head CT scan orders in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erly, William K; Berger, William G; Krupinski, Elizabeth; Seeger, Joachim F; Guisto, John A

    2002-01-01

    Prior studies have revealed little difference in residents' abilities to interpret cranial CT scans. The purpose of this study was to assess the performance of radiology residents at different levels of training in the interpretation of emergency head CT images. Radiology residents prospectively interpreted 1324 consecutive head CT scans ordered in the emergency department at the University of Arizona Health Science Center. The residents completed a preliminary interpretation form that included their interpretation and confidence in that interpretation. One of five neuroradiologists with a Certificate of Added Qualification subsequently interpreted the images and classified their assessment of the residents' interpretations as follows: "agree," "disagree-insignificant," or "disagree-significant." The data were analyzed by using analysis-of-variance or chi-squared methods. Overall, the agreement rate was 91%; the insignificant disagreement rate, 7%; and the significant disagreement rate, 2%. The level of training had a significant (P =.032) effect on the rate of agreement; upper-level residents had higher rates of agreement than those of more junior residents. There were 62 false-negative findings. The most commonly missed findings were fractures (n = 18) and chronic ischemic foci (n = 12). The most common false-positive interpretations involved 10 suspected intracranial hemorrhages and suspected fractures. The level of resident training has a significant effect on the rate of disagreement between the preliminary interpretations of emergency cranial CT scans by residents and the final interpretations by neuroradiologists. Efforts to reduce residents' errors should focus on the identification of fractures and signs of chronic ischemic change.

  19. Application of headed studs in steel fiber reinforced cementitious composite slab of steel beam-column connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Cui; Nakashima, Masayoshi

    2012-03-01

    Steel fiber reinforced cementitous composites (SFRCC) is a promising material with high strength in both compression and tension compared with normal concrete. The ductility is also greatly improved because of 6% volume portion of straight steel fibers. A steel beam-column connection with Steel fiber reinforced cementitous composites (SFRCC) slab diaphragms is proposed to overcome the damage caused by the weld. The push-out test results suggested that the application of SFRCC promises larger shear forces transferred through headed studs allocated in a small area in the slab. Finite element models were developed to simulate the behavior of headed studs. The failure mechanism of the grouped arrangement is further discussed based on a series of parametric analysis. In the proposed connection, the SFRCC slab is designed as an exterior diaphragm to transfer the beam flange load to the column face. The headed studs are densely arranged on the beam flange to connect the SFRCC slab diaphragms and steel beams. The seismic performance and failure mechanism of the SFRCC slab diaphragm beam-column connection were investigated based on the cyclic loading test. Beam hinge mechanism was achieved at the end of the SFRCC slab diaphragm by using sufficient studs and appropriate rebars in the SFRCC slab.

  20. Profile of Head and Neck Cancer Patients at Department of Otorhinolaringology-Head and Neck Surgery Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inez Aulia Rakhmawulan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Head and neck cancer is a health problem with a high mortality rate. Head and neck cancer are increasing and effect many individuals from diverse backgrounds. Usually patients come with advanced stages, therefore these conditions could lead to decrease their quality of life. Aim of this study was to describe the profile of head and neck cancer patients at the Otorhinolaringology-Head and Neck Surgery Department, Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional method was used from medical records of head neck cancer patients at Department of Otorhinolaringology-Head and Neck Surgery, Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung from 2008 to 2012 that used the total sampling method. Results: There were 665 patients included in this study, which men who participated were 388 and women were 277. Most of them were elementary educated (44.96%, housewives (32.03%, and those aged 46–55 years old (28.33%. There were nasopharyngeal (38.20%, sinonasal (17.29%, larnyx (13.08%, oropharnyx (6.32%, thyroid gland (6.17%, oral cavity (3.91%, hypopharynx (2.41%, and parotid gland (2.26% cancer. The major histopathological findings were undifferentiated carcinoma (45.41% and squamous cell carcinoma (22.26%, those were presented with stage I (7.4%, II (13.5%, III (24.4%, and IV (54.7%. Conclusions: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma was the most predominant cases which majority were presented in advanced stage and major histopathology features was undifferentiated carcinoma, while demografic characteristic mostly were in middle aged and older, men with low education background.

  1. GPU-Powered Modelling of Nonlinear Effects due to Head-On Beam-Beam Interactions in High-Energy Hadron Colliders.

    CERN Document Server

    Furuseth, Sondre

    2017-01-01

    The performance of high-energy circular hadron colliders, as the Large Hadron Collider, is limited by beam-beam interactions. The strongly nonlinear force between the two opposing beams causes diverging Hamiltonians and resonances, which can lead to a reduction of the lifetime of the beams. The nonlinearity makes the effect of the force difficult to study analytically, even at first order. Numerical models are therefore needed to evaluate the overall effect of different configurations of the machines. This report discusses results from an implementation of the weak-strong model, studying the effects of head-on beam-beam interactions. The assumptions has been shown to be valid for configurations where the growth and losses of the beam are small. The tracking has been done using an original code which applies graphic cards to reduce the computation time. The bunches in the beams have been modelled cylindrically symmetrical, based on a Gaussian distribution in three dimensions. This choice fits well with bunches...

  2. Meeting of Directors and Heads of Department from CEA-Saclay, France

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Directors and Heads of Department from the Saclay centre of the French atomic energy commission (CEA) visited CERN in December. They are pictured here at the LHC magnet test facility in building SM18. On the left behind the visitors are the test benches where magnets are prepared for installation in String 2: the 120-metre full-scale model of an LHC cell of the regular part of the arc, which can be seen to the right. Photos 01, 02: Left to right: Marc Dejardin, Alain Givernaud, Louis Laurent, François Kircher, Antoine Masurel, Joël Feltesse, André Menez, T. Taylor, Philippe Pradelles, Bernard Sevestre, Michel Roche, Jean-Yves Gascoin, Thierry Lieven, Michel Spiro, Jean-Pierre Pervès, Yves Lemoigne, Béatrice Reder, Georges Carola, Philippe Lebrun, Yves Bourlat, Bertrand Mercier, Jean-Paul Langlois, Patrick Laurent, Didier Moulin, Xavier Vitart, Marc Serre, Jean-Louis Pierrey, Patrick Jarry, Bruno Mansoulié, Stéphane Lequien, Hervé Barbelin, Philippe Pallier, Jean-Yves Guillamot, and Norbert Sioegel.

  3. Intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy for previously irradiated advanced head and neck malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nag, Subir; Schuller, David E.; Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Rodriguez-Villalba, Silvia; Grecula, John; Bauer, Constance

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: This is a retrospective review to evaluate the role of surgery and intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (IOERT) in the treatment of patients with previously irradiated advanced head and neck cancers. Methods and Materials: Between January 1992 and March 1997, 38 patients (31 males, 7 females; median age of 62 years) with recurrent head and neck cancer were treated with maximal resection and IOERT at the Ohio State University (OSU). All had been previously treated with full-course radiotherapy (median 65.1 Gy, range 50-74.4 Gy). Twenty-nine patients (76%) had previously undergone one or more surgical procedures. After maximal surgery the tumor bed was treated with IOERT (single field in 36 patients and 2 fields in 2 patients), most commonly with 6 MeV electrons (87%). The dose administered (at 90% isodose line) was 15 Gy for close or microscopically positive margins in 34 patients and 20 Gy for gross disease in 1 patient. Further external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) was not given. Results: After a median follow-up of 30 months (range 8-39 months), 24 of the 38 patients (66%) recurred within the IOERT field. Median time to IOERT failure was 6 months (95% CI: 4.3-7.7). The 6-month, 1-, and 2-year control rates within the IOERT volume were 41%, 19%, and 13 %, respectively. Thirty of the 38 patients (79%) recurred in locoregional areas. Median time to locoregional failure was 4 months (95% CI: 3.3-4.7). The 6-month, 1-, and 2-year locoregional control rates were 33%, 11%, and 4%, respectively. Distant metastases occurred in 7 patients, 5 in association with IOERT failure and 2 with locoregional failure. Median overall survival was 7 months (95% CI: 4.7-9.3). The 6-month, 1-, 2-, and 3-year actuarial survival rates were 51%, 21%, 21%, and 8%, respectively. Major treatment-related complications occurred in 6 patients (16%). Conclusion: IOERT alone, at the dose used, is not sufficient for control of recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck cancers

  4. 8 June 2010 - South Dakota Governor M. Rounds signing the guest book with External Relations Office Adviser R. Voss, visiting the LHC superconducting Magnet test hall with Technology Department L. Bottura, in the CERN Control Centre with Beams Department Head P. Collier, ATLAS visitor Centre with Deputy Collaboration Spokesperson A. Lankford and visiting CMS Control Centre with Deputy Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela. LHC Communications and FNAL member K. Yurkewicz accompanies throughout (see complete delegation list below).

    CERN Multimedia

    Teams (M. Brice/J.C. Gadmer)

    2010-01-01

    CERN-HI-1006100 24: from left to right: Permanent Mission Representative A. Shybut; External Relations Office Adviser R. Voss; LHC Communications and FNAL K. Yurkewicz, Washington CSG Director for internationl programmes S. Sutcliffe-Stephenson; Technology Department Representative L. Bottura; South Dakota State Patrol D. Svendsen; CSG Executive Director and Former State Senator from Kansas D. Atkins;Office of the First Lady L. Svendsen; Office of the Governor K. Mueller; First Lady J. Rounds; South Dakota Governor M. Rounds; Washington State Senator T. Eide;Judge M. Eide; Assemblyman J. Oceguera and G. Oceguera (with son Jackson Oceguera, 5 months).

  5. The Relationship of Leadership Style of the Department Head to Nursing Faculty Professional Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Daria McConnell

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine if there was a relationship between the leadership style of the nursing department head and the level of professional satisfaction and organizational commitment by nursing faculty members. The survey instrument was a self-constructed four point Likert scale designed by the researcher to determine the…

  6. 18 December 2012 - British University of Edinburgh Principal T. O’Shea and delegation (see list below) visiting the CERN Control Centre with Beams Department D. Nisbet, the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Beams Department R. Veness, in the ATLAS Visitor Centre and experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti, in LHCb experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Campana and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    The delegation was throughout accompanied by Beams Department R. Veness and Physics Department and ATLAS Collaboration P. Wells 1.\tProf. Sir Timothy O'Shea, Principal, University of Edinburgh 2.\tProf. Lesley Yellowlees, Vice Principal, Head of College of Science and Engineering 3.\tProf Jeff Haywood, Vice Principal for Knowledge Management 4.\tProf. Peter Higgs, Professor of Theoretical Physics 5.\tMr Bruce Minto, Supporter of the University 6.\tProf. Walter Nimmo, Supporter of the University 7.\tProf. Arthur Trew, Head of School of Physics and Astronomy 8.\tProf David Robertson, Head of School of Informatics 9.\tProf Stefano Brandani, Head of School of Engineering 10.\tMr Alan Walker, accompanying Prof. Higgs 11.\tProf. Peter Clarke, LHCb Collaboration, School of Physics and Astronomy

  7. Head-On Beam-Beam Interactions in High-Energy Hadron Colliders. GPU-Powered Modelling of Nonlinear Effects

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2160109; Støvneng, Jon Andreas

    2017-08-15

    The performance of high-energy circular hadron colliders, as the Large Hadron Collider, is limited by beam-beam interactions. The strength of the beam-beam interactions will be higher after the upgrade to the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider, and also in the next generation of machines, as the Future Circular Hadron Collider. The strongly nonlinear force between the two opposing beams causes diverging Hamiltonians and drives resonances, which can lead to a reduction of the lifetime of the beams. The nonlinearity makes the effect of the force difficult to study analytically, even at first order. Numerical models are therefore needed to evaluate the overall effect of different configurations of the machines. For this thesis, a new code named CABIN (Cuda-Accelerated Beam-beam Interaction) has been developed to study the limitations caused by the impact of strong beam-beam interactions. In particular, the evolution of the beam emittance and beam intensity has been monitored to study the impact quantitatively...

  8. Minor head injury in anticoagulated patients: a 6-year retrospective analysis in an emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Riccardi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate management of minor head injury (MHI in patients receiving oral anticoagulant (OAC is unclear. In this retrospective study, we focused on elderly patients (>65 years treated with OAC, presented to our emergency department with MHI between 2004 and 2010. Three hundred and six patients with MHI were taking OAC: we documented 7.19% hemorrhages at the first computed tomography (C; 18.19% deaths; 50.1% spontaneous reabsorptions; 22.73% deteriorations of intracranial bleeding without surgical intervention (for clinical comorbidity, and 4.55% neurosurgical interventions. We documented a second positive CT scan in 2 patients (1.51% who had no symptoms and remained asymptomatic during observation. In both cases, intracranial bleeding resolved spontaneously. The mean international normalized ratio (INR value was 2.26, higher in the group of patients with bleeding (2.74 than in the group without bleeding (2.19. We found a significant increased risk in patients with posttraumatic loss of consciousness [odds ratio (OR 28.3], diffuse headache (OR 14.79, vomiting (OR 14.2 and neurological signs (OR 5.27. We did not reach significance in patients with post-traumatic amnesia. Our data confirm the need for a CT scan of any patients on OAC with MHI. None of our patients developed any symptoms or signs during observation, and only 2 patients developed an intracranial hemorrhage in the second CT scan with a favorable evolution. Our data need to be confirmed with an observational study, but we suggest that the second CT could be reserved for patients developing symptoms and signs during observation. We also underline the role of the INR in the stratification of risk.

  9. Clinical Application of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography of the Rabbit Head: Part 1 - Normal Dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, G G; Arzi, Boaz; Cissell, Derek D; Hatcher, David C; Kass, Philip H; Zhen, Amy; Verstraete, Frank J M

    2016-01-01

    Domestic rabbits ( Oryctolagus cuniculus ) are increasingly popular as household pets; therefore, veterinarians need to be familiar with the most common diseases afflicting rabbits including dental diseases. Diagnostic approaches for dental disease include gross oral examination, endoscopic oral examination, skull radiography, and computed tomography (CT). CT overcomes many limitations of standard radiography by permitting cross-sectional images of the rabbit head in multiple planes without superimposition of anatomic structures. Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is an oral and maxillofacial imaging modality that produces high-resolution images. The objective of this study was to describe and compare the normal anatomic features of the dentition and surrounding maxillofacial structures in healthy rabbits on CBCT and conventional CT. Ten New Zealand white rabbit cadaver heads were scanned using CBCT and conventional CT. Images were evaluated using Anatomage Invivo 5 software. The maxillofacial anatomy was labeled on CBCT images, and the mean lengths and widths of the teeth were determined. The visibility of relevant dental and anatomic features (pulp cavity, germinal center, tooth outline, periodontal ligament) were scored and compared between conventional CT and CBCT. The thinnest teeth were the maxillary second incisor teeth at 1.29 ± 0.26 mm and the maxillary third molar teeth at 1.04 ± 0.10 mm. In general, it was found that CBCT was superior to conventional CT when imaging the dentition. Importantly, the periodontal ligament was significantly ( P  < 0.01) more visible on CBCT than on conventional CT. Ability to see the periodontal ligament with such detail may allow earlier detection and treatment of periodontal disease in rabbits. This study is the first of its kind and shows the feasibility and yield of CBCT when evaluating the maxillofacial features and dentition in rabbits.

  10. Clinical Application of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography of the Rabbit Head: Part 1 - Normal Dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GG Comet Riggs

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Domestic rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus are increasingly popular as household pets; therefore, veterinarians need to be familiar with the most common diseases afflicting rabbits including dental diseases. Diagnostic approaches for dental disease include gross oral examination, endoscopic oral examination, skull radiography, and computed tomography (CT. CT overcomes many limitations of standard radiography by permitting cross-sectional images of the rabbit head in multiple planes without superimposition of anatomic structures. Cone-beam CT (CBCT is an oral and maxillofacial imaging modality that produces high-resolution images. The objective of this study was to describe and compare the normal anatomic features of the dentition and surrounding maxillofacial structures in healthy rabbits on CBCT and conventional CT. Ten New Zealand white rabbit cadaver heads were scanned using CBCT and conventional CT. Images were evaluated using Anatomage Invivo 5 software. The maxillofacial anatomy was labeled on CBCT images and the mean lengths and widths of the teeth were determined. The visibility of relevant dental and anatomic features (pulp cavity, germinal center, tooth outline, periodontal ligament were scored and compared between conventional CT and CBCT. The thinnest teeth were the maxillary second incisor teeth at 1.29 ± 0.26 mm and the maxillary third molar teeth at 1.04 ±0.10 mm. In general, it was found that CBCT was superior to conventional CT when imaging the dentition. Importantly, the periodontal ligament was significantly (P<0.01 more visible on CBCT than on conventional CT. Ability to see the periodontal ligament with such detail may allow earlier detection and treatment of periodontal disease in rabbits. This study is the first of its kind and shows the feasibility and yield of CBCT when evaluating the maxillofacial features and dentition in rabbits.

  11. Head injuries in youth soccer players presenting to the emergency department

    OpenAIRE

    Pickett, W; Streight, S; Simpson, K; Brison, R; Cusimano, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: There has been recent concern about neuropsychological injuries experienced by soccer players, particularly related to the purposeful heading of the ball. There are few population based analyses examining whether this is a legitimate concern.

  12. Computed Tomography Profile and its Utilization in Head Injury Patients in Emergency Department: A Prospective Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Waganekar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Based on Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, head injury can be classified as minor (GCS 13–15, moderate (GCS 9–12, and severe (GCS 3–8. There is a lot of controversy in the use of computed tomography (CT in head injury patients. Aims: This study was intended to estimate the rate of CT positivity in head injury patients and to define the criteria for doing CT in head injury patients. Settings and Design: This was a prospective observational study in the emergency department (ED over a 12-month period. Subjects and Methods: Study involved all head injury patients attending ED. Risk factors studied were a loss of consciousness (LOC, vomiting, seizures, ear bleed, nosebleed, external injuries, and alcohol intoxication. Statistical Analysis Used: Comparison of CT positivity with the patient's demographics and clinical characteristics was carried out using Chi-square. Results: A total of 1782 patients were included in this study. Overall CT positivity was 50.9%. In minor head injury (MHI, CT positivity rate was 38%. The study showed significant association of CT positivity with five variables: LOC >5 min, vomiting, seizures, ear bleed, and nosebleed. Conclusions: From the study, we recommend following: CT is indicated in all patients with moderate and severe head injury (GCS ≤12. Low threshold for taking CT is advisable in elderly and alcohol-intoxicated patients. In MHI, CT is indicated if any one of the following risk factors are present: LOC >5 min, history of vomiting, history of seizures, history of ear bleed, and history of nosebleed.

  13. A morphological comparison of the piriform sinuses in head-on and head-rotated views of seated subjects using cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashina, Atsushi; Tanimoto, Keiji; Ohtsuka, Masahiko; Nagasaki, Toshikazu; Sutthiprapaporn, Pipop; Iida, Yukihiro; Katsumata, Akitoshi

    2008-01-01

    Food flow in the oropharynx changes when the head is rotated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate morphological differences in the upper and lower piriform sinuses in head-on (HO) versus head-rotated (HR) positions. Ten healthy adult volunteers with no previous history of dysphagia were subjected to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the HO and HR positions. Binary CBCT images were created at 50% gray scale to examine morphological changes in the lower piriform sinuses. Upon rotation to the right, the cross-sectional area of the left lower piriform sinus increased significantly (P=0.037). The depth of the right lower piriform sinus also increased significantly (P=0.011) upon rotation. The volume of the lower piriform sinuses increased significantly on both sides (right, P=0.009; left, P=0.013). The upper piriform sinuses acquired a teardrop shape, with the rotated side narrowed and opposite side enlarged. These results suggest that changes in food flow during head rotation result mainly from changes in the size and shape of the upper piriform sinuses. (author)

  14. History of the Department of Dermatology in Gdansk. The profiles of heads of the Department from the post-war period to modern times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Purzycka-Bohdan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available With respect to the achievements of contemporary medicine, it is vital to remember the history and physicians who created structures and aimed at developing many branches of medicine. The history of the Dermatology Department in Gdansk – one of the oldest clinics in the Medical University of Gdansk – and biographies of its professors were recalled during many anniversaries and jubilees as a sign of respect to the founders and continuators of the School of Dermatology in Gdansk. Without their hard work and devotion, the progress in diagnosis and treatment of many dermatological diseases would not be seen. In the post-war period the Department of Dermatology in Gdansk was famous for its success in elimination of an epidemic of venereal diseases. The following years were difficult due to reorganization of the health service in Poland and opening of new diagnostic laboratories which are necessary for contemporary dermatology. Apart from its therapeutic function, the department conducts scientific research and medical training which results in many publications, international cooperation, organization of conferences and education of qualified medical staff. The forthcoming 70 th anniversary of the foundation of the Dermatology Department in Gdansk is an excellent opportunity to recall and to present profiles of the professors who were the heads of the department from the post-war period to modern times: Prof. Tadeusz Pawlas, Franciszek Miedzinski, Jerzy Kozakiewicz, Henryk Szarmach and Prof. Jadwiga Roszkiewicz.

  15. Coping with Natural Disasters: Lessons Learnt by a Head of Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Beverley

    2011-01-01

    Since the first of the 29 significant earthquakes and thousands of aftershocks that the University of Canterbury (New Zealand) community has endured in the last year, Beverly Lord has learned a few lessons as a departmental head in a university during a time of natural disaster. Herein, she organizes and describes these lessons under five…

  16. The impact of reorienting cone-beam computed tomographic images in varied head positions on the coordinates of anatomical landmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hun; Jeong, Ho Gul; Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Jung Hee; Han, Sang Sun [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Yonsei University, College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the coordinates of anatomical landmarks on cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images in varied head positions before and after reorientation using image analysis software. CBCT images were taken in a normal position and four varied head positions using a dry skull marked with 3 points where gutta percha was fixed. In each of the five radiographic images, reference points were set, 20 anatomical landmarks were identified, and each set of coordinates was calculated. Coordinates in the images from the normally positioned head were compared with those in the images obtained from varied head positions using statistical methods. Post-reorientation coordinates calculated using a three-dimensional image analysis program were also compared to the reference coordinates. In the original images, statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. However, post-reorientation, no statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. The changes in head position impacted the coordinates of the anatomical landmarks in three-dimensional images. However, reorientation using image analysis software allowed accurate superimposition onto the reference positions.

  17. Evaluation of linear measurements of implant sites based o head orientation during acquisition: An ex vivo study using cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabban, Hanadi; Mahdian, Mina; Dhingra, Ajay; Lurie, Alan G.; Tadinada, Aditya [University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Farmington (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This study evaluated the effect of various head orientations during cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image acquisition on linear measurements of potential implant sites. Six dry human skulls with a total of 28 implant sites were evaluated for seven different head orientations. The scans were acquired using a Hitachi CB-MercuRay CBCT machine. The scanned volumes were reconstructed. Horizontal and vertical measurements were made and were compared to measurements made after simulating the head position to corrected head angulations. Data was analyzed using a two-way ANOVA test. Statistical analysis revealed a significant interaction between the mean errors in vertical measurements with a marked difference observed at the extension head position (P<0.05). Statistical analysis failed to yield any significant interaction between the mean errors in horizontal measurements at various head positions. Head orientation could significantly affect the vertical measurements in CBCT scans. The main head position influencing the measurements is extension.

  18. Paul Collier : Balancing beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    As former head of AB Operations, Paul Collier and his group were in the ‘cockpit’ for the LHC’s maiden voyage - piloting the first beam around the ring. But now, as Head of the Beams Department, he will need his feet firmly on the ground in order to balance all the beam activities at CERN. "As Department Head, I’ll have less direct contact with the machines," Collier says with a hint of regret. "I’ll still obviously be very involved, but they won’t actually let me loose in front of the keyboard anymore!" As the new Head of the BE Department, Collier will be in charge of nearly 400 people, and will oversee all the beam activities, including the preparations for the longest period of beam operation in the history of CERN. In the new organization, the BE, TE and EN Departments have been grouped together in the Accelerator and Technology Sector. "‘Partnership’ is a key word for the three departments," says Collier. "The n...

  19. A NOVEL, REMOVABLE, CERROBEND, BEAM-BLOCKING DEVICE FOR RADIATION THERAPY OF THE CANINE HEAD AND NECK: PILOT STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Michael S; Berlato, Davide; Vanhaezebrouck, Isabelle; Gordon, Ira K; Hansen, Katherine S; Theon, Alain P; Holt, Randall W; Trestrail, Earl A

    2017-01-01

    Radiation therapy of the head and neck can result in mucositis and other acute affects in the oral cavity. This prospective pilot study evaluated a novel, intraoral, beam-blocking device for use during imaging and therapeutic procedures. The beam-blocking device was made from a metal alloy inserted into a coated frozen dessert mold (Popsicle® Mold, Cost Plus World Market, Oakland, CA). The device was designed so that it could be inserted into an outer shell, which in turn allowed it to be placed or removed depending on the need due to beam configuration. A Farmer type ionization chamber and virtual water phantom were used to assess effects of field size on transmission. Six large breed cadaver dogs, donated by the owner after death, were recruited for the study. Delivered dose at the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the device, with and without the alloy block in place, were measured using radiochromic film. It was determined that transmission was field size dependent with larger field sizes leading to decreased attenuation of the beam, likely secondary to scatter. The mean and median transmission on the ventral surface without the beam-blocking device was 0.94 [range 0.94-0.96]. The mean and median transmission with the beam-blocking device was 0.52 [range 0.50-0.57]. The mean and median increase in dose due to backscatter on the dorsal surface of the beam-blocking device was 0.04 [range 0.02-0.04]. Findings indicated that this novel device can help attenuate radiation dose ventral to the block in dogs, with minimal backscatter. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  20. 28 May 2010 - Japanese Ambassador H. Ueda visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with CERN Technology Deputy Department Head L. Rossi.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    CERN-HI-1005088 02 Japanese Ambassador H. Ueda (right) visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Deputy Department Head L. Rossi(left). H. Ueda is accompanied by KEK and ATLAS Collaboration T. Kondo (centre).

  1. Prof. John Wood, Chief Executive Designate, Dr Gordon Walker, Directorate, Chief Executive, Prof. Ken J. Peach, Head of the Particle Physics Department, CLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, United Kingdom

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    L. to. r.: Dr. Ian Wilson, CLIC Deputy Study Leader, Prof. Ken J. Peach, Head of the Particle Physics Department, Prof. John Wood, Chief Executive Designate, Dr. Gordon Walker, Directorate, Chief Executive

  2. Audit of high energy therapy beams in hospital oncology departments by the National Radiation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyth, V.G.

    1994-02-01

    In 1993 the output of every high energy radiotherapy beam used clinically in New Zealand was measured by National Radiation Laboratory (NRL) staff using independent dosimetry equipment. The purpose of this was to audit the dosimetry that is used by hospital physicists for the basis of patient treatments, and to uncover any errors that may be clinically significant. This report analyses the uncertainties involved in comparing the NRL and hospital measurements, and presents the results of the 1993 audit. The overall uncertainty turns out to be about 1.5%. The results for linear accelerator photon beams are consistent with a purely random variation within this uncertainty. Electron beams show some small errors beyond the expected uncertainty. Gamma beams have the potential to be the most accurately measured, but in practice are less accurately measured than linear accelerator beams. None of the disagreements indicated an error of clinical significance. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  3. First full-beam PET acquisitions in proton therapy with a modular dual-head dedicated system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportelli, G.; Belcari, N.; Camarlinghi, N.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Ferretti, S.; Kraan, A.; Ortuño, J. E.; Romano, F.; Santos, A.; Straub, K.; Tramontana, A.; Del Guerra, A.; Rosso, V.

    2014-01-01

    During particle therapy irradiation, positron emitters with half-lives ranging from 2 to 20 min are generated from nuclear processes. The half-lives are such that it is possible either to detect the positron signal in the treatment room using an in-beam positron emission tomography (PET) system, right after the irradiation, or to quickly transfer the patient to a close PET/CT scanner. Since the activity distribution is spatially correlated with the dose, it is possible to use PET imaging as an indirect method to assure the quality of the dose delivery. In this work, we present a new dedicated PET system able to operate in-beam. The PET apparatus consists in two 10 cm × 10 cm detector heads. Each detector is composed of four scintillating matrices of 23 × 23 LYSO crystals. The crystal size is 1.9 mm × 1.9 mm × 16 mm. Each scintillation matrix is read out independently with a modularized acquisition system. The distance between the two opposing detector heads was set to 20 cm. The system has very low dead time per detector area and a 3 ns coincidence window, which is capable to sustain high single count rates and to keep the random counts relatively low. This allows a new full-beam monitoring modality that includes data acquisition also while the beam is on. The PET system was tested during the irradiation at the CATANA (INFN, Catania, Italy) cyclotron-based proton therapy facility. Four acquisitions with different doses and dose rates were analysed. In all cases the random to total coincidences ratio was equal or less than 25%. For each measurement we estimated the accuracy and precision of the activity range on a set of voxel lines within an irradiated PMMA phantom. Results show that the inclusion of data acquired during the irradiation, referred to as beam-on data, improves both the precision and accuracy of the range measurement with respect to data acquired only after irradiation. Beam-on data alone are enough to give precisions better than 1 mm

  4. The planning target volume margins detected by cone-beam CT in head and neck cancer patients treated by image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jun; Chen Hong; Zhang Guoqiao; Chen Fei; Zhang Li

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the planning target volume margins of head and neck cancers treated by image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Methods: 464 sets cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images before setup correction and 126 sets CBCT images after correction were obtained from 51 head and neck cancer patients treated by IGRT in our department. The systematic and random errors were evaluated by either online or offline correction through registering the CBCT images to the planning CT. The data was divided into 3 groups according to the online correction times. Results: The isocenter shift were 0.37 mm ± 2.37 mm, -0.43 mm ± 2.30 mm and 0.47 mm ± 2.65 mm in right-left (RL), anterior-posterior (AP) and superior-inferior (SI) directions respectively before correction, and it reduced to 0.08 mm ± 0.68 mm, -0.03 mm ± 0.74 mm and 0.03 mm ± 0.80 mm when evaluated by 126 sets corrected CBCT images. The planning target volume (PTV) margin from clinical target volume (CTV) before correction were: 6.41 mm, 6.15 mm and 7.10 mm based on two parameter model, and it reduced to 1.78 mm, 1.80 mm and 1.97 mm after correction. The PTV margins were 3.8 mm, 3.8 mm, 4.0 mm; 4.0 mm, 4.0 mm, 5.0 mm and 5.4 mm, 5.2 mm, 6.1 mm in RL, AP and SI respectively when online-correction times were more than 15 times, 11-15 times, 5-10 times. Conclusions: CBCT-based on online correction reduce the PTV margin for head and neck cancers treated by IGRT and ensure more precise dose delivery and less normal tissue complications. (authors)

  5. A Comparison of Perceptions of Administrative Tasks and Professional Development Needs of Chairpersons/Heads of Departments in Australia and the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seagren, Alan T.; Creswell, John W.

    Management tasks of department chairs and their perceived needs for staff development were studied in Australian Colleges of Advanced Education (CAE), U.S. state colleges, and a U.S. university. Data were obtained from 679 Australian and 98 U.S. department heads, using similar instruments developed by the Nebraska-Lincoln Task Force on Management…

  6. Dose monitoring in pediatric and young adult head and cervical spine CT studies at two emergency duty departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niiniviita, Hannele; Kiljunen, Timo; Huuskonen, Minna; Teperi, Simo; Kulmala, Jarmo

    2018-04-01

    As the number of pediatric computed tomography (CT) imaging is increasing, there is a need for real-time radiation dose monitoring and evaluation of the imaging protocols. The aim of this study was to present the imaging data, patient doses, and observations of pediatric and young adult trauma-and routine head CT and cervical spine CT collected by a dose monitoring software. Patient age, study date, imaging parameters, and patient dose as volume CT dose index (CTDI vol ) and dose length product (DLP) were collected from two emergency departments' CT scanners for 2-year period. The patients were divided into four age groups (0-5, 6-10, 11-15, and 16-20 years) for statistical analysis and effective dose determination. The 75th percentile doses were evaluated to be used as local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). Six hundred fifteen trauma head, 318 routine head, and 592 trauma cervical spine CT studies were assessed. All mean CTDI vol values were statistically lower in hospital B (40.3 ± 12.3, 30.03 ± 11.1, and 6.9 ± 3.1 mGy, respectively) than in hospital A (53.0 ± 12.9, 43.2 ± 8.7, and 18.3 ± 7.3 mGy, respectively). Statistically significant differences were observed on scanning length between hospitals and between CTDI vol values when protocol was updated. The 75th percentiles of trauma cervical spine in hospital B can be used as local DRL. Non-optimized protocols were also revealed in hospital A. Dose monitoring software offers a valuable tool for evaluating the imaging practices and finding non-optimized protocols.

  7. Improving Clinical Information on Head CT Requisitions From the Emergency Department to Aid Interpretation and Billing Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Dillon; Spiegel, Thomas; Katzman, Gregory L; Haas, Kateland; Ali, Saad

    2018-01-01

    The accuracy of radiologic interpretations is higher when appropriate clinical information is provided, as is the likelihood of reimbursement for the studies. The purpose of this project was to evaluate and improve the quality of clinical information provided on head CT requisitions from an urban emergency department (ED). In a prospective study conducted from July 2015 to May 2016, attending neuroradiologists evaluated 1100 randomly selected ED requisitions for unenhanced head CT, grading them for clinical and billing adequacy on a scale of 0-2. After acquisition of baseline data (400 studies), an intervention was performed that consisted of education of ED staff on the importance of clinical information in requisitions. A reminder slide was placed on a large screen in the ED staff working area with examples of appropriate history. Postintervention data (700 studies) were subsequently obtained. Mean scores and payment lag time before versus after the intervention were compared by Wilcoxon rank sum test. Statistically significant improvement was found in mean scores after the intervention for both clinical (1.32 to 1.43, p = 0.003) and billing (1.64 to 1.74, p = 0.02) adequacy categories. The percentage of studies with a score of 2 increased in both categories, and the percentages of 0 and 1 scores declined. There was a 21.1-day decrease in payment lag time (from 75.8 to 54.7 days, p Billing efficiency improved, and payment lag time decreased substantially.

  8. Analysis of head motion prior to and during proton beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, Reinhard W.; Fargo, Ramiz A.; Meinass, Helmut J.; Slater, Jerry D.; Slater, James M.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: We report on the use of a noninvasive patient motion monitoring system to evaluate the amount of head motion prior to and during proton radiation therapy sessions. Methods and Materials: Two optical displacement sensors, placed close to the patient's head, were used for online monitoring of the head position, with submillimeter accuracy. Motion data, including the difference between start and end position (Dx) and the maximum displacement during the recorded session (Dx-max), were acquired for pretreatment sessions to analyze alignment radiographs, and for treatment sessions. We have recorded 102 pretreatment and 99 treatment sessions in 16 patients immobilized with a thermoplastic mask, and 44 pretreatment and 56 treatment sessions in 13 patients immobilized with vacuum-assisted dental fixation. To avoid incorrect data analysis due to replicate observations, only 1 pretreatment and 1 treatment session per patient were selected at random for statistical comparison of mean or median motion parameters in different subgroups. Results: Both techniques showed similar immobilization efficiencies. The median Dx and Dx-max values were 0.18 mm and 0.46 mm, respectively, for 16 treatment sessions with mask immobilization, and 0.22 mm and 0.50 mm, respectively, for 13 treatment sessions with dental immobilization. Motion parameters for pretreatment and treatment sessions were not statistically different. Conclusion: Online verification of patient's head motion is feasible and provides valuable data for confirmation of proper treatment delivery in individual patients, as well as for the evaluation of different immobilization methods

  9. Proton Beam Reirradiation for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer: Multi-institutional Report on Feasibility and Early Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romesser, Paul B. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Radiation Oncology, New York, New York (United States); Cahlon, Oren [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Radiation Oncology, New York, New York (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Scher, Eli D. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Radiation Oncology, New York, New York (United States); Hug, Eugen B.; Sine, Kevin [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); DeSelm, Carl [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Radiation Oncology, New York, New York (United States); Fox, Jana L. [Montefiore Medical Center, Radiation Oncology, Bronx, New York (United States); Mah, Dennis [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Garg, Madhur K. [Montefiore Medical Center, Radiation Oncology, Bronx, New York (United States); Han-Chih Chang, John [Northwestern Medicine Chicago Proton Center, Warrenville, Illinois (United States); Lee, Nancy Y., E-mail: leen2@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Radiation Oncology, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Reirradiation therapy (re-RT) is the only potentially curative treatment option for patients with locally recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC). Given the significant morbidity with head and neck re-RT, interest in proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) has increased. We report the first multi-institutional clinical experience using curative-intent PBRT for re-RT in recurrent HNC. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of ongoing prospective data registries from 2 hybrid community practice and academic proton centers was conducted. Patients with recurrent HNC who underwent at least 1 prior course of definitive-intent external beam radiation therapy (RT) were included. Acute and late toxicities were assessed with the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late radiation morbidity scoring system, respectively. The cumulative incidence of locoregional failure was calculated with death as a competing risk. The actuarial 12-month freedom–from–distant metastasis and overall survival rates were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Ninety-two consecutive patients were treated with curative-intent re-RT with PBRT between 2011 and 2014. Median follow-up among surviving patients was 13.3 months and among all patients was 10.4 months. The median time between last RT and PBRT was 34.4 months. There were 76 patients with 1 prior RT course and 16 with 2 or more courses. The median PBRT dose was 60.6 Gy (relative biological effectiveness, [RBE]). Eighty-five percent of patients underwent prior HNC RT for an oropharynx primary, and 39% underwent salvage surgery before re-RT. The cumulative incidence of locoregional failure at 12 months, with death as a competing risk, was 25.1%. The actuarial 12-month freedom–from–distant metastasis and overall survival rates were 84.0% and 65.2%, respectively. Acute toxicities of grade 3 or greater included mucositis (9

  10. Proton Beam Reirradiation for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer: Multi-institutional Report on Feasibility and Early Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romesser, Paul B.; Cahlon, Oren; Scher, Eli D.; Hug, Eugen B.; Sine, Kevin; DeSelm, Carl; Fox, Jana L.; Mah, Dennis; Garg, Madhur K.; Han-Chih Chang, John; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Reirradiation therapy (re-RT) is the only potentially curative treatment option for patients with locally recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC). Given the significant morbidity with head and neck re-RT, interest in proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) has increased. We report the first multi-institutional clinical experience using curative-intent PBRT for re-RT in recurrent HNC. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of ongoing prospective data registries from 2 hybrid community practice and academic proton centers was conducted. Patients with recurrent HNC who underwent at least 1 prior course of definitive-intent external beam radiation therapy (RT) were included. Acute and late toxicities were assessed with the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late radiation morbidity scoring system, respectively. The cumulative incidence of locoregional failure was calculated with death as a competing risk. The actuarial 12-month freedom–from–distant metastasis and overall survival rates were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Ninety-two consecutive patients were treated with curative-intent re-RT with PBRT between 2011 and 2014. Median follow-up among surviving patients was 13.3 months and among all patients was 10.4 months. The median time between last RT and PBRT was 34.4 months. There were 76 patients with 1 prior RT course and 16 with 2 or more courses. The median PBRT dose was 60.6 Gy (relative biological effectiveness, [RBE]). Eighty-five percent of patients underwent prior HNC RT for an oropharynx primary, and 39% underwent salvage surgery before re-RT. The cumulative incidence of locoregional failure at 12 months, with death as a competing risk, was 25.1%. The actuarial 12-month freedom–from–distant metastasis and overall survival rates were 84.0% and 65.2%, respectively. Acute toxicities of grade 3 or greater included mucositis (9

  11. Penetrating head injuries in children presenting to the emergency department in Australia and New Zealand: A PREDICT prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babl, Franz E; Lyttle, Mark D; Bressan, Silvia; Borland, Meredith L; Phillips, Natalie; Kochar, Amit; Dalton, Sarah; Cheek, John A; Gilhotra, Yuri; Furyk, Jeremy; Neutze, Jocelyn; Donath, Susan; Hearps, Stephen; Arpone, Marta; Crowe, Louise; Dalziel, Stuart R; Barker, Ruth; Oakley, Ed

    2018-03-26

    Penetrating head injuries (pHIs) are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Data on pHIs in children outside North America are limited. We describe the mechanism of injuries, neuroimaging findings, neurosurgery and mortality for pHIs in Australia and New Zealand. This was a planned secondary analysis of a prospective observational study of children New Zealand emergency departments (EDs) between 2011 and 2014. We reviewed all cases where clinicians had clinically suspected pHI as well as all cases of clinically important traumatic brain injuries (death, neurosurgery, intubation >24 h, admission >2 days and abnormal computed tomography). Of 20 137 evaluable patients with a head injury, 21 (0.1%) were identified to have sustained a pHI. All injuries were of non-intentional nature, and there were no gunshot wounds. The mechanisms of injuries varied from falls, animal attack, motor vehicle crashes and impact with objects. Mean Glasgow Coma Scale on ED arrival was 10; 10 (48%) had a history of loss of consciousness, and 7 (33%) children were intubated pre-hospital or in the ED. Fourteen (67%) children underwent neurosurgery, two (10%) craniofacial surgery, and five (24%) were treated conservatively; four (19%) patients died. Paediatric pHIs are very rare in EDs in Australia and New Zealand but are associated with high morbidity and mortality. The absence of firearm-related injuries compared to North America is striking and may reflect Australian and New Zealand firearm regulations. © 2018 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  12. Emergency Department Triage of Traumatic Head Injury Using a Brain Electrical Activity Biomarker: A Multisite Prospective Observational Validation Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Daniel; Prichep, Leslie S; Bazarian, Jeffrey; Huff, J Stephen; Naunheim, Rosanne; Garrett, John; Jones, Elizabeth B; Wright, David W; O'Neill, John; Badjatia, Neeraj; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Curley, Kenneth C; Chiacchierini, Richard; O'Neil, Brian; Hack, Dallas C

    2017-05-01

    A brain electrical activity biomarker for identifying traumatic brain injury (TBI) in emergency department (ED) patients presenting with high Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) after sustaining a head injury has shown promise for objective, rapid triage. The main objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the efficacy of an automated classification algorithm to determine the likelihood of being computed tomography (CT) positive, in high-functioning TBI patients in the acute state. Adult patients admitted to the ED for evaluation within 72 hours of sustaining a closed head injury with GCS 12 to 15 were candidates for study. A total of 720 patients (18-85 years) meeting inclusion/exclusion criteria were enrolled in this observational, prospective validation trial, at 11 U.S. EDs. GCS was 15 in 97%, with the first and third quartiles being 15 (interquartile range = 0) in the study population at the time of the evaluation. Standard clinical evaluations were conducted and 5 to 10 minutes of electroencephalogram (EEG) was acquired from frontal and frontal-temporal scalp locations. Using an a priori derived EEG-based classification algorithm developed on an independent population and applied to this validation population prospectively, the likelihood of each subject being CT+ was determined, and performance metrics were computed relative to adjudicated CT findings. Sensitivity of the binary classifier (likely CT+ or CT-) was 92.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 87.8%-95.5%) for detection of any intracranial injury visible on CT (CT+), with specificity of 51.6% (95% CI = 48.1%-55.1%) and negative predictive value (NPV) of 96.0% (95% CI = 93.2%-97.9%). Using ternary classification (likely CT+, equivocal, likely CT-) demonstrated enhanced sensitivity to traumatic hematomas (≥1 mL of blood), 98.6% (95% CI = 92.6%-100.0%), and NPV of 98.2% (95% CI = 95.5%-99.5%). Using an EEG-based biomarker high accuracy of predicting the likelihood of being CT+ was obtained, with

  13. Reduction of radial-head subluxation in children by triage nurses in the emergency department: a cluster-randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Andrew; Clarkin, Chantalle; Barrowman, Nick; Correll, Rhonda; Osmond, Martin H.; Plint, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Radial-head subluxation is an easily identified and treated injury. We investigated whether triage nurses in the emergency department can safely reduce radial-head subluxation at rates that are not substantially lower than those of emergency department physicians. Methods: We performed an open, noninferiority, cluster-randomized control trial. Children aged 6 years and younger who presented to the emergency department with a presentation consistent with radial-head subluxation and who had sustained a known injury in the previous 12 hours were assigned to either nurse-initiated or physician-initiated treatment, depending on the day. The primary outcome was the proportion of children who had a successful reduction (return to normal arm usage). We used a noninferiority margin of 10%. Results: In total, 268 children were eligible for inclusion and 245 were included in the final analysis. Of the children assigned to receive physician-initiated care, 96.7% (117/121) had a successful reduction performed by a physician. Of the children assigned to receive nurse-treatment care, 84.7% (105/124) had a successful reduction performed by a nurse. The difference in the proportion of successful radial head subluxations between the groups was 12.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.8% to 19.7%). Noninferiority of nurse-initiated radial head subluxation was not shown. Interpretation: In this trial, the rate of successful radial-head subluxation performed by nurses was inferior to the physician success rate. Although the success rate in the nurse-initiated care group did not meet the non-inferiority margin, nurses were able to reduce radial head subluxation for almost 85% of children who presented with probable radial-head subluxation. Trial registration: Clinical Trials.gov, no. NCT00993954. PMID:24664649

  14. Cone-Beam CT Assessment of Interfraction and Intrafraction Setup Error of Two Head-and-Neck Cancer Thermoplastic Masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velec, Michael; Waldron, John N.; O'Sullivan, Brian; Bayley, Andrew; Cummings, Bernard; Kim, John J.; Ringash, Jolie; Breen, Stephen L.; Lockwood, Gina A.; Dawson, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively compare setup error in standard thermoplastic masks and skin-sparing masks (SSMs) modified with low neck cutouts for head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty head-and-neck IMRT patients were randomized to be treated in a standard mask (SM) or SSM. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans, acquired daily after both initial setup and any repositioning, were used for initial and residual interfraction evaluation, respectively. Weekly, post-IMRT CBCT scans were acquired for intrafraction setup evaluation. The population random (σ) and systematic (Σ) errors were compared for SMs and SSMs. Skin toxicity was recorded weekly by use of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: We evaluated 762 CBCT scans in 11 patients randomized to the SM and 9 to the SSM. Initial interfraction σ was 1.6 mm or less or 1.1 deg. or less for SM and 2.0 mm or less and 0.8 deg. for SSM. Initial interfraction Σ was 1.0 mm or less or 1.4 deg. or less for SM and 1.1 mm or less or 0.9 deg. or less for SSM. These errors were reduced before IMRT with CBCT image guidance with no significant differences in residual interfraction or intrafraction uncertainties between SMs and SSMs. Intrafraction σ and Σ were less than 1 mm and less than 1 deg. for both masks. Less severe skin reactions were observed in the cutout regions of the SSM compared with non-cutout regions. Conclusions: Interfraction and intrafraction setup error is not significantly different for SSMs and conventional masks in head-and-neck radiation therapy. Mask cutouts should be considered for these patients in an effort to reduce skin toxicity.

  15. Three-dimensional image analysis of a head of the giant panda by the cone-beam type CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, H.; Komiya, T.; Narushima, E.; Suzuki, N.

    2002-01-01

    The cone-beam type CT (Computed Tomography) enabled us to collect the three-dimensional (3D) digitalized data directly from the animal carcass. In this study, we applied the techniques of the cone-beam type CT for a carcass head of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) to obtain the 3D images easily without reconstruction process, and could morphologically examine the sections from the 3D data by means of non-destructive observations. The important results of the study represent the two following points. 1) We could show the morphological relationships between the muscles of mastication and the mandible in non-destructive status from the 3D data. The exact position of the coronoid process could be recognized in the rostro-lateral space of the temporal fossa. 2) By the serial sections from the 3D data sets, the morphological characteristics in the nasal cavity were detailed with high resolution in this rare species. The nasal concha was well-developed in the nasal cavity. The ethmoidal labyrinth was encountered immediately caudal to the nasal cavity and close to the region of the olfactory bulb. The ethmoidal labyrinth consisted of the complicated osseous structure in this area. The data will be useful to discuss the olfactory function in the reproduction behavior of this species

  16. SU-E-T-230: Creating a Large Number of Focused Beams with Variable Patient Head Tilt to Improve Dose Fall-Off for Brain Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, J; Ma, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a treatment delivery and planning strategy by increasing the number of beams to minimize dose to brain tissue surrounding a target, while maximizing dose coverage to the target. Methods: We analyzed 14 different treatment plans via Leksell PFX and 4C. For standardization, single tumor cases were chosen. Original treatment plans were compared with two optimized plans. The number of beams was increased in treatment plans by varying tilt angles of the patient head, while maintaining original isocenter and the beam positions in the x-, y- and z-axes, collimator size, and beam blocking. PFX optimized plans increased beam numbers with three pre-set tilt angles, 70, 90, 110, and 4C optimized plans increased beam numbers with tilt angles increasing arbitrarily from range of 30 to 150 degrees. Optimized treatment plans were compared dosimetrically with original treatment plans. Results: Comparing total normal tissue isodose volumes between original and optimized plans, the low-level percentage isodose volumes decreased in all plans. Despite the addition of multiple beams up to a factor of 25, beam-on times for 1 tilt angle versus 3 or more tilt angles were comparable (<1 min.). In 64% (9/14) of the studied cases, the volume percentage decrease by >5%, with the highest value reaching 19%. The addition of more tilt angles correlates to a greater decrease in normal brain irradiated volume. Selectivity and coverage for original and optimized plans remained comparable. Conclusion: Adding large number of additional focused beams with variable patient head tilt shows improvement for dose fall-off for brain radiosurgery. The study demonstrates technical feasibility of adding beams to decrease target volume

  17. The juvenile head trauma syndrome - Deterioration after mild TBI: Diagnosis and clinical presentation at the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikstra, Angelina R A; Metting, Zwany; Fock, Johanna M; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2017-03-01

    Annually 14.000 children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) are admitted to the Emergency Department (ED) in the Netherlands. Presentation varies and a specific entity comprises the juvenile head trauma syndrome (JHTS) with secondary deterioration after a mild trauma. As outcome of JHTS can be fatal, early recognition is essential. To outline the epidemiology and clinical features of JHTS, in comparison to paediatric mild TBI patients without JHTS. Retrospective study of 570 patients with mild TBI admitted to the ED of a level-one trauma centre from 2008 to 2014. Diagnosis of JHTS by experienced neurologists was compared with diagnosis by physicians at the ED. Physicians at the ED diagnosed JHTS more frequently (14%) compared to experienced neurologists (8%). JHTS occurred after a lucid interval varying from 5 to 225 min (mean 44 (SD 64)) with changes in consciousness. JHTS patients were younger compared to mild TBI patients (4.1 (SD 2.4) vs. 7.3 (SD 5.7), p syndrome comprise changes in consciousness and vomiting or changed behaviour on presentation at the ED. For clinical practice, these factors should guide the decision for hospital admission or discharge. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of detector readout gain mode and bowtie filters for cone-beam CT imaging of the head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jennifer; Sisniega, Alejandro; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Dang, Hao; Webster Stayman, J.; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David H.; Aygun, Nafi; Koliatsos, Vassillis E.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2016-08-01

    The effects of detector readout gain mode and bowtie filters on cone-beam CT (CBCT) image quality and dose were characterized for a new CBCT system developed for point-of-care imaging of the head, with potential application to diagnosis of traumatic brain injury, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), and stroke. A detector performance model was extended to include the effects of detector readout gain on electronic digitization noise. The noise performance for high-gain (HG), low-gain (LG), and dual-gain (DG) detector readout was evaluated, and the benefit associated with HG mode in regions free from detector saturation was quantified. Such benefit could be realized (without detector saturation) either via DG mode or by incorporation of a bowtie filter. Therefore, three bowtie filters were investigated that varied in thickness and curvature. A polyenergetic gain correction method was developed to equalize the detector response between the flood-field and projection data in the presence of a bowtie. The effect of bowtie filters on dose, scatter-to-primary ratio, contrast, and noise was quantified in phantom studies, and results were compared to a high-speed Monte Carlo (MC) simulation to characterize x-ray scatter and dose distributions in the head. Imaging in DG mode improved the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) by ~15% compared to LG mode at a dose (D 0, measured at the center of a 16 cm CTDI phantom) of 19 mGy. MC dose calculations agreed with CTDI measurements and showed that bowtie filters reduce peripheral dose by as much as 50% at the same central dose. Bowtie filters were found to increase the CNR per unit square-root dose near the center of the image by ~5-20% depending on bowtie thickness, but reduced CNR in the periphery by ~10-40%. Images acquired at equal CTDIw with and without a bowtie demonstrated a 24% increase in CNR at the center of an anthropomorphic head phantom. Combining a thick bowtie filter with a short arc (180°  +  fan angle) scan centered

  19. The relationship between emotional intelligence and transformational-transactional leadership style among the heads of nursing education departments in Iranian medical universities, 2012

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives: Emotional intelligence contributes to the success in leadership, especially among nursing managers. This study sought to determine the relationship between the components of emotional intelligence and transformational-transactional leadership style among the heads of nursing education departments of Iranian medical universities.Methods: This cross-sectional study used convenience sampling to select the managers of 68 nursing education departments from the country’s ...

  20. Obstacles Faced by Heads of Departments and Faculty Members in the Jordanian Public Universities in the Implementation of Vocational and Technical Education Programs from Their Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Heba Ibraheem; Airout, Mostafa Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to find out the obstacles faced by heads of departments and faculty members at Jordanian public universities in the implementation of vocational and technical education programs from their perspective, and to find out the effect of gender, experience, and academic rank on their perspective. To achieve the aim of the…

  1. An evaluation of the effect that the implementation of the NICE rules may have on a diagnostic imaging department for the early management of head injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, C.; Harvey, J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Guidelines by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) for the early management of minor head injuries initiate the use of computed tomography (CT) for patients who may be at risk of developing intracranial haematoma. This retrospective study was designed to evaluate the effect the implementation of the NICE guidelines would have on the diagnostic imaging department of a local district general hospital. The main objective was to establish if there would be an increase in the number of CT head referrals for patients with minor head injuries. Secondly to assess how the implementation of these guidelines would affect the workload to the diagnostic imaging department in terms of cost and time, and to discuss the issue of radiation dose to patients. Method: A sample of 100 patients who were referred from the Accident and Emergency department (A and E) for plain skull radiographs, over a 4-month period were selected. The clinical information on each of these patients' was then extracted and a data collection sheet was to assess each patient according to the NICE criteria. Results and conclusion: The study found an 18% (n = 100) increase in the referral rate for CT heads for patients presenting with minor head injuries. It was also found that the use of these guidelines would mean a decrease in cost to the diagnostic imaging department of Pounds 324. Furthermore a saving of 10 h of radiographers' time was established, although the effective radiation dose to patients would be increased by 29 mSv. The NICE guidelines have proved efficient in identifying patients with intracranial damage although this coincides with an 18% (n = 100) increase in referral rates for CT and increased radiation dose to patients. However, the use of these guidelines would reduce workload to the diagnostic imaging department in terms of cost and time

  2. Clinical Application of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography of the Rabbit Head: Part 1 – Normal Dentition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, G. G.; Arzi, Boaz; Cissell, Derek D.; Hatcher, David C.; Kass, Philip H.; Zhen, Amy; Verstraete, Frank J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Domestic rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are increasingly popular as household pets; therefore, veterinarians need to be familiar with the most common diseases afflicting rabbits including dental diseases. Diagnostic approaches for dental disease include gross oral examination, endoscopic oral examination, skull radiography, and computed tomography (CT). CT overcomes many limitations of standard radiography by permitting cross-sectional images of the rabbit head in multiple planes without superimposition of anatomic structures. Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is an oral and maxillofacial imaging modality that produces high-resolution images. The objective of this study was to describe and compare the normal anatomic features of the dentition and surrounding maxillofacial structures in healthy rabbits on CBCT and conventional CT. Ten New Zealand white rabbit cadaver heads were scanned using CBCT and conventional CT. Images were evaluated using Anatomage Invivo 5 software. The maxillofacial anatomy was labeled on CBCT images, and the mean lengths and widths of the teeth were determined. The visibility of relevant dental and anatomic features (pulp cavity, germinal center, tooth outline, periodontal ligament) were scored and compared between conventional CT and CBCT. The thinnest teeth were the maxillary second incisor teeth at 1.29 ± 0.26 mm and the maxillary third molar teeth at 1.04 ± 0.10 mm. In general, it was found that CBCT was superior to conventional CT when imaging the dentition. Importantly, the periodontal ligament was significantly (P < 0.01) more visible on CBCT than on conventional CT. Ability to see the periodontal ligament with such detail may allow earlier detection and treatment of periodontal disease in rabbits. This study is the first of its kind and shows the feasibility and yield of CBCT when evaluating the maxillofacial features and dentition in rabbits. PMID:27800485

  3. Ocular dose investigation of head and neck con-beam computed tomography (CBCT) Examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dong Wook; Lee, Se Hyung; Kim, Chan Hyeong [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Image-guided radiation therapy using Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely accepted as a general approach for patient localization and verification during the course of treatment, although the additional imaging doses to patients are still remained in concern. As distinct from the organs related to the radiation induced cancer, the lens of the eye is also sensitive to the radiation exposure mainly related to the induction of a cataract in the lens. Especially, in radiation treatment, the cumulative imaging doses from the frequent CBCT scans can be additionally contributed to the treatment doses. Therefore, concerns about lens doses from CBCT has surfaced as a critical issue. In the present paper, we investigated the lens dose and the effective dose from CBCT scans. In this study, we have successfully used MC method to model Varian CBCT unit. In addition, the modified stylized phantom and MC method have been used to investigate lens doses and effective doses of patient under the CBCT scans.

  4. WE-EF-207-05: Monte Carlo Dosimetry for a Dedicated Cone-Beam CT Head Scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Xu, J; Dang, H; Stayman, J W; Aygun, N; Koliatsos, V E; Siewerdsen, J H [Johns Hopkins University, Balitmore, MD (United States); Wang, X; Foos, D H [Carestream Health, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) is an attractive platform for point-of-care imaging of traumatic brain injury and intracranial hemorrhage. This work implements and evaluates a fast Monte-Carlo (MC) dose estimation engine for development of a dedicated head CBCT scanner, optimization of acquisition protocols, geometry, bowtie filter designs, and patient-specific dosimetry. Methods: Dose scoring with a GPU-based MC CBCT simulator was validated on an imaging bench using a modified 16 cm CTDI phantom with 7 ion chamber shafts along the central ray for 80–100 kVp (+2 mm Al, +0.2 mm Cu). Dose distributions were computed in a segmented CBCT reconstruction of an anthropomorphic head phantom with 4×10{sup 5} tracked photons per scan (5 min runtime). Circular orbits with angular span ranging from short scan (180° + fan angle) to full rotation (360°) were considered for fixed total mAs per scan. Two aluminum filters were investigated: aggressive bowtie, and moderate bowtie (matched to 16 cm and 32 cm water cylinder, respectively). Results: MC dose estimates showed strong agreement with measurements (RMSE<0.001 mGy/mAs). A moderate (aggressive) bowtie reduced the dose, per total mAs, by 20% (30%) at the center of the head, by 40% (50%) at the eye lens, and by 70% (80%) at the posterior skin entrance. For the no bowtie configuration, a short scan reduced the eye lens dose by 62% (from 0.08 mGy/mAs to 0.03 mGy/mAs) compared to full scan, although the dose to spinal bone marrow increased by 40%. For both bowties, the short scan resulted in a similar 40% increase in bone marrow dose, but the reduction in the eye lens was more pronounced: 70% (90%) for the moderate (aggressive) bowtie. Conclusions: Dose maps obtained with validated MC simulation demonstrated dose reduction in sensitive structures (eye lens and bone marrow) through combination of short-scan trajectories and bowtie filters. Xiaohui Wang and David Foos are employees of Carestream Health.

  5. [Value of angiography and embolisation in treatment of head and neck vascular malformations at Otolaryngology Department, Poznań University of Medical Sciences, Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, Maciej; Kopeć, Tomasz; Juszkat, Robert; Szyfterl, Witold; Borucki, Łukasz

    2008-01-01

    Angiography is an invasive, radiological investigation of vascular system. It plays an important role within variety of diagnostic tools in head and neck pathologies. In selected cases with well defined tumor supply vessels, angiography may be combined with intravascular obliteration. This possibility widen indications, which comprise diagnostic arteriographies - visualization of blood supply and extension of vascularization; therapeutic and diagnostic arteriographies - palliative or radical in character, dependent on pathology; and therapeutic angiographies as adjuvant therapy prior to surgical treatment. Authors present their experience with endovascular techniques application in head and neck pathologies. Material comprised 59 angiographies performed in patients treated at Otolaryngology Department at Poznań University of Medical Sciences between 2000-2007. In conclusion authors emphasize advantages and disadvantages, as well as, the role of the endovascular treatment in head and neck surgery.

  6. Observer Evaluation of a Metal Artifact Reduction Algorithm Applied to Head and Neck Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpics, Mark; Surucu, Murat; Mescioglu, Ibrahim; Alite, Fiori; Block, Alec M.; Choi, Mehee; Emami, Bahman; Harkenrider, Matthew M.; Solanki, Abhishek A.; Roeske, John C., E-mail: jroeske@lumc.edu

    2016-11-15

    Purpose and Objectives: To quantify, through an observer study, the reduction in metal artifacts on cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images using a projection-interpolation algorithm, on images containing metal artifacts from dental fillings and implants in patients treated for head and neck (H&N) cancer. Methods and Materials: An interpolation-substitution algorithm was applied to H&N CBCT images containing metal artifacts from dental fillings and implants. Image quality with respect to metal artifacts was evaluated subjectively and objectively. First, 6 independent radiation oncologists were asked to rank randomly sorted blinded images (before and after metal artifact reduction) using a 5-point rating scale (1 = severe artifacts; 5 = no artifacts). Second, the standard deviation of different regions of interest (ROI) within each image was calculated and compared with the mean rating scores. Results: The interpolation-substitution technique successfully reduced metal artifacts in 70% of the cases. From a total of 60 images from 15 H&N cancer patients undergoing image guided radiation therapy, the mean rating score on the uncorrected images was 2.3 ± 1.1, versus 3.3 ± 1.0 for the corrected images. The mean difference in ranking score between uncorrected and corrected images was 1.0 (95% confidence interval: 0.9-1.2, P<.05). The standard deviation of each ROI significantly decreased after artifact reduction (P<.01). Moreover, a negative correlation between the mean rating score for each image and the standard deviation of the oral cavity and bilateral cheeks was observed. Conclusion: The interpolation-substitution algorithm is efficient and effective for reducing metal artifacts caused by dental fillings and implants on CBCT images, as demonstrated by the statistically significant increase in observer image quality ranking and by the decrease in ROI standard deviation between uncorrected and corrected images.

  7. Beam-beam and impedance

    CERN Document Server

    White, S.

    2014-07-17

    As two counter-rotating beams interact they can give rise to coherent dipole modes. Under the influence of impedance these coherent beam-beam modes can couple to higher order head-tail modes and lead to strong instabilities. A fully self-consistent approach including beam-beam and impedance was used to characterize this new coupled mode instability and study possible cures such as a transverse damper and high chromaticity.

  8. The juvenile head trauma syndrome Deterioration after mild TBI : Diagnosis and clinical presentation at the Emergency Department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pikstra, Angelina R. A.; Metting, Zwany; Fock, Johanna M.; van der Naalt, Joukje

    Background: Annually 14.000 children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) are admitted to the Emergency Depathuent (ED) in the Netherlands. Presentation varies and a specific entity comprises the juvenile head trauma syndrome (JHTS) with secondary deterioration after a mild trauma. As outcome of JHTS

  9. Extent of Implementing the Total Quality Management Principles by Academic Departments Heads at Najran University from Faculty Members' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Din, Hesham Moustafa Kamal; Abouzid, Mohamed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the implementing degree of Total Quality Management (TQM) principals by Academic Departmental Heads (ADH) at the Najran University from faculty members' perspectives. It also aimed to determine significant differences between the average estimate of sample section of faculty members about the implementing degree of TQM…

  10. Patient-Centered Decision Support: Formative Usability Evaluation of Integrated Clinical Decision Support With a Patient Decision Aid for Minor Head Injury in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Edward R; Hess, Erik P; Guo, George; Breslin, Maggie; Lopez, Kevin; Pavlo, Anthony J; Abujarad, Fuad; Powsner, Seth M; Post, Lori A

    2017-05-19

    The Canadian Computed Tomography (CT) Head Rule, a clinical decision rule designed to safely reduce imaging in minor head injury, has been rigorously validated and implemented, and yet expected decreases in CT were unsuccessful. Recent work has identified empathic care as a key component in decreasing CT overuse. Health information technology can hinder the clinician-patient relationship. Patient-centered decision tools to support the clinician-patient relationship are needed to promote evidence-based decisions. Our objective is to formatively evaluate an electronic tool that not only helps clinicians at the bedside to determine the need for CT use based on the Canadian CT Head Rule but also promotes evidence-based conversations between patients and clinicians regarding patient-specific risk and patients' specific concerns. User-centered design with practice-based and participatory decision aid development was used to design, develop, and evaluate patient-centered decision support regarding CT use in minor head injury in the emergency department. User experience and user interface (UX/UI) development involved successive iterations with incremental refinement in 4 phases: (1) initial prototype development, (2) usability assessment, (3) field testing, and (4) beta testing. This qualitative approach involved input from patients, emergency care clinicians, health services researchers, designers, and clinical informaticists at every stage. The Concussion or Brain Bleed app is the product of 16 successive iterative revisions in accordance with UX/UI industry design standards. This useful and usable final product integrates clinical decision support with a patient decision aid. It promotes shared use by emergency clinicians and patients at the point of care within the emergency department context. This tablet computer app facilitates evidence-based conversations regarding CT in minor head injury. It is adaptable to individual clinician practice styles. The resultant tool

  11. Integrated beam orientation and scanning-spot optimization in intensity-modulated proton therapy for brain and unilateral head and neck tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wenbo; O'Connor, Daniel; Nguyen, Dan; Yu, Victoria Y; Ruan, Dan; Dong, Lei; Sheng, Ke

    2018-02-02

    Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) is the state-of-the-art method of delivering proton radiotherapy. Previous research has been mainly focused on optimization of scanning spots with manually selected beam angles. Due to the computational complexity, the potential benefit of simultaneously optimizing beam orientations and spot pattern could not be realized. In this study, we developed a novel integrated beam orientation optimization (BOO) and scanning-spot optimization algorithm for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). A brain chordoma and three unilateral head-and-neck patients with a maximal target size of 112.49 cm 3 were included in this study. A total number of 1162 noncoplanar candidate beams evenly distributed across 4π steradians were included in the optimization. For each candidate beam, the pencil-beam doses of all scanning spots covering the PTV and a margin were calculated. The beam angle selection and spot intensity optimization problem was formulated to include three terms: a dose fidelity term to penalize the deviation of PTV and OAR doses from ideal dose distribution; an L1-norm sparsity term to reduce the number of active spots and improve delivery efficiency; a group sparsity term to control the number of active beams between 2 and 4. For the group sparsity term, convex L2,1-norm and nonconvex L2,1/2-norm were tested. For the dose fidelity term, both quadratic function and linearized equivalent uniform dose (LEUD) cost function were implemented. The optimization problem was solved using the Fast Iterative Shrinkage-Thresholding Algorithm (FISTA). The IMPT BOO method was tested on three head-and-neck patients and one skull base chordoma patient. The results were compared with IMPT plans created using column generation selected beams or manually selected beams. The L2,1-norm plan selected spatially aggregated beams, indicating potential degeneracy using this norm. L2,1/2-norm was able to select spatially separated beams and achieve

  12. Head Trauma from Falling Increases Subsequent Emergency Department Visits More Than Other Fall-Related Injuries in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southerland, Lauren T; Stephens, Julie A; Robinson, Shari; Falk, James; Phieffer, Laura; Rosenthal, Joseph A; Caterino, Jeffrey M

    2016-04-01

    To determine whether fall-related injuries affect return to the ED after the initial visit. Retrospective chart review. Academic Level 1 trauma center ED. Individuals aged 65 and older evaluated for a fall from standing height or less and discharged (N = 263, average age 77, 70% female). After institutional review board approval, electronic medical record data were queried. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression models were used to determine factors associated with risk of returning to the ED within 90 days. Injuries included fractures (45%, n = 117); head trauma (22%, n = 58); abrasions, lacerations, or contusions (34%, n = 88); and none (22%, n = 57). Emergency care was frequently required, with 13 (5%, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.3-7.6%) returning within 72 hours, 35 (13%, 95% CI = 9.2-17%] within 30 days, and 57 (22%, 95% CI = 17-27%) within 90 days. Univariately, the odds of returning to the ED within 90 days was more than two times as high for those with head trauma as for those without (odds ratio = 2.66). This remained significant in the multivariable model, which controlled for Charlson Comorbidity Index, fractures, soft tissue injuries, and ED observation unit use. More than one-third of older adults with minor head trauma from a fall will need to return to the ED in the following 90 days. These individuals should receive close attention from primary care providers. The link between minor head trauma and ED recidivism is a new finding. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. Assessment of acute head injury in an emergency department population using sport concussion assessment tool - 3rd edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Zahid, Abdullah; Hubbard, Molly E; Dammavalam, Vikalpa M; Balser, David Y; Pierre, Gritz; Kim, Amie; Kolecki, Radek; Mehmood, Talha; Wall, Stephen P; Frangos, Spiros G; Huang, Paul P; Tupper, David E; Barr, William; Samadani, Uzma

    2018-01-01

    Sport Concussion Assessment Tool version 3 (SCAT-3) is one of the most widely researched concussion assessment tools in athletes. Here normative data for SCAT3 in nonathletes are presented. The SCAT3 was administered to 98 nonathlete healthy controls, as well as 118 participants with head-injury and 46 participants with other body trauma (OI) presenting to the ED. Reference values were derived and classifier functions were built to assess the accuracy of SCAT3. The control population had a mean of 2.30 (SD = 3.62) symptoms, 4.38 (SD = 8.73) symptom severity score (SSS), and 26.02 (SD = 2.52) standardized assessment of concussion score (SAC). Participants were more likely to be diagnosed with a concussion (from among healthy controls) if the SSS > 7; or SSS ≤ 7 and SAC ≤22 (sensitivity = 96%, specificity = 77%). Identification of head injury patients from among both, healthy controls and body trauma was possible using rule SSS > 7 and headache or pressure in head present, or SSS ≤ 7 and SAC ≤ 22 (sensitivity = 87%, specificity = 80%). In this current study, the SCAT-3 provided high sensitivity to discriminate acute symptoms of TBI in the ED setting. Individuals with a SSS > 7 and headache or pressure in head, or SSS ≤ 7 but with a SAC ≤ 22 within 48-hours of an injury should undergo further testing.

  14. Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies: Open Data Policy--Managing Information as an Asset

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    Information is a valuable national resource and a strategic asset to the Federal Government, its partners, and the public. In order to ensure that the Federal Government is taking full advantage of its information resources, executive departments and...

  15. 14th September 2011 - US Under Secretary for Science, Department of Energy S. Koonin signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    CERN-HI-1109234 48, from left to right: ALICE Collaboration USA National Coordination J. Harris, ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford, Head of International Relations F. Pauss, Under Secretary for Science, Department of Energy S. Koonin, Adviser for the US R. Voss, Special Assistant to Under Secretary for Science C. Lin, CMS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson and Spokesperson elect 2012-2013 J. Incandela and LHC Collaboration S. Stone.During his tour of the LHC superconducting magnet test hall he saw one of the superconducting inner-triplet magnets contributed by Fermilab to the LHC. His visit also included the CMS, ATLAS and ALICE experiments as well as the CERN Control Centre.

  16. 4 April 2013 - Spanish State Secretary of Science, Development and Innovation C. Vela Olmo in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    4 April 2013 - Spanish State Secretary of Science, Development and Innovation C. Vela Olmo in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  17. 25 February 2013- President A. Acar of the Turkish Middle East Technical University signing the guest book with Engineering Department Head R. Saban and Adviser for Relations with Turkey E. Tsesmelis.

    CERN Multimedia

    Samuel Morier-Genoud

    2013-01-01

    25 February 2013- President A. Acar of the Turkish Middle East Technical University signing the guest book with Engineering Department Head R. Saban and Adviser for Relations with Turkey E. Tsesmelis.

  18. Wolfsberg Executive Director P. Guptara at ATLAS experiment with ATLAS Resources Coordinator M. Nordberg, LHC machine Technical Coordination and Planning P. Proudlock and Information Technology Department Head W. von Rüden on 21 September 2006.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Wolfsberg Executive Director P. Guptara at ATLAS experiment with ATLAS Resources Coordinator M. Nordberg, LHC machine Technical Coordination and Planning P. Proudlock and Information Technology Department Head W. von Rüden on 21 September 2006.

  19. 29 May 2013 - Rector Politecnico di Torino M. Gilli in the ATLAS experimental cavern with L. Pontecorvo (ATLAS Collaboration) and in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Engineering Department Head R. Saban.

    CERN Multimedia

    VMO

    2013-01-01

    29 May 2013 - Rector Politecnico di Torino M. Gilli in the ATLAS experimental cavern with L. Pontecorvo (ATLAS Collaboration) and in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Engineering Department Head R. Saban.

  20. 24th May 2011 - ITER Organization Director-General O.Motojima visiting SM18 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Deputy L. Rossi, accompanied by Adviser for Relations with ITER J.-P. Koutchouk.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    24th May 2011 - ITER Organization Director-General O.Motojima visiting SM18 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Deputy L. Rossi, accompanied by Adviser for Relations with ITER J.-P. Koutchouk.

  1. 23rd August 2011 - Turkish Representatives of the Union of Chambers and Commodity Exchanges, E. Uluatam and S. Kologlu, visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Engineering Department Head R. Saban.

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Jeannet

    2011-01-01

    23rd August 2011 - Turkish Representatives of the Union of Chambers and Commodity Exchanges, E. Uluatam and S. Kologlu, visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Engineering Department Head R. Saban.

  2. Design of a Multi-Pinhole Collimator for I-123 DaTscan Imaging on Dual-Headed SPECT Systems in Combination with a Fan-Beam Collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael A; Mukherjee, Joyeeta M; Könik, Arda; Zubal, I George; Dey, Joyoni; Licho, Robert

    2016-02-01

    For the 2011 FDA approved Parkinson's Disease (PD) SPECT imaging agent I-123 labeled DaTscan, the volume of interest (VOI) is the interior portion of the brain. However imaging of the occipital lobe is also required with PD for calculation of the striatal binding ratio (SBR), a parameter of significance in early diagnosis, differentiation of PD from other disorders with similar clinical presentations, and monitoring progression. Thus we propose the usage of a combination of a multi-pinhole (MPH) collimator on one head of the SPECT system and a fan-beam on the other. The MPH would be designed to provide high resolution and sensitivity for imaging of the interior portion of the brain. The fan-beam collimator would provide lower resolution but complete sampling of the brain addressing data sufficiency and allowing a volume-of-interest to be defined over the occipital lobe for calculation of SBR's. Herein we focus on the design of the MPH component of the combined system. Combined reconstruction will be addressed in a subsequent publication. An analysis of 46 clinical DaTscan studies was performed to provide information to define the VOI, and design of a MPH collimator to image this VOI. The system spatial resolution for the MPH was set to 4.7 mm, which is comparable to that of clinical PET systems, and significantly smaller than that of fan-beam collimators employed in SPECT. With this set, we compared system sensitivities for three aperture array designs, and selected the 3 × 3 array due to it being the highest of the three. The combined sensitivity of the apertures for it was similar to that of an ultra-high resolution fan-beam (LEUHRF) collimator, but smaller than that of a high-resolution fan-beam collimator (LEHRF). On the basis of these results we propose the further exploration of this design through simulations, and the development of combined MPH and fan-beam reconstruction.

  3. [Odontogenic inflammations of head and neck area treated in the Department of Otolaryngology in St. Łukasz Regional Hospital - five years observation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtarowicz, Agnieszka; Dobroś, Wiesław

    2014-01-01

    In the ethology of inflammations within the head and neck area, odontogenic ethology still plays an important role. Early recognition, diagnosis and management of odontogenic infections are requisites for avoiding or minimizing the development of potential complications. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze the clinical presentation, surgical management and cost implications of patients treated for odontogenic inflammations of head and neck area at the Department of Otolaryngology in the Regional Hospital in Tarnów in last 5 years. The study was based on medical documentations of 65 patients, 34 males and 31 females between the age of 16-83 years. Despite common accessibility of wholesome education and dental prevention, a lot of patients disregard their disorders. That's why treatment of odontogenic inflammations is often difficult and prolonged. The authors reveal a cost burden in a public health care as a result of odontogenic inflammations. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  4. Design and optimization of a beam shaping assembly for BNCT based on D-T neutron generator and dose evaluation using a simulated head phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, Fatemeh S; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2012-12-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to design a beam shaping assembly for BNCT based on D-T neutron generator. The optimization of this configuration has been realized in different steps. This proposed system consists of metallic uranium as neutron multiplier, TiF(3) and Al(2)O(3) as moderators, Pb as reflector, Ni as shield and Li-Poly as collimator to guide neutrons toward the patient position. The in-air parameters recommended by IAEA were assessed for this proposed configuration without using any filters which enables us to have a high epithermal neutron flux at the beam port. Also a simulated Snyder head phantom was used to evaluate dose profiles due to the irradiation of designed beam. The dose evaluation results and depth-dose curves show that the neutron beam designed in this work is effective for deep-seated brain tumor treatments even with D-T neutron generator with a neutron yield of 2.4×10(12) n/s. The Monte Carlo Code MCNP-4C is used in order to perform these calculations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of Computed tomography (CT scan ordering in children with mild head injury at Emergency Department at Suez Canal University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abouzeid

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available CT is the gold standard diagnostic test for evaluating children with head trauma however, this procedure has disadvantages, including exposure to ionizing radiation, transport of the child away from the direct supervision of emergency physicians, the frequent requirement for pharmacologic sedation, additional health care costs, and increased time for completing Emergency Department (ED evaluation. The Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN is a clinical decision rule that aims to determine which children are at very low risk of developing clinically important traumatic brain injury (ci TBI * and who therefore do not require a CT scan of the head. *(ci TBI defined by death from TBI, need for Neurosurgery, intubation more than 24 hours for TBI, or Hospital admission more than 2 nights for TBI. Aim of the study: The aim of this study was to improve the quality of management of children with mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI at the Emergency Department (ED by evaluating CT scan ordering in comparison to the PECARN clinical decision rule (CDR. Methodology: The present study was a cross sectional observational study that was conducted at the Emergency Department (ED of Suez Canal University (SCU Hospital. It included 97 children 18 years old or younger with history of blunt head trauma within the last 24 hours with Glasgow coma score (GCS between 13-15 who presented to ED of SCU Hospital. Results: The present study revealed that 20.6% of patients were classified as High Risk, 45.3% as Intermediate Risk, and 35% as Low risk of developing (ci TBI according to PECARN CDR. CT scan was ordered in all patients classified as High Risk, 90.9% of patients classified as Intermediate Risk, and 51.5% of patients classified as Low Risk. This study also revealed that falling from height (FFH was the most common cause of mTBI (60% of patients and direct head injury was the second common cause (30% of patients. Conclusion: The present study

  6. In memory of professor Czesław Niżankowski, Head of the Department of Anatomy, Wroclaw Medical University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacała, Ryszard R; Wronecki, Krzysztof; Kacała, Arkadiusz; Domagała, Zygmunt; Porwolik, Michał

    2018-03-20

    Professor Czesław Niżankowski was an academic teacher and researcher at several universities; head of the Department of Anatomy at Wroclaw Medical University (1966-1982); and head of the Department of Biological Sciences at the Wrocław School of Physical Education (since 1972 University School of Physical Education in Wrocław), as well as the chancellor there. He contributed greatly to the development of morphological sciences, supervising many doctoral and post-doctoral works. He dedicated considerable time to the preparation of anatomical specimens of lungs, hearts and organs of the gastrointestinal tract. At the Museum of Anatomy, there are over 100 specimens of lungs prepared using the forced air technique improved by Professor Niżankowski, along with specimens of the bronchial tree and vascular system prepared using a corrosive technique. Professor Niżankowski was an active member of scientific societies in Wrocław and in other cities in Poland. For his accomplishments, he received a number of ministerial and state awards, including the Knight's Cross of the Order of Polonia Restituta, and was granted an honorary doctorate by Wroclaw Medical University.

  7. Dose calculation accuracy of different image value to density tables for cone-beam CT planning in head & neck and pelvic localizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barateau, Anaïs; Garlopeau, Christopher; Cugny, Audrey; De Figueiredo, Bénédicte Henriques; Dupin, Charles; Caron, Jérôme; Antoine, Mikaël

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to identify the most accurate combination of phantom and protocol for image value to density table (IVDT) on volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dose calculation based on kV-Cone-beam CT imaging, for head and neck (H&N) and pelvic localizations. Three phantoms (Catphan(®)600, CIRS(®)062M (inner phantom for head and outer phantom for body), and TomoTherapy(®) "Cheese" phantom) were used to create IVDT curves of CBCT systems with two different CBCT protocols (Standard-dose Head and Standard Pelvis). Hounsfield Unit (HU) time stability and repeatability for a single On-Board-Imager (OBI) and compatibility of two distinct devices were assessed with Catphan(®)600. Images from the anthropomorphic phantom CIRS ATOM(®) for both CT and CBCT modalities were used for VMAT dose calculation from different IVDT curves. Dosimetric indices from CT and CBCT imaging were compared. IVDT curves from CBCT images were highly different depending on phantom used (up to 1000 HU for high densities) and protocol applied (up to 200 HU for high densities). HU time stability was verified over seven weeks. A maximum difference of 3% on the dose calculation indices studied was found between CT and CBCT VMAT dose calculation across the two localizations using appropriate IVDT curves. One IVDT curve per localization can be established with a bi-monthly verification of IVDT-CBCT. The IVDT-CBCTCIRS-Head phantom with the Standard-dose Head protocol was the most accurate combination for dose calculation on H&N CBCT images. For pelvic localizations, the IVDT-CBCTCheese established with the Standard Pelvis protocol provided the best accuracy. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 28 August 2013 - Director of Technical Quality Management Head of ESTEC Establishment European Space Agency F. Ongaro visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Technology Department J.-P. Tock; visiting the ATLAS experimental area with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. Accompanied throughout by F. Bordry and V. Parma.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    28 August 2013 - Director of Technical Quality Management Head of ESTEC Establishment European Space Agency F. Ongaro visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Technology Department J.-P. Tock; visiting the ATLAS experimental area with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. Accompanied throughout by F. Bordry and V. Parma.

  9. 10 September 2013 - Italian Minister for Economic Development F. Zanonato visiting the ATLAS cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton and Italian scientists F. Gianotti and A. Di Ciaccio; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci; in the LHC tunnel with S. Bertolucci, Technology Deputy Department Head L. Rossi and Engineering Department Head R. Saban; visiting CMS cavern with Scientists G. Rolandi and P. Checchia.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    10 September 2013 - Italian Minister for Economic Development F. Zanonato visiting the ATLAS cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton and Italian scientists F. Gianotti and A. Di Ciaccio; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci; in the LHC tunnel with S. Bertolucci, Technology Deputy Department Head L. Rossi and Engineering Department Head R. Saban; visiting CMS cavern with Scientists G. Rolandi and P. Checchia.

  10. 6th July 2010 - United Kingdom Science and Technology Facilities Council W. Whitehorn signing the guest book with Head of International relations F. Pauss, visiting the Computing Centre with Information Technology Department Head Deputy D. Foster, the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department P. Strubin,the Centre Control Centre with Operation Group Leader M. Lamont and the CLIC/CTF3 facility with Project Leader J.-P. Delahaye.

    CERN Multimedia

    Teams : M. Brice, JC Gadmer

    2010-01-01

    6th July 2010 - United Kingdom Science and Technology Facilities Council W. Whitehorn signing the guest book with Head of International relations F. Pauss, visiting the Computing Centre with Information Technology Department Head Deputy D. Foster, the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department P. Strubin,the Centre Control Centre with Operation Group Leader M. Lamont and the CLIC/CTF3 facility with Project Leader J.-P. Delahaye.

  11. Use of External Beam Radiotherapy Is Associated With Reduced Incidence of Second Primary Head and Neck Cancer: A SEER Database Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusthoven, Kyle; Chen Changhu; Raben, David; Kavanagh, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer have a significant risk of developing a second primary cancer of the head and neck. We hypothesized that treatment with external beam radiotherapy (RT) might reduce this risk, because RT can eradicate occult foci of second head and neck cancer (HNCA). Methods and Materials: The data of patients with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Historic Stage A localized squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, larynx, and pharynx were queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. For patients treated with or without RT, the incidence of second HNCA was determined and compared using the log-rank method. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed for each site, evaluating the influence of covariates on the risk of second HNCA. Results: Between 1973 and 1997, 27,985 patients were entered with localized HNCA. Of these patients, 44% had received RT and 56% had not. The 15-year incidence of second HNCA was 7.7% with RT vs. 10.5% without RT (hazard ratio 0.71, p <0.0001). The effect of RT was more profound in patients diagnosed between 1988 and 1997 (hazard ratio 0.53, p <0.0001) and those with pharynx primaries (hazard ratio 0.47, p <0.0001). On multivariate analysis, RT was associated with a reduced risk of second HNCA for pharynx (p <0.0001) and larynx (p = 0.04) tumors. For oral cavity primaries, RT was associated with an increased risk of second HNCA in patients treated before 1988 (p <0.001), but had no influence on patients treated between 1988 and 1997 (p = 0.91). Conclusion: For localized HNCA, RT is associated with a reduced incidence of second HNCA. These observations are consistent with the eradication of microscopic foci of second HNCA with external beam RT

  12. 1 April 2014 - President of the Parliament of the Principality of Liechtenstein A. Frick and his delegation visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head J.M. Jiménez and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. Deputy Head of International Relations E. Tsesmelis present throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Pantelia, Anna

    2014-01-01

    1 April 2014 - President of the Parliament of the Principality of Liechtenstein A. Frick and his delegation visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head J.M. Jiménez and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. Deputy Head of International Relations E. Tsesmelis present throughout.

  13. 5 December 2011 - Chilean President of the Comision Nacional de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica J. M. Aguilera in the ATLAS visitor centre with Adviser J. Salicio Diez and ATLAS Collaboration G. Mikenberg; signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Department Head F. Bordry.

    CERN Multimedia

    VMO Team

    2011-01-01

    5 December 2011 - Chilean President of the Comision Nacional de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica J. M. Aguilera in the ATLAS visitor centre with Adviser J. Salicio Diez and ATLAS Collaboration G. Mikenberg; signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Department Head F. Bordry.

  14. 30th November 2010 - Norwegian Ministry of Government Administration, Reform and Church Affairs State Secretary R. Valle signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci; visiting CERN Computer Centre with Information Technology Department Head F. Hemmer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    30th November 2010 - Norwegian Ministry of Government Administration, Reform and Church Affairs State Secretary R. Valle signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci; visiting CERN Computer Centre with Information Technology Department Head F. Hemmer.

  15. 5 June 2013 - European Union Ambassador to Switzerland and the Principality of Liechtenstein R. Jones in the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler, in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer. Head of the EU Projects Office S. Stavrev present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    5 June 2013 - European Union Ambassador to Switzerland and the Principality of Liechtenstein R. Jones in the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler, in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer. Head of the EU Projects Office S. Stavrev present.

  16. 14th March 2011 - Australian Senator the Hon. K. Carr Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research in the ATLAS Visitor Centre with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti,visiting the SM18 area with G. De Rijk,the Computing centre with Department Head F. Hemmer, signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer with Head of International relations F. Pauss

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-claude Gadmer

    2011-01-01

    14th March 2011 - Australian Senator the Hon. K. Carr Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research in the ATLAS Visitor Centre with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti,visiting the SM18 area with G. De Rijk,the Computing centre with Department Head F. Hemmer, signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer with Head of International relations F. Pauss

  17. 17 January 2014 - Y. Sakurada Japanese Senior Vice Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head J.M. Jiménez. Head of International Relations R. Voss present throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Pantelia, Anna

    2014-01-01

    17 January 2014 - Y. Sakurada Japanese Senior Vice Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head J.M. Jiménez. Head of International Relations R. Voss present throughout.

  18. Study of Microorganism Growth Pattern in Nasal Pack of Patients Visiting the Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, I; Pokharel, M; Dhakal, A; Amatya, R Cm; Madhup, S; Sherchan, J B

    2015-01-01

    Background Nasal packs are utilized nearly by otorhinolaryngologists for controlling epistaxis and post nasal procedures. Complications have been reported due to them; therefore the use of antibiotics is a common practice among otorhinolaryngologists. Objective To detect microbiological flora associated with nasal packing and find evidence to support the benefit of systemic antibiotics with it. Method A prospective, analytical study was conducted on 51 patients presenting to the Department of ENT, KUSMS from June to September 2015 who required nasal packing. Approval of the local Institutional review committee (IRC) was taken. The mid part of the pack was collected in a sterile bottle under aseptic technique and sent to microbiology department. Specimen collection, culture, identification tests were done according to the guidelines by American Society for Microbiology. Data were collected using the individual patient records and Microsoft Office Excel 2007. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS 16.0. Result Among the 51 cultures; 33 (64.7%) were positive. In 18 (35.3%) cultures no organism was grown. Statistical analysis did not show significance between duration of pack kept with microbial growth (p=0.051) or the type of pack kept (p=0.212) .It showed significance with foul smell of the pack to the growth (p <0.001). Conclusion Microbiological flora was associated with nasal pack. Antibiotic soaked nasal packs have lesser incidence of positive bacterial growth when compared with plain nasal packs. Nasal packs kept for less than 48 hours have lesser incidence of positive bacterial growth when compared with nasal packs kept for more than 48 hours. Therefore, administering systemic antibiotics in cases when we plan to keep the pack for longer duration is recommended.

  19. Validated image fusion of dedicated PET and CT for external beam radiation and therapy in the head and neck area.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, W.V.; Schinagl, D.A.X.; Dalen, J.A. van; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2008-01-01

    AIM: Integration of positron emission tomography (PET) information into computer tomography (CT)- based intensity modulated external beam radiation therapy (IMRT) allows adaptation of the target volume to functional parameters, but only when the image registration procedure is reliable. The aim of

  20. Final report to US Department of Energy: Cyclotron autoresonance accelerator for electron beam dry scrubbing of flue gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, J.L.

    2001-05-25

    Several designs have been built and operated of microwave cyclotron autoresonance accelerators (CARA's) with electron beam parameters suitable for remediation of pollutants in flue gas emissions from coal-burning power plants. CARA designs have also been developed with a TW-level 10.6 micron laser driver for electron acceleration from 50 to 100 MeV, and with UHF drivers for proton acceleration to over 500 MeV. Dose requirements for reducing SO2, NOx, and particulates in flue gas emissions to acceptable levels have been surveyed, and used to optimize the design of an electron beam source to deliver this dose.

  1. Measuring uncertainty in dose delivered to the cochlea due to setup error during external beam treatment of patients with cancer of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, M; Lovelock, D; Hunt, M; Mechalakos, J; Hu, Y; Pham, H; Jackson, A

    2013-12-01

    To use Cone Beam CT scans obtained just prior to treatments of head and neck cancer patients to measure the setup error and cumulative dose uncertainty of the cochlea. Data from 10 head and neck patients with 10 planning CTs and 52 Cone Beam CTs taken at time of treatment were used in this study. Patients were treated with conventional fractionation using an IMRT dose painting technique, most with 33 fractions. Weekly radiographic imaging was used to correct the patient setup. The authors used rigid registration of the planning CT and Cone Beam CT scans to find the translational and rotational setup errors, and the spatial setup errors of the cochlea. The planning CT was rotated and translated such that the cochlea positions match those seen in the cone beam scans, cochlea doses were recalculated and fractional doses accumulated. Uncertainties in the positions and cumulative doses of the cochlea were calculated with and without setup adjustments from radiographic imaging. The mean setup error of the cochlea was 0.04 ± 0.33 or 0.06 ± 0.43 cm for RL, 0.09 ± 0.27 or 0.07 ± 0.48 cm for AP, and 0.00 ± 0.21 or -0.24 ± 0.45 cm for SI with and without radiographic imaging, respectively. Setup with radiographic imaging reduced the standard deviation of the setup error by roughly 1-2 mm. The uncertainty of the cochlea dose depends on the treatment plan and the relative positions of the cochlea and target volumes. Combining results for the left and right cochlea, the authors found the accumulated uncertainty of the cochlea dose per fraction was 4.82 (0.39-16.8) cGy, or 10.1 (0.8-32.4) cGy, with and without radiographic imaging, respectively; the percentage uncertainties relative to the planned doses were 4.32% (0.28%-9.06%) and 10.2% (0.7%-63.6%), respectively. Patient setup error introduces uncertainty in the position of the cochlea during radiation treatment. With the assistance of radiographic imaging during setup, the standard deviation of setup error reduced by 31

  2. Utilization of intensity modulated beam radiotherapy (IMBXRT) to diminish dose to the parotid gland in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiao, W. Woo; Grant, Walter H.; Butler, E. Brian

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine if intensity conformal modulated radiotherapy could diminish the radiation dose to the parotid gland in the treatment of primary head and neck cancer. Materials and Methods: The NOMOS Peacock treatment system was utilized in the planning and delivery of conformal radiotherapy for the following diseases: 1) an oropharyngeal cancer that extends from the soft palate to the tonsillar fossa without nodal disease, 2) laryngeal hypopharyngeal cancer without nodal disease, 3) and adenocystic carcinoma, that originated in the hard palate. Patients were treated to areas suspicious for microscopic disease (nodal disease in 1 and 2, perineural spread in 3) at 2 Gy per fraction for a tc of 50 Gy in five weeks. The primary disease was treated at 2.4 Gy per fraction for a total of 60 Gy over five weeks. The percent of the volume of each parotid gland receiving < 20 Gy, <25 Gy and <30 Gy retrospectively was determined for each of the above mentioned optimized plans. The patients were observed for the clinical development of xerostomia. Results: No patient developed clinically apparent xerostomia within one month of completion of radiotherapy. Conclusion: IMBXRT could reduce the volume to parotid glands receiving high radiation doses. Sparing of the parotid glands appear to be most easily accomplished when irradiating head and neck tumors that do not require regional nodal treatment. For head and neck cancer that requires nodal treatment it is possible to spare a significant portion of the parotid glands if the disease originates below the hyoid bone where the primary site is not in close proximity to the parotid glands. Objective salivary flow data are being obtained pre ar post treatment, to confirm the subjective impression of lack of clinical xerostomia. IMBXRT is potentially beneficial in decreasing the morbidity of xerostomia related to head and neck irradiation

  3. Investigation of changes in brain natriuretic peptide serum levels and its diagnostic value in patients with mild and moderate head trauma, in patients referred to emergency department of Alzahra Hospital, Isfahan, 2013-2014

    OpenAIRE

    Reza Azizkhani; Es'haq Keshavarz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Head trauma is one of the most common reasons for emergency department (ED) care. Over the past decade, initial management strategies in mild and moderate head trauma have become focused on selective computed tomography (CT) use based upon presence or absence of specific aspects of patient history and/or clinical examination which has received more attention following reports of increased cancer risk from CT scans. Recently changes in serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels f...

  4. The relationship between emotional intelligence and transformational-transactional leadership style among the heads of nursing education departments in Iranian medical universities, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Emotional intelligence contributes to the success in leadership, especially among nursing managers. This study sought to determine the relationship between the components of emotional intelligence and transformational-transactional leadership style among the heads of nursing education departments of Iranian medical universities.Methods: This cross-sectional study used convenience sampling to select the managers of 68 nursing education departments from the country’s universities of medical sciences. Data were collected using the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory and Bass’s Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire. Data analysis was performed with Pearson’s correlation coefficient, analysis of variance, and Student’s test in SPSS version 16.0.Results: There was a direct, positive correlation between emotional intelligence and leadership style (P < 0.05 r = 0.36. The components of problem solving, happiness, independence, self-actualization, emotional self-awareness, interpersonal relationship, optimism, and accountability showed significant correlations with all leadership styles. However, impulse control was not significantly correlation with any of the leadership styles.Conclusion: Considering the significant positive correlation between the components of emotional intelligence and leadership styles, training about emotional intelligence and its components and reinforcing the components of emotional intelligence can be beneficial to presenting leadership styles and thus more successful management.

  5. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector on a mobile C-arm: preclinical investigation in image-guided surgery of the head and neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewerdsen, J. H.; Chan, Y.; Rafferty, M. A.; Moseley, D. J.; Jaffray, D. A.; Irish, J. C.

    2005-04-01

    A promising imaging platform for combined low-dose fluoroscopy and cone-beam CT (CBCT) guidance of interventional procedures has been developed in our laboratory. Based on a mobile isocentric C-arm (Siemens PowerMobil) incorporating a high-performance flat-panel detector (Varian PaxScan 4030CB), the system demonstrates sub-mm 3D spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility with field of view sufficient for head and body sites. For pre-clinical studies in head neck tumor surgery, we hypothesize that the 3D intraoperative information provided by CBCT permits precise, aggressive techniques with improved avoidance of critical structures. The objectives include: 1) quantify improvement in surgical performance achieved with CBCT guidance compared to open and endoscopic techniques; and 2) investigate specific, challenging surgical tasks under CBCT guidance. Investigations proceed from an idealized phantom model to cadaveric specimens. A novel surgical performance evaluation method based on statistical decision theory is applied to excision and avoidance tasks. Analogous to receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis in medical imaging, the method quantifies surgical performance in terms of Lesion-Excised (True-Positve), Lesion-Remaining (False-Negative), Normal-Excised (False-Positive), and Normal-Remaining (True-Negative) fractions. Conservative and aggressive excision and avoidance tasks are executed in 12 cadaveric specimens with and without CBCT guidance, including: dissection through dura, preservation of posterior lamina, ethmoid air cells removal, exposure of peri-orbita, and excision of infiltrated bone in the skull base (clivus). Intraoperative CBCT data was found to dramatically improve surgical performance and confidence in the execution of such tasks. Pre-clinical investigation of this platform in head and neck surgery, as well as spinal, trauma, biopsy, and other nonvascular procedures, is discussed.

  6. SU-F-T-224: Importance of Timely Review of Daily Cone-Beam CTs: Dosimetric Evaluation of Rejected CBCTs for Head and Neck Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, M; Yu, N; Joshi, N; Koyfman, S; Xia, P [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lin, S [Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To dosimetrically evaluate the importance of timely reviewing daily CBCTs for patients with head and neck cancer. Methods: After each fraction daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) for head and neck patients are reviewed by physicians prior to next treatment. Physician rejected image registrations of CBCT were identified and analyzed for 17 patients. These CBCT images were rigidly fused with planning CT images and the contours from the planning CT were transferred to CBCTs. Because of limited extension in the superior-inferior dimension contours with partial volumes in CBCTs were discarded. The treatment isocenter was placed by applying the clinically recorded shifts to the volume isocenter of the CBCT. Dose was recalculated at the shifted isocenter using a homogeneous dose calculation algorithm. Dosimetrically relevant changes defined as greater than 5% deviation from the clinically accepted plans but with homogeneous dose calculation were evaluated for the high dose (HD), intermediate dose (ID), and low dose (LD) CTVs, spinal cord, larynx, oropharynx, parotids, and submandibular glands. Results: Among seventeen rejected CBCTS, HD-CTVs, ID-CTVs, and LD-CTVs were completely included in the CBCTs for 17, 1, and 15 patients, respectively. The prescription doses to the HD-CTV, ID-CTV, and LD-CTV were received by < 95% of the CTV volumes in 5/17, 1/1, and 5/15 patients respectively. For the spinal cord, the maximum doses (D0.03cc) were increased > 5% in 13 of 17 patients. For the oropharynx, larynx, parotid, and submandibular glands, the mean dose of these organs at risk was increased > 5% in 7/17, 8/12, 11/16 and 6/16 patients, respectively. Conclusion: Timely review daily CBCTs for head and neck patients under daily CBCT guidance is important, and uncorrected setup errors can translate to dosimetrically relevant dose increases in organsat- risk and dose decreases in the clinical target volumes.

  7. Evaluation of image quality for different kV cone-beam CT acquisition and reconstruction methods in the head and neck region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elstroem, Ulrik V.; Muren, Ludvig P. (Dept. of Oncology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)), e-mail: ulrielst@rm.dk; Petersen, Joergen B. B. (Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)); Grau, Cai (Dept. of Oncology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark))

    2011-08-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the image quality obtained in a standard QA phantom with both clinical and non-clinical cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquisition modes for the head and neck (HN) region as a step towards CBCT-based treatment planning. The impact of deteriorated Hounsfield unit (HU) accuracy was investigated by comparing results from clinical CBCT image reconstructions to those obtained from a pre-clinical scatter correction algorithm. Methods. Five different CBCT acquisition modes on a clinical system for kV CBCT-guided radiotherapy were investigated. Image reconstruction was performed in both standard clinical software and with an experimental reconstruction algorithm with improved beam hardening and scatter correction. Using the Catphan 504 phantom, quantitative measures of HU uniformity, HU verification and linearity, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and spatial resolution using modulation transfer function (MTF) estimation were assessed. To benchmark the CBCT image properties, comparison to standard HN protocols on conventional CT scanners was performed by similar measures. Results. The HU uniformity within a water-equivalent homogeneous region was considerably improved using experimental vs. standard reconstruction, by factors of two for partial scans and four for full scans. Similarly, the amount of capping/cupping artifact was reduced by more than 1.5%. With mode and reconstruction specific HU calibration using seven inhomogeneity inserts comparable HU linearity was observed. CNR was on average 5% higher for experimental reconstruction (scaled with the square-root of dose between modes for both reconstruction methods). Conclusions. Judged on parameters affecting the common diagnostic image properties, improved beam hardening and scatter correction diminishes the difference between CBCT and CT image quality considerably. In the pursuit of CBCT-based treatment adaptation, dedicated imaging protocols may be required

  8. William Brinkman (centre), Director of the Department of Energy, U.S.A. at the superconducting magnet test hall SM18 with (from left to right) Coordinator for External Relations F. Pauss, Advisor for Non-Member States J. Ellis, J. Strait from Fermilab and Deputy Head of Technology Department L. Rossi on 13 November 2009.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice; SM18

    2009-01-01

    William Brinkman (centre), Director of the Department of Energy, U.S.A. at the superconducting magnet test hall SM18 with (from left to right) Coordinator for External Relations F. Pauss, Advisor for Non-Member States J. Ellis, J. Strait from Fermilab and Deputy Head of Technology Department L. Rossi on 13 November 2009.

  9. 13 September 2013 - Chairman of the Board of Directors of the von Karman Institute Kingdom of Belgium J.-P. Contzen visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department N. Delruelle and signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. International Relations Adviser T. Kurtyka present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Egli (visit)

    2013-01-01

    13 September 2013 - Chairman of the Board of Directors of the von Karman Institute Kingdom of Belgium J.-P. Contzen visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department N. Delruelle and signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. International Relations Adviser T. Kurtyka present.

  10. Accuracy of software-assisted contour propagation from planning CT to cone beam CT in head and neck radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Christian A.; Elstrøm, Ulrik V.; Jensen, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    the clinical target to counteract multiple uncertainties, including daily setup errors, target definition, and interfraction changes in the anatomy. Several studies indicate that the anatomical changes in these patients over the course of treatment can be substantial [7–9 Barker JL, Garden AS, Ang KK, et al...... contouring of target volumes and normal tissues, which remains a time consuming task, even for experienced clinicians. There is a growing array of commercial software aimed at easing this burden by automatic contouring, utilizing novel deformable image registration (DIR) techniques to propagate one set...... have been found to reduce contouring time considerably [15 La Macchia M, Fellin F, Amichetti M, et al. Systematic evaluation of three different commercial software solutions for automatic segmentation for adaptive therapy in head-and-neck, prostate and pleural cancer. Radiat Oncol 2012;7:160. [Cross...

  11. The use of cone-beam computed tomography in an orthodontic department in between research and daily clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Paolo M; Melsen, Birte

    2008-01-01

    A correct orthodontic diagnosis needs to be based on accurate images of the craniofacial region and is crucial for the development of a valid treatment plan. A cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanner allows 3D imaging of the craniofacial complex. CBCT scanners represent a significant advantage in imaging capabilities for dentistry and orthodontics, replacing conventional 2D radiographic images with 3D data sets and only a small increase in radiation. The present study surveys the rationale, advantages, and disadvantages of the available CBCT appliances and presents answers to questions often asked in relation to this technology.

  12. Shore Duty Department Head School

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-01

    which needs documentation from objective data to support it and make it believable. * Numbers, facts, lists, trends , information that people cannot...thoroughly familiar with policies and procedures. Know-your people, know the situation and trends . Breadth of Knowledge. This is an area that will help build...107) Descriptive Ethics Metaethics Normative Ethics This level is broken down into: eManagerial ethics - eBusiness ethics *Professional ethics 11- 14

  13. Novel information theory based method for superimposition of lateral head radiographs and cone beam computed tomography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, W; Nyssen, E; Bottenberg, P; de Groen, P; Vande Vannet, B

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to introduce a novel alignment criterion, focus mutual information (FMI), for the superimposition of lateral cephalometric radiographs and three dimensional (3D) cone beam computed images as well as the assessment of the alignment characteristics of the new method and comparison of the novel methodology with the region of interest (ROI) approach. Methods Implementation of a FMI criterion-based methodology that only requires the approximate indication of stable structures in one single image. The robustness of the method was first addressed in a phantom experiment comparing the new technique with a ROI approach. Two consecutive cephalometric radiographs were then obtained, one before and one after functional twin block application. These images were then superimposed using alignment by FMI where the following were focused on, in several ways: (1) cranial base and acoustic meatus, (2) palatal plane and (3) mandibular symphysis. The superimposed images were subtracted and coloured. The applicability to cone beam CT (CBCT) is illustrated by the alignment of CBCT images acquired before and after craniofacial surgery. Results The phantom experiment clearly shows superior alignment when compared to the ROI approach (Wilcoxon n = 17, Z = −3.290, and P = 0.001), and robustness with respect to the choice of parameters (one-sample t-test n = 50, t = −12.355, and P = 0.000). The treatment effects are revealed clearly in the subtraction image of well-aligned cephalometric radiographs. The colouring scheme of the subtraction image emphasises the areas of change and visualizes the remodelling of the soft tissue. Conclusions FMI allows for cephalometry without tracing, it avoids the error inherent to the use of landmarks and the interaction of the practitioner is kept to a minimum. The robustness to focal distribution variations limits the influence of possible examiner inaccuracy. PMID:20395459

  14. 9 July 2008 - Microsoft Co-Founder P. Allen visiting ATLAS control room and underground experimental area with Adviser J. Ellis and IT Department Head W. von Rüden.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    9 July 2008 - Microsoft Co-Founder P. Allen visiting ATLAS control room and underground experimental area with Adviser J. Ellis and IT Department Head W. von Rüden and guided by ATLAS Collaboration Users S. Goldfarb, P. Nevski and L. Price.

  15. Image Guidance During Head-and-Neck Cancer Radiation Therapy: Analysis of Alignment Trends With In-Room Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zumsteg, Zachary; DeMarco, John; Lee, Steve P.; Steinberg, Michael L.; Lin, Chun Shu; McBride, William; Lin, Kevin; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kupelian, Patrick; Lee, Percy

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: On-board cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is currently available for alignment of patients with head-and-neck cancer before radiotherapy. However, daily CBCT is time intensive and increases the overall radiation dose. We assessed the feasibility of using the average couch shifts from the first several CBCTs to estimate and correct for the presumed systematic setup error. Methods and Materials: 56 patients with head-and-neck cancer who received daily CBCT before intensity-modulated radiation therapy had recorded shift values in the medial–lateral, superior–inferior, and anterior–posterior dimensions. The average displacements in each direction were calculated for each patient based on the first five or 10 CBCT shifts and were presumed to represent the systematic setup error. The residual error after this correction was determined by subtracting the calculated shifts from the shifts obtained using daily CBCT. Results: The magnitude of the average daily residual three-dimensional (3D) error was 4.8 ± 1.4 mm, 3.9 ± 1.3 mm, and 3.7 ± 1.1 mm for uncorrected, five CBCT corrected, and 10 CBCT corrected protocols, respectively. With no image guidance, 40.8% of fractions would have been >5 mm off target. Using the first five CBCT shifts to correct subsequent fractions, this percentage decreased to 19.0% of all fractions delivered and decreased the percentage of patients with average daily 3D errors >5 mm from 35.7% to 14.3% vs. no image guidance. Using an average of the first 10 CBCT shifts did not significantly improve this outcome. Conclusions: Using the first five CBCT shift measurements as an estimation of the systematic setup error improves daily setup accuracy for a subset of patients with head-and-neck cancer receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy and primarily benefited those with large 3D correction vectors (>5 mm). Daily CBCT is still necessary until methods are developed that more accurately determine which patients may benefit from

  16. Clinical Application of Cone Beam Computed Tomography of the Rabbit Head: Part 2—Dental Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, G. G.; Cissell, Derek D.; Arzi, Boaz; Hatcher, David C.; Kass, Philip H.; Zhen, Amy; Verstraete, Frank J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Domestic rabbits are increasing in popularity as household pets; therefore, veterinarians need to be familiar with the most common diseases afflicting rabbits including dental disease. Current diagnostic approaches include gross oral examination, endoscopic oral examination, skull radiography, and computed tomography (CT). Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), a new oral and maxillofacial imaging modality that has the capability to produce high-resolution images, has not yet been described for use in evaluating dental disease in rabbits. A total of 15 client-owned rabbits had CBCT, oral examination, dental charting, and dental treatment performed under general anesthesia. Images were evaluated using transverse and custom multiplanar (MPR), 3D, and panoramic reconstructed images. The CBCT findings were grouped into abnormalities that could be detected on conscious oral examination vs. abnormalities that could not be detected by conscious oral examination. Potential associations between the two categories were examined by pairwise Fisher’s exact test with statistical significance determined by P periapical lucency (11/15), moth-eaten pattern of osteolysis of the alveolar bone (9/15), ventral mandibular border contour changes (9/15), and missing teeth (8/15). Of the CBCT abnormalities likely to be observed on oral examination, coronal elongation (detectable on oral examination) was significantly associated with apical elongation (P = 0.029). There were no other significant associations between CBCT findings that are also clinically detectable and CBCT findings that are not be detectable on oral examination. This suggests that pathology often exists that is not apparent upon oral examination. This study establishes the common CBCT findings associated with dental disease in rabbits and demonstrates the feasibility of this technology to diagnose and plan treatment in dental disorders in this species. PMID:28194401

  17. Intraoperative cone-beam CT for guidance of head and neck surgery: Assessment of dose and image quality using a C-arm prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, M J; Siewerdsen, J H; Moseley, D J; Jaffray, D A; Irish, J C

    2006-10-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector represents a promising modality for intraoperative imaging in interventional procedures, demonstrating sub-mm three-dimensional (3D) spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility. Measurements of patient dose and in-room exposure for CBCT-guided head and neck surgery are reported, and the 3D imaging performance as a function of dose and other acquisition/reconstruction parameters is investigated. Measurements were performed on a mobile isocentric C-arm (Siemens PowerMobil) modified in collaboration with Siemens Medical Solutions (Erlangen, Germany) to provide flat-panel CBCT. Imaging dose was measured in a custom-built 16 cm cylindrical head phantom at four positions (isocenter, anterior, posterior, and lateral) as a function of kVp (80-120 kVp) and C-arm trajectory ("tube-under" and "tube-over" half-rotation orbits). At 100 kVp, for example ("tube-under" orbit), the imaging dose was 0.059 (isocenter), 0.022 (anterior), 0.10 (posterior), and 0.056 (lateral) mGy/ mAs, with scans at approximately 50 and approximately 170 mAs typical for visualization of bony and soft-tissue structures, respectively. Dose to radiosensitive structures (viz., the eyes and thyroid) were considered in particular: significant dose sparing to the eyes (a factor of 5) was achieved using a "tube-under" (rather than "tube-over") half-rotation orbit; a thyroid shield (0.5 mm Pb-equivalent) gave moderate reduction in thyroid dose due to x-ray scatter outside the primary field of view. In-room exposure was measured at positions around the operating table and up to 2 m from isocenter. A typical CBCT scan (10 mGy to isocenter) gave in-air exposure ranging from 29 mR (0.26 mSv) at 35 cm from isocenter, to <0.5 mR (<0.005 mSv) at 2 m from isocenter. Three-dimensional (3D) image quality was assessed in CBCT reconstructions of an anthropomorphic head phantom containing contrast-detail spheres (11-103 HU; 1.6-12.7 mm) and a natural human

  18. Intraoperative cone-beam CT for guidance of head and neck surgery: Assessment of dose and image quality using a C-arm prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, M. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Moseley, D. J.; Jaffray, D. A.; Irish, J. C.

    2006-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector represents a promising modality for intraoperative imaging in interventional procedures, demonstrating sub-mm three-dimensional (3D) spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility. Measurements of patient dose and in-room exposure for CBCT-guided head and neck surgery are reported, and the 3D imaging performance as a function of dose and other acquisition/reconstruction parameters is investigated. Measurements were performed on a mobile isocentric C-arm (Siemens PowerMobil) modified in collaboration with Siemens Medical Solutions (Erlangen, Germany) to provide flat-panel CBCT. Imaging dose was measured in a custom-built 16 cm cylindrical head phantom at four positions (isocenter, anterior, posterior, and lateral) as a function of kVp (80-120 kVp) and C-arm trajectory ('tube-under' and 'tube-over' half-rotation orbits). At 100 kVp, for example ('tube-under' orbit), the imaging dose was 0.059 (isocenter), 0.022 (anterior), 0.10 (posterior), and 0.056 (lateral) mGy/mAs, with scans at ∼50 and ∼170 mAs typical for visualization of bony and soft-tissue structures, respectively. Dose to radiosensitive structures (viz., the eyes and thyroid) were considered in particular: significant dose sparing to the eyes (a factor of 5) was achieved using a 'tube-under' (rather than 'tube-over') half-rotation orbit; a thyroid shield (0.5 mm Pb-equivalent) gave moderate reduction in thyroid dose due to x-ray scatter outside the primary field of view. In-room exposure was measured at positions around the operating table and up to 2 m from isocenter. A typical CBCT scan (10 mGy to isocenter) gave in-air exposure ranging from 29 mR (0.26 mSv) at 35 cm from isocenter, to <0.5 mR (<0.005 mSv) at 2 m from isocenter. Three-dimensional (3D) image quality was assessed in CBCT reconstructions of an anthropomorphic head phantom containing contrast-detail spheres (11-103 HU;1.6-12.7 mm) and a natural human skeleton. The contrast

  19. Assessing the Challenges Heads of Department Encounter in Instructional Supervision in Ghana. A Case of Selected Senior High Schools in Kwabre East District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kweku Bedu; Howard, Peggy Maansah Ankai; Peligah, Y. S.; Cann, Lily Obu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the challenges HoDs in Senior High Schools face during instructional supervision. In so doing, the study employed case study and used mixed method approach. In all a total of 92 questionnaires were administered with a response rate of 75.40%. The population consisted of School Heads /Assistant Heads, HoDs and…

  20. Evaluation of deformable image registration for contour propagation between CT and cone-beam CT images in adaptive head and neck radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Zhang, Y Y; Shi, Y H; Zhou, L H; Zhen, X

    2016-04-29

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is a critical technic in adaptive radiotherapy (ART) to propagate contours between planning computerized tomography (CT) images and treatment CT/Cone-beam CT (CBCT) image to account for organ deformation for treatment re-planning. To validate the ability and accuracy of DIR algorithms in organ at risk (OAR) contours mapping, seven intensity-based DIR strategies are tested on the planning CT and weekly CBCT images from six Head & Neck cancer patients who underwent a 6 ∼ 7 weeks intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Three similarity metrics, i.e. the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), the percentage error (PE) and the Hausdorff distance (HD), are employed to measure the agreement between the propagated contours and the physician delineated ground truths. It is found that the performance of all the evaluated DIR algorithms declines as the treatment proceeds. No statistically significant performance difference is observed between different DIR algorithms (p> 0.05), except for the double force demons (DFD) which yields the worst result in terms of DSC and PE. For the metric HD, all the DIR algorithms behaved unsatisfactorily with no statistically significant performance difference (p= 0.273). These findings suggested that special care should be taken when utilizing the intensity-based DIR algorithms involved in this study to deform OAR contours between CT and CBCT, especially for those organs with low contrast.

  1. BE Department Annual Report 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Collier, Paul; Billen, Ronny; Hatziangeli, Eugenia; Jensen, Erk; Jones, Rhodri; Lamont, Mike; Mackney, Anna; Sollander, Peter; Steerenberg, Rende

    2017-01-01

    The Beams Department hosts the Groups responsible for the beam generation, acceleration, diagnostics, controls and performance optimization for the whole CERN accelerator complex. This Report describes the 2016 highlights for the BE Department.

  2. Clinical and video head impulse test in the diagnosis of posterior circulation stroke presenting as acute vestibular syndrome in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Ayse; Karbek Akarca, Funda; Eraslan, Cenk; Tarhan, Ceyda; Bilgen, Cem; Kirazli, Tayfun; Celebisoy, Nese

    2017-01-01

    Head impulse test (HIT) is the critical bedside examination which differentiates vestibular neuritis (VN) from posterior circulation stroke (PCS) in acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). Video-oculography based HIT (vHIT) may have aadditional strength in making the differentiation. Patients admitted to the emergency department of a tertiary-care medical center with AVS were studied. An emergency specialist and a neurologist performed HIT. vHIT was conducted by an neuro-otology research fellow. Forty patients 26 male, 14 female with a mean age of 49 years were included in the analyses. Final diagnoses were VN in 24 and PCS in 16 patients.In the VN group, clinical HIT was assessed as abnormal in 19(80%) cases by the emergency specialist and in 20(83%) by the neurologist. In all PCS patients, HIT was recorded as normal both by the emergency specialist and the neurologist (100%).On vHIT, patients with VN had significantly low gain values for both the ipsilesional and contralesional sides when compared with the healthy controls, with significantly lower figures for the ipsilesional side (p < 0.001). All patients in this group had normal DWI-MRI.PCS patients had bilaterally low gain (p < 0.05) on vHIT. However, gain asymmetry was not significant. Subgroup analyses according to presence of brainstem involvement revealed bilateral low gain (p < 0.05) in patients with brainstem infarction (anterior inferior cerebellar artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery stroke, AICA-PICA stroke) whereas patients with pure cerebellar infarction (posterior inferior cerebellar artery-superior cerebellar artery stroke, PICA-SCA stroke) had gain values similar to healthy controls.With a gain cut-off ≤0.75 and gain asymmetry cut-off ≥17%, as determined by ROC analysis, 100% of PCS patients and 80% of VN patients were correctly diagnosed. Clinical HIT, either performed by an emergency specialist or neurologist is equivalent to vHIT gain and gain asymmetry analysis as conducted

  3. Beam-beam effects in the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Lebedev, V.; Lebrun, P.; Moore, R.S.; Sen, T.; Tollestrup, A.; Valishev, A.; Zhang, X.L.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with 6 times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Electromagnetic long-range and head-on interactions of high intensity proton and antiproton beams have been significant sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations. We present observations of the beam-beam phenomena in the Tevatron and results of relevant beam studies. We analyze the data and various methods employed in operations, predict the performance for planned luminosity upgrades, and discuss ways to improve it.

  4. Investigation of changes in brain natriuretic peptide serum levels and its diagnostic value in patients with mild and moderate head trauma, in patients referred to emergency department of Alzahra Hospital, Isfahan, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizkhani, Reza; Keshavarz, Es'haq

    2016-01-01

    Head trauma is one of the most common reasons for emergency department (ED) care. Over the past decade, initial management strategies in mild and moderate head trauma have become focused on selective computed tomography (CT) use based upon presence or absence of specific aspects of patient history and/or clinical examination which has received more attention following reports of increased cancer risk from CT scans. Recently changes in serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels following head trauma have been studied. We investigated the changes in serum levels of BNP in patients with mild and moderate head trauma, in whom the first brain CT scanning was normal. This study is a cross-sectional, descriptive research. It was performed in patients with mild and moderate head trauma. Forty-one patients with isolated mild and moderate traumatic brain injury (Glasgow Coma Scale = 9-15) were included. First brain CT scans were obtained during 2 h after ED arrival and the second one after 24 h. Plasma BNP levels were determined using a specific immunoassay system. Twenty-three patients were in Group A (with normal first and second brain CT) and 18 patients in Group B (with normal first and abnormal second brain CT). With P = 0.001, serum BNP level = 9.04 was determined for differentiating two groups. We concluded that serum BNP level is higher in patients with mild and moderate head trauma with delayed pathologic changes in second brain CT relative to patients with mild and moderate head trauma and with normal delayed brain CT.

  5. Performance of cone-beam computed tomography and multidetector computed tomography in diagnostic imaging of the midface: A comparative study on Phantom and cadaver head scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veldhoen, Simon [University Medical Center Hamburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Schoellchen, Maximilian; Hanken, H.; Precht, C.; Heiland, M. [University Medical Center Hamburg, Department of Oral- and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hamburg (Germany); Henes, F.O.; Adam, G.; Regier, M. [University Medical Center Hamburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Schoen, G. [University Medical Center Hamburg, Department of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, Hamburg (Germany); Nagel, H.D. [Science and Technology for Radiology, Buchholz (Germany); Schumacher, U. [University Medical Center Hamburg, Institute of Anatomy, Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    To compare multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) regarding radiation, resolution, image noise, and image quality. CBCT and 256-MDCT were compared based on three scan protocols: Standard-dose (∼24 mGy), reduced-dose (∼9 mGy), and low-dose (∼4 mGy). MDCT images were acquired in standard- and high-resolution mode (HR-MDCT) and reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction (IR). Spatial resolution in linepairs (lp) and objective image noise (OIN) were assessed using dedicated phantoms. Image quality was assessed in scans of 25 cadaver heads using a Likert scale. OIN was markedly higher in FBP-MDCT when compared to CBCT. IR lowered the OIN to comparable values in standard-mode MDCT only. CBCT provided a resolution of 13 lp/cm at standard-dose and 11 lp/cm at reduced-dose vs. 11 lp/cm and 10 lp/cm in HR-MDCT. Resolution of 10 lp/cm was observed for both devices using low-dose settings. Quality scores of MDCT and CBCT did not differ at standard-dose (CBCT, 3.4; MDCT, 3.3-3.5; p > 0.05). Using reduced- and low-dose protocols, CBCT was superior (reduced-dose, 3.2 vs. 2.8; low dose, 3.0 vs. 2.3; p < 0.001). Using the low-dose protocol, the assessed CBCT provided better objective and subjective image quality and equality in resolution. Similar image quality, but better resolution using CBCT was observed at higher exposure settings. (orig.)

  6. Comprehensive evaluation of ten deformable image registration algorithms for contour propagation between CT and cone-beam CT images in adaptive head & neck radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    Full Text Available Deformable image registration (DIR is a critical technic in adaptive radiotherapy (ART for propagating contours between planning computerized tomography (CT images and treatment CT/cone-beam CT (CBCT images to account for organ deformation for treatment re-planning. To validate the ability and accuracy of DIR algorithms in organ at risk (OAR contour mapping, ten intensity-based DIR strategies, which were classified into four categories-optical flow-based, demons-based, level-set-based and spline-based-were tested on planning CT and fractional CBCT images acquired from twenty-one head & neck (H&N cancer patients who underwent 6~7-week intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT. Three similarity metrics, i.e., the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC, the percentage error (PE and the Hausdorff distance (HD, were employed to measure the agreement between the propagated contours and the physician-delineated ground truths of four OARs, including the vertebra (VTB, the vertebral foramen (VF, the parotid gland (PG and the submandibular gland (SMG. It was found that the evaluated DIRs in this work did not necessarily outperform rigid registration. DIR performed better for bony structures than soft-tissue organs, and the DIR performance tended to vary for different ROIs with different degrees of deformation as the treatment proceeded. Generally, the optical flow-based DIR performed best, while the demons-based DIR usually ranked last except for a modified demons-based DISC used for CT-CBCT DIR. These experimental results suggest that the choice of a specific DIR algorithm depends on the image modality, anatomic site, magnitude of deformation and application. Therefore, careful examinations and modifications are required before accepting the auto-propagated contours, especially for automatic re-planning ART systems.

  7. Comprehensive evaluation of ten deformable image registration algorithms for contour propagation between CT and cone-beam CT images in adaptive head & neck radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Yuyu; Shi, Yinghua; Wu, Shuyu; Xiao, Yang; Gu, Xuejun; Zhen, Xin; Zhou, Linghong

    2017-01-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is a critical technic in adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for propagating contours between planning computerized tomography (CT) images and treatment CT/cone-beam CT (CBCT) images to account for organ deformation for treatment re-planning. To validate the ability and accuracy of DIR algorithms in organ at risk (OAR) contour mapping, ten intensity-based DIR strategies, which were classified into four categories-optical flow-based, demons-based, level-set-based and spline-based-were tested on planning CT and fractional CBCT images acquired from twenty-one head & neck (H&N) cancer patients who underwent 6~7-week intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Three similarity metrics, i.e., the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), the percentage error (PE) and the Hausdorff distance (HD), were employed to measure the agreement between the propagated contours and the physician-delineated ground truths of four OARs, including the vertebra (VTB), the vertebral foramen (VF), the parotid gland (PG) and the submandibular gland (SMG). It was found that the evaluated DIRs in this work did not necessarily outperform rigid registration. DIR performed better for bony structures than soft-tissue organs, and the DIR performance tended to vary for different ROIs with different degrees of deformation as the treatment proceeded. Generally, the optical flow-based DIR performed best, while the demons-based DIR usually ranked last except for a modified demons-based DISC used for CT-CBCT DIR. These experimental results suggest that the choice of a specific DIR algorithm depends on the image modality, anatomic site, magnitude of deformation and application. Therefore, careful examinations and modifications are required before accepting the auto-propagated contours, especially for automatic re-planning ART systems.

  8. 15 February 2012 - Geneva United Nations Office Director-General K.-J. Tokayev in the LHC tunnel with Adviser for Relations with international organisations M. Bona and Technology Department Head F. Bordry.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    Kassym-Jomart Tokayev, director-general of the United Nations Office at Geneva, (centre picture 02), visited CERN on 15 February. He toured the LHC tunnel with Maurizio Bona, CERN’s adviser to the director-general, relations with international organizations, left, and Frédérick Bordry, CERN’s technology department head. He also visited the ATLAS underground experimental area, as well as the exhibition at the Globe of Science and Innovation.

  9. 學科領導在課程改革中的角色:香港個案研究Roles of Department Heads in Curriculum Change: A Hong Kong Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    譚彩鳳Choi-Fung Tam

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available 西方研究發現學科組織是學校改進的重要單位,學科領導對推動課程革新、 改善同儕的溝通及協作、重組組織結構等有不少貢獻。本個案研究旨在探索兩位中 文學科領導的角色、風格,並揭示在其領導下學科組織文化的特色。研究發現學科 領導具備多元化的角色,與其職責有密切關係。再者,這兩位領導的風格各有不 同,其中一位具有民主型的領導風格,給同事賦權增能,與他們共享決策權;另一 位卻具有支援性的領導風格,為學科組織成員樹立榜樣。研究揭示學科領導是促進 課程變革的重要人物,其開放態度有利新課程的實施。 Western studies reveal that subject department is an important changing unit for school improvement. Heads of departments contribute significantly to the changes of curriculum, improvement of communication and collaboration among colleagues, and restructuring of organizations. This case study aimed at investigating the roles and leadership styles of two Chinese Language department heads, and the characteristics of the departmental culture under their leadership. The results reported that the roles of department heads were multi-dimensional; which were closely related to their duties. Furthermore, the leadership styles of the two department heads were different. One of them exercised democratic leadership; power and decision-making were shared with her colleagues. While the other tended to perform supportive leadership, she was a role model for her members. The findings concluded that department heads played an important role in curriculum change and their openness facilitated the successful implementation of new curriculum.

  10. Head Start Impact Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Nationally representative, longitudinal information from an evaluation where children were randomly assigned to Head Start or community services as usual;direct...

  11. Early Head Start Evaluation

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Longitudinal information from an evaluation where children were randomly assigned to Early Head Start or community services as usual;direct assessments and...

  12. Overview of Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kept in the emergency department or hospital for observation. Children who have had a minor head injury ... penetrating trauma (such as a knife or gunshot wound). Injuries may range from relatively small hematomas (collections ...

  13. 8 March 2012 - Extraordinary and plenipotentiary Ambassador R. van Schreven, Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to the United Nations Office and other international organisations at Geneva, signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson Y. Schutz; throughout accompanied by Former Deputy Department Head and Senior Physicist L. Linssen.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    8 March 2012 - Extraordinary and plenipotentiary Ambassador R. van Schreven, Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to the United Nations Office and other international organisations at Geneva, signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson Y. Schutz; throughout accompanied by Former Deputy Department Head and Senior Physicist L. Linssen.

  14. Head Lice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head lice are parasitic wingless insects. They live on people's heads and feed on their blood. An adult louse ... Children ages 3-11 and their families get head lice most often. Personal hygiene has nothing to ...

  15. 29 March 2011 - Ninth President of Israel S.Peres welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Heuer who introduces Council President M. Spiro, Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers, Head of International Relations F. Pauss, Physics Department Head P. Bloch, Technology Department Head F. Bordry, Human Resources Department Head A.-S. Catherin, Beams Department Head P. Collier, Information Technology Department Head F. Hemmer, Adviser for Israel J. Ellis, Legal Counsel E. Gröniger-Voss, ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti, Former ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni, Weizmann Institute G. Mikenberg, CERN VIP and Protocol Officer W. Korda.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    During his visit he toured the ATLAS underground experimental area with Giora Mikenberg of the ATLAS collaboration, Weizmann Institute of Sciences and Israeli industrial liaison office, Rolf Heuer, CERN’s director-general, and Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson. The president also visited the CERN computing centre and met Israeli scientists working at CERN.

  16. 2 March 2011 - Swedish State Secretary to the Minister for Enterprise and Energy C. Håkansson Boman signing the guest book wit Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; in the ATLAS visitor centre with P. Grafstrom; troughout accompanied by Deparment Head T. Pettersson.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2011-01-01

    She was welcomed to CERN by Felicitas Pauss, head of international relations. The visit included a presentation about the LHC Computing Grid project and a tour of the LHC superconducting magnet test hall and the ATLAS visitor centre.

  17. 3 October 2013 - Ukrainian Vice Prime Minister Ukraine K. I. Gryschenko welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Heuer who introduces Head of International Relations R. Voss; Head of Technology Department F. Bordry; Deputy Head of International Relations E. Tsesmelis; Deputy Legal Counsel M. Wilbers; Adviser for Ukraine T. Kurtyka; Signing of the Agreement between Ukraine and CERN concerning the granting of the status of Associate Member at CERN; in the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and visiting CMS experimental area with CERN Team Leader A. Petrilli.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    3 October 2013 - Ukrainian Vice Prime Minister Ukraine K. I. Gryschenko welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Heuer who introduces Head of International Relations R. Voss; Head of Technology Department F. Bordry; Deputy Head of International Relations E. Tsesmelis; Deputy Legal Counsel M. Wilbers; Adviser for Ukraine T. Kurtyka; Signing of the Agreement between Ukraine and CERN concerning the granting of the status of Associate Member at CERN; in the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and visiting CMS experimental area with CERN Team Leader A. Petrilli.

  18. Weekly monitoring of the effects of conventional external beam radiation therapy on patients with head and neck, chest, and pelvis cancer by means of blood cells count

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundgren, Maria da Salete Fonseca dos Santos [Hospital Universitario Oswaldo Cruz, Recife, PE (Brazil). Radiotherapy Unit]. E-mail: salete@lundgren.med.br; Cavalcanti, Maria do Socorro de Mendonca [Universidade de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Sampaio, Divaldo de Almeida [Centro de Hematologia de Pernambuco (Hemope), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2008-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the necessity of weekly monitoring by means of leukocyte and platelet counts of patients with head and neck, chest, and pelvis cancer submitted to conventional radiotherapy. Materials and methods: A hundred and one adult patients with cancer of head and neck (n = 11), chest (n = 35) and pelvis (n = 55), submitted to radiotherapy were assessed by means of leukocyte and platelet counts on a weekly basis, with a comparison between the results before and during the treatment and in correlation with the area treated, patient's sex and age group. Results: The most significant decrease in leukocytes was observed in the fourth week, when lymphocytes, total leukocytes, neutrophils, monocytes and platelets presented a decrease of 53.5%, 26.8%, 19.4%, 22.2% and 14.6%, respectively, in comparison with the values found before the beginning of the therapy. Geometric means for pelvis during the treatment were lower than those for chest, and head and neck. Lymphocytes demonstrated to be more sensitive to radiation therapy. No alteration was found in leukocyte or platelet counts in correlation with patients' sex or age. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, weekly leukocyte and platelet counts do not seem to be useful in the assessment patients submitted to conventional radiotherapy for localized cancer. (author)

  19. [Communique on the present status and future of anthropology taken from the meeting of department heads and principle scientists from the Society of Anthropology (GfA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühli, F; Schiefenhivel, W

    2009-09-01

    The primary goal discussed is to strengthen the scientifically important research discipline of anthropology in the coming years by reinforcing its position in the German university system as a trans-disciplinary field and to edify its image within the public eye. Like many other branches of science, anthropology has witnessed a number of profound changes in the university sphere in recent years. In addition to increased reliance on monetary funding, the fundamental structure of research and teaching in the university sector, the product of centuries-old development, is experiencing a transition phase and progressively operating ever more under the influence of"excellence monitoring" as well as the "Bologna" process. Financial cuts have led to the termination of once fix job positions at all levels, whereby the loss of mid-level positions requisite for a healthy and functional junior academic environment, such as post-doc jobs, is particularly unsettling. The still tangible burden of recent historical events and small number of prominent representatives in the field are problematic, however, the primary concern today involves the seemingly imminent closure of established anthropological centres and discontinuation of department chair positions. Fortunately, this ominous trend does not apply to all leading university departments, many of which are engaged in innovative and novel concepts, and has resulted in their general acceptance and the fortification of anthropology programs. Furthermore, it is becoming increasingly difficult to secure adequate funding for projects from money givers such as the DFG, mainly because of the relatively small size of the field. Specialization within the field at the university level obviously poses a serious problem for such a small holistic discipline (with regards to problem statements and methodology). The definition of anthropology as an entity is complicated by external influences such as newly developing research interests that

  20. 5 February 2010: Romanian Former Minister of Justice V. Stoica (4th from left) visiting SM18 with, from left to right, University of Bucharest Faculty of Physics A. Costescu, DESY Hamburg C. Diaconu; Mrs Valeriu Stoica; Université de Montpellier II S. Ciulli; Technology Department Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings group S. Ilie; Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Adviser for Russian Federation, Central and Eastern Europe T. Kurtyka.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    5 February 2010: Romanian Former Minister of Justice V. Stoica (4th from left) visiting SM18 with, from left to right, University of Bucharest Faculty of Physics A. Costescu, DESY Hamburg C. Diaconu; Mrs Valeriu Stoica; Université de Montpellier II S. Ciulli; Technology Department Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings group S. Ilie; Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Adviser for Russian Federation, Central and Eastern Europe T. Kurtyka.

  1. Spot-scanning beam proton therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy for ipsilateral head and neck malignancies: A treatment planning comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandula, Shravan; Zhu, Xiaorong; Garden, Adam S.; Gillin, Michael; Rosenthal, David I.; Ang, Kie-Kian; Mohan, Radhe; Amin, Mayankkumar V.; Garcia, John A.; Wu, Richard; Sahoo, Narayan; Frank, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for head and neck malignancies can have side effects that impede quality of life. Theoretically, proton therapy can reduce treatment-related morbidity by minimizing the dose to critical normal tissues. We evaluated the feasibility of spot-scanning proton therapy for head and neck malignancies and compared dosimetry between those plans and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. Plans from 5 patients who had undergone IMRT for primary tumors of the head and neck were used for planning proton therapy. Both sets of plans were prepared using computed tomography (CT) scans with the goals of achieving 100% of the prescribed dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) and 95% to the planning TV (PTV) while maximizing conformity to the PTV. Dose-volume histograms were generated and compared, as were conformity indexes (CIs) to the PTVs and mean doses to the organs at risk (OARs). Both modalities in all cases achieved 100% of the dose to the CTV and 95% to the PTV. Mean PTV CIs were comparable (0.371 IMRT, 0.374 protons, p = 0.953). Mean doses were significantly lower in the proton plans to the contralateral submandibular (638.7 cGy IMRT, 4.3 cGy protons, p = 0.002) and parotid (533.3 cGy IMRT, 48.5 cGy protons, p = 0.003) glands; oral cavity (1760.4 cGy IMRT, 458.9 cGy protons, p = 0.003); spinal cord (2112.4 cGy IMRT, 249.2 cGy protons, p = 0.002); and brainstem (1553.52 cGy IMRT, 166.2 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Proton plans also produced lower maximum doses to the spinal cord (3692.1 cGy IMRT, 2014.8 cGy protons, p = 0.034) and brainstem (3412.1 cGy IMRT, 1387.6 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Normal tissue V 10 , V 30 , and V 50 values were also significantly lower in the proton plans. We conclude that spot-scanning proton therapy can significantly reduce the integral dose to head and neck critical structures. Prospective studies are underway to determine if this reduced dose translates to improved quality of life

  2. Spot-scanning beam proton therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy for ipsilateral head and neck malignancies: A treatment planning comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandula, Shravan [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhu, Xiaorong [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Rosenthal, David I.; Ang, Kie-Kian [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Amin, Mayankkumar V.; Garcia, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wu, Richard; Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for head and neck malignancies can have side effects that impede quality of life. Theoretically, proton therapy can reduce treatment-related morbidity by minimizing the dose to critical normal tissues. We evaluated the feasibility of spot-scanning proton therapy for head and neck malignancies and compared dosimetry between those plans and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. Plans from 5 patients who had undergone IMRT for primary tumors of the head and neck were used for planning proton therapy. Both sets of plans were prepared using computed tomography (CT) scans with the goals of achieving 100% of the prescribed dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) and 95% to the planning TV (PTV) while maximizing conformity to the PTV. Dose-volume histograms were generated and compared, as were conformity indexes (CIs) to the PTVs and mean doses to the organs at risk (OARs). Both modalities in all cases achieved 100% of the dose to the CTV and 95% to the PTV. Mean PTV CIs were comparable (0.371 IMRT, 0.374 protons, p = 0.953). Mean doses were significantly lower in the proton plans to the contralateral submandibular (638.7 cGy IMRT, 4.3 cGy protons, p = 0.002) and parotid (533.3 cGy IMRT, 48.5 cGy protons, p = 0.003) glands; oral cavity (1760.4 cGy IMRT, 458.9 cGy protons, p = 0.003); spinal cord (2112.4 cGy IMRT, 249.2 cGy protons, p = 0.002); and brainstem (1553.52 cGy IMRT, 166.2 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Proton plans also produced lower maximum doses to the spinal cord (3692.1 cGy IMRT, 2014.8 cGy protons, p = 0.034) and brainstem (3412.1 cGy IMRT, 1387.6 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Normal tissue V{sub 10}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 50} values were also significantly lower in the proton plans. We conclude that spot-scanning proton therapy can significantly reduce the integral dose to head and neck critical structures. Prospective studies are underway to determine if this reduced dose translates to improved quality of life.

  3. Beam path toxicity in candidate organs-at-risk: Assessment of radiation emetogenesis for patients receiving head and neck intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocak-Uzel, Esengul; Gunn, G. Brandon; Colen, Rivka R.; Kantor, Micheal E.; Mohamed, Abdallah S.R.; Schoultz-Henley, Sara; Mavroidis, Paniyotis; Frank, Steven J.; Garden, Adam S.; Beadle, Beth M.; Morrison, William H.; Phan, Jack; Rosenthal, David I.; Fuller, Clifton D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: To investigate potential dose–response relationship between radiation-associated nausea and vomiting (RANV) reported during radiotherapy and candidate nausea/vomiting-associated regions of interest (CNV-ROIs) in head and neck (HNC) squamous cell carcinomas. Methods and material: A total of 130 patients treated with IMRT with squamous cell carcinomas of head and neck were evaluated. For each patient, CNV-ROIs were segmented manually on planning CT images. Clinical on-treatment RANV data were reconstructed by a review of the records for all patients. Dosimetric data parameters were recorded from dose–volume histograms. Nausea and vomiting reports were concatenated as a single binary “Any N/V” variable, and as a “CTC-V2+” variable. Results: The mean dose to CNV-ROIs was higher for patients experiencing RANV events. For patients receiving IMRT alone, a dose–response effect was observed with varying degrees of magnitude, at a statistically significant level for the area postrema, brainstem, dorsal vagal complex, medulla oblongata, solitary nucleus, oropharyngeal mucosa and whole brain CNV-ROIs. Conclusion: RANV is a common therapy-related morbidity facing patients receiving HNC radiotherapy, and, for those receiving radiotherapy-alone, is associated with modifiable dose to specific CNS structures

  4. Heads Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC HEADS UP Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . HEADS UP Brain Injury Basics What Is a Concussion? Concussion ...

  5. Beam-beam studies for FCC-hh

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068329; Pieloni, Tatiana; Buffat, Xavier; Furuseth, Sondre Vik

    2017-01-01

    The Future Circular Collider hadron-hadron (FCC-hh) design study is currently exploring different IR design possibilities including round and flat optics or different crossing schemes. The present study intends to evaluate each scenario from the beam-beam effects point of view. In particular the single particle long term stability to maximize beam lifetimes and luminosity reach is used to quantify the differences. The impact of strong head on interactions on the beam quality and lifetime is addressed by means of GPU accelerated simulations code featuring a weak-strong 6-dimensional beam-beam interaction.

  6. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with HEADS UP & CDC's Injury Center HEADS UP Resources File Formats Help: How do I view different ... 6348 Email CDC-INFO U.S. Department of Health & Human Services HHS/Open USA.gov Top

  7. TLD measurements and Monte Carlo calculations of head and neck organ and effective doses for cone beam computed tomography using 3D Accuitomo 170.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Marina; Manser, Peter; Dula, Karl; Volken, Werner; Stampanoni, Marco Fm; Fix, Michael K

    2017-10-01

    In dentistry, the use of cone beam CT has steadily increased over the last few years. The aim of this study was to measure organ doses and to perform dose calculations based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to work out a basis for full three-dimensional (3D) dose calculations for any patient examination performed with the machine used in this study. TLD-100 LiF detectors were placed at 71 measurement positions on the surface and within a RT-Humanoid phantom to cover all relevant radiosensitive organs and tissues. Three examinations with different protocols were performed with the 3D Accuitomo ® and dose calculations with MC simulations were carried out for the same three protocols using the EGSnrc MC transport code system. Field of views of 140 × 100, 80 × 50 and 40 × 40 mm 2 were selected, the mean organ doses were measured as 5.2, 2.75 and 1.5 mGy and the effective doses were determined as 250, 97 and 48 µSv. For the MC simulation of organ doses and the thermoluminescent dosemeter measurements, an overall agreement within ±10.1% (two standard deviations) was achieved. The measured dose values for 3D Accuitomo ® were about a factor 2 lower when compared with conventional CT examinations. Reliable results for the organ doses as well as effective dose values were achieved with thermoluminescent dosemeter measurements in the RT-Humanoid phantom. This study provides the basis for the application of MC simulations for further dose determinations of cone beam CT machines. The MC calculation may therefore be a valuable tool to support the dentists in the evaluation of the trade-off between additional information that may be relevant to the choice of therapy and the additional dose given to the patient.

  8. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); White, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  9. 26th August 2010 - World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General M. Jarraud signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; throughout accompanied by M. Bona, CERN Relations with International Organisations

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    26th August 2010 - World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General M. Jarraud signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; throughout accompanied by M. Bona, CERN Relations with International Organisations

  10. 18 January 2011 - Ing. Vittorio Malacalza, ASG Superconductors S.p.A, Italy in the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Deputy Department Head L. Rossi, in the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS experimental area with Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    18 January 2011 - Ing. Vittorio Malacalza, ASG Superconductors S.p.A, Italy in the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Deputy Department Head L. Rossi, in the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS experimental area with Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

  11. 17 October 2013 - C. Ashton High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Vice-President of the European Commission visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    17 October 2013 - C. Ashton High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Vice-President of the European Commission visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  12. 27 June 2012 - Ambassador K. Pierce, Permanent Representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Department Head P. Collier and CMS control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson J. Virdee.

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Egli

    2012-01-01

    27 June 2012 - Ambassador K. Pierce, Permanent Representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Department Head P. Collier and CMS control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson J. Virdee.

  13. 12 December 2013 - Sir Konstantin Novoselov, Nobel Prize in Physics 2010, signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Spokesperson D. Charlton; in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. I. Antoniadis, CERN Theory Group Leader, accompanies throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    12 December 2013 - Sir Konstantin Novoselov, Nobel Prize in Physics 2010, signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Spokesperson D. Charlton; in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. I. Antoniadis, CERN Theory Group Leader, accompanies throughout.

  14. 11th February 2011 - Member of the Parliament for Glasgow North and Shadow Secretary of State for Scotland A. McKechin MP signing the geust book with Adviser J. Ellis, University of Glasgow Principal A. Muscatelli and Engineering Department Head R. Saban.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2011-01-01

    11th February 2011 - Member of the Parliament for Glasgow North and Shadow Secretary of State for Scotland A. McKechin MP signing the geust book with Adviser J. Ellis, University of Glasgow Principal A. Muscatelli and Engineering Department Head R. Saban.

  15. Chairman of the DELL Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer Michael S. Dell with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and in front of the ATLAS detector (centre) with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford (left) and Information Technology Department Head F. Hemmer on 26th January 2010.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    Chairman of the DELL Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer Michael S. Dell with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and in front of the ATLAS detector (centre) with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford (left) and Information Technology Department Head F. Hemmer on 26th January 2010.

  16. 18 December 2013 - P. Kron Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of ALSTOM signing the Guest Book with the Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. Accompanied by P. Fassnacht throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    18 December 2013 - P. Kron Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of ALSTOM signing the Guest Book with the Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. Accompanied by P. Fassnacht throughout.

  17. 20th May 2010 - Malaysian Minister for Science, Technology and Innovation H. F: B. H. Yusof signing the guest book with Coordinator for External Relations F. Pauss and CMS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; throughout accompanied by CERN Advisers J. Ellis and E. Tsesmelis.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien brice

    2010-01-01

    20th May 2010 - Malaysian Minister for Science, Technology and Innovation H. F: B. H. Yusof signing the guest book with Coordinator for External Relations F. Pauss and CMS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; throughout accompanied by CERN Advisers J. Ellis and E. Tsesmelis.

  18. 16 December 2013 - P. Lavie President of the Technion Institute of Technology in Israel visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the Guest Book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. G. Mikenberg, E. Rabinovici, Y. Rozen and S. Tarem present throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    16 December 2013 - P. Lavie President of the Technion Institute of Technology in Israel visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the Guest Book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. G. Mikenberg, E. Rabinovici, Y. Rozen and S. Tarem present throughout.

  19. Utility of Megavoltage Fan-Beam CT for Treatment Planning in a Head-And-Neck Cancer Patient with Extensive Dental Fillings Undergoing Helical Tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Claus; Liu Tianxiao; Jennelle, Richard L.; Ryu, Janice K.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.; Chen, Allen M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential utility of megavoltage fan-beam computed tomography (MV-FBCT) for treatment planning in a patient undergoing helical tomotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the presence of extensive dental artifact. A 28-year-old female with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma presented for radiation therapy. Due to the extensiveness of the dental artifact present in the oral cavity kV-CT scan acquired at simulation, which made treatment planning impossible on tomotherapy planning system, MV-FBCT imaging was obtained using the HI-ART tomotherapy treatment machine, with the patient in the treatment position, and this information was registered with her original kV-CT scan for the purposes of structure delineation, dose calculation, and treatment planning. To validate the feasibility of the MV-FBCT-generated treatment plan, an electron density CT phantom (model 465, Gammex Inc., Middleton, WI) was scanned using MV-FBCT to obtain CT number to density table. Additionally, both a 'cheese' phantom (which came with the tomotherapy treatment machine) with 2 inserted ion chambers and a generic phantom called Quasar phantom (Modus Medical Devices Inc., London, ON, Canada) with one inserted chamber were used to confirm dosimetric accuracy. The MV-FBCT could be used to clearly visualize anatomy in the region of the dental artifact and provide sufficient soft-tissue contrast to assist in the delineation of normal tissue structures and fat planes. With the elimination of the dental artifact, the MV-FBCT images allowed more accurate dose calculation by the tomotherapy system. It was confirmed that the phantom material density was determined correctly by the tomotherapy MV-FBCT number to density table. The ion chamber measurements agreed with the calculations from the MV-FBCT generated phantom plan within 2%. MV-FBCT may be useful in radiation treatment planning for nasopharyngeal cancer patients in the setting of extensive

  20. Electronics Department. Progress Report 1984

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde

    This report summarizes the activities in the Electronics Department in 1984. These include work under the headings of informatics, applied laser physics, nuclear geophysics, instrumentation and measuring techniques, and instrumentation consulting, registration and maintenance for the Danish...

  1. Diagnosis of incisive canal in patients referred to radiology department of dental faculty of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences using cone beam computed tomogtaphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Niknami

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Considering importance of recognizing the position of incisive canal before inserting intraosseous implants and bone harvesting from the symphysis and to preventing from adverse effects after these surgeries, using appropriate imaging method is essential and necessary. Due to the high accuracy measurement and high quality of CBCT and also low received dose to patient ̦ the aim of this study was to evaluate and recognize the position of incisive canal using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT. Materials and Methods: In this study, good quality CBCT mandible image of 60 patients including 32 women and 28 men with average ages of 41.3±2.5 were observed for diagnosing and recognizing the position of mandibular incisive canal using three observers separately. Data were statistically analyzed using SPSS software (version 20.0 for Windows, Chicago, IL, USA and Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests. Results: Horizontal and vertical assessment was independent from the sex of patients. The incisive canal was recognizable in 89.8 percent of specimens. In vertical dimension, in 57.5 percent of specimens the canal was observed in the inferior one third and in 32.25 percent in the medial one third. In horizontal dimension, in 14.75 percent of specimens the canal was observed in the buccal one third, 52.75 percent in the medial one third and 22.25 percent in the lingual one third. Conclusion: The quality of CBCT imaging and its accuracy and resolution can play an important role in the differentiation and determination of the position of incisive canal.

  2. challenges facing child headed households

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mugumbate

    Now there is a new family set up: the child headed households. (CHH). ..... building fund and uniforms to complement BEAM. For those in primary ... these children. As a result of this SRHBC took it upon itself to keep food for this household and only give them what was enough for a week or so. The issue of food insecurity ...

  3. Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... numbness in the arms or legs. Loss of consciousness. Seizures. What causes a head injury? There are ... Aid and Injury Prevention Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight ...

  4. Head Lice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Head lice cannot jump or fly. Only the direct contact with an infested person or their contaminated ... the complex world of health care and making…Sports and Exercise at Every AgeRead Article >>Exercise and ...

  5. Practical management of head injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wester, K.; Skretting, P.; Syvertsen, A.H.; Aas-Aune, G.

    1987-01-01

    The article offers practical advice for the management and treatment of severe head injuries in a county hospital without a neurosurgical department. Recommendations are based partly on recent, relevant literature and partly on our experience in a Norwegian county hospital and a neurosurgical department

  6. Coherent Beam-Beam Effects in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Alexahin, Yu I; Herr, Werner; Zorzano-Mier, M P

    2001-01-01

    In the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) two proton beams of similar intensities collide in several interaction points. It is well known that the head-on collision of two beams of equal strength can excite coherent modes whose frequencies are separated from the incoherent spectrum of oscillations of individual particles. This can lead to the loss of Landau damping and possibly to unstable motion. The beam-beam effect in the LHC is further complicated by a large number of bunches (2808 per beam), a finite crossing angle and gaps in the bunch train. The coherent beam-beam effects under various conditions and operational scenarios are studied analytically and with multiparticle simulations. We give an overview of the main results and present proposals to overcome these difficulties together with possible side effects.

  7. Electron beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudjak, Yu.V.; Vladyko, V.B.

    1993-01-01

    The electron beam transport in ion channel has been investigated. The influence of the external longitudinal magnetic field and self beam magnetic field on the charge neutralization process was defined. Beam head erosion under channel is curved or the availability of transverse external magnetic field was numerically simulated. The numerical investigation of the ion-hose instability was performed. The conditions, when as a result of ion-hose instability development may be coming out of the channel by beam tail, were founded. It was shown, that supplementary creation of plasma by electron beam and ions did not lead to the reduction of ion-hose instability. Sufficient slowing down of ion-hose instability development could be achieved if betatron length increased to impulse tail. In the case of a weak initial nonsymmetrical perturbation, sausage instability was investigated. Numerical simulation showed that this instability could lead to beam radius increasing in order. The electron beam guiding by low conductive plasma channel was considered. The attractive force of beam to this channel under nonsymmetrical injection was defined analytically

  8. Beam-beam collisions and crossing angles in RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peggs, S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper evaluates the strength of head on and parasitic beam-beam collisions in RHIC when the crossing angle is zero. A non-zero crossing angle is not required in normal operation with 120 bunches, thanks to the early separation of the two beams. The RHIC lattice is shown to easily accommodate even conservatively large crossing angles, for example in beam dynamics studies, or in future operational upgrades to as many as 360 bunches per ring. A modest loss in luminosity is incurred when gold ions collide at an angle after 10 hours of storage

  9. Analysis of Beam-Beam Kink Instability in a Linac-Ring Electron-Ion Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V. Lebedev; J. Bisognano; R. Li; B. Yunn

    2001-01-01

    A linac-ring collision scheme was considered in recent proposals of electron-gold colliders (eRHIC) and polarized-electron light-ion colliders (EPIC). The advantages of using an energy-recovered linac for the electron beam is that it avoids the limitation of beam-beam tune shift inherent in a storage ring, pertains good beam quality and easy manipulation of polarization. However, the interaction of the ion beam in the storage ring with the electron beam from the linac acts analogously to a transverse impedance, and can induce unstable behavior of the ion beam similar to the strong head-tail instability. In this paper, this beam-beam kink instability with head-tail effect is analyzed using the linearized Vlasov equation, and the threshold of transverse mode coupling instability is obtained

  10. Head Tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bones in the neck. Children with Klippel-Feil syndrome may have a short, broad neck, low hairline, and very restricted neck movement. Torticollis ... surgery may be necessary. To treat Klippel-Feil syndrome, a specialist may recommend ... to ease head and neck pain. Your pediatrician can refer you to a ...

  11. Head lice

    OpenAIRE

    Burgess, Ian F

    2011-01-01

    Head lice can only be diagnosed by finding live lice, as eggs take 7 days to hatch, and may appear viable for weeks after death of the egg. Infestation may be more likely in school children, with risks increased in children with more siblings, longer hair, or of lower socioeconomic group.

  12. Is HEADS in our heads?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Kirsten A; Hertz, Pernille Grarup; Blix, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Outpatient clinic visits are a window of opportunity to address health risk behaviors and promote a healthier lifestyle among young people. The HEADS (Home, Education, Eating, Activities, Drugs [i.e. substance use including tobacco, alcohol, and illegal drugs], Sexuality [including...... contraception], Safety, Self-harm) interview is a feasible way of exploring health risk behaviors and resilience. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate how often HEADS topics were addressed according to young patients and staff in pediatric and adult outpatient clinics. METHODS: We conducted...

  13. 14 November 2013 - Director of Indian Institute of Technology Indore P. Mathur with members of the Indian community working at CERN; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2, the ALICE experimental area and SM18 with ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson, Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare P. Giubellino and Technology Department, Accelerator Beam Transfer Group Leader V. Mertens

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    14 November 2013 - Director of Indian Institute of Technology Indore P. Mathur with members of the Indian community working at CERN; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2, the ALICE experimental area and SM18 with ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson, Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare P. Giubellino and Technology Department, Accelerator Beam Transfer Group Leader V. Mertens

  14. COMPORTAMIENTO DE GENOTIPOS DE TRIGO A LA FUSARIOSIS DE LA ESPIGA EN EL DEPARTAMENTO DE NARIÑO,COLOMBIA WHEAT GENOTYPES BEHAVIOR TO FUSARIUM HEAD BLIGHT IN NARIÑO DEPARTMENT, COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Esteban Reyes Caicedo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available La Fusariosis de la espiga del trigo (FET causada por el hongo Fusarium spp., se registra como una de las enfermedades más limitantes en el departamento de Nariño, Colombia, debido a la alta prevalencia y a la ausencia de técnicas de manejo eficientes. Este trabajo se planteó con el fin de evaluar el comportamiento de diferentes genotipos de trigo respecto a la incidencia del patógeno y su efecto sobre los componentes de rendimiento. Se estudiaron 45 genotipos, 13 provenientes de la colección de CORPOICA y 32 cedidos por la Facultad de Ciencias Agrícolas de la Universidad de Nariño. Se realizó la purificación y multiplicación del hongo a partir de espigas afectadas. La inoculación en el campo se hizo con bomba manual de 20 litros, en espigamiento del cultivo. El ensayo constó de 45 tratamientos en un diseño de bloques al azar con cuatro repeticiones. Se analizaron la incidencia de la enfermedad en espiga y grano, las macollas efectivas, el número de granos por espiga, el peso de 1000 granos y el rendimiento en kg/ha. Se identificaron 10 genotipos con resistencia a FET y dos de ellos con buen comportamiento agronómico. Particularmente el genotipo L23 presentó una reacción altamente resistente (AR y resistente (R en la evaluación de incidencia en espiga y grano respectivamente. Se destaca que los genotipos que mostraron resistencia a la enfermedad tienen como progenitor la variedad ICA YACUANQUER que se registra con moderada resistencia a la FET.The Fusarium sead blight of wheat caused by Fusarium spp. is registred in the Nariño Department (Colombia, like one of most limiting diseases, due to the high prevalence and the poor management techniques. This research was carried out in orfer to evaluate the reaction of different wheat genotypes inoculated with the pathogen, and the effect on yield components. 45 genotypes were evaluated, 13 of them proceeding from CORPOICA Colletion, and 32 giving by the Agricultural Science School

  15. Coherent beam-beam effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    There are two physical pictures that describe the beam-beam interaction in a storage ring collider: The weak-strong and the strong-strong pictures. Both pictures play a role in determining the beam-beam behavior. This review addresses only the strong-strong picture. The corresponding beam dynamical effects are referred to as the coherent beam-beam effects. Some basic knowledge of the weak-strong picture is assumed. To be specific, two beams of opposite charges are considered. (orig.)

  16. Superresolution beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available zones capable of introducing a phase shift of zero or p on the alternately out of phase rings of the TEMp0 beams into a unified phase and then focusing the rectified beam to generate a high resolution beam which has a Gaussian beam intensity distribution...

  17. 0-6722 : spread prestressed concrete slab beam bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The Texas Department of Transportation uses : precast prestressed concrete slab beam bridges for : shorter-span bridges of approximately 3050 ft in : length. Conventional slab beam bridges have slab : beams placed immediately adjacent to one anoth...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special ... the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  19. Coherent Beam-Beam Oscillations at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zorzano-Mier, M P

    1999-01-01

    The transverse coherent motion of the two colliding LHC beams is studied by multi-particle tracking, where the beam-beam force is calculated assuming a Gaussian beam distribution with variable barycentres and rms beam sizes. The simulation yields the coherent and incoherent oscillation frequencies, the emittance growth of either beam, and evidence for the existence or lack of Landau damping. The transverse beam sizes change with the fractional part of the tune as expected from the dynamic beta effect. For head-on collisions, we find that the pi-mode frequency lies outside of the continuum frequency spread if the ratio of the beam-beam parameters exceeds 0.6, in accordance with predictions [1]. For smaller ratios, the pi-mode is Landau damped. When long range interactions are also included, undamped coherent modes do still exist outside the continuum, both with and without alternating crossing planes at two interaction points. However, the simulation shows that separating the tunes of the two beams can restore...

  20. Bray Head

    OpenAIRE

    Brocas, Samuel Frederick (Irish cityscape painter, watercolorist, and draftsman, 1792-1847)

    2008-01-01

    'A number of Martello towers were built around the coast of Ireland, especially along the east, from Millmount (Drogheda), to Bray, around Dublin Bay but also around Cork Harbour on the south coast. On the east coast, concentrated mainly around Dublin Bay, the towers were in line of sight of each other, providing the ability to communicate with one another, or warn of any incoming attacks.' (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martello_Tower#Ireland) 'Bray Head (Irish: Ceann Bre) is a hill and headland, of...

  1. Goniometer head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, V.; Berger, V.D.; Kadyrzhanov, K.K.; Zarifov, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The goniometer head is an electromechanical instrument that performs the independent transfer of a testing sample on three coordinate axes (X, Y, Z) within limits of ±8 mm and independent rotation relative of these directions. The instrument comprises a sample holder, bellows component and three electrometer drives. The sample holder rotates around the axes X and Y, and is installed on the central arm which rotates around axis Z. One characteristic of this instrument is its independence which allows its use in any camera for researches in the field of radiation physics. 2 figs

  2. Metallurgy Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde

    The activities of the Metallurgy Department at Risø during 1981 are described. The work is presented in three chapters: General Materials Research, Technology and Materials Development, Fuel Elements. Furthermore, a survey is given of the department's participation in international collaboration...

  3. Head Start Impact Study. Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puma, Michael; Bell, Stephen; Cook, Ronna; Heid, Camilla; Shapiro, Gary; Broene, Pam; Jenkins, Frank; Fletcher, Philip; Quinn, Liz; Friedman, Janet; Ciarico, Janet; Rohacek, Monica; Adams, Gina; Spier, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This Technical Report is designed to provide technical detail to support the analysis and findings presented in the "Head Start Impact Study Final Report" (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, January 2010). Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Head Start Impact Study and its findings. Chapter 2 provides technical information on the…

  4. Beam Dynamics Challenges for Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    Zimmermann, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The luminosity of hadron colliders rises with the beam intensity, until some limit is encountered, mostly due to head-on and long-range beam-beam interaction, due to electron cloud, or due to conventional impedance sources. Also beam losses caused by various mechanisms may affect the performance. The limitations can be alleviated, if not overcome, by a proper choice of beam parameters and by dedicated compensation schemes. Examples include alternating crossing at several interaction points, electromagnetic wires, super-bunches, electron lenses, clearing electrodes, and nonlinear collimation. I discuss such mitigating measures and related research efforts, with special emphasis on the LHC and its upgrade.

  5. Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

  6. Beam cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Danared, H

    2006-01-01

    Beam cooling is the technique of reducing the momentum spread and increasing the phase-space density of stored particle beams. This paper gives an introduction to beam cooling and Liouville’s theorem, and then it describes the three methods of active beam cooling that have been proven to work so far, namely electron cooling, stochastic cooling, and laser cooling. Ionization cooling is also mentioned briefly.

  7. Molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendelbury, J.M.; Smith, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Studies with directed collision-free beams of particles continue to play an important role in the development of modern physics and chemistry. The deflections suffered by such beams as they pass through electric and magnetic fields or laser radiation provide some of the most direct information about the individual constituents of the beam; the scattering observed when two beams intersect yields important data about the intermolecular forces responsible for the scattering. (author)

  8. Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) 2000 Cohort

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Descriptive, longitudinal study including direct assessments, classroom observation, parent and teacher interviews, for a nationally represenative sample of Head...

  9. Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) 2006 Cohort

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Descriptive, longitudinal study including direct assessments, classroom observation, parent and teacher interviews, for a nationally represenative sample of Head...

  10. Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) 2003 Cohort

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Descriptive, longitudinal study including direct assessments, classroom observation, parent and teacher interviews, for a nationally represenative sample of Head...

  11. Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) 1997 Cohort

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Descriptive, longitudinal study including direct assessments, classroom observation, parent and teacher interviews, for a nationally represenative sample of Head...

  12. 16 February 2016 - British Ambassador to the United Nations and Other International Organisations at Geneva signing the guest book with CERN Director-General F. Gianotti and Beams Department Head P. Collier.

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2016-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Julian Braithwaite Ambassador and Permanent Representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the United Nations and Other International Organisations at Geneva

  13. Frontiers of particle beams: Intensity limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienes, M.; Month, M.; Turner, S.

    1992-01-01

    The present volume is the proceedings of the latest of these joint schools, held on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, in 1990. This course dealt with intensity limitations and was centered on a series of lectures which could be divided into the following main categories: Self and environmental fields, Coherent instabilities and their simulation, Beam-beam interaction, Other multiparticle effects, Beam source limitations, Engineering limitations. (orig.)

  14. Electronics Department progress report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    this report summarizes the Electronics Department's activities in 1983. These include work under the headings of man-machine system and operator studies, reliability techniques, application of nuclear techniques to mineral exploration, applied laser physics, computing and, lastly, research instrumentation. (author)

  15. Recycled Paper Beam Sculpture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Kristin; Tabacchi, Jo

    2011-01-01

    As art department budgets across the country continue to shrink, art teachers are increasingly on the lookout for inexpensive materials that can be used to teach a range of concepts. In this article, the authors describe a newspaper beam tower project inspired by the book, "The Wonderful Towers of Watts" by Patricia Zelver. There are many more…

  16. Applications of electron lenses: scraping of high-power beams, beam-beam compensation, and nonlinear optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio

    2014-09-11

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Hollow electron beam collimation and halo control were studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN; a conceptual design was recently completed. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compensation in LHC luminosity upgrade scenarios with small crossing angles. At Fermilab, we are planning to install an electron lens in the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA, a 40-m ring for 150-MeV electrons) as one of the proof-of-principle implementations of nonlinear integrable optics to achieve large tune spreads and more stable beams without loss of dynamic aperture.

  17. RH Department Information Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, HR Department would like to invite you to an information meeting which will be held on Thursday 30 September 2010 at 9:30 am in the Main Auditorium (Building 500)* A welcome coffee will be available from 9:00 a.m. The presentation will cover the CERN Competency Model which consists of the technical and behavioral competencies that are intrinsic to our Organization and its application in the various HR processes. This presentation will be followed by a questions & answers session. We look forward to seeing you all on 30 September! Best regards, Anne-Sylvie Catherin Head, Human Resources Department *This meeting will be simultaneously retransmitted and thereafter available at the following address: http://webcast.cern.ch.

  18. Beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the open-quotes Boosterclose quotes and open-quotes ATLASclose quotes linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates

  19. Head circumference (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head circumference is a measurement of the circumference of the child's head at its largest area, above the eyebrows and ears and around the back of the head. During routine check-ups, the distance is measured ...

  20. Abnormal Head Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Abnormal Head Position En Español Read in Chinese What is an abnormal head posture? An abnormal or compensatory head posture occurs ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is typically ...

  2. 29 September 2015 - Vice-President of the Government of Spain S. Sáenz de Santamaría in the ATLAS visitor centre, the Synchrocyclotron, the Data Centre visit point and the LHC magnet facility with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Technology Department Head J.M. Jiménez.

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Were also present from Spain: Sra. Carmen Vela, Secretaria de Estado de Investigación, Desarrollo e Innovación, Sr. D. Bernardo de Sicart Escoda Embajador de España en Berna, Sra. Da Ana Menéndez Pérez, Embajadora Representante Permanente de España ante Naciones Unidas y OOII con sede en Ginebra, Sra. Da María Pico Directora del Gabinete de la Vicepresidenta and Sr. D. Miguel Temboury Redondo Subsecretario de Economía y Competitividad. And from CERN: Dr Maria Alandes Pradillo, Information Technology Department, Dr Maria Barroso-Lopez Deputy Group Leader, IT-PES, Dr Frédérick Bordry, Director of Accelerators and Technology, Dr Borja Fernandez Adiego Engineering Department, Prof. Maria Jose Garcia Borge ISOLDE Collaboration Spokesperson, Dr Fabiola Gianotti Director-General elect 2016-2020, Mr Frédéric Hemmer Information Technology Department Head, Prof. Mario Martinez, Spanish Scientific Delegate to CERN Council Mr Guillermo Merino Fernandez, Technology Department Mr Lluis Miralles, General Infrast...

  3. Electronics department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities in 1978 of some of the groups within the Electronics Department. The work covered includes plant protection and operator studies, reliability techniques, application of nuclear techniques to mineral exploration, applied laser physics, computing and, lastly, research instrumentation. (author)

  4. Heading for a fall? Management of head injury in infants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Williamson, M

    2010-09-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest reasons for infants (< 1 year) to attend the Emergency Department (ED). Clinical management varies considerably and concern about non accidental injury results in a high admission rate in some hospitals. Information was obtained on 103 children under one year of age presenting to the ED with head injury in a prospective study. The average age was 6.7 months and 57% of patients were male. Twenty eight babies had skull x rays with 1 skull fracture diagnosed. None required CT brain scan. Ninety eight (94%) were discharged home from the ED. There were no unplanned returns, readmissions or adverse events. The incidence of traumatic brain injury in children under one year of age presenting with head injury is low and the majority can be safely discharged home.

  5. 3 December 2015 - Finnish Rector, Lapland University of Applied Sciences, M. Lampela, signing an agreement with Engineering Department Head R. Saban an the guest book with HiLumi Project Leader L. Rossi.

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Also present from Finland: Principal Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering L. Kantola, Lic.Sc; Senior Lecturer, Information and Communications Technology K. Karlsson;Senior Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering A. Pikkarainen, M.Eng. Also present from CERN: HiLumi Configuration, Quality and Resource Officer I. Bejar Alonso; HiLumi Deputy Project Leader O. Brüning; HiLumi Collaboration B. Di Girolamo; HiLumi Integration and Installation Officer P. Fessia; Engineering Department M. Garlasche.

  6. Toxicity of Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanfilippo, Nicholas J.; Mitchell, James; Grew, David; DeLacure, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the acute morbidity of high dose head and neck RT and CRT in patients with infected with HIV. Methods and Materials: All HIV-positive patients who underwent radiation therapy for head and neck cancer in our department between 2004 and 2008 were reviewed. Treatment related data were examined. All treatments were delivered with megavoltage photon beams or electron beams. Patients were evaluated by an attending radiation oncologist for toxicity and response on a weekly basis during therapy and monthly after treatment in a multidisciplinary clinic. Acute toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy and Oncology Group (RTOG) common toxicity criteria. Response to treatment was based on both physical exam as well as post-treatment imaging as indicated. Results: Thirteen patients who underwent RT with a diagnosis of HIV were identified. Median age was 53 years and median follow-up was 22 months. Twelve had squamous cell carcinoma and one had lymphoproliferative parotiditis. Median radiation dose was 66.4 Gy and median duration of treatment was 51 days. The median number of scheduled radiotherapy days missed was zero (range 0 to 7). One patient (8%) developed Grade 4 confluent moist desquamation. Eight patients (61%) developed Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusion: Based on our results, HIV-positive individuals appear to tolerate treatment for head and neck cancer, with toxicity similar to that in HIV-negative individuals.

  7. Head Impact Laboratory (HIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HIL uses testing devices to evaluate vehicle interior energy attenuating (EA) technologies for mitigating head injuries resulting from head impacts during mine/...

  8. Elliptical beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandres, Miguel A; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2008-12-08

    A very general beam solution of the paraxial wave equation in elliptic cylindrical coordinates is presented. We call such a field an elliptic beam (EB). The complex amplitude of the EB is described by either the generalized Ince functions or the Whittaker-Hill functions and is characterized by four parameters that are complex in the most general situation. The propagation through complex ABCD optical systems and the conditions for square integrability are studied in detail. Special cases of the EB are the standard, elegant, and generalized Ince-Gauss beams, Mathieu-Gauss beams, among others.

  9. Department of Material Studies - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The technology of modifying surfaces of technological materials by means of continuous and pulsed energy and particle beams has been intensely studied for more than 20 years. In some fields, it is currently utilized on a wide scale in industry. Continuous or pulsed ion and plasma beams play a significant role among various approaches used in this area. The research carried by Department P-IX is centered on applications of our two ion implantation facilities (ion implanters) of different kinds and unique sources of high-intensity intense plasma pulses, operated by the Department of Plasma Physics. The Department cooperates closely with Forschungszentrum Rossendorf (FZR, Dresden, Germany) in the field of analytical ion beam techniques and the use of unique ion implantation facilities. The main objectives of the Department are: · the search for new ways of modifying the surface properties of solid materials by means of continuous or pulsed ion and plasma beams and · the implementation of ion implantation techniques in national industries as a method of improving the lifetime of machine parts and tools utilized in industry. In 2008, research was focused on: · ion implantation/plasma treatment of ceramics aimed at improving their wettability in ceramic-metal joints, · ion beam synthesis and plasma pulse activation of superconducting MgB 2 phases, · cobalt and zirconium inclusions in conducting layers produced in oxide insulators (Al 2 O 3 ) by ion implantation and thermal annealing. Research was conducted in cooperation with Department P-V of IPJ, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (Warsaw), Warsaw University of Technology, Institute of Technology of Materials for Electronics (Warsaw), Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences (Poznan), Institute of Chemical Physics PAS and Forschungszentrum Rossendorf FZR (Dresden, Germany), as well as with some industrial companies. (author)

  10. Acute subdural hematoma, Head injury, Functional reco

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kim

    Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Kenyatta National Hospital, University of Nairobi,. Nairobi, Kenya. 2. Department of Human Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Nairobi, Kenya. E-Mail Contact - KIBOI Julius Githinji : Mots-clés: Keywords: Acute subdural hematoma, Head injury, Functional recovery, ...

  11. Head trauma and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samejima, Kanji; Yoshii, Nobuo; Tobari, Chitoshi

    1979-01-01

    In our cases of acute and subacute subdural hematoma, the use of CT was evaluated. In our department of surgery, acute subdural hematoma was found in 46 of 388 patients of head trauma who underwent CT. Acute subdural hematoma, like epidural hematoma was usually visualized as a high-density area along the cranial inner table, and this was easily differenciated from epidural hematoma because of difference in shape from the other. The picture of acute subdural hematoma was occasionally confused with that of intracerebral hematoma or cerebral contusion. Single use of CT does not differenciate subacute subdural hematoma from chronic subdural hematoma. However, CT usually visualized acute hematoma as a high-density area, showing the extent of hematoma. Comparison of the thickness of hematoma with the axis deviation of the median part such as the 3rd cerebral ventricle suggested severity of cerebral edema. CT also revealed bilateral or multiple lesions of cerebral contusion or intracerebral hematoma. (Ueda, J.)

  12. Superresolution beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available positions of p zeros of intensity distributions on the Gaussian beam, resulting to a generation of TEMp0 beams where there are minimum losses. The LGBs are well-known family of exact orthogonal solutions of free-space paraxial wave equation in cylindrical...

  13. Spin Depolarization due to Beam-Beam Interaction in NLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Kathleen A

    2001-01-04

    Calculations of spin depolarization effects due to the beam-beam interaction are presented for several NLC designs. The depolarization comes from both classical (Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi precession) and quantum (Sokolov-Ternov spin-flip) effects. It is anticipated that some physics experiments at future colliders will require a knowledge of the polarization to better than 0.5% precision. We compare the results of CAIN simulations with the analytic estimates of Yokoya and Chen for head-on collisions. We also study the effects of transverse offsets and beamstrahlung-induced energy spread.

  14. Beam diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Raich, U

    2008-01-01

    Most beam measurements are based on the electro-magnetic interaction of fields induced by the beam with their environment. Beam current transformers as well as beam position monitors are based on this principle. The signals induced in the sensors must be amplified and shaped before they are converted into numerical values. These values are further treated numerically in order to extract meaningful machine parameter measurements. The lecture introduces the architecture of an instrument and shows where in the treatment chain digital signal analysis can be introduced. Then the use of digital signal processing is presented using tune measurements, orbit and trajectory measurements as well as beam loss detection and longitudinal phase space tomography as examples. The hardware as well as the treatment algorithms and their implementation on Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) or in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are presented.

  15. Electric potential structures and propagation of electron beams injected from a spacecraft into a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nagendra; Hwang, K. S.

    1988-01-01

    One-dimensional Vlasov simulations are used to study the propagation of electron beams injected from a spacecraft into an ambient plasma and the associated potential structures. It is shown that, for a given beam velocity, the propagation velocity and the potential structure depends on the beam density. In the case of moderate beams, a double layer forms near the beam head which propagates into the ambient plasma much more slowly than the initial beam velocity.

  16. A Proposal to the Department of Energy for The Fabrication of a Very High Energy Polarized Gama Ray Beam Facility and A Program of Medium Energy Physics Research at The National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandorfi, A.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Giordano, G.; Matone, G.

    1982-09-01

    This proposal requests support for the fabrication and operation of a modest facility that would provide relatively intense beams of monochromatic and polarized photons with energies in the range of several hundreds of MeV. These {gamma} rays would be produced by Compton backscattering laser light from the electrons circulating in the 2.5-3.0 GeV 'X-RAY' storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The excellent emittance, phase space, and high current of this state-of-the-art storage ring will allow the production of 2 x 10{sup 7} {gamma} rays per second. These photons would be tagged by detecting the scattered electrons, thereby determining the energy to 2.7 MeV for all {gamma}-ray energies. The efficiency of this tagging procedure is 100% and the {gamma}-ray beam would be essentially background free. Tagging will also allow the flexibility of operating with a dynamic range as large as 200 MeV in photon energy while still preserving high resolution and polarization. These beams will permit a fruitful study of important questions in medium-energy nuclear physics. The initial goals of this program are to reach reliable operation with photon energies up to 300 MeV and to develop {gamma}-ray beams with energies up to about 500 MeV. To demonstrate reliable operation, a modest physics program is planned that, for the most part, utilizes existing magnets and detector systems but nonetheless addresses several important outstanding problems. Gamma ray beams of the versatility, intensity, energy, and resolution that can be achieved at this facility are not currently available at any other world facility either existing or under construction. Furthermore, the proposed program would produce the first intense source of medium-energy {gamma} rays that are polarized. Because of the difficulties in producing such polarized beams, it is very unlikely that viable alternate sources can be developed in the near future; at

  17. Department of Radiation Detectors: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piekoszewski, J.

    1998-01-01

    (full text) Work carried out in 1997 in the Department of Radiation Detectors concentrated on three subjects: (i) Semiconductor Detectors (ii) X-ray Tube Generators (iii) Material Modification using Ion and Plasma Beams. Semiconductor detectors: Semiconductor detectors of ionizing radiation are among the basic tools utilized in such fields of research and industry as nuclear physics, high energy physics, medical (oncology) radiotherapy, radiological protection, environmental monitoring, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence non-destructive analysis of chemical composition, nuclear power industry. The Department all objectives are: - search for new types of detectors, - adapting modern technologies (especially of industrial microelectronics) to detector manufacturing, - producing unique detectors tailored for physics experiments, - manufacturing standard detectors for radiation measuring instruments, - scientific development of the staff. These 1997 objectives were accomplished particularly by: - research on unique detectors for nuclear physics (e.g. transmission type Si(Li) detectors with extremely thin entrance and exit window), - development of technology of high-resistivity (HRSi) silicon detectors and thermoelectric cooling systems (KBN grant), - study of the applicability of industrial planar technology in producing detectors, - manufacturing detectors developed in previous years, re-generating and servicing customer detectors of various origin. In accomplishing of the above, the Department cooperated with interested groups of physicists from our Institute (P-I and P-II Departments), Warsaw University, Warsaw Heavy Ion Laboratory and with some technology Institutes based in Warsaw (ITME, ITE). Some detectors and services have been delivered to customers on a commercial basis. X-Rat tube generators: The Department conducts research on design and technology of producing X-ray generators based on X-ray tubes of special construction. In 1997, work on a special

  18. Head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the titles are: Combined Surgical Resection and Irradiation for Head and Neck Cancers; Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Head and Neck Database: Identification of Prognostic Factors and the Re-evaluation of American Joint Committee Stages; Combined Modality Approach to Head and Neck Cancer; Induction Combination Chemotherapy of Regionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer; and Outcome after Complete Remission to Induction Chemotherapy in Head and Neck Cancer

  19. Simulations of coherent beam-beam modes at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Zorzano-Mier, M P

    2000-01-01

    The transverse coherent motion of two colliding proton beams at the Large Hadron Collider is studied by multiparticle tracking. We use the beam-beam force for a Gaussian beam distribution with variable barycenters and rms beam sizes, and optionally include the effect of long-range collisions and external impedance. The simulation yields the coherent and incoherent oscillation frequencies, the emittance growth of either beam, and evidence for the existence or lack of Landau damping. For head-on collisions of beams with equal sizes, we find that the pi -mode frequency lies outside of the continuum frequency spread, if the ratio of the beam-beam parameters exceeds 0.6, in accordance with predictions. For smaller ratios of the beam- beam parameters, or if, for equal beam-beam parameters, the beam sizes are widely different, the pi mode is Landau damped. When long- range collisions are also included, undamped coherent modes do still exist outside the continuum, both with and without alternating crossing planes at ...

  20. PH Department: at the heart of CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    The Physics Department is where the Laboratory’s scientific activity takes place. Some 1000 members of the personnel and 11,000 users work together on CERN’s highly diversified experimental programme. The challenges for the coming years are twofold: maintain the level of excellence that led the Laboratory to the discovery of the Higgs boson, and preserve the diversity of the scientific programme. The new Department Head discusses his vision with us.   Livio Mapelli. “On paper, our plan for the next two years shows no surprises,” says Livio Mapelli, former Deputy Department Head and now, since January, Head of the Physics Department (PH). “We have to finish the completion, consolidation and initial upgrades of the experiments planned for LS1. In 2015, our core activity will be supporting the experiments during the restart of the accelerator complex. However, as physicists, the best reward for us would be to obtain new breakthroughs and importa...

  1. 21 March 2011 - South African Ministry of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Technology (DST) Director General P. Mjwara signing the guest with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Adviser J. Ellis and ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino and J. Cleymans; in the CERN control centre with R. Steerenberg; visiting ALICE surface exhibition with P. Giubellino and LHC superconducting magnet test hall with L. Bottura.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    21 March 2011 - South African Ministry of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Technology (DST) Director General P. Mjwara signing the guest with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Adviser J. Ellis and ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino and J. Cleymans; in the CERN control centre with R. Steerenberg; visiting ALICE surface exhibition with P. Giubellino and LHC superconducting magnet test hall with L. Bottura.

  2. 19 January 2011 - British University of Manchester, Vice-President and Dean for the Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences Professor of Structural Engineering School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering C. Bailey in CERN Control Centre with Department Head P. Collier; at LHCb with R. Lindner and ATLAS underground experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson D. Charlton, througout accompanied by . Collier with R. Appleby and F. Loebinger

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    19 January 2011 - British University of Manchester, Vice-President and Dean for the Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences Professor of Structural Engineering School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering C. Bailey in CERN Control Centre with Department Head P. Collier; at LHCb with R. Lindner and ATLAS underground experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson D. Charlton, througout accompanied by . Collier with R. Appleby and F. Loebinger

  3. 9 February 2012 - Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of Spain to the United Nations Office at Geneva and other International Organisations, Ambassador A. Santos Maraver signing the guest book with CERN Director-General; in the CERN Control Centre with N. Catalan; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS underground experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela; throughout accompanied by Adviser J. Salicio Diez and Former Physics Deputy Department Head L. Alvarez Gaumé.

    CERN Multimedia

    Visual Media Office

    2012-01-01

    9 February 2012 - Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of Spain to the United Nations Office at Geneva and other International Organisations, Ambassador A. Santos Maraver signing the guest book with CERN Director-General; in the CERN Control Centre with N. Catalan; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS underground experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela; throughout accompanied by Adviser J. Salicio Diez and Former Physics Deputy Department Head L. Alvarez Gaumé.

  4. 18 December 2012 -Portuguese President of FCT M. Seabra visiting the Computing Centre with IT Department Head F. Hemmer, ATLAS experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti and A. Henriques Correia, in the LHC tunnel at Point 2 and CMS experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson J. Varela, signing an administrative agreement with Director-General R. Heuer; LIP President J. M. Gago and Delegate to CERN Council G. Barreia present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Samuel Morier-Genoud

    2012-01-01

    18 December 2012 -Portuguese President of FCT M. Seabra visiting the Computing Centre with IT Department Head F. Hemmer, ATLAS experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti and A. Henriques Correia, in the LHC tunnel at Point 2 and CMS experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson J. Varela, signing an administrative agreement with Director-General R. Heuer; LIP President J. M. Gago and Delegate to CERN Council G. Barreia present.

  5. 24 February 2012 - Portuguese Minister for Education and Science N. Crato visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. The Minister is accompanied by Secretary of State for Science L. Parreira and LIP Director J.M. Gago. A. Henriques(ATLAS), C. Lourenço (CMS) and Adviser R. Voss accompany the delegation throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    On 24 February Nuno Crato, the Portuguese minister for education and science, left, toured the LHC superconducting-magnet test hall accompanied by Frédérick Bordry, CERN’s technology department head. He also took the opportunity to visit the underground experimental areas of ATLAS and CMS, and heard about the LHC Computing Grid Project before meeting Portuguese scientists working at CERN.

  6. ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

    2012-07-01

    The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

  7. Department of Radiation Detectors: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piekoszewski, J.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Work carried out in 1998 in the Department of Radiation Detectors concentrated on three subjects: (i) Semiconductor Detectors (ii) X-ray Tube Generators (iii) Material Modification Using Ion and Plasma Beams. SEMICONDUCTOR DETECTORS: Semiconductor detectors of ionizing radiation are among the basic tools utilized in such fields of research and industry as nuclear physics, high energy physics, medical (oncology) radiotherapy, radiological protection, environmental monitoring, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence non-destructive analysis of chemical composition, nuclear power industry. The departmental objectives are: a search for new types of detectors; producing unique detectors tailored for physics experiments; manufacturing standard detectors for radiation measuring instruments; scientific development of the staff. These objectives were accomplished in 1998 particularly by: research on unique thin silicon detectors for identification of particles in E-ΔE telescopes, modernization of technology of manufacturing Ge(Li) detectors capable of detecting broader range of gamma energies, manufacturing detectors developed in previous years, re-generating and servicing customer detectors of various origin. In accomplishment of the above the Department co-operated with groups of physicists from IPJ, PAN Institute of Physics (Warsaw), and with some technology Institutes based in Warsaw (ITME, ITE). Some detectors and services have been delivered to customers on a commercial basis. X-Ray TUBE GENERATORS: The Department conducts research on design and technology of manufacturing X-ray generators as well as on imaging and dosimetry of X-ray beams. Various models of special construction X-ray tubes and their power supplies are under construction. In 1998 work concentrated on: completing laboratory equipment for manufacturing X-ray tubes and their components, developing technology of manufacturing X-ray tubes and their components, completing a laboratory set-up with

  8. Department of Material Studies - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Z.

    2007-01-01

    The technology of modifying surfaces of practical-use materials by means of continuous and pulsed energy and particle beams has been intensely studied for more than 20 years. In some fields it is presently utilized on a wide scale in industry. Continuous or pulsed ion and plasma beams play a significant role among various approaches used in this area. The research carried by Department P-IX is centered around the use of two own ion implantation machines (ion implanters) of different kind and several world-wide unique sources of high-intensity intense plasma pulses, utilized jointly with Department P-V. The Department cooperates closely with Forschungszentrum Rossendorf (FZR, Dresden, Germany) in the field of ion-beam-based analytical techniques and the use of unique ion implantation facilities. The main objectives of the Department are: search for new ways of modifying surface properties of solid materials by means of continuous or pulsed ion and plasma beams and implementation of ion implantation technique in national industries as a method of improving the lifetime of machine parts and tools utilized in industry. In 2006 these objectives were accomplished in many ways, particularly by research on: formation of superconducting MgB 2 phases, electrical conductivity in metallic nano-layers produced in oxide insulators (Al 2 O 3 ) by ion implantation, ion implantation as a method of improving mechanical properties of stainless steels without degrading their corrosion resistance, ion implantation/plasma treatment of ceramics aimed at improving their wettability in ceramic-metal joints, methods of controlling wear of ceramic-polymer pairs used in bio-medical applications. The research was conducted in cooperation with Department P-V of IPJ, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (Warsaw), Warsaw University of Technology, Institute of Technology of Materials for Electronics (Warsaw), and Institute of Molecular Physics Polish Academy of Sciences (Poznan

  9. OCULAR MANIFESTATIONS OF HEAD INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanukollu Venkata Madusudana Rao

    2016-12-01

    and in patients reported to Department of Ophthalmology with a history of head injury.

  10. Molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, N.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a timeless and rather complete theoretical and experimental treatment of electric and magnetic resonance molecular-beam experiments for studying the radio frequency spectra of atoms and molecules. The theory of interactions of the nucleus with atomic and molecular fields is extensively presented. Measurements of atomic and nuclear magnetic moments, electric multipole moments, and atomic fine and hyperfine structure are detailed. Useful but somewhat outdated chapters on gas kinetics, molecular beam design, and experimental techniques are also included

  11. Beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Considerable experience has now been gained with the various beam transport lines, and a number of minor changes have been made to improve the ease of operation. These include: replacement of certain little-used slits by profile monitors (harps or scanners); relocation of steering magnets, closer to diagnostic harps or profile scanners; installation of a scanner inside the isocentric neutron therapy system; and conversion of a 2-doublet quadrupole telescope (on the neutron therapy beamline) to a 2-triplet telescope. The beam-swinger project has been delayed by very late delivery of the magnet iron to the manufacturer, but is now progressing smoothly. The K=600 spectrometer magnets have now been delivered and are being assembled for field mapping. The x,y-table with its associated mapping equipment is complete, together with the driver software. One of the experimental areas has been dedicated to the production of collimated neutron beams and has been equipped with a bending magnet and beam dump, together with steel collimators fixed at 4 degrees intervals from 0 degrees to 16 degrees. Changes to the target cooling and shielding system for isotope production have led to a request for much smaller beam spot sizes on target, and preparations have been made for rearrangement of the isotope beamline to permit installation of quadrupole triplets on the three beamlines after the switching magnet. A practical system of quadrupoles for matching beam properties to the spectrometer has been designed. 6 figs

  12. An introduction to beam physics

    CERN Document Server

    Berz, Martin; Wan, Weishi

    2015-01-01

    The field of beam physics touches many areas of physics, engineering, and the sciences. In general terms, beams describe ensembles of particles with initial conditions similar enough to be treated together as a group so that the motion is a weakly nonlinear perturbation of a chosen reference particle. Particle beams are used in a variety of areas, ranging from electron microscopes, particle spectrometers, medical radiation facilities, powerful light sources, and astrophysics to large synchrotrons and storage rings such as the LHC at CERN. An Introduction to Beam Physics is based on lectures given at Michigan State University’s Department of Physics and Astronomy, the online VUBeam program, the U.S. Particle Accelerator School, the CERN Academic Training Programme, and various other venues. It is accessible to beginning graduate and upper-division undergraduate students in physics, mathematics, and engineering. The book begins with a historical overview of methods for generating and accelerating beams, high...

  13. Standard beam PWC for Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenker, H.

    1983-02-01

    As one of its projects the Fermilab Experimental Areas Department has been designed and tested a relatively small proportional wire chamber for use in the secondary beam lines. It is intended to supplement the variety of detectors known in the vernacular as SWICS that are used to obtain profiles for beam tuning. The new detector, described in this report, operates in the limited proportional mode and allows experimenters to use a standard, lab supported device for associating trajectories of individual beam particles with events triggering their own experiment's apparatus. A completed triple plane module is shown

  14. Head and face reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002980.htm Head and face reconstruction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Head and face reconstruction is surgery to repair or ...

  15. Head CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - ... Head CT is done in the hospital or radiology center. You lie on a narrow table that ...

  16. Head Lice: Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites - Lice - Head Lice Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Lice Head Lice General Information Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Treatment ...

  17. Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes ... swallowing A change or hoarseness in the voice Head and neck cancers are twice as common in ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, ... than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  19. Head injury - first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000028.htm Head injury - first aid To use the sharing features on this page, ... a concussion can range from mild to severe. First Aid Learning to recognize a serious head injury and ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Perfusion of the Head CT Angiography (CTA) Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Videos related to Computed Tomography ( ...

  2. Quantum beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2003-01-01

    Present state and future prospect are described on quantum beams for medical use. Efforts for compactness of linac for advanced cancer therapy have brought about the production of machines like Accuray's CyberKnife and TOMOTHERAPY (Tomo Therapy Inc.) where the acceleration frequency of X-band (9-11 GHz) is used. For cervical vein angiography by the X-band linac, a compact hard X-ray source is developed which is based on the (reverse) Compton scattering through laser-electron collision. More intense beam and laser are necessary at present. A compact machine generating the particle beam of 10 MeV-1 GeV (laser-plasma accelerator) for cancer therapy is also developed using the recent compression technique (chirped-pulse amplification) to generate laser of >10 TW. Tokyo University is studying for the electron beam with energy of GeV order, for the laser-based synchrotron X-ray, and for imaging by the short pulse ion beam. Development of advanced compact accelerators is globally attempted. In Japan, a virtual laboratory by National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), a working group of universities and research facilities through the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, started in 2001 for practical manufacturing of the above-mentioned machines for cancer therapy and for angiography. Virtual Factory (Inc.), a business venture, is to be stood in future. (N.I.)

  3. Status of the studies on collective effects involving beam-beam interactions at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Buffat, Xavier; Metral, Elias; Ribes Metidieri, Ariadna; Barranco Garcia, Javier; Goncalves Jorge, Patrik; Pieloni, Tatiana; Tambasco, Claudia; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2018-01-01

    This note summarised the status of the studies on the coherent beam-beam effects in the HL-LHC project. It is shown that the obit, tune, chromaticity and dynamic β effects due to head-on and long-range beam-beam interactions are tolerable without dedicated mitigations in the baseline scenario. The stability of coherent beam-beam modes under the influence of the beam coupling impedance is evaluated, as well as the impact of the beam-beam induced tune spread on the Landau damping of single beam head-tail modes of oscillation. Since the beam stability is marginal at the end of the squeeze for the ultimate scenario, it is suggested to use the ATS optics to increase the effect of the octupoles at constant current, thus providing sufficient margins. Measurements suggesting that the transverse damper noise has to be significantly reduced to allow for operation with large beam-beam parameter are shown.

  4. BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR DOUBLE-GAUSSIAN BEAMS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MONTAG, C.; MALITSKY, N.; BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-05-16

    Electron cooling together with intra-beam scattering results in a transverse distribution that can best be described by a sum of two gaussians, one for the high-density core and one for the tails of the distribution. Simulation studies are being performed to understand the beam-beam interaction of these double-gaussian beams. Here we report the effect of low-frequency random tune modulations on diffusion in double-gaussian beams and compare the effects to those in beam-beam interactions with regular gaussian beams and identical tune shift parameters.

  5. BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR DOUBLE-GAUSSIAN BEAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MONTAG, C.; MALITSKY, N.; BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling together with intra-beam scattering results in a transverse distribution that can best be described by a sum of two gaussians, one for the high-density core and one for the tails of the distribution. Simulation studies are being performed to understand the beam-beam interaction of these double-gaussian beams. Here we report the effect of loW--frequency random tune modulations on diffusion in double-gaussian beams and compare the effects to those in beam-beam interactions with regular gaussian beams and identical tune shift parameters

  6. Beam-Beam Simulations for Double-Gaussian Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Montag, Christoph; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; Malitsky, Nikolay

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling together with intra-beam scattering results in a transverse distribution that can best be described by a sum of two Gaussians, one for the high-density core and one for the tails of the distribution. Simulation studies are being performed to understand the beam-beam interaction of these double-Gaussian beams. Here we report the effect of low-frequency random tune modulations on diffusion in double-Gaussian beams and compare the effects to those in beam-beam interactions with regular Gaussian beams and identical tuneshift parameters.

  7. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans ... out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses ... of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  9. CT Perfusion of the Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Site Index A-Z CT Perfusion of the Head Computed tomography (CT) perfusion of the head uses ... the Head? What is CT Perfusion of the Head? Computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging shows which areas ...

  10. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  11. Exterior beam-column joint study with non-conventional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aboutaha (2003) reported that the use of straight-headed bars in the exterior beam-column joint for cyclic response were very effective in relocating potential plastic regions. Murty et al (2003) reported that the ACI standard hooks for anchorage of the longitudinal beam bar with hairclip- type transverse joint reinforcement ...

  12. Improving the instructional leadership of heads of department in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We explain how we engaged HODs in one such school in a participatory action research process, to help them construct a framework for improving their instructional leadership. Qualitative data was generated through open-ended questionnaires, transcripts of recorded action learning set meetings, photovoice narratives, ...

  13. Department heads negotiating emerging managerialism: The Central Eastern European context\

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machovcová, Kateřina; Zábrodská, Kateřina; Mudrák, Jiří

    -, leden (2018), s. 1-18 ISSN 1741-1432 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-20856S Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : higher education * middle managers * neo-liberal reforms in academia * academic leadership * manager-academic Subject RIV: AN - Psychology OBOR OECD: Psychology (including human - machine relations) Impact factor: 0.982, year: 2016

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Department Heads' Self-Perception of their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    transition toward a knowledge based economy by providing the human resources required for leadership, management, business and professional positions that are important for the development of the country. To take the advantage of higher education, Ethiopia has embarked on higher education expansion and reform.

  15. Department heads negotiating emerging managerialism: The Central Eastern European context\

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machovcová, Kateřina; Zábrodská, Kateřina; Mudrák, Jiří

    -, leden (2018), s. 1-18 ISSN 1741-1432 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-20856S Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : higher education * middle managers * neo-liberal reforms in academia * academic leadership * manager- academic Subject RIV: AN - Psychology OBOR OECD: Psychology (including human - machine relations) Impact factor: 0.982, year: 2016

  16. Head trauma and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samejima, Kanji; Yoshii, Nobuo; Tobari, Chitoshi

    1979-01-01

    It has been said that chronic subdural hematoma cannot be diagnosed by CT. In our cases, CT was used, and the results were described. According to the density of the picture, CT findings of chronic subdural hematoma could be classified into 3 types, those of higher density than that of the cerebral paranchyma, those of isodensity, and those of lower density than that of the cerebral parenchyma. The difference among them appeared to be due to variation in the fluid in hematoma, especially that in hemoglobin concentration. Chronic subdural hematoma was found in 27 of 388 cases of head trauma in which CT was undertaken in our department of surgery for last 2 years. It is difficult to differenciate this disease from subdural edema or subarachnoideal retention of the cerebrospinal fluid. In many cases, use of contrast medium added no change to the CT picture. Cerebral angiography is necessary for definite diagnosis of the disease. Chronic subdural hematoma gives more varieties of findings than other intracranial hematomas. However, if the film is very carefully read, CT is still useful for diagnosing this disease in spite of initially remarked difficulties. (Ueda, J.)

  17. Scattering of ion beams from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiland, W.; Taglauer, E.

    1978-01-01

    A review is presented of the scattering of ion beams from surfaces and the physical phenomena which are probably most important for the formation of the final state (charge and excitation) of the secondary particles. The subject is treated under the headings: ion scattering, desorption by ion impact, and neutralization. (U.K.)

  18. Cone beam computed tomography in veterinary dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thielen, B.; Siguenza, F.; Hassan, B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in imaging dogs and cats for diagnostic dental veterinary applications. CBCT scans of heads of six dogs and two cats were made. Dental panoramic and multi-planar reformatted (MPR) para-sagittal

  19. Nonlinear interaction of colliding beams in particle storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, J C; Month, M

    1979-01-01

    When two beams of high energy particles moving in opposite directions are brought into collision, a large amount of energy is available for the production of new particles. However to obtain a sufficiently high event rate for rare processes, such as the production of the intermediate vector boson (Z/sub 0/ and W/sup + -/), large beam currents are also required. Under this circumstance, the high charge density of one beam results in a classical electromagnetic interaction on the particles in the other beam. This very nonlinear space charge force, caled the beam-beam force, limits the total circulating charge and, thereby, the ultimate performance of the colliding ring system. The basic nature of the beam-beam force is discussed, indicating how it is quite different in the case of continuous beams, which cross each other at an angle as compared to the case of bunched beams which collide head-on. Some experimental observations on the beam-beam interaction in proton-proton and electron-positron beams are then reviewed and interpreted. An important aspect of the beam-beam problem in storage rings is to determine at what point in the analysis of the particle dynamics is it relevant to bring in the concepts of stochasticity, slow diffusion, and resonance overlap. These ideas are briefly discussed.

  20. The beam intensity and positron monitoring system of the Daresbury Electron Synchrotron (NINA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poole, D.E.; Ring, T.; Peters, D.G.; Allen, J.

    1976-01-01

    The beam sensing system of NINA has been redesigned and rebuilt to provide comprehensive monitoring of beam intensity and position. The reasons for the change are stated, and the requirements and performance specification for the new system are listed. The report falls under the following heads: the sensing head; the head electronics unit; the line receiver unit; performance of installed monitors; display system and computer interface. The performance of the new system is summarized. (U.K.)

  1. Original Research Human papillomavirus in head and neck ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UNC Project–Malawi, Lilongwe, Malawi. 2. Department of Surgery, Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe, Malawi. 3. Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. 4. Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University of North Carolina, ...

  2. Quad shot - hypofractionated radiotherapy for palliation in advanced squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maqsood, T.; Ali, U.; Arif, S.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of quad-shot radiation therapy for palliation in locally advanced and metastatic inoperable squamous cell carcinomas of head and neck. Study Design: A quasi-experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Oncology department, Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from Sep 2012 to Sep 2013. Material and Methods: Thirty five patients were included with histologically confirmed advanced inoperable squamous cell carcinoma in head and neck region, performance status 2 or 3 and survival =3 months. Patients were treated with radiation therapy 14 Gy in four fractions, megavoltage beam, twice daily fractions (at least 6 hours apart), for 2 consecutive days. Symptoms due to cancer (pain and dysphagia) were assessed as per common toxicity criteria adverse event version 4.0 on day 0 before treatment and day 21 after start of treatment. Results: Grades of pain and dysphagia showed significant improvement after treatment with a p-value <0.001. A total of 91.4% patients showed an improvement in grade of pain (32 out of 35 patients) and 45.7% of patients showed improvement in grade of dysphagia (16 out of 35 patients). There was a statistically significant decrease in grades of pain and dysphagia after treatment. Conclusion: The short duration of hypofractionated radiotherapy with Quad Shot was effective with respect to symptom palliation in locally advanced and metastatic inoperable head and neck cancers.

  3. Department of Plasma Physics and Technology - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinski, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The activities of the Department in 2007 continued previous studies in the following fields of plasma physics, controlled nuclear fusion and plasma technology of surface engineering: · Studies of physical phenomena in pulsed discharges in the Plasma-Focus (PF) and RPI-IBIS facilities; · Development of selected methods for high-temperature plasma diagnostics; · Research on plasma technologies; · Selected problems of plasma theory and computational modelling. As for the experimental studies particular attention was paid to the analysis of the correlation of X-ray pulses with pulsed electron beams and other corpuscular emissions from different Plasma-Focus (PF) facilities. A collisional-radiative model, taking into account the Stark effect and strong electric fields in the so called '' hot- spot '' regions of a pinch, was applied in those analyses. The main aim of these studies was to identify the physical phenomena responsible for the emission during the PF-type discharges. The emitted protons were also measured with nuclear track detectors. The measurements made it possible to obtain images of the regions, where the D-D fusion reactions occurred, as well as to determine the angular distribution of the emitted protons. Pulsed plasma streams were also investigated by means of time-resolved optical spectroscopy and corpuscular diagnostics. In a frame of the EURATOM program, efforts were devoted to the development of diagnostic methods for tokamak-type facilities. Such studies include the design and construction of the 4-channel Cherenkov-type detection system for the TORE-SUPRA tokamak at CEA-Cadarache. In the meantime in order to collect some experience a new measuring head was especially prepared for experiments within small facilities. Other fusion- oriented efforts are connected with the application of the solid-state nuclear track detectors for investigation of protons from tokamak plasma and high-energy beams emitted from laser produced plasmas

  4. SEX DETERMINATION FROM FEMORAL HEAD DIAMETERS IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-03-01

    Mar 1, 2000 ... Request for reprints to: Dr. P S Igbigbi, Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Private Bag 360 Chichiri, Blantyre 3 Malawi. SEX DETERMINATION .... Figure 2. Bar chart showing the ranges of head diameters of male and female femurs. (RVD-Right vertical diameter; LVD-Left vertical diameter; RTD -.

  5. Head Injuries in Soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrick, Karen M

    2016-07-01

    Soccer is currently the most popular and fastest growing sport worldwide, with approximately 265 million registered soccer players existing around the world. The popularity of the sport, coupled with the high incidence of 18.8-21.5 head injuries per 1,000 player hours reported, make it essential that clinicians, coaches, and the athletes, have a solid understanding of head injuries. The successful rehabilitation of athletes with head injuries relies upon early and accurate identification strategies and implementation of appropriate return to play measures across all areas in the continuum of care. Soccer is a frequently played sport, and head injuries are common. Therefore, it is imperative that clinicians, coaches, and the athletes themselves have a solid understanding of head injury prevention, diagnosis, and treatment options. The purpose of this article was to provide rehabilitation nurses with current information regarding frequently occurring head injuries in the widespread sport of soccer. © 2015 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  6. Exercise therapy for trismus in head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, P.U.; Sterken, M.W.; Spijkervet, F.K.L.; Roodenburg, J.L.N.; Pater, R.

    The aim of this study was to analyze retrospectively effects of exercise therapy on trismus related to head and neck cancer or as a consequence of its treatment, and to compare these effects with trismus not related to head and neck cancer. Medical records of patients referred to the department of

  7. Head and Neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Liselotte; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Loft, Annika

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography with FDG of the head and neck region is mainly used for the diagnosis of head and neck cancer, for staging, treatment evaluation, relapse, and planning of surgery and radio therapy. This article is a practical guide of imaging techniques......, including a detailed protocol for FDG PET in head and neck imaging, physiologic findings, and pitfalls in selected case stories....

  8. 3rd February 2011-Science Museum Patrons-Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland-visiting CMS cavern and LHC Tunnel with A. De Roeck,CMS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson and M. Lamont,Beams Department, Operation Group Leader

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    The delegation: Mr Ian Blatchford,Director of the Science Museum and NMSI Mrs Susan Fisher,Director of Development, National Museum of Science and Industry (NMSI) Dr Douglas Gurr,Chairman of the Board of Trustees, NMSI Mr Martin Smith,Previous NMSI trustee Mrs Elise Smith,Spouse Mr Michael Wilson,NMSI trustee Mrs Jane Wilson,Spouse Mr Gregg Wilson,Son Dr Ann Coxon,UK Friends of the Science Museum Trustee Mr Nicholas Lewis,Contact of Martin Smith accompanied by P. Wells,Physics Department, ATLAS Inner Detector Group Leader and A. Koek,Communication group (International Arts Development, CERN Cultural Policy and Strategy with the Arts, The Collide Programme)

  9. Bottom head assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fife, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    A bottom head dome assembly is described which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending there through. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending there through, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending there through, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore there through, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. 2 figs

  10. Beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The beam diagnostic components for both the transfer and the high-energy beamlines perform well except for some of the scanners whose noise pick-up has become a problem, especially at low beam intensities. This noise pick-up is primarily due to deterioration of the bearings in the scanner. At some locations in the high-energy beamlines, scanners were replaced by harps as the scanners proved to be practically useless for the low-intensity beams required in the experimental areas. The slits in the low-energy beamline, which are not water-cooled, have to be repaired at regular intervals because of vacuum leaks. Overheating causes the ceramic feedthroughs to deteriorate resulting in the vacuum leaks. Water-cooled slits have been ordered to replace the existing slits which will later be used in the beamlines associated with the second injector cyclotron SPC2. The current-measurement system will be slightly modified and should then be much more reliable. 3 figs

  11. MD 979: Beta-beating measurements on colliding beams

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalves Jorge, Patrik; Pieloni, Tatiana; Buffat, Xavier; Carlier, Felix Simon; Coello De Portugal - Martinez Vazquez, Jaime Maria; Fol, Elena; Langner, Andy Sven; Medina Medrano, Luis Eduardo; Olexa, Jakub; Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; Valuch, Daniel; Wegscheider, Andreas; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    The HL-LHC high brightness beams will give a large β-beating due to the head-on and long-range interactions since a beam-beam parameter of 0.01 per Interaction Point (IP) is expected. The β-heating induced by two head-on collision reaches 15%. A third IP, i.e. IP8, could bring the β-heating up to 24%. The aim of the Machine Development (MD) study was to test optics measurements with AC dipole and ADT on colliding beams at injection and to implement a correction of the β-heating due to to head-on collision in the two experiments IP1&5. Int his note, we summarize the first results of this test performed in the LHC.

  12. Public Health Departments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — State and Local Public Health Departments in the United States Governmental public health departments are responsible for creating and maintaining conditions that...

  13. Agricultural Research Department annual report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    A description is given of the work in the Agricultural Research Department of Risoe National Laboratory. The description is given under the headings a) plant breeding research, and b) energy consumption in plant cultivation. A list of staff members and of publications is also given. (BP)

  14. Agricultural Research Department annual report 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    A description is given of the work in the Agricultural Research Department of Risoe National Laboratory. The description is given under the headings a) plant breeding research, and b) energy sumption in plant cultivation. A list of staff members is also given. (bp)

  15. The Agricultural Research Department annual report 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    A description is given of the work in the Agricultural Research Department of Risoe National Laboratory. The description is given under the headings a) plant breeding research, and b) energy consumption in plant cultivation. A list of staff members is also given. (bp)

  16. Head Injuries in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play a crucial role in injury prevention and initial treatment when injuries occur at school. The role of school nurses includes being knowledgeable about the management of head injuries, including assessment and initial treatment. The school nurse must be familiar with the outcomes of a head injury and know when further evaluation…

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  18. Measurement of beam energy spread in a space-charge dominated electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Cui

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of beam energy spread in a space-charge dominated beam is very important to understanding the physics of intense beams. It is believed that coupling between the transverse and longitudinal directions via Coulomb collisions will cause an increase of the beam longitudinal energy spread. At the University of Maryland, experiments have been carried out to study the energy evolution in such intense beams with a high-resolution retarding field energy analyzer. The temporal beam energy profile along the beam pulse has been characterized at the distance of 25 cm from the anode of a gridded thermionic electron gun. The mean energy of the pulsed beams including the head and tail is reported here. The measured rms energy spread is in good agreement with the predictions of the intrabeam scattering theory. As an application of the beam energy measurement, the input impedance between the cathode and the grid due to beam loading can be calculated and the impedance number is found to be a constant in the operation region of the gun.

  19. Beam divergence scaling in neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, A.J.T.

    1976-01-01

    One of the main considerations in the design of neutral beam injectors is to monimize the divergence of the primary ion beam and hence maximize the beam transport and minimize the input of thermal gas. Experimental measurements of the divergence of a cylindrical ion beam are presented and these measurements are used to analyze the major components of ion beam divergence, namely: space charge expansion, gas-ion scattering, emittance and optical aberrations. The implication of these divergence components in the design of a neutral beam injector system is discussed and a method of maximizing the beam current is described for a given area of source plasma

  20. The Department of Surgery, University of Limpopo (Medunsa Campus)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Department of Surgery, University of. Limpopo (Medunsa Campus). D. MBAVA, M.B. Ch.B. M. C. M. MODiBA, F.C.S., F.A.C.S., M.D.. Department of General Surgery (Medunsa Campus), University of Limpopo. Professor O. E. Hansen – the first Head of Surgery. Professor J. A. L. van. Wyk – the second Head of. Surgery.

  1. Trunnion-Head Stresses in THA: Are Big Heads Trouble?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavernia, Carlos J; Iacobelli, David A; Villa, Jesus M; Jones, Kinzy; Gonzalez, Jose L; Jones, William Kinzy

    2015-06-01

    The effects of large heads on stresses at the THA trunnion-head junction and their impact on tribocorrosion/metal ion release remain controversial. A 12/14 3D-model of a stem with different head sizes was investigated. Material properties of titanium were assigned to the trunnion and cobalt-chrome/alumina to the heads. A load simulating walking single-leg stand phase was applied to the head. A total contact head-trunnion interface was assumed. The area underneath the junction underwent significant elevations in stresses as head size increased from 28- to 40-mm. Maximum principal stress doubled between 28 and 40-mm heads, regardless of head material. Stress levels had a direct correlation to head diameter. Stress increases observed using increasingly larger heads will probably contribute to head-trunnion tribocorrosion and ion release. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Beam screens for the LHC beam pipes

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    1997-01-01

    Cross-section of LHC prototype beam pipes showing the beam screens. Slits in the screens allow residual gas molecules to be pumped out and become frozen to the walls of the ultra-cold beam pipe. Beam screens like these have been designed to line the beam pipes, absorbing radiation before it can hit the magnets and warm them up, an effect that would greatly reduce the magnetic field and cause serious damage.

  3. Head trauma in female professional wrestlers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomoto, Jun; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Nemoto, Masaaki

    2007-01-01

    The clinical characteristics of head trauma were evaluated in 18 wrestlers belonging to a female professional wrestling organization, 13 regular members and five trainees aged 15-34 years. Medical examinations for head trauma were performed in all wrestlers, and wrestlers treated at our emergency outpatient department were clinically evaluated. In addition, the relationships of head trauma with duration of the wrestling career of 1-16 years (mean 8 years) in the regular members, and less than 1 year in the five trainees, and body mass index (BMI) of 21.0-32.0 in the 16 subjects, excluding two trainees, was evaluated. Chronic symptoms were noted in four of the 18 wrestlers with long wrestling careers (16 years in 1, 13 years in 1, and 5 years in 2). Three wrestlers with symptoms immediately after head trauma showed recurrent retrograde amnesia and had low BMI (21.6, 21.6, and 23.1). Five wrestlers were treated at our emergency outpatient clinic, three required hospitalization and two showed intracranial traumatic changes on computed tomography (acute subdural hematoma in 1 and diffuse brain swelling in 1). Head trauma in female professional wrestlers is associated with longer wrestling career and low BMI. Periodic medical examinations are recommended to monitor for signs of head trauma. (author)

  4. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popple, Richard A; Brezovich, Ivan A; Fiveash, John B

    2014-05-01

    The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify arrangements equivalent to equiangular

  5. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popple, Richard A., E-mail: rpopple@uabmc.edu; Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify

  6. Dosimetry study of split beam technique using megavoltage beams and its clinical implications. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, R.; Mira, J.G.; Pomeroy, T.C.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of beam divergence and overlapping of adjacent fields in the treatment planning is well known. The use of split beam technique has been suggested as one way of addressing this problem. The present work reports a detailed dosimetry of this technique 60 Co beam (Theratron 780). The dose distributions at and near the junction plane between two adjacent fields were measured; they were compared with those for diverging fields (with and without gap on the skin). As an illustration, different treatment planning techniques for head and neck tumors and subsequent dose distributions are discussed. Our findings clearly indicate that the extension of penumbra near the geometrical edge of a split beam is considerably less than that of an open beam of the same field size. Consequently when two adjacent fields are used, the overdose at and near the junction plane is reduced greatly by the split beam. For head and neck tumors the split beam technique gives a much better dose distribution than any other conventional treatment techniques

  7. Head injury serum markers for assessing response to trauma: Design of the HeadSMART study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Matthew E; Rao, Vani; Bechtold, Kathleen T; Roy, Durga; Sair, Haris I; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Stevens, Robert D; Batty, D Scott; Falk, Hayley; Fernandez, Christopher; Ofoche, Uju; Vassila, Alexandra; Hall, Anna J; Anderson, Braden; Bessman, Edward; Lyketsos, Constantine G; Everett, Allen D; Van Eyk, Jennifer; Korley, Frederick K

    2017-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis and risk stratification of traumatic brain injury (TBI) at time of presentation remains a clinical challenge. The Head Injury Serum Markers for Assessing Response to Trauma study (HeadSMART) aims to examine blood-based biomarkers for diagnosing and determining prognosis in TBI. HeadSMART is a 6-month prospective cohort study comparing emergency department patients evaluated for TBI (exposure group) to (1) emergency department patients evaluated for traumatic injury without head trauma and (2) healthy persons. Study methods and characteristics of the first 300 exposure participants are discussed. Of the first 300 participants in the exposure arm, 70% met the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine criteria for TBI, with the majority (80.1%) classified as mild TBI. The majority of subjects in the exposure arm had Glasgow Coma Scale scores of 13-15 (98.0%), normal head computed tomography (81.3%) and no prior history of concussion (71.7%). With systematic phenotyping, HeadSMART will facilitate diagnosis and risk-stratification of the heterogeneous group of individuals currently diagnosed with TBI.

  8. On-line image guided radiation therapy using cone-beam CT (CBCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bak, Jin O; Park, Suk Won; Jeong, Kyung Keun; Keum, Ki Chang

    2006-01-01

    Using cone beam CT, we can compare the position of the patients at the simulation and the treatment. In on-line image guided radiation therapy, one can utilize this compared data and correct the patient position before treatments. Using cone beam CT, we investigated the errors induced by setting up the patients when use only the markings on the patients' skin. We obtained the data of three patients that received radiation therapy at the Department of Radiation Oncology in Chung-Ang University during August 2006 and October 2006. Just as normal radiation therapy, patients were aligned on the treatment couch after the simulation and treatment planning. Patients were aligned with lasers according to the marking on the skin that were marked at the simulation time and then cone beam CTs were obtained. Cone beam CTs were fused and compared with simulation CTs and the displacement vectors were calculated. Treatment couches were adjusted according to the displacement vector before treatments. After the treatment, positions were verified with kV X-ray (OBI system). In the case of head and neck patients, the average sizes of the setup error vectors, given by the cone beam CT, were 0.19 cm for the patient A and 0.18 cm for the patient B. The standard deviations were 0.15 cm and 0.21 cm, each. On the other hand, in the case of the pelvis patient, the average and the standard deviation were 0.37 cm and 01 cm. Through the on-line IGRT using cone beam CT, were could correct the setup errors that could occur in the conventional radiotherapy. The importance of the on-line IGRT should be emphasized in the case of 3D conformal therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy, which have complex target shapes and steep dose gradients

  9. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  10. Head injury: audit of a clinical guideline to justify head CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haydon, Nicholas B.

    2013-01-01

    Head injury causes significant morbidity and mortality, and there is contention about which patients to scan. The UK National Health Service Clinical Guideline (CG) 56 provides criteria for selecting patients with clinically important brain injury who may benefit from a head CT scan, while minimising the radiation and economic burden of scanning patients without significant injury. This study aims to audit the documentation of the use of these guidelines in a busy UK trauma hospital and discusses the comparison with an Australian (New South Wales (NSW) ) head injury guideline. A retrospective cohort study of 480 patients presenting with head injury to the emergency department over 2 months was performed. The patient notes were assessed for documentation of each aspect of the clinical guidelines. Criteria were established to assess the utilisation of the CG 56. A database of clinical data was amalgamated with the head CT scan results for each patient. For the UK CG 56, 73% of the criteria were documented, with the least documented being 'signs of basal skull fracture' and 'amnesia of events'. Thirty-two per cent of patients received head CT and of these, 24% (37 patients) were reported to have pathology. Twenty-four patients underwent head CT without clinical justification being documented, none of which had reported pathology on CT. The study shows that the head injury guidelines are not being fully utilised at a major UK trauma hospital, resulting in 5% of patients being exposed to ionising radiation without apparent documented clinical justification. The NSW guideline has distinct differences to the CG 56, with a more complex algorithm and an absence of specific time frames for head CT completion. The results suggest a need for further education and awareness of head injury clinical guidelines.

  11. 25 CFR 213.26 - Rate of royalty on casing-head gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... gasoline the minimum rate of royalty shall be 121/2 percent of the value of the casing-head gas, which... operating regulations of the Department. (b) In cases where gas produced and sold has a value for drip gasoline, casing-head gasoline content, and as dry gas from which the casing-head gasoline has been...

  12. Renewing Head Start's Promise: Invest in What Works for Disadvantaged Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Since Head Start's last reauthorization in 2007, the Department of Health and Human Services, which oversees Head Start, has implemented significant reforms that are improving the program. In "Renewing Head Start's Promise: Invest in What Works for Disadvantaged Preschoolers," Sara Mead offers several recommendations to enable…

  13. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer ... there any new developments in treating my disease? Head and neck cancer overview The way a particular ...

  14. American Head and Neck Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Head & Neck Society Mission Statement: Advance Education, Research, and Quality of Care for the head and neck oncology patient. American Head & Neck Society | AHNS The mission of the AHNS is to ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  16. Automated translating beam profiler for in situ laser beam spot-size and focal position measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keaveney, James

    2018-03-01

    We present a simple and convenient, high-resolution solution for automated laser-beam profiling with axial translation. The device is based on a Raspberry Pi computer, Pi Noir CMOS camera, stepper motor, and commercial translation stage. We also provide software to run the device. The CMOS sensor is sensitive over a large wavelength range between 300 and 1100 nm and can be translated over 25 mm along the beam axis. The sensor head can be reversed without changing its axial position, allowing for a quantitative estimate of beam overlap with counter-propagating laser beams. Although not limited to this application, the intended use for this device is the automated measurement of the focal position and spot-size of a Gaussian laser beam. We present example data of one such measurement to illustrate device performance.

  17. Head injuries in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, R C

    1996-12-01

    Injuries to the head and neck are the most frequent catastrophic sports injury, and head injuries are the most common direct athletic cause of death. Although direct compressive forces may injure the brain, neural tissue is particularly susceptible to injury from shearing stresses, which are most likely to occur when rotational forces are applied to the head. The most common athletic head injury is concussion, which may very widely in severity. Intracranial haemorrhage is the leading cause of head injury death in sports, making rapid initial assessment and appropriate follow up mandatory after a head injury. Diffuse cerebral swelling is another serious condition that may be found in the child or adolescent athlete, and the second impact syndrome is a major concern in adult athletes. Many head injuries in athletes are the result of improper playing techniques and can be reduced by teaching proper skills and enforcing safety promoting rules. Improved conditioning (particularly of the neck), protective headgear, and careful medical supervision of athletes will also minimise this type of injury.

  18. Femoral head avascular necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrysikopoulos, H.; Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.L.; Ashburn, W.; Pretorius, T.

    1988-01-01

    MR imaging has been shown to be more sensitive and specific than planar scintigraphy for avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head. However, experience with single photon emission CT (SPECT) is limited. The authors retrospectively compared 1.5-T MR imaging with SPECT in 14 patients with suspected femoral head AVN. Agreement between MR imaging and SPECT was present in 24 femurs, 14 normal and ten with AVN. MR imaging showed changes of AVN in the remaining four femoral heads. Of these, one was normal and the other three inconclusive for AVN by SPECT. The authors conclude that MR imaging is superior to SPECT for the evaluation of AVN of the hip

  19. Crystalline beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffer, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Ions in a storage ring are confined to a mean orbit by focusing elements. To a first approximation these may be described by a constant harmonic restoring force: F = -Kr. If the particles in the frame moving along with the beam have small random thermal energies, then they will occupy a cylindrical volume around the mean orbit and the focusing force will be balanced by that from the mutual repulsion of the particles. Inside the cylinder only residual two-particle interactions will play a significant role and some form of ordering might be expected to take place. The results of some of the first MD calculations showed a surprising result: not only were the particles arranged in the form of a tube, but they formed well-defined layers: concentric shells, with the particles in each shell arranged in a hexagonal lattice that is characteristic of two-dimensional Coulomb systems. This paper discusses the condense layer structure

  20. The EN Department has a new leader

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Roberto Saban takes over as new Engineering Department leader on 1 July 2010, at a time when the LHC is entering a stable operation phase. Roberto Saban presents his plans and vision.   Roberto Saban, new leader of the EN Department. The CERN Engineering (EN) Department's main areas of activity are technical coordination, the design and operation with beam of accelerator components and experimental facilities, the associated infrastructure systems, such as electrical distribution, cooling, ventilation and transport, and finally the design and construction of mechanical elements for the facilities. “I do not plan to change the internal structure of the Department because it works well but, with the LHC entering a phase of stable functioning, the Department will shift its focus to operation and maintenance. In this new situation, our role is not limited to supporting LHC operation but, on the contrary, we fully take part in it thanks to the synergy with the BE and TE Departments inside th...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... used to detect: bleeding, brain injury and skull fractures in patients with head injuries. bleeding caused by ... be asked to remove hearing aids and removable dental work. Women will be asked to remove bras ...

  2. TCGA head Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much ... head CT scanning. Manufacturers of intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... assess head injuries, severe headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It ... within the brain shortly after a patient exhibits symptoms of a stroke. a stroke, especially with a ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, ... cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scans in children should always be done with low-dose technique. top of page What are the ... page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor ... scanning provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than regular ...

  11. Redesign of a Low Energy Probe Head

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, Yi-Nong; Ries, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The present situation of the low energy probe LE2 in TRIUMF cyclotron is that the thickness of the finger 5 is uniform over a radial length of 3.25 inch and its weight which amounts to ~447 g is affecting its re-circulating ball mechanism and causing it to fall below the median plane over its range of movement. We therefore re-design it in order to reduce its weight. First, we made simulations and determined the optimum thickness of the probe head vs its radial length. These simulation results are found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements made. Finally, we calculated the temperature rise caused by the beam power dumped on the probe, and figured out the maximum current of beam that can be dumped on the finger.

  12. Beam halo in high-intensity beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wangler, T.P.

    1993-01-01

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. The beam-halo is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied to intense neutron generators for nuclear materials processing. The author describes what has been learned about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams using numerical simulations of initial laminar beams in uniform linear focusing channels. Initial results are presented from a study of beam entropy for an intense space-charge dominated beam

  13. Providing Academic Leadership in Universities in Cross River State, Nigeria: Assessment of Departmental Heads' Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuegwu, Basil A.; Nwi-ue, Felix D.

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed Heads of Departments' effectiveness in providing academic leadership at the departmental level. I research question and 2 hypotheses were formulated to give direction to this investigation. Survey design was adopted for the study. The population of the study comprised 110 Heads of Departments from 2 universities in Cross River…

  14. Narrow-headed garter snake (Thamnophis rufipunctatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Erika M.

    2006-01-01

    The narrow-headed garter snake is a harmless, nonvenomous snake that is distinguished by its elongated, triangular-shaped head and the red or dark spots on its olive to tan body. Today, the narrow-headed garter snake is a species of special concern in the United States because of its decline over much of its historic range. Arizona's Oak Creek has historically contained the largest population of narrow-headed garter snakes in the United States. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Arizona Game and Fish Department jointly funded research by USGS scientists in Oak Creek to shed light on the factors causing declining population numbers. The research resulted in better understanding of the snake's habitat needs, winter and summer range, and dietary habits. Based on the research findings, the U.S. Forest Service has developed recommendations that visitors and local residents can adopt to help slow the decline of the narrow-headed garter snake in Oak Creek.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... up in shades of gray, and air appears black. With CT scanning, numerous x-ray beams and ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ...

  18. Radiotherapy for head and neck cancer in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schofield, Clare P.; Sykes, Andrew J.; Slevin, Nicholas J.; Rashid, Noor Z.Z.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Elderly patients with head and neck cancer may not be treated aggressively with radiotherapy, due to concerns regarding tolerance of treatment and toxicity. A retrospective study was undertaken of patients aged 80 years and over, treated by definitive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Material and methods: 98 patients aged 80-92 received radiotherapy for carcinoma of the head and neck between 1991 and 1995. All patients received beam directed radiotherapy with radical intent using an immobilisation shell. Results: Cancer specific survival was 59% and overall local control was 70% at 5 years. Both were significantly affected by T stage and site of disease. Cancer specific survival was comparable to that of patients aged below 80 years. Seven patients died within 6 months of the treatment. Three patients developed severe late toxicity. Metastatic disease occurred in eight patients. Conclusions: Radiotherapy is a beneficial and well tolerated treatment in elderly patients with carcinoma of the head and neck

  19. Head-tail instability caused by electron cloud in positron storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Ohmi, K

    2000-01-01

    In positron or proton storage rings with many closely spaced bunches, a large number of electrons can be generated in the vacuum chamber due to photoemission or secondary emission. The density of this `electron cloud' increases along a bunch train, until the growth saturates under the influence of its own space charge field. In this report, we discuss the possibility of a single-bunch two-stream instability driven by the electron cloud, where any initial head-tail perturbation of the bunch is amplified by the coherent motion of cloud electrons near the beam. Depending on the strength of the beam-electron interaction, the chromaticity and the synchrotron oscillation frequency, this instability either resembles a linac beam break up, or a head-tail instability. We present computer simulations of beam break up and head-tail instabilities for the Low Energy Ring of the KEK B factory, and compare the simulation results with analytical estimates.

  20. Head trauma in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ji-Yao

    2013-11-01

    The Chinese Head Trauma Data Bank (CHTDB) has been established, which includes 7,145 hospitalised cases with acute head trauma patients in 47 hospitals. We explored factors that might affect the outcome of acute traumatic brain injury. There was no statistical difference in the mortality rate between male (7.5%) and female (7.2%) patients (P>0.05). The mortality rate in children (65 years) was 7.3%, 7.2% and 9.0%, respectively (P>0.05). The mortality rate of patients with mild (2.7%), moderate (5.0%) and severe (21.8%) head trauma was significantly different (P40 mm Hg was 6.3%, 21.4% and 93.1%, respectively (Phead trauma data bank in China, has one of the largest numbers of cases of any head trauma data bank in the world. Our major findings on mortality may be helpful to neurosurgeons for predicting the outcome of acute head trauma patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Electron beam control for barely separated beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, David R.; Ament, Lucas J. P.

    2017-04-18

    A method for achieving independent control of multiple beams in close proximity to one another, such as in a multi-pass accelerator where coaxial beams are at different energies, but moving on a common axis, and need to be split into spatially separated beams for efficient recirculation transport. The method for independent control includes placing a magnet arrangement in the path of the barely separated beams with the magnet arrangement including at least two multipole magnets spaced closely together and having a multipole distribution including at least one odd multipole and one even multipole. The magnetic fields are then tuned to cancel out for a first of the barely separated beams to allow independent control of the second beam with common magnets. The magnetic fields may be tuned to cancel out either the dipole component or tuned to cancel out the quadrupole component in order to independently control the separate beams.

  2. Literature in Focus Beta Beams: Neutrino Beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    By Mats Lindroos (CERN) and Mauro Mezzetto (INFN Padova, Italy) Imperial Press, 2009 The beta-beam concept for the generation of electron neutrino beams was first proposed by Piero Zucchelli in 2002. The idea created quite a stir, challenging the idea that intense neutrino beams only could be produced from the decay of pions or muons in classical neutrino beams facilities or in future neutrino factories. The concept initially struggled to make an impact but the hard work by many machine physicists, phenomenologists and theoreticians over the last five years has won the beta-beam a well-earned position as one of the frontrunners for a possible future world laboratory for high intensity neutrino oscillation physics. This is the first complete monograph on the beta-beam concept. The book describes both technical aspects and experimental aspects of the beta-beam, providing students and scientists with an insight into the possibilities o...

  3. Beam Techniques - Beam Control and Manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minty, Michiko G

    2003-04-24

    We describe commonly used strategies for the control of charged particle beams and the manipulation of their properties. Emphasis is placed on relativistic beams in linear accelerators and storage rings. After a brief review of linear optics, we discuss basic and advanced beam control techniques, such as transverse and longitudinal lattice diagnostics, matching, orbit correction and steering, beam-based alignment, and linac emittance preservation. A variety of methods for the manipulation of particle beam properties are also presented, for instance, bunch length and energy compression, bunch rotation, changes to the damping partition number, and beam collimation. The different procedures are illustrated by examples from various accelerators. Special topics include injection and extraction methods, beam cooling, spin transport and polarization.

  4. Creating and decomposing vector Bessel beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Africa. 2 Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, North Carolina State University, Rayleigh, North Carolina 27695, USA. *Corresponding author: ADudley@csir.co.za Abstract This is a paper presented on creating and decomposing vector... Bessel beams, presented at the 58th annual SAIP conference. The paper discusses spatially inhomogeneous polarization states that are referred to as cylindrical vector beams which include radial and azimuthal polarization. Also included...

  5. Role of Honey in Prevention of Radiation induced Mucositis in Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvi, Z. A.; Mahmood, A.; Rasul, S.; Ali, U.; Arif, S.; Ishtiaq, S.; Maqsood, T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of honey in preventing radiation induced mucositis (RIM) in patients with head and neck cancers. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Oncology Department of Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from July 2011 to September 2012. Patients and Methods: Sixty patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer requiring radiotherapy to the oropharyngeal mucosa were randomized into two groups to receive either radiation alone or radiation and natural honey. Patients were treated using 6-MV X-ray beams from linear accelerator at a dose rate of 2 Gy per day five times a week up to a dose of 66 Gy. In the treatment group, patients were advised to take 20 ml of pure honey 15 minutes before, 15 minutes after and 6 hours after radiotherapy. Patients were evaluated every week for the development of RIM using the WHO oral mucositis grading system. Results: In treatment group, out of 30 patients, 4(13%) developed grade 3 RIM and none developed grade 4 RIM. In control group, out of 30 patients, 12 (40%) developed grade 3 or 4 RIM (p=0.039). Four patients (13%) in treatment group lost more than 5 Kg weight during the course of radiotherapy compared to 16 patients (53%) in control group (p=0.002). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that honey is a simple and cost effective treatment to prevent RIM. Large scale randomized trials are needed to confirm the results of our study. (author)

  6. ISR beam scrapers

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1972-01-01

    Beam scrapers seen in the direction of the beam. The two horizontal scraper foils are near the centre of the beam pipe andthe two scrapers for protection of the vacuum chamber are further outside. In the lower part of the beam pipe is the vertical halo scraping blade.

  7. Telecommunication using muon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location

  8. Analysis of orthotropic beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen Y. Liu; S. Cheng

    1979-01-01

    A plane-stress analysis of orthotropic or isotropic beams is presented. The loading conditions considered are: (1) a concentrated normal load arbitrarily located on the beam, and (2) a distributed normal load covering an arbitrary length of the beam. exhibit close agreement with existing experimental data from Sitka spruce beams. Other loading conditions can similarly...

  9. Telecommunication using muon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Richard C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location.

  10. Head first Ajax

    CERN Document Server

    Riordan, Rebecca M

    2008-01-01

    Ajax is no longer an experimental approach to website development, but the key to building browser-based applications that form the cornerstone of Web 2.0. Head First Ajax gives you an up-to-date perspective that lets you see exactly what you can do -- and has been done -- with Ajax. With it, you get a highly practical, in-depth, and mature view of what is now a mature development approach. Using the unique and highly effective visual format that has turned Head First titles into runaway bestsellers, this book offers a big picture overview to introduce Ajax, and then explores the use of ind

  11. Head First Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Griffiths, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    Wouldn't it be great if there were a statistics book that made histograms, probability distributions, and chi square analysis more enjoyable than going to the dentist? Head First Statistics brings this typically dry subject to life, teaching you everything you want and need to know about statistics through engaging, interactive, and thought-provoking material, full of puzzles, stories, quizzes, visual aids, and real-world examples. Whether you're a student, a professional, or just curious about statistical analysis, Head First's brain-friendly formula helps you get a firm grasp of statistics

  12. LANSCE beam current limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the Beam Current Limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beam line below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described

  13. Large Scale Beam-beam Simulations for the CERN LHC using Distributed Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Herr, Werner; McIntosh, E; Schmidt, F

    2006-01-01

    We report on a large scale simulation of beam-beam effects for the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The stability of particles which experience head-on and long-range beam-beam effects was investigated for different optical configurations and machine imperfections. To cover the interesting parameter space required computing resources not available at CERN. The necessary resources were available in the LHC@home project, based on the BOINC platform. At present, this project makes more than 60000 hosts available for distributed computing. We shall discuss our experience using this system during a simulation campaign of more than six months and describe the tools and procedures necessary to ensure consistent results. The results from this extended study are presented and future plans are discussed.

  14. Engineering aspects of particle beam fusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    The Department of Energy is supporting research directed toward demonstration of DT fuel ignition in an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsule. As part of the ICF effort, two major Particle Beam Fusion Accelerators (PBFA I and II) are being developed at Sandia National Laboratories with the objective of providing energetic light ion beams of sufficient power density for target implosion. Supporting light ion beam research is being performed at the Naval Research Laboratory and at Cornell University. If the answers to several key physics and engineering questions are favorable, pulsed power accelerators will be able to provide an efficient and inexpensive approach to high target gain and eventual power production applications

  15. EIC Electron Beam Polarimetry Workshop Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzon, W.

    2008-01-01

    A summary of the Precision Electron Beam Polarimetry Workshop for a future Electron Ion Collider (EIC) is presented. The workshop was hosted by the University of Michigan Physics Department in Ann Arbor on August 23-24, 2007 with the goal to explore and study the electron beam polarimetry issues associated with the EIC to achieve sub-1% precision in polarization determination. Ideas are being presented that were exchanged among experts in electron polarimetry and source and accelerator design to examine existing and novel electron beam polarization measurement schemes

  16. Mechanical analysis of ceramic head for modular hip prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravagli, E.

    1995-03-01

    A study, performed with the department of orthopaedics of the Rome Catholic University, has found out the two possible parameters mainly responsible for head breaking, i. e. errors in conical mating between head and stem, and cracks in the heads. This study has been continued in the frame of the STRIDE-CETMA project, aimed at founding and developing a centre for technologically advanced materials in Brindisi Technology Park (Italy). This report starts a systematic mechanical analysis of the above mentioned head, with the purpose of characterizing it exhaustively. The evaluations made lead to the conclusion that in nomimal conditions, the head is largely overdimensioned, taking into account the maximum load applied to the prosthesis

  17. The beam dump tunnels

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    In these images workers are digging the tunnels that will be used to dump the counter-circulating beams. Travelling just a fraction under the speed of light, the beams at the LHC will each carry the energy of an aircraft carrier travelling at 12 knots. In order to dispose of these beams safely, a beam dump is used to extract the beam and diffuse it before it collides with a radiation shielded graphite target.

  18. Ion beam diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strehl, P.

    1994-04-01

    This report is an introduction to ion beam diagnosis. After a short description of the most important ion beam parameters measurements of the beam current by means of Faraday cups, calorimetry, and beam current transformers and measurements of the beam profile by means of viewing screens, profile grids and scanning devices, and residual gas ionization monitors are described. Finally measurements in the transverse and longitudinal phase space are considered. (HSI)

  19. Beam-beam interaction and Pacman effects in the SSC with random nonlinear multipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goderre, G.P.; Ohnuma, S.

    1988-01-01

    In order to find the combined effects of beam-beam interaction (head-on and long-range) and random nonlinear multipoles in dipole magnets, transverse tunes and smears have been calculated as a function of oscillation amplitudes. Two types of particles, ''regular'' and ''Pacman,'' have been investigated using a modified version of tracking code TEAPOT. Regular particles experience beam-beam interactions in all four interaction regions (IR's), both head-on and long range, while pacman particles interact with bunches of the other beam in one medium-beta and one low-beta IR's only. The model for the beam-beam interaction is of weak-strong type and the strong beam is assumed to have a round Gaussian charge distribution. Furthermore, it is assumed that the vertical closed orbit deviation arising from the finite crossing angle of 70 μrad is perfectly compensated for regular particles. The same compensation applied to pacman particles creates a closed orbit distortion. Linear tunes are adjusted for regular particles to the design values but there are no nonlinear corrections except for chromaticity correcting sextupoles in two families. Results obtained in this study do not show any reduction of dynamic or linear aperture for pacman particles but some doubts exist regarding the validity of defining the linear aperture from the smear alone. Preliminary results are given for regular particles when (Δp/p) is modulated by the synchrotron oscillation. For these, fifty oscillations corresponding to 26,350 revolutions have been tracked. A very slow increase in the horizontal amplitude, /approximately/4 /times/ 10/sup /minus/4//oscillation (relative), is a possibility but this should be confirmed by trackings of larger number of revolutions. 11 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Characterizing the combinatorial beam angle selection problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangert, Mark; Ziegenhein, Peter; Oelfke, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    The beam angle selection (BAS) problem in intensity-modulated radiation therapy is often interpreted as a combinatorial optimization problem, i.e. finding the best combination of η beams in a discrete set of candidate beams. It is well established that the combinatorial BAS problem may be solved efficiently with metaheuristics such as simulated annealing or genetic algorithms. However, the underlying parameters of the optimization process, such as the inclusion of non-coplanar candidate beams, the angular resolution in the space of candidate beams, and the number of evaluated beam ensembles as well as the relative performance of different metaheuristics have not yet been systematically investigated. We study these open questions in a meta-analysis of four strategies for combinatorial optimization in order to provide a reference for future research related to the BAS problem in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment planning. We introduce a high-performance inverse planning engine for BAS. It performs a full fluence optimization for ≈3600 treatment plans per hour while handling up to 50 GB of dose influence data (≈1400 candidate beams). For three head and neck patients, we compare the relative performance of a genetic, a cross-entropy, a simulated annealing and a naive iterative algorithm. The selection of ensembles with 5, 7, 9 and 11 beams considering either only coplanar or all feasible candidate beams is studied for an angular resolution of 5°, 10°, 15° and 20° in the space of candidate beams. The impact of different convergence criteria is investigated in comparison to a fixed termination after the evaluation of 10 000 beam ensembles. In total, our simulations comprise a full fluence optimization for about 3000 000 treatment plans. All four combinatorial BAS strategies yield significant improvements of the objective function value and of the corresponding dose distributions compared to standard beam configurations with equi

  1. Characterizing the combinatorial beam angle selection problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, Mark; Ziegenhein, Peter; Oelfke, Uwe

    2012-10-01

    The beam angle selection (BAS) problem in intensity-modulated radiation therapy is often interpreted as a combinatorial optimization problem, i.e. finding the best combination of η beams in a discrete set of candidate beams. It is well established that the combinatorial BAS problem may be solved efficiently with metaheuristics such as simulated annealing or genetic algorithms. However, the underlying parameters of the optimization process, such as the inclusion of non-coplanar candidate beams, the angular resolution in the space of candidate beams, and the number of evaluated beam ensembles as well as the relative performance of different metaheuristics have not yet been systematically investigated. We study these open questions in a meta-analysis of four strategies for combinatorial optimization in order to provide a reference for future research related to the BAS problem in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment planning. We introduce a high-performance inverse planning engine for BAS. It performs a full fluence optimization for ≈3600 treatment plans per hour while handling up to 50 GB of dose influence data (≈1400 candidate beams). For three head and neck patients, we compare the relative performance of a genetic, a cross-entropy, a simulated annealing and a naive iterative algorithm. The selection of ensembles with 5, 7, 9 and 11 beams considering either only coplanar or all feasible candidate beams is studied for an angular resolution of 5°, 10°, 15° and 20° in the space of candidate beams. The impact of different convergence criteria is investigated in comparison to a fixed termination after the evaluation of 10 000 beam ensembles. In total, our simulations comprise a full fluence optimization for about 3000 000 treatment plans. All four combinatorial BAS strategies yield significant improvements of the objective function value and of the corresponding dose distributions compared to standard beam configurations with equi

  2. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawabe, James K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head ...

  4. Silva as the Head

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2015-01-01

    The head of the performance design programme is substituted by a sister's academy delegate. this performance situation formed part of a week of semesterstart where the students and professors visited Sister's Academy, Malmø. I participated in the Sister's Academy as visiting researcher and here...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... assess head injuries, severe headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor to evaluate your face, sinuses, and skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can ...

  6. Overview of Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... falls, motor vehicle crashes, assaults, and mishaps during sports and recreational activities. People with minor head injuries may have a headache ... feel part of the body Inability to recognize people or the ... vision, or blind spots) Drainage of clear fluid (cerebrospinal fluid) from ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of page ... to obtain a tissue sample ( biopsy ) from the brain. assess aneurysms or ... or any disorder of the heart, kidneys or thyroid gland , or ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Blood Clots CT Perfusion of the Head CT Angiography ( ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of page ...

  10. Summary of activities of the Research Department 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This annual report of the Research Department describes the activities performed during 1984 in the following fields: Physics, Reactor Chemistry, Radiobiology, Prospective and Special Studies, Biomathematics, Labelled Molecules and Radiochemistry. During this period the first heavy ion beam in the accelerator Tandar was obtained. A list of publications made by the Department this year is enclosed. (M.E.L.) [es

  11. Beam Dynamics in an Electron Lens with the Warp Particle-in-cell Code

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, Giulio; Redaelli, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Electron lenses are a mature technique for beam manipulation in colliders and storage rings. In an electron lens, a pulsed, magnetically confined electron beam with a given current-density profile interacts with the circulating beam to obtain the desired effect. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for beam-beam compensation, for abort-gap clearing, and for halo scraping. They will be used in RHIC at BNL for head-on beam-beam compensation, and their application to the Large Hadron Collider for halo control is under development. At Fermilab, electron lenses will be implemented as lattice elements for nonlinear integrable optics. The design of electron lenses requires tools to calculate the kicks and wakefields experienced by the circulating beam. We use the Warp particle-in-cell code to study generation, transport, and evolution of the electron beam. For the first time, a fully 3-dimensional code is used for this purpose.

  12. Department of Nuclear Reactions: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusek, K.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In spite of reduced personnel the number of papers published and in press exceeded fifty, almost ten more than a year ago. Another good sign is the growing number of PhD students. The following short reports cover the three major domains of our scientific activities: nuclear, material and atomic physics. Nuclear physics: The structure of light nuclei was investigated, and studies of nuclear reactions induced by heavy ions were performed including experiments at the Heavy Ion Laboratory of Warsaw University. The experiments were carried out in collaboration with scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Research from Kiev, Ukraine. Proton induced reactions on zirconium were investigated theoretically by means of a multistep-direct model extended for the unbound particle - hole states. Good agreement with the experimental data was achieved. Isospin effects in multifragmentation of relativistic heavy ions were studied by the ALADIN Collaboration. Elements of a new generation detector PANDA were tested experimentally using a proton beam provided by the C-30 compact cyclotron at Swierk. Evidence of a narrow baryon state was found in a quasi - real photoproduction on the deuterium target by the HERMES Collaboration. Atomic physics: Ionisation of selected heavy elements by sulphur ions was investigated in collaboration with the Swietokrzyska Academy, Kielce. Materials research: Hydrogen release from ultrahigh molecular weight polythene was investigated by means of an α - particle beam from the Van de Graaff accelerator of our Department. Last but not least, many of our colleagues have been involved in education. Lectures on nuclear physics, accelerators, detectors used in nuclear research as well as nuclear methods applied in solid state studies for students from many high schools of Warsaw and for students of Warsaw University were given by Dr. Andrzej Korman and Dr. Lech Nowicki. Also, our Department made a significant contribution to the 7 th Science

  13. Beam diagnostics for low energy beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Harasimowicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-energetic ion and antimatter beams are very attractive for a number of fundamental studies. The diagnostics of such beams, however, is a challenge due to low currents down to only a few thousands of particles per second and significant fraction of energy loss in matter at keV beam energies. A modular set of particle detectors has been developed to suit the particular beam diagnostic needs of the ultralow-energy storage ring (USR at the future facility for low-energy antiproton and ion research, accommodating very low beam intensities at energies down to 20 keV. The detectors include beam-profile monitors based on scintillating screens and secondary electron emission, sensitive Faraday cups for absolute intensity measurements, and capacitive pickups for beam position monitoring. In this paper, the design of all detectors is presented in detail and results from beam measurements are shown. The resolution limits of all detectors are described and options for further improvement summarized. Whilst initially developed for the USR, the instrumentation described in this paper is also well suited for use in other low-intensity, low-energy accelerators, storage rings, and beam lines.

  14. Department of Civil Engineering,

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2015-03-02

    Mar 2, 2015 ... Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra, Malaysia,. Selangor, Malaysia. 2. Department of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti. Putra, Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia. 3. Department of Civil Engineering, Federal University of Technology, ...

  15. The Danish Head and Neck Cancer database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Overgaard J

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Jens Overgaard,1 Aleksandar Jovanovic,1 Christian Godballe,2,3 Jesper Grau Eriksen3 1Department of Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 2Department of ORL – Head and Neck Surgery, 3Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark Aim of the database: The Danish Head and Neck Cancer database is a nationwide clinical quality database that contains prospective data collected since the early 1960s. The overall aim of this study was to describe the outcome of the national strategy for multidisciplinary treatment of head and neck cancer in Denmark and to create a basis for clinical trials. Study population: The study population consisted of all Danish patients referred for treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx, pharynx, oral cavity, or neck nodes from unknown primary or any histopathological type (except lymphoma of cancer in the nasal sinuses, salivary glands, or thyroid gland (corresponding to the International Classification of Diseases, tenth revision, classifications C.01–C.11, C.30–C.32, C.73, and C.80. Main variables: The main variables used in the study were symptoms and the duration of the symptoms; etiological factors; pretreatment and diagnostic evaluation, including tumor–node–metastasis classification, imaging, histopathology, and laboratory tests; primary treatment with semidetailed information of radiotherapy, surgery, and medical treatment; follow-up registration of tumor status and side effects; registration of relapse and treatment thereof; and registration of death and cause of death. Main results: Data from >33,000 patients have been recorded during a period of >45 years. In this period, the outcome of treatment improved substantially, partly due to better treatment as a result of a series of continuous clinical trials and subsequent implementation in national guidelines. The database has furthermore been used to describe the effect of reduced waiting time

  16. Revisit of combined parallel-beam/cone-beam or fan-beam/cone-beam imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Gengsheng L

    2013-10-01

    This aim of this paper is to revisit the parallel-beam/cone-beam or fan-beam/cone-beam imaging configuration, and to investigate whether this configuration has any advantages. Twenty years ago, it was suggested to simultaneously use a parallel-beam (or a fan-beam) collimator and a cone-beam collimator to acquire single photon emission computed tomography data. The motivation was that the parallel-beam (or the fan-beam) collimator can provide sufficient sampling, while the cone-beam collimator is able to provide higher photon counts. Even with higher total counts, this hybrid system does not give significant improvement (if any) in terms of image noise and artifacts reduction. If a conventional iterative maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization algorithm is used to reconstruct the image, the resultant reconstruction may be worse than the parallel-beam-only (or fan-beam-only) system. This paper uses the singular value decomposition (SVD) analysis to explain this phenomenon. The SVD results indicate that the parallel-beam-only and the fan-beam-only system outperform the combined systems. The optimal imaging system does not necessary to be the one that generates the projections with highest signal-to-noise ratio and best resolution.

  17. Next HR Department public meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, I am pleased to invite you to the next public meeting organized by the HR Department, which will take place on Tuesday 28 June at 3 p.m. in the Council Chamber. A drink will be served after the meeting as of 16:30 This meeting will be the opportunity to revisit the specificities of the Career Structure measures and Benchmark Jobs, what they entail and how they will be implemented, and to answer your questions. This meeting is also important for me on a personal note, as I will bid you farewell, at least for a few years, taking special leave as of 1 August 2016 to take up the position of Director-General for Human Resources at the European Central Bank in Frankfurt.  Should you not be able to attend the meeting, it can also be followed via Webcast and the recording will be made available on Indico. I look forward to meeting you. Best regards, Anne-Sylvie Catherin Head of the Human Resources Department

  18. Head Lice: Information for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Head Lice Information for Parents Language: English Español (Spanish) ... Tweet Share Compartir You should examine your child's head, especially behind the ears and at the nape ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  20. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or ... Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or ...

  1. Childhood Head and Neck Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thyroid Association ® www.thyroid.org Childhood Head & Neck Irradiation What is the thyroid gland? The thyroid gland ... Thyroid Association ® www.thyroid.org Childhood Head & Neck Irradiation Thyroid nodules (see Thyroid Nodule brochure) • Thyroid nodules ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  4. Single photon emission computed tomography by using fan beam collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Yoshihisa

    1992-01-01

    A multislice fan beam collimator which has parallel collimation along the cephalic-caudul axis of a patient and converging collimation within planes that are perpendicular to that axis was designed for a SPECT system with a rotating scintillation camera, and it was constructed by the lead casting method which was developed in recent years. A reconstruction algorithm for fan beam SPECT was formed originally by combining the reconstruction algorithm of the parallel beam SPECT with that of the fan beam X-ray CT. The algorithm for fan beam SPECT was confirmed by means of computer simulation and a head phantom filled with diluted radionuclide. Not only 99m Tc but also 123 I was used as a radionuclide. A SPECT image with the fan beam collimator was compared with that of a parallel hole, low energy, high resolution collimator which was routinely used for clinical and research SPECT studies. Both system resolution and sensitivity of the fan beam collimator were ∼20% better than those of the parallel hole collimator. Comparing SPECT images obtained from fan beam collimator with those of parallel hole collimator, the SPECT images using fan beam collimator had far better resolution. A fan beam collimator is a useful implement for the SPECT study. (author)

  5. Low current beam techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint, A.; Laird, J.S.; Bardos, R.A.; Legge, G.J.F. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Nishijima, T.; Sekiguchi, H. [Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan).

    1993-12-31

    Since the development of Scanning Transmission Microscopy (STIM) imaging in 1983 many low current beam techniques have been developed for the scanning (ion) microprobe. These include STIM tomography, Ion Beam Induced Current, Ion Beam Micromachining and Microlithography and Ionoluminense. Most of these techniques utilise beam currents of 10{sup -15} A down to single ions controlled by beam switching techniques This paper will discuss some of the low beam current techniques mentioned above, and indicate, some of their recent applications at MARC. A new STIM technique will be introduced that can be used to obtain Z-contrast with STIM resolution. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Beam Dynamics and Beam Losses - Circular Machines

    CERN Document Server

    Kain, V

    2016-01-01

    A basic introduction to transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics as well as the most relevant beam loss mechanisms in circular machines will be presented in this lecture. This lecture is intended for physicists and engineers with little or no knowledge of this subject.

  7. T10 Beam Studies & Beam Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Bergmann, Michael Georges; Van Dijk, Maarten; CERN. Geneva. EN Department

    2017-01-01

    In order to test detector components before their installation in actual experiments, one uses test beams in which one can control particle typ, momentum and size to high degree. For this project the focus of a secondary beam at T10 in the East Area at CERN was analysed using an AZALEA telescope from DESY.

  8. Where are we heading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noto, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    The present paper deals with different aspects connected to the global petroleum industry by discussing the way of heading. The aspects cover themes like new frontiers, new relationships, sanctions, global climate change, new alliances and new technology. New frontiers and relationships concern domestic policy affecting the industry, and sanctions are discussed in connection with trade. The author discusses the industry's participation in the global environmental policy and new alliances to provide greater opportunity for developing new technology

  9. Where are we heading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noto, L.A. [Mobil Corporation, (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The present paper deals with different aspects connected to the global petroleum industry by discussing the way of heading. The aspects cover themes like new frontiers, new relationships, sanctions, global climate change, new alliances and new technology. New frontiers and relationships concern domestic policy affecting the industry, and sanctions are discussed in connection with trade. The author discusses the industry`s participation in the global environmental policy and new alliances to provide greater opportunity for developing new technology

  10. Head segmentation in vertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Kuratani, Shigeru; Schilling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Classic theories of vertebrate head segmentation clearly exemplify the idealistic nature of comparative embryology prior to the 20th century. Comparative embryology aimed at recognizing the basic, primary structure that is shared by all vertebrates, either as an archetype or an ancestral developmental pattern. Modern evolutionary developmental (Evo-Devo) studies are also based on comparison, and therefore have a tendency to reduce complex embryonic anatomy into overly simplified patterns. Her...

  11. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  12. Successful Beam-Beam Tuneshift Compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishofberger, Kip Aaron [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The performance of synchrotron colliders has been limited by the beam-beam limit, a maximum tuneshift that colliding bunches could sustain. Due to bunch-to-bunch tune variation and intra-bunch tune spread, larger tuneshifts produce severe emittance growth. Breaking through this constraint has been viewed as impossible for several decades. This dissertation introduces the physics of ultra-relativistic synchrotrons and low-energy electron beams, with emphasis placed on the limits of the Tevatron and the needs of a tuneshift-compensation device. A detailed analysis of the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) is given, comparing theoretical models to experimental data whenever possible. Finally, results of Tevatron operations with inclusion of the TEL are presented and analyzed. It is shown that the TEL provides a way to shatter the previously inescapable beam-beam limit.

  13. Conceptual design of heavy ion beam compression using a wedge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan C. Wong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Heavy ion beams are a useful tool for conducting high energy density physics (HEDP experiments. Target heating can be enhanced by beam compression, because a shorter pulse diminishes hydrodynamic expansion during irradiation. A conceptual design is introduced to compress ∼100  MeV/u to ∼GeV/u heavy ion beams using a wedge. By deflecting the beam with a time-varying field and placing a tailor-made wedge amid its path downstream, each transverse slice passes through matter of different thickness. The resulting energy loss creates a head-to-tail velocity gradient, and the wedge shape can be designed by using stopping power models to give maximum compression at the target. The compression ratio at the target was found to vary linearly with (head-to-tail centroid offset/spot radius at the wedge. The latter should be approximately 10 to attain tenfold compression. The decline in beam quality due to projectile ionization, energy straggling, fragmentation, and scattering is shown to be acceptable for well-chosen wedge materials. A test experiment is proposed to verify the compression scheme and to study the beam-wedge interaction and its associated beam dynamics, which will facilitate further efforts towards a HEDP facility.

  14. Beam Loss in Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Plum, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Beam loss is a critical issue in high-intensity accelerators, and much effort is expended during both the design and operation phases to minimize the loss and to keep it to manageable levels. As new accelerators become ever more powerful, beam loss becomes even more critical. Linacs for H- ion beams, such as the one at the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, have many more loss mechanisms compared to H+ (proton) linacs, such as the one being designed for the European Spallation Neutron Source. Interesting H- beam loss mechanisms include residual gas stripping, H+ capture and acceleration, field stripping, black-body radiation and the recently discovered intra-beam stripping mechanism. Beam halo formation, and ion source or RF turn on/off transients, are examples of beam loss mechanisms that are common for both H+ and H- accelerators. Machine protection systems play an important role in limiting the beam loss.

  15. Beam scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enge, H.A.

    1977-01-01

    A system for deflecting a beam of particles having different momenta, preferably through a 90 0 angle, so as to cause the beam to impinge upon a moving target and to scan across the target is described. The system includes a means responsive to a beam from a suitable source for causing the beam to periodically scan in a scanning plane and further means for deflecting the periodically scanned beam through the desired angle in a deflection plane so that the deflected beam impinges on the target. Means are included in the system for reducing the momentum dispersion at the target in both the deflection and the scanning planes and for spatially focussing the beam so as to produce a desired beam diameter at the target

  16. Crossed beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolder, K.T.

    1976-01-01

    Many natural phenomena can only be properly understood if one has a detailed knowledge of interactions involving atoms, molecules, ions, electrons or photons. In the laboratory these processes are often studied by preparing beams of two types of particle and observing the reactions which occur when the beams intersect. Some of the more interesting of these crossed beam experiments and their results are discussed. Proposals to extend colliding beam techniques to high energy particle physics are also outlined. (author)

  17. Electron beam curing of polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janke, C.J.; Wheeler, D.; Saunders, C.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the CRADA was to conduct research and development activities to better understand and utilize the electron beam PMC curing technology. This technology will be used to replace or supplement existing PMC thermal curing processes in Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Programs (DP) projects and American aircraft and aerospace industries. This effort involved Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc./Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. (Contractor), Sandia National Laboratories, and ten industrial Participants including four major aircraft and aerospace companies, three advanced materials companies, and three electron beam processing organizations. The technical objective of the CRADA was to synthesize and/or modify high performance, electron beam curable materials that meet specific end-use application requirements. There were six tasks in this CRADA including: Electron beam materials development; Electron beam database development; Economic analysis; Low-cost Electron Beam tooling development; Electron beam curing systems integration; and Demonstration articles/prototype structures development. The contractor managed, participated and integrated all the tasks, and optimized the project efforts through the coordination, exchange, and dissemination of information to the project participants. Members of the Contractor team were also the principal inventors on several electron beam related patents and a 1997 R and D 100 Award winner on Electron-Beam-Curable Cationic Epoxy Resins. The CRADA achieved a major breakthrough for the composites industry by having successfully developed high-performance electron beam curable cationic epoxy resins for use in composites, adhesives, tooling compounds, potting compounds, syntactic foams, etc. UCB Chemicals, the world's largest supplier of radiation-curable polymers, has acquired a license to produce and sell these resins worldwide

  18. Head Lice: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spread lice? Can swimming spread lice? What are head lice? The head louse, or Pediculus humanus capitis , ... spread disease. Who is at risk for getting head lice? Head lice are found worldwide. In the ...

  19. Acoustic Split-Beam Echosounder Data (EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Southeast Fisheries Science Center Mississippi Laboratories collects data using Simrad EK60 scientific split-beam acoustic echosounders during resource...

  20. Superior performance of cone beam tomography in detecting a calcaneus fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohse, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cone beam computed tomography is a state-of-the-art imaging tool, initially developed for dental and maxillofacial application. With its high resolution and low radiation dose, cone beam tomography has been expanding its application fields, for example, to diagnosis of traumata and fractures in the head and neck area. In this study, we demonstrate superior and satisfactory performance of cone beam tomography for the imaging of a calcaneus fracture in comparison to conventional and computed tomography.

  1. An Electromagnetic Beam Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to an electromagnetic beam converter and a method for conversion of an input beam of electromagnetic radiation having a bell shaped intensity profile a(x,y) into an output beam having a prescribed target intensity profile l(x',y') based on a further development...

  2. Beams 92: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, D.; Cooperstein, G.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Ion beam papers; electron beam, bremsstrahlung, and diagnostics papers; radiating Z- pinch papers; microwave papers; electron laser papers; advanced accelerator papers; beam and pulsed power applications papers; pulsed power papers; and these papers have been indexed separately elsewhere

  3. External proton and Li beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuff, Juan A.; Burlon, Alejandro A.; Debray, Mario E.; Kesque, Jose M.; Kreiner, Andres J.; Stoliar, Pablo A.; Naab, Fabian; Ozafran, Mabel J.; Vazquez, Monica E.; Perez de la Hoz, A.; Somacal, Hector; Valda, Alejandro; Canevas, S.; Ruffolo, M.; Tasat, D.R.; Muhlmann, M. C.

    2000-01-01

    In the frame of a feasibility study to introduce proton therapy in Argentina in a collaborative agreement between the Physics and Radiobiology Departments of the National Atomic Energy Commission or Argentina and the Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay, France, external proton and Li beams were produced at the TANDAR accelerator in Buenos Aires. The specific aim of this work was to start radiobiology studies on cell cultures and small laboratory animals. In particular we seek to determine here the relative biological effectiveness, RBE, for proton and Li beams as a function of energy for different tumor and normal cell lines. The 24 MeV proton beam was diffused using a 25 μm gold foil and extracted through a Kapton window to obtain a homogeneous field (constant to 95%) of about 7 cm in diameter. Measurements were carried out with quasi-monoenergetic beams (of 20.2 ± 0.07 MeV, 2.9 ± 0.10 MeV y 1.5 ± 0.1 MeV for protons and 21.4 ± 0.4 MeV for Lithium). Proton fluence and Bragg peaks were measured. The dose delivered in each case was monitored on-line with a calibrated transmission ionization chamber. Three cell lines PDV, PDVC 57 and V 79 (as a reference) were irradiated with γ-rays, proton and lithium beams with linear energy transfer (LET) from 2 to 100 keV/μm. RBE values in the range of 1.2-5.9 were obtained. In addition preliminary studies on chromosomal aberrations and viability of alveolar macrophages were carried out. (author)

  4. Department of Radiation Detectors - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piekoszewski, J.

    1997-01-01

    Work carried out in 1996 in the Department of Radiation Detectors concentrated on three subjects: (i) Semiconductor Detectors (ii) X-ray Tube Generators (iii) Material Modification Using Ion and Plasma Beams. The Departamental objectives are: a search for new types of detectors, adapting modern technologies (especially of industrial microelectronics) to detector manufacturing, producing unique detectors tailored for physics experiments, manufacturing standard detectors for radiation measuring instruments. These objectives were accomplished in 1996 by: research on unique detectors for nuclear physics (e.g. a spherical set of particle detectors silicon ball), detectors for particle identification), development of technology of high-resistivity silicon detectors HRSi (grant proposal), development of thermoelectric cooling systems (grant proposal), research on p-i-n photodiode-based personal dosimeters, study of applicability of industrial planar technology in producing detectors, manufacturing detectors developed in previous years, re-generating and servicing customer detectors of various origin. The Department conducts research on the design and technology involved in producing X-ray generators based on X-ray tubes of special construction. Various tube models and their power supplies were developed. Some work has also been devoted to the detection and dosimetry of X-rays. X-ray tube generators are applied to non-destructive testing and are components of analytical systems such as: X-ray fluorescence chemical composition analysis, gauges of layer thickness and composition stress measurements, on-line control of processes, others where an X-ray tube may replace a radio-isotope source. In 1996, the Department: reviewed the domestic demand for X-ray generators, developed an X-ray generator for diagnosis of ostheroporosis of human limbs, prepared a grant proposal for the development of a new instrument for radiotherapy, the so-called needle-like X-ray tube. (author)

  5. Department of Radiation Detectors - Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piekoszewski, J. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    Work carried out in 1996 in the Department of Radiation Detectors concentrated on three subjects: (i) Semiconductor Detectors (ii) X-ray Tube Generators (iii) Material Modification Using Ion and Plasma Beams. The Departamental objectives are: a search for new types of detectors, adapting modern technologies (especially of industrial microelectronics) to detector manufacturing, producing unique detectors tailored for physics experiments, manufacturing standard detectors for radiation measuring instruments. These objectives were accomplished in 1996 by: research on unique detectors for nuclear physics (e.g. a spherical set of particle detectors silicon ball), detectors for particle identification), development of technology of high-resistivity silicon detectors HRSi (grant proposal), development of thermoelectric cooling systems (grant proposal), research on p-i-n photodiode-based personal dosimeters, study of applicability of industrial planar technology in producing detectors, manufacturing detectors developed in previous years, re-generating and servicing customer detectors of various origin. The Department conducts research on the design and technology involved in producing X-ray generators based on X-ray tubes of special construction. Various tube models and their power supplies were developed. Some work has also been devoted to the detection and dosimetry of X-rays. X-ray tube generators are applied to non-destructive testing and are components of analytical systems such as: X-ray fluorescence chemical composition analysis, gauges of layer thickness and composition stress measurements, on-line control of processes, others where an X-ray tube may replace a radio-isotope source. In 1996, the Department: reviewed the domestic demand for X-ray generators, developed an X-ray generator for diagnosis of ostheroporosis of human limbs, prepared a grant proposal for the development of a new instrument for radiotherapy, the so-called needle-like X-ray tube. (author).

  6. Beam line for Schools: beyond expectations

    CERN Multimedia

    Cian O'Luanaigh

    2014-01-01

    Out of 292 proposals for CERN's first ever "Beam line for Schools" contest, two teams of high-school students – Odysseus' Comrades from Varvakios Pilot School in Athens, Greece and Dominicuscollege from Dominicus College in Nijmegen in the Netherlands – were selected to spend 10 days conducting their proposed experiments at the fully equipped T9 beam line on CERN's Meyrin site. Dedicated CERN staff and users from across the departments have put in a huge effort to ensure the success of the project.   Detector physicist Cenk Yidriz (centre, white helmet) explains the setup of the "Beamline for schools" experiment at the T9 beamline. It's finally beam time. After months of organisation, coding, engineering and even painting the experimental area, the T9 beam line is ready to deliver protons to experiments devised and built by high-school students. “They are here to collect data and experience the l...

  7. Department of Accelerator Physics and Technology: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plawski, E.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The main activities of the Accelerator Physics and Technology Department were focused on following subjects: - contribution to development and building of New Therapeutical Electron Accelerator delivering the photon beams of 6 and 15 MeV, - study of the photon and electron spectra of narrow photon beams with the use of the BEAM/EGSnrc codes, - design and construction of special RF structures for use in CLIC Test Facility in CERN, - design and construction of 1:1 copper, room temperature models of accelerating superconducting 1.3 GHz structures for TESLA Project in DESY. In spite of drastic reduction of scientific and technical staff (from 16 to 10 persons) the planned works were successfully completed, but requested some extraordinary efforts. In realisation of 6/15 MeV Accelerator Project, the Department was responsible all along the project for calculations of all most important parts (electron gun, accelerating structure, beam focusing, achromatic deviation) and also for construction and physical modelling of some strategic subassemblies. The results of scientific and technical achievements of our Department in this work are documented in the Annex to Final Report on realisation of KBN Scientific Project No PBZ 009-13 and earlier Annual Reports 2000 and 2001. The results of Monte Carlo calculations of narrow photon beams and experimental verification using Varian Clinac 2003CD, Simens Mevatron and CGR MeV Saturn accelerators ended up with PhD thesis prepared by MSc Anna Wysocka. Her thesis: Collimation and Dosimetry of X-ray Beams for Stereotactic Radiotherapy with Linear Accelerators was sponsored by KBN scientific Project Nr T11E 04121. In collaboration with LNF INFN Frascati the electron beam deflectors were designed for CERN CLIC Test Facility CTF3. These special type travelling wave RF structures were built by our Department and are actually operated in CTF3 experiment. As the result of collaboration with TESLA-FEL Project in DESY, the set of RF

  8. Department of Nuclear Reactions: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusek, K.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: It is surprising how so few under-paid scientists could do so much. During 2004 the number of papers published or being in press exceeded fifty, making almost three papers per person employed in our department. Furthermore, among these papers one was published in Nature, the World's highest-ranked scientific journal. This is a result that will be difficult to beat. It is my pleasure to mention that one of our PhD students, Mr Sergiy Mezhevych, won a prestigious Heavy Ion Laboratory Prize founded by Prof. Inamura, for his experimental work using a beam from the Warsaw Cyclotron. Thanks to the effort of our colleagues the Hermes Collaboration Meeting organized by IPJ in Kazimierz Dolny (June 25 - July 1) turned out a success. The following short reports cover the three major domains of our scientific activities: nuclear, materials and atomic physics. -Nuclear physics - The structure of light nuclei, including exotic radioactive isotopes, was investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Some experimental studies were performed at the Heavy Ion Laboratory of Warsaw University in collaboration with scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Research in Kiev, Ukraine. The two reports present interesting results for the rare carbon isotope, 14 C. In the framework of Feshbach, Kerman and Koonin theory the multistep emission of one particle as well as more complicated direct processes were studied. It was found that these more complex processes play an important role in proton induced reactions. Experimental data from projectile-multifragmentation experiments with stable and radioactive beams were analysed. Some preliminary results are presented. Using a proton beam provided by the C-30 compact cyclotron at Swierk, detectors consisting of a PWO scintillator coupled to avalanche photodiodes were tested. The aim of these tests was to find the best detectors for the large electromagnetic calorimeter which will be used in future PANDA Collaboration experiments

  9. Dosimetry for electron beam application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.

    1983-12-01

    This report describes two aspects of electron beam dosimetry, on one hand development of film dosimeters and measurements of their properties, and on the other hand development of calorimeters for calibration of routine dosimeters, e.g. thin films. Two types of radiochromic thin film dosimeters have been developed in this department, and the properties of these and commercially available dosimeters have been measured and found to be comparable. Calorimeters which are in use for routine measurements, are being investigated with reference to their application as standardizing instruments, and new calorimeters are being developed. (author)

  10. Fire Department Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services.

  11. Department of Nuclear Reactions - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusek, K.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Our activity in 2008 has focused on well-established domains of research: nuclear and atomic physics, and applications. · As far as nuclear physics is concerned; our interests are very broad, ranging from the structure of the nucleon to the structure of the nucleus including high-energy multifragmentation studies. Our colleagues led by Prof. Pawel Zupranski, members of the HERMES collaboration that comprises 32 institutions from eleven countries at the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg, worked last year on the extraction of Spin Density Matrix Elements of vector mesons from scattering experiments on hydrogen targets. They also studied the distribution of quarks and gluons in nucleon. A team led by Prof. B. Zwieglinski was involved in the large-scale international collaboration PANDA (antiProton ANnihilation at DArmstadt). They studied the response of cooled PWO scintillators irradiated by gammas in the energy range of 4-20 MeV. The gammas were produced radiative proton capture on light by nuclei using a proton beam from the Van de Graaff accelerator of our Department. As a result, an important extrapolation of measurements performed by another group of physicists at much higher γ-ray energies was obtained. Low energy nuclear physics experiments were continued at the Heavy Ion Laboratory of Warsaw University in collaboration with foreign institutions: the University of Jyvaeskylae, the Institute of Nuclear Research of the Ukrainian Academy of Science and the Institute de Recherches Subatomique in Strasbourg. At high energies, a study of the isospin - dependence of the caloric curve was performed by the ALADIN Collaboration in a series of experiments at GSI - Darmstadt using radioactive beams of Sn and La. It was found that the asymmetry due to isospin is very weak. · Atomic physics studies were devoted to ionisation of heavy atoms by oxygen ions from the tandem accelerator of Erlangen-Nuernberg University. X-rays generated in the

  12. Head Lice: Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are naturally occurring pyrethroid extracts from the chrysanthemum flower. Pyrethrins are safe and effective when used as ... does not imply endorsement by the Public Health Service or by the U.S. Department of Health and ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... interprets the results and how do I get them? A radiologist with expertise in supervising and interpreting ... radiology departments are well-equipped to deal with them. Because children are more sensitive to radiation, they ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... detailed images of many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, and blood vessels. CT ... iodine is extremely rare, and radiology departments are well-equipped to deal with them. Because children are ...

  15. Head First Web Design

    CERN Document Server

    Watrall, Ethan

    2008-01-01

    Want to know how to make your pages look beautiful, communicate your message effectively, guide visitors through your website with ease, and get everything approved by the accessibility and usability police at the same time? Head First Web Design is your ticket to mastering all of these complex topics, and understanding what's really going on in the world of web design. Whether you're building a personal blog or a corporate website, there's a lot more to web design than div's and CSS selectors, but what do you really need to know? With this book, you'll learn the secrets of designing effecti

  16. Head First Python

    CERN Document Server

    Barry, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Ever wished you could learn Python from a book? Head First Python is a complete learning experience for Python that helps you learn the language through a unique method that goes beyond syntax and how-to manuals, helping you understand how to be a great Python programmer. You'll quickly learn the language's fundamentals, then move onto persistence, exception handling, web development, SQLite, data wrangling, and Google App Engine. You'll also learn how to write mobile apps for Android, all thanks to the power that Python gives you. We think your time is too valuable to waste struggling with

  17. Head First Mobile Web

    CERN Document Server

    Gardner, Lyza; Grigsby, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Despite the huge number of mobile devices and apps in use today, your business still needs a website. You just need it to be mobile. Head First Mobile Web walks you through the process of making a conventional website work on a variety smartphones and tablets. Put your JavaScript, CSS media query, and HTML5 skills to work-then optimize your site to perform its best in the demanding mobile market. Along the way, you'll discover how to adapt your business strategy to target specific devices. Navigate the increasingly complex mobile landscapeTake both technical and strategic approaches to mobile

  18. Head first C#

    CERN Document Server

    Stellman, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Head First C# is a complete learning experience for object-oriented programming, C#, and the Visual Studio IDE. Built for your brain, this book covers C# 3.0 and Visual Studio 2008, and teaches everything from language fundamentals to advanced topics including garbage collection, extension methods, and double-buffered animation. You'll also master C#'s hottest and newest syntax, LINQ, for querying SQL databases, .NET collections, and XML documents. By the time you're through, you'll be a proficient C# programmer, designing and coding large-scale applications. Every few chapters you will come

  19. Head first C#

    CERN Document Server

    Stellman, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    You want to learn C# programming, but you're not sure you want to suffer through another tedious technical book. You're in luck: Head First C# introduces this language in a fun, visual way. You'll quickly learn everything from creating your first program to learning sophisticated coding skills with C# 4.0, Visual Studio 2010 and .NET 4, while avoiding common errors that frustrate many students. The second edition offers several hands-on labs along the way to help you build and test programs using skills you've learned up to that point. In the final lab, you'll put everything together. From o

  20. Applications of Dual-Energy Computed Tomography for Artifact Reduction in the Head, Neck, and Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Eric; Srinivasan, Ashok

    2017-08-01

    Conventional computed tomography (CT) uses a polychromatic energy beam to offer superb anatomic detail of the head and spine. However, technical challenges remain that can degrade the diagnostic image quality of these examinations. Dual-energy CT analyzes the changes in attenuation of soft tissues at different energy levels, from which different reconstructions can be made to yield the optimal contrast-to-noise ratio, reduce beam-hardening artifact, or evaluate tissue composition. In this article, selective applications of the dual energy CT technique are discussed, highlighting a powerful tool in the diagnostic CT evaluation of the head, neck, and spine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Uranium enrichment: heading for the abyss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, C.

    1983-01-01

    This article discusses the federal government's $2.3 billion a year business enriching uranium for nuclear power plants which is heading toward a major crisis. Due to miscalculations by the Department of Energy, it is caught with billions of dollars of construction in progress just as projected demand for enriched uranium is decreasing. At the center of the controversy is the Gas Centrifuge Plant at Portsmouth, Ohio - estimated to cost $10 billion dollars. A review of how DOE got into this situation and how they plan to solve it is presented

  2. (PhD) is senior lecturer at the Department of Political Science and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    Idowu Biao (PhD) is Professor of Lifelong Learning at the Department of Adult Education, University of Botswana. He has served as Ag. Dean, Director, and Head of Department in several Universities. idowubiao2014@gmail.com. Dominic Azuh is at the Department of Economics and Development Studies, Covenant ...

  3. Sex determination from femoral head diameters in black Malawians ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the sex of black Malawians from femoral head diameters. Design: A retrospective study on patients investigated in three x-ray departments. Setting: Radiographs were collected from the archives of Queen Elizabeth Central, Chikwawa and Balaka hospitals. Subject: X-ray films of 496 pelves of adult ...

  4. The scourge of head injury among commercial motorcycle riders in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Surgery, Makerere University College of Health Sciences. 2. ... Objectives: To determine the prevalence of protective gear use, the occurrence of head injury and the relationship between ... Data was collected using pretested interviewer administered questionnaires, double entered in Epidata and analyzed.

  5. Accidental and Nonaccidental Head Injuries in Infants: Distinguishing Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available One hundred fifty infants hospitalized with head injury over a 3-year period, 57 (38% due to child abuse, were studied prospectively at the Departments of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Neuro-ophthalmology, and Legal Medicine, CHRU de Lille, France.

  6. 20 September 2013 - Ambassador Z. Akram , Permanent Representative of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva (3rd) with Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group Leader F. Bertinelli, Head of International Relations R. Voss, CMS Collaboration, Quaid-i-Azam University H. Hoorani, Permanent Mission First Secretary U. Iqbal Jadoon and LHC Consolidation, Industrial Services, Technology Department JP. Tock in front of the lift to the LHC tunnel at Point 1. Site Manager M. Décombaz on the back.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    20 September 2013 - Ambassador Z. Akram , Permanent Representative of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva (3rd) with Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group Leader F. Bertinelli, Head of International Relations R. Voss, CMS Collaboration, Quaid-i-Azam University H. Hoorani, Permanent Mission First Secretary U. Iqbal Jadoon and LHC Consolidation, Industrial Services, Technology Department JP. Tock in front of the lift to the LHC tunnel at Point 1. Site Manager M. Décombaz on the back.

  7. [Improving emergency department organisation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanov, Youri; Beltramini, Alexandra; Debuc, Erwan; Pateron, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Emergency departments use has been constantly increasing over the world. Overcrowding is defined as a situation which compromises patient safety because of delayed cares. This situation is often reached. Emergency departments have to continuously improve their organization to be able to ensure the same quality of care to a higher number of patients. Thus a good organization is essential: it doesn't always avoid overcrowding. The rest of the hospital has to be involved in this process to ensure efficiency. We examine the various interventions and procedures that can be found in medical literature for improving patients flow and management in emergency departments.

  8. Strong-strong beam-beam simulation on parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, Ji

    2004-08-02

    The beam-beam interaction puts a strong limit on the luminosity of the high energy storage ring colliders. At the interaction points, the electromagnetic fields generated by one beam focus or defocus the opposite beam. This can cause beam blowup and a reduction of luminosity. An accurate simulation of the beam-beam interaction is needed to help optimize the luminosity in high energy colliders.

  9. Strong-strong beam-beam simulation on parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang, Ji

    2004-01-01

    The beam-beam interaction puts a strong limit on the luminosity of the high energy storage ring colliders. At the interaction points, the electromagnetic fields generated by one beam focus or defocus the opposite beam. This can cause beam blowup and a reduction of luminosity. An accurate simulation of the beam-beam interaction is needed to help optimize the luminosity in high energy colliders

  10. Photodynamic therapy in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil H Nelke

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a special type of treatment involving the use of a photosensitizer or a photosensitizing agent along with a special type of light, which, combined together, induces production of a form of oxygen that is used to kill surrounding cells in different areas of the human body. Specification of the head and neck region requires different approaches due to the surrounding of vital structures. PDT can also be used to treat cells invaded with infections such as fungi, bacteria and viruses. The light beam placed in tumor sites activates locally applied drugs and kills the cancer cells. Many studies are taking place in order to invent better photosensitizers, working on a larger scale and to treat deeply placed and larger tumors. It seems that PDT could be used as an alternative surgical treatment in some tumor types; however, all clinicians should be aware that the surgical approach is still the treatment of choice. PDT is a very accurate and effective therapy, especially in early stages of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC, and can greatly affect surgical outcomes in cancerous patients. We present a detailed review about photosensitizers, their use, and therapeutic advantages and disadvantages.

  11. Eye-based head gestures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardanbegi, Diako; Witzner Hansen, Dan; Pederson, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A novel method for video-based head gesture recognition using eye information by an eye tracker has been proposed. The method uses a combination of gaze and eye movement to infer head gestures. Compared to other gesture-based methods a major advantage of the method is that the user keeps the gaze...... on the interaction object while interacting. This method has been implemented on a head-mounted eye tracker for detecting a set of predefined head gestures. The accuracy of the gesture classifier is evaluated and verified for gaze-based interaction in applications intended for both large public displays and small...

  12. Department of Education (DOE)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The purpose of this agreement is to assist the U.S. Department of Education in its obligation to ensure that applicants for student financial assistance under Title...

  13. Department of Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find Your State Transportation Department 5 Star Automobile Crash Test Ratings Office of Drug & Alcohol Policy & Compliance Register your Unmanned Aircraft or Drone DOT Careers Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) ...

  14. The Corporate Marketing Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Thomas; Eggert, Andreas; Münkhoff, Eva

    Corporate marketing has been downsized or eliminated in many firms. At the same time, firms that still own a corporate marketing department struggle with organizing and positioning their commercial front‐end. The question arises whether firms need a corporate marketing department, and if so, how ...... successful outcomes of corporate marketing activities. In sum, our framework provides important insights on how to successfully organize corporate marketing activities.......Corporate marketing has been downsized or eliminated in many firms. At the same time, firms that still own a corporate marketing department struggle with organizing and positioning their commercial front‐end. The question arises whether firms need a corporate marketing department, and if so, how...... it can best add value to the firm. Based on a qualitative study among B2B companies, we develop a conceptual framework highlighting the various parental roles through which corporate marketing can contribute to overall firm and business unit performance. In addition, we identify five gaps that restrain...

  15. Hypoglycemia in Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jang Su

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: When hypoglycemic patients present in the emergency department, physicians should pay attention to the presence of infection, malignancy, liver diseases (liver cirrhosis and biliary tract infection, and acute renal failure.

  16. Department of reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    The general development of the Department of Reacctor Technology at Risoe during 1981 is presented, ant the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included. (author)

  17. Nebraska Department of Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against the Nebraska Department of Transportation, a state agency located at 1500 Highway 2, Lincoln, NE 68509, for alleged violations of its municipal separate stormwater sewer sy

  18. Iowa Department of Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against Iowa Department of Transportation, a state agency with its primary office located at 800 Lincoln Way, Ames, IA 50010, for alleged violations at two roadway construction pro

  19. Simulation and dosimetric analysis of protons, 4He ions and 12C ions beams for brain neoplasm therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Guilherme M.; Mello, Victor Barreto Braga; Mello Neto, Joao R.T. de

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to simulate protons, 4 He ions and 12 C ions beams, radiating the head of an average-sized man with the purpose of treating a hypothalamic tumor. GEANT4 was used to simulate the head (skin, skull and brain), and the beam, giving their characteristics and also the physical processes involved. The results sought herein are graphs of depth for relative dose for each of the three particles incident on the settings mentioned above. (author)

  20. Department of Reactor Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde

    The general development of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risø during 1981 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included.......The general development of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risø during 1981 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included....

  1. Department of Nuclear Reactions: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusek, K.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: During last year the physicists of the Department of Nuclear Reactions were involved in many experiments and projects: -Low energy nuclear reactions: For the first time a heavy ion beam from the Warsaw Cyclotron C-200 was used to investigate elastic and inelastic scattering of 12 C ions from 12 C target. The experiment is a part of a long range programme devoted to study the energy dependence of the nucleus-nucleus interactions. -Multifragmentation of relativistic heavy ions: Multifragmentation reactions induced by 12 C on different heavy targets and at different energies were studied in experiments performed at Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung by the ALADIN Collaboration. These asymmetric systems were investigated in order to study the interplay between preequilibrium and equilibrium phenomena in the nuclear liquid - gas phase transition. -The structure of nucleons: A novel, two-structure description of the Roper resonance was proposed on the basis of the α-p scattering data reanalysed by means of a T-matrix formalism. -Atomic physics: Emission of the X-rays by fast heavy ions (S, Ti, Fe) as they traverse the matter (thin carbon or other light element foil) was investigated in a series of experiments performed at University of Erlangen. It was demonstrated, that the characteristic K α X-rays emitted by a heavy ion can serve as a tool for Z-value control of the ion. -Material research: Semiconductor heterostructures were investigated by means of Rutherford Back Scattering and Channeling methods using the 2 MeV α particles from the Van de Graaff accelerator ''Lech'' at the Department. The following reports present the results and major successes which were achieved in 1999. (author)

  2. [Maxillary sinusitis as a diagnostical adverse finding of the dental cone-beam computed tomography study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreindorfer, Károly; Kiss, Ágnes; Marada, Gyula

    2017-11-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography is a frequently used diagnostical method in the head and neck region. The thickening of the maxillary sinus mucosa is often observed in these images. Determining the prevalence of teeth and roots that can be identified as cause of maxillary odontogenic sinusitis, and recording the average observed mucosa thickening on these images. The scans that give the base of the study have been performed by the Department of Dentistry of Medical University of Pécs between 2015-2016. The size of the voxels had been varied between 0.25 and 0.4 mm and the size of the image had been set up to 15×12 cm. The acquisition time had been set up to 27 seconds. 170 cases of the 260 revised records fulfilled the initial criterion conditions. The average mucosa thickness was 8.8 mm. During the present study, the upper first molars palatal and the second molars mesiobuccal roots were mainly associated with maxillary odontogenic sinusitis. Whether in the case of chronic maxillary sinusitis that is not or only temporarily responsive to conventional therapy, may it be justifiable to provide dental consultation and cone-beam computed tomography to exclude the dental origin of sinusitis. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(44): 1747-1753.

  3. Laser beam shaping techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DICKEY,FRED M.; WEICHMAN,LOUIS S.; SHAGAM,RICHARD N.

    2000-03-16

    Industrial, military, medical, and research and development applications of lasers frequently require a beam with a specified irradiance distribution in some plane. A common requirement is a laser profile that is uniform over some cross-section. Such applications include laser/material processing, laser material interaction studies, fiber injection systems, optical data image processing, lithography, medical applications, and military applications. Laser beam shaping techniques can be divided into three areas: apertured beams, field mappers, and multi-aperture beam integrators. An uncertainty relation exists for laser beam shaping that puts constraints on system design. In this paper the authors review the basics of laser beam shaping and present applications and limitations of various techniques.

  4. Beam induced RF heating

    CERN Document Server

    Salvant, B; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Baglin, V; Barnes, M J; Bartmann, W; Baudrenghien, P; Berrig, O; Bracco, C; Bravin, E; Bregliozzi, G; Bruce, R; Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cattenoz, G; Caspers, F; Claudet, S; Day, H; Garlasche, M; Gentini, L; Goddard, B; Grudiev, A; Henrist, B; Jones, R; Kononenko, O; Lanza, G; Lari, L; Mastoridis, T; Mertens, V; Métral, E; Mounet, N; Muller, J E; Nosych, A A; Nougaret, J L; Persichelli, S; Piguiet, A M; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Rumolo, G; Salvachua, B; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Shaposhnikova, E; Tavian, L; Timmins, M; Uythoven, J; Vidal, A; Wenninger, J; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    After the 2011 run, actions were put in place during the 2011/2012 winter stop to limit beam induced radio frequency (RF) heating of LHC components. However, some components could not be changed during this short stop and continued to represent a limitation throughout 2012. In addition, the stored beam intensity increased in 2012 and the temperature of certain components became critical. In this contribution, the beam induced heating limitations for 2012 and the expected beam induced heating limitations for the restart after the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) will be compiled. The expected consequences of running with 25 ns or 50 ns bunch spacing will be detailed, as well as the consequences of running with shorter bunch length. Finally, actions on hardware or beam parameters to monitor and mitigate the impact of beam induced heating to LHC operation after LS1 will be discussed.

  5. Craft Stick Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karplus, Alan K.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this exercise is to provide a phenomenological 'hands-on' experience that shows how geometry can affect the load carrying capacity of a material used in construction, how different materials have different failure characteristics, and how construction affects the performance of a composite material. This will be accomplished by building beams of a single material and composite beams of a mixture of materials (popsicle sticks, fiberboard sheets, and tongue depressors); testing these layered beams to determine how and where they fail; and based on the failure analysis, designing a layered beam that will fail in a predicted manner. The students will learn the effects of lamination, adhesion, and geometry in layered beam construction on beam strength and failure location.

  6. Chryse 'Alien Head'

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    26 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an impact crater in Chryse Planitia, not too far from the Viking 1 lander site, that to seems to resemble a bug-eyed head. The two odd depressions at the north end of the crater (the 'eyes') may have formed by wind or water erosion. This region has been modified by both processes, with water action occurring in the distant past via floods that poured across western Chryse Planitia from Maja Valles, and wind action common occurrence in more recent history. This crater is located near 22.5oN, 47.9oW. The 150 meter scale bar is about 164 yards long. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left/lower left.

  7. Beam Extraction and Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Kalvas, T.

    2013-12-16

    This chapter gives an introduction to low-energy beam transport systems, and discusses the typically used magnetostatic elements (solenoid, dipoles and quadrupoles) and electrostatic elements (einzel lens, dipoles and quadrupoles). The ion beam emittance, beam space-charge effects and the physics of ion source extraction are introduced. Typical computer codes for analysing and designing ion optical systems are mentioned, and the trajectory tracking method most often used for extraction simulations is described in more detail.

  8. Mechanical beam isolator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.; Vann, C.S.

    1996-10-01

    Back-reflections from a target, lenses, etc. can gain energy passing backwards through a laser just like the main beam gains energy passing forwards. Unless something blocks these back-reflections early in their path, they can seriously damage the laser. A Mechanical Beam Isolator is a device that blocks back-reflections early, relatively inexpensively, and without introducing aberrations to the laser beam

  9. Cyclotron radiation beam control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominke, P.

    1983-01-01

    This patent application describes an apparatus for attenuating a beam of particulate radiation comprising a series of modules, each module being constituted by a sphere having a passage, a cupola covering said sphere and a base supporting said sphere, and means for causing movement of the spheres for aligning said passages with an axis of a beam line and arranging said passages out of alignment so as to attenuate the beam. (author)

  10. Chilled beam application guidebook

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, David; Gräslund, Jonas; Hogeling, Jaap; Lund Kristiansen, Erik; Reinikanen, Mika; Svensson, Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    Chilled beam systems are primarily used for cooling and ventilation in spaces, which appreciate good indoor environmental quality and individual space control. Active chilled beams are connected to the ventilation ductwork, high temperature cold water, and when desired, low temperature hot water system. Primary air supply induces room air to be recirculated through the heat exchanger of the chilled beam. In order to cool or heat the room either cold or warm water is cycled through the heat exchanger.

  11. Who needs hyperon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    Hyperon beams can provide new interesting information about hadron structure and their strong, electromagnetic and weak interactions. The dependence of hadron interactions on strangeness and baryon number is not understood, and data from hyperon beams can provide new clues to paradoxes which arise in the interpretation of data from conventional beams. Examples of interesting data are total and differential cross sections, magnetic moments and values of Gsub(A)/Gsub(V) for weak semileptonic decays. (author)

  12. Instability of compensated beam-beam collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Autin, B.; Chen, Pisin.

    1989-01-01

    The beam-beam disruption phenomena in linear colliders are increasingly seen as a source of serious problems for these machines. A plasma compensation scheme, in which the motion of the plasma electrons in the presence of the colliding beams provides neutralizing charge and current densities, has been proposed and studied. But natural alternative to this scheme is to consider the overlapping of nearly identical high energy e + and e/sup /minus// bunches, and the collision of two such pairs - in other words, collision of two opposing relativistic positronium plasmas. It should be noticed that while the luminosity for all collisions is increased by a factor of four in this scheme, the event rate for e + e/sup /minus// collisions is only increased by a factor of two. The other factor of two corresponds to the addition of e + e + and e/sup /minus//e/sup /minus// collisions to the interaction point. This beam compensation scheme, which has been examined through computer simulation by Balakin and Solyak in the Soviet Union, promises full neutralization of beam charges and currents. These numerical investigations have shown that plasma instabilities exist in this nominally neutral system. Although the implementation of this idea seems technically daunting, the potential benefits (beamstrahlung and disruption suppression, relaxation of final focus system constraints) are such that we should consider the physics of these collisions further. In the remainder of this paper, we theoretically analyze the issues of stability and bunch parameter tolerances in this scheme. 11 refs

  13. Dosimetric evaluation of fattening filter free photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechner, W.

    2014-01-01

    Very recently, conventional treatment machines able to deliver flattening filter free photon have been introduced into clinical practice. An Elekta Pricise linear accelerator LINAC which was able to deliver 6MV and 10 MV flattened (FF) and flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams was used throughout this work. The investigated modalities were 9-Field intensity modulated radiotherapy (Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)) and 360° - single arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)) with flattened and unflattened photon beams. For treatment plan evaluation the concept of Pareto optimal fronts was employed. Additionally, the efficiency of these modalities was assessed. The evaluation of the treatment plan quality showed no significant difference between FF- and FFF-beams. With respect to treatment plan efficiency, a significant decrease of delivery time of IMRT treatment plans without flattening filter compared to those with filter was found. On average, the delivery time decreased by 18% and 4% for prostate and head-and-neck cases, respectively. In contrast to that, the delivery time of VMAT treatment plans without flatting filter was significantly increased by 22% and 16% for prostate and head- and-neck cases, respectively. The applicability of 14 different detectors to small field dosimetry in FF- as well as in FFF-beams was investigated by measuring output factors of 6MV and 10 MV FF- and FFF- beams. An additional MLC was attached to the treatment machine in order to generate field sizes between 0.6x0.6 cm 2 and 10x10 cm 2 . Alanine pellets were used as reference detectors for the calculation of correction factors for small field dosimetry. Compared to alanine, the solid sate detectors and the liquid filled ionization chamber generally overestimated the output factors of small fields, whereas the air filled ionzation chambers underestimated the output factors. For the shielded diodes the correction factors ranged between 8

  14. Dual-beam CRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A dual-beam cathode-ray tube having a pair of electron guns and associated deflection means disposed side-by-side on each side of a central axis is described. The electron guns are parallel and the deflection means includes beam centering plates and angled horizontal deflection plates to direct the electron beams toward the central axis, precluding the need for a large-diameter tube neck in which the entire gun structures are angled. Bowing control plates are disposed adjacent to the beam centering plates to minimize trace bowing, and an intergun shield is disposed between the horizontal deflection plates to control and correct display pattern geometry distortion

  15. GANIL beam profile detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribouillard, C.

    1997-01-01

    In the design phase of GANIL which started in 1977, one of the priorities of the project management was equipping the beamlines with a fast and efficient system for visualizing the beam position, thus making possible adjustment of the beam transport lines optics and facilitating beam control. The implantation of some thirty detectors was foreseen in the initial design. The assembly of installed detectors (around 190) proves the advantages of these detectors for displaying all the beams extracted from GANIL: transfer and transport lines, beam extracted from SISSI, very high intensity beam, secondary ion beams from the production target of the LISE and SPEG spectrometers, different SPIRAL project lines. All of these detectors are based on standard characteristics: - standard flange diameter (DN 160) with a standard booster for all the sensors; - identical analog electronics for all the detectors, with networking; - unique display system. The new micro-channel plate non-interceptive detectors (beam profile and ion packet lengths) make possible in-line control of the beam quality and accelerator stability. (author)

  16. ALFA beam halo

    CERN Document Server

    Komarek, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    This note serves as a final report about CERN Summer Student Programme 2014 project. The beam halo is an undesired phenomenon for physics analyses on particle accelerators. It surrounds the beam core and constitutes an important part of background for signal measurements on some detectors, eg. in the forward region. In this study, the data from the ALFA detector were used, specifically from the run 191373 ($\\beta^*=90\\unit{m}$) and the run 213268 ($\\beta^*=1\\unit{km}$). Using the ROOT framework, a software for beam halo events selection was created and beam halo properties were examined. In the run 213268, excessive beam halo is suspected to be the reason for multiple beam scrapings that occurred. A kinematic reconstruction of beam halo particles is attempted in order to understand beam halo properties in the interaction point. Some further simulations are employed to find constraints for beam halo particles in order to survive in the accelerator for a longer time/many revolutions. This work represents a st...

  17. Simulation of Beam-Beam Background at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Sailer, Andre

    2010-01-01

    The dense beams used at CLIC to achieve a high luminosity will cause a large amount of background particles through beam-beam interactions. Generator level studies with GuineaPig and full detector simulation studies with an ILD based CLIC detector have been performed to evaluate the amount of beam-beam background hitting the vertex detector.

  18. Simulation of Beam-Beam Background at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Sailer, A

    2010-01-01

    The dense beams used at CLIC to achieve a high luminosity will cause a large amount of background particles through beam-beam interactions. Generator level studies with GUINEAPIG and full detector simulation studies with an ILD based CLIC detector have been performed to evaluate the amount of beam-beam back- ground hitting the vertex detector.

  19. Increased nuclear safety and reliability through power beaming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coomes, E.P.; Widrig, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Space satellites and platforms currently include self-contained power systems to supply the energy necessary to accomplish mission objectives. With power beaming, the power system is separate from the satellite and the two are connected by an energy beam. This approach is analogous to earth-based central station power generation and distribution over transmission lines to various customers. In space, power is produced by power satellites (central power generating stations) and transmitted via energy beams to individual users. Power beaming has the ability to provide an order of magnitude increase in power availability over solar-based power systems with less mass on orbit. The technologies needed for power beaming are being developed today under existing programs directed by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the US Department of Energy. A space power architecture based on power beaming would greatly increase the safety and reliability of employing nuclear power in space

  20. Peripheral blood picture following mild head trauma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alioglu, Bulent; Ozyurek, Emel; Avci, Zekai; Atalay, Basar; Caner, Hakan; Ozbek, Namik

    2008-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate changes in peripheral white blood cell, and differential counts following mild head trauma in a pediatric population. Fifty-one patients (mean age, 79 +/- 62 months) with mild head trauma (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score 15) who were admitted to the emergency department, were studied. Two blood specimens were collected from each patient, one on arrival and one after 24 h at the emergency department. Complete blood count was performed using a hemocytometer and the absolute cell counts for each sample were calculated after examination of peripheral smear. No patient developed any complication during the hospital stay or after discharge. Significant differences were found for white blood cell, neutrophil, and immature cell counts just after and 24 h after trauma (P = 0.047, 0.039 and 0.009, respectively). Mild head trauma may cause an increase in white blood cell, neutrophil and band counts in children just after trauma. In a child with a mild head trauma, who is asymptomatic, with GCS score of 15 and absence of risk factors, and without clinical deterioration, complete blood cell count may be omitted from laboratory workup. But a prospective randomized study comparing mild head trauma patients with good and bad clinical outcome is needed to draw a definite conclusion.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  2. Flat Head Syndrome (Positional Plagiocephaly)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... itself out. Although they're very simple, the exercises must be done correctly. For kids with severe flat head syndrome in which repositioning for 2-3 months doesn't help, doctors may prescribe a custom-molded helmet or head band. While helmets might ...

  3. Analytical modelling of soccer heading

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MS received 11 April 2014; revised 22 September 2014; accepted 14 February 2015. Abstract. Heading occur frequently in soccer games and studies have shown that repetitive heading of the soccer ball could result in degeneration of brain cells and lead to mild traumatic brain injury. This study proposes a two ...

  4. Womanhood in Bessie Head's fiction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rain Cloud~· Gather ( 1969), Maru ( 1972) and A Question of Power ( 1974 ),. Head addresses and deals with ... In A Question of Power, Head deals with these groups through. Kenosi and Elizabeth respectively. ... environment, Mma Millipede soon establishes herself through her hard work and unique individuality which ...

  5. Analytical modelling of soccer heading

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Heading occur frequently in soccer games and studies have shown that repetitive heading of the soccer ball could result in degeneration of brain cells and lead to mild traumatic brain injury. This study proposes a two degree-of-freedom linear mathematical model to study the impact of the soccer ball on the brain. The model ...

  6. The head-mounted microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Dailey, Seth H; Naze, Sawyer A; Jiang, Jack J

    2012-04-01

    Microsurgical equipment has greatly advanced since the inception of the microscope into the operating room. These advancements have allowed for superior surgical precision and better post-operative results. This study focuses on the use of the Leica HM500 head-mounted microscope for the operating phonosurgeon. The head-mounted microscope has an optical zoom from 2× to 9× and provides a working distance from 300 mm to 700 mm. The headpiece, with its articulated eyepieces, adjusts easily to head shape and circumference, and offers a focus function, which is either automatic or manually controlled. We performed five microlaryngoscopic operations utilizing the head-mounted microscope with successful results. By creating a more ergonomically favorable operating posture, a surgeon may be able to obtain greater precision and success in phonomicrosurgery. Phonomicrosurgery requires the precise manipulation of long-handled cantilevered instruments through the narrow bore of a laryngoscope. The head-mounted microscope shortens the working distance compared with a stand microscope, thereby increasing arm stability, which may improve surgical precision. Also, the head-mounted design permits flexibility in head position, enabling operator comfort, and delaying musculoskeletal fatigue. A head-mounted microscope decreases the working distance and provides better ergonomics in laryngoscopic microsurgery. These advances provide the potential to promote precision in phonomicrosurgery. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Return of the talking heads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinecke Hansen, Kenneth; Bro, Peter; Andersson, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The present article suggests that the brief history of Western television news dramaturgy can be expounded as three major waves: from the early days of the talking heads in the studio, over the narrativization of the field report to a (re-)current studio- and field-based talking heads format...

  8. Segmentation process significantly influences the accuracy of 3D surface models derived from cone beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Schepers, Rutger H; Gerrits, Pieter; Ren, Yijin

    AIMS: To assess the accuracy of surface models derived from 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with two different segmentation protocols. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven fresh-frozen cadaver heads were used. There was no conflict of interests in this study. CBCT scans were made of the heads and 3D

  9. Synchrotron accelerator technology for proton beam therapy with high accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiramoto, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    Proton beam therapy was applied at the beginning to head and neck cancers, but it is now extended to prostate, lung and liver cancers. Thus the need for a pencil beam scanning method is increasing. With this method radiation dose concentration property of the proton beam will be further intensified. Hitachi group has supplied a pencil beam scanning therapy system as the first one for M. D. Anderson Hospital in United States, and it has been operational since May 2008. Hitachi group has been developing proton therapy system to correspond high-accuracy proton therapy to concentrate the dose in the diseased part which is located with various depths, and which sometimes has complicated shape. The author described here on the synchrotron accelerator technology that is an important element for constituting the proton therapy system. (K.Y.)

  10. Department of Nuclear Reactions: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusek, K.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The Department of Nuclear Reactions had a very productive year. The following reports cover three major domains of our activities: nuclear, material and atomic physics. One of the current questions in modern nuclear physics is question of the phase transitions in nuclear matter. Our physicists, the members of the ALADIN Collaboration at Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, participated in new experiments exploring properties of highly excited nuclear matter and the phenomenon of the liquid - gas phase transition. The experiments yielded a number of important results. Details can be found in the three short reports presented in this volume. Structure of a nucleon is another important subject of nuclear science research. In the last year energy region of Δ resonance has been investigated by means of charge exchange reaction. The experiment was performed at Laboratory National Saturne in Saclay by SPESIV-π collaboration consisting of physicist from Institute of Nuclear Physics Orsay, Niels Bohr Institute Copenhagen and from our Department. The main achievement of the experiment was evidence for a Δ - hole attraction in the spin longitudinal channel. Reactions induced by radioactive ion beams such as 6 He recently attract a lot of interest. There exist some evidences that the 6 He nucleus has a two-neutron halo structure similar to that well established for 11 Li. An analysis of 6 He + 4 He scattering data reported in this volume revealed some similarities between the loosely bound 6 Li nucleus and the neutron rich 6 He. Research in material physics has focused on two basic topics: a crystallographic model of uranium dioxide, a material currently used as a nuclear fuel and transformations of defects in GaAs crystals at low temperature. The investigations have been carried out in a wide collaboration with scientists from the University of Jena, Research Center Karlsruhe and Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire Orsay. Some experiments have been performed at

  11. Progress report of the Nuclear Physics Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The experiments and the technological studies carried out at the Nuclear Physics Department of Saclay from October 1, 1981 to September 30, 1982 are presented. These studies concern the structure of nuclei and hypernuclei and various reaction mechanisms. They have been performed with the 8.5 MV tandem Van de Graaff, with the 600 MeV electron linac, at the synchrotron SATURNE and with different accelerators belonging to other laboratories, in particular the SARA facility at Grenoble, the boosted tandem at Heidelberg and the secondary beams at CERN [fr

  12. Progress report of the nuclear physics department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This progress report presents the experiments and the technological studies carried out at the Nuclear Physics Department of Saclay from October 1, 1984 to September 30, 1985. These studies concern the structure of nuclei, the nuclear reaction mechanisms and, more and more, mesic processes in nuclear dynamics. The experiments have been carried at the 700 MeV electron linac, the synchrotron SATURNE, the heavy ion accelerator GANIL, the SARA facility at Grenoble, and the antiproton beams at CERN. An important technical activity has been devoted to the construction of the supraconducting booster of the 9 MV tandem [fr

  13. Department of Thermonuclear Research. Annual report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.

    1989-01-01

    Department of Thermonuclear Research annual report 1988 presents a short review of theoretical, experimental and technological studies performed within a framework of two research programs: diagnostics of high-temperature plasma and nuclear technology. We describe theoretical investigations on the modelling of Tokamak edge plasmas, ion motions, atomic collisions, high-voltage electrode systems and plasma-focus (PF) facilities. The experimental studies on plasma-ion streams, high-current discharges of the PF-type, and on the interaction of ion beams with gaseous targets, are shortly summarized. Also presented are technological studies on electronic and high-voltage systems, as well as applications of the IONOTRON type plasma devices. (author)

  14. Summary of activities of the Research Department 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This annual report of teh Research Department concerns the year 1985. It describes the work carried out in the following fields: Physics, Reactor Chemistry, Radiobiology, Prospective and Special Studies, Biomathematics and Radiochemistry. During the year the first experiments employing heavy ion beams of the new electrostatic accelerator Tandar were made. A list of publications of the Department is enclosed here. (M.E.L.) [es

  15. Agricultural research department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The annual report gives a general review of the research work of the department. The acitivities of the year are described in 4 short project reports each followed by a list of publications, posters and lectures. Further, the report gives two review articles on selected subjects related to the work: ''Pea mutants'' and ''Linkage maps''. Included in the report are also a list of the staff members, guest scientists and students, lectures given at the department, and a list of travel- and other activities. (author)

  16. Fast and Precise Beam Energy Measurement using Compton Backscattering at e+e- Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminskiy, V V; Muchnoi, N Yu; Zhilich, V N

    2017-01-01

    The report describes a method for a fast and precise beam energy measurement in the beam energy range 0.5-2 GeV and its application at various e+e- colliders. Low-energy laser photons interact head-on with the electron or positron beam and produce Compton backscattered photons whose energy is precisely measured by HPGe detector. The method allows measuring the beam energy with relative accuracy of ∼2-5.10-5. The method was successfully applied at VEPP-4M, VEPP-3, VEPP-2000 (BINP, Russia) and BEPC-II (IHEP, China).

  17. Electron beam diagnostics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garganne, P.

    1989-08-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a study on beam diagnostics, using carbon wire scanners and optical transition radiation (DTR) monitors. The main consideration consists in the material selection, taking their thermal properties and their effect on the beam into account [fr

  18. Atomic Ferris wheel beams

    OpenAIRE

    Lembessis, Vasileios E.

    2017-01-01

    We study the generation of atom vortex beams in the case where an atomic wave-packet, moving in free space, is diffracted from a properly tailored light mask with a spiral transverse profile. We show how such a diffraction scheme could lead to the production of an atomic Ferris wheel beam.

  19. Atomic Ferris wheel beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembessis, Vasileios E.

    2017-07-01

    We study the generation of atom vortex beams in the case where a Bose-Einstein condensate, released from a trap and moving in free space, is diffracted from a properly tailored light mask with a spiral transverse profile. We show how such a diffraction scheme could lead to the production of an atomic Ferris wheel beam.

  20. Ionization beam scanner

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    Inner structure of an ionization beam scanner, a rather intricate piece of apparatus which permits one to measure the density distribution of the proton beam passing through it. On the outside of the tank wall there is the coil for the longitudinal magnetic field, on the inside, one can see the arrangement of electrodes creating a highly homogeneous transverse electric field.