WorldWideScience

Sample records for beam-gas spectroscopy

  1. Atomic lifetime measurements by beam-gas-dye laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoranzer, H.; Volz, U.

    1993-01-01

    Beam-gas-dye laser spectroscopy as a precise, cascade-free and collision-free method for measuring atomic lifetimes and individual oscillator strengths is described. Its recent application to fine-structure levels of the KrI 5p configuration is reported. The experimental uncertainty is reduced by one order of magnitude, with respect to previous work, down to 0.3% (1σ). The discussion of these results in comparison with experimental and theoretical ones from the literature underlines the precision of the method and its potential to guide future theoretical developments.

  2. LOW ENERGY BEAM-GAS SPECTROSCOPY OF HIGHLY IONISED ATOMS

    OpenAIRE

    Desesquelles, J.; Denis, A.; Druetta, M.; Martin, S.

    1989-01-01

    Features of low energy beam-gas spectroscopic source are reviewed and compared to those of other light sources. Measurement techniques are surveyed. They include the study of wavelength of heavy multiply charged ions in visible and u.v. ranges from normal excited states, doubly excited states, high n levels and doubly excited Rydberg levels.

  3. Precision luminosity measurement at LHCb with beam-gas imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Barschel, Colin

    The luminosity is the physical quantity which relates the cross-section to the production rate in collider experiments. The cross-section being the particle physics observable of interest, a precise determination of the luminosity is required. This work presents the absolute luminosity calibration results performed at the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment at CERN using a novel method based on beam-gas interactions with data acquired at a center of mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV and $\\sqrt{s}=2.76$ TeV. Reconstructed beam-gas interaction vertices in LHCb are used to measure the beam profiles, thus making it possible to determine the beams overlap integral. An important element of this work was to install and use a neon gas injection system to increase the beam-gas interaction rate. The precision reached with the beam-gas imaging method relies on the two-dimensional beam shape determination developed in this work. For such precision, the interaction vertex resolution is an important ingredient. There...

  4. Employing Beam-Gas Interaction Vertices for Transverse Profile Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rihl, Mariana; Baglin, Vincent; Barschel, Colin; Bay, Aurelio; Blanc, Frederic; Bravin, Enrico; Bregliozzi, Giuseppe; Chritin, Nicolas; Dehning, Bernd; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Gaspar, Clara; Gianì, Sebastiana; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Greim, Roman; Haefeli, Guido; Hopchev, Plamen; Jacobsson, Richard; Jensen, Lars; Jones, Owain Rhodri; Jurado, Nicolas; Kain, Verena; Karpinski, Waclaw; Kirn, Thomas; Kuhn, Maria; Luthi, Berengere; Magagnin, Paolo; Matev, Rosen; Nakada, Tatsuya; Neufeld, Niko; Panman, Jaap; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Salvant, Benoit; Schael, Stefan; Schneider, Olivier; Schwering, Georg; Tobin, Mark; Veness, Raymond; Veyrat, Quentin; Vlachos, Sotiris; Wlochal, Michael; Xu, Zhirui; von Dratzig, Arndt

    2016-01-01

    Interactions of high-energy beam particles with residual gas offer a unique opportunity to measure the beam profile in a non-intrusive fashion. Such a method was successfully pioneered* at the LHCb experiment using a silicon microstrip vertex detector. During the recent Large Hadron Collider shutdown at CERN, a demonstrator Beam-Gas Vertexing system based on eight scintillating-fibre modules was designed**, constructed and installed on Ring 2 to be operated as a pure beam diagnostics device. The detector signals are read out and collected with LHCb-type front-end electronics and a DAQ system consisting of a CPU farm. Tracks and vertices will be reconstructed to obtain a beam profile in real time. Here, first commissioning results are reported. The advantages and potential for future applications of this technique are discussed.

  5. LHCb: A novel method for an absolute luminosity measurement at LHCb using beam-gas imaging

    CERN Multimedia

    Barschel, C

    2013-01-01

    A novel technique to measure the absolute luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using beam-gas interactions has been successfully used in the LHCb experiment. A gas injection device (SMOG) has been installed in the LHCb experiment to increase the pressure around the interaction point during dedicated fills. The Beam Gas Imaging method (BGI) has now the potential to surpass the accuracy of the commonly used van der Meer scan method (VDM). This poster presents the principles of the Beam Gas Imaging method used to measure the beam overlap integral. Furthermore the gas injection increased the accuracy measurement of the so-called ghost charges and also intensities per bunch.

  6. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  7. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  8. Studies for Online Selection of Beam-Gas Events with the LHCb Vertex Locator

    CERN Document Server

    Hopchev, Plamen; Ferro-Luzzi, M

    2008-01-01

    The start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is scheduled for the Summer 2008. The accelerator is going to provide unprecedented amount of proton-proton colli- sions with a record center-of-mass energy. The total number of collisions produced in an interaction point is directly connected to a collider characteristic called `absolute luminosity'. The luminosity depends on a number of quantities like the number of particles in a bunch, the bunch size and the number of bunches in a beam. For precise measurements of Standard Model parameters and for the search of New Physics the LHC experiments count on precise knowledge on its luminosity. The absolute luminosity of LHC is going to be measured using various meth- ods, including the recently proposed beam-gas luminosity method. This method counts on the reconstruction of beam-gas vertices for measuring the beam shapes and overlap integral. The beam-gas luminosity method is going to be first tried in the LHCb experiment, making use of its excellent vertex resolutio...

  9. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  10. LHCb: Beam-gas background for LHCb at 3.5 TeV

    CERN Multimedia

    Brett, D R; Corti, G; Alessio, F; Jacobsson, R; Talanov, V; Lieng, M H

    2011-01-01

    We consider the machine induced backgrounds for LHCb arising from collisions of the beam with residual gas in the long straight sections of the LHC close to the experiment. We concentrate on the background particle fluxes initiated by inelastic beam-gas interactions with a direct line of sight to the experiment, with the potential impact on the experiment increasing for larger beam currents and changing gas pressures. In this paper we calculate the background rates for parameters foreseen with LHC running in 2011, using realistic residual pressure profiles. We also discuss the effect of using a pressure profile formulated in terms of equivalent hydrogen, through weighting of other residual gases by their cross section, upon the radial fluxes from the machine and the detector response. We present the expected rates and the error introduced through this approximation.

  11. Quarkonium spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experimental investigations of heavy quark-antiquark bound state systems are reviewed. Results from SPEAR on charmonium spectroscopy and from DORIS and CESR on bottomonium spectroscopy are presented. The current status of the search for top is also discussed

  12. Terahertz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation I will review methods for spectroscopy in the THz range, with special emphasis on the practical implementation of the technique known ad THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). THz-TDS has revived the old field of far-infrared spectroscopy, and enabled a wealth of new...... activities that promise commercial potential for spectroscopic applications in the THz range. This will be illustrated with examples of spectroscopy of liquids inside their bottles as well as sensitive, quantitative spectroscopy in waveguides....

  13. Chemical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of chemical spectroscopy with neutrons is to utilize the dependence of neutron scattering cross-sections on isotope and on momentum transfer (which probes the spatial extent of the excitation) to understand fundamental and applied aspects of the dynamics of molecules and fluids. Chemical spectroscopy is divided into three energy ranges: vibrational spectroscopy, 25-500 MeV, for which much of the work is done on Be-filter analyzer instruments; low energy spectroscopy, less than 25 MeV; and high resolution spectroscopy, less than 1 MeV, which typically is performed on backscattering spectrometers. Representative examples of measurements of the Q-depenence of vibrational spectra, higher energy resolution as well as extension of the Q-range to lower values at high energy transfers, and provisions of higher sensitivities in vibrational spectroscopy are discussed. High resolution, high sensitivity, and polarization analysis studies in low energy spectroscopy are discussed. Applications of very high resolution spectroscopy are also discussed

  14. MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR has had a major impact on medicine over the past few years due to rapid advances in the application of the MR phenomena. The result has been a valuable new imaging modality. In the near future, MR spectroscopy will likely have an even greater impact on the practice of medicine. This is due to the ability of MR spectroscopy to provide a nondestructive and noninvasive means of monitoring body chemistry in humans. For example, P-31 MR spectroscopy can be used to monitor pH and metabolites involved in both bioenergetics and lipid metabolism. The results from pioneering studies in animals and humans provide evidence that P-31 MR spectroscopy will both contribute to the understanding of disease processes and provide a monitor of therapeutic response. Thus, MR spectroscopy promises to provide a new window of information to clinicians for use in the management of human diseases. In this refresher course, an introduction to MR spectroscopy methodology and the information contained in the MR spectrum is presented. In addition, an overview of areas in which MR spectroscopy may have a major impact on medicine is presented

  15. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., ultrafast lasers (atto- and femto-second lasers) and parametric oscillators, coherent matter waves, Doppler-free Fourier spectroscopy with optical frequency combs, interference spectroscopy, quantum optics, the interferometric detection of gravitational waves and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  16. Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is addressed to persons interested in learning about what has been done and what can be done with Moessbauer spectroscopy. In an introductory chapter the basic principle is explained and the general parameters governing Moessbauer spectroscopy are tabulated. For the following chapters various disciplines are chosen and the wide applicability of this measuring technique is demonstrated. The second chapter discusses a few representative examples of chemical interesting information being reflected by isomer shifts and quadrupole splittings, particularly with respect to bonding and structural properties. The third chapter deals with some applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy for characterizing magnetic compounds and its use for magnetic structure investigations, particularly by making use of polarized radiation. The fourth chapter describes the use of the Moessbauer spectroscopy for studying iron in biological molecules. As an example of recent applications to mineralogy and geology the results of the studies of lunar samples are reviewed in the fifth chapter. Finally, in the last chapter, work is described on the use of Moessbauer spectroscopy in physical metallurgy, particularly quantitative analyses which have enabled metallurgists to solve many old problems. (orig./FW)

  17. Optical Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrhaug, Erling

    The work presented in this thesis is broadly concerned with how complexation reactions and molecular motion can be characterized with the standard techniques in optical spectroscopy. The thesis aims to show a relatively broad range of methods for probing physico-chemical properties in fluorophore...... information about chemical equilibria, kinetics and molecular motion by monitoring changes in optical properties of the system. The five presented research projects are largely unrelated to each other both in aim and in what property is probed, however they are all connected in that they are fluorophore...... containing systems and are characterized using techniques in optical spectroscopy. Of the standard techniques in optical spectroscopy, particular attention has been paid to those based on time-resolved measurements and polarization, which is reflected in the experiment design in the projects. Not all of the...

  18. Nuclear spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ajzenberg-Selove, Fay

    1960-01-01

    Nuclear Spectroscopy, Part A deals with the experimental and theoretical techniques involved in nuclear spectroscopy.This book discusses the interactions of charged particles with matter, gaseous ionization detectors, and particular mass attenuation coefficients. The magnetic gamma-ray spectrometers for photo or internal-conversion electrons, general characteristics of cross-section variation with energy, and measurement of fast neutron spectra are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the elastic scattering of photons by nuclei and measurement of widths of gamma-radiating levels.This pub

  19. Optogalvanic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser induced optogalvanic spectroscopy in a hollow cathode-produced plasma has been used to resolve the isotopic structure of some absorption lines in uranium. We have shown that the optogalvanic signal associated with any isotope can be related to the concentration of that isotope in a multi-isotopic sample. From the results we have obtained, optogalvanic spectroscopy of sputtered samples appears to be an interesting approach to the isotopic analysis of both natural and enriched uranium and could easily be applied to the analysis of other fissile elements, such as the plutonium isotopes

  20. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zelinger, Zdeněk; Střižík, Michal

    Weinheim : Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, 2008 - (Lackner, M.), s. 227-254 ISBN 978-3-527-31997-8 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : lasers * chemistry * photoacoustic spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  1. Grain Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamandola, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    Our fundamental knowledge of interstellar grain composition has grown substantially during the past two decades thanks to significant advances in two areas: astronomical infrared spectroscopy and laboratory astrophysics. The opening of the mid-infrared, the spectral range from 4000-400 cm(sup -1) (2.5-25 microns), to spectroscopic study has been critical to this progress because spectroscopy in this region reveals more about a materials molecular composition and structure than any other physical property. Infrared spectra which are diagnostic of interstellar grain composition fall into two categories: absorption spectra of the dense and diffuse interstellar media, and emission spectra from UV-Vis rich dusty regions. The former will be presented in some detail, with the latter only very briefly mentioned. This paper summarized what we have learned from these spectra and presents 'doorway' references into the literature. Detailed reviews of many aspects of interstellar dust are given.

  2. Particle spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last years, particle spectroscopy has evolved into the spectroscopy of leptons and quarks. This era was initiated in 1974 by the discovery of J/psi mesons, quickly followed by new lepton Tau and finally Ypsilon mesons. In this report, talk is concentrated on one specific old hadrons, namely exotics. The main part is then devoted to the new quarks charm and beauty. As for the exotics, baryonium in its broad and narrow states, dibaryons, and exotic quantum numbers are described. There is no firm evidence for exotic quantum numbers so far. Consequently, both experiments and theory have to be improved. Next, new quark spectroscopy is described on quark charge, charm (charmonium, charm particles, F mesons), and beauty. Description of the beauty is further divided into Ypsilon parameters, event topology, quark jets, change of topology at the Ypsilon, other properties of events in the Ypsilon region, Ypsilon summary, and Ypsilon prime. As seen above, in addition to the charm quark, there is now ample evidence for the existence of a new heavy quark which is most probably of the 'beauty' type. To answer the question whether a 6th quark t would constitute perfect symmetry between leptons and quarks, again the answer can now only be: PETRA works and CESR and PEP will follow soon. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  3. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., frequency doubling in external cavities, reliable cw-parametric oscillators, tunable narrow-band UV sources, more sensitive detection techniques, tunable femtosecond and sub-femtosecond lasers (X-ray region and the attosecond range), control of atomic and molecular excitations, frequency combs able to synchronize independent femtosecond lasers, coherent matter waves, and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  4. NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book reviews the applications of NMR-spectroscopy in medicine and biology. The first chapter of about 40 pages summarizes the history of development and explains the chemical and physical fundamentals of this new and non-invasive method in an easily comprehensible manner. The other chapters summarize diagnostic results obtained with this method in organs and tissues, so that the reader will find a systematic overview of the available findings obtained in the various organ systems. It must be noted, however, that ongoing research work and new insight quite naturally will necessitate corrections to be done, as is the case here with some biochemical interpretations which would need adjustment to latest research results. NMR-spectroscopy is able to measure very fine energy differences on the molecular level, and thus offers insight into metabolic processes, with the advantage that there is no need of applying ionizing radiation in order to qualitatively or quantitatively analyse the metabolic processes in the various organ systems. (orig./DG) With 40 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emission and absorption of photons taking place without changes in the frequency spectrum of the crystal lattice are known as the Moessbauer effect. It takes place in the low energy levels of heavy nuclei in solid lattices at low temperatures. On the basis of the hyperfine structure of Moessbauer spectra the notions are explained of isomer shift, quadrupole splitting and magnetic splitting. The principle and function are explained of Moessbauer spectrometers and the methods of graphical processing of spectra, also the use of the least square fit. Moessbauer spectroscopy is nondestructive, highly sensitive and selective and makes structural resolution possible. It is used for quantitative and qualitative analysis of compounds. Examples are given of the use of this method for mineralogical and crystallo-chemical analysis of lunar minerals and rocks, for analysis of corrosion products of iron and for phase analysis of alloys. (M.D.)

  6. Planetary spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main goal of the research is charge coupled device (CCD) spectroscopic and imaging studies of the solar system in support of spacecraft investigations. Studies include the physical behavior of comets, the atmosphere of the gaseous planets, and the solid surfaces of satellites and asteroids. The major observing program consisted of approximately 50 nights of photometry of Comet Halley in order to resolve the controversy over this comet's rotation period. This data is presently being analyzed. Additional observing projects included the spectroscopic occultation of Charon by Pluto, reflection spectroscopy of Mercury, and a spectrum of the satellite Oberon. Mercury data does not corroborate the Fe(++) absorption feature reported by McCord and Clark at 8800 A but instead potentially shows a weaker feature at longer wavelengths. This position is in much closer accord with expectations for Mercury since a band center near 8800 A implies too little Fe(++) on Mercury, especially if band shifts with temperature are considered. The Pluto project proved that the deep methane absorptions visible in their combined specta are due soley to Pluto with Charon showing a flat and featureless spectrum. It appears that if Charon ever contained a substantial methane component, the satellite's low surface gravity could not hold it and the methane evaporated and escaped

  7. MHD Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R F; Fasoli, A; Testa, D; Sharapov, S; Berk, H L; Breizman, B; Gondhalekar, A; Mantsinen, M

    2004-03-23

    Experiments are conducted on the JET tokamak to assess the diagnostic potential of MHD active and passive spectroscopy, for the plasma bulk and its suprathermal components, using Alfv{acute e}n Eigenmodes (AEs) excited by external antennas and by energetic particles. The measurements of AE frequencies and mode numbers give information on the bulk plasma. Improved equilibrium reconstruction, in particular in terms of radial profiles of density and safety factor, is possible from the comparison between the antenna driven spectrum and that calculated theoretically. Details of the time evolution of the non-monotonic safety factor profile in advanced scenarios can be reconstructed from the frequency of ICRH-driven energetic particle modes. The plasma effective mass can be inferred from the resonant frequency of externally driven AEs in discharges with similar equilibrium profiles. The stability thresholds and the nonlinear development of the instabilities can give clues on energy and spatial distribution of the fast particle population. The presence of unstable AEs provides lower limits in the energy of ICRH generated fast ion tails. Fast ion pressure gradients and their evolution can be inferred from the stability of AEs at different plasma radial positions. Finally, the details of the AE spectrum in the nonlinear stage can be used to obtain information about the fast particle velocity space diffusion.

  8. SIMP Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hochberg, Yonit; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    We study the interactions between strongly interacting massive particle dark matter and the Standard Model via a massive vector boson that is kinetically mixed with the hypercharge gauge boson. The relic abundance is set by 3-to-2 self-interactions of the dark matter, while the interactions with the vector mediator enable kinetic equilibrium between the dark and visible sectors. We show that a wide range of parameters is phenomenologically viable and can be probed in various ways. Astrophysical and cosmological constraints are evaded due to the p-wave nature of dark matter annihilation into visible particles, while direct detection methods using electron recoils can be sensitive to parts of the parameter space. In addition, we propose performing spectroscopy of the strongly coupled dark sector at e+e- colliders, where the energy of a mono-photon can track the resonance structure of the dark sector. Alternatively, some resonances may decay back into Standard Model leptons or jets, realizing `hidden valley' phe...

  9. Hertzian spectroscopy application to excited states in accelerated ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that accelerated ion beams enables the application of optical hertzian spectrometry methods to be extended to research on the excited states of free ionic systems. The photon beat method has proved especially simple to apply in beam foil geometry because of the unidirectional beam velocity while the beam gas device is suitable for experiments of the energy level crossing type. Only the resonance technique involving direct application of high-frequency magnetic fields poses serious problems because of the high HF powers necessary. So far structure intervals have been measured in ions carrying up to three charges (seven in the special case of Lamb shift measurements) with a precision of a few percent. The interest of these structure studies in free ions is emphasized particularly. The study of hydrogen-like or helium-like ions of high Z allows the fundamental calculations of quantum electrodynamics to be checked with regard to the Lamb shift or the spontaneous emission theory. In more complex electronic systems, optical spectroscopy of accelerated ion beams gives wavelengths with a resolution reaching 10-5, lifetimes with an accuracy better than 10% when the cascade effects are properly studied, and Lande factors with a precision of several % under present technical conditions. The photon beat method concerns hyperfine nuclear effects in light atoms of Z<=20. Another line of research study the hyperfine structure of a given configuration in an isoelectronic sequence

  10. Chiroptical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurst, Jerome E.

    1995-09-01

    A brief review of the literature, and Chemical and Engineering News in particular, reveals that the determination and use of optical activity is of increasing importance in today's commercial and research laboratories. The classical technique is to measure [alpha]D using a manual or recording polarimeter to provide a single value, the specific rotation at 589 nm. A spectropolarimeter can be used to determine optical activity through the UV-Visible spectrum (Optical Rotatory Dispersion [ORD]). At wavelengths far removed from electronic absorption bands, optical activity arises from circular birefringence, or the difference in the refractive index for left- and right-circularly polarized light; i.e., nL - nR does not equal zero for chiral materials. If the optical activity is measured through an absorption band, complex behavior is observed (a Cotton Effect curve). At an absorption band, chiral materials exhibit circular dichroism (CD), or a difference in the absorption of left- and right-circularly polarized light; epsilon L minus epsilon R does not equal zero. If the spectropolarimeter is set for the measurement of CD spectra, one observes what appears to be a UV-Vis spectrum except that some absorption bands are positive while others may be negative. Just as enantiomers have specific rotations that are equal and opposite at 589 nm (sodium D line), rotations are equal and opposite at all wavelengths, and CD measurements are equal and opposite at all wavelengths. Figure 1 shows the ORD curves for the enantiomeric carvones while Figure 2 contains the CD curves. The enantiomer of carvone that has the positive [alpha]D is obtained from caraway seeds and is known to have the S-configuration while the R-enantiomer is found in spearmint oil. Figure 1. ORD of S-(+)- and R-(-)-carvones Figure 2. CD of S-(+)- and R-(-)-carvones While little can be done to correlate stereochemistry with [alpha]D values, chiroptical spectroscopy (ORD and/or CD) often can be used to assign

  11. Basics of Optical Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hof, Martin; Macháň, Radek

    Vol. 1. 2. Weinheim : Wiley-VCH, 2014 - (Gauglitz, G.; Moore, D.), s. 31-38 ISBN 978-3-527-32150-6 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : spectroscopy * optics * infrared spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  12. Basic molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorry, PA

    1985-01-01

    BASIC Molecular Spectroscopy discusses the utilization of the Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) programming language in molecular spectroscopy. The book is comprised of five chapters that provide an introduction to molecular spectroscopy through programs written in BASIC. The coverage of the text includes rotational spectra, vibrational spectra, and Raman and electronic spectra. The book will be of great use to students who are currently taking a course in molecular spectroscopy.

  13. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  14. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented. (GHT)

  15. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented

  16. Coherent Raman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Eesley, G L

    1981-01-01

    Coherent Raman Spectroscopy provides a unified and general account of the fundamental aspects of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy, also known as coherent Raman spectroscopy. The theoretical basis from which coherent Raman spectroscopy developed is described, along with its applications, utility, and implementation as well as advantages and disadvantages. Experimental data which typifies each technique is presented. This book is comprised of four chapters and opens with an overview of nonlinear optics and coherent Raman spectroscopy, followed by a discussion on nonlinear transfer function of matter

  17. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  18. Spectroscopy for Dummies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvold, Lars René

    This presentation will give short introduction to the most pertinent topics of optical spectroscopy. The following topics will be discussed: • The origin of spectra in UV, VIS and IR spectral range • Spectroscopic methods like absorption, luminescence and Raman • Wavelength dispersive optical...... components • Materials for use optical spectroscopy • Spectrometer geometries • Detectors for use in spectrometer • Practical examples of optical spectroscopy The objective of this presentation is to give the audience a good feel for the range of possibilities that optical spectroscopy can provide....

  19. Coherent detection spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bueren, H.G. van

    1969-01-01

    Various methods of optical spectroscopy are compared, with special emphasis on resolution and acceptance of the systems. It is shown that coherent detection with a laser as a local oscillator has important advantages for specific applications in astronomical spectroscopy and interferometry, especial

  20. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    van Zee, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ""Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy"" discusses the use of optical resonators and lasers to make sensitive spectroscopic measurements. This volume is written by the researcchers who pioneered these methods. The book reviews both the theory and practice behind these spectroscopic tools and discusses the scientific discoveries uncovered by these techniques. It begins with a chapter on the use of optical resonators for frequency stabilization of lasers, which is followed by in-depth chapters discussing cavity ring-down spectroscopy, frequency-modulated, cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, intracavity spectr

  1. Modulation gamma resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possibility to control dynamic processes in a matter through gamma-resonance modulation by high-frequency external variable fields in excess of inverse lifetimes of the Moessbauer nuclei excited states, that is, within the megahertz frequency range lies in the heart of the modulation gamma-resonance spectroscopy. Through the use of the gamma-resonance process theoretical analysis methods and of the equation solution method for the density matrix with the secondary quantization of gamma-radiation field one attacks the problems dealing with the effect of both variable fields and relaxation on gamma-resonance. One has studied the gamma-radiation ultrasound modulation stages. One points out a peculiar role of the gamma-magnetic resonance effect in modulation gamma resonance spectroscopy formation. One forecasts development of the modulation gamma-resonance spectroscopy into the nonlinear gamma-resonance spectroscopy

  2. Advances in DUV spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Mogensen, Claus Tilsted

    The would-be advantages of deep UV (DUV) spectroscopy are well known, but the potential applications have so far not been fully realized due to technological limitations and, perhaps, lack of bright ideas. However, new components and new knowledge about DUV spectra and spectroscopic methods...... combined with increasing needs for solutions to practical problems in environmental protection, medicine and pollution monitoring promise a new era in DUV spectroscopy. Here we shall review the basis for DUV spectroscopy, both DUV fluorescence and DUV Raman spectroscopy, and describe recent advances in...... technology and principles that could be applied to new and improved applications of this promising technique. As an example we describe a recent cooperation between Grundfos, DTU and Intarsia Optics to measure live bacterial cells in drinking water....

  3. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Hink

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques allow the quantification of fluorescent molecules present at the nanomolar concentration level. After a brief introduction to the technique, this chapter presents a protocol including background information in order to measure and quantify the molecul

  4. Charmonium spectroscopy, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state of charmonium spectroscopy is reviewed. All analyses proceed from a spin-dependent, non-relativistic Schroedinger equation. Many of the possible branching ratios for charm like states are investigated. 17 refs

  5. Resonance ionization spectroscopy 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy and its Applications, held at the University College of Swansea, Wales, 1986. The Symposium is divided into eight main sections entitled: photophysics and spectroscopy, noble gas atom counting, resonance ionization mass spectrometry, materials and surface analysis, small molecules, medical and environmental applications, resonance ionization and materials separation, and elementary particles and nuclear physics. Thirty papers were chosen for INIS and indexed separately. (U.K.)

  6. Ultrafast infrared vibrational spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Fayer, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    The past ten years or so have seen the introduction of multidimensional methods into infrared and optical spectroscopy. The technology of multidimensional spectroscopy is developing rapidly and its applications are spreading to biology and materials science. Edited by a recognized leader in the field and with contributions from top researchers, including experimentalists and theoreticians, this book presents the latest research methods and results and will serve as an excellent resource for other researchers.

  7. Terahertz Spectroscopy and Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Zeitler, Axel; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    "This book presents the current state of knowledge in the field of terahertz spectroscopy, providing a comprehensive source of information for beginners and experienced researchers alike whose interests lie in this area. The book aims to explain the fundamental physics that underpins terahertz  technology and to describe its key applications. Highlights of scientific research in the field of terahertz science are also outlined in some chapters, providing an overview as well as giving an insight into future directions for research.  Over the past decade terahertz spectroscopy has developed into one of the most rapidly growing areas of its kind, gaining an important impact across a wide range of scientific disciplines. Due to substantial advances in femtosecond laser technology, terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) has established itself as the dominant spectroscopic technique for experimental scientists interested in measurements at this frequency range. In solids and liquids THz radiation is in reso...

  8. Chiral Rotational Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, Robert P; Barnett, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    We introduce chiral rotational spectroscopy: a new technique that enables the determination of the individual optical activity polarisability components $G_{XX}'$, $G_{YY}'$, $G_{ZZ}'$, $A_{X,YZ}$, $A_{Y,ZX}$ and $A_{Z,XY}$ of chiral molecules, in a manner that reveals the enantiomeric constitution of a sample whilst yielding an incisive signal even for a racemate. Chiral rotational spectroscopy could find particular use in the analysis of molecules that are chiral by virtue of their isotopic constitution and molecules with multiple chiral centres. The principles that underpin chiral rotational spectroscopy can also be exploited in the search for molecular chirality in space, which, if found, may add weight to hypotheses that biological homochirality and indeed life itself are of cosmic origin.

  9. Instrumentation for Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The indigenous efforts in instrumentation for Moessbauer spectroscopy are reviewed. After a brief recapitulation of early developments in this field, the current status is described. Instrumentation for Moessbauer spectroscopy involves various aspects such as, velocity transducer, preparation of the radioactive source in proper host matrix, gamma-ray detectors, electron detectors in the case of conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy, data acquisition system, temperature variation facility such as cryostats and furnaces, externally applied magnetic field, etc. While the review attempts to cover most of these aspects, the constituents of a basic modern Moessbauer spectrometer, viz. a constant accelerator Moessbauer drive, a top loading type liquid helium cryostat and an inexpensive microprocessor based data acquisition system are discussed in detail. Developments in personal computer based systems are also indicated. (author). 10 figs., 61 refs

  10. Spectroscopy for the Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Robert J.; Hopkins, Scott; Power, William P.; Leung, Tong; Hepburn, John

    2015-06-01

    Undergraduate students in all areas of science encounter one or more types of spectroscopy as an essential tool in their discipline, but most never take the advanced physics or chemistry courses in which the subject is normally taught. To address this problem, for over 20 years our department has been teaching a popular Introductory Spectroscopy course that assumes as background only a one-term introductory chemistry course containing a unit on atomic theory, and a familiarity with rudimentary calculus. This survey course provides an introduction to microwave, infrared, Raman, electronic, photoelectron and NMR spectroscopy in a manner that allows students to understand many of these phenomena as intuitive generalizations of the problem of a particle in a 1-D box or a particle-on-a-ring, and does not require any high level mathematics.

  11. Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method of background correction in atomic absorption spectroscopy has recently been introduced, based on the Zeeman splitting of spectral lines in a magnetic field. A theoretical analysis of the background correction capability observed in such instruments is presented. A Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer utilizing a 50 Hz sine wave modulated magnetic field is described. (Auth.)

  12. FTIR Rotational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Ron; Henderson, Giles

    1987-01-01

    Presented are representative examples of the spectra and the analyses for a linear molecule (HC1), a symmetric top molecule (NH3), and an asymmetric top (H2O). Any combination of these projects could be incorporated in a physical chemistry or molecular spectroscopy laboratory. (RH)

  13. Spectroscopy of new particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldhaber, G.

    1977-08-01

    A review of the spectroscopy of the ''psions'' with hidden charm or charm quantum number ch = o is followed by a discussion of charmed mesons and baryons. The anomalous C-..mu.. events and the heavy lepton hypothesis are briefly considered. (SDF)

  14. Photoacoustic and photothermal spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoacoustic and photothermal spectroscopy methods can be effectively applied to the analysis of microparticles in condensed matter. A more violent photothermal conversion phenomenon of a particle, laser breakdown and accompanying plasma and acoustic emission, was applied to individual detection and analysis of ultrafine particles in ultrapure water. Laser-like nonlinear emission from the plasma was observed. (author)

  15. Advanced Spectroscopy Technique for Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Zeng, Haishan

    This chapter presents an overview of the applications of optical spectroscopy in biomedicine. We focus on the optical design aspects of advanced biomedical spectroscopy systems, Raman spectroscopy system in particular. Detailed components and system integration are provided. As examples, two real-time in vivo Raman spectroscopy systems, one for skin cancer detection and the other for endoscopic lung cancer detection, and an in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy system for skin assessment are presented. The applications of Raman spectroscopy in cancer diagnosis of the skin, lung, colon, oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, breast, and cervix are summarized.

  16. Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Brooks

    2014-06-01

    The past decade has seen several major technology advances in electronics operating at microwave frequencies making it possible to develop a new generation of spectrometers for molecular rotational spectroscopy. High-speed digital electronics, both arbitrary waveform generators and digitizers, continue on a Moore's Law-like development cycle that started around 1993 with device bandwidth doubling about every 36 months. These enabling technologies were the key to designing chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectrometers which offer significant sensitivity enhancements for broadband spectrum acquisition in molecular rotational spectroscopy. A special feature of the chirped-pulse spectrometer design is that it is easily implemented at low frequency (below 8 GHz) where Balle-Flygare type spectrometers with Fabry-Perot cavity designs become technologically challenging due to the mirror size requirements. The capabilities of CP-FTMW spectrometers for studies of molecular structure will be illustrated by the collaborative research effort we have been a part of to determine the structures of water clusters - a project which has identified clusters up to the pentadecamer. A second technology trend that impacts molecular rotational spectroscopy is the development of high power, solid state sources in the mm-wave/THz regions. Results from the field of mm-wave chirped-pulse Fourier transform spectroscopy will be described with an emphasis on new problems in chemical dynamics and analytical chemistry that these methods can tackle. The third (and potentially most important) technological trend is the reduction of microwave components to chip level using monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) - a technology driven by an enormous mass market in communications. Some recent advances in rotational spectrometer designs that incorporate low-cost components will be highlighted. The challenge to the high-resolution spectroscopy community - as posed by Frank De

  17. International symposium on NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication consists of 32 papers and presentations from the field of NMR spectroscopy applications submitted to the International Symposium on NMR Spectroscopy held at Smolenice between 29 Sep and 3 Oct, 1980. (B.S.)

  18. Antihydrogen Experiment Gravity Interferometry Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Gerber, S; Tietje, I C; Allkofer, Y R; Trezzi, D; Dassa, L; Rienacker, B; Khalidova, O; Ferrari, G; Krasnicky, D; Perini, D; Cerchiari, G; Belov, A; Boscolo, I; Sacerdoti, M G; Ferragut, R O; Nedelec, P; Testera, G; Hinterberger, A; Al-qaradawi, I; Malbrunot, C L S; Brusa, R S; Prelz, F; Manuzio, G; Riccardi, C; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Haider, S; Haug, F; Merkt, F; Turbabin, A; Castelli, F; Doser, M; Penasa, L; Gninenko, S; Cataneo, F; Zenoni, A; Cabaret, L; Comparat, D P; Zmeskal, J; Scampoli, P; Dudarev, A; Kellerbauer, A G; Lagomarsino, V E; Mariazzi, S; Fesel, J V; Nesteruk, K P; Eisel, W T; Carraro, C; Zavatarelli, S M

    The AEGIS experiment (Antihydrogen Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) has the aim of carrying out the first measurement of the gravitational interaction of antimatter to a precision of 1%, by applying techniques from atomic physics, laser spectroscopy and interferometry to a beam of antihydrogen atoms. A further goal of the experiment is to carry out spectroscopy of the antihydrogen atoms in flight.

  19. Femtosecond laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hannaford, Peter

    2005-01-01

    As concepts and methodologies have evolved over the past two decades, the realm of ultrafast science has become vast and exciting and has impacted many areas of chemistry, biology and physics, and other fields such as materials science, electrical engineering, and optical communication. The field has recently exploded with the announcement of a series of remarkable new developments and advances. This volume surveys this recent growth in eleven chapters written by leading international researchers in the field. It includes sections on femtosecond optical frequency combs, soft x-ray femtosecond laser sources, and attosecond laser sources. In addition, the contributors address real-time spectroscopy of molecular vibrations with sub-5-fs pulses and multidimensional femtosecond coherent spectroscopies for studying molecular and electron dynamics. Novel methods for measuring and characterizing ultrashort laser pulses and ultrashort pulses of light are also described. The topics covered are revolutionizing the field...

  20. Visible spectroscopy on ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report visible spectroscopy and impurity investigations on ASDEX are reviewed and several sets of visible spectra are presented. As a basis for identification of metallic impurity lines during plasma discharges spectra from a stainless steel - Cu arc have been recorded. In a next step a spectrum overview of ASDEX discharges is shown which reveals the dominating role of lines from light impurities like carbon and oxygen throughout the UV and visible range (2000 A ≤ λ ≤ 8000 A). Metallic impurity lines of neutrals or single ionized atoms are observed near localized surfaces. The dramatic effect of impurity reduction by boronization of the vessel walls is demonstrated in a few examples. In extension to some ivesti-gations already published, further diagnostic applications of visible spectroscopy are presented. Finally, the hardware and software system used on ASDEX are described in detail. (orig.)

  1. Spectroscopy of gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abele, Hartmut; Bittner, Thomas; Cronenberg, Gunther; Filter, Hanno; Jenke, Tobias; Lemmel, Hartmut; Thalhammer, Martin [Atominstitut TU Wien, Wien (Austria); Geltenbort, Peter [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France)

    2012-07-01

    This talk is about a test of the Newtons Inverse Square Law of Gravity at micron distances by quantum interference with ultra-cold neutrons deep into the theoretically interesting regime. The method is based on a new resonance spectroscopy technique related to Rabi spectroscopy, but it has been adapted to gravitationally bound quantum systems. By coupling such a quantum system to mechanical vibrations, we observe resonant transitions, devoid of electromagnetic interaction. As Newtonian gravity and hypothetical Fifth Forces evolve with different phase information, the experiment has the potential to test the equivalence principle and Newtons gravity law at the micron scale. This experiment can therefore test speculations on large extra dimensions of sub-millimetre size of space-time or the origin of the cosmological constant in the universe, where effects are predicted in the interesting range of this experiment and might give a signal in an improved setup.

  2. Precision Muonium Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Jungmann, Klaus P

    2016-01-01

    The muonium atom is the purely leptonic bound state of a positive muon and an electron. It has a lifetime of 2.2 $\\mu$s. The absence of any known internal structure provides for precision experiments to test fundamental physics theories and to determine accurate values of fundamental constants. In particular groun dstate hyperfine structure transitions can be measured by microwave spectroscopy to deliver the muon magnetic moment. The frequency of the 1s-2s transition in the hydrogen-like atom can be determined with laser spectroscopy to obtain the muon mass. With such measurements fundamental physical interactions, in particular Quantum Electrodynamics, can also be tested at highest precision. The results are important input parameters for experiments on the muon magnetic anomaly. The simplicity of the atom enables further precise experiments, such as a search for muonium-antimuonium conversion for testing charged lepton number conservation and searches for possible antigravity of muons and dark matter.

  3. Spectroscopy of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This talk is about a test of the Newtons Inverse Square Law of Gravity at micron distances by quantum interference with ultra-cold neutrons deep into the theoretically interesting regime. The method is based on a new resonance spectroscopy technique related to Rabi spectroscopy, but it has been adapted to gravitationally bound quantum systems. By coupling such a quantum system to mechanical vibrations, we observe resonant transitions, devoid of electromagnetic interaction. As Newtonian gravity and hypothetical Fifth Forces evolve with different phase information, the experiment has the potential to test the equivalence principle and Newtons gravity law at the micron scale. This experiment can therefore test speculations on large extra dimensions of sub-millimetre size of space-time or the origin of the cosmological constant in the universe, where effects are predicted in the interesting range of this experiment and might give a signal in an improved setup.

  4. High Resolution Laboratory Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brünken, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    In this short review we will highlight some of the recent advancements in the field of high-resolution laboratory spectroscopy that meet the needs dictated by the advent of highly sensitive and broadband telescopes like ALMA and SOFIA. Among these is the development of broadband techniques for the study of complex organic molecules, like fast scanning conventional absorption spectroscopy based on multiplier chains, chirped pulse instrumentation, or the use of synchrotron facilities. Of similar importance is the extension of the accessible frequency range to THz frequencies, where many light hydrides have their ground state rotational transitions. Another key experimental challenge is the production of sufficiently high number densities of refractory and transient species in the laboratory, where discharges have proven to be efficient sources that can also be coupled to molecular jets. For ionic molecular species sensitive action spectroscopic schemes have recently been developed to overcome some of the limita...

  5. Optical imaging and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brady, David J

    2009-01-01

    An essential reference for optical sensor system design This is the first text to present an integrated view of the optical and mathematical analysis tools necessary to understand computational optical system design. It presents the foundations of computational optical sensor design with a focus entirely on digital imaging and spectroscopy. It systematically covers: Coded aperture and tomographic imaging Sampling and transformations in optical systems, including wavelets and generalized sampling techniques essential to digital system analysis Geometric, wave, and statis

  6. Mineral Spectroscopy Server

    OpenAIRE

    Rossman, George R.

    2010-01-01

    This server provides information about mineralogy and is primarily dedicated to providing information about color in minerals and access to data on Mineral Absorption Spectra in the visible and infrared regions of the spectrum and Raman spectra of minerals. Most data on the server were obtained in the Caltech mineral spectroscopy labs. Other types of spectroscopic data on minerals are also available. Visible, near-infrared and infrared absorption spectra are available for a number of minerals...

  7. 2008 Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip J. Reid

    2009-09-21

    The conference focuses on using vibrational spectroscopy to probe structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and interfaces. The goal is to bring together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of systems.

  8. Quantitative phase spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Rinehart, Matthew; Zhu, Yizheng; Wax, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative phase spectroscopy is presented as a novel method of measuring the wavelength-dependent refractive index of microscopic volumes. Light from a broadband source is filtered to an ~5 nm bandwidth and rapidly tuned across the visible spectrum in 1 nm increments by an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). Quantitative phase images of semitransparent samples are recovered at each wavelength using off-axis interferometry and are processed to recover relative and absolute dispersion measu...

  9. Point-Contact Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Naidyuk, Yu G; Naidyuk, Yu. G.

    2003-01-01

    The history is described of how one of the most commonly used electric circuit components, an ordinary electric contact, has become a powerful tool for the physicists to study various mechanisms of electron scattering in metals. The physical principles of spectroscopy of quasi-particle excitations in metals by means of point contacts (PCs) whose dimensions range from only a few to tens of nanometers are presented in a popular form.

  10. Colloquium: Graphene spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Basov, D. N.; Fogler, M. M.; A. Lanzara; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Yuanbo

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic studies of electronic phenomena in graphene are reviewed. A variety of methods and techniques are surveyed, from quasiparticle spectroscopies (tunneling, photoemission) to methods probing density and current response (infrared optics, Raman) to scanning probe nanoscopy and ultrafast pump-probe experiments. Vast complimentary information derived from these investigations is shown to highlight unusual properties of Dirac quasiparticles and many-body interaction effects in the phys...

  11. Nonequilibrium spin noise spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Fuxiang; Pershin, Yuriy V.; Slipko, Valeriy A.; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.

    2013-01-01

    Spin Noise Spectroscopy (SNS) is an experimental approach to obtain correlators of mesoscopic spin fluctuations in time by purely optical means. We explore the information that this technique can provide when it is applied to a weakly non-equilibrium regime when an electric current is driven through a sample by an electric field. We find that the noise power spectrum of conducting electrons experiences a shift, which is proportional to the strength of the spin-orbit coupling for electrons mov...

  12. Layman friendly spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentic, Stipo; Sessions, Sharon

    Affordable consumer grade spectroscopes (e.g. SCiO, Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE) are becoming more available to the general public. We introduce the concepts of spectroscopy to the public and K12 students and motivate them to delve deeper into spectroscopy in a dramatic participatory presentation and play. We use diffraction gratings, lasers, and light sources of different spectral properties to provide a direct experience of spectroscopy techniques. Finally, we invite the audience to build their own spectroscope--utilizing the APS SpectraSnapp cell phone application--and study light sources surrounding them in everyday life. We recontextualize the stigma that science is hard (e.g. ``Math, Science Popular Until Students Realize They're Hard,'' The Wall Street Journal) by presenting the material in such a way that it demonstrates the scientific method, and aiming to make failure an impersonal scientific tool--rather than a measure of one's ability, which is often a reason for shying away from science. We will present lessons we have learned in doing our outreach to audiences of different ages. This work is funded by the APS Outreach Grant ``Captain, we have matter matters!'' We thank New Mexico Tech Physics Department and Physics Club for help and technical equipment.

  13. Biomolecular EPR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, Wilfred Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive, Up-to-Date Coverage of Spectroscopy Theory and its Applications to Biological SystemsAlthough a multitude of books have been published about spectroscopy, most of them only occasionally refer to biological systems and the specific problems of biomolecular EPR (bioEPR). Biomolecular EPR Spectroscopy provides a practical introduction to bioEPR and demonstrates how this remarkable tool allows researchers to delve into the structural, functional, and analytical analysis of paramagnetic molecules found in the biochemistry of all species on the planet. A Must-Have Reference in an Intrinsically Multidisciplinary FieldThis authoritative reference seamlessly covers all important bioEPR applications, including low-spin and high-spin metalloproteins, spin traps and spin lables, interaction between active sites, and redox systems. It is loaded with practical tricks as well as do's and don'ts that are based on the author's 30 years of experience in the field. The book also comes with an unprecedented set of...

  14. NEUROFEEDBACK USING FUNCTIONAL SPECTROSCOPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Oliver; Wighton, Paul; Tisdall, M Dylan; Hess, Aaron; Breiter, Hans; van der Kouwe, André

    2014-06-01

    Neurofeedback based on real-time measurement of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal has potential for treatment of neurological disorders and behavioral enhancement. Commonly employed methods are based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sequences that sacrifice speed and accuracy for whole-brain coverage, which is unnecessary in most applications. We present multi-voxel functional spectroscopy (MVFS): a system for computing the BOLD signal from multiple volumes of interest (VOI) in real-time that improves speed and accuracy of neurofeedback. MVFS consists of a functional spectroscopy (FS) pulse sequence, a BOLD reconstruction component, a neural activation estimator, and a stimulus system. The FS pulse sequence is a single-voxel, magnetic resonance spectroscopy sequence without water suppression that has been extended to allow acquisition of a different VOI at each repetition and real-time subject head motion compensation. The BOLD reconstruction component determines the T2* decay rate, which is directly related to BOLD signal strength. The neural activation estimator discounts nuisance signals and scales the activation relative to the amount of ROI noise. Finally, the neurofeedback system presents neural activation-dependent stimuli to experimental subjects with an overall delay of less than 1s. Here we present the MVFS system, validation of certain components, examples of its usage in a practical application, and a direct comparison of FS and echo-planar imaging BOLD measurements. We conclude that in the context of realtime BOLD imaging, MVFS can provide superior accuracy and temporal resolution compared with standard fMRI methods. PMID:24999293

  15. Active Beam Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hellermann, M. G.; Delabie, E.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Biel, W.; Marchuk, O.; Summers, H. P.; Whiteford, A.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N. C.; Zastrow, K. D.

    2008-03-01

    Charge eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) plays a pivotal role in the diagnostics of hot fusion plasmas and is implemented currently in most of the operating devices. In the present report the main features of CXRS are summarized and supporting software packages encompassing "Spectral Analysis Code CXSFIT", "Charge Exchange Analysis Package CHEAP", and finally "Forward Prediction of Spectral Features" are described. Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) is proposed as indispensable cross-calibration tool for absolute local impurity density measurements and also for the continuous monitoring of the neutral beam power deposition profile. Finally, a full exploitation of the `Motional Stark Effect' pattern is proposed to deduce local pitch angles, total magnetic fields and possibly radial electric fields. For the proposed active beam spectroscopy diagnostic on ITER comprehensive performance studies have been carried out. Estimates of expected spectral signal-to-noise ratios are based on atomic modelling of neutral beam stopping and emissivities for CXRS, BES and background continuum radiation as well as extrapolations from present CXRS diagnostic systems on JET, Tore Supra, TEXTOR and ASDEX-UG. Supplementary to thermal features a further promising application of CXRS has been proposed recently for ITER, that is a study of slowing-down alpha particles in the energy range up to 2 MeV making use of the 100 keV/amu DNB (Diagnostic Neutral Beam) and the 500 keV/amu HNB (Heating Neutral Beam). Synthetic Fast Ion Slowing-Down spectra are evaluated in terms of source rates and slowing-down parameters

  16. Resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) from its inception to the present is summarized. The uses of RIS are principally analytical, and these uses are classified in several different ways for this report. The classifications are: (1) basic ways of counting atoms; (2) RIS applications according to the type of particle detector; (3) applications according to source preparation; (4) applications in chemical physics and chemistry; and (5) applications involving daughter atom detection. Each classification is discussed in some detail, and examples of specific applications are mentioned under each classification. Some other potential applications not necessarily related to these classifications are also mentioned

  17. Plasma polarization spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Iwamae, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    Plasma Polarization Spectroscopy (PPS) is now becoming a standard diagnostic technique for working with laboratory plasmas. This new area needs a comprehensive framework, both experimental and theoretical. This book reviews the historical development of PPS, develops a general theoretical formulation to deal with this phenomenon, along with an overview of relevant cross sections, and reports on laboratory experiments so far performed. It also includes various facets that are interesting from this standpoint, e.g. X-ray lasers and effects of microwave irradiation. It also offers a timely discussion of instrumentation that is quite important in a practical PPS experiment.

  18. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speckhard, Eric G; Ng, Kenny C Y; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-22

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce linelike spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming experiments will have the precision needed. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications. PMID:26849582

  19. Auger electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General features of electron excited Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) which is a nondestructive technique for the analysis of surfaces upto about 15 Adeg depth with a detection limit of about 0.1% of a monolayer. Methods of measuring the Auger electron energies and recent improvements in the instrumentation are reviewed. Typical energy resolution is found to be about 0.5% which is specially suited for the detection of light elements. It is widely used in metallurgy, surface chemistry and thin film studies. (K.B.)

  20. Nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1984 Nuclear Science Symposium. Measuring systems for nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy using single-photon counting techniques are presented. These involve systems based on relaxation-type spark gap light pulser and synchronously pumped mode-locked dye lasers. Furthermore, typical characteristics and optimization of operating conditions of the critical components responsible for the system time resolution are discussed. A short comparison of the most important deconvolution methods for numerical analysis of experimental data is given particularly with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescence signal. 22 refs., 8 figs

  1. Theory overview on spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theoretical overview of the exotic spectroscopy in the charm and beauty quark sector is presented. These states are unexpected harvest from the e+e- and hadron colliders and a permanent abode for the majority of them has yet to be found. We argue that some of these states, in particular the Yb(10890) and the recently discovered states Zb(10610) and Zb(10650), discovered by the Belle collaboration are excellent candidates for tetraquark states [bq][ anti b anti q], with q=u,d light quarks. Theoretical analyses of the Belle data carried out in the tetraquark context is reviewed. (orig.)

  2. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Speckhard, Eric G; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce line-like spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming and proposed experiments will make significant improvements. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  3. Fourier transforms in spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kauppinen, Jyrki

    2000-01-01

    This modern approach to the subject is clearly and logically structured, and gives readers an understanding of the essence of Fourier transforms and their applications. All important aspects are included with respect to their use with optical spectroscopic data. Based on popular lectures, the authors provide the mathematical fundamentals and numerical applications which are essential in practical use. The main part of the book is dedicated to applications of FT in signal processing and spectroscopy, with IR and NIR, NMR and mass spectrometry dealt with both from a theoretical and practical poi

  4. MR spectroscopy in dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With an increasingly aging population we are faced with the problem of an increasing number of dementia patients. In addition to clinical, neuropsychological and laboratory procedures, MRI plays an important role in the early diagnosis of dementia. In addition to various morphological changes functional changes can also help in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of dementia. Overall the diagnosis of dementia can be improved by using parameters from MR spectroscopy. This article focuses on MR spectroscopic changes in the physiological aging process as well as on changes in mild cognitive impairment a precursor of Alzheimer's dementia, in Alzheimer's dementia, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia and Lewy body dementia. (orig.)

  5. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsing, F

    2005-06-15

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  6. Wave mixing spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several new aspects of nonlinear or wave mixing spectroscopy were investigated utilizing the polarization properties of the nonlinear output field and the dependence of this field upon the occurrence of multiple resonances in the nonlinear susceptibility. First, it is shown theoretically that polarization-sensitive detection may be used to either eliminate or controllably reduce the nonresonant background in coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, allowing weaker Raman resonances to be studied. The features of multi-resonant four-wave mixing are examined in the case of an inhomogeneously broadened medium. It is found that the linewidth of the nonlinear output narrows considerably (approaching the homogeneous width) when the quantum mechanical expressions for the doubly- and triply-resonant susceptibilities are averaged over a Doppler or strain broadened profile. Experimental studies of nonlinear processes in Pr+3:LaF3 verify this linewidth narrowing, but indicate that this strain broadened system cannot be treated with a single broadening parameter as in the case of Doppler broadening in a gas. Several susceptibilities are measured from which are deduced dipole matrix elements and Raman polarizabilities related to the 3H4, 3H6, and 3P0 levels of the praseodymium ions

  7. Gamma spectroscopy in hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have started a project of high-resolution hypernuclear γ-spectroscopy using a recently-constructed germanium detector system (Hyperball). In the first experiment (KEK E419), we observed two γ transitions in Λ7Li, the spin-flip M1(3/2+ → 1/2+) at 691.7 ± 0.65stat ± 1.0sys keV and the E2(5/2+ → 1/2+) at 2050.4 ± 0.4stat ± 0.7sys keV. The former gives unambiguous information on the strength of the ΛN spin-spin interaction. B(E2) of the latter transition was measured to be 3.6 ± 0.5stat-0.4+0.5sys e2fm4. In the second experiment (BNL E930), we observed the E2(5/2+, 3/2+ → 1/2+) transitions of Λ9Be at around 3.05 MeV, which suggests a small ΛN spin-orbit interaction. Such studies for various p-shell Λ hypernuclei are being continued to determine all the ΛN spin-dependent interactions. Intense beams at JHF 50 GeV PS allow us γ-spectroscopy of heavier hypernuclei, neutron rich hypernuclei, and double Λ hypernuclei, etc. (author)

  8. Photothermal spectroscopy of aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ aerosol absorption spectroscopy was performed using two novel photothermal detection schemes. The first, based on a photorefractive effect and coherent detection, called phase fluctuation optical heterodyne (PFLOH) spectroscopy, could, depending on the geometry employed, yield particle specific or particle and gas absorption data. Single particles of graphite as small as 1 μm were detected in the particle specific mode. In another geometrical configuration, the total absorption (both gas and particle) of submicron sized aerosols of ammonium sulfate particles in equilibrium with gaseous ammonia and water vapor were measured at varying CO2 laser frequencies. The specific absorption coefficient for the sulfate ion was measured to be 0.5 m2/g at 1087 cm-1. The absorption coefficient sensitivity of this scheme was less than or equal to 10-8 cm-1. The second scheme is a hybrid visible Mie scattering scheme incorporating photothermal modulation. Particle specific data on ammonium sulfate droplets were obtained. For chemically identical species, the relative absorption spectrum versus laser frequency can be obtained for polydisperse aerosol distributions directly from the data without the need for complex inverse scattering calculations

  9. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  10. Raman spectroscopy in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent Raman scattering studies in different types of graphene samples are reviewed here. We first discuss the first-order and the double resonance Raman scattering mechanisms in graphene, which give rise to the most prominent Raman features. The determination of the number of layers in few-layer graphene is discussed, giving special emphasis to the possibility of using Raman spectroscopy to distinguish a monolayer from few-layer graphene stacked in the Bernal (AB) configuration. Different types of graphene samples produced both by exfoliation and using epitaxial methods are described and their Raman spectra are compared with those of 3D crystalline graphite and turbostratic graphite, in which the layers are stacked with rotational disorder. We show that Resonance Raman studies, where the energy of the excitation laser line can be tuned continuously, can be used to probe electrons and phonons near the Dirac point of graphene and, in particular allowing a determination to be made of the tight-binding parameters for bilayer graphene. The special process of electron-phonon interaction that renormalizes the phonon energy giving rise to the Kohn anomaly is discussed, and is illustrated by gated experiments where the position of the Fermi level can be changed experimentally. Finally, we discuss the ability of distinguishing armchair and zig-zag edges by Raman spectroscopy and studies in graphene nanoribbons in which the Raman signal is enhanced due to resonance with singularities in the density of electronic states.

  11. Vibrational spectroscopy at electrified interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Wieckowski, Andrzej; Braunschweig, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Reviews the latest theory, techniques, and applications Surface vibrational spectroscopy techniques probe the structure and composition of interfaces at the molecular level. Their versatility, coupled with their non-destructive nature, enables in-situ measurements of operating devices and the monitoring of interface-controlled processes under reactive conditions. Vibrational Spectroscopy at Electrified Interfaces explores new and emerging applications of Raman, infrared, and non-linear optical spectroscopy for the study of charged interfaces. The book draws from hu

  12. Photoelectron photoion molecular beam spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of supersonic molecular beams in photoionization mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy to assist in the understanding of photoexcitation in the vacuum ultraviolet is described. Rotational relaxation and condensation due to supersonic expansion were shown to offer new possibilities for molecular photoionization studies. Molecular beam photoionization mass spectroscopy has been extended above 21 eV photon energy by the use of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) facilities. Design considerations are discussed that have advanced the state-of-the-art in high resolution vuv photoelectron spectroscopy. To extend gas-phase studies to 160 eV photon energy, a windowless vuv-xuv beam line design is proposed

  13. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  14. Heavy meson spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article we give a review of certain aspects of the present understanding of spectroscopy of heavy mesons and constituent quark masses in the light of non-relativistic potential model approach motivated by quantum chromodynamics. We find that the one gluon exchange at short distance and colour-confining interaction at large distance which is pure scalar (or scalar-vector admixture with dominant scalar interaction) under the Lorentz transformation, can explain only partially the present data on 1P states of cc-bar and bb-bar states. The S-wave data, that are available at present, however can be understood with both scalar confinement or scalar-vector admixture with scalar-dominant interaction. (author). 44 refs, 13 tabs

  15. Theory overview on spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmed

    2011-08-15

    A theoretical overview of the exotic spectroscopy in the charm and beauty quark sector is presented. These states are unexpected harvest from the e{sup +}e{sup -} and hadron colliders and a permanent abode for the majority of them has yet to be found. We argue that some of these states, in particular the Y{sub b}(10890) and the recently discovered states Z{sub b}(10610) and Z{sub b}(10650), discovered by the Belle collaboration are excellent candidates for tetraquark states [bq][ anti b anti q], with q=u,d light quarks. Theoretical analyses of the Belle data carried out in the tetraquark context is reviewed. (orig.)

  16. Spectroscopy Made Easy: Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Piskunov, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    Context. The Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME) package has become a popular tool for analyzing stellar spectra, often in connection with large surveys or exoplanet research. SME has evolved significantly since it was first described in 1996, but many of the original caveats and potholes still haunt users. The main drivers for this paper are complexity of the modeling task, the large user community, and the massive effort that has gone into SME. Aims. We do not intend to give a comprehensive introduction to stellar atmospheres, but will describe changes to key components of SME: the equation of state, opacities, and radiative transfer. We will describe the analysis and fitting procedure and investigate various error sources that affect inferred parameters. Methods. We review the current status of SME, emphasizing new algorithms and methods. We describe some best practices for using the package, based on lessons learned over two decades of SME usage. We present a new way to assess uncertainties in derived stellar pa...

  17. Transit spectroscopy with GTC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osorio M.R. Zapatero

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to different ground-based surveys and space missions, nowadays we have a fairly large sample of discovered extra-solar planets to study and, without a doubt, this number will increase in the future. One of the most succesful techniques that allows us to prove the physical properties and atmospheric composition of these exoplanets is transmission spectroscopy. The level of precision that is require to measure these effects provides a technical challenge that is solved by using big telescopes and stable instruments to reach low noise levels. In this article, we will discuss the use of the 10m class telescope GTC to observed planetary transits in spectroscopic mode and some of the results that we are currently obtaining.

  18. Quantum-Limited Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Truong, Gar-Wing; May, Eric F; Stace, Thomas M; Luiten, Andre N

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy has an illustrious history delivering serendipitous discoveries and providing a stringent testbed for new physical predictions, including applications from trace materials detection, to understanding the atmospheres of stars and planets, and even constraining cosmological models. Reaching fundamental-noise limits permits optimal extraction of spectroscopic information from an absorption measurement. Here we demonstrate a quantum-limited spectrometer that delivers high-precision measurements of the absorption lineshape. These measurements yield a ten-fold improvement in the accuracy of the excited-state (6P$_{1/2}$) hyperfine splitting in Cs, and reveals a breakdown in the well-known Voigt spectral profile. We develop a theoretical model that accounts for this breakdown, explaining the observations to within the shot-noise limit. Our model enables us to infer the thermal velocity-dispersion of the Cs vapour with an uncertainty of 35ppm within an hour. This allows us to determine a value for Boltzm...

  19. Bragg Curve Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An alternative utilization is presented for the gaseous ionization chamber in the detection of energetic heavy ions, which is called Bragg Curve Spectroscopy (BCS). Conceptually, BCS involves using the maximum data available from the Bragg curve of the stopping heavy ion (HI) for purposes of identifying the particle and measuring its energy. A detector has been designed that measures the Bragg curve with high precision. From the Bragg curve the range from the length of the track, the total energy from the integral of the specific ionization over the track, the dE/dx from the specific ionization at the beginning of the track, and the Bragg peak from the maximum of the specific ionization of the HI are determined. This last signal measures the atomic number, Z, of the HI unambiguously

  20. Raman spectroscopy of magnetoliposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate monolayer and bilayer magnetite-based magnetoliposomes (MLs). The Raman probe is the hydroxyl (OH) group chemisorbed at the magnetite nanoparticle surface. Measurements were performed at room temperature in the typical OH stretching region. The data gathered for both samples are compared to each other and with those obtained for pure water. In comparison to liquid water (2.74 kcal/mol), it was found that the hydrogen bond strength between the chemisorbed OH-group and the polar headgroup of the inner phospholipid layer was reduced in both the monolayer (2.22 kcal/mol) and the bilayer (1.83 kcal/mol) ML samples

  1. Quantitative velocity modulation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, James N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-05-01

    Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (VMS) is arguably the most important development in the 20th century for spectroscopic study of molecular ions. For decades, interpretation of VMS lineshapes has presented challenges due to the intrinsic covariance of fit parameters including velocity modulation amplitude, linewidth, and intensity. This limitation has stifled the growth of this technique into the quantitative realm. In this work, we show that subtle changes in the lineshape can be used to help address this complexity. This allows for determination of the linewidth, intensity relative to other transitions, velocity modulation amplitude, and electric field strength in the positive column of a glow discharge. Additionally, we explain the large homogeneous component of the linewidth that has been previously described. Using this component, the ion mobility can be determined.

  2. Near-infrared spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue ischaemia can be a significant contributor to increased morbidity and mortality. Conventional oxygenation monitoring modalities measure systemic oxygenation, but regional tissue oxygenation is not monitored. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS is a non-invasive monitor for measuring regional oxygen saturation which provides real-time information. There has been increased interest in the clinical application of NIRS following numerous studies that show improved outcome in various clinical situations especially cardiac surgery. Its use has shown improved neurological outcome and decreased postoperative stay in cardiac surgery. Its usefulness has been investigated in various high risk surgeries such as carotid endarterectomy, thoracic surgeries, paediatric population and has shown promising results. There is however, limited data supporting its role in neurosurgical population. We strongly feel, it might play a key role in future. It has significant advantages over other neuromonitoring modalities, but more technological advances are needed before it can be used more widely into clinical practice.

  3. Nonlinear Dynamic Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Björnham, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) is an experimental technique that is commonly used to assess information of the strength, energy landscape, and lifetime of noncovalent bio-molecular interactions. DFS traditionally requires an applied force that increases linearly with time so that the bio-complex under investigation is exposed to a constant loading rate. However, tethers or polymers can modulate the applied force in a nonlinear regime. For example, bacterial adhesion pili and polymers with worm-like chain properties are examples of structures that show nonlinear force responses. In these situations, the theory for traditional DFS cannot be readily applied. In this work we expand the theory for DFS to also include nonlinear external forces while still maintaining compatibility with the linear DFS theory. To validate the theory we modeled a bio-complex expressed on a stiff, an elastic and a worm-like chain polymer, using Monte Carlo methods, and assessed the corresponding rupture force spectra. It was found th...

  4. Computational multiheterodyne spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Burghoff, David; Hu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Dual comb spectroscopy allows for high-resolution spectra to be measured over broad bandwidths, but an essential requirement for coherent integration is the availability of a phase reference. Usually, this means that the combs' phase and timing errors must be measured and either minimized by stabilization or removed by correction, limiting the technique's applicability. In this work, we demonstrate that it is possible to extract the phase and timing signals of a multiheterodyne spectrum completely computationally, without any extra measurements or optical elements. These techniques are viable even when the relative linewidth exceeds the repetition rate difference, and can tremendously simplify any dual comb system. By reconceptualizing frequency combs in terms of the temporal structure of their phase noise, not their frequency stability, we are able to greatly expand the scope of multiheterodyne techniques.

  5. Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, Daniel R; Mathies, Richard A

    2016-05-01

    Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is an ultrafast nonlinear optical technique that provides vibrational structural information with high temporal (sub-50 fs) precision and high spectral (10 cm(-1) ) resolution. Since the first full demonstration of its capabilities ≈15 years ago, FSRS has evolved into a mature technique, giving deep insights into chemical and biochemical reaction dynamics that would be inaccessible with any other technique. It is now being routinely applied to virtually all possible photochemical reactions and systems spanning from single molecules in solution to thin films, bulk crystals and macromolecular proteins. This review starts with an historic overview and discusses the theoretical and experimental concepts behind this technology. Emphasis is put on the current state-of-the-art experimental realization and several variations of FSRS that have been developed. The unique capabilities of FSRS are illustrated through a comprehensive presentation of experiments to date followed by prospects. PMID:26919612

  6. Broadband terahertz spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenhui Fan

    2011-01-01

    1.Introduction Spanning the frequency range between the infrared (IR) radiation and microwaves,terahertz (THz) waves are,also known as T-rays,T-lux,or simply called THz,assigned to cover the electromagnetic spectrum typically from 100 GHz (1011 Hz) to 10 THz (1013 Hz),namely,from 3 mm to 30 μm in wavelength,although slightly different definitions have been quoted by different authors.For a very long time,THz region is an almost unexplored field due to its rather unique location in the electromagnetic spectrum.Well-known techniques in optical or microwave region can not be directly employed in the THz range because optical wavelengths are too short and microwave wavelengths are too long compared to THz wavelengths.%An overview of the major techniques to generate and detect THz radiation so far, especially the major approaches to generate and detect coherent ultra-short THz pulses using ultra-short pulsed laser, has been presented. And also, this paper, in particularly, focuses on broadband THz spectroscopy and addresses on a number of issues relevant to generation and detection of broadband pulsed THz radiation as well as broadband time-domain THz spectroscopy (THz-TDS) with the help of ultra-short pulsed laser. The time-domain waveforms of coherent ultra-short THz pulses from photoconductive antenna excited by femtosecond laser with different pulse durations and their corresponding Fourier-transformed spectra have been obtained via the numerical simulation of ultrafast dynamics between femtosecond laser pulse and photoconductive material. The origins of fringes modulated on the top of broadband amplitude spectrum, which is measured by electric-optic detector based on thin nonlinear crystal and extracted by fast Fourier transformation, have been analyzed and the major solutions to get rid of these fringes are discussed.

  7. Vibrational spectroscopy of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two important steps for the development of a biosensor are the immobilization of the biological component (e.g. protein) on a surface and the enhancement of the signal to improve the sensitivity of detection. To address these subjects, the present work describes Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) investigations of several proteins bound to the surface of an attenuated total reflection (ATR) crystal. Furthermore, new nanostructured surfaces for signal enhancement were developed for use in FTIR microscopy. The mitochondrial redox-protein cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was incorporated into a protein-tethered bilayer lipid membrane (ptBLM) on an ATR crystal featuring a roughened two-layer gold surface for signal enhancement. Electrochemical excitation by periodic potential pulses at different modulation frequencies was followed by time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy. Phase sensitive detection was used for deconvolution of the IR spectra into vibrational components. A model based on protonation-dependent chemical reaction kinetics could be fitted to the time evolution of IR bands attributed to several different redox centers of the CcO. Further investigations involved the odorant binding protein 14 (OBP14) of the honey bee (Apis mellifera), which was studied using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and circular dichroism. OBP14 was found to be thermally stable up to 45 °C, thus permitting the potential application of this protein for the fabrication of biosensors. Thermal denaturation measurements showed that odorant binding increases the thermal stability of the OBP-odorant complex. In another project, plasmonic nanostructures were fabricated that enhance the absorbance in FTIR microscopy measurements. The nanostructures are composed of an array of round-shaped insulator and gold discs on top of a continuous gold layer. Enhancement factors of up to ⁓125 could be observed with self-assembled monolayers of dodecanethiol molecules immobilized on the gold surface (author)

  8. Laser ionization mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardez, Luis J., III; Siekhaus, W. J.

    1989-10-01

    Laser Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (LIMS) is a simple technique with several advantages and disadvantages over standard mass spectroscopy techniques. The LIMS technique uses a laser to vaporize a small portion of a sample. The vapor from the sample consists of a mixture of charged and neutral atoms or fragments. Using electrostatic grids, the ions (positive or negative) are given a known amount of kinetic energy and sent down a time-of-flight tube. The time it takes the ions to travel down the flight tube is recorded. Knowing the ions' energy, the length of the flight tube, and the time it takes the ions to travel that distance, the masses of the ions can be calculated. The instrument used is a LIMA 3 made by Cambridge Mass Spectrometry. It has a Quanta Ray DCR-11 Nd:YAG laser, which was frequency-quadrupled to 266 nm. The laser spot size is typically between 2 and 5 microns in diameter and the pulse width is between 5 and 10 nanoseconds. The energy of the laser is continually variable between 0.1 and 3.0 millijoules. The detector is a 17-stage venetian-blind multiplier made by Thorn EMI. The analysis is carried out under vacuum, usually between 10(exp -8) and 10(exp -9) Torr. The LIMA 3 has several useful features such as: a He-Ne pilot laser used to target the Nd:YAG laser; a microscope (which is used to view the sample through the laser optics); and a precision sample stage for accurate sample alignment.

  9. Electron Spectroscopy for Material Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Süzer, Şefik

    1998-01-01

    Basic principles of the two electron spectroscopic techniques, the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS, and the Auger electron spectroscopy, AES, are given. Their utilization in material characterization are introduced through examples with application of these techniques to various surface related problems.

  10. Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Shapiro, Alexander; Berg, Rolf W.;

    Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt......Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt...

  11. The light meson spectroscopy program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Elton S.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent discoveries of a number of unexpected new charmomium-like meson states at the BaBar and Belle B-factories have demonstrated how little is still known about meson spectroscopy. In this talk we will review recent highlights of the light quark spectroscopy from collider and fixed target experiments.

  12. The light meson spectroscopy program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Elton S. [JLAB

    2014-06-01

    Recent discoveries of a number of unexpected new charmomium-like meson states at the BaBar and Belle B-factories have demonstrated how little is still known about meson spectroscopy. In this talk we will review recent highlights of the light quark spectroscopy from collider and fixed target experiments.

  13. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods and results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in the study of plasmons, alloys and gold compounds are discussed. After a comprehensive introduction, seven papers by the author, previously published elsewhere, are reprinted and these cover a wide range of the uses of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. (W.D.L.)

  14. Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesendanger, Roland

    1994-09-01

    Preface; List of acronyms; Introduction; Part I. Experimental Methods and Theoretical Background of Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy: 1. Scanning tunnelling microscopy; 2. Scanning force microscopy; 3. Related scanning probe techniques; Part II. Applications of Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy: 4. Condensed matter physics; 5. Chemistry; 6. Organic materials; 7. Metrology and standards; 8. Nanotechnology; References; Index.

  15. Raman Spectroscopy for Clinical Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. Fenn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the leading causes of death throughout the world. Advancements in early and improved diagnosis could help prevent a significant number of these deaths. Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational spectroscopic technique which has received considerable attention recently with regards to applications in clinical oncology. Raman spectroscopy has the potential not only to improve diagnosis of cancer but also to advance the treatment of cancer. A number of studies have investigated Raman spectroscopy for its potential to improve diagnosis and treatment of a wide variety of cancers. In this paper the most recent advances in dispersive Raman spectroscopy, which have demonstrated promising leads to real world application for clinical oncology are reviewed. The application of Raman spectroscopy to breast, brain, skin, cervical, gastrointestinal, oral, and lung cancers is reviewed as well as a special focus on the data analysis techniques, which have been employed in the studies.

  16. Operando fuel cell spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Ian Michael

    The active state of a catalyst only exists during catalysis (1) provided the motivation for developing operando spectroscopic techniques. A polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was designed to interface with commercially available instruments for acquisition of infrared spectra of the catalytic surface of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) during normal operation. This technique has provided insight of the complex processes occurring at the electrode surface. Nafion, the solid electrolyte used in most modern-day polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), serves many purposes in fuel cell operation. However, there is little known of the interface between Nafion and the electrode surface. Previous studies of complex Stark tuning curves of carbon monoxide on the surface of a platinum electrode were attributed the co-adsorption of bisulfite ions originating from the 0.5M H2SO4 electrolyte used in the study(2). Similar tuning curves obtained on a fuel cell MEA despite the absence of supplemental electrolytes suggest the adsorption of Nafion onto platinum (3). The correlation of spectra obtained using attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy (ATR) and polarization modulated IR reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) to a theoretical spectrum generated using density functional theory (DFT) lead to development of a model of Nafion and platinum interaction which identified participation of the SO3- and CF3 groups in Nafion adsorption. The use of ethanol as a fuel stream in proton exchange membrane fuel cells provides a promising alternative to methanol. Relative to methanol, ethanol has a greater energy density, lower toxicity and can be made from the fermentation of biomass(4). Operando IR spectroscopy was used to study the oxidation pathway of ethanol and Stark tuning behavior of carbon monoxide on Pt, Ru, and PtRu electrodes. Potential dependent products such as acetaldehyde, acetic acid and carbon monoxide are identified as well as previously

  17. Raman Spectroscopy of Cocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Frank; Reardon, Paul; Ochoa, Romulo; Abourahma, Heba; Marti, Marcus; Dimeo, Rachel

    2010-02-01

    Cocrystals are a class of compounds that consist of two or more molecules that are held together by hydrogen bonding. Pharmaceutical cocrystals are those that contain an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) as one of the components. Pharmaceutical cocrystals are of particular interest and have gained a lot of attention in recent years because they offer the ability to modify the physical properties of the API, like solubility and bioavailability, without altering the chemical structure of the API. The APIs that we targeted for our studies are theophylline (Tp) and indomethacin (Ind). These compounds have been mixed with complementary coformers (cocrystal former) that include acetamide (AcONH2), melamine (MLM), nicotinic acid (Nic-COOH), 4-cyanopyridine (4-CNPy) and 4-aminopyridine (4-NH2Py). Raman spectroscopy has been used to characterize these cocrystals. Spectra of the cocrystals were compared to those of the coformers to analyze for peak shifts, specifically those corresponding to hydrogen bonding. A 0.5 m CCD Spex spectrometer was used, in a micro-Raman setup, for spectral analysis. An Argon ion Coherent laser at 514.5 nm was used as the excitation source. )

  18. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with 13C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system

  19. Broadband transmission EPR spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfred R Hagen

    Full Text Available EPR spectroscopy employs a resonator operating at a single microwave frequency and phase-sensitive detection using modulation of the magnetic field. The X-band spectrometer is the general standard with a frequency in the 9-10 GHz range. Most (biomolecular EPR spectra are determined by a combination of the frequency-dependent electronic Zeeman interaction and a number of frequency-independent interactions, notably, electron spin - nuclear spin interactions and electron spin - electron spin interactions, and unambiguous analysis requires data collection at different frequencies. Extant and long-standing practice is to use a different spectrometer for each frequency. We explore the alternative of replacing the narrow-band source plus single-mode resonator with a continuously tunable microwave source plus a non-resonant coaxial transmission cell in an unmodulated external field. Our source is an arbitrary wave digital signal generator producing an amplitude-modulated sinusoidal microwave in combination with a broadband amplifier for 0.8-2.7 GHz. Theory is developed for coaxial transmission with EPR detection as a function of cell dimensions and materials. We explore examples of a doublet system, a high-spin system, and an integer-spin system. Long, straigth, helical, and helico-toroidal cells are developed and tested with dilute aqueous solutions of spin label hydroxy-tempo. A detection limit of circa 5 µM HO-tempo in water at 800 MHz is obtained for the present setup, and possibilities for future improvement are discussed.

  20. Meson Spectroscopy at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Grube, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The COmmon Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy (COMPASS) is a multi-purpose fixed-target experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) aimed at studying the structure and spectrum of hadrons. The two-stage spectrometer has a good acceptance for charged as well as neutral particles over a wide kinematic range and thus allows to access a wide range of reactions. Light mesons are studied with negative (mostly $\\pi^-$) and positive ($p$, $\\pi^+$) hadron beams with a momentum of 190 GeV/$c$. The spectrum of light mesons is investigated in various final states produced in diffractive dissociation reactions at squared four-momentum transfers to the target between 0.1 and 1.0 $(\\text{GeV}/c)^2$. The flagship channel is the $\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ final state, for which COMPASS has recorded the currently largest data sample. These data not only allow to measure the properties of known resonances with high precision, but also to search for new states. Among these is a new resonance-like signal, t...

  1. (e,2e) spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed treatment of the theoretical and experimental aspects of the symmetric (e,2e) reaction in atoms, molecules and solids is presented. Two experimental arrangements are described for measuring angular correlations and separation energy spectra, the one arrangement employing coplanar and the other noncoplanar symmetric kinematics. The latter arrangement is shown to be particularly suitable for extracting information. The basic approximation, the factorized distorted-wave off-shell impulse approximation with fully distorted waves, is shown to correctly describe the reaction in some test cases, as does the phase distortion approximation. At energies of the order of 1200 eV the simple eikonal and plane wave approximations adequately describe the valence shell cross sections for light atoms and molecules containing first row elements. Energy independent structure information is obtained on: (a) shapes and magnitudes of the square of the momentum space wave functions for individual electron orbitals; (b) separation energies for individual ion eigenstates; (c) the characteristic orbital of each state; and (d) spectroscopic factors describing the probability that an eigenstate contains the principal configuration of a hole in the characteristic orbital for each eigenstate. Comparison is made with photoelectron spectroscopy and Compton scattering, since they separately yield some of the information obtained by the (e,2e) method. A brief summary is given of other electron-electron coincidence experiments. (Auth.)

  2. Spectroscopy of hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent technological developments regarding secondary beams, magnetic spectrometers and detectors have made it possible to use electronic counter techniques to study hypernuclei. The in-flight strangeness exchange reaction K-+AZ → π-+sub(Λ)AZ is kinematically the most favorable. To undertake this experimental study, at Saclay we have built the large solid angle (20 msr), broad momentum acceptance (+-18%) and high resolution (dp/p=10-3) magnetic spectrometer SPES II. On its focal plane three large wire chambers allow us to measure the coordinates of the outgoing particle with a precision better than one millimeter. This whole system has been transported to CERN where, in conjunction with the secondary beam line K22, it has been used to investigate the spectroscopy of eleven hypernuclei: sub(Λ)6Li, sub(Λ)7Li, sub(Λ)9Be, sub(Λ)12C, sub(Λ)16O, sub(Λ)27Al, sub(Λ)32S, sub(Λ)40Ca, sub(Λ)51V, sub(Λ)89Y, and sub(Λ)209Bi. For the first time the precise and unambiguous identification of hypernuclear excited states has been possible. This has allowed us to determine the central and the spin-orbit of the Λ-nucleus interaction

  3. Roaming and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Joel

    2014-06-01

    Accurate ab initio theoretical/computational work on dynamics and spectroscopy begins with a potential energy surface (PES). My talk therefore begins with a brief review of progress we have made in developing accurate ab initio global PESs for reaction dynamics. "Roaming" is an unusual alternate pathway to reaction products that was found in the unimolecular dissociation of H_2CO by running roughly 100 000 trajectories on such a PES. The signatures of roaming were seen in the spectroscopic detection of the rotational states of CO correlated with translational energy distribution of the H_2. I will discuss roaming in NO_3 photodissociation to NO+O_2 and give a short history of the topic. In particular I will recount how poor Franck-Condon factors in pioneering LIF detection experiments in 1997 of the low-lying vibrational states of O_2 plus the assumption of a "prior" vibrational distribution led to the wrong conclusions about the O_2 vibrational-state distribution. Later more sophisticated experiments obtained the correct vibrational distribution, which led to the (correct) speculation about roaming in this system. I conclude with some comments about roaming wavefunctions and will wonder aloud about ways to detect wavefunctions spectroscopically. (Roaming wavefunctions have been reported by Hua Guo and co-workers for the MgH_2.)

  4. Heavy quark spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New experimental and theoretical developments in heavy quark spectroscopy are reviewed. From studies of J/psi decays, the eta' is found to have some ''glue'' or other inert component, while the iota (a glueball candidate) probably contains some quarks as well. The xi(2.2) persists in new Mark III data, but is not seen by the DM2 collaboration. The production of charmonium states by anti pp reactions is reviewed. First evidence for a P- wave charmed meson, D(2420), has been presented by the ARGUS group. Radiative UPSILON decay studies fail to confirm the zeta(8.3) and begin to place useful limits on Higgs bosons. First results from an experiment at Fermilab on low-background hadronic production of UPSILON states are shown. Accurate measurements of chi/sub b/(1P) masses by the ARGUS collaboration are noted, and interpreted as favoring scalar quark confinement. Studies of t and other heavy quarks will probe the q anti q interaction below 0.05 fm, are likely to be strongly affected by t anti t-Z interference, and can provide varied information on Higgs bosons. 144 refs., 21 figs

  5. Intermolecular spectroscopy of gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectroscopic techniques have been very successfully applied to the study of individual molecules. The same techniques can also be used to investigate intermolecular interactions. Collision-induced absorption (CIA) and collision-induced light scattering (CILS) are important examples of intermolecular interactions. These effects can be described by the dynamical information contained in the general intermolecular correlation functions. One of the aims of this review is to stress the central role of these correlation functions in the field of intermolecular spectroscopy. Because they have a well-defined physical meaning, they are very suitable for the purpose of introducing new physical approximations, particularly in the case of liquids. Some aspects of the theory of CIA will be discussed, mainly as applied to gases. References to similar situations in CILS will occasionally be made, but no comprehensive review will be attempted. One of the basic quantities in CIA is the absorption coefficient. The question is investigated wether it can be expanded in powers of the density. Finally, the moments of the spectrum, interference effects and line shapes are discussed. (KBE)

  6. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y K [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with {sup 13}C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system.

  7. Meson Spectroscopy at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the COMPASS experiment at CERN is to study the structure and dynamics of hadrons. The two-stage spectrometer used by the experiment has large acceptance and covers a wide kinematic range for charged as well as neutral particles and can therefore measure a wide range of reactions. The spectroscopy of light mesons is performed with negative (mostly $\\pi^-$) and positive ($p$, $\\pi^+$) hadron beams with a momentum of 190 GeV/$c$. The light-meson spectrum is measured in different final states produced in diffractive dissociation reactions with squared four-momentum transfer $t$ to the target between 0.1 and 1.0 $(\\text{GeV}/c)^2$. The flagship channel is the $\\pi^-\\pi^-\\pi^+$ final state, for which COMPASS has recorded the currently world's largest data sample. These data not only allow to measure the properties of known resonances with high precision, but also to observe new states. Among these is a new axial-vector signal, the $a_1(1420)$, with unusual properties. Novel analysis techniques have been...

  8. HASPECT: HAdron SPEctroscopy CenTer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main motivations for hadron spectroscopy in general and in particular for hybrid meson spectroscopy will be reviewed. The HASPECT (HAdron SPEctroscopy CenTer) project will be presented and discussed.

  9. Electron spectroscopy of dilute nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of electron spectroscopies in dilute nitride semiconductor research for both chemical analysis and the determination of electronic and lattice vibrational properties is described. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the nitrogen bonding configurations in dilute InNxSb1-x and InNxAs1-x alloys is presented. High resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS) of the plasmon excitations in InNxSb1-x is shown to provide information on the electronic properties of the material, before and after annealing. HREELS is also used to investigate the GaN-like phonon modes in GaNxAs1-x alloys

  10. Recommendations concerning magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In medicine the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied in the form of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In vivo MRS can be carried out non-invasively. The committee of the Dutch Health Council briefly discusses the qualities and potentialities of the nuclei that will probably be used in future clinical spectroscopy: 31P, 13C, 1H (and possibly 19F and 23Na). The committee discusses several possibilities of combining imaging and spectroscopy. The imaging of nuclei other than protons is also possible with MRS. Potential applications are considered in oncology, cardiology, neurology and hepatology. (Auth.)

  11. PAH FIR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioda, Andrew; Ricca, A.; Tucker, J.; Bauschlicher, C., Jr.; Allamandola, L.

    2009-01-01

    The mid-IR spectra of a majority of astronomical sources are dominated by emission features near 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, and 11.2 µm. These features, formerly referred to as the Unidentified Infrared (UIR) Bands, are now generally thought to originate in free polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules and closely related species. In addition to dominating the 3-20 µm region of the spectrum, they carry some 20-40% of the total IR luminosity from most of these objects. PAHs dominate the mid-IR emission from many galactic and extragalactic objects. As such, this material tracks a wide variety of astronomical processes, making this spectrum a powerful probe of the cosmos Apart from bands in the mid-IR, PAHs have bands spanning the Far-IR (20 to 1000 mm) and these FIR features should be present in astronomical sources. However, with one exception, the FIR spectral characteristics are known only for a few neutral small PAHs trapped in salt pellets or oils at room temperature, data which is not relevant to astrophysics. Furthermore, since most emitting PAHs responsible for the mid-IR astronomical features are ionized, the absence of any experimental or theoretical PAH ion FIR spectra will make it impossible to correctly interpret the FIR data from these objects. In view of the upcoming Herschel space telescope mission and SOFIA's FIR airborne instrumentation, which will pioneer the FIR region, it is now urgent to obtain PAH FIR spectra. This talk will present an overview of the FIR spectroscopy of PAHs.

  12. Laser induced plasma spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Nak Bae; Woo, Hyung Joo; Kim, Joon Kon; Kim, Gi Dong; Choi, Han Woo; Yoon, Yoon Yeol; Shim, Sang Kwun [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    When the pulsed laser is focused onto a small spot of a solid surface, an optically induced plasma is formed at this surface. This plasma will be formed when the laser power density exceeds the breakdown threshold value of the solid surface. The interaction of high power laser light with a target or solid materials have been an active topic not only in plasma physics but also in the field of analytical chemistry. Recently, LIPS(laser induced plasma spectroscopy) has been applied many kinds of sample analysis including solid, liquid and gas analysis. LIPS has a advantage of the minimal sample preparation required for a solid sample and ability to analyze conducting as well as nonconducting materials, multi-elemental analysis. But this method has a poorer sensitivity than several competing atomic spectroscopic methods and semiquantitative analysis. Numerous factors affect the ablation process, including the laser pulse properties, such as pulse width, spatial and temporal fluctuations of the pulse and laser power fluctuations. The mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the sample also influence the ablation process. We studied LIPS with Nd:YAG second harmonic 532 nm and the induced plasma temperature was studied by observing the emission intensity of Fe(I) line and the plasma temperature of the different kind of samples were calculated using Boltzmann plotting method under same laser condition. Using the above experimental results, LIPS has been applied for the analysis of the elemental distribution mapping of the polished rock section. For the elemental mapping analysis, XY stage controlled by step motor and PC were used and 5 x 5 mm element image was obtained. For the quantitative analysis, rock standard samples were analyzed and Ba, Cu, Fe, Mn, Si and Sr calibration curve were obtained. (author). 22 refs., 2 tabs., 14 figs.

  13. Moessbauer Spectroscopy in Materials Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication in electronic form has been set up as proceedings of the conference dealing with applications of the Moessbauer spectroscopy in material science. Twenty-three abstracts and twenty-two presentations are included.

  14. Lecture II. Charmed particle spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discussion of charmed particle spectroscopy covers the particle properties and interrelations from a charmed quark composition point of view including SU(4)-symmetry generalities, mesons, baryons, charmed particle masses, and decays of charmed particles. 6 references

  15. FTIR spectroscopy of borate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Laszlo; Beregi, E.; Polgar, K.; Peter, A.

    1999-03-01

    Infrared absorption spectroscopy has been used to study the vibrational modes in various borate crystals, the electronic transitions of Nd3+ ions in NYAB, and the stretching vibration of hydroxyl ions in CLBO crystals.

  16. Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Noy, Aleksandr

    2008-01-01

    "...Noy's Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy is both a timely and useful summary of fundamental aspects of molecular force spectroscopy, and I believe it would make a worthwhile addition to any good scientific library. New research groups that are entering this field would be well advisedto study this handbook in detail before venturing into the exciting and challenging world of molecular force spectroscopy." Matthew F. Paige, University of Saskatchewan, Journal of the American Chemical Society Modern materials science and biophysics are increasingly focused on studying and controlling intermolecular interactions on the single-molecule level. Molecular force spectroscopy was developed in the past decade as the result of several unprecedented advances in the capabilities of modern scientific instrumentation, and defines a number of techniques that use mechanical force measurements to study interactions between single molecules and molecular assemblies in chemical and biological systems. Examples of these...

  17. Moessbauer spectroscopy with 191193Ir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contributions made by Ir Moessbauer spectroscopy to the determination of nuclear parameters, as well as applications in solid state physics and chemistry, are reviewed. In addition, a brief description of experimental techniques and source preparation procedures is given. (Auth.)

  18. The Solar Spectroscopy Explorer Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Bookbinder, Jay

    2010-01-01

    The Solar Spectroscopy Explorer (SSE) concept is conceived as a scalable mission, with two to four instruments and a strong focus on coronal spectroscopy. In its core configuration it is a small strategic mission ($250-500M) built around a microcalorimeter (an imaging X-ray spectrometer) and a high spatial resolution (0.2 arcsec) EUV imager. SSE puts a strong focus on the plasma spectroscopy, balanced with high resolution imaging - providing for break-through imaging science as well as providing the necessary context for the spectroscopy suite. Even in its smallest configuration SSE provides observatory class science, with significant science contributions ranging from basic plasma and radiative processes to the onset of space weather events. The basic configuration can carry an expanded instrument suite with the addition of a hard X-ray imaging spectrometer and/or a high spectral resolution EUV instrument - significantly expanding the science capabilities. In this configuration, it will fall at the small end...

  19. Localised IR spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    CERN Document Server

    Yarrow, Fiona

    2010-01-01

    IR absorption spectroscopy of hemoglobin was performed using an IR optical parametric oscillator laser and a commercial atomic force microscope in a novel experimental arrangement based on the use of a bottom-up excitation alignment. This experimental approach enables detection of protein samples with a resolution that is much higher than that of standard IR spectroscopy. Presented here are AFM based IR absorption spectra of micron sized hemoglobin features

  20. Force spectroscopy in studying infection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Zhaokun; Leake, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical force spectroscopy tools - for example optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy, - have been used to study elastic, mechanical, conformational and dynamic properties of single biological specimens from single proteins to whole cells to reveal information not accessible by ensemble average methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and so on. Here we review the application of these tools on a range of infection-related question...

  1. Spectroscopy scales new peaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researchers have used superconducting detectors to break the 'iron law' of NMR spectroscopy. When nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was discovered over half a century ago by Ed Purcell and Felix Bloch, neither could have possibly predicted that it would make an impact on nearly every area of science imaginable. Magnetic resonance is now the fundamental analytical tool in synthetic chemistry and also plays a leading role in proteomics and biomedical research. It has revolutionized modern radiology and neurology, and its applications outside the laboratory or clinic are as diverse as oil-well logging, food analysis and the detection of explosives. Moreover, during all this energetic engagement with the world outside, NMR has remained a valuable tool in basic physics research, notably in condensed matter and, most recently, as a test-bed for new ideas in quantum computing (see Quantum computers get real Physics World April 2002 pp21-22 print version). In a typical NMR experiment the sample being studied is placed in a strong magnetic field, which forces the magnetic moments or 'spins' of all the nuclei in the sample to line up and precess around the direction of the applied field. The spins all precess at the same frequency but with random phases. Pulses of radiofrequency (RF) radiation are then directed at the sample, disturbing the alignment of the spins and producing a state in which the phases are coherent. As this state precesses in the magnetic field, the spins emit RF radiation that can be analysed to reveal the structural, chemical and dynamical properties of the sample. Traditionally it has been important to use a strong magnetic field of the order of teslas, but researchers in the US and Germany have now shown that NMR can be performed with fields in the microtesla range (R McDermott et al. 2002 Science 295 2247). In the June issue of Physics World, Paul Callaghan of Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, describes how magnetic resonance continues to

  2. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT (Conference Chair); Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE’s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE’s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  3. Advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012). Abstract book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The abstract book of the International workshop on advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012) include contributions concerning the following issues: environmental applications, NMR spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and theory, technical application: separation processes, emission spectroscopy.

  4. Advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012). Abstract book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerstendorf, Harald; Mueller, Katharina; Steudtner, Robin (eds.)

    2012-07-01

    The abstract book of the International workshop on advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012) include contributions concerning the following issues: environmental applications, NMR spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and theory, technical application: separation processes, emission spectroscopy.

  5. Spectroscopy of light quark systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article is part of a proposal for the construction of a high intensity proton accelerator in Europe (EHF, Proposal for a European Hadron Facility, edited by J.F. Crawford (SIN), supported by BMFT (Germany) and INFN (Italy)). Experiments concerning the spectroscopy of light quark systems are discussed, which can be performed with kaon beams of high intensity and high purity at EHF. After a brief review of the status of meson- and baryon- spectroscopy an optimized detection system is presented, and two specific experiments (glue-ball production with K- beams; radiative decays of the Λ(1405)-resonance) are discussed in detail. A Monte-Carlo-simulation shows, that clear signals for these processes can be obtained in short measuring times. These examples demonstrate, that with high quality K- beams new and important information on hadron-spectroscopy can be obtained, which is important for a further understanding of quantum-chromo-dynamics. (orig.)

  6. Infrared Spectroscopy with Visible Light

    CERN Document Server

    Kalashnikov, Dmitry A; Kulik, Sergei P; Krivitsky, Leonid A

    2015-01-01

    Spectral measurements in the infrared (IR) optical range provide unique fingerprints of materials which are useful for material analysis, environmental sensing, and health diagnostics. Current IR spectroscopy techniques require the use of optical equipment suited for operation in the IR range, which faces challenges of inferior performance and high cost. Here we develop a spectroscopy technique, which allows spectral measurements in the IR range using visible spectral range components. The technique is based on nonlinear interference of infrared and visible photons, produced via Spontaneous Parametric Down Conversion (SPDC). The intensity interference pattern for a visible photon depends on the phase of an IR photon, which travels through the media. This allows determining properties of the media in the IR range from the measurements of visible photons. The technique can substitute and/or complement conventional IR spectroscopy techniques, as it uses well-developed optical components for the visible range.

  7. Force spectroscopy in studying infection

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Zhaokun

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical force spectroscopy tools - for example optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy, - have been used to study elastic, mechanical, conformational and dynamic properties of single biological specimens from single proteins to whole cells to reveal information not accessible by ensemble average methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and so on. Here we review the application of these tools on a range of infection-related questions from antibody-inhibited protein processivity to virus-cell adhesion. In each case we focus on how the instrumental design tailored to the biological system in question translates into the functionality suitable for that particular study. The unique insights that force spectroscopy has gained to complement knowledge learned through population averaging techniques in interrogating biomolecular details prove to be instrumental in therapeutic innovations such as those in structure-based drug design.

  8. Force Spectroscopy in Studying Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhaokun; Leake, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical force spectroscopy tools-for example, optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy-have been used to study elastic, mechanical, conformational and dynamic properties of single biological specimens from single proteins to whole cells to reveal information not accessible by ensemble average methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and so on. Here, we review the application of these tools on a range of infection-related questions from antibody-inhibited protein processivity to virus-cell adhesion. In each case, we focus on how the instrumental design tailored to the biological system in question translates into the functionality suitable for that particular study. The unique insights that force spectroscopy has gained to complement knowledge learned through population averaging techniques in interrogating biomolecular details prove to be instrumental in therapeutic innovations such as those in structure-based drug design. PMID:27193551

  9. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  10. Quantum spectroscopy of plasmonic nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Kalashnikov, Dmitry A; Kuznetsov, Arseniy I; Krivitsky, Leonid A

    2013-01-01

    We use frequency entangled photons, generated via spontaneous parametric down conversion, to measure the broadband spectral response of an array of gold nanoparticles exhibiting Fano-type plasmon resonance. Refractive index sensing of a liquid is performed by measuring the shift of the array resonance. This method is robust in excessively noisy conditions compared with conventional broadband transmission spectroscopy. Detection of a refractive index change is demonstrated with a noise level 70 times higher than the signal, which is shown to be inaccessible with the conventional transmission spectroscopy. Use of low photon fluxes makes this method suitable for measurements of photosensitive bio-samples and chemical substances.

  11. Ultrabroadband spectroscopy for security applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrecht, Sunniva; Berge, Luc; Skupin, Stefan;

    2015-01-01

    Ultrabroadband spectroscopy is a promising novel approach to overcome two major hurdles which have so far limited the application of THz spectroscopy for security applications: the increased bandwidth enables to record several characteristic spectroscopic features and the technique allows for...... remote detection. However, for real applications several parameters still have to be optimized. A comprehensive evaluation of the potential of this technique includes for example a detailed study of the generation process in an air plasma. We present some aspects of our joint theoretical and experimental...... evaluation of the technique for defense and civil security applications....

  12. Annual reports on NMR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Graham A; McCarthy, M J

    1995-01-01

    Over recent years, no other technique has grown to such importance as that of NMR spectroscopy. It is used in all branches of science where precise structural determination is required and where the nature of interactions and reactions in solution is being studied. Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy has established itself as a means for the specialist and non-specialist alike to become familiar with new applications of the technique in all branches of chemistry, including biochemistry, and pharmaceutics. This volume focuses on theoretical aspects of NMR nuclear shielding and on applications of

  13. Spectroscopy of transient neutral species via negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, A.

    1991-12-01

    Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to study two types of transient neutral species: bound free radicals (NO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}) and unstable neutral species ([IHI] and [FH{sub 2}]). The negative ion time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer used for these experiments is described in detail.

  14. Spectroscopy of transient neutral species via negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, A.

    1991-12-01

    Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to study two types of transient neutral species: bound free radicals (NO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}) and unstable neutral species ((IHI) and (FH{sub 2})). The negative ion time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer used for these experiments is described in detail.

  15. Interpretation of Transition Voltage Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Everardus H.; Guedon, Constant M.; van Wees, Bart J.; van der Molen, Sense Jan

    2009-01-01

    The promise of transition voltage spectroscopy (TVs) is that molecular level positions can be determined in molecular devices without applying extreme voltages. Here, we consider the physics behind TVs in more detail. Remarkably, we find that the Simmons model employed thus far is inconsistent with

  16. Applications of transient Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transient effects in Moessbauer spectroscopy were generated by sweeping the frequency or switching the phase of recoilless gamma radiation. From a sinusoidal frequency sweep a separation of source and absorber contributions to the experimental linewidth was obtained. With phase switching exceptionally large effects were observed. The experimental results were obtained mainly using the 67Zn resonance. (Auth.)

  17. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  18. Trends in resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author reviews the history of resonance ionization spectroscopy and then comments on the delineations of RIS with reference to many related laser processes. The substance of the paper deals with the trends in RIS and especially how the needs for sensitive analytical methods have overshadowed the orginal plan to study excited species. 9 refs., 1 fig

  19. Polarization spectroscopy of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of polarization of spectral lines emitted by tokamak plasmas provide information about the plasma internal magnetic field and the current density profile. The methods of polarization spectroscopy, as applied to the tokamak diagnostic, are reviewed with emphasis on the polarimetry of motional Stark effect in hydrogenic neutral beam emissions. 25 refs., 7 figs

  20. Nuclear Structure by Laser Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report illustrates the contribution of laser spectroscopy to our knowledge about variations of nuclear charge radii in long isotopic and isotonic chains comprising stable and short lived isotopes. The recent results obtained experimentally in the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna, are presented and discussed. (author). 32 refs.; 9 figs

  1. Raman spectroscopy for nanomaterials characterization

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    First volume of a 40-volume series on nanoscience and nanotechnology, edited by the renowned scientist Challa S.S.R. Kumar. This handbook gives a comprehensive overview about Raman spectroscopy for the characterization of nanomaterials. Modern applications and state-of-the-art techniques are covered and make this volume essential reading for research scientists in academia and industry.

  2. More seminars on muonium spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper concerns topics which illustrate the use of muonium spectroscopy in four major areas. The experimental method -muon spin rotation (muSR) is employed in the four topics, which include: muSR studies in magnetism, muons in metals and metal hydrides, muonium in semiconductors and muSR studies in chemistry. (U.K.)

  3. Gluonic excitations in hadronic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical expectations are described for new forms of hadronic matter containing gluons as excitable degrees of freedom. Particular attention is paid to hybrid states containing both quarks and gluons. Recent work on the spectroscopy of hybrid mesons and hybrid baryons is reviewed. Comparisons of bag model, lattice QCD and QCD sum rule predictions are made and some confrontation with data attempted. (author)

  4. High-spin nuclear spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, R.M.

    1986-07-01

    High-spin spectroscopy is the study of the changes in nuclear structure, properties, and behavior with increasing angular momentum. It involves the complex interplay between collective and single-particle motion, between shape and deformation changes, particle alignments, and changes in the pairing correlations. A review of progress in theory, experimentation, and instrumentation in this field is given. (DWL)

  5. Spectroscopy, scattering, and KK molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author presents a pedagogical description of a new theoretical technique, based on the multichannel Schroedinger equation, for simultaneously applying the quark model to both meson spectroscopy and meson-meson scattering. This is an extension of an earlier analysis which led to the prediction that the fo(975) and ao(980) scalar mesons are K bar K molecular states

  6. Problems in Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    A collection of 22 introductory exercise problems for the course "Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy (QCS)".......A collection of 22 introductory exercise problems for the course "Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy (QCS)"....

  7. Nanometrology using localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Claus; Lindstedt, Daniel N.; Laurberg, Asger V.;

    2013-01-01

    A novel optical characterization technique called localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy is presented. LSPR spectroscopy exploits light excited surface plasmons, which are collective coherent electron oscillations at a metal/dielectric interface. The LSPR can be observed in a...

  8. Photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy of solids and surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    The use of photoelectron spectroscopy, primarily x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, to obtain information on the electronic structure of a wide variety of solids (especially the bulk electronic structure of solids) is covered. Both valence band and core-level spectra, as well as a few cases of photon excited Auger electron spectroscopy, are employed in the investigations to derive information on N(E). The effect of several modulations inherent in the measured I(E)'s, such as final state band structure, cross section, and relaxation, is discussed. Examples of many-electron interactions in PES are given. Some experimental aspects of PES and AES studies are given with emphasis on sample preparation techniques. Multiple splitting of core levels is examined using the Mn levels in MnF/sub 2/ as a detailed case study. Core level splittings in transition metals, rare earth metals, transition metal halides and several alloys are also reported. The application of PES to the study of the chemical bond in some crystalline semiconductors and insulators, A/sup N/B/sup 8-N/ and A/sup N/B/sup 10-N/ compounds is treated, and a spectroscopic scale of ionicity for these compounds is developed from the measured ''s-band'' splitting in the valence band density of states. (GHT)

  9. Photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy of solids and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of photoelectron spectroscopy, primarily x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, to obtain information on the electronic structure of a wide variety of solids (especially the bulk electronic structure of solids) is covered. Both valence band and core-level spectra, as well as a few cases of photon excited Auger electron spectroscopy, are employed in the investigations to derive information on N(E). The effect of several modulations inherent in the measured I(E)'s, such as final state band structure, cross section, and relaxation, is discussed. Examples of many-electron interactions in PES are given. Some experimental aspects of PES and AES studies are given with emphasis on sample preparation techniques. Multiple splitting of core levels is examined using the Mn levels in MnF2 as a detailed case study. Core level splittings in transition metals, rare earth metals, transition metal halides and several alloys are also reported. The application of PES to the study of the chemical bond in some crystalline semiconductors and insulators, A/sup N/B/sup 8-N/ and A/sup N/B/sup 10-N/ compounds is treated, and a spectroscopic scale of ionicity for these compounds is developed from the measured ''s-band'' splitting in the valence band density of states

  10. Ion traps for high resolution spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As applications of ion traps, direct mass measurement and laser spectroscopy are reported. The advantages of ion traps for high resolution spectroscopy are mentioned. Double resonance method for hfs measurement and problems on ion injection into trap are explained. The planning of laser and microwave spectroscopy, using an ion trap and ISOL at Tohoku cyclotron, is described. (author)

  11. Laser spectroscopy of sputtered atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of laser radiation to study the sputtering process is of relatively recent origin. Much has been learned from this work about the basic physics of the sputtering process itself through measurements of velocity and excited state distributions of sputtered atoms and the effects of adsorbates on substrate sputtering yields. Furthermore, the identification, characterization, and sensitive detection of sputtered atoms by laser spectroscopy has led to the development of in situ diagnostics for impurity fluxes in the plasma edge regions of tokamaks and of ultrasensitive methods (ppB Fe in Si) for surface analysis with ultralow (picocoulomb) ion fluences. The techniques involved in this work, laser fluorescence and multiphoton resonance ionization spectroscopy, will be described and illustrations given of results achieved up to now. 55 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  12. Precision spectroscopy with entangled states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The use of entangled states can provide an increased sensitivity in quantum-limited spectroscopic measurements, leading to an uncertainty that is inversely proportional to the number of particles instead of the usual square-law dependence. In this contribution, we show that spectroscopy with maximally entangled states of atoms also offers significant advantages over experiments done with single atoms. As a first example, we demonstrate that entanglement can be used to effectively eliminate first-order Zeeman shifts in spectroscopy with 40Ca+ even though there are no m = 0 → m = 0 transitions. Secondly, we present how maximally correlated states of two 40Ca+ are used for measuring tiny frequency shifts of the S1/2 → D5/2 transition arising from second-order Zeeman shifts and electric quadrupole shifts due to the trapping potential. (author)

  13. Trapping and spectroscopy of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I review the results and techniques used by the MIT H↑ group to achieve a fractional resolution of 2 parts in 1012 in the 1S-2S transition in hydrogen [Cesar, D. Fried, T. Killian, A. Polcyn, J. Sandberg, I.A. Yu, T. Greytak, D. Kleppner and J. Doyle, Two-photon spectroscopy of trapped atomic hydrogen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 255.] With some improvements, this system should deliver 100 times higher resolution with an improved signal count rate getting us closer to an old advertised goal of a precision of 1 part in 1018. While these developments are very important for the proposed test of the CPT theorem through the comparison with anti-hydrogen, some of the techniques used with hydrogen are not applicable to anti-hydrogen and I discuss some difficulties and alternatives for the trapping and spectroscopy of anti-hydrogen

  14. Liquid identification by Hilbert spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyatti, M.; Divin, Y.; Poppe, U.; Urban, K.

    2009-11-01

    Fast and reliable identification of liquids is of great importance in, for example, security, biology and the beverage industry. An unambiguous identification of liquids can be made by electromagnetic measurements of their dielectric functions in the frequency range of their main dispersions, but this frequency range, from a few GHz to a few THz, is not covered by any conventional spectroscopy. We have developed a concept of liquid identification based on our new Hilbert spectroscopy and high- Tc Josephson junctions, which can operate at the intermediate range from microwaves to THz frequencies. A demonstration setup has been developed consisting of a polychromatic radiation source and a compact Hilbert spectrometer integrated in a Stirling cryocooler. Reflection polychromatic spectra of various bottled liquids have been measured at the spectral range of 15-300 GHz with total scanning time down to 0.2 s and identification of liquids has been demonstrated.

  15. Liquid identification by Hilbert spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast and reliable identification of liquids is of great importance in, for example, security, biology and the beverage industry. An unambiguous identification of liquids can be made by electromagnetic measurements of their dielectric functions in the frequency range of their main dispersions, but this frequency range, from a few GHz to a few THz, is not covered by any conventional spectroscopy. We have developed a concept of liquid identification based on our new Hilbert spectroscopy and high- Tc Josephson junctions, which can operate at the intermediate range from microwaves to THz frequencies. A demonstration setup has been developed consisting of a polychromatic radiation source and a compact Hilbert spectrometer integrated in a Stirling cryocooler. Reflection polychromatic spectra of various bottled liquids have been measured at the spectral range of 15-300 GHz with total scanning time down to 0.2 s and identification of liquids has been demonstrated.

  16. Liquid identification by Hilbert spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyatti, M; Divin, Y; Poppe, U; Urban, K, E-mail: M.Lyatti@fz-juelich.d, E-mail: Y.Divin@fz-juelich.d [Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Fast and reliable identification of liquids is of great importance in, for example, security, biology and the beverage industry. An unambiguous identification of liquids can be made by electromagnetic measurements of their dielectric functions in the frequency range of their main dispersions, but this frequency range, from a few GHz to a few THz, is not covered by any conventional spectroscopy. We have developed a concept of liquid identification based on our new Hilbert spectroscopy and high- T{sub c} Josephson junctions, which can operate at the intermediate range from microwaves to THz frequencies. A demonstration setup has been developed consisting of a polychromatic radiation source and a compact Hilbert spectrometer integrated in a Stirling cryocooler. Reflection polychromatic spectra of various bottled liquids have been measured at the spectral range of 15-300 GHz with total scanning time down to 0.2 s and identification of liquids has been demonstrated.

  17. Crowded Field 3D Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, T; Roth, M M; Becker, Thomas; Fabrika, Sergei; Roth, Martin M.

    2003-01-01

    The quantitative spectroscopy of stellar objects in complex environments is mainly limited by the ability of separating the object from the background. Standard slit spectroscopy, restricting the field of view to one dimension, is obviously not the proper technique in general. The emerging Integral Field (3D) technique with spatially resolved spectra of a two-dimensional field of view provides a great potential for applying advanced subtraction methods. In this paper an image reconstruction algorithm to separate point sources and a smooth background is applied to 3D data. Several performance tests demonstrate the photometric quality of the method. The algorithm is applied to real 3D observations of a sample Planetary Nebula in M31, whose spectrum is contaminated by the bright and complex galaxy background. The ability of separating sources is also studied in a crowded stellar field in M33.

  18. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rule, Gordon S

    2006-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful technique to study the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy is a comprehensive textbook that guides the reader from a basic understanding of the phenomenological properties of magnetic resonance to the application and interpretation of modern multi-dimensional NMR experiments on 15N/13C-labeled proteins. Beginning with elementary quantum mechanics, a set of practical rules is presented and used to describe many commonly employed multi-dimensional, multi-nuclear NMR pulse sequences. A modular analysis of NMR pulse sequence building blocks also provides a basis for understanding and developing novel pulse programs. This text not only covers topics from chemical shift assignment to protein structure refinement, as well as the analysis of protein dynamics and chemical kinetics, but also provides a practical guide to many aspects of modern spectrometer hardware, sample preparation, experimental set-up, and data pr...

  19. Heavy quark spectroscopy and decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The understanding of q anti q systems containing heavy, charmed, and bottom quarks has progressed rapidly in recent years, through steady improvements in experimental techniques for production and detection of their decays. These lectures are meant to be an experimentalist's review of the subject. In the first of two lectures, the existing data on the spectroscopy of the bound c anti c and b anti b systems will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on comparisons with the theoretical models. The second lecture covers the rapidly changing subject of the decays of heavy mesons (c anti q and b anti q), and their excited states. In combination, the spectroscopy and decays of heavy quarks are shown to provide interesting insights into both the strong and electroweak interactions of the heavy quarks. 103 refs., 39 figs

  20. Autler-Townes multiplet spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ghafoor, Fazal

    2013-01-01

    We extend the concepts of the Autler-Townes doublet and triplet spectroscopy to quartuplet, quintuplet and suggest linkages in sodium atom in which to display these spectra. We explore the involved fundamental processes of quantum interference of the corresponding spectroscopy by examining the Laplace transform of the corresponding state-vector subjected to steady coherent illumination in the rotating wave approximation and Weisskopf-Wigner treatment of spontaneous emission as a simplest probability loss. In the quartuplet, four fields interact appropriately and resonantly with the five-level atom. The spectral profile of the single decaying level, upon interaction with three other levels, splits into four destructively interfering dressed states generating three dark lines in the spectrum. These dark lines divide the spectrum into four spectral components (bright lines) whose widths are effectively controlled by the relative strength of the laser fields and the relative width of the single decaying level. We...

  1. Ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaenel, H. von; Klemenc, M.; Meyer, T. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland). Lab. fuer Festkoerperphysik

    2001-04-01

    Ballistic electron-emission spectroscopy (BEES) and microscopy (BEEM) have been carried out on epitaxial metal/semiconductor interfaces and on epitaxial nanostructures in UHV and at low temperatures. We describe how the band structure of the metal may lead to pronounced focusing of the hot carrier beam injected by the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip, thereby greatly enhancing the spatial resolution, such that spectroscopy at buried point defects becomes possible. The strain fields of Ge quantum dots buried underneath an epitaxial silicide film on a Si(100) substrate are found to induce a characteristic clustering of linear defects at the metal/semiconductor interface. The Schottky barrier height lowering associated with these defects allows for an easy identification of buried dots, despite the many mechanisms leading to contrast in BEEM images. (orig.)

  2. Josephson spectroscopy on submillimeter waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Josephson high-temperature superconducting submillimeter spectrometer is developed, made and experimentally investigated. The integral receiving structure of the spectrometer comprises the YBCO Josephson junction on the bicrystal boundary, the two-gap (or logo-periodic) antenna and the low-inductive resistive shunt. The selective detector response and the response on the intermediate frequency 1.4 GHz are measured at the action of signals in the frequency range 350-1250 GHz. Th new spectroscopy method based on the mode of the mixer with self-pumping is proposed. The technique for the separation of the studied signal spectrum from the measured HF response is presented. This spectroscopy method with using the Josephson mixer with self-pumping at the high intermediate frequency allows one to improve the sensitivity, the spectral resolution and the dynamic range of the Josephson spectrometer

  3. Infrared spectroscopy with visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnikov, Dmitry A.; Paterova, Anna V.; Kulik, Sergei P.; Krivitsky, Leonid A.

    2016-02-01

    Spectral measurements in the infrared optical range provide unique fingerprints of materials, which are useful for material analysis, environmental sensing and health diagnostics. Current infrared spectroscopy techniques require the use of optical equipment suited for operation in the infrared range, components of which face challenges of inferior performance and high cost. Here, we develop a technique that allows spectral measurements in the infrared range using visible-spectral-range components. The technique is based on nonlinear interference of infrared and visible photons, produced via spontaneous parametric down conversion. The intensity interference pattern for a visible photon depends on the phase of an infrared photon travelling through a medium. This allows the absorption coefficient and refractive index of the medium in the infrared range to be determined from the measurements of visible photons. The technique can substitute and/or complement conventional infrared spectroscopy and refractometry techniques, as it uses well-developed components for the visible range.

  4. Laser spectroscopy of cold molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Borri, Simone

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent results in high-resolution spectroscopy on cold molecules. Laser spectroscopy of cold molecules addresses issues of symmetry violation, like in the search for the electric dipole moment of the electron and the studies on energy differences in enantiomers of chiral species; tries to improve the precision to which fundamental physical constants are known and tests for their possible variation in time and space; tests quantum electrodynamics, and searches for a fifth force. Further, we briefly review the recent technological progresses in the fields of cold molecules and mid-infrared lasers, which are the tools that mainly set the limits for the resolution that is currently attainable in the measurements.

  5. Applications of neutron activation spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Silarski, M

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery in 1932, neutrons became a basis of many methods used not only in research, but also in industry and engineering. Among others, the exceptional role in the modern nuclear engineering is played by the neutron activation spectroscopy, based on the interaction of neutron flux with atomic nuclei. In this article we shortly describe application of this method in medicine and detection of hazardous substances.

  6. Baryon spectroscopy in lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derek B. Leinweber; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; David Richards; Anthony G. Williams; James Zanotti

    2004-04-01

    We review recent developments in the study of excited baryon spectroscopy in lattice QCD. After introducing the basic methods used to extract masses from correlation functions, we discuss various interpolating fields and lattice actions commonly used in the literature. We present a survey of results of recent calculations of excited baryons in quenched QCD, and outline possible future directions in the study of baryon spectra.

  7. Spectroscopy of heavy quark hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy quarks play special roles in the hadron spectroscopy. Some distinct features of heavy quark dynamics and their significance in the P-wave baryons with a single heavy quark are discussed. We also explore a new color configuration in exotic tetra-quark mesons with two heavy quarks. Finally, possibility of bound states of a charmed baryon with a nucleon and nuclei are examined. (author)

  8. Spectroscopy, scattering, and KK molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, J. [Univ. of Mississippi, University, MS (United States)

    1994-04-01

    The author presents a pedagogical description of a new theoretical technique, based on the multichannel Schroedinger equation, for simultaneously applying the quark model to both meson spectroscopy and meson-meson scattering. This is an extension of an earlier analysis which led to the prediction that the f{sub o}(975) and a{sub o}(980) scalar mesons are K{bar K} molecular states.

  9. Optical spectroscopy and tooth decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, P.; De, T.; Singh, R.

    2005-11-01

    Optical spectroscopy in the ultraviolet, visible and mid-infrared spectral regions has been used to discriminate between healthy and diseased teeth of patients in the age range 15-75 years. Spectral scans of absorbance versus wavenumber and fluorescence intensity versus wavelength have been recorded and investigated for caries and periodontal disease. Such optical diagnostics can prove very useful in the early detection and treatment of tooth decay.

  10. Autofluorescence spectroscopy of malignant tissue

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zavadil, Jiří; Ležal, Dimitrij; Ducháč, V.; Procházka, M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2005), s. 1023-1028. ISSN 1454-4164 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/02/0799; GA ČR(CZ) GA104/05/0878 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : laser application in medicine * fluorescence spectroscopy * glass fibres Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.138, year: 2005

  11. Raman spectroscopy of bone metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Sottnik, Joseph; Morris, Michael; Keller, Evan

    2012-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy of bone has been used to characterize chemical changes occurring in diseases such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and osteomyelitis. Metastasis of cancer into bone causes changes to bone quality that are similar to those observed in osteoporosis, such as decreased bone strength, but with an accelerated timeframe. In particular, osteolytic (bone degrading) lesions in bone metastasis have a marked effect on patient quality of life because of increased risk of fractures, pain, and hypercalcemia. We use Raman spectroscopy to examine bone from two different mouse models of osteolytic bone metastasis. Raman spectroscopy measures physicochemical information which cannot be obtained through standard biochemical and histological measurements. This study was reviewed and approved by the University of Michigan University Committee on the Care and Use of Animals. Two mouse models of prostate cancer bone metastasis, RM1 (n=3) and PC3-luc (n=4) were examined. Tibiae were injected with RM1 or PC3-luc cancer cells, while the contralateral tibiae received a placebo injection for use as controls. After 2 weeks of incubation, the mice were sacrificed and the tibiae were examined by Raman microspectroscopy (λ=785 nm). Spectroscopic markers corresponding to mineral stoichiometry, bone mineralization, and mineral crystallinity were compared in spectra from the cancerous and control tibiae. X-ray imaging of the tibia confirmed extensive osteolysis in the RM1 mice, with tumor invasion into adjoining soft tissue and moderate osteolysis in the PC3-luc mice. Raman spectroscopic markers indicate that osteolytic lesions are less mineralized than normal bone tissue, with an altered mineral stoichiometry and crystallinity.

  12. Development of MEMS photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Alex Lockwood [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Eichenfield, Matthew S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Griffin, Benjamin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harvey, Heidi Alyssa [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nielson, Gregory N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Okandan, Murat [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Langlois, Eric [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Resnick, Paul James [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shaw, Michael J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Young, Ian [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Givler, Richard C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reinke, Charles M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-01-01

    After years in the field, many materials suffer degradation, off-gassing, and chemical changes causing build-up of measurable chemical atmospheres. Stand-alone embedded chemical sensors are typically limited in specificity, require electrical lines, and/or calibration drift makes data reliability questionable. Along with size, these "Achilles' heels" have prevented incorporation of gas sensing into sealed, hazardous locations which would highly benefit from in-situ analysis. We report on development of an all-optical, mid-IR, fiber-optic based MEMS Photoacoustic Spectroscopy solution to address these limitations. Concurrent modeling and computational simulation are used to guide hardware design and implementation.

  13. Study on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser atomic spectroscopic study on actinium element has been performed in many areas of spectroscopy. The study on characteristic of atomic vapor has been proceeded for copper atom and the spatial density distribution of copper vapor is measured. This experimental data has been compared with the theoretically calculated data. In spectroscopic experiment, the first and second excited states for actinium element are identified and the most efficient ionization scheme for actinium element is identified. In addition, the corrosion problem for filament material due to the heating of the actinium element has been studied. (Author)

  14. Studies on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser atomic spectroscopy is studied both theoretically and experimentally. For Na-like ions, possible electric dipole, quadrupole and magnetic dipole transitions between atomic levels below 4f doublet F (J=7/2) state are investigated, using the recently developed computer programs - MCDF, MJE and MULTPOL. Line strength, oscillator strength and transition probability are calculated. A preliminary results for Hg-RIS experiment are also presented. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, high power dye laser, vacuum system, ionization cell and ion measuring system are constructed, and their characteristics are examined. (Author)

  15. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution measurements on γ rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author)

  16. Dalitz Plots and Hadron Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Wuethrich, Adrian

    2005-01-01

    In this master thesis I discuss how the weak three-body decay B^+ --> pi^- pi^+ K^+ is related to the strong interactions between the final-state particles. Current issues in hadron spectroscopy define a region of interest in a Dalitz plot of this decay. This region is roughly characterized by energies from 0 to 1.6 GeV of the pi^- pi^+ and the pi^- K^+ system, and energies from 3 to 5 GeV of the pi^+ K^+ system. Therefore I propose to use for the former two systems elastic unitarity (Watson'...

  17. Spectroscopy of blue stellar objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, K. J.; Warnock, A., III; Nations, H. L.; Barden, S. C.

    1983-01-01

    Spectra have been obtained for the brightest objects from a list of blue stellar objects found in a Palomar Schmidt field centered on Kapteyn Selected Area 28. Four of the objects presented here comprise a complete sample of objects with UV excess and magnitudes brighter than or equal to B = 16.3 mag. The object with the largest UV excess is a previously undiscovered quasar of redshift 0.25 and cataloged B magnitude of 15.6 mag. The object shows some evidence of variability. Spectroscopy for one bright object in a companion field centered on Selected Area 29 is also presented.

  18. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, W.R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    High-resolution measurements on {gamma} rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author) 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Technological applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review is given of some recent industrial applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy. One of the most desirable futures of the Moessbauer effect is the feasibility of performing in situ measurements. Such measurements are extremely important especially in the upgrading of coal derived liquids. Such applications have been very successful in understanding the role of iron sulfides stoichiometries in direct coal liquefaction. The use of in situ techniques is invaluable in the investigation of the metal support interaction and their relation to carburization processes in Fischer-Tropsch reactions. Emphasis is placed in the use of a multiple technique approach to elucidate scientific problems of industrial importance. (Auth.)

  20. Simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsoni, Abdollah T.; Hamby, David M.

    2010-03-23

    A phoswich radiation detector for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta rays and gamma rays includes three scintillators with different decay time characteristics. Two of the three scintillators are used for beta detection and the third scintillator is used for gamma detection. A pulse induced by an interaction of radiation with the detector is digitally analyzed to classify the type of event as beta, gamma, or unknown. A pulse is classified as a beta event if the pulse originated from just the first scintillator alone or from just the first and the second scintillator. A pulse from just the third scintillator is recorded as gamma event. Other pulses are rejected as unknown events.

  1. Examining pharmaceuticals using terahertz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulovská, Kateřina; Křesálek, Vojtěch

    2015-10-01

    Pharmaceutical trafficking is common issue in countries where they are under stricter dispensing regime with monitoring of users. Most commonly smuggled pharmaceuticals include trade names Paralen Plus, Modafen, Clarinase repetabs, Aspirin complex, etc. These are transported mainly from Eastern Europe (e.g. Poland, Ukraine, Russia) to countries like Czech Republic, which is said to have one of the highest number of methamphetamine producers in Europe. The aim of this paper is to describe the possibility of terahertz spectroscopy utilization as an examining tool to distinguish between pharmaceuticals containing pseudoephedrine compounds and those without it. Selected medicaments for experimental part contain as an active ingredient pseudoephedrine hydrochloride or pseudoephedrine sulphate. Results show a possibility to find a pseudoephedrine compound spectra in samples according to previously computed and experimentally found ones, and point out that spectra of same brand names pills may vary according to their expiration date, batch, and amount of absorbed water vapours from ambience. Mislead spectrum also occurs during experimental work in a sample without chosen active ingredient, which shows persistent minor inconveniences of terahertz spectroscopy. All measurement were done on the TPS Spectra 3000 instrument.

  2. Theory of resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) can be defined as a state selective detection process in which pulsed tunable lasers are used to promote transitions from the selected state of the atoms or molecules in question to higher states, one of which will be ionized by the absorption of another photon. The ability to make saturated RIS measurements opens up a wide variety of applications to both basic and applied research. In reviews of RIS the subject was treated generally, including the underlying photophysics applications, the ability to use it to count single atoms, and its applications to measurements in atomic and molecular physics. They view resonance ionization spectroscopy as a specific type of multiphoton ionization in which the goal is to make quantitative measurements of quantum-selected populations in atomic or molecular systems. This goal attained by requiring that the selective excitation steps be resonant in nature and involve only one- or two-photon (only one-photon if at all possible) absorption processes, thereby allowing the entire process to be carried to saturation without loss of spectroscopic selectivity due to laser power induced shifts or broadening

  3. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >108 ) with broadband ≃5 - 13 meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 103 signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  4. General Remarks about mossbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than forty years have passed since the discovery of Mossbauer effect; one of the most brilliant findings in modern physics. This effect proved itself to be the powerful tool in almost all disciplines of the natural sciences and technology. Its unique feature is that it gives the possibility to get the results which cannot be obtained by any other physical methods. Mossbauer effect has been used as a key to unlock some basic physical, chemical and biological phenomena, as a guide for finding the new ways of solving applied scientific and technical problems of electronics, metallurgy, civil engineering, and even fine arts and archaeology. Very few scientific techniques can claim entry into as many countries as Mossbauer spectroscopy. Due to its wide application in an education and research processes the community of Mossbauer spectroscopists extends to almost 100 different countries. Laboratory equipment necessary for conducting gamma resonance spectroscopy, do not require large investments, premises, personnel. The spectrometer is rather small in size and could be installed on the ordinary laboratory table. That is why Mossbauer effect is widely used at numerous Universities all over the world as an universal instrument for tuition and research

  5. Structural proteomics by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Joon; Lee, Woonghee; Lee, Weontae

    2008-08-01

    Structural proteomics is one of the powerful research areas in the postgenomic era, elucidating structure-function relationships of uncharacterized gene products based on the 3D protein structure. It proposes biochemical and cellular functions of unannotated proteins and thereby identifies potential drug design and protein engineering targets. Recently, a number of pioneering groups in structural proteomics research have achieved proof of structural proteomic theory by predicting the 3D structures of hypothetical proteins that successfully identified the biological functions of those proteins. The pioneering groups made use of a number of techniques, including NMR spectroscopy, which has been applied successfully to structural proteomics studies over the past 10 years. In addition, advances in hardware design, data acquisition methods, sample preparation and automation of data analysis have been developed and successfully applied to high-throughput structure determination techniques. These efforts ensure that NMR spectroscopy will become an important methodology for performing structural proteomics research on a genomic scale. NMR-based structural proteomics together with x-ray crystallography will provide a comprehensive structural database to predict the basic biological functions of hypothetical proteins identified by the genome projects. PMID:18761469

  6. Quantum-beat Auger spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Song Bin

    2015-01-01

    The concept of nonlinear quantum-beat pump-probe Auger spectroscopy is introduced by discussing a relatively simple four-level model system. We consider a coherent wave packet involving two low-lying states that was prepared by an appropriate pump pulse. This wave packet is subsequently probed by a weak, time-delayed probe pulse with nearly resonant coupling to a core-excited state of the atomic or molecular system. The resonant Auger spectra are then studied as a function of the duration of the probe pulse and the time delay. With a bandwidth of the probe pulse approaching the energy spread of the wave packet, the Auger yields and spectra show quantum beats as a function of pump-probe delay. An analytic theory for the quantum-beat Auger spectroscopy will be presented, which allows for the reconstruction of the wave packet by analyzing the delaydependent Auger spectra. The possibility of extending this method to a more complex manifold of electronic and vibrational energy levels is also discussed.

  7. Stochastic Time-Series Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Scoville, John

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopically measuring low levels of non-equilibrium phenomena (e.g. emission in the presence of a large thermal background) can be problematic due to an unfavorable signal-to-noise ratio. An approach is presented to use time-series spectroscopy to separate non-equilibrium quantities from slowly varying equilibria. A stochastic process associated with the non-equilibrium part of the spectrum is characterized in terms of its central moments or cumulants, which may vary over time. This parameterization encodes information about the non-equilibrium behavior of the system. Stochastic time-series spectroscopy (STSS) can be implemented at very little expense in many settings since a series of scans are typically recorded in order to generate a low-noise averaged spectrum. Higher moments or cumulants may be readily calculated from this series, enabling the observation of quantities that would be difficult or impossible to determine from an average spectrum or from prinicipal components analysis (PCA). This meth...

  8. Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The contributions given hereafter to this Annual Report cover a broad activity of the Department in 1999 both in the pure nuclear spectroscopy and in the applied spectroscopy investigations. That activity is then assembled in the two main groups: the nuclear structure studies with the application of the multidetector systems such as GASP, GAMMASPHERE, EUROBALL and the RFD - as its ancillary device, and investigations of condensed matter properties with the use of nuclear methods. In addition, non-nuclear methods such as the atomic force microscopy provided several new encouraging results. The nice data obtained are due to the great skill and hard work of all members of the staff, and a vast cooperation both with international and national institutes and institutions. When anticipated for calling the attractive results of the past year, I would rather admit that all data given here pretend to be those. To meet with, I refer directly to the short presentations given in the next pages. (author)

  9. Tunneling spectroscopy of novel superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent discoveries of exciting new superconductors have led to further exciting speculations about novel mechanisms and/or pairing. Tunneling spectroscopy can again play an important role in establishing the applicability of these ideas to specific superconductors. In addition to the traditional role of verifying in detail the electron-phonon coupling through α2F, in many cases the magnitude of the gap compared to the BCS prediction or the crystalline gap anisotropy can reveal direct information about novel mechanisms and/or pairing. Since many of these new materials have only been available as bulk samples, or bulk single-crystal studies are desired, the technique of vacuum tunneling spectroscopy, pioneered by Poppe (1981) for superconductors, is most appropriate. However, thick, nonconducting surface layers are often found which prevent true vacuum tunneling. For these samples, mechanical contact of the tunneling tip is required to break through the surface layer to the superconductor below. The resulting point-contact tunneling can, however, emulate many of the results of true tunneling through a vacuum or insulator. In this paper, they shall briefly review relevant tunneling techniques and some recent experiments on magnetic, organic, heavy fermion and high-T/sub c/ oxide superconductors. Connections are made to theoretical ideas, especially regarding novel mechanisms and/or pairing

  10. X-ray echo spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin-echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a point-like x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x-rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1--0.02-meV ultra-high-resolution IXS applications (resolving power $> 10^8$) with broadband $\\simeq$~5--13~meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than $10^3$ signal e...

  11. Hyphenated spectroscopy as a polymorph screening tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, Jaakko; Strachan, Clare J; Pöllänen, Kati; Yliruusi, Jouko; Rantanen, Jukka

    2007-06-28

    Polymorph screening of a model compound (nitrofurantoin) was performed. Nitrofurantoin was crystallized from acetone-water mixtures with varying process parameters. Two anhydrate forms (alpha and beta) and one monohydrate form (II) were crystallized in the polymorph screen. The solid forms were analyzed with three complementary spectroscopic techniques: near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and terahertz pulsed spectroscopy (TPS), and the results of the solid phase analysis were verified with X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). NIR and Raman spectroscopy were coupled to achieve a rapid and comprehensive method of solid phase analysis. The hyphenated NIR/Raman spectroscopic data were analyzed with a multivariate method, principal component analysis (PCA). The combination was found effective in screening solid forms due to the complementary characteristics of the methods. NIR spectroscopy is powerful in differentiating between anhydrate and hydrate forms and intermolecular features, whereas Raman spectroscopy is sensitive to intramolecular alterations in the molecular backbone. PMID:17367979

  12. Raman Spectroscopy and Related Techniques in Biomedicine

    OpenAIRE

    Alistair Elfick; Andrew Downes

    2010-01-01

    In this review we describe label-free optical spectroscopy techniques which are able to non-invasively measure the (bio)chemistry in biological systems. Raman spectroscopy uses visible or near-infrared light to measure a spectrum of vibrational bonds in seconds. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman (CARS) microscopy and stimulated Raman loss (SRL) microscopy are orders of magnitude more efficient than Raman spectroscopy, and are able to acquire high quality chemically-specific images in seconds. We dis...

  13. Nanometrology using localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Claus; Lindstedt, Daniel N.; Laurberg, Asger V.; Kristensen, Anders; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2013-01-01

    A novel optical characterization technique called localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy is presented. LSPR spectroscopy exploits light excited surface plasmons, which are collective coherent electron oscillations at a metal/dielectric interface. The LSPR can be observed in a tra...... dense device layers where the vacant space for test structures is limited.In this work, LSPR spectroscopy is used to evaluate a fabrication process including imprinting, etching and metallisation of gammadion test structures distributed on a 4” wafer....

  14. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS), pt.A

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial by containing quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers Fluorescence Fluctuation SpectroscopyContains chapters on such topics as Time-integrated fluorescence cumulant analysis, Pulsed Interleaved Excitation, and raster image correlation spectroscopy and number and brightness analysis.Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the fieldCovers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopyContains chapte

  15. Recent Results on Hadron Spectroscopy from BESIII

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Beijiang

    2015-01-01

    Hadron spectroscopy is one of the most important physics goals of BESIII. BESIII brings great opportunities to study the XYZ states of charmonium by directly producing the Y states up to 4.6 GeV. High statistics of charmonium decays collected at BESIII provide an excellent place for hunting gluonic excitations and studying the excited baryons. Recent results of light hadron spectroscopy and charmonium spectroscopy from BESIII will be reported.

  16. XXII Conference on spectroscopy. Summaries of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    XXII Conference on spectroscopy took place 8-12 October 2001 in Zvenigorod, Moscow region. The recent advantages in the field of atomic and molecular spectroscopy were discussed. The current methods for elemental spectra analysis were considered. They are based on both traditional atomic emission, adsorption and Raman spectroscopic techniques and on introduction of the mass spectroscopy with the high-temperature plasma atomizer. The particular attention was given the application of spectroscopic methods for plasma diagnostics and air pollution control

  17. Solid state spectroscopies basic principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalo, Julio A; De Frutos, Jose

    2002-01-01

    Materials physics is a very active research field at present and it is expected to remain so in the foreseeable future. Different spectroscopies are currently used to investigate the structure and dynamics of crystalline materials. Some traditional spectroscopies are presented in this book: optical, magnetic resonance, ultrasonic, brillouin, neutron scattering, soft mode and dielectric response spectroscopies. For all of them, the presentation is complemented with some reference material for more modern or sophisticated spectroscopies.This book should be useful as an introductory textbook for

  18. Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shu-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures is an original and timely contribution to a very active area of physics and materials science research. This book presents the theoretical and experimental phenomena of Raman spectroscopy, with specialized discussions on the physical fundamentals, new developments and main features in low-dimensional systems of Raman spectroscopy. In recent years physicists, materials scientists and chemists have devoted increasing attention to low-dimensional systems and as Raman spectroscopy can be used to study and analyse such materials as carbon nan

  19. Laser spectroscopy of muonic deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Randolf; Nez, François; Fernandes, Luis M. P.; Amaro, Fernando D.; Biraben, François; Cardoso, João M. R.; Covita, Daniel S.; Dax, Andreas; Dhawan, Satish; Diepold, Marc; Giesen, Adolf; Gouvea, Andrea L.; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Knowles, Paul; Kottmann, Franz; Le Bigot, Eric-Olivier; Liu, Yi-Wei; Lopes, José A. M.; Ludhova, Livia; Monteiro, Cristina M. B.; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Rabinowitz, Paul; dos Santos, Joaquim M. F.; Schaller, Lukas A.; Schuhmann, Karsten; Schwob, Catherine; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F. C. A.; Antognini, Aldo

    2016-08-01

    The deuteron is the simplest compound nucleus, composed of one proton and one neutron. Deuteron properties such as the root-mean-square charge radius rd and the polarizability serve as important benchmarks for understanding the nuclear forces and structure. Muonic deuterium μd is the exotic atom formed by a deuteron and a negative muon μ–. We measured three 2S-2P transitions in μd and obtain rd = 2.12562(78) fm, which is 2.7 times more accurate but 7.5σ smaller than the CODATA-2010 value rd = 2.1424(21) fm. The μd value is also 3.5σ smaller than the rd value from electronic deuterium spectroscopy. The smaller rd, when combined with the electronic isotope shift, yields a “small” proton radius rp, similar to the one from muonic hydrogen, amplifying the proton radius puzzle.

  20. Theory of resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) can be defined as a state selective detection process in which pulsed tunable lasers are used to promote transitions from the selected state of the atoms or molecules in question to higher states, one of which will be ionized by the absorption of another photon. At least one resonance step is used in the stepwise ionization process, and it has been shown that the ionization probability of the spectroscopically selected species can nearly always be made close to unity. Since measurements of the number of photoelectrons or ions can be made very precisely and even one electron (or under vacuum conditions, one ion) can be detected, the technique can be used to make quantitative measurements of very small populations of the state-selected species

  1. Screening spectroscopy of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yermolenko, S. B.; Voloshynskyy, D. I.; Fedoruk, O. S.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to establish objective parameters of the field of laser and incoherent radiation of different spectral ranges (UV, visible, IR) as a non-invasive optical method of interaction with different samples of biological tissues and fluids of patients to determine the state of prostate cancer and choosing the best personal treatment. The objects of study were selected venous blood plasma of patient with prostate cancer, histological sections of rat prostate gland in the postoperative period. As diagnostic methods have been used ultraviolet spectrometry samples of blood plasma in the liquid state, infrared spectroscopy middle range (2,5-25 microns) dry residue of plasma by spectral diagnostic technique of thin histological sections of biological tissues.

  2. Spectroscopy after the new particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional spectroscopy is reexamined in a search for puzzles and paradoxes which have arisen in attempting to describe the properties of the known particles. These may offer clues to the missing elements necessary for the description of the new particles. The minimum number of elementary building blocks, charm and color, the colored quark model for saturation, spin splittings in the meson spectrum, three kinds of quarks, the Melosh transformation and the Jackson frame, beyond the single-quark transition--the Zweig rule mystery, new particles and old symmetries, the f--A2 interference, and tests of the Zweig rule by rho--ω and f--A2--f' interference are considered

  3. Decay spectroscopy of $^{178}$Au

    CERN Document Server

    Whitmore, B

    In this thesis, the neutron-deficient nucleus $^{178}$Au is investigated through decay spectroscopy. Si and HPGe detectors were used to analyse the decay radiation of $^{178}$Au and its daughter nuclei. Previous studies have been unable to distinguish decay radiation from different isomeric states of this nucleus. This thesis represents the first time such isomeric discrimination has been achieved, and presents tentative spin assignments of both the ground state and an isomer. The neutron-deficient gold isotopes are an area of interest for the study of shape coexistence. This is the phenomenon exhibited by nuclei able to exist at a number of close lying energy minima, each reflecting a distinct type of deformation. It is hoped that studies such as this can help identify the evolution of nuclear deformation in this region of the nuclear chart.

  4. Cartilage analysis by reflection spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laun, T.; Muenzer, M.; Wenzel, U.; Princz, S.; Hessling, M.

    2015-07-01

    A cartilage bioreactor with analytical functions for cartilage quality monitoring is being developed. For determining cartilage composition, reflection spectroscopy in the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) spectral region is evaluated. Main goal is the determination of the most abundant cartilage compounds water, collagen I and collagen II. Therefore VIS and NIR reflection spectra of different cartilage samples of cow, pig and lamb are recorded. Due to missing analytical instrumentation for identifying the cartilage composition of these samples, typical literature concentration values are used for the development of chemometric models. In spite of these limitations the chemometric models provide good cross correlation results for the prediction of collagen I and II and water concentration based on the visible and the NIR reflection spectra.

  5. Graphene intracavity spaser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozovik, Yu. E.; Nechepurenko, I. A.; Dorofeenko, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    We propose an intracavity plasmon absorption spectroscopy method based on graphene active plasmonics. It is shown that the plasmonic cavity contribution to the sensitivity is proportional to the quality factor Q of the graphene plasmonic cavity and reaches two orders of magnitude. The addition of gain medium into the cavity increases the sensitivity of method. Maximum sensitivity is reached in the vicinity of the plasmon generation threshold. The gain contribution to the sensitivity is proportional to Q1/2. The giant amplification of sensitivity in the graphene plasmon generator is associated with a huge path length, limited only by the decoherence processes. An analytical estimation of the sensitivity to loss caused by analyzed particles (molecules, nanoparticles, etc.) normalized by the single pass plasmon scheme is derived. Usage of graphene nanoflakes as plasmonic cavity allows a high spatial resolution to be reached, in addition to high sensitivity.

  6. Spectroscopy of Isolated Prebiotic Nucleobases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svadlenak, Nathan; Callahan, Michael P.; Ligare, Marshall; Gulian, Lisa; Gengeliczki, Zsolt; Nachtigallova, Dana; Hobza, Pavel; deVries, Mattanjah

    2011-01-01

    We use multiphoton ionization and double resonance spectroscopy to study the excited state dynamics of biologically relevant molecules as well as prebiotic nucleobases, isolated in the gas phase. Molecules that are biologically relevant to life today tend to exhibit short excited state lifetimes compared to similar but non-biologically relevant analogs. The mechanism is internal conversion, which may help protect the biologically active molecules from UV damage. This process is governed by conical intersections that depend very strongly on molecular structure. Therefore we have studied purines and pyrimidines with systematic variations of structure, including substitutions, tautomeric forms, and cluster structures that represent different base pair binding motifs. These structural variations also include possible alternate base pairs that may shed light on prebiotic chemistry. With this in mind we have begun to probe the ultrafast dynamics of molecules that exhibit very short excited states and search for evidence of internal conversions.

  7. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, A.; Parthey, Ch G.; Kolachevsky, N.; Alnis, J.; Khabarova, K.; Pohl, R.; Peters, E.; Yost, D. C.; Matveev, A.; Predehl, K.; Droste, S.; Wilken, T.; Holzwarth, R.; Hänsch, T. W.; Abgrall, M.; Rovera, D.; Salomon, Ch; Laurent, Ph; Udem, Th

    2013-12-01

    Precise determinations of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference [1]. A recent measurement of the 2S - 2P3/2 transition frequency in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct [2, 3]. We hope to contribute to this so-called "proton size puzzle" by providing additional experimental input from hydrogen spectroscopy.

  8. Auger electron spectroscopy of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes how the surface compositions of some alloys can be determined by Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). The motivation for this research and the reasons for the choice of alloy systems studied are formulated. The theoretical background of AES is briefly discussed and the apparatus used and the experimental procedures applied are described. Four alloy systems have been investigated in this thesis - Ni-Cu and Pd - Ag (consisting of a component active in most cataytic reactions - Ni and Pd; and a component which is almost inactive for a number of reactions - Cu and Ag) and Pt - Pd and Pt-Ir (consisting of two active components). Knowledge of the surface composition of the various alloy systems is shown to be essential for the interpretation of catalytic results. (Auth./C.F.)

  9. MR spectroscopy in clinical research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O

    1994-01-01

    MR spectroscopy (MRS) offers unique possibilities for non-invasive evaluation of biochemistry in vivo. During recent years there has been a growing body of evidence from clinical research studies on human beings using 31P and 1H MRS. The results indicate that it is possible to evaluate phosphorous...... energy metabolism, loss of neurones, and lactate production in a large number of brain diseases. Furthermore, 31P and 1H MRS may be particularly clinically useful in evaluation of various disorders in skeletal muscle. In the heart 31P MRS seems at the moment the most suitable for evaluation of global...... affections of the myocardium. In the liver 31P MRS appears to be rather insensitive and non-specific, but absolute quantification of metabolite concentrations and using metabolic "stress models" may prove useful in the future. The clinical role of MRS in oncology is still unclear, but it may be useful for...

  10. Spectroscopy of family gauge bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectroscopy of family gauge bosons is investigated based on a U(3) family gauge boson model proposed by Sumino. In his model, the family gauge bosons are in mass eigenstates in a diagonal basis of the charged lepton mass matrix. Therefore, the family numbers are defined by (e1,e2,e3)=(e,μ,τ), while the assignment for quark sector are free. For possible family-number assignments (q1,q2,q3), under a constraint from K0–K¯0 mixing, we investigate possibilities of new physics, e.g. production of the lightest family gauge boson at the LHC, μ−N→e−N, rare K and B decays, and so on.

  11. Raman spectroscopy peer review report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Site in eastern Washington includes 177 underground storage tanks (UST), which contain waste materials produced during the production of nuclear fuels. The materials in the tanks must be characterized to support the retrieval, processing, and final disposition of the waste. Characterization is currently performed by removing waste samples for analyses in a hot cell or laboratory. A review of the Hanford Raman Spectroscopy Program was held in Richland on March 23 and 24, 1994. A team of principal investigators and researchers made presentations that covered both technical and programmatic aspects of the Hanford Site Raman work. After these presentations and discussions, the review panel met in a closed session to formalize a list of findings. The reviewers agreed that Raman spectroscopy is an excellent method to attack the tank waste characterization and screening problems that were presented. They agreed that there was a good chance that the method would be successful as presently envisioned. The reviewers provided the following primary recommendations: evaluation a laser with wavelength in the near infrared; provide optical filters at or near the sampling end of the fiber-optic probe; develop and implement a strategy for frequent calibration of the system; do not try to further increase Raman resolution at the expense of wavelength range; clearly identify and differentiate between requirements for providing a short-term operational system and requirements for optimizing a system for long-term field use; and determine the best optical configuration, which may include reduced fiber-optic diameter and/or short focal length and low F-number spectrographs

  12. Consistent spectroscopy for a extended gauge model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The consistent spectroscopy was obtained with a Lagrangian constructed with vector fields with a U(1) group extended symmetry. As consistent spectroscopy is understood the determination of quantum physical properties described by the model in an manner independent from the possible parametrizations adopted in their description. (L.C.J.A.)

  13. NMR Spectroscopy and Its Value: A Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used by chemists. Furthermore, the use of NMR spectroscopy to solve structures of macromolecules or to examine protein-ligand interactions is popular. Yet, few students entering graduate education in biological sciences have been introduced to this method or its utility. Over the last six…

  14. Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Rubidium: An Undergraduate Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, V.; Hingant, B.; Allafort, A.; Pigeard, M.; Roch, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe two complementary nonlinear spectroscopy methods which both allow one to achieve Doppler-free spectra of atomic gases. First, saturated absorption spectroscopy is used to investigate the structure of the 5S[subscript 1/2] [right arrow] 5P[subscript 3/2] transition in rubidium. Using a slightly modified experimental…

  15. Baryonic spectroscopy and its immediate future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quark model is reviewed briefly for baryons and the various versions of SU(6) symmetry which were proposed and used in connection with baryon spectroscopy are reviewed. A series of basic questions are reviewed which experimental work in this field should aim to settle, as a minimal program. One also heralds the beginning of a new baryon spectroscopy associated with psi physics

  16. Resonance Raman spectroscopy and ultrafast chemical dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Nandita; Umapathy, Siva

    1998-01-01

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy is normally used to study the excited state structure and dynamics of various photochemical and photophysical processes. In this article. we briefly discuss the various applications of RR spectroscopy and show how experimental RR intensities along with time-dependent wavepacket dynamical calculations can be used to study the excited state structure and ultrafast dynamics (\\sim 10(- 15) secs).

  17. Brain MR Spectroscopy: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Arsalan Zamani

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Advances in brain MR spectroscopy can be classified in"nthree different fields: MR spectroscopy with a higher"nstrength scanner, integration of MR spectroscopy with"nother imaging techniques in the diagnosis of brain"ntumors, and the topic of MRS in psychiatric diseases."nMRS with a higher strength magnet: The theoretical"nadvantage of a 3T magnet over a 1.5T magnet is an"nexpected two fold increase in signal to noise ratio. In"nIran J Radiol 2011, 8 (Supp.1 S63"nfact because of other factors (increased susceptibility"neffects, difficulty in achieving good shimming, shorter"nT1 values and the SAR issue this improved signal/"nnoise ratio is less than a factor of two. Nevertheless,"nin MRS with a higher strength magnet, there is a"ndefinite improved spectral resolution. This under"nproper condition allows a better separation of peaks"nthat were close together (or even superimposed on one"nanother on a 1.5T magnet. Imaging lactate becomes"nmore challenging as we will see."nAs the MRS has becomes better refined and its"ncapabilities better understood, it has found its way"ninto multiple imaging algorithms of brain tumors. One"nof the best known of these begins by dividing lesions"non the basis of whether they enhance or not and then,"nduring the rest of the algorithm uses MRS results in"nconjunction with DWI, and perfusion imaging toward"na more accurate diagnosis. The accuracy of these"nalgorithms is being tested but the results so far have"nbeen promising. The role of MRS in these algorithms"nis on differentiation of non-enhancing lesions (nonneoplastic"nvs. neoplastic and in the differentiation"nof high grade neoplasm into primary and metastatic"ndisease."nMRS in psychiatric disease: MR imaging in general"nand MRS in particular, have been used in psychiatry"nfor almost 30 years now. As imaging has evolved and"nimproved it has become more and more clear that"npsychiatric disease, like organic disease, has its own"nneuropathology. Although

  18. Raman Spectroscopy of Ocular Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Gellermann, Warner

    The optically transparent nature of the human eye has motivated numerous Raman studies aimed at the non-invasive optical probing of ocular tissue components critical to healthy vision. Investigations include the qualitative and quantitative detection of tissue-specific molecular constituents, compositional changes occurring with development of ocular pathology, and the detection and tracking of ocular drugs and nutritional supplements. Motivated by a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cataract formation in the aging human lens, a great deal of work has centered on the Raman detection of proteins and water content in the lens. Several protein groups and the hydroxyl response are readily detectable. Changes of protein compositions can be studied in excised noncataractous tissue versus aged tissue preparations as well as in tissue samples with artificially induced cataracts. Most of these studies are carried out in vitro using suitable animal models and conventional Raman techniques. Tissue water content plays an important role in optimum light transmission of the outermost transparent ocular structure, the cornea. Using confocal Raman spectroscopy techniques, it has been possible to non-invasively measure the water to protein ratio as a measure of hydration status and to track drug-induced changes of the hydration levels in the rabbit cornea at various depths. The aqueous humor, normally supplying nutrients to cornea and lens, has an advantageous anterior location for Raman studies. Increasing efforts are pursued to non-invasively detect the presence of glucose and therapeutic concentrations of antibiotic drugs in this medium. In retinal tissue, Raman spectroscopy proves to be an important tool for research into the causes of macular degeneration, the leading cause of irreversible vision disorders and blindness in the elderly. It has been possible to detect the spectral features of advanced glycation and advanced lipooxydation end products in

  19. Planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical composition of a planet can be inferred from the gamma rays escaping from its surface and can be used to study its origin and evolution. The measured intensities of certain gamma rays of specific energies can be used to determine the abundances of a number of elements. The major sources of these gamma-ray lines are the decay of natural radionuclides, reactions induced by energetic galactic-cosmic-ray particles, capture of low energy neutrons, and solar-proton-induced radioactivities. The fluxes of the more intense gamma-ray lines emitted from 30 elements were calculated using current nuclear data and existing models. The source strengths for neutron-capture reactions were modified from those previously used. The fluxes emitted from a surface of average lunar composition are reported for 288 gamma-ray lines. These theoretical fluxes have been used elsewhere to convert the data from the Apollo gamma-ray spectrometers to elemental abundances and can be used with results from future missions to map the concentrations of a number of elements over a planet's surface. Detection sensitivities for these elements are examined and applications of gamma-ray spectroscopy for future orbiters to Mars and other solar-system objects are discussed

  20. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy intrinsic seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have begun to quantify the ability of acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS) to detect the removal and replacement of the lid of a simulated special nuclear materials drum. Conceptually, the acoustic spectrum of a container establishcs a baseline fingerprint, which we refer to as an intrinsic seal, for the container. Simply removing and replacing the lid changes some of the resonant frequencies because it is impossible to exactly duplicate all of the stress patterns between the lid and container. Preliminary qualitative results suggested that the ARS intrinsic seal could discriminate between cases where a lid has or has not been removed. The present work is directed at quantifying the utility of the ARS intrinsic seal technique, including the technique's sensitivity to ''nuisance'' effects, such as temperature swings, movement of the container, and placement of the transducers. These early quantitative tests support the potential of the ARS intrinsic seal application, but also reveal a possible sensitivity to nuisance effects that could limit environments or conditions under which the technique is effective

  1. Measuring Gravitation Using Polarization Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsko, Andrey; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2004-01-01

    A proposed method of measuring gravitational acceleration would involve the application of polarization spectroscopy to an ultracold, vertically moving cloud of atoms (an atomic fountain). A related proposed method involving measurements of absorption of light pulses like those used in conventional atomic interferometry would yield an estimate of the number of atoms participating in the interferometric interaction. The basis of the first-mentioned proposed method is that the rotation of polarization of light is affected by the acceleration of atoms along the path of propagation of the light. The rotation of polarization is associated with a phase shift: When an atom moving in a laboratory reference interacts with an electromagnetic wave, the energy levels of the atom are Doppler-shifted, relative to where they would be if the atom were stationary. The Doppler shift gives rise to changes in the detuning of the light from the corresponding atomic transitions. This detuning, in turn, causes the electromagnetic wave to undergo a phase shift that can be measured by conventional means. One would infer the gravitational acceleration and/or the gradient of the gravitational acceleration from the phase measurements.

  2. Differentiating tissue by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woessner, Stefan; Huen, Julien; Malthan, Dirk

    2004-03-01

    A common problem in several surgical applications is the lack of navigational information. Most often, the only source of information about the location of crucial structures, in relation to the surgical instrument, is the visible and tactile sensory input of the surgeon. In some cases, this leads to time-consuming procedures and a high risk for the patient. Therefore, we developed a spectroscopic sensor system for automatic differentiation between several tissue types. For example in milling processes, a sensor that is able to detect bone in contrast to nerve or vein tissue can be used to control the milling process. We showed exemplarily for the cochlea implant, a typical ENT-surgery, that with the help of our sensor system, the milling of bone can be accelerated without increasing the risk for the patient. It is also possible to use this type of sensor system in the area of medical robotics in soft-tissue applications. With real-time information, a continuous registration can take place, in contrast to a registration that is done using static preoperatively acquired images. We showed that our sensor system can be used to dynamically update the location of the patient in relation to CT or MR-images. In conclusion, we have been able to show that well-known spectroscopy sensors can be used to open new possibilities in medical treatment with and without the use of robotics.

  3. Issues in Light Hadron Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, D

    1994-01-01

    A high priority in light spectroscopy is to seek out and characterize various types of non-$(Q\\bar{Q}$) meson. The large quantity of new data now appearing will present a great opportunity. To identify the non-$(Q\\bar{Q}$) intruders one needs to know the regular $(Q\\bar{Q}$) pattern well; whole meson families thus become a target for close investigation. A powerful discovery strategy is to observe the same meson in a variety of reactions. Because mesons appear as resonances, other dynamics can distort the signal in a particular decay channel. Unitarity is the master principle for co- ordinating various sightings of the same resonance. Much of the new spectroscopic information in prospect will come from inferring two-body dynamics from three-body final states. Conventional methods of analysis via the isobar model use approximations to unitarity that need validation. Of all the meson families, the scalars should be a prime hunting ground for non-$(Q\\bar{Q}$)'s. Even before the advent of the new results, some re...

  4. Planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reedy, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    The chemical composition of a planet can be inferred from the gamma rays escaping from its surface and can be used to study its origin and evolution. The measured intensities of certain gamma rays of specific energies can be used to determine the abundances of a number of elements. The major sources of these gamma-ray lines are the decay of natural radionuclides, reactions induced by energetic galactic-cosmic-ray particles, capture of low energy neutrons, and solar-proton-induced radioactivities. The fluxes of the more intense gamma-ray lines emitted from 30 elements were calculated using current nuclear data and existing models. The source strengths for neutron-capture reactions were modified from those previously used. The fluxes emitted from a surface of average lunar composition are reported for 288 gamma-ray lines. These theoretical fluxes have been used elsewhere to convert the data from the Apollo gamma-ray spectrometers to elemental abundances and can be used with results from future missions to map the concentrations of a number of elements over a planet's surface. Detection sensitivities for these elements are examined and applications of gamma-ray spectroscopy for future orbiters to Mars and other solar-system objects are discussed.

  5. Organ mapping using parelectric spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whenever physical methods are used in the field of diagnostics, it is necessary to find an unambiguous mapping of the properties of the tested tissues (e.g. normal or pathologic) to their answer to the respective analysis tool such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), ultrasound, x-rays or the relatively new method of parelectric spectroscopy (PS). The well-established non-invasive NMR method has, by now, a sufficiently wide-spread atlas of such mappings. This has to be contrasted to the situation of the PS method where first experiments showed the fulfilment of conditions necessary for any reliable diagnosis, namely the uncertainties of the results being small compared to the differences between the normal and pathologic state of the tissues under test. To help close this gap, we present here results of the behaviour of 12 different organs of mice, taken 20 min after excision and give the dependence of the two most essential PS parameters, the dipole density Δε and the mobility f0, on the type of healthy organs. To be able to use tumorous tissues preserved in formaldehyde after excision for comparison purposes, we have been measuring the changes of some organs between the fresh state and the preserved state under formaldehyde for over 180 min each

  6. Organ mapping using parelectric spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaschke, T [Department of Physics, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Sivaramakrishnan, R [Department of Physics, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Gross, M [Department of Audiology and Phoniatrics, Charite University Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Kramer, K D [Department of Physics, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2006-03-21

    Whenever physical methods are used in the field of diagnostics, it is necessary to find an unambiguous mapping of the properties of the tested tissues (e.g. normal or pathologic) to their answer to the respective analysis tool such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), ultrasound, x-rays or the relatively new method of parelectric spectroscopy (PS). The well-established non-invasive NMR method has, by now, a sufficiently wide-spread atlas of such mappings. This has to be contrasted to the situation of the PS method where first experiments showed the fulfilment of conditions necessary for any reliable diagnosis, namely the uncertainties of the results being small compared to the differences between the normal and pathologic state of the tissues under test. To help close this gap, we present here results of the behaviour of 12 different organs of mice, taken 20 min after excision and give the dependence of the two most essential PS parameters, the dipole density {delta}{epsilon} and the mobility f{sub 0}, on the type of healthy organs. To be able to use tumorous tissues preserved in formaldehyde after excision for comparison purposes, we have been measuring the changes of some organs between the fresh state and the preserved state under formaldehyde for over 180 min each.

  7. Spectroscopy Division: progress report for 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarises the work done by members of the Spectroscopy Division both within BARC as well as in scientific institutions elsewhere during the calendar year 1990. Main areas of research activity include atomic spectroscopy for hyperfine structure and isotope shift determination, theoretical and experimental studies of diatomic molecules, infrared and Raman spectroscopy of polyatomic molecules, design and fabrication of beam line optics for INDUS-I synchrotron radiation source, beam foil spectroscopy and laser spectroscopy of various atomic and molecular systems. Major experimental facilities that have been utilised include a fourier transform spectrometer, an excimer laser pumped dye-laser and a continous wave argon-ion laser. The report also includes the spectroscopic analytical service rendered for various DAE units and describes briefly some new analytical facilities like laser enhanced ionization in flames and resonance ionization mass spectroscopy using pulsed lasers which are being set up. The above activites were reported by members of the Spectroscopy Division via invited lectures, papers presented in various national and international conferences and publication in scientific journals. Details of these are given at the end of the report. (author). figs., tabs

  8. Handbook of Applied Solid State Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Vij, D. R

    2006-01-01

    Solid-State spectroscopy is a burgeoning field with applications in many branches of science, including physics, chemistry, biosciences, surface science, and materials science. Handbook of Applied Solid-State Spectroscopy brings together in one volume information about various spectroscopic techniques that is currently scattered in the literature of these disciplines. This concise yet comprehensive volume covers theory and applications of a broad range of spectroscopies, including NMR, NQR, EPR/ESR, ENDOR, scanning tunneling, acoustic resonance, FTIR, auger electron emission, x-ray photoelectron emission, luminescence, and optical polarization, and more. Emphasis is placed on fundamentals and current methods and procedures, together with the latest applications and developments in the field.

  9. Science Perspectives for 3D Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kissler-Patig, Markus; Roth, Martin M; ESO Workshop

    2007-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the last conference ever on integral-field spectroscopy. A daring statement, indicating that integral-field spectroscopy has evolved into a mature technique - a common user utility for astronomical research. Nowadays many integral-field spectrographs are installed on 4m to 8-10m class telescopes around the world. While many of those instruments are referred to in this volume, the book is explicitly not dedicated to technical issues, but is focusing on the scientific questions that can be answered with integral-field spectroscopy. These range from solar system studies all the way to high redshift surveys.

  10. Terahertz spectroscopy of explosives and drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Giles Davies

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Terahertz frequency radiation possesses a unique combination of desirable properties for noninvasive imaging and spectroscopy of materials. This includes the ability to obtain chemical and structural information about substances concealed within dry packaging, such as paper, plastics, and cardboard. As a result, the application of terahertz frequency spectroscopy for the sensing and identification of materials of security interest, such as explosives and, to a lesser extent, drugs-of-abuse, has caught the attention of a number of researchers and security agencies. We describe terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and examine the terahertz spectra of a wide range of drugs-of-abuse, pure explosives, and plastic explosives.

  11. Near-infrared spectroscopy for cocrystal screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allesø, Morten; Velaga, Sitaram; Alhalaweh, Amjad; Cornett, Claus; Rasmussen, Morten Arendt; Van Der Berg, Franciscus Winfried J; de Diego, Heidi Lopez; Rantanen, Jukka

    2008-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is a well-established technique for solid-state analysis, providing fast, noninvasive measurements. The use of NIR spectroscopy for polymorph screening and the associated advantages have recently been demonstrated. The objective of this work was to evaluate the...... retained in a physical mixture with the guest molecule, while liquid-assisted cogrinding did not induce any changes in the crystal lattice. The good chemical peak selectivity of Raman spectroscopy allowed a straightforward interpretation of sample data by analyzing peak positions and comparing to those of...

  12. Neural networks for nuclear spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, P.E.; Kangas, L.J.; Hashem, S.; Kouzes, R.T. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    In this paper two applications of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in nuclear spectroscopy analysis are discussed. In the first application, an ANN assigns quality coefficients to alpha particle energy spectra. These spectra are used to detect plutonium contamination in the work environment. The quality coefficients represent the levels of spectral degradation caused by miscalibration and foreign matter affecting the instruments. A set of spectra was labeled with quality coefficients by an expert and used to train the ANN expert system. Our investigation shows that the expert knowledge of spectral quality can be transferred to an ANN system. The second application combines a portable gamma-ray spectrometer with an ANN. In this system the ANN is used to automatically identify, radioactive isotopes in real-time from their gamma-ray spectra. Two neural network paradigms are examined: the linear perception and the optimal linear associative memory (OLAM). A comparison of the two paradigms shows that OLAM is superior to linear perception for this application. Both networks have a linear response and are useful in determining the composition of an unknown sample when the spectrum of the unknown is a linear superposition of known spectra. One feature of this technique is that it uses the whole spectrum in the identification process instead of only the individual photo-peaks. For this reason, it is potentially more useful for processing data from lower resolution gamma-ray spectrometers. This approach has been tested with data generated by Monte Carlo simulations and with field data from sodium iodide and Germanium detectors. With the ANN approach, the intense computation takes place during the training process. Once the network is trained, normal operation consists of propagating the data through the network, which results in rapid identification of samples. This approach is useful in situations that require fast response where precise quantification is less important.

  13. Autofluorescence spectroscopy of oral mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, S. K.; Uppal, A.; Gupta, P. K.

    1998-06-01

    We report the results of an in-vitro study on autofluorescence from pathologically characterized normal and malignant squamous tissues from the oral cavity. The study involved biopsy samples from 47 patients with oral cancer of which 11 patients had cancer of tongue, 17 of buccal mucosa and 19 of alveolus. The results of excitation and emission spectroscopy at several wavelengths (280 nm less than or equal to (lambda) exless than or equal to 460 nm; 340 nm less than or equal to (lambda) em less than or equal to 520 nm) showed that at (lambda) ex equals 337 nm and 400 nm the mean value for the spectrally integrated fluorescence intensity [(Sigma) (lambda ) IF((lambda) )] from the normal tissue sites was about a factor of 2 larger than that from the malignant tissue sites. At other excitation wavelengths the difference in (Sigma) (lambda ) IF((lambda) ) was not statistically significant. Similarly, for (lambda) em equals 390 nm and 460 nm, the intensity of the 340 nm band of the excitation spectra from normal tissues was observed to be a factor of 2 larger than that from malignant tissues. Analysis of these results suggests that NADH concentration is higher in normal oral tissues compared to the malignant. This contrasts with our earlier observation of an reduced NADH concentration in normal sites of breast tissues vis a vis malignant sites. For the 337 nm excited emission spectra a 10-variable MVLR score (using (Sigma) (lambda ) IF((lambda) ) and normalized intensities at nine wavelengths as input parameters) provided a sensitivity and specificity of 95.7% and 93.1% over the sample size investigated.

  14. News from Online: More Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney Judd, Carolyn

    1999-09-01

    rising from a cup of hot coffee. Next is an applet with atoms in a parabolic magnetic trap at http://www.colorado.edu/physics/2000/applets/bec.html. The height of the magnetic trap can be changed in order to allow for escape of the most energetic atoms, resulting in cooling so that the Bose-Einstein Condensate is formed. Physics 2000 demands robust computing power. Check the system requirements on the introductory screen before venturing too far into this site. Martin V. Goldman, from the University of Colorado at Boulder, is the Director of Physics 2000, which received support from the Colorado Commission on Higher Education and the National Science Foundation. David Rea is the Technical Director, and many others help make this excellent site possible. Mark your calendars: October 31 through December 3, 1999! Bookmark this site-- http://www.ched-ccce.org/confchem/1999/d/index.html --and sign up. The Winter 1999 CONFCHEM Online Conference will focus on Developments in Spectroscopy and Innovative Strategies for Teaching Spectroscopy in the Undergraduate Curriculum. Scott Van Bramer of Widener University is the conference chair. Experts will present six papers, each to be followed by online discussions. CONFCHEM Online Conferences are sponsored by the American Chemical Society Division of Chemical Education's Committee on Computers in Chemical Education (CCCE). Several Online Conferences are held each year--all are well worth your time. World Wide Web Addresses EMSpectrum Explorer http://mc2.cchem.berkeley.edu/chemcnx/light_energy/EMSpectrum/emspectrum.html Light and Energy http://mc2.cchem.berkeley.edu/chemcnx/light_energy/index.html Emission Spectrum Java Applet http://mc2.cchem.berkeley.edu/chemcnx/light_energy/applets/emission/index.html Absorption Java Applet http://mc2.cchem.berkeley.edu/chemcnx/light_energy/applets/absorption/index.html Removing Color with a Single Filter from Colored Light http://mc2.cchem

  15. Auger spectroscopy and surface analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1925 Pierre Auger reported on his observations of low energy electrons associated with core-ionised atoms in cloud chamber experiments. He was able to correctly identify the mechanism for their production, and such electrons are now known as Auger electrons. Typically Auger electrons have energies in the range 10 eV to 2 keV. The short distance that such low energy electrons travel in solids ensures that Auger electrons come from the surface layers. The data generated by the AES technique are complex. There are at least three electrons involved in the process, and there are many possible configurations for the atom. These possibilities led to spectra that are not readily interpreted in detail. Theory lags behind experiment in this area. In principle, it should be possible to find information about the chemical environment of atoms from Auger spectra. While there are clear changes in spectral lineshapes, there is no simple way to go from the spectra to an understanding of the chemical bonding of the atom. There are a number of experiments currently underway which aim to improve our understanding of the Auger process. Synchrotron experiments with tunable energy x-rays are providing new insight. Experiments that use positrons to excite Auger emission have also produced further recent understanding. Coincidence experiments between photoelectrons and Auger electrons have also made recent advances. Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy reduces the complexity of Auger spectra by only counting those electrons that occur as a consequence of selected ionizations. The effect is to reduce the complexity of the spectra, and to isolate processes that are often clouded by the simultaneous occurrence of other effects. (author)

  16. Submillimeter Spectroscopy of Hydride Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, T. G.

    1998-05-01

    Simple hydride molecules are of great importance in astrophysics and astrochemistry. Physically they dominate the cooling of dense, warm phases of the ISM, such as the cores and disks of YSOs. Chemically they are often stable end points of chemical reactions, or may represent important intermediate stages of the reaction chains, which can be used to test the validity of the process. Through the efforts of astronomers, physicists, chemists, and laboratory spectroscopists we have an approximate knowledge of the abundance of some of the important species, but a great deal of new effort will be required to achieve the comprehensive and accurate data set needed to determine the energy balance and firmly establish the chemical pathways. Due to the low moment of inertia, the hydrides rotate rapidly and so have their fundamental spectral lines in the submillimeter. Depending on the cloud geometry and temperature profile they may be observed in emission or absorption. Species such as HCl, HF, OH, CH, CH(+) , NH_2, NH_3, H_2O, H_2S, H_3O(+) and even H_3(+) have been detected, but this is just a fraction of the available set. Also, most deduced abundances are not nearly sufficiently well known to draw definitive conclusions about the chemical processes. For example, the most important coolant for many regions, H_2O, has a possible range of deduced abundance of a factor of 1000. The very low submillimeter opacity at the South Pole site will be a significant factor in providing a new capabilty for interstellar hydride spectroscopy. The new species and lines made available in this way will be discussed.

  17. Vibrational spectroscopy of water interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Q.

    1994-12-01

    The second order nonlinear optical processes of second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are powerful and versatile tools for studying all kinds of surfaces. They possess unusual surface sensitivity due to the symmetry properties of the second order nonlinear susceptibility. The technique of infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) is particularly attractive because it offers a viable way to do vibrational spectroscopy on any surfaces accessible to light with submonolayer sensitivity. In this thesis, the author applies SFG to study a number of important water interfaces. At the air/water interface, hydrophobic solid/water and liquid/water interfaces, it was found that approximately 25% of surface water molecules have one of their hydrogen pointing away from the liquid water. The large number of unsatisfied hydrogen bonds contributes significantly to the large interfacial energy of the hydrophobic surfaces. At the hydrophilic fused quartz/water interface and a fatty acid monolayer covered water surface, the structure and orientation of surface water molecules are controlled by the hydrogen bonding of water molecules with the surface OH groups and the electrostatic interaction with the surface field from the ionization of surface groups. A change of pH value in the bulk water can significantly change the relative importance of the two interactions and cause a drastic change in orientation of the surface water molecules. SFG has also been applied to study the tribological response of some model lubricant films. Monolayers of Langmuir-Blodgett films were found to disorder orientationaly under mildly high pressure and recover promptly upon removal of the applied pressure.

  18. Coincident photoelectron spectroscopy on superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim of the performed experiments of this thesis was to attempt to detect Cooper pairs as carriers of the superconducting current directly by means of the photoelectric effect. The method of the coincident photoelectron spectroscopy aims thereby at the detection of two coherently emitted electrons by the interaction with a photon. Because electrostatic analyzers typically cover only a very small spatial angle, which goes along with very low coincidence rates, in connection with this thesis a time-of-flight projection system has been developed, which maps nearly the whole spatial angle on a position-resolving detector. The pulsed light source in form of special synchrotron radiation necessary for the measurement has been adjusted so weak, that only single photons could arrive at the sample. Spectroscoped were beside test measurements on silver layers both a lead monocrystal as representative of the classical BCS superconductors and monocrystalline Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 from the family of the high-temperature superconductors. With excitation energies up to 40 eV could be shown that sufficiently smooth and clean surfaces in the superconducting phase exhibit within the resolving power of about 0.5 eV no recognizable differences in comparison to the normally conducting phase. Beside these studies furthermore the simple photoemission at the different samples and especially in the case of the lead crystal is treated, because here no comparable results are known. Thereby the whole momentum space is discussed and the Fermi surface established as three-dimensional model, by means of which the measurement results are discussed. in the theoretical descriptions different models for the Cooper-pair production are presented, whereby to the momentum exchange with the crystal a special role is attributed, because this can only occur in direct excitations via discrete lattice vectors.

  19. Recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy (RIMS) is a novel technique to determine the charge state and the complete final momentum vector PR of a recoiling target ion emerging from an ionising collision of an atom with any kind of radiation. It offers a unique combination of superior momentum resolution in all three spatial directions of ΔPR = 0.07 a.u. with a large detection solid angle of ΔΩR/4π≥ 98%. Recently, low-energy electron analysers based on rigorously new concepts and reaching similar specifications were successfully integrated into RIM spectrometers yielding so-called ''reaction microscopes''. Exploiting these techniques, a large variety of atomic reactions for ion, electron, photon and antiproton impact have been explored in unprecedented detail and completeness. Among them first kinematically complete experiments on electron capture, single and double ionisation in ion-atom collisions at projectile energies between 5 keV and 1.4 GeV. Double photoionisation of He has been investigated at energies Eγ close to the threshold (Eγ = 80 eV) up to Eγ = 58 keV. At Eγ>8 keV the contributions to double ionisation after photoabsorption and Compton scattering were kinematically separated for the first time. These and many other results will be reviewed in this article. In addition, the experimental technique is described in some detail and emphasis is given to envisage the rich future potential of the method in various fields of atomic collision physics with atoms, molecules and clusters. (orig.)

  20. Electron spectroscopy and molecular structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron spectroscopy can now be applied to solids, liquids and gases. Some fields of research require ultrahigh vacuum conditions, in particular those directly concerned with surface phenomena on the monolayer level. Liquids have just recently been subject to studies and several improvements and extensions of this technique can be done. Much advance has lately been achieved in the case of gases, where the pressure range presently is 10-5-1 torr. Signal-to-background ratios for core lines can be approximately 1000:1 and the resolution has been increased to the extent that vibrational fine structures of 1s levels in some small molecules have been observed. These improvements are based on the monochromatization of the exciting AlKα radiation. Under such conditions the background is furthermore so much reduced that shake-up structures are more generally accessible for closer studies. ESCA shifts are also much easier to resolve and to measure with higher precision, around 0.02 eV. The photoionization dynamics including atomic and molecular relaxations has been investigated, both experimentally and theoretically. In the valence electron region improvements in energy resolution and in the application of the intensity model based on the MO-LCAO approximation greatly facilitate the assignments of the valence orbitals. Accumulation of empirical evidences gathered from series of similar chemical species and also better methods of calculation, both ab initio and semiempirical, have gradually resulted in a much better understanding of the molecular orbital description. The experience of the latest ESCA instrument with monochromatization has motivated an attempt to design an optimized apparatus according to the general principles of this prototype. A considerable gain in intensity can be made at an improved resolution set by the inherent diffraction pattern of the focussing spherical quartz crystals. (author)

  1. Aggregation of metallochlorophylls - Examination by spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, L. J.; Katz, J. J.

    1969-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements determine which metallochlorophylls, besides magnesium-containing chlorophylls, possess coordination aggregation properties. Infrared spectroscopy reveals that only zinc pheophytin and zinc methyl pheophorbide showed significant coordination aggregation, whereas divalent nickel and copper did not.

  2. Fluorescence spectroscopy: basic foundations and methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  3. Solar neutrino spectroscopy (before and after superkamiokande)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of solar neutrino spectroscopy based on data from four experiments are presented. Perspectives related to forthcoming experiments are discussed. Implications of the results for neutrino properties are considered. (author). 54 refs, 2 tabs

  4. Spectroscopy and optical diagnostics for gases

    CERN Document Server

    Hanson, Ronald K; Goldenstein, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    This text provides an introduction to the science that governs the interaction of light and matter (in the gas phase). It provides readers with the basic knowledge to exploit the light-matter interaction to develop quantitative tools for gas analysis (i.e. optical diagnostics) and understand and interpret the results of spectroscopic measurements. The authors pair the basics of gas‐phase spectroscopy with coverage of key optical diagnostic techniques utilized by practicing engineers and scientists to measure fundamental flow‐field properties. The text is organized to cover three sub‐topics of gas‐phase spectroscopy: (1) spectral line positions, (2) spectral line strengths, and (3) spectral lineshapes by way of absorption, emission, and scattering interactions. The latter part of the book describes optical measurement techniques and equipment. Key subspecialties include laser induced fluorescence, tunable laser absorption spectroscopy, and wavelength modulation spectroscopy. It is ideal for students an...

  5. Ultrabroadband THz spectroscopy of disordered materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zalkovskij, Maksim; Malureanu, Radu; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Savastru, Dan; Popescu, Aurelian

    2011-01-01

    We perform THz spectroscopic investigations of the dielectric function of disordered materials in the THz region. Specifically, we consider amorphous materials and perform ultrabroadband THz spectroscopy of chalcogenide glasses where we observe the transition from universal scaling of the...

  6. Moessbauer Spectroscopy study of Quimsachata Volcano materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been studied volcanic lava from Quimsachata Volcano in Pem. Moessbauer Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, electronic and optical microscopy allowed the identification of different mineralogical phases. (A.C.AS.)

  7. Application of ACAR spectroscopy to acidic catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ACAR spectroscopy was employed as a new alternative technique for the measurement of surface acidity in zeolytic materials. Positive results were exhibited and advantages over conventional methods noted. (orig.)

  8. Neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure, related topics. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure and related topics are considered. P, T-breaking, neutron beta decay, neutron radiative capture and neutron polarizability are discussed. Reaction with fast neutrons, methodical aspect low-energy fission are considered too

  9. Microresonator Soliton Dual-Comb Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Suh, Myoung-Gyun; Yang, Ki Youl; Yi, Xu; Vahala, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Rapid characterization of optical and vibrational spectra with high resolution can identify species in cluttered environments and is important for assays and early alerts. In this regard, dual-comb spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful approach to acquire nearly instantaneous Raman and optical spectra with unprecedented resolution. Spectra are generated directly in the electrical domain and avoid bulky mechanical spectrometers. Recently, a miniature soliton-based comb has emerged that can potentially transfer the dual-comb method to a chip platform. Unlike earlier microcombs, these new devices achieve high-coherence, pulsed mode locking. They generate broad, reproducible spectral envelopes, which is essential for dual-comb spectroscopy. Here, dual-comb spectroscopy is demonstrated using these devices. This work shows the potential for integrated, high signal-to-noise spectroscopy with fast acquisition rates.

  10. NMR spectroscopy assists synthetic fuels research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cookson, D.J.; Smith, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has proved to be a useful and versatile technique for the study of synthetic fuels feedstocks, catalysts, process intermediates and final products. Some applications of the technique to coal and gas conversion research are illustrated and discussed.

  11. Solid-State Spectroscopy An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzmany, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Spectroscopic methods have opened up a new horizon in our knowledge of solid-state materials. Numerous techniques using electromagnetic radiation or charged and neutral particles have been invented and worked out to a high level in order to provide more detailed information on the solids. The text presented here is an updated description of such methods as they were originally presented in the first edition. It covers linear response of solids to electromagnetic radiation in a frequency range extending from megahertz or gigahertz as used in spin resonance spectroscopy, to infrared spectroscopy and various forms of spectroscopy in the visible and near visible spectral range. It extends to spectroscopy in the UV and x-ray spectral range and eventually several spectroscopic methods are addressed in the frequency range of g radiation. Likewise linear response to irradiation with particles such as electrons, positrons, muons, neutrons, and atoms is discussed. Instrumental and technical background is provided as we...

  12. Sensors Based on Spectroscopy of Guided Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homola, Jiří

    The last two decades have witnessed remarkable progress in the develpment of affinity biosensors and their applications in areas such as environmental protection, biotechnology, medical diagnostics, drug screening, food safety, and security. An affinity biosensor consists of a transducer and a biological recognition element which is able to interact with a selected analyte. Various optical methods have been exploited in biosensors including fluorescence spectroscopy, interferometry (reflectometric white light interferometry, modal interferometry in optical waveguide structures), and spectroscopy of guided modes of optical waveguides. Optical biosensors based on spectroscopy of guided modes of optical waveguides - grating coupler, resonant mirror, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) - rely on the measurement of binding-induced refractive index changes and thus are label-free technologies. This paper reviews fundamentals of optical sensors based on spectroscopy of guided modes of optical waveguides and their applications.

  13. Raman and Photoluminescence Spectroscopy in Mineral Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, J. W.

    2014-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is particularly useful for rapid identification of minerals and gemstones. Raman spectrometers also allow PL studies for authentication of samples and geological provenance, diamond type screening and detection of HPHT treatments.

  14. Noise and detection in ''optical'' modulation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measuring techniques suitable for ''optical'' modulation spectroscopy are analyzed and source of noise identified. The choice of optical detector is for photoelectrical devices. It is shown that the shot noise of phototubes is the most important noise source

  15. Compact dual channel spectroscopy amplifier cum discriminator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A single width NIM module having two channels of spectroscopy amplifier cum discriminator has been developed for Nuclear Physics experiments at IUAC. Each channel contains a shaping amplifier along with logic circuits to generate the energy and timing information respectively

  16. Perturbative corrections to photon coincidence spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Horvath, L.; Sanders, B. C.

    2000-01-01

    Photon coincidence spectroscopy is a promising technique for probing the nonlinear regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics in the optical domain, however its accuracy is mitigated by two factors: higher-order photon correlations, which contribute to an enhanced pair count rate, and non-simultaneity of emitted photon pairs from the optical cavity. We show that the technique of photon coincidence spectroscopy is effective in the presence of these effects if the quantitative predictions are adj...

  17. Processes in Geophysics Studied by Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helgason, Orn [University of Iceland, Science Institute (Iceland)

    2004-12-15

    Moessbauer spectroscopy has been appreciated in geoscience as a powerful tool to study magnetic and structural properties of a wide range of minerals and rocks. In this presentation the application of Moessbauer spectroscopy in different geophysical processes such as tracing the development of magma during volcanic eruptions and phase transitions of magnetic minerals due to thermal impact of dikes in earlier lava formation or hydrothermal alteration will be discussed.

  18. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of man infecting protozoans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the fundamentals of photothermal spectroscopy are presented, special emphasis is done in the obtention of the optical absorption spectra. It is shown that this spectroscopy can be used successfully for the monitoring of protozoans that could infect the human. The usefulness of the technique is illustrated in the special case of Leishmania, where it is possible to find that the stage when the protozoan infect vertebrate cells show important differences in relation to the protozoans infecting insects

  19. Application of Infrared Spectroscopy in Honey Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lidija Svečnjak; Nikola Biliškov; Dragan Bubalo; Domagoj Barišić

    2011-01-01

    The chemical composition and sensory characteristics vary significantly within different honey types. In order to determine botanical origin of honey, it is necessary to conduct rather complicated and time consuming analytical methods. IR spectroscopy has not yet been experimentally explored for honey analysis in Croatia, so the aim of this study was to determine claimed botanical origin of honey using both, standard and alternative (IR spectroscopy) methods, for the purpose of their comparis...

  20. Motivations for Imaging Spectroscopy at Dome C

    OpenAIRE

    Kelz, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Antarctica offers unique conditions for ground-based observations, such as low sky background in the infrared, improved seeing, and low turbulence and scintillation noise. These properties are particularly beneficial to imaging, precision photometry, and infrared observations. It may be less clear if Antarctica offers equally compelling advantages for spectroscopy, in particular in the optical domain. However, scientific programmes that make use of imaging (or 3D) spectroscopy for selected fo...

  1. Transient Moessbauer spectroscopy: experiments with 57Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transient methods are widely used in NMR and laser spectroscopy. In the γ-energy region coherent transients are a relatively new discovery. So far most transient measurements have been performed with the very narrow Moessbauer resonance of 67Zn. Results of 57Fe measurements have also been reported. We discussed here recent improvements in transient Moessbauer spectroscopy with 57Fe. 6 refs., 3 figs. (author)

  2. Characterization of Electrochemical Interfaces by INfrared Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jimin

    1996-01-01

    The properties of electrochemical interfaces are studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Potential difference infrared spectroscopy (PDIRS) was used in the investigation of carbon monoxide adsorbed on polycrystalline platinum electrodes. It is found that the infrared peak position of adsorbed carbon monoxide is linearly dependent on the applied electrode potential, and that the Stark tuning rate is a function of system temperature. The change in Stark tuning rate is the result ...

  3. Spectroscopy of brain tumors; Spektroskopie bei Hirntumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raab, Peter; Lanfermann, Heinrich [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie; Pilatus, Ulrich [Frankfurt Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2008-09-15

    Metabolic imaging with NMR-spectroscopy has become a diagnostic tool that is used for the examination of cerebral pathologies. It is a non-invasive technique, which can detect and quantify biochemical changes. This paper describes the history of NMR-spectroscopy, its technical basis and possible areas of use for tumor diagnostics. An overview of the literature is given and upcoming developments are mentioned. (orig.)

  4. Nuclear Spin Noise and STM Noise Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Balatsky, A. V.; Fransson, J.; Mozyrsky, D.; Manassen, Yishay

    2006-01-01

    We consider fluctuations of the electronic spin due to coupling to nuclear spin. Noise spectroscopy of an electronic spin can be revealed in the Scanning Tunnelling Microscope (STM). We argue that the noise spectroscopy of electronic spin can reveal the nuclear spin dynamics due to hyperfine coupling. Tunnelling current develops satellites of the main lines at Larmor frequency and at zero frequency due to hyperfine coupling. We also address the role of the rf field that is at or near the reso...

  5. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of Entamoeba histolytica strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Avalos, D.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Silva, E. F.; Orozco, E.; de Menezes, L. F.; Vargas, H.

    2005-06-01

    Pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of E. histolytica are studied using photoacoustic spectroscopy. It is shown that the pathogenic strain presents a spectrum similar to that of iron sulfur proteins. The non-pathogenic strain does not show any relevant absorption at the studied wavelength range. The differences observed between the optical absorption spectra of both strains opens the possibility of using photoacoustic spectroscopy as a reliable and simple technique to identify different types of E. histolytica strains.

  6. Applications of Raman spectroscopy in life science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Airton A.; T. Soto, Cláudio A.; Ali, Syed M.; Neto, Lázaro P. M.; Canevari, Renata A.; Pereira, Liliane; Fávero, Priscila P.

    2015-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been applied to the analysis of biological samples for the last 12 years providing detection of changes occurring at the molecular level during the pathological transformation of the tissue. The potential use of this technology in cancer diagnosis has shown encouraging results for the in vivo, real-time and minimally invasive diagnosis. Confocal Raman technics has also been successfully applied in the analysis of skin aging process providing new insights in this field. In this paper it is presented the latest biomedical applications of Raman spectroscopy in our laboratory. It is shown that Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been used for biochemical and molecular characterization of thyroid tissue by micro-Raman spectroscopy and gene expression analysis. This study aimed to improve the discrimination between different thyroid pathologies by Raman analysis. A total of 35 thyroid tissues samples including normal tissue (n=10), goiter (n=10), papillary (n=10) and follicular carcinomas (n=5) were analyzed. The confocal Raman spectroscopy allowed a maximum discrimination of 91.1% between normal and tumor tissues, 84.8% between benign and malignant pathologies and 84.6% among carcinomas analyzed. It will be also report the application of in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy as an important sensor for detecting advanced glycation products (AGEs) on human skin.

  7. Near infrared spectroscopy and exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) provides a non-invasive method for the continuous monitoring of changes in tissue oxygenation and blood volume during aerobic exercise. During incremental exercise in adult subjects there was a positive correlation between lactate threshold (measured by blood sampling) and changes in the rate of muscle deoxygenation (measured by NIRS). However, the 7% failure rate for the NIRS test mitigated against the general use of this method. NIRS did not provide a valid method for LT determination in an adolescent population. NIRS was then used to examine whether haemodynamic changes could be a contributing factor to the mechanism underlying the cross-transfer effect. During a one-legged incremental aerobic exercise test the muscle was more deoxygenated in the exercising leg than in the non-exercising leg, consistent with oxygen consumption outstripping blood flow to the exercising limb. However, muscle blood volume increased equally in both legs. This suggests that blood flow may be raised to similar levels in both the legs; although local factors may signal an increase in blood volume, this effect is expressed in both legs. Muscle blood flow and changes in muscle blood volume were then measured directly by NIRS during an incremental one-arm aerobic exercise test. There was no significant difference in either blood volume or blood flow in the two arms at the end of the test. In the non-exercising arm changes in blood flow and blood volume were measured throughout the protocol. At higher exercise intensities, blood volume continued to rise as muscle blood flow plateaued, indicating that blood volume changes become independent of changes in blood flow. Finally, the effect of different training regimes on changes in muscle blood volume was examined. Subjects were assigned to a training group; two-arm training, one-arm training or a control group. Training did not affect blood volume changes during two-arm exercise. However, during one

  8. Optical spectroscopy of semiconductor surfaces: From differential reflectivity to reflection anisotropy spectroscopy (personal and subjective notes)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An historical review of the development of optical spectroscopy of surface states in semiconductors is presented. The importance of symmetry considerations and of polarization properties is emphasized

  9. Raman Spectroscopy for Homeland Security Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Mogilevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is an analytical technique with vast applications in the homeland security and defense arenas. The Raman effect is defined by the inelastic interaction of the incident laser with the analyte molecule’s vibrational modes, which can be exploited to detect and identify chemicals in various environments and for the detection of hazards in the field, at checkpoints, or in a forensic laboratory with no contact with the substance. A major source of error that overwhelms the Raman signal is fluorescence caused by the background and the sample matrix. Novel methods are being developed to enhance the Raman signal’s sensitivity and to reduce the effects of fluorescence by altering how the hazard material interacts with its environment and the incident laser. Basic Raman techniques applicable to homeland security applications include conventional (off-resonance Raman spectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and spatially or temporally offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS and TORS. Additional emerging Raman techniques, including remote Raman detection, Raman imaging, and Heterodyne imaging, are being developed to further enhance the Raman signal, mitigate fluorescence effects, and monitor hazards at a distance for use in homeland security and defense applications.

  10. Zeeman spectroscopy of tokamak edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeeman spectroscopy is a valuable tool both for diagnostic purposes, and for more fundamental studies of atomic and molecular processes in the boundary region of magnetically confined fusion plasmas (B ≅ 1 to 10 T). The method works well when the Zeeman (Paschen-Back) effect plays an important, or dominant, role in relation to other broadening mechanisms (Doppler, Stark, resonant excitation transfer) in determining the spectral line shape. For impurity species identification and temperature determination, Zeeman spectroscopy has advantages over charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy from highly excited radiator states, since spectral features practically unique to the species under investigation are analysed. It also provides useful information on probable mechanisms of line production (e.g. sputtering mechanisms, electron impact-induced dissociative excitation from molecules in the edge plasma), and on the temperature evolution of lower charge states in the process of convection inwards or diffusion outwards from the hotter plasma interior. Where different physical processes are responsible for different sections of the line profile -- especially in the case of hydrogen isotopes -- Zeeman spectroscopy can provide a set of characteristic temperatures for each section. The method is introduced in both passive and active spectroscopy, and general principles of the Zeeman effect are discussed with special reference to regimes of interest for the tokamak. Relevant physical processes (sputtering mechanisms, electron impact-induced dissociative excitation from molecules in the edge plasma, and ion-atom collisional heating mechanisms) are illustrated by sample spectra

  11. Atomic spectroscopy sympsoium, Gaithersburg, Maryland, September 23--26, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstracts of one hundred papers given at the conference are presented along with the conference program and an author index. Session topics include: highly ionized atoms; laser spectroscopy and hyperfine structure; complex spectra; laser spectroscopy, radiation theory; theory of highly ionized atoms and analysis of plasmas; plasma spectroscopy, line strengths; spectral analysis, instrumentation, reference wavelengths; beam foil spectroscopy, line strengths, energy levels; absorption spectroscopy, autoionization, and related theory; and spectral analysis, instrumentation, and VUV physics

  12. Towards spectroscopy of partially coherent sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditional spectroscopy is concerned with spatially incoherent sources. In relatively recent times, after the invention of the lasers in 1960, spectroscopy of coherent sources has also been gradually developed. In the last few years it was found that spectroscopy of partially coherent sources i.e., those which are neither completely uncorrelated nor fully correlated, encounters certain problems. They arise from the fact predicted theoretically in 1986 and confirmed experimentally soon afterwards that, in general, the spectrum of light generated by a partially coherent source changes on propagation, even in free space. Such changes may take many different forms. For example a spectral line may be shifted or distorted or it may be split into several lines. In this talk the basic physical principles underlying this phenomenon will be described and some recent developments in this field will be reviewed

  13. UV/VUV high sensitivity absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High sensitivity absorption spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic technique for reactive glow discharges plasmas. Absolute column densities of many chemical radicals have been measured in both deposition and etching plasmas. Modern photodiode or charge-coupled device (CCD) detector arrays vastly increase the sensitivity of traditional absorption experiments enabling one to observe fractional absorptions of ultraviolet (UV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation less than 0.0001. Stable arc lamps provide a continuum source in some experiments, but experiments at very high spectral resolution or at VUV wavelengths require the greater spectral radiance of synchrotron radiation. High sensitivity absorption spectroscopy has been applied to intense glow discharges used for lighting, for diamond film deposition, and for both depositing and etching Si films. Absorption spectroscopy provides absolute column densities, is useful for transitions that do not fluoresce, and approaches the sensitivity of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) in glow discharges under some conditions

  14. Raman spectroscopy at the tritium laboratory Karlsruhe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman spectroscopy is employed successfully for analysis of hydrogen isotopologues at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK). Raman spectroscopy is based on the inelastic scattering of photons off molecules. Energy is transferred to the molecules as rotational/vibrational excitation being characteristic for each type of molecule. Thus, qualitative analysis is possible from the Raman shifted light, while quantitative information can be obtained from the signal intensities. After years of research and development, the technique is now well-advanced providing fast (< 10 s), precise (< 0.1%) and true (< 3%) compositional analysis of gas mixtures of hydrogen isotopologues. In this paper, we summarize the recent achievements in the further development on this technique, and the various applications for which it is used at TLK. Raman spectroscopy has evolved as a versatile, highly accurate key method for quantitative analysis complementing the port-folio of analytic techniques at the TLK

  15. Practical guide to surface science and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Yip-Wah

    2001-01-01

    Practical Guide to Surface Science and Spectroscopy provides a practical introduction to surface science as well as describes the basic analytical techniques that researchers use to understand what occurs at the surfaces of materials and at their interfaces. These techniques include auger electron spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, inelastic scattering of electrons and ions, low energy electron diffraction, scanning probe microscopy, and interfacial segregation. Understanding the behavior of materials at their surfaces is essential for materials scientists and engineers as they design and fabricate microelectronics and semiconductor devices. The book gives over 100 examples, discussion questions and problems with varying levels of difficulty. Included with this book is a CD-ROM, which not only contains the same information, but also provides many elements of animation and interaction that are not easily emulated on paper. In diverse subject matters ranging from the operation of ion pumps, computer-...

  16. Synchrotron Mossbauer Spectroscopy of powder samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron Mossbauer Spectroscopy, SMS, is an emerging technique that allows fast and accurate determination of hyperfine field parameters similar to conventional Mossbauer spectroscopy with radioactive sources. This new technique, however, is qualitatively different from Mossbauer spectroscopy in terms of equipment, methodology, and analysis to warrant a new name. In this paper, the authors report on isomer shift and quadrupole splitting measurements of Mohr's salt, Fe(NH4)2(SO4)2·6H2O for demonstration purposes. Theoretical calculations were performed and compared to experiments both in energy and time domain to demonstrate the influence of thickness distribution and preferential alignment of powder samples. Such measurements may prove to be useful when the data collection times are reduced to few seconds in the third generation, undulator based synchrotron radiation sources

  17. Multivoxel Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Gliomatosis Cerebri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gliomatosis cerebri is a rare entity with non-specific clinical and conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings; accurate diagnosis is a differential diagnostic challenge. MR spectroscopy has recently been introduced as a useful diagnostic tool for detection of this entity. We present a gliomatosis cerebri case in which we made the radiological diagnosis using the MR spectroscopy findings; the diagnosis was confirmed by subsequent biopsy and histopathologic evaluation. Multivoxel spectroscopy (CSI, PRESS, 1500/135) shows a marked increase in Cho/NAA (6.6), normal to mild increase in Cho/Cr (1.2), and marked decrease in NAA/Cr (0.2) compared with the normally appearing contralateral side (Cho/NAA: 0.8, Cho/Cr: 0.9, NAA/Cr: 1.2)

  18. Broadband single-molecule excitation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Gellings, Esther; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has developed into a widely used tool in multiple disciplines of science. The diversity of routinely recorded emission spectra does underpin the strength of the single-molecule approach in resolving the heterogeneity and dynamics, otherwise hidden in the ensemble. In early cryogenic studies single molecules were identified by their distinct excitation spectra, yet measuring excitation spectra at room temperature remains challenging. Here we present a broadband Fourier approach that allows rapid recording of excitation spectra of individual molecules under ambient conditions and that is robust against blinking and bleaching. Applying the method we show that the excitation spectra of individual molecules exhibit an extreme distribution of solvatochromic shifts and distinct spectral shapes. Importantly, we demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of the broadband technique is comparable to that of emission spectroscopy putting both techniques side-by-side in single-molecule spectroscopy.

  19. MR spectroscopy of meningioma - case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authors present a case report of 61 year old woman with tarantella midline meningioma compressing temporal and occipital lobes. CT and MR imaging including MR spectroscopy was performed before surgery, 3 weeks and 3 months after surgery. The tumor was resected after partial preoperative embolization. In MR spectroscopy, alanine (Ala), creatine (Cr), choline (Cho), lactate (Lac), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), N-acetyl-aspartyl-lutamate (NAAG) spectra and Ala/Cr, Ala/Cho, Cr/Cho, Lac/Cho, NAA+NAAG/Cho ratios were evaluated. Ala/Cr and Ala/Cho ratios showed the best correlation with clinical image values dropped after surgery and then raised pointing to the growth of residual tumor. Alanine increase was confirmed by MR spectroscopy.

  20. The electronic paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy - Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This collective book addresses the various applications of electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The addressed issues (and chapters) are: the dosimetry of ionizing radiation, the tracing of natural organic matter within drainage basins, the detection and characterisation of free radicals after spin trapping, copper complexation by peptides involved in neuro-degenerative diseases, crystal chemistry of clay minerals and alteration process and evolution of continental surfaces, structure and catalytic mechanism of redox enzymes, the primitive carbonated matter, use of paramagnetic probes to study structural transitions within proteins, organic radicals and molecular magnetism, EPR of transient magnetic species, characterization of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, and fundamentals and applications of ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Appendices present the principles of magnetic resonance (Bloch equations and pulse methods), the pulse EPR (ESEEM, HYSCORE and PELDOR experiments), the principle of continuous wave ENDOR (Electron-nuclear double resonance) spectroscopy, and the protein functions

  1. Reservoir compartmentalization assessment by using FTIR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Permanyer, A. [Dept. Geoquimica, Petrologia i Prospeccio Geologica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, s/n, 08028 - Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Rebufa, C.; Kister, J. [Universite d' Aix - Marseille III, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques de St. Jerome, CNRS UMR 6171, Laboratoire de Geochimie Organique Analytique et Environnement (GOAE), Case 561, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2007-09-15

    Reservoir geochemistry has traditionally used the gas chromatographic fingerprinting method and star diagrams to provide evidence of petroleum reservoir compartmentalization. Recently alternative techniques such as Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy have been postulated to aid the evaluation of reservoir compartmentalization, and to characterize the geochemical evolution of oils from individual reservoirs. FTIR spectroscopy was applied successfully in the Tarragona Basin, Offshore N.E. Spain, validating the method to identify oils from different reservoirs. Moreover the method was successfully applied to provide evidence of compositional differences in oils from a faulted reservoir (El Furrial field, Venezuela), in which GC fingerprints failed to differentiate the oils. FTIR spectroscopy therefore, proves to be a complementary tool for reservoir compartmentalization studies. (author)

  2. FTIR spectroscopy applications in forensic science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infrared spectroscopy, and especially Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, is a well-established technique in analytical chemistry and finds widespread application in qualitative and quantitative analyses. Infrared spectra depend on the nature of the functional groups present in the analyte, and are generally complex with numerous maxima and minima. These features are useful for comparison purposes and, in most cases, the infrared spectrum of an organic compound is considered as a unique functional print of this compound (i e the infrared spectrum constitutes the chemical signature or fingerprint of an organic compound). Many inorganic substances may also be uniquely identified using infrared spectroscopy. Until recently, infrared spectroscopy was of only limited utility in forensic science, despite its high selectivity. This is because infrared spectroscopy suffered from a lack of sensitivity in its early forms. However, with the advance of modern technology this is no longer the case. The widespread use of microscope attachments, along with numerous new sampling accessories, has overcome most of the previous limitations. For example, with an infrared microscope, it is possible to focus the infrared beam, and therefore select relevant areas of the sample as small as 10 x 10 μm and achieve a measurement in situ. Such a configuration enables the rapid generation of high-resolution spectra from samples of 10 ng. Typical forensic applications include the analysis of single textile fibres, minute paint chips or smears, drugs, laser printer and photocopy toners, polymers and miscellaneous unknown substances. Here we will broadly review the most common applications of infrared spectroscopy in forensic science

  3. Trap-assisted decay spectroscopy with ISOLTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalska, M; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Beck, D.; Blank, B.; Blaum, K.; Böhm, Ch.; Borgmann, Ch.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Fraile, L.M.; George, S.; Herfurth, F.; Herlert, A.; Kreim, S.; Lunney, D.; Minaya-Ramirez, E.; Neidherr, D.; Rosenbusch, M.; Rubio, B.; Schweikhard, L.; Stanja, J.; Zuber, K.

    Penning traps are excellent high-precision mass spectrometers for radionuclides. The high-resolving power used for cleaning isobaric and even isomeric contaminants can be exploited to improve decay-spectroscopy studies by delivering purified samples. An apparatus allowing trap-assisted decay spectroscopy has been coupled to the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at ISOLDE/CERN. The results from studies with stable and radioactive ions show that the setup can be used to perform decay studies on purified short-lived nuclides and to assist mass measurements.

  4. Motivations for Imaging Spectroscopy at Dome C

    CERN Document Server

    Kelz, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Antarctica offers unique conditions for ground-based observations, such as low sky background in the infrared, improved seeing, and low turbulence and scintillation noise. These properties are particularly beneficial to imaging, precision photometry, and infrared observations. It may be less clear if Antarctica offers equally compelling advantages for spectroscopy, in particular in the optical domain. However, scientific programmes that make use of imaging (or 3D) spectroscopy for selected follow-up studies of IR surveys, long-term monitoring of extended targets and resolved stellar population studies in crowded fields, also benefit from the site conditions at Dome C.

  5. Trap-assisted decay spectroscopy with ISOLTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalska, M., E-mail: kowalska@cern.ch [CERN, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Naimi, S. [CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS, Universite de Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Agramunt, J.; Algora, A. [IFIC, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Beck, D. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Blank, B. [CENBG, Universite Bordeaux 1/CNRS/IN2P3, 33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Blaum, K.; Boehm, Ch.; Borgmann, Ch. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Breitenfeldt, M. [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, Institut fuer Physik, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Fraile, L.M. [Universidad Complutense, Dep. de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, 28040 Madrid (Spain); George, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Herfurth, F. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Herlert, A. [CERN, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Kreim, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lunney, D.; Minaya-Ramirez, E. [CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS, Universite de Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Neidherr, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rosenbusch, M. [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, Institut fuer Physik, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); and others

    2012-10-11

    Penning traps are excellent high-precision mass spectrometers for radionuclides. The high-resolving power used for cleaning isobaric and even isomeric contaminants can be exploited to improve decay-spectroscopy studies by delivering purified samples. An apparatus allowing trap-assisted decay spectroscopy has been coupled to the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at ISOLDE/CERN. The results from studies with stable and radioactive ions show that the setup can be used to perform decay studies on purified short-lived nuclides and to assist mass measurements.

  6. Spectroscopy the key to the stars

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Keith

    2007-01-01

    This is the first non-technical book on spectroscopy written specifically for practical amateur astronomers. It includes all the science necessary for a qualitative understanding of stellar spectra, but avoids a mathematical treatment which would alienate many of its intended readers. Any amateur astronomer who carries out observational spectroscopy and who wants a non-technical account of the physical processes which determine the intensity and profile morphology of lines in stellar spectra will find this is the only book written specially for them. It is an ideal companion to existing books

  7. Principles of laser spectroscopy and quantum optics

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    Principles of Laser Spectroscopy and Quantum Optics is an essential textbook for graduate students studying the interaction of optical fields with atoms. It also serves as an ideal reference text for researchers working in the fields of laser spectroscopy and quantum optics. The book provides a rigorous introduction to the prototypical problems of radiation fields interacting with two- and three-level atomic systems. It examines the interaction of radiation with both atomic vapors and condensed matter systems, the density matrix and the Bloch vector, and applications involving linear absorptio

  8. Mathematical efficiency calibration in gamma spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminski, S; Wilhelm, C

    2003-01-01

    Mathematical efficiency calibration with the LabSOCS software was introduced for two detectors in the measurement laboratory of the Central Safety Department of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. In the present contribution, conventional efficiency calibration of gamma spectroscopy systems and mathematical efficiency calibration with LabSOCS are compared with respect to their performance, uncertainties, expenses, and results. It is reported about the experience gained, and the advantages and disadvantages of both methods of efficiency calibration are listed. The results allow the conclusion to be drawn that mathematical efficiency calibration is a real alternative to conventional efficiency calibration of gamma spectroscopy systems as obtained by measurements of mixed gamma ray standard sources.

  9. A Brief History of Spectroscopy on EBIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P

    2007-02-28

    In the autumn of 1986, the first electron beam ion trap, EBIT, was put into service as a light source for the spectroscopy of highly charged ions. On the occasion of the twentieth anniversary of EBIT, we review its early uses for spectroscopy, from the first measurements of x rays from L-shell xenon ions in 1986 to its conversion to SuperEBIT in 1992 and rebirth as EBIT-I in 2001. Together with their sibling, EBIT-II, these machines have been used at Livermore to perform a multitude of seminal studies of the physics of highly charged ions.

  10. On black hole spectroscopy via adiabatic invariance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Qingquan, E-mail: qqjiangphys@yeah.net [College of Physics and Electronic Information, China West Normal University, Nanchong, Sichuan 637002 (China); Han Yan [College of Mathematic and Information, China West Normal University, Nanchong, Sichuan 637002 (China)

    2012-12-05

    In this Letter, we obtain the black hole spectroscopy by combining the black hole property of adiabaticity and the oscillating velocity of the black hole horizon. This velocity is obtained in the tunneling framework. In particular, we declare, if requiring canonical invariance, the adiabatic invariant quantity should be of the covariant form I{sub adia}= Contour-Integral p{sub i}dq{sub i}. Using it, the horizon area of a Schwarzschild black hole is quantized independently of the choice of coordinates, with an equally spaced spectroscopy always given by {Delta}A=8{pi}l{sub p}{sup 2} in the Schwarzschild and Painleve coordinates.

  11. Large Area X-Ray Spectroscopy Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tananbaum, H.

    1997-01-01

    The Large Area X-ray Spectroscopy (LAXS) mission concept study continues to evolve strongly following the merging of the LAXS mission with the Next Generation X-ray Observatory (NGXO, PI: Nick White) into the re-named High Throughput X-ray Spectroscopy (HTXS) Mission. HTXS retains key elements of the LAXS proposal, including the use of multiple satellites for risk-reduction and cost savings. A key achievement of the program has been the recommendation by the Structure and Evolution of the Universe (SEUS) (April 1997) for a new start for the HTXS mission in the 2000-2004 timeframe.

  12. Correlation Force Spectroscopy for Single Molecule Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Radiom, Milad

    2014-01-01

    This thesis addresses development of a new force spectroscopy tool, correlation force spectroscopy (CFS), for the measurement of the mechanical properties of very small volumes of material (molecular to �[BULLET]m3) at kHz-MHz time-scales. CFS is based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the principles of CFS resemble those of dual-trap optical tweezers. CFS consists of two closely-spaced micro-cantilevers that undergo thermal fluctuations. Measurement of the correlation in thermal fluctu...

  13. Spectroscopy of element 115 decay chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolph, Dirk [Lund University, Sweden; Forsberg, U. [Lund University, Sweden; Golubev, P. [Lund University, Sweden; Sarmiento, L. G. [Lund University, Sweden; Yakushev, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Andersson, L.-L. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Di Nitto, A. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Duehllmann, Ch. E. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Gates, J. M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gregorich, K. E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Hessberger, F. P. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Herzberg, R.-D [University of Liverpool; Khuyagbaatar, J. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Kratz, J. V. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Schaedel, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Aberg, S. [Lund University, Sweden; Ackermann, D. [GSI-Hemholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany; Block, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Brand, H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Carlsson, B. G. [Lund University, Sweden; Cox, D. [University of Liverpool; Derkx, X. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Eberhardt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Even, J. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Fahlander, C. [Lund University, Sweden; Gerl, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Jaeger, E. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kindler, B. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Krier, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kojouharov, I. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kurz, N. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Lommel, B. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Mistry, A. [University of Liverpool; Mokry, C. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Nitsche, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Omtvedt, J. P. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Papadakis, P. [University of Liverpool; Ragnarsson, I. [Lund University, Sweden; Runke, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schaffner, H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schausten, B. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Thoerle-Pospiech, P. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Torres, T. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Traut, T. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Trautmann, N. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Tuerler, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Ward, A. [University of Liverpool; Ward, D. E. [Lund University, Sweden; Wiehl, N. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany

    2013-01-01

    A high-resolution a, X-ray and -ray coincidence spectroscopy experiment was conducted at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fu r Schwerionenforschung. Thirty correlated a-decay chains were detected following the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am. The observations are consistent with previous assignments of similar decay chains to originate from element Z = 115. The data includes first candidates of fingerprinting the decay step Mt --> Bh with characteristic X rays. For the first time, precise spectroscopy allows the derivation of excitation schemes of isotopes along the decay chains starting with elements Z > 112. Comprehensive Monte-Carlo simulations accompany the data analysis. Nuclear structure models provide a first level interpretation.

  14. Theory of attosecond absorption spectroscopy in krypton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Jan Conrad; Lindroth, Eva; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2012-01-01

    A theory for time-domain attosecond pump–attosecond probe photoabsorption spectroscopy is formulated and related to the atomic response. The theory is illustrated through a study of attosecond absorption spectroscopy in krypton. The atomic parameters entering the formulation such as energies and...... Auger widths, as well as wave functions and dipole coupling matrix elements, are determined by accurate many-body structure calculations. We create a hole in a valence shell by an attosecond pump, couple an inner-shell electron to the hole by an attosecond probe, and then monitor the formation of the...

  15. Probing giant magnetoresistance with THz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Zuanming; Tkach, Alexander; Casper, Frederick;

    2014-01-01

    We observe a giant magnetoresistance effect in CoFe/Cu-based multistack using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The magnetic field-dependent dc conductivity, electron scattering time, as well as spin-asymmetry parameter of the structure are successfully determined. © 2014 OSA.......We observe a giant magnetoresistance effect in CoFe/Cu-based multistack using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The magnetic field-dependent dc conductivity, electron scattering time, as well as spin-asymmetry parameter of the structure are successfully determined. © 2014 OSA....

  16. Laser spectroscopy used in nuclear physics; La spectroscopie laser appliquee a la physique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Blanc, F

    2001-04-05

    The study of nuclear shapes is a basic topic since it constitutes an excellent ground for testing and validating nuclear models. Measurements of the electron quadrupolar moment, of the nuclear charge radius and of the magnetic dipolar moment shed light on the nuclear deformation. Laser spectroscopy is a specific tool for such measurements, it is based on the interaction of the nucleus with the surrounding electron cloud (hyperfine structure), it is then an external approach of the shape of the nucleus whereas the classical nuclear spectroscopy ({alpha}, {beta} or {gamma}) gives information on the deformation from the inside of the nucleus. The author describes 2 techniques of laser spectroscopy: the colinear spectroscopy directly applied to a beam issued from an isotope separator and the resonant ionization spectroscopy linked with atom desorption that allows the study of particular nuclei. In order to illustrate both methods some effective measurements are presented: - the colinear spectroscopy has allowed the achievement of the complete description of the isomeric state (T = 31 years) of hafnium-178; - The experiment Complis has revealed an unexpected even-odd zigzag effect on very neutron-deficient platinum isotopes; and - the comparison of 2 isotopes of gold and platinum with their isomers has shown that the inversion of 2 levels of neutron, that was found out by nuclear spectroscopy, is in fact a consequence of a change in the nuclear shape. (A.C.)

  17. Spectroscopy with trapped highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P

    2008-01-23

    We give an overview of atomic spectroscopy performed on electron beam ion traps at various locations throughout the world. Spectroscopy at these facilities contributes to various areas of science and engineering, including but not limited to basic atomic physics, astrophysics, extreme ultraviolet lithography, and the development of density and temperature diagnostics of fusion plasmas. These contributions are accomplished by generating, for example, spectral surveys, making precise radiative lifetime measurements, accounting for radiative power emitted in a given wavelength band, illucidating isotopic effects, and testing collisional-radiative models. While spectroscopy with electron beam ion traps had originally focused on the x-ray emission from highly charged ions interacting with the electron beam, the operating modes of such devices have expanded to study radiation in almost all wavelength bands from the visible to the hard x-ray region; and at several facilities the ions can be studied even in the absence of an electron beam. Photon emission after charge exchange or laser excitation has been observed, and the work is no longer restricted to highly charged ions. Much of the experimental capabilities are unique to electron beam ion traps, and the work performed with these devices cannot be undertaken elsewhere. However, in other areas the work on electron beam ion traps rivals the spectroscopy performed with conventional ion traps or heavy-ion storage rings. The examples we present highlight many of the capabilities of the existing electron beam ion traps and their contributions to physics.

  18. Determination of hexacelsian by infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillem Villar, M C; Monzonís, C G

    1984-07-01

    Hexacelsian has been determined by infrared spectroscopy with KBr discs and K(4)Fe(CN)(6) as internal standard. A KBr particle size of celsian, calibration curves were constructed. A least-squares fit yielded correlation coefficients of 0.998 and 0.997. PMID:18963645

  19. XAFS Spectroscopy : Fundamental Principles and Data Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Mojet, B.L.; Dorssen, G.E. van; Ramaker, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    The physical principles of XAFS spectroscopy are given at a sufficiently basic level to enable scientists working in the field of catalysis to critically evaluate articles dealing with XAFS studies on catalytic materials. The described data-analysis methods provide the basic tools for studying the e

  20. Overview. Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy. Section 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Styczen, J. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The 1994 year activity in the Nuclear Spectroscopy Department was like in previous years spread over large variety of subjects concerned with the in-beam nuclear spectroscopy and many nucleon transfer reactions, properties of high excited nuclear states, and the applied nuclear spectroscopy. The studies in the first two groups were mostly carried out in a vast international collaboration which enabled us to carry out experiments on highly sophisticated experimental facilities abroad like EUROGAM, GASP, HECTOR or OSIRIS, and others. Some preparations for `home` experiments have been carried out on the very much looked forward and recently obtained heavy ion beam from the cyclotron at the Warsaw University. The applied nuclear spectroscopy works, on the other hand, were based on using our own installations: an elaborated set-up for perturbed angular correlations, the RBS and PIXE set-ups at the Van de Graaff accelerator, the implanter, an atomic force microscope and several others. Much of the effort manifests itself in several valuable results which are summarized in the following pages. It is to be underlined that those results, as well as some new instrumentation developments were possible due to additional support via special grants and the promotion of the international cooperation by the State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN). (author).

  1. Metallosupramolecular coordination polyelectrolytes investigated by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallosupramolecular coordination polyelectrolytes (MEPEs) based on rigid and flexible ditopic bis-terpyridine ligands and Fe(II) ions are investigated by Moessbauer spectroscopy. We demonstrate the influence of mechanical stress induced by grinding on the structure of MEPE as well as the ability of MEPE to self-repair through recrystallisation.

  2. Parallel reconstruction in accelerated multivoxel MR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, V. O.; Klomp, D. W. J.; Laterra, J.; Barker, P. B.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo develop the simultaneous acquisition of multiple voxels in localized MR spectroscopy (MRS) using sensitivity encoding, allowing reduced total scan time compared to conventional sequential single voxel (SV) acquisition methods. MethodsDual volume localization was used to simultaneously exci

  3. Applications of Moessbauer Spectroscopy in Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The demand by industrial researchers to characterize commercial materials with high precision has seen the growth of many spectroscopic techniques in the broad area of applied materials science. Moessbauer spectroscopy is slowly moving into the industrial arena, due in part to the development of new and highly technological materials whose performance can only be optimized through complete analysis and evaluation down to the atomic level. The movement from the traditional research laboratory environment is assisted by the portability of the most recent instrumentation, including PC based data acquisition, miniature spectrometers, user friendly software for spectral analysis and the development of the scattering detectors for in-situ Moessbauer analysis. Scientific researchers are more often being sought to collaborate in industrial projects to solve problems of economic and social importance. An overview is presented on some of the industrial applications for which Moessbauer spectroscopy is being used today. Discussion includes some of the features important for close collaboration between the research scientist and industrial partners, as well as some of the challenges likely to be faced by the researcher in the endeavours to bring the Moessbauer methodology to the industrial environment. Corrosion research, and the need to fully understand the effect of environmental parameters on the performance of structural steels, is one area in which Moessbauer spectroscopy has become a required analytical technique. One example of a close liason between academia and industry and the use of Moessbauer spectroscopy to characterize and improve the quality of galvanneal steel sheet is presented.

  4. Ultra-deep Optical Spectroscopy with PMAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, M. M.; Fechner, T.; Wolter, D.; Kelz, A.; Becker, T.

    PMAS, the Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrophotometer, is a new integral field spectrograph in the optical, which is optimized for good transmission and high image quality from 350 nm to 1 mm. We present our plan to implement a CCD charge-shuffle mode to allow for beam switching with a very high degree of sky subtraction accuracy for faint object 3-D spectroscopy.

  5. Imaging Intelligence with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Rex E.; Gasparovic, Charles; Chavez, Robert S.; Caprihan, Arvind; Barrow, Ranee; Yeo, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([to the first power]H-MRS) is a technique for the assay of brain neurochemistry "in vivo." N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the most prominent metabolite visible within the [to the first power]H-MRS spectrum, is found primarily within neurons. The current study was designed to further elucidate NAA-cognition…

  6. Statistical process control for alpha spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statistical process control(SPC) allows for the identification of problems in alpha spectroscopy processes before they occur, unlike standard laboratory Q C which only identifies problems after a process fails. SPC tools that are directly applicable to alpha spectroscopy include individual X-charts and X-bar charts, process capability plots, and scatter plots. Most scientists are familiar with the concepts the and methods employed by SPC. These tools allow analysis of process bias, precision, accuracy and reproducibility as well as process capability. Parameters affecting instrument performance are monitored and analyzed using SPC methods. These instrument parameters can also be compared to sampling, preparation, measurement, and analysis Q C parameters permitting the evaluation of cause effect relationships. Three examples of SPC, as applied to alpha spectroscopy , are presented. The first example investigates background contamination using averaging to show trends quickly. A second example demonstrates how SPC can identify sample processing problems, analyzing both how and why this problem occurred. A third example illustrates how SPC can predict when an alpha spectroscopy process is going to fail. This allows for an orderly and timely shutdown of the process to perform preventative maintenance, avoiding the need to repeat costly sample analyses. 7 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Photoelectron Spectroscopy in Advanced Placement Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benigna, James

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) is a new addition to the Advanced Placement (AP) Chemistry curriculum. This article explains the rationale for its inclusion, an overview of how the PES instrument records data, how the data can be analyzed, and how to include PES data in the course. Sample assessment items and analysis are included, as well as…

  8. Spectroscopy of Sound Transmission in Solid Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Dean J.; Peterson, Joshua P.; Fitzjarrald, Tamara J.

    2013-01-01

    These laboratory experiments are designed to familiarize students with concepts of spectroscopy by using sound waves. Topics covered in these experiments include the structure of nitinol alloys and polymer chain stiffness as a function of structure and temperature. Generally, substances that are stiffer or have higher symmetry at the molecular…

  9. A New Spin on Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozwiak, Chris [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-12-01

    The electronic spin degree of freedom is of general fundamental importance to all matter. Understanding its complex roles and behavior in the solid state, particularly in highly correlated and magnetic materials, has grown increasingly desirable as technology demands advanced devices and materials based on ever stricter comprehension and control of the electron spin. However, direct and efficient spin dependent probes of electronic structure are currently lacking. Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) has become one of the most successful experimental tools for elucidating solid state electronic structures, bolstered by-continual breakthroughs in efficient instrumentation. In contrast, spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has lagged behind due to a lack of similar instrumental advances. The power of photoemission spectroscopy and the pertinence of electronic spin in the current research climate combine to make breakthroughs in Spin and Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (SARPES) a high priority . This thesis details the development of a unique instrument for efficient SARPES and represents a radical departure from conventional methods. A custom designed spin polarimeter based on low energy exchange scattering is developed, with projected efficiency gains of two orders of magnitude over current state-of-the-art polarimeters. For energy analysis, the popular hemispherical analyzer is eschewed for a custom Time-of-Flight (TOF) analyzer offering an additional order of magnitude gain in efficiency. The combined instrument signifies the breakthrough needed to perform the high resolution SARPES experiments necessary for untangling the complex spin-dependent electronic structures central to today's condensed matter physics.

  10. Spectroscopy and decays of charm and bottom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a brief review of the quark model, we discuss our present knowledge of the spectroscopy of charm and bottom mesons and baryons. We go on to review the lifetimes, semileptonic, and purely leptonic decays of these particles. We conclude with a brief discussion B and D mixing and rare decays

  11. Basic principles of ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N K Rai; A Y Lakshmanna; V V Namboodiri; S Umapathy

    2012-01-01

    When a light beam passes through any medium, the effects of interaction of light with the material depend on the field intensity. At low light intensities the response of materials remain linear to the amplitude of the applied electromagnetic field. But for sufficiently high intensities, the optical properties of materials are no longer linear to the amplitude of applied electromagnetic field. In such cases, the interaction of light waves with matter can result in the generation of new frequencies due to nonlinear processes such as higher harmonic generation and mixing of incident fields. One such nonlinear process, namely, the third order nonlinear spectroscopy has become a popular tool to study molecular structure. Thus, the spectroscopy based on the third order optical nonlinearity called stimulated Raman spectroscopy (SRS) is a tool to extract the structural and dynamical information about a molecular system. Ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy (URLS) is analogous to SRS but is more sensitive than SRS. In this paper, we present the theoretical basis of SRS (URLS) techniques which have been developed in our laboratory.

  12. Optical spectroscopy for food and beverages control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignani, Anna Grazia; Ciaccheri, Leonardo; Mencaglia, Andrea Azelio

    2011-08-01

    A selection of spectroscopy-based, fiber optic and micro-optic devices is presented. They have been designed and tested for monitoring the quality and safety of typical foodstuffs. The VIS-NIR spectra, considered as product fingerprints, allowed to discriminating the geographic region of production and to detecting nutritional and nutraceutic indicators.

  13. Electron spectrometer for gas-phase spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozek, J.D.; Schlachter, A.S. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    An electron spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy of gaseous samples using synchrotron radiation has been designed and constructed. The spectrometer consists of a gas cell, cylindrical electrostatic lens, spherical-sector electron energy analyzer, position-sensitive detector and associated power supplies, electronics and vacuum pumps. Details of the spectrometer design are presented together with some representative spectra.

  14. X-ray spectroscopy of magnetic CVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, Giorgio

    I discuss two topics in X-ray spectroscopy of magnetic CVs: reflection from the white dwarf surface, and opacity effects in the post shock plasma. I also briefly mention future observational perspectives, with particular emphasis on the Constellation X-ray mission.

  15. EXAFS-spectroscopy on synchrotron radiation beam

    CERN Document Server

    Aksenov, V L; Kuzmin, A Y; Purans, Y

    2001-01-01

    In the review the basis theoretical principles of EXAFS spectroscopy are given, as one of principal directions of an absorption spectroscopy permitting with a high accuracy to gain parameters of the short-range order in multicomponent amorphous and quasi-crystal mediums. The methods of the analysis of EXAFS spectra with allowance of effects of multiply scattering are featured. The exposition of the experimental set-ups, which realize the method of EXAFS spectroscopy on beams of SR, requirement of the monochromatization of radiation beams are given. For investigation of phase transition and external effects the energy-dispersive EXAFS spectrometer is creating at the National center of SR Kurchatov Institute which can measure the EXAFS spectrum with a time resolution 3-5 ms. The experimental results on investigation (by the EXAFS spectroscopy method) of oxides of tungsten and molybdenum are given, which have unique property: the variable valence of an ion of metal is depending on external action. The most inter...

  16. Moessbauer spectroscopy study of a natural zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the help of Moessbauer spectroscopy, it was established that iron in natural zeolites occupies positions in the aluminosilicate structure in place of aluminium; the positions of iron are octahedricals, and the valency is 3+; it was shown too, that the zeolite is geometrically stable to acid treatment, notwithstanding the formation of vacancies during acid treatments. (author)

  17. Nuclear properties studied by laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments of atomic nuclei are determined by means of laser spectroscopy model-independently. Laser-rf techniques enable us to make precision measurement of these moments. The hfs anomaly, i.e., Bohr-Weisskopf effect will be studied systematically at CERN ISOLDE shortly. (author)

  18. Interactive alpha spectroscopy on personal computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An interactive alpha spectroscopy program is described for the Microsoft Windows environment on personal computers. The program supports multiple sample types for tailoring analysis procedures and the simultaneous graphical representation of data being analysed and live data being collected. Both simple ROI area calculations and sophisticated multiplet analysis capabilities are supported by the package. (orig.)

  19. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajek, Milan [MR Unit, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Videnska 1958/9, 140 21 Prague (Czech Republic)], E-mail: miha@medicon.cz; Dezortova, Monika [MR Unit, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Videnska 1958/9, 140 21 Prague (Czech Republic)], E-mail: mode@medicon.cz; Krsek, Pavel [Department of Pediatric Neurology, Charles University, Second Medical School, Motol Hospital, V Uvalu 84, 150 06 Prague 5 (Czech Republic)], E-mail: pavel.krsek@post.cz

    2008-08-15

    The introduction to the application of {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy for clinical and research studies of mesial temporal and extratemporal epilepsies is done. The techniques of single voxel and spectroscopic imaging are discussed and the analysis of {sup 1}H MR spectra together with basic metabolic descriptions is presented.

  20. 1H MR spectroscopy in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction to the application of 1H MR spectroscopy for clinical and research studies of mesial temporal and extratemporal epilepsies is done. The techniques of single voxel and spectroscopic imaging are discussed and the analysis of 1H MR spectra together with basic metabolic descriptions is presented

  1. Ir Spectroscopy and Nickel (II) Hexammines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedijk, J.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment, for the general chemistry laboratory, intended to introduce the student to infrared spectroscopy. After being introduced to the theory of molecular vibrations on an elementary level, each student receives a list of 5-7 nickel (II) ammines to be prepared, analyzed and characterized by infrared spectoscopy. (MLH)

  2. Isolated Gramicidin Peptides Probed by IR Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijs, A. M.; Kabelac, M.; Abo-Riziq, A.; Hobza, P.; de Vries, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    We report double-resonant IR/UV ion-dip spectroscopy of neutral gramicidin peptides in the gas phase. The IR spectra of gramicidin A and C, recorded in both the 1000 cm(-1) to 1800 cm(-1) and the 2700 to 3750 cm(-1) region, allow structural analysis. By studying this broad IR range, various local in

  3. Near Infrared Spectroscopy Systems for Tissue Oximetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren Dahl

    other medical applications. The tissue oximeters are realised by incorporation of pn-diodes into the silicon in order to form arrays of infrared detectors. These arrays can then be used for spatially resolved spectroscopy measurements, with the targeted end user being prematurely born infant children...

  4. Spectroscopy of Bs and Ds mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study Bs and Ds spectroscopy in quenched lattice QCD using the Fermilab approach to heavy quarks. We obtain results at four lattice spacings, a, using O(a)-improved Wilson quarks. We compare and contrast the various methods for heavy quarks on the lattice, discussing which methods work best for different physical systems and the ease with which calculations may be performed

  5. Results on Panoramic Spectroscopy of Mrk 171

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakopian, S. A.; Balayan, S. K.; Movsessian, T. A.

    2014-07-01

    Observations of Mrk 171, aimed at conduction of panoramic spectroscopy, were undertaken with the Byurakan 2.6-m telescope using spectrograph ``VAGR''. Within the two components of the galaxy, Mrk171W and Mrk171E, there were differentiated eight condensations of starforming activiity, i.e. HII-regions, and no sign of AGN activity was revealed inspite of existing suggestions.

  6. Results on Panoramic Spectroscopy of MRK 171

    OpenAIRE

    Hakopian, S. A.; Balayan, S. K.; Movsessian, T. A.

    2014-01-01

    Observations of Mrk 171, aimed at conduction of panoramic spectroscopy, were undertaken with the Byurakan 2.6-m telescope using spectrograph VAGR. Within the two components of the galaxy, there were differentiated eight condensations of starforming activity, i.e. HII regions, and no sign of AGN activity was revealed inspite of existing suggestions.

  7. The dawn of X‐ray spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerward, Leif

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a few episodes from the early days of X‐ray spectroscopy. It relies on contemporary publications, especially those by Barkla, Moseley, Siegbahn, and Compton. The paper addresses the subject from the vantage point of physics and should be of interest to the X‐ray spectroscopist...

  8. Photoelectron spectroscopy of heavy atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of relativistic interactions in the photoionization of heavy atoms and molecules has been investigated by the technique of photoelectron spectroscopy. In particular, experiments are reported which illustrate the effects of the spin-orbit interaction in the neutral ground state, final ionic states and continuum states of the photoionization target

  9. Using GPU Programming for Inverse Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Gerts; N. Fredette; H. Wimberly

    2010-07-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed a detector that relies heavily on computationally expensive inverse spectroscopy algorithms to determine probabilistic three dimensional mappings of the source and its intensity. This inverse spectroscopy algorithm applies to material accountability due to the potential to determine where nuclear sources are present as a function of time and space. And yet because the novel algorithm can become prohibitively expensive on a standard desktop PC, the INL has incorporated new hardware from the commercial graphics community. General programming for graphics processing units (GPUs) is not a new concept. However, the application of GPUs to evidence theory-based inverse spectroscopy is both novel and particularly apropos. Improvements while using a (slightly upgraded) standard PC are approximately three orders of magnitude, making a ten hour computation in less than four seconds. This significantly changes the concept of prohibitively expensive calculations and makes application to materials accountability possible in near real time. Indeed, the sensor collection time is now expected to dominate the time required to determine the source and its intensity, instead of the inverse spectroscopy method.

  10. Correlation spectroscopy applied to glycerol polyester spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent development of glycerol polyesters for use as controlled release matrix materials in the nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals industries presented a unique opportunity to apply correlation spectroscopy. In a typical formulation the glycerol is reacted with a polyfunctional acid such as citr...

  11. The development of nuclear spectroscopy in Uzbekistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In monograph the history of development of nuclear physics in Uzbekistan beginning from 1958 is shown. In particular the experimental and theoretical investigations on gamma and beta spectroscopy of atomic nuclei carried out with the use of existing nuclear-physical facilities in Uzbekistan are presented. (author). 14 figs

  12. Nonlinear spectroscopy of rubidium: an undergraduate experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we describe two complementary nonlinear spectroscopy methods which both allow one to achieve Doppler-free spectra of atomic gases. First, saturated absorption spectroscopy is used to investigate the structure of the 5S1/2 → 5P3/2 transition in rubidium. Using a slightly modified experimental setup, Doppler-free two-photon absorption spectroscopy is then performed on the 5S1/2 → 5D5/2 transition in rubidium, leading to accurate measurements of the hyperfine structure of the 5D5/2 energy level. In addition, electric dipole selection rules of the two-photon transition are investigated, first by modifying the polarization of the excitation laser, and then by measuring two-photon absorption spectra when a magnetic field is applied close to the rubidium vapour. All experiments are performed with the same grating-feedback laser diode, providing an opportunity to compare different high-resolution spectroscopy methods using a single experimental setup. Such experiments may acquaint students with quantum mechanics selection rules, atomic spectra and Zeeman effect.

  13. Applied spectroscopy and the science of nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on several areas of intense topical interest related to applied spectroscopy and the science of nanomaterials. The eleven chapters in the book cover the following areas of interest relating to applied spectroscopy and nanoscience: ·         Raman spectroscopic characterization, modeling and simulation studies of carbon nanotubes, ·         Characterization of plasma discharges using laser optogalvanic spectroscopy, ·         Fluorescence anisotropy in understanding protein conformational disorder and aggregation, ·         Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in nanomedicine, ·         Calculation of Van der Waals interactions at the nanoscale, ·         Theory and simulation associated with adsorption of gases in nanomaterials, ·         Atom-precise metal nanoclusters, ·         Plasmonic properties of metallic nanostructures, two-dimensional materials, and their composites, ·         Applications of graphe...

  14. Monitoring enzymatic ATP hydrolysis by EPR spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hacker, Stephan M.; Hintze, Christian; Marx, Andreas; Drescher, Malte

    2014-01-01

    An adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogue modified with two nitroxide radicals is developed and employed to study its enzymatic hydrolysis by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. For this application, we demonstrate that EPR holds the potential to complement fluorogenic substrate analogues in monitoring enzymatic activity.

  15. Isolated Gramicidin Peptides Probed by IR Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rijs, A. M.; Kabeláč, Martin; Abo-Riziq, A.; Hobza, Pavel; de Vries, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 10 (2011), s. 1816-1821. ISSN 1439-4235 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA AV ČR IAA400550808 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : density functional calculations * gramicidin * IR spectroscopy * protein folding Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.412, year: 2011

  16. Terahertz spectroscopy – yesterday, today and tomorrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    THz spectroscopy exploits the farthest region of the infrared, at very long wavelengths. In this interesting spectral range we observe fingerprint spectra of explosives and other solid chemicals, we observe the interplay between molecules in the liquid phase, and we observe the motion of electron...

  17. Novel concepts for terahertz waveguide spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2009-01-01

    In the recent years there has been a tremendous interest in various waveguides for the THz range. A waveguide offers strong confinement of the field as well as low-loss propagation over significant distances, properties which are important for sensitive spectroscopy. The confinement of the field ...

  18. Spherical electrostatic electron spectrometer for Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benczer-Koller, N.; Kolk, B.

    1977-01-01

    A high transmission spherical electrostatic electron spectrometer was constructed for combined Moessbauer and conversion electron spectroscopies. To date, a transmission of 7% and an energy resolution of 2.5% at 14 keV were achieved for a source of 1 cm diameter.

  19. Laser spectroscopy and dynamics of transient species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clouthier, D.J. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to study the vibrational and electronic spectra and excited state dynamics of a number of transient sulfur and oxygen species. A variety of supersonic jet techniques, as well as high resolution FT-IR and intracavity dye laser spectroscopy, have been applied to these studies.

  20. Moessbauer spectroscopy in kaolin iron study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In kaolin iron can be found in two distinct ways: First in solid solution replacing another element in the Kaolin structure. Second as oxides or oxide-hydroxide. The use of Moessbauer Spectroscopy allows to identify in which way iron is present and quantify its content in Kaolin. In this work Kaolin samples of two different sources were studied using this technique. (author)

  1. Reflectance spectroscopy and asteroid surface mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffey, Michael J.; Bell, Jeffrey F.; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1989-01-01

    Information available from reflectance spectroscopy on the surface mineralogy of asteroids is discussed. Current spectral interpretive procedures used in the investigations of asteroid mineralogy are described. Present understanding of the nature and history of asteroids is discussed together with some still unresolved issues such as the source of ordinary chondrites.

  2. X-ray spectroscopy: Enlightened state

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, James K.

    2014-07-01

    Determining the sequence of events following photon absorption by a molecule can be a surprisingly challenging task. An innovative use of time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy has revealed an important insight into the ultrafast excited-state dynamics of a well-known inorganic chromophore.

  3. Evaluation of uncertainty in handheld terahertz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierken, Josiah; Criner, Amanda; Zicht, Tyler

    2016-02-01

    Advances in terahertz spectroscopy have shown it to be an effective tool for the inspection of polymers and ceramics in laboratory environments. Furthermore, recent work has shown promise that terahertz reflectance spectroscopy may be effectively applied to surface characterization of CMCs and PMCs to investigate chemical changes resulting from thermal degradation. However, even under tightly controlled laboratory conditions, various sources of uncertainty such as surface variability, ambient atmospheric conditions, as well as measurement errors within the system will be present. The analysis of measurement uncertainty is further complicated by the fact that reflectance spectra are constituted by the nonlinear relationship between the dielectric spectra and the reflectance spectra, thereby making model calibration more difficult as compared to transmission and absorbance spectroscopy. As inspections transition from laboratory to field-level applications sources of uncertainty must be considered to properly assess the health of a material with any means of statistical significance. In this study, spectra from terahertz spectroscopy systems are investigated to assess the variation in measurement uncertainty. By characterizing the uncertainty variation, recommendations are proposed for improving inspection procedures in both laboratory and field-level NDE.

  4. Physics of ultracold Fermi gases revealed by spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törmä, Päivi

    2016-04-01

    This article provides a brief review of how various spectroscopies have been used to investitage many-body quantum phenomena in the context of ultracold Fermi gases. In particular, work done with RF spectroscopy, Bragg spectroscopy and lattice modulation spectroscopy is considered. The theoretical basis of these spectroscopies, namely linear response theory in the many-body quantum physics context is briefly presented. Experiments related to the BCS-BEC crossover, imbalanced Fermi gases, polarons, possible pseudogap and Fermi liquid behaviour and measuring the contact are discussed. Remaining open problems and goals in the field are sketched from the perspective how spectroscopies could contribute.

  5. Photoelectron structure factor and diffraction spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We described all-direction-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. • Bonding character of energy band is analyzed by photoelectron structure factor. • We succeeded in measuring PED pattern from exfoliated graphene. • New mathematical procedure for diffraction spectroscopy is explained. - Abstract: The information obtained by all-direction-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy for valence band and core levels are described. By measuring two-dimensional photoelectron intensity angular distribution (PIAD) from valence band, the iso-energy cross section of valence band, e.g., the Fermi surface can be observed. In the case of linearly polarized-light excitation, the symmetry relation in the photoelectron excitation process is also displayed as “angular distribution from atomic orbital”, which is used to distinguish the atomic orbitals constituting the energy band. Another important effect in angular distribution is the “photoelectron structure factor (PSF)”, which originates from the interference among photoelectron waves from individual atoms. The bonding character of the energy band can be clarified from the intensity inequivalency between Brillouin zones determined by PSF. On the other hand, the photoelectron from a localized core level is an excellent probe for element-specific atomic structure analysis. Photoelectron diffraction provides information on the surrounding atomic configuration, which is recorded as forward focusing peaks at local interatomic directions and diffraction patterns in PIAD. By combining this diffraction technique with core level spectroscopy – we call it diffraction spectroscopy, one can get access to each atomic site structure and have their electronic property information individually. Direct three-dimensional atomic structure visualization and site specific electronic property analysis methods are reviewed

  6. An instrument for the investigation of actinides with spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, S.-W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tobin, J. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chung, B. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    A new system for spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy has been built and commissioned at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the investigation of the electronic structure of the actinides.Actinide materials are very toxic and radioactive and therefore cannot be brought to most general user facilities for spectroscopic studies. The technical details of the new system and preliminary data obtained therein will be presented and discussed.

  7. Further advancement of differential optical absorption spectroscopy: theory of orthogonal optical absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liudchik, Alexander M

    2014-08-10

    A modified version of the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) method is presented. The technique is called orthogonal optical absorption spectroscopy (OOAS). A widespread variant of DOAS with smoothing of the registered spectrum and absorption cross sections being made employing a polynomial regression is a particular case of OOAS. The concept of OOAS provides a variety of new possibilities for constructing computational schemes and analyzing the influence of different error sources on calculated concentrations. PMID:25320931

  8. Raman spectroscopy of saliva as a perspective method for periodontitis diagnostics Raman spectroscopy of saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.; Bakhmutov, D.; Minaeva, S.

    2012-01-01

    In view of its potential for biological tissues analyses at a molecular level, Raman spectroscopy in optical range has been the object of biomedical research for the last years. The main aim of this work is the development of Raman spectroscopy for organic content identifying and determination of biomarkers of saliva at a molecular level for periodontitis diagnostics. Four spectral regions were determined: 1155 and 1525 cm-1, 1033 and 1611 cm-1, which can be used as biomarkers of this widespread disease.

  9. Modeling the Effect of Polychromatic Light in Quantitative Absorbance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rachel; Cantrell, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Laboratory experiment is conducted to give the students practical experience with the principles of electronic absorbance spectroscopy. This straightforward approach creates a powerful tool for exploring many of the aspects of quantitative absorbance spectroscopy.

  10. Near-infraread spectroscopy during peripheral vascular surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, Torben Veith; Eiberg, Jonas Peter; Vogt, Katja; Secher, Niels Henry

    Original,Near-infraread spectroscopy,Vascular disease,Vascular by-pass surgery,Perioperative oxymetry......Original,Near-infraread spectroscopy,Vascular disease,Vascular by-pass surgery,Perioperative oxymetry...

  11. In-flight decay spectroscopy of exotic light nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charity, R. J. [Department of Chemistry, Washington University, St. Louis, Mo 63130 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    In-flight-decay spectroscopy is discussed, including its advantages and disadvantages. In particular the use of in-flight-decay spectroscopy for the study of two-proton decay along isobaric multiplets in highlighted.

  12. Photothermal Infrared Spectroscopy of Airborne Samples with Mechanical String Resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, Shoko; Schmid, Silvan; Larsen, Tom; Hansen, Ole; Boisen, Anja

    2013-01-01

    Micromechanical photothermal infrared spectroscopy is a promising technique, where absorption-related heating is detected by frequency detuning of microstring resonators. We present photothermal infrared spectroscopy with mechanical string resonators providing rapid identification of femtogram...

  13. Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, Trevor L.; Fox, Zachary W.; Slenkamp, Karla M.; Khalil, Munira, E-mail: mkhalil@uw.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Box 351700, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2015-10-21

    Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic (2D VE) spectroscopy is a femtosecond Fourier transform (FT) third-order nonlinear technique that creates a link between existing 2D FT spectroscopies in the vibrational and electronic regions of the spectrum. 2D VE spectroscopy enables a direct measurement of infrared (IR) and electronic dipole moment cross terms by utilizing mid-IR pump and optical probe fields that are resonant with vibrational and electronic transitions, respectively, in a sample of interest. We detail this newly developed 2D VE spectroscopy experiment and outline the information contained in a 2D VE spectrum. We then use this technique and its single-pump counterpart (1D VE) to probe the vibrational-electronic couplings between high frequency cyanide stretching vibrations (ν{sub CN}) and either a ligand-to-metal charge transfer transition ([Fe{sup III}(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3−} dissolved in formamide) or a metal-to-metal charge transfer (MMCT) transition ([(CN){sub 5}Fe{sup II}CNRu{sup III}(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup −} dissolved in formamide). The 2D VE spectra of both molecules reveal peaks resulting from coupled high- and low-frequency vibrational modes to the charge transfer transition. The time-evolving amplitudes and positions of the peaks in the 2D VE spectra report on coherent and incoherent vibrational energy transfer dynamics among the coupled vibrational modes and the charge transfer transition. The selectivity of 2D VE spectroscopy to vibronic processes is evidenced from the selective coupling of specific ν{sub CN} modes to the MMCT transition in the mixed valence complex. The lineshapes in 2D VE spectra report on the correlation of the frequency fluctuations between the coupled vibrational and electronic frequencies in the mixed valence complex which has a time scale of 1 ps. The details and results of this study confirm the versatility of 2D VE spectroscopy and its applicability to probe how vibrations modulate charge and energy transfer in a

  14. Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic (2D VE) spectroscopy is a femtosecond Fourier transform (FT) third-order nonlinear technique that creates a link between existing 2D FT spectroscopies in the vibrational and electronic regions of the spectrum. 2D VE spectroscopy enables a direct measurement of infrared (IR) and electronic dipole moment cross terms by utilizing mid-IR pump and optical probe fields that are resonant with vibrational and electronic transitions, respectively, in a sample of interest. We detail this newly developed 2D VE spectroscopy experiment and outline the information contained in a 2D VE spectrum. We then use this technique and its single-pump counterpart (1D VE) to probe the vibrational-electronic couplings between high frequency cyanide stretching vibrations (νCN) and either a ligand-to-metal charge transfer transition ([FeIII(CN)6]3− dissolved in formamide) or a metal-to-metal charge transfer (MMCT) transition ([(CN)5FeIICNRuIII(NH3)5]− dissolved in formamide). The 2D VE spectra of both molecules reveal peaks resulting from coupled high- and low-frequency vibrational modes to the charge transfer transition. The time-evolving amplitudes and positions of the peaks in the 2D VE spectra report on coherent and incoherent vibrational energy transfer dynamics among the coupled vibrational modes and the charge transfer transition. The selectivity of 2D VE spectroscopy to vibronic processes is evidenced from the selective coupling of specific νCN modes to the MMCT transition in the mixed valence complex. The lineshapes in 2D VE spectra report on the correlation of the frequency fluctuations between the coupled vibrational and electronic frequencies in the mixed valence complex which has a time scale of 1 ps. The details and results of this study confirm the versatility of 2D VE spectroscopy and its applicability to probe how vibrations modulate charge and energy transfer in a wide range of complex molecular, material, and biological systems

  15. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy of crystalline and aqueous systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Møller, Uffe; Eichhorn, Finn; Merbold, Hannes; Folkenberg, J.R.; Clark, S.J.

    We use ab-initio density-functional perturbation theory together with THz spectroscopy for precise prediction and assignment of vibrational modes in molecular crystals. We show that THz spectroscopy is useful for analysis of liquids and food products.......We use ab-initio density-functional perturbation theory together with THz spectroscopy for precise prediction and assignment of vibrational modes in molecular crystals. We show that THz spectroscopy is useful for analysis of liquids and food products....

  16. Vibrational spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations on biological molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Peica, Niculina

    2006-01-01

    Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopy are among the most widely used techniques in the physical and natural sciences today. Vibrational spectroscopy, including IR and Raman spectroscopy, has both a long and interesting history and an illustrious record of contributions to science. Spectroscopy in the pharmaceutical industry is dominated by techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) for the elucidation of chemical structures. Despite this, the versatility of ...

  17. Near-infrared spectroscopy during peripheral vascular surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J P; Schroeder, T V; Vogt, K C; Secher, N H

    1997-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy was performed perioperatively on the dorsum of the foot in 14 patients who underwent infrainguinal bypass surgery using a prosthesis or the greater saphenous vein. Dual-wavelength continuous light spectroscopy was used to assess changes in tissue saturation before, during...... indicate that near-infrared spectroscopy is appropriate for perioperative monitoring during vascular grafting....

  18. Spectroscopy: An Introduction for Talented High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Elaine; Magyar, James G.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates the four week chemistry program in a summer program in science and mathematics. Identifies weekly topics for the program: (1) color and visible spectroscopy; (2) UV spectroscopy, fluorescence, and chemiluminescence; (3) IR and NMR spectroscopy; and (4) lists 12 individual projects. (MVL)

  19. Statistical filtering in fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháň, Radek; Kapusta, Peter; Hof, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 406, č. 20 (2014), s. 4797-4813. ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Filtered fluorescence correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence spectral correlation spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.436, year: 2014

  20. Molecular Laser Spectroscopy as a Tool for Gas Analysis Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Javis Anyangwe Nwaboh; Thibault Desbois; Daniele Romanini; Detlef Schiel; Olav Werhahn

    2011-01-01

    We have used the traceable infrared laser spectrometric amount fraction measurement (TILSAM) method to perform absolute concentration measurements of molecular species using three laser spectroscopic techniques. We report results performed by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS), and cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS), all based on the TILSAM methodology. The measured results of the different spectroscopic techniques are ...

  1. Applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy in cement studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last two decades Moessbauer spectrometer has been employed to investigate cement and its clinker. In this work some of these investigations are exhibited briefly hoping that this would facilitate further investigations. It has already been seen that Moessbauer spectroscopy gives good information about some vague points which were present before using this technique as a tool in cement studies such as clinker formation, iron solubility, the iron states in the different phases of clinker as well as the effect of hydration at different times on the states of iron cement pastes, methods for the quality control of the manufactured clinker, the evaluation of the degree of hydration and the compressive strength have been assessed. A concept about the Moessbauer spectroscopy is presented. (author)

  2. Photon Correlation Spectroscopy for Observing Natural Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Dravins, Dainis

    2007-01-01

    Natural laser emission may be produced whenever suitable atomic energy levels become overpopulated. Strong evidence for laser emission exists in astronomical sources such as Eta Carinae, and other luminous stars. However, the evidence is indirect in that the laser lines have not yet been spectrally resolved. The lines are theoretically estimated to be extremely narrow, requiring spectral resolutions very much higher (R approx.= 10**8) than possible with ordinary spectroscopy. Such can be attained with photon-correlation spectroscopy on nanosecond timescales, measuring the autocorrelation function of photon arrival times to obtain the coherence time of light, and thus the spectral linewidth. A particular advantage is the insensitivity to spectral, spatial, and temporal shifts of emission-line components due to local velocities and probable variability of 'hot-spots' in the source. A laboratory experiment has been set up, simulating telescopic observations of cosmic laser emission. Numerically simulated observa...

  3. Squeezed-light spin noise spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucivero, Vito Giovanni; Jiménez-Martínez, Ricardo; Kong, Jia; Mitchell, Morgan W.

    2016-05-01

    We report quantum enhancement of Faraday rotation spin noise spectroscopy by polarization squeezing of the probe beam. Using natural abundance Rb in 100 Torr of N2 buffer gas and squeezed light from a subthreshold optical parametric oscillator stabilized 20 GHz to the blue of the D1 resonance, we observe that an input squeezing of 3.0 dB improves the signal-to-noise ratio by 1.5 to 2.6 dB over the combined (power)⊗(number density) ranges (0.5-4.0 mW)⊗(1.5 ×1012cm-3 to 1.3 ×1013 cm-3), covering the ranges used in optimized spin noise spectroscopy experiments. We also show that squeezing improves the tradeoff between statistical sensitivity and broadening effects, a previously unobserved quantum advantage.

  4. Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, R; Tatsumi, Y; Huang, S; Ling, X; Dresselhaus, M S

    2016-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is reviewed based on our recent theoretical and experimental works. First, we discuss the semi-classical and quantum mechanical description for the polarization dependence of Raman spectra of TMDs in which the optical dipole transition matrix elements as a function of laser excitation energy are important for understanding the polarization dependence of the Raman intensity and Raman tensor. Overviewing the symmetry of TMDs, we discuss the dependence of the Raman spectra of TMDs on layer thickness, polarization, laser energy and the structural phase. Furthermore, we discuss the Raman spectra of twisted bilayer and heterostructures of TMDs. Finally, we give our perspectives on the Raman spectroscopy of TMDs. PMID:27388703

  5. Biophotonics: Spectroscopy, Imaging, Sensing, and Manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolo, Baldassare Di

    2011-01-01

    This volume describes an impressive array of the current photonic-related technologies being used in the investigation of biological systems. The topics include various types of microscopy (fluorescence correlation microscopy, two-photon microscopy), sensitive detection of biological molecules, nano-surgery techniques, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, nano-plasmonics, terahertz spectroscopy, and photosynthetic energy conversion. The emphasis is on the physical principles behind each technique, and on examining the advantages and limitations of each.The book begins with an overview by Paras Prasad, a leader in the field of biophotonics, of several important optical techniques currently used for studying biological systems. In the subsequent chapters these techniques are discussed in depth, providing the reader with a detailed understanding of the basic physical principles at work. An excellent treatment of terahertz spectroscopy demonstrates how photonics is being extended beyond the visible region. Rec...

  6. New methods in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages of the NMR-spectroscopy at high fields are particularly obvious in structure determination of natural compounds. Only small amounts of substance are necessary today and in most cases classical NMR-techniques are sufficient to get the relevant structure parameters chemical shift and J-coupling. For the examination of smallest amounts, new one dimensional (1D) pulse sequences have been introduced in the last few years. They also allow the observation of weak nuclei e.g. 13C, 15N. The greatest advances are observed in the field of two dimensional (2D) NMR-spectroscopy. There is no doubt that this technique is of general importance for chemists, especially in the determination of complex natural compounds. (orig.)

  7. Atomic vapor spectroscopy in integrated photonic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, Ralf; Pernice, Wolfram; Kübler, Harald; Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We investigate an integrated optical chip immersed in atomic vapor providing several waveguide geometries for spectroscopy applications. The narrow-band transmission through a silicon nitride waveguide and interferometer is altered when the guided light is coupled to a vapor of rubidium atoms via the evanescent tail of the waveguide mode. We use grating couplers to couple between the waveguide mode and the radiating wave, which allow for addressing arbitrary coupling positions on the chip surface. The evanescent atom-light interaction can be numerically simulated and shows excellent agreement with our experimental data. This work demonstrates a next step towards miniaturization and integration of alkali atom spectroscopy and provides a platform for further fundamental studies of complex waveguide structures.

  8. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopy and sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Loock, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    The book reviews the dramatic recent advances in the use of optical resonators for high sensitivity and high resolution molecular spectroscopy as well as for chemical, mechanical and physical sensing.  It encompasses a variety of cavities including those made of two or more mirrors, optical fiber loops, fiber gratings and spherical cavities. The book focuses on novel techniques and their applications. Each chapter is written by an expert and/or pioneer in the field. These experts also provide the theoretical background in optics and molecular physics where needed. Examples of recent breakthroughs include the use of frequency combs (Nobel prize 2005) for cavity enhanced sensing and spectroscopy, the use of novel cavity materials and geometries, the development of optical heterodyne detection techniques combined to active frequency-locking schemes. These methods allow the use and interrogation of optical resonators with a variety of coherent light sources for trace gas detection and sensing of strain, temperat...

  9. Fluorescence spectroscopy applied to orange trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcassa, L. G.; Gasparoto, M. C. G.; Belasque, J., Jr.; Lins, E. C.; Dias Nunes, F.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2006-05-01

    In this work, we have applied laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate biological processes in orange trees (Citrus aurantium L.). We have chosen to investigate water stress and Citrus Canker, which is a disease caused by the Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri bacteria. The fluorescence spectroscopy was investigated by using as an excitation source a 442-nm 15-mW HeCd gas multimode discharge laser and a 532-nm 10-mW Nd3+:YAG laser. The stress manifestation was detected by the variation of fluorescence ratios of the leaves at different wavelengths. The fluorescence ratios present a significant variation, showing the possibility to observe water stress by fluorescence spectrum. The Citrus Canker’s contaminated leaves were discriminated from the healthy leaves using a more complex analysis of the fluorescence spectra. However, we were unable to discriminate it from another disease, and new fluorescence experiments are planned for the future.

  10. Scanning Josephson spectroscopy on the atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randeria, Mallika T.; Feldman, Benjamin E.; Drozdov, Ilya K.; Yazdani, Ali

    2016-04-01

    The Josephson effect provides a direct method to probe the strength of the pairing interaction in superconductors. By measuring the phase fluctuating Josephson current between a superconducting tip of a scanning tunneling microscope and a BCS superconductor with isolated magnetic adatoms on its surface, we demonstrate that the spatial variation of the pairing order parameter can be characterized on the atomic scale. This system provides an example where the local pairing potential suppression is not directly reflected in the spectra measured via quasiparticle tunneling. Spectroscopy with such superconducting tips also shows signatures of previously unexplored Andreev processes through individual impurity-bound Shiba states. The atomic resolution achieved here establishes scanning Josephson spectroscopy as a promising technique for the study of novel superconducting phases.

  11. Heavy flavor production and spectroscopy at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Bertsche, David Edwin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Heavy flavour production and spectroscopy at ATLAS ATLAS has a wide programme to study the production properties of conventional and exotic quarkonium, beauty, and charm bound states. This presentation will cover the latest results on J/psi, psi2s and Upsilon production at 7, 8, and 13 TeV, D meson and X(3872) production with Run-1 data, B+ production at 13 TeV, and studies of associated production of quarkonium with other heavy flavour states or vector bosons. Latest results in the ATLAS programme of heavy hadron production and spectroscopy are also presented, including the latest searches for the bottomonium counterpart to the X(3872), studies of B_c and Lambda_b decays, measurement of b-quark fragmentation functions, and searches for new exotic bound states.

  12. Remote sensing by IR heterodyne spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiuk, T.; Mumma, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The use of infrared heterodyne spectroscopy for the study of planetary atmospheres is discussed. Infrared heterodyne spectroscopy provides a convenient and sensitive method for measuring the true intensity profiles of atmospheric spectral lines. Application of radiative transfer theory to measured lineshapes can then permit the study of molecular abundances, temperatures, total pressures, excitation conditions, and dynamics of the regions of line formation. The theory of formation of atmospheric spectral lines and the retrieval of the information contained in these molecular lines is illustrated. Notable successes of such retrievals from infrared heterodyne measurements on Venus, Mars, Jupiter and the earth are given. A discussion of developments in infrared heterodyne technology is also presented. Previously announced in STAR as N83-28551

  13. Handbook of tritium NMR spectroscopy and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following a brief introduction, highlighting the importance of 3H nmr spectroscopy for tritium tracer studies, Chapter 1 deals with the theory of the method, the interpretation of spectra and other experimental aspects, emphasizing the importance of careful sample preparation and the special relationship of 3H nmr spectral detail to the wealth of published data for proton spectra. Chapter 2 reviews the current methods for labelling compounds with tritium and the relationship of observed patterns of labelling to these methods. Chapter 3 describes applications of 3H nmr spectroscopy to research in the life sciences which illustrate the power of the technique. Studies employing this analytical tool have revealed numerous interesting and indeed unexpected results in the behaviour of tritium atoms in labelled molecules. These studies have included applications of tritiated compounds in analytical and biochemical problems, in problems of catalysis and reaction mechanisms, and in other areas of scientific research. (author)

  14. Photoassociative Excitation Spectroscopy of Excimer Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ronald Blake

    Laser excitation spectroscopy of transitions having dissociative ground states was explored as a tool for the study of excimer molecules. Since the repulsive nature of the ground state constrains collision pairs to large internuclear transitions, bound >=ts free excitation spectra contain more structure than the bound to free fluorescence spectra for the same molecules, therefore containing more information about the potential surfaces. Unique properties of the photoassociative excitation spectroscopy technique are described which allow the dependence of the dipole transition moment on the internuclear separation (mu (R)) to be extracted in a very direct manner. Excitation spectra are presented for the B >=ts X transitions of KrF and XeI for the wavelength (lambda) interval 206 nm KrI are given. This work required the development of a tunable VUV source, which is described.

  15. Kinetics and spectroscopy of low temperature plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Loureiro, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    This is a comprehensive textbook designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students. Both authors rely on more than 20 years of teaching experience in renowned Physics Engineering courses to write this book addressing the students’ needs. Kinetics and Spectroscopy of Low Temperature Plasmas derives in a full self-consistent way the electron kinetic theory used to describe low temperature plasmas created in the laboratory with an electrical discharge, and presents the main optical spectroscopic diagnostics used to characterize such plasmas. The chapters with the theoretical contents make use of a deductive approach in which the electron kinetic theory applied to plasmas with basis on the electron Boltzmann equation is derived from the basic concepts of Statistical and Plasma Physics. On the other hand, the main optical spectroscopy diagnostics used to characterize experimentally such plasmas are presented and justified from the point of view of the Atomic and Molecular Physics. Low temperature plasmas...

  16. Multidimensional Electronic Spectroscopy of Photochemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuernberger, Patrick; Ruetzel, Stefan; Brixner, Tobias

    2015-09-21

    Coherent multidimensional electronic spectroscopy can be employed to unravel various channels in molecular chemical reactions. This approach is thus not limited to analysis of energy transfer or charge transfer (i.e. processes from photophysics), but can also be employed in situations where the investigated system undergoes permanent structural changes (i.e. in photochemistry). Photochemical model reactions are discussed by using the example of merocyanine/spiropyran-based molecular switches, which show a rich variety of reaction channels, in particular ring opening and ring closing, cis-trans isomerization, coherent vibrational wave-packet motion, radical ion formation, and population relaxation. Using pump-probe, pump-repump-probe, coherent two-dimensional and three-dimensional, triggered-exchange 2D, and quantum-control spectroscopy, we gain intuitive pictures on which product emerges from which reactant and which reactive molecular modes are associated. PMID:26382095

  17. Cavity-Enhanced Ultrafast Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Reber, Melanie A R; Allison, Thomas K

    2015-01-01

    We present a new technique using a frequency comb laser and optical cavities for performing ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy with improved sensitivity. Resonantly enhancing the probe pulses, we demonstrate a sensitivity of $\\Delta$OD $ = 1 \\times 10^{-9}/\\sqrt{\\mbox{Hz}}$ for averaging times as long as 30 s per delay point ($\\Delta$OD$_{min} = 2 \\times 10^{-10}$). Resonantly enhancing the pump pulses allows us to produce a high excitation fraction at high repetition-rate, so that signals can be recorded from samples with optical densities as low as OD $\\approx 10^{-8}$, or column densities $< 10^{10}$ molecules/cm$^2$. This high sensitivity enables new directions for ultrafast spectroscopy.

  18. Laser Spectroscopy of Muonic Atoms and Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Randolf; Fernandes, Luis M P; Ahmed, Marwan Abdou; Amaro, Fernando D; Amaro, Pedro; Biraben, François; Cardoso, João M R; Covita, Daniel S; Dax, Andreas; Dhawan, Satish; Diepold, Marc; Franke, Beatrice; Galtier, Sandrine; Giesen, Adolf; Gouvea, Andrea L; Götzfried, Johannes; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hildebrandt, Malte; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Kirch, Klaus; Knecht, Andreas; Knowles, Paul; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J; Bigot, Eric-Olivier Le; Liu, Yi-Wei; Lopes, José A M; Ludhova, Livia; Machado, Jorge; Monteiro, Cristina M B; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Rabinowitz, Paul; Santos, Joaquim M F dos; Santos, José Paulo; Schaller, Lukas A; Schuhmann, Karsten; Schwob, Catherine; Szabo, Csilla I; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F C A; Voss, Andreas; Weichelt, Birgit; Antognini, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy of the Lamb shift (2S-2P energy difference) in light muonic atoms or ions, in which one negative muon $\\mu^-$ is bound to a nucleus, has been performed. The measurements yield significantly improved values of the root-mean-square charge radii of the nuclei, owing to the large muon mass, which results in a vastly increased muon wave function overlap with the nucleus. The values of the proton and deuteron radii are 10 and 3 times more accurate than the respective CODATA values, but 7 standard deviations smaller. Data on muonic helium-3 and -4 ions is being analyzed and will give new insights. In future, the (magnetic) Zemach radii of the proton and the helium-3 nuclei will be determined from laser spectroscopy of the 1S hyperfine splittings, and the Lamb shifts of muonic Li, Be and B can be used to improve the respective charge radii.

  19. Atomic vapor spectroscopy in integrated photonic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, Ralf; Kübler, Harald; Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert, E-mail: r.loew@physik.uni-stuttgart.de [5. Physikalisches Institut and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Gruhler, Nico; Pernice, Wolfram [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2015-07-27

    We investigate an integrated optical chip immersed in atomic vapor providing several waveguide geometries for spectroscopy applications. The narrow-band transmission through a silicon nitride waveguide and interferometer is altered when the guided light is coupled to a vapor of rubidium atoms via the evanescent tail of the waveguide mode. We use grating couplers to couple between the waveguide mode and the radiating wave, which allow for addressing arbitrary coupling positions on the chip surface. The evanescent atom-light interaction can be numerically simulated and shows excellent agreement with our experimental data. This work demonstrates a next step towards miniaturization and integration of alkali atom spectroscopy and provides a platform for further fundamental studies of complex waveguide structures.

  20. Applications of Raman spectroscopy to gemology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersani, Danilo; Lottici, Pier Paolo

    2010-08-01

    Being nondestructive and requiring short measurement times, a low amount of material, and no sample preparation, Raman spectroscopy is used for routine investigation in the study of gemstone inclusions and treatments and for the characterization of mounted gems. In this work, a review of the use of laboratory Raman and micro-Raman spectrometers and of portable Raman systems in the gemology field is given, focusing on gem identification and on the evaluation of the composition, provenance, and genesis of gems. Many examples are shown of the use of Raman spectroscopy as a tool for the identification of imitations, synthetic gems, and enhancement treatments in natural gemstones. Some recent developments are described, with particular attention being given to the semiprecious stone jade and to two important organic materials used in jewelry, i.e., pearls and corals. PMID:20419294

  1. Azimuthal Doppler Effect in Optical Vortex Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Yoshimura, Shinji; Toda, Yasunori; Morisaki, Tomohiro; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Masayoshi

    2015-11-01

    Optical vortices (OV) are a set of solutions of the paraxial Helmholtz equation in the cylindrical coordinates, and its wave front has a spiral shape. Since the Doppler shift is caused by the phase change by the movement in a wave field, the observer in the OV, which has the three-dimensional structured wave front, feels a three-dimensional Doppler effect. Since the multi-dimensional Doppler components are mixed into a single Doppler spectrum, development of a decomposition method is required. We performed a modified saturated absorption spectroscopy to separate the components. The OV and plane wave are used as a probe beam and pump beam, respectively. Although the plane-wave pump laser cancels the z-direction Doppler shift, the azimuthal Doppler shift remains in the saturated dip. The spatial variation of the dip width gives the information of the azimuthal Doppler shift. The some results of optical vortex spectroscopy will be presented.

  2. Vibrational Spectroscopy on Trapped Cold Molecular Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanyile, Ncamiso B.; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2014-06-01

    We perform vibrational spectroscopy on the V0←10 overtone of a trapped and sympathetically cooled CaH+ molecular ion using a resonance enhanced two photon dissociation scheme. Our experiments are motivated by theoretical work that proposes comparing the vibrational overtones of CaH^+ with electronic transitions in atoms to detect possible time variation of in the mass ratio of the proton to electron. Due to the nonexistence of experimental data of the transition, we start the search with a broadband femtosecond Ti:Saph laser guided by theoretical calculations. Once the vibrational transition has been identified, we will move to CW lasers to perform rotationally resolved spectroscopy. M. Kajita and Y. Moriwaki, J. Phys. B. At. Mol. Opt.Phys., 42,154022(2009) Private communication

  3. Speeded Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) Response Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Xu; Bray, Signe; Reiss, Allan L

    2010-01-01

    The hemodynamic response measured by Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) is temporally delayed from the onset of the underlying neural activity. As a consequence, NIRS based brain-computer-interfaces (BCIs) and neurofeedback learning systems, may have a latency of several seconds in responding to a change in participants' behavioral or mental states, severely limiting the practical use of such systems. To explore the possibility of reducing this delay, we used a multivariate pattern classificat...

  4. Applications of Nonlinear Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (NLEIS)

    KAUST Repository

    Adler, S. B.

    2013-08-31

    This paper reviews the use of nonlinear electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (NLEIS) in the analysis of SOFC electrode reactions. By combining EIS and NLEIS, as well as other independent information about an electrode material, it becomes possible to establish quantitative links between electrochemical kinetics and materials properties, even when systems are unstable with time. After a brief review of the method, this paper summarizes recent results analyzing the effects of Sr segregation in thin-film LSC electrodes. © The Electrochemical Society.

  5. Raman spectroscopy in pharmaceutical product design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paudel, Amrit; Raijada, Dhara; Rantanen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    molecular-based drug discovery, design of innovative drug delivery systems and quality control of finished products. This review presents concise accounts of various conventional and emerging Raman instrumentations including associated hyphenated tools of pharmaceutical interest. Moreover, relevant...... application cases of Raman spectroscopy in early and late phase pharmaceutical development, process analysis and micro-structural analysis of drug delivery systems are introduced. Finally, potential areas of future advancement and application of Raman spectroscopic techniques are discussed....

  6. Heavy baryon spectroscopy with relativistic kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a comparative Faddeev study of heavy baryon spectroscopy with nonrelativistic and relativistic kinematics. We show results for different standard hyperfine interactions with both kinematics in an attempt to learn about the light quark dynamics. We highlight the properties of particular states accessible in nowadays laboratories that would help in discriminating between different dynamical models. The advance in the knowledge of light quark dynamics is a key tool for the understanding of the existence of exotic hadrons.

  7. Sputter-initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technique, sputter-initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy (SIRIS), which provides an ultrasensitive analysis of solid samples for all elements except helium and neon is described in this paper. Sensitivities down to 1 part in 1012 should be available in routine SIRIS analysis, and greater sensitivities should be available for special cases. The basic concepts of this technology and early results in the development of the new SIRIS process and apparatus are presented. (Auth.)

  8. Imaging spectroscopy with the atomic force microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Baselt, David R.; Baldeschwieler, John D.

    1994-01-01

    Force curve imaging spectroscopy involves acquiring a force-distance curve at each pixel of an atomic force microscope image. Processing of the resulting data yields images of sample hardness and tip-sample adhesion. These images resemble Z modulation images and the sum of forward and reverse friction images, respectively, and like them exhibit a number of potentially misleading contrast mechanisms. In particular, XY tip motion has a pronounced effect on hardness images and the meniscus force...

  9. Star formation seen with high resolution spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnewisser, G.

    1990-03-01

    More than 90 anorganic and organic molecules have been detected by high resolution spectroscopy in interstellar molecular clouds or in the envelopes of stars. The detected wavelengths of the lines - predominantly located in the millimeter- and submillimeter wavelength region - unequivocally identify the molecules and give precise knowledge of the physical and chemical conditions of molecular clouds from which the radiation emanates. The line intensities and line profiles contain information about the densities, temperatures and dynamics prevailing in molecular clouds.

  10. Nuclear spectroscopy with direct relations II. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Throw, F. E. [ed.

    1964-03-01

    The Symposium on Nuclear Spectroscopy with Direct Reactions, sponsored and organized by Argonne National Laboratory under the auspices of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission, was held on 9-11 March 1964 at the Center for Continuing Education, University of Chicago. The present volume contains the invited papers along with abstracts or summaries of the few short papers selected for their special relevance to the topics of the invited lecturers . Edited versions of the discussions are also included.

  11. Advanced magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Peng; 曹鹏

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is a well-known non-invasive technique that provides spectra (by MR spectroscopy, MRS) and images (by magnetic resonance imaging, MRI) of the examined tissue with detailed metabolic, structural, and functional information. This doctoral work is focused on advanced methodologies and applications of MRS for probing cellular and molecular changes in vivo. A single-voxel diffusion-weighted (DW) MRS method was first developed for monitoring the size changes of intramyocellu...

  12. Alpha particle spectroscopy by gridded ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gridded ionization chamber has been constructed with the aim of determining its ultimate energy resolution in alpha spectroscopy, utilizing a cooled FET pre-amplifier of the type normally employed with semiconductor detectors. With suitable mechanical collimation of the alpha particles, their fine structure has been measured with an energy resolution of -11.5 keV (fwhm), achieved using an Ar + 0.75% C2H2 mixture as the filling gas. (orig.)

  13. Gamma spectroscopy in water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma spectroscopy analysis of spent fuels in power reactors; study of two typical cases: determination of the power distribution by the mean of the activity of a low periodic element (Lanthanum 140) and determination of the burnup absolute rate by examining the ratio of Cesium 134 and Cesium 137 activities. Measures were realized on fuel solutions and on fuel assemblies. Development of a power distribution map of the assemblies and comparison with the results of a three dimensional calculation of core evolution

  14. High resolution spectroscopy of nearby AGN

    OpenAIRE

    Kaastra, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the potential of high resolution spectroscopy of nearby AGN with XEUS is discussed. The focus is upon the energy resolution that is needed in order to disentangle the different spectral components. It is shown that there is an urgent need for high spectral resolution, and that a spectral resolution of 1 eV, if possible, leads to a significant increase in diagnostic power as compared to 2 eV resolution.

  15. Rare earth optogalvanic spectroscopy: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IEAv has special interest in the studies of rare earth isotope applications in laser medium and integrated optics as well as aerospace research. We are starting to work with Ytterbium, Erbium, Dysprosium and Neodymium laser selective photoionization research. This paper describes the preliminary results of emission and optogalvanic spectroscopy obtained from a Neodymium hollow cathode lamps. Furthermore these results were used to setup our laser systems to work to leads a Nd isotopes selective laser photoionization. (author)

  16. Identification of gemstone treatments with Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefert, Lore; Haenni, Henry A.; Chalain, Jean-Pierre

    2000-09-01

    The newest gemstone treatment concerns brownish diamonds of type IIa. These can be improved to near colorless by an enhancement process developed by General Electric, USA, using high temperature and pressure. A comparison of Raman spectroscopic features in the visible area (luminescence bands) of both treated and untreated colorless diamonds is given. Finally, examples of artificially colored peals and corals and their detection with Raman spectroscopy are shown.

  17. Materials characterization by resonant ultrasonic spectroscopy method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Yong Moo; Jung, H.K.; Joo, Y.S.; Sim, C.M

    2001-01-01

    A high temperature resonant ultrasound spectroscopy(RUS) was developed. The dynamic elastic constant of RPV weld, which has various different microstructure was determined by RUS. It was confirmed the RUS method is very sensitive to the microstructures of the material. RUS can be used to monitor the degradation of nuclear materials including neutron irradiation embrittlement through the measurement of dynamic elastic constants, elastic anisotropy, high temperature elastic constant and Q-factor.

  18. Exploring Extra Dimensions in Spectroscopy Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Feng; LIU Hong-Ya

    2006-01-01

    @@ We propose an idea in spectroscopy to search for extra spatial dimensions as well as to detect the possible deviation from Newton's inverse-square law at small scale, and we take high-Z hydrogenic systems and muonic atoms as illustrations. The relevant experiments might help to explore a more than two extra dimensions scenario in the brane world model proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, Dvali (ADD) and to set constraints for fundamental parameters such as the size of extra dimensions.

  19. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of β-hematin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaria affects over 200 million individuals annually, resulting in 800 000 fatalities. Current tests use blood smears and can only detect the disease when 0.1–1% of blood cells are infected. We are investigating the use of photoacoustic flowmetry to sense as few as one infected cell among 10 million or more normal blood cells, thus diagnosing infection before patients become symptomatic. Photoacoustic flowmetry is similar to conventional flow cytometry, except that rare cells are targeted by nanosecond laser pulses to induce ultrasonic responses. This system has been used to detect single melanoma cells in 10 ml of blood. Our objective is to apply photoacoustic flowmetry to detection of the malaria pigment hemozoin, which is a byproduct of parasite-digested hemoglobin in the blood. However, hemozoin is difficult to purify in quantities greater than a milligram, so a synthetic analog, known as β-hematin was derived from porcine hemin. The specific purpose of this study is to establish the efficacy of using β-hematin, rather than hemozoin, for photoacoustic measurements. We characterized β-hematin using UV–vis spectroscopy, TEM, and FTIR, then tested the effects of laser irradiation on the synthetic product. We finally determined its absorption spectrum using photoacoustic excitation. UV–vis spectroscopy verified that β-hematin was distinctly different from its precursor. TEM analysis confirmed its previously established nanorod shape, and comparison of the FTIR results with published spectroscopy data showed that our product had the distinctive absorbance peaks at 1661 and 1206 cm−1. Also, our research indicated that prolonged irradiation dramatically alters the physical and optical properties of the β-hematin, resulting in increased absorption at shorter wavelengths. Nevertheless, the photoacoustic absorption spectrum mimicked that generated by UV–vis spectroscopy, which confirms the accuracy of the photoacoustic method and strongly suggests that

  20. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of β-hematin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Edward B.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Whiteside, Paul J. D.; Sudduth, Amanda S. M.; Custer, John R.; Beerntsen, Brenda; Viator, John A.

    2012-06-01

    Malaria affects over 200 million individuals annually, resulting in 800 000 fatalities. Current tests use blood smears and can only detect the disease when 0.1-1% of blood cells are infected. We are investigating the use of photoacoustic flowmetry to sense as few as one infected cell among 10 million or more normal blood cells, thus diagnosing infection before patients become symptomatic. Photoacoustic flowmetry is similar to conventional flow cytometry, except that rare cells are targeted by nanosecond laser pulses to induce ultrasonic responses. This system has been used to detect single melanoma cells in 10 ml of blood. Our objective is to apply photoacoustic flowmetry to detection of the malaria pigment hemozoin, which is a byproduct of parasite-digested hemoglobin in the blood. However, hemozoin is difficult to purify in quantities greater than a milligram, so a synthetic analog, known as β-hematin was derived from porcine hemin. The specific purpose of this study is to establish the efficacy of using β-hematin, rather than hemozoin, for photoacoustic measurements. We characterized β-hematin using UV-vis spectroscopy, TEM, and FTIR, then tested the effects of laser irradiation on the synthetic product. We finally determined its absorption spectrum using photoacoustic excitation. UV-vis spectroscopy verified that β-hematin was distinctly different from its precursor. TEM analysis confirmed its previously established nanorod shape, and comparison of the FTIR results with published spectroscopy data showed that our product had the distinctive absorbance peaks at 1661 and 1206 cm-1. Also, our research indicated that prolonged irradiation dramatically alters the physical and optical properties of the β-hematin, resulting in increased absorption at shorter wavelengths. Nevertheless, the photoacoustic absorption spectrum mimicked that generated by UV-vis spectroscopy, which confirms the accuracy of the photoacoustic method and strongly suggests that

  1. A new package for teaching molecular spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalibart, Michel

    2003-06-01

    A set of self-training software packages devoted to Molecular Spectroscopy is under development at the University of BORDEAUX. Their purpose is to allow self-training in various spectroscopic methods: Fourier transform infrared, Raman scattering, ultraviolet absorption, and photoluminescence. This software includes theory and practice; it covers numerous sampling methods for liquids, solids and gas as well as the interpretation of spectra, spectral searching methods and quantitative analysis.

  2. Materials characterization by resonant ultrasonic spectroscopy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high temperature resonant ultrasound spectroscopy(RUS) was developed. The dynamic elastic constant of RPV weld, which has various different microstructure was determined by RUS. It was confirmed the RUS method is very sensitive to the microstructures of the material. RUS can be used to monitor the degradation of nuclear materials including neutron irradiation embrittlement through the measurement of dynamic elastic constants, elastic anisotropy, high temperature elastic constant and Q-factor

  3. Submillimeter wave spectroscopy of biological macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, Tatiana

    2005-03-01

    The recently emergence of submillimeter-wave or terahertz (THz) spectroscopy of biological molecules has demonstrated the capability to detect low-frequency internal molecular vibrations involving the weakest hydrogen bonds of the DNA base pairs and/or non-bonded interactions. These multiple bonds, although having only ˜ 5% of the strength of covalent bonds, stabilize the structure of bio-polymers, by holding the two strands of the DNA double helix together, or polypeptides together in different secondary structure conformations. There will be a review of THz-frequency transmission (absorption) results for biological materials obtained from Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy during the last few years^1,2. Multiple resonances, due to low frequency vibrational modes within biological macromolecules, have been unambiguously demonstrated in qualitative agreement with theoretical prediction, thereby confirming the fundamental physical nature of observed resonance features. The discovery of resonance character of interaction between THz radiation and biological materials opens many possible applications for THz spectroscopy technique in biological sensing and biomedicine using multiple resonances as distinctive spectral fingerprints. However, many issues still require investigation. Kinetics of interactions with radiation at THz has not been studied and vibrational lifetimes have not been measured directly as a function of frequency. The strength of resonant modes of bio-molecules in aqueous environment and strong dependence of spectra on molecular orientation need explanation. Vibrational modes have not been assigned to specific motions within molecules. THz spectroscopy of bio-polymers makes it only in first steps. 1. T. Globus, D. Woolard, M. Bykhovskaia, B. Gelmont, L. Werbos, A. Samuels. International Journal of High Speed Electronics and Systems (IJHSES), 13, No. 4, 903-936 (2003). 2. T. Globus, T. Khromova, D. Woolard and B. Gelmont. Proceedings of

  4. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in laser gradient field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is capable of probing dynamic processes in living biological systems. From photon fluctuation of fluorescing particles which diffuse through a small detection volume, FCS reveals information on the concentration and the structure of the particles, as well as information on microscopic environment.In this note, we study the radiation forces experienced by Rayleigh particles in a laser field in details, and analyze the effects of gradient field on FCS measurements.

  5. Following Enzyme Activity with Infrared Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Saroj Kumar; Andreas Barth

    2010-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy provides a direct, "on-line" monitor of enzymatic reactions. Measurement of enzymatic activity is based on the fact that the infrared spectra of reactants and products of an enzymatic reaction are usually different. Several examples are given using the enzymes pyruvate kinase, fumarase and alcohol dehydrogenase. The main advantage of the infrared method is that it observes the reaction of interest directly, i.e.,no activity assay is required to c...

  6. Electronic spectroscopy of transition metal dimer

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Yue; 钱玥

    2013-01-01

    This thesis reports laser spectroscopic studies of gas-phase transition metal dimers using laser ablation/reaction with free jet expansion and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy technique. Themolecules studied in this work are palladium dimer (Pd2) and vanadium dimer (V2). Many compounds formed from these transition metals are important and functional catalysts in chemical reactions. Therefore, it is of great significance to start from the fundamental level to understand the prope...

  7. Nuclear spectroscopy with direct relations II. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Symposium on Nuclear Spectroscopy with Direct Reactions, sponsored and organized by Argonne National Laboratory under the auspices of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission, was held on 9-11 March 1964 at the Center for Continuing Education, University of Chicago. The present volume contains the invited papers along with abstracts or summaries of the few short papers selected for their special relevance to the topics of the invited lecturers . Edited versions of the discussions are also included

  8. Standoff spectroscopy using a conditioned target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Neste, Charles W.; Morales-Rodriguez, Marissa E.; Senesac, Lawrence R.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2011-12-20

    A system and method are disclosed for standoff spectroscopy of molecules (e.g. from a residue) on a surface from a distance. A source emits radiation that modifies or conditions the residue, such as through photodecomposition. A spectral generating source measures a spectrum of the residue before and after the residue is exposed to the radiation from that source. The two spectra are compared to produce a distinct identification of the residues on the surface or identify certain properties of the residue.

  9. Applications Of Mechanical Spectroscopy To Industrial Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Schaller R.

    2015-01-01

    The paper is a review of original results, which were obtained by mechanical spectroscopy in the development of industrial materials, such as grey cast iron (damping capacity), aluminum alloys (recrystallization), nickel alloys (grain boundary embrittlement) and gold alloys (hardening mechanisms). Moreover it is shown that the study of grain boundary sliding at high temperature has led to the development of new grades of zirconia exhibiting a high toughness and a good resistance to creep. It ...

  10. Meson and baryon spectroscopy on the lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Richards

    2010-12-01

    Recent progress at understanding the excited state spectrum of mesons and baryons is described. I begin by outlining the application of the variational method to compute the spectrum, and the program of anisotropic clover lattice generation designed for hadron spectroscopy. I present results for the excited meson spectrum, with continuum quantum numbers of the states clearly delineated. I conclude with recent results for the low lying baryon spectrum, and the prospects for future calculations.

  11. THz Near-Field Microscopy and Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    von Ribbeck, Hans-Georg

    2015-01-01

    Imaging with THz radiation at nanoscale resolution is highly desirable for specific material investigations that cannot be obtained in other parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Nevertheless, classical free-space focusing of THz waves is limited to a >100 μm spatial resolution, due to the diffraction limit. However, the scattering- type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) promises to break this diffraction barrier. In this work, the realization of s-SNOM and spectroscopy for the...

  12. Absorption spectroscopy with quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosterev, A. A.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Gmachl, C.; Capasso, F.; Sivco, D. L.; Baillargeon, J. N.; Hutchinson, A. L.; Cho, A. Y.

    2001-01-01

    Novel pulsed and cw quantum cascade distributed feedback (QC-DFB) lasers operating near lambda=8 micrometers were used for detection and quantification of trace gases in ambient air by means of sensitive absorption spectroscopy. N2O, 12CH4, 13CH4, and different isotopic species of H2O were detected. Also, a highly selective detection of ethanol vapor in air with a sensitivity of 125 parts per billion by volume (ppb) was demonstrated.

  13. Synthesis and Spectroscopy of Composite Semiconductor Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzmorris, Robert Carl

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor nanostructures, also known as quantum dots (QDs), have shown great promise as optical materials in solar cells, light emitting devices, and as fluorescent probes. When combined with other materials, the properties of QDs can be modified to suit a particular application. QD heterostructures were synthesized and investigated using time resolved spectroscopy in order to understand how to control the fate of excitons. A one pot approach to the synthesis of CdSe/ZnSe/ZnS core/shel...

  14. Drug Stability Analysis by Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Chetan Shende; Wayne Smith; Carl Brouillette; Stuart Farquharson

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical drugs are available to astronauts to help them overcome the deleterious effects of weightlessness, sickness and injuries. Unfortunately, recent studies have shown that some of the drugs currently used may degrade more rapidly in space, losing their potency before their expiration dates. To complicate matters, the degradation products of some drugs can be toxic. Here, we present a preliminary investigation of the ability of Raman spectroscopy to quantify mixtures of four drugs; ...

  15. FEU-140 photomultipliers in pulsed plasma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Special fast photomultipliers are usually employed in photoelectric spectroscopy of nonstationary plasmas. Measurements have been made on the pulse characteristics and spectral sensitivity for the FEU-140 photomultiplier, which enables one to record a light flux of about 10-10 W as pulses of duration down to 10 nsec in the range 200-650 nm with a fairly wide linearity range (10-10-10-18 W)

  16. Non-linear phase dispersion spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Robles, Francisco E.; Satterwhite, Lisa L.; Wax, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Non-linear phase dispersion spectroscopy (NLDS) is introduced as a means to retrieve wide-band, high spectral resolution profiles of the wavelength-dependent, real part of the refractive index. The method is based on detecting dispersion effects imparted to a light field with low coherence transmitted through a thin sample and detected interferometrically in the spectral domain. The same sampled signal is also processed to yield quantitative phase maps and spectral information regarding the t...

  17. Moessbauer spectroscopy study of interfaces for spintronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The submonolayer sensitivity and element-specificity of conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy, combined with the use of 57Fe enriched tracer layers, enable to carefully investigate thin films and interfaces at the atomic-scale. This paper reports on the main achievements we obtained so far in the study of structural, chemical, and magnetic properties of a variety of interfaces between oxides and Fe-based films having potential interest in the field of spintronics.

  18. High resolution spectroscopy of scandium monohalides

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Ye; 夏晔

    2012-01-01

    This thesis reports the study of the molecular and electronic structure of scandium monohalides using the technique of laser ablation/reaction with supersonic free jet expansion used for producing the target molecules and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy for recording their electronic transition spectrum. The scandium diatomic molecules studied in this work were scandium monoiodide (ScI) and scandium monobromide (ScBr), which were produced by the reaction of Sc atoms with 2% CH3...

  19. Spin noise spectroscopy in GaAs

    OpenAIRE

    Oestreich, M.; Roemer, M.; Haug, R. J.; Haegele, D.

    2005-01-01

    We observe the noise spectrum of electron spins in bulk GaAs by Faraday rotation noise spectroscopy. The experimental technique enables the undisturbed measurement of the electron spin dynamics in semiconductors. We measure exemplarily the electron spin relaxation time and the electron Lande g-factor in n-doped GaAs at low temperatures and find good agreement of the measured noise spectrum with an unpretentious theory based on Poisson distribution probability.

  20. Candida parapsilosis Biofilm Identification by Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Ota Samek; Katarina Mlynariková; Silvie Bernatová; Jan Ježek; Vladislav Krzyžánek; Martin Šiler; Pavel Zemánek; Filip Růžička; Veronika Holá; Martina Mahelová

    2014-01-01

    Colonies of Candida parapsilosis on culture plates were probed directly in situ using Raman spectroscopy for rapid identification of specific strains separated by a given time intervals (up to months apart). To classify the Raman spectra, data analysis was performed using the approach of principal component analysis (PCA). The analysis of the data sets generated during the scans of individual colonies reveals that despite the inhomogeneity of the biological samples unambiguous associations to...

  1. Vibrational spectroscopy of polar molecules with superradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guin-Dar; Yelin, Susanne F.

    2013-07-01

    We investigate cooperative phenomena and superradiance for vibrational transitions in polar molecule spectroscopy of high optical-depth samples. Such cooperativity comes from the build-up of inter-particle coherence through dipole-dipole interactions and leads to speed-up of decay processes. We compare our calculation to recent work and find very good agreement, suggesting that superradiant effects need to be taken into account in a wide variety of ultracold molecule experiments, including vibrational and rotational states.

  2. Vibrational spectroscopy of polar molecules with superradiance

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Guin-Dar; Yelin, Susanne F.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate cooperative phenomena and superradiance for vibrational transitions in polar molecule spectroscopy when a high optical-depth (OD) sample is studied. Such cooperativity comes from the build-up of inter-particle coherence through dipole-dipole interactions and leads to the speed-up of decay process. We compare our calculation to recent work [Deiglmayr et al., Eur. Phys. J. D 65, 99 (2011)] and find very good agreement, suggesting that superradiant effects need to be included in a...

  3. Point contact spectroscopy of heavy fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Point contact spectroscopy (PCS) has been performed on the heavy fermion systems CeAl3, CeCu6, UPt3, U6Co and U2PtC2. The dynamical resistance dU/dI is a function of the electronic density of states (EDS) at E/sub F/. The width of the EDS inferred from the PC measurements can be compared with the γ-value of the specific heat

  4. Evanescent wave spectroscopy using multimode optical fibres

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Joseph A.

    1990-01-01

    The use of multimode optical fibre as an intrinsic chemical sensor, with application in on-line analysis in the process industry, is described. The technique of attenuated total reflection spectroscopy is applied to the unclad section of the fibre which is in contact with the chemical being detected. A model based on selective mode propagation is developed to relate the evanescent absorption coefficient of the fibre probe to the bulk absorption coefficient of the absor...

  5. Applications of chiroptical spectroscopy to coordination compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wu, Tao; You, X. Z.; Bouř, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 284, SI (2015), s. 1-18. ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-03978S; GA ČR GAP208/11/0105 Grant ostatní: GA AV ČR(CZ) M200550902 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : chirality * coordination compounds * chiroptical spectroscopy * new materials Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 12.239, year: 2014

  6. Moessbauer Spectroscopy of Locally Inhomogeneous Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper considers ways for obtaining information from Moessbauer spectra of locally inhomogeneous systems. The entire notion locally inhomogeneous system (LIS) is given a more precise definition applied to Moessbauer spectroscopy. There are considered factors that lead to local inhomogeneity of hyperfine interactions and its mechanisms. Application of LIS Moessbauer spectra processing and analysis methods are discussed. Ways for comprehensive utilization of various methods are described along with the role of a priori information at all processing stages.

  7. HII Galaxies with 3D Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kehrig, C.; Vilchez, J. M.; Sanchez, S. F.; E. Telles; Martin-Gordon, D.; Lopez-MArtin, L.

    2006-01-01

    We present our ongoing work on integral field spectroscopy of three prototypical HII galaxies: IIZw70, IIZw71 and IZw18. The data are mainly used to study the ionized gas and stellar clusters. Our main goal is to investigate the presence of spatial variations in ionization structure indicators, physical conditions and gaseous metal abundances, in these galaxies. Maps of the relevant emission lines and a preliminary analysis of the ionization structure are presented for IIZw70.

  8. A Short Guide to Debris Disk Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Christine H.

    2009-01-01

    Multi-wavelength spectroscopy can be used to constrain the dust and gas properties in debris disks. Circumstellar dust absorbs and scatters incident stellar light. The scattered light is sometimes resolved spatially at visual and near-infrared wavelengths using high contrast imaging techniques that suppress light from the central star. The thermal emission is inferred from infrared through submillimeter excess emission that may be 1-2 orders of magnitude brighter than the stellar photosphere ...

  9. Large scale calculations for hadron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The talk reviews some recent Monte Carlo calculations for Quantum Chromodynamics, performed on Euclidean lattices of rather large extent. Purpose of the calculations is to provide accurate determinations of quantities, such as interquark potentials or mass eigenvalues, which are relevant for hadronic spectroscopy. Results obtained in quenched QCD on 163 x 32 lattices are illustrated, and a discussion of computational resources and techniques required for the calculations is presented. 18 refs.,3 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Quantitative atomic spectroscopy for primary thermometry

    OpenAIRE

    Truong, Gar-Wing; May, Eric F.; Stace, Thomas M.; Luiten, Andre N.

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative spectroscopy has been used to measure accurately the Doppler-broadening of atomic transitions in $^{85}$Rb vapor. By using a conventional platinum resistance thermometer and the Doppler thermometry technique, we were able to determine $k_B$ with a relative uncertainty of $4.1\\times 10^{-4}$, and with a deviation of $2.7\\times 10^{-4}$ from the expected value. Our experiment, using an effusive vapour, departs significantly from other Doppler-broadened thermometry (DBT) techniques,...

  11. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in depression

    OpenAIRE

    Naren P Rao; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Bangalore N Gangadhar

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a unique technique that can directly assess the concentration of various biochemical metabolites in the brain. Thus, it is used in the study of molecular pathophysiology of different neuropsychiatric disorders, such as, the major depressive disorder and has been an area of active research. We conducted a computer-based literature search using the Pubmed database with ‘magnetic resonance spectroscopy’, ‘MRS’, ‘depression’, and ‘major depressive disorder...

  12. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: nonlocal limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toscano, Giuseppe; Raza, Søren; Xiao, Sanshui;

    2012-01-01

    for our understanding of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The intrinsic length scale of the electron gas serves to smear out assumed field singularities, leaving the SERS enhancement factor finite, even for geometries with infinitely sharp features. For silver nanogroove structures......, mimicked by periodic arrays of half-cylinders (up to 120 nm in radius), we find no enhancement factors exceeding 10 orders of magnitude (1010)....

  13. PICLE: a 2-D code for laser-beam - gas-jet interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A heat transport hydrodynamic PIC code was adapted for application to the KMSF gas-jet experiments. The input material density profile was changed from the original solid slab geometry to a cylindrically symmetric profile modeling the gas-jet plume. The target material was changed from the original Z = 1 to arbitrary Z. Energy deposition was modified to include inverse bremsstrahlung and resonance absorption. Preliminary results indicate electron thermal conduction dominates over mass flow for times up to about the laser pulse length. Electron thermal conduction is seen to vary between classical and flux-limited values spatially and temporally according to plasma conditions. Applications of this code, entitled PICLE (Particle-In-Cell Laser Equipment code), to absorption and flux-limit parameter studies are described. A source listing and sample input deck are included

  14. Experiments to validate self-consistent beam-gas-electron code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molvik, A. W.; Sharp, W. M.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Cohen, R. H.; Friedman, A.; Lund, S. M.; Vay, J.-L.; Coleman, J. E.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Furman, M. A.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.

    2007-11-01

    The WARP-POSINST model tracks beam ions and secondary particles (ions, electrons, gas molecules) in a self-consistent manner with techniques developed for heavy-ion fusion and e-cloud studies in high-intensity accelerators. We have developed simple experiments to exercise the code. Heavy-ion beams striking a surface cause gas desorption and electron emission, both of which can limit beam performance. Subsequent beam ions can ionize the gas, producing additional electrons. Two parallel plates, on either side of the beam and orthogonal to the end wall, are biased as a dipole: one grounded and the other biased to ± 10 kV. The electron current to a positive plate jumps to the electron emission value; then ramps slowly due to ionization of desorbed gas. This is a rigorous test of the particle dynamics of the model and constrains the secondary particle production coefficients.

  15. X-ray spectroscopy an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Bipin K

    1979-01-01

    Rontgen's discovery of X-rays in 1895 launched a subject which became central to the development of modern physics. The verification of many of the predic­ tions of quantum theory by X-ray spectroscopy in the early part of the twen­ tieth century stimulated great interest in thi's area, which has subsequently influenced fields as diverse as chemical physics, nuclear physics, and the study of the electronic properties of solids, and led to the development of techniques such as Auger, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The improvement of the theoretical understanding of the physics underlying X-ray spectroscopy has been accompanied by advances in experimental techniques, and the subject provides an instructive example of how progress on both these fronts can be mutually beneficial. This book strikes a balance between his­ torical description, which illustrates this symbiosis, and the discussion of new developments. The application of X-ray spectroscopic methods to the in­ vestigation of chemical b...

  16. A Guided Inquiry Approach to NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, Laura E.; Lisensky, George C.; Spencer, Brock

    1998-04-01

    We present a novel way to introduce NMR spectroscopy into the general chemistry curriculum as part of a week-long aspirin project in our one-semester introductory course. Aspirin is synthesized by reacting salicylic acid and acetic anhydride. Purity is determined by titration and IR and NMR spectroscopy. Students compare IR and NMR spectra of their aspirin product to a series of reference spectra obtained by the class. Students are able to interpret the IR spectra of their aspirin using IR data from previous experiments. NMR is introduced by having students collect 1H NMR spectra of a series of reference compounds chosen to include some of the structural features of aspirin and compare spectra and structures of the reference compounds to develop a correlation chart for chemical shifts. This process is done in small groups using shared class data and is guided by a series of questions designed to relate the different kinds of hydrogen atoms to number and position of peaks in the NMR spectrum. Students then identify the peaks in the NMR spectrum of their aspirin product and relate percent purity by titration with spectral results and percent yield. This is an enjoyable project that combines the synthesis of a familiar material with a guided inquiry-based introduction to NMR spectroscopy.

  17. Application of Infrared Spectroscopy in Honey Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Svečnjak

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition and sensory characteristics vary significantly within different honey types. In order to determine botanical origin of honey, it is necessary to conduct rather complicated and time consuming analytical methods. IR spectroscopy has not yet been experimentally explored for honey analysis in Croatia, so the aim of this study was to determine claimed botanical origin of honey using both, standard and alternative (IR spectroscopy methods, for the purpose of their comparison, Altogether 144 samples of nine different unifloral honey types (black locust, sweet chestnut, lime, sage, heath, rosemary, lavender, mandarin and strawberry tree were collected from different Croatian regions directly from the beekeepers. In order to confirm claimed botanical origin of collected honey samples, melissopalinological analysis, moisture and electrical conductivity measurements were conducted. Infrared spectra of honey samples were recorded using the ABB Bomem MB102 Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR spectrometer. Selected IR spectral regions were analyzed by multivariate data analysis, principal components analysis (PCA. Preliminary PCA of IR spectra showed significant clustering of the analyzed samples by botanical origin. The results of this study showed that IR spectroscopy provides reliable results, but also represents rapid and cheap analytical tool in comparison to commonly used standard analytical methods. This research has also provided the first insight in infrared spectra of Croatian honeys.

  18. Application of Infrared Spectroscopy in Honey Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Svečnjak

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition and sensory characteristics vary significantly within different honey types. In order to determine botanical origin of honey, it is necessary to conduct rather complicated and time consuming analytical methods. IR spectroscopy has not yet been experimentally explored for honey analysis in Croatia, so the aim of this study was to determine claimed botanical origin of honey using both, standard and alternative (IR spectroscopy methods, for the purpose of their comparison, Altogether 144 samples of nine different unifloral honey types (black locust, sweet chestnut, lime, sage, heath, rosemary, lavender, mandarin and strawberry tree were collected from different Croatian regions directly from the beekeepers. In order to confirm claimed botanical origin of collected honey samples, melissopalinological analysis, moisture and electrical conductivity measurements were conducted. Infrared spectra of honey samples were recorded using the ABB Bomem MB102 Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR spectrometer. Selected IR spectral regions were analyzed by multivariate data analysis, principal components analysis (PCA. Preliminary PCA of IR spectra showed significant clustering of the analyzed samples by botanical origin. The results of this study showed that IR spectroscopy provides reliable results, but also represents rapid and cheap analytical tool in comparison to commonly used standard analytical methods. This research has also provided the first insight in infrared spectra of Croatian honeys.

  19. Microwave spectroscopy of biomolecular building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, José L; López, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Microwave spectroscopy, considered as the most definitive gas phase structural probe, is able to distinguish between different conformational structures of a molecule, because they have unique spectroscopic constants and give rise to distinct individual rotational spectra.Previously, application of this technique was limited to molecular specimens possessing appreciable vapor pressures, thus discarding the possibility of studying many other molecules of biological importance, in particular those with high melting points, which had a tendency to undergo thermal reactions, and ultimately degradation, upon heating.Nowadays, the combination of laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy techniques, in supersonic jets, has enabled the gas-phase study of such systems. In this chapter, these techniques, including broadband spectroscopy, as well as results of their application into the study of the conformational panorama and structure of biomolecular building blocks, such as amino acids, nucleic bases, and monosaccharides, are briefly discussed, and with them, the tools for conformational assignation - rotational constants, nuclear quadrupole coupling interaction, and dipole moment. PMID:25721775

  20. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perakis, Fivos; Marco, Luigi De; Shalit, Andrey; Tang, Fujie; Kann, Zachary R; Kühne, Thomas D; Torre, Renato; Bonn, Mischa; Nagata, Yuki

    2016-07-13

    We present an overview of recent static and time-resolved vibrational spectroscopic studies of liquid water from ambient conditions to the supercooled state, as well as of crystalline and amorphous ice forms. The structure and dynamics of the complex hydrogen-bond network formed by water molecules in the bulk and interphases are discussed, as well as the dissipation mechanism of vibrational energy throughout this network. A broad range of water investigations are addressed, from conventional infrared and Raman spectroscopy to femtosecond pump-probe, photon-echo, optical Kerr effect, sum-frequency generation, and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopic studies. Additionally, we discuss novel approaches, such as two-dimensional sum-frequency generation, three-dimensional infrared, and two-dimensional Raman terahertz spectroscopy. By comparison of the complementary aspects probed by various linear and nonlinear spectroscopic techniques, a coherent picture of water dynamics and energetics emerges. Furthermore, we outline future perspectives of vibrational spectroscopy for water researches. PMID:27096701

  1. Ultrasensitive laser spectroscopy for breath analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtas, J.; Bielecki, Z.; Stacewicz, T.; Mikołajczyk, J.; Nowakowski, M.

    2012-03-01

    At present there are many reasons for seeking new methods and technologies that aim to develop new and more perfect sensors for different chemical compounds. However, the main reasons are safety ensuring and health care. In the paper, recent advances in the human breath analysis by the use of different techniques are presented. We have selected non-invasive ones ensuring detection of pathogenic changes at a molecular level. The presence of certain molecules in the human breath is used as an indicator of a specific disease. Thus, the analysis of the human breath is very useful for health monitoring. We have shown some examples of diseases' biomarkers and various methods capable of detecting them. Described methods have been divided into non-optical and optical methods. The former ones are the following: gas chromatography, flame ionization detection, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry, proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry. In recent twenty years, the optical methods have become more popular, especially the laser techniques. They have a great potential for detection and monitoring of the components in the gas phase. These methods are characterized by high sensitivity and good selectivity. The spectroscopic sensors provide the opportunity to detect specific gases and to measure their concentration either in a sampling place or a remote one. Multipass spectroscopy, cavity ring-down spectroscopy, and photo-acoustic spectroscopy were characterised in the paper as well.

  2. Using Raman spectroscopy to characterize biological materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Holly J; Ashton, Lorna; Bird, Benjamin; Cinque, Gianfelice; Curtis, Kelly; Dorney, Jennifer; Esmonde-White, Karen; Fullwood, Nigel J; Gardner, Benjamin; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Walsh, Michael J; McAinsh, Martin R; Stone, Nicholas; Martin, Francis L

    2016-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy can be used to measure the chemical composition of a sample, which can in turn be used to extract biological information. Many materials have characteristic Raman spectra, which means that Raman spectroscopy has proven to be an effective analytical approach in geology, semiconductor, materials and polymer science fields. The application of Raman spectroscopy and microscopy within biology is rapidly increasing because it can provide chemical and compositional information, but it does not typically suffer from interference from water molecules. Analysis does not conventionally require extensive sample preparation; biochemical and structural information can usually be obtained without labeling. In this protocol, we aim to standardize and bring together multiple experimental approaches from key leaders in the field for obtaining Raman spectra using a microspectrometer. As examples of the range of biological samples that can be analyzed, we provide instructions for acquiring Raman spectra, maps and images for fresh plant tissue, formalin-fixed and fresh frozen mammalian tissue, fixed cells and biofluids. We explore a robust approach for sample preparation, instrumentation, acquisition parameters and data processing. By using this approach, we expect that a typical Raman experiment can be performed by a nonspecialist user to generate high-quality data for biological materials analysis. PMID:26963630

  3. New Spectroscopy at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzoni, M.A.; /INFN, Rome

    2007-04-18

    The Babar experiment at the SLAC B factory has accumulated a high luminosity that offers the possibility of systematic studies of quarkonium spectroscopy and of investigating rare new phenomena. Recent results in this field are presented. In recent times spectroscopy has become exciting again, after the discovery of new states that are not easily explained by conventional models. States such as the X(3872) and the Y(4260) could be new excited charmonium states, but require precise measurements for positive identification. The BaBar experiment [1] is installed at the asymmetric storage ring PEP-II. 90% of the data accumulated by BaBar are taken at the Y(4S) (10.58 GeV) and 10% just below (10.54 GeV). The BaBar detector includes a 5-layer, double-sided silicon vertex tracker and a 40-layer drift chamber in a 1.5 T solenoidal magnetic field, which detect charged particles and measures their momenta and ionization energy losses. Photons, electrons, and neutral hadrons are detected with a CsI(Tl)-crystal electromagnetic calorimeter. An internally reflecting ring-imaging Cherenkov is also used for particle id. Penetrating muon and neutral hadrons are identified by an array of resistive-plate chambers embedded in the steel of the flux return. The detector allows good track and vertex resolution, good particle id and good photon detection so it is especially suited for spectroscopy studies.

  4. Optics and Spectroscopy at Surfaces and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordo, Vladimir G.; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2005-10-01

    This book covers linear and nonlinear optics as well as optical spectroscopy at solid surfaces and at interfaces between a solid and a liquid or gas. The authors give a concise introduction to the physics of surfaces and interfaces. They discuss in detail physical properties of solid surfaces and of their interfaces to liquids and gases and provide the theoretical background for understanding various optical techniques. The major part of the book is dedicated to a broad review on optical techniques and topical applications such as infrared and optical spectroscopy or optical microscopy. Discussions of nonlinear optics, but also nano-optics and local spectroscopy complement this self-contained work. Helpful features include about 50 problems with solutions, a glossary and a thoroughly elaborated list of topical references. The book is suited as a text for graduate students but also for scientists working in physics, chemistry, materials or life sciences who look for an expert introduction to surface optical aspects of their studies.

  5. Cardiac magnetic resonance spectroscopy: potential clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR spectroscopy is the only method for non-invasive detection of various aspects of cardiac metabolism in humans. While the 1H nucleus of water and fat molecules is the signal source for MR imaging, the MR spectroscopic technique allows for the study of a number of other nuclei, such as 13C, 19F, 23Na, 31P, 39K and 87Rb. Clinical applications presently are confined to the 31P nucleus. 31P-MR spectroscopy allows the non-invasive study of cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolites ATP and phosphocreatine. The phosphocreatine/ATP ratio is considered an index of the energetic state of the heart. Possible clinical indications include heart failure, valve disease and coronary artery disease. In heart failure, the phosphocreatine/ATP ratio is reduced and correlates with clinical severity, ejection fraction and prognosis. In mitral and aortic valve disease, a reduced phosphocreatine/ATP ratio may indicate the optimum timing for valve replacement. In coronary artery disease, a regional decrease of phosphocreatine during stress (''biochemical ergometry'') may indicate local ischemia. Furthermore, absolute quantification of high-energy phosphates may allow diagnosis of myocardial viability. Major technical developments, leading to improved spatial and temporal resolution will be necessary to establish MR spectroscopy as a routine clinical tool. (orig.)

  6. Hypernuclear Spectroscopy at JLab Hall C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Osamu; Doi, Daisuke; Fujii, Yu; Toshiyuki, Gogami; Kanda, Hiroki; Kaneta, M; Kawama, Daisuke; Maeda, Kazushige; Maruta, Tomofumi; Matsumura, Akihiko; Nagao, Sho; Nakamura, Satoshi; Shichijo, Ayako; Tamura, Hirokazu; Taniya, Naotaka; Yamamoto, Taku; Yokota, Kosuke; Kato, S; Sato, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Noumi, Hiroyuki; Motoba, T; Hiyama, E; Albayrak, Ibrahim; Ates, Ozgur; Chen, Chunhua; Christy, Michael; Keppel, Cynthia; Kohl, Karl; Li, Ya; Liyanage, Anusha Habarakada; Tang, Liguang; Walton, T; Ye, Zhihong; Yuan, Lulin; Zhu, Lingyan; Baturin, Pavlo; Boeglin, Werner; Dhamija, Seema; Markowitz, Pete; Raue, Brian; Reinhold, Joerg; Hungerford, Ed; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard; Gaskell, David; Horn, Tanja; Jones, Mark; Smith, Gregory; Vulcan, William; Wood, Stephen; Johnston, C; Simicevic, Neven; Wells, Stephen; Samantha, Chhanda; Hu, Bitao; Shen, Ji; Wang, W; Zhang, Xiaozhuo; Zhang, Yi; Feng, Jing; Fu, Y; Zhou, Jian; Zhou, S; Jiang, Yi; Lu, H; Yan, Xinhu; Ye, Yunxiu; Gan, Liping; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Danagoulian, Samuel; Gasparian, Ashot; Elaasar, Mostafa; Wesselmann, Frank; Asaturyan, Arshak; Margaryan, Amur; Mkrtchyan, Arthur; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Androic, Darko; Furic, Miroslav; Petkovic, Tomislav; Seva, Tomislav; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Rodriguez, Victor; Cisbani, Evaristo; Cusanno, Francesco; Garibaldi, Franco; Urciuoli, Guido; De Leo, Raffaele; Maronne, S; Achenbach, Carsten

    2010-03-01

    Since the 1st generation experiment, E89-009, which was successfully carried out as a pilot experiment of (e,e'K+) hypernuclear spectroscopy at JLab Hall C in 2000, precision hypernuclear spectroscopy by the (e,e'K+) reactions made considerable progress. It has evolved to the 2nd generation experiment, E01-011, in which a newly constructed high resolution kaon spectrometer (HKS) was installed and the “Tilt method” was adopted in order to suppress large electromagnetic background and to run with high luminosity. Preliminary high-resolution spectra of 7ΛHe and 28ΛAl together with that of 12ΛB that achieved resolution better than 500 keV(FWHM) were obtained. The third generation experiment, E05-115, has completed data taking with an experimental setup combining a new splitter magnet, high resolution electron spectrometer (HES) and the HKS used in the 2nd generation experiment. The data were accumulated with targets of 7Li, 9Be, 10B, 12C and 52Cr as well as with those of CH2 and H2O for calibration. The analysis is under way with particular emphasis of determining precision absolute hypernuclear masses. In this article, hypernuclear spectroscopy program in the wide mass range at JLab Hall C that has undergone three generation is described.

  7. Hypernuclear Spectroscopy at JLab Hall C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the 1st generation experiment, E89-009, which was successfully carried out as a pilot experiment of (e,e(prime)K+) hypernuclear spectroscopy at JLab Hall C in 2000, precision hypernuclear spectroscopy by the (e,e(prime)K+) reactions made considerable progress. It has evolved to the 2nd generation experiment, E01-011, in which a newly constructed high resolution kaon spectrometer (HKS) was installed and the 'Tilt method' was adopted in order to suppress large electromagnetic background and to run with high luminosity. Preliminary high-resolution spectra of 7ΛHe and 28ΛAl together with that of 12ΛB that achieved resolution better than 500 keV(FWHM) were obtained. The third generation experiment, E05-115, has completed data taking with an experimental setup combining a new splitter magnet, high resolution electron spectrometer (HES) and the HKS used in the 2nd generation experiment. The data were accumulated with targets of 7Li, 9Be, 10B, 12C and 52Cr as well as with those of CH2 and H2O for calibration. The analysis is under way with particular emphasis of determining precision absolute hypernuclear masses. In this article, hypernuclear spectroscopy program in the wide mass range at JLab Hall C that has undergone three generation is described.

  8. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBartolo, Baldassare; Barnes, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This booklet presents an account of the course 'Spectroscopy of Systems with Spatially Confined Structures' held in Erice-Sicily, Italy, from June 15 to June 30, 2001. This meeting was organized by the International School of Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy of the 'Ettore Majorana' Centre for Scientific Culture. The purpose of this course was to present and discuss nanometer-scale physics, a rapidly progressing field. The top-down approach of semiconductor technology will soon meet the scales of the bottom-up approaches of supramolecular chemistry and of spatially localized excitations in ionic crystals. This course dealt with the fabrication, measurement and understanding of the relevant structures and brought together the scientific communities responsible for these development. The advances in this area of physics have already let to applications in optoelectronics and will likely lead to many more. The subjects of the course included spatially resolved structures such as quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots, single atoms and molecules, clusters, fractal systems, and the development of related techniques like near-field spectroscopy and confocal microscopy to study such systems.

  9. Photoelectron spectroscopy bulk and surface electronic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Suga, Shigemasa

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is now becoming more and more required to investigate electronic structures of various solid materials in the bulk, on surfaces as well as at buried interfaces. The energy resolution was much improved in the last decade down to 1 meV in the low photon energy region. Now this technique is available from a few eV up to 10 keV by use of lasers, electron cyclotron resonance lamps in addition to synchrotron radiation and X-ray tubes. High resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) is now widely applied to band mapping of materials. It attracts a wide attention from both fundamental science and material engineering. Studies of the dynamics of excited states are feasible by time of flight spectroscopy with fully utilizing the pulse structures of synchrotron radiation as well as lasers including the free electron lasers (FEL). Spin resolved studies also made dramatic progress by using higher efficiency spin detectors and two dimensional spin detectors. Polarization depend...

  10. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical application in neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) provides a non-invasive method of studying metabolism in vivo. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) defines neuro chemistry on a regional basis by acquiring a radiofrequency signal with chemical shift from one or many voxels or volumes previously selected on MRI. The tissue's chemical environment determines the frequency of a metabolite peak in an MRS spectrum. Candidates for MRS include: 1H, 31P, 13C, 23Na, 7Li, 19F, 14N, 15N, 17O, 39K The most commonly studied nuclei are 1H and 31P. This lecture is focused on Proton (1H) Spectroscopy. Proton MRS can be added on to conventional MR imaging protocols. It can be used to serially monitor biochemical changes in tumors, stroke, epilepsy, metabolic disorders, infections, and neurodegenerative diseases.The MR spectra do not come labeled with diagnoses. They require interpretation and should always be correlated with the MR images before making a final diagnosis. As a general rule, the single voxel, short TE technique is used to make the initial diagnosis, because the signal-to-noise is high and all metabolites are represented. Multi-voxel, long TE techniques are used to further characterize different regions of a mass and to assess brain parenchyma around or adjacent to the mass. Multi-voxel, long TE techniques are also used to assess response to therapy and to search for tumor recurrence. Each metabolite appears at a specific ppm, and each one reflects specific cellular and biochemical processes

  11. Visualizing Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy with Computer Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Charles B.; Fine, Leonard W.

    1996-01-01

    IR Tutor, an interactive, animated infrared (IR) spectroscopy tutorial has been developed for Macintosh and IBM-compatible computers. Using unique color animation, complicated vibrational modes can be introduced to beginning students. Rules governing the appearance of IR absorption bands become obvious because the vibrational modes can be visualized. Each peak in the IR spectrum is highlighted, and the animation of the corresponding normal mode can be shown. Students can study each spectrum stepwise, or click on any individual peak to see its assignment. Important regions of each spectrum can be expanded and spectra can be overlaid for comparison. An introduction to the theory of IR spectroscopy is included, making the program a complete instructional package. Our own success in using this software for teaching and research in both academic and industrial environments will be described. IR Tutor consists of three sections: (1) The 'Introduction' is a review of basic principles of spectroscopy. (2) 'Theory' begins with the classical model of a simple diatomic molecule and is expanded to include larger molecules by introducing normal modes and group frequencies. (3) 'Interpretation' is the heart of the tutorial. Thirteen IR spectra are analyzed in detail, covering the most important functional groups. This section features color animation of each normal mode, full interactivity, overlay of related spectra, and expansion of important regions. This section can also be used as a reference.

  12. Spectroscopy analogue-to-digital converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of world trends in the branch of electronic constructions for spectroscopy analogue-to-digital converters (ADC) applied in different fields of nuclear physics and techniques has been done. Data sheets and graphical comparison of main parameters for ADC that have appeared in world literature are also added. Recent methods applied for conversion of voltage pulse amplitude with linear coding scale have been described. Future trends up to year 1990 anticipating the increase of spectroscopy ADC resolution up to 15 bits and the shortening of ADC conversion time down to 1 μs have been presented. The dynamic development of very fast converters with low accuracy has been predicted. Present ADC are capable of sampling pulses from nuclear detectors with repetition rate up to 100 MHz. Examples of different correction methods for deleting ADC measurement errors show that both hardware and software tools may be used. On the ground of these methods one can use for spectroscopy ADC design commercially available integrated circuits with large scale integration. Then good metrology parameters, simplicity of realization and small overall dimensions may be obtained. These correction methods make a compromise between speed and precision of ADC operation possible. 81 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs. (author)

  13. Spectroscopy Division progress report (July 1992-June 1993)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development activities of the Spectroscopy Division during the year July 1992-June 1993 are reported in the form of individual summaries. These are arranged under the headings: (1) analytical spectroscopy, (2) infrared and Raman spectroscopy, (3) atomic spectra, (4) electronic spectra, (5) laser spectroscopy, (6) synchrotron beam foil and plasma spectroscopy, (7) optics, (8) electronics and instrumentation, and (9) design, fabrication and workshop etc. The list of publications and papers presented at the various conferences, symposia, workshops etc. by the staff members of the Division during the report period is also given. (author)

  14. Determining the Authenticity of Gemstones Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponick, Aaron; Marchozzi, Emedio; Johnston, Cynthia R.; Wigal, Carl T.

    1998-04-01

    The benefits of laser spectroscopy in the undergraduate curriculum have been the focus of several recent articles in this journal. Raman spectroscopy has been of particular interest since the similarities of Raman to conventional infrared spectroscopy make the interpretation of spectral data well within undergraduate comprehension. In addition, the accessibility to this technology is now within the reach of most undergraduate institutions. This paper reports the development of an experiment using Raman spectroscopy which determines the authenticity of both diamonds and pearls. The resulting spectra provide an introduction to vibrational spectroscopy and can be used in a variety of laboratory courses ranging from introductory chemistry to instrumental analysis.

  15. Spectroscopy Division progress report (January 1991 to June 1992)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development activities of the Spectroscopy Division during the calendar year 1990-1992 are reported in the form of individual summaries. These are arranged under the headings: (1) analytical spectroscopy, (2) infrared and Raman spectroscopy, (3) atomic spectra, (4) molecular and electronic spectra, (5) laser spectroscopy (6) synchrotron, beam foil and plasma spectroscopy, (7) optics, (8) design, fabrication and workshop etc. The list of publications and papers presented at the various conferences, symposia etc. by the staff members of the Division during the report period is given at the end. (author). figs

  16. Issues in light meson spectroscopy: The case for meson spectroscopy at CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godfrey, S. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa (Canada)

    1994-04-01

    The author reviews some outstanding issues in meson spectroscopy. The most important qualitative issue is whether hadrons with explicit gluonic degrees of freedom exist. To answer this question requires a much better understanding of conventional q{bar q} mesons. The author therefore begins by examining the status of conventional meson spectroscopy and how the situation can be improved. The expected properties of gluonic excitations are discussed with particular emphasis on hybrids to give guidance to experimental searches. Multiquark systems are commented upon as they are likely to be important in the mass region under study and will have to be understood better. In the final section the author discusses the opportunities that CEBAF can offer for the study of meson spectroscopy.

  17. Double-modulation spectroscopy of molecular ions - Eliminating the background in velocity-modulation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Guang; Tholl, Hans Dieter; Farley, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Velocity-modulation spectroscopy is an established technique for performing laser absorption spectroscopy of molecular ions in a discharge. However, such experiments are often plagued by a coherent background signal arising from emission from the discharge or from electronic pickup. Fluctuations in the background can obscure the desired signal. A simple technique using amplitude modulation of the laser and two lock-in amplifiers in series to detect the signal is demonstrated. The background and background fluctuations are thereby eliminated, facilitating the detection of molecular ions.

  18. Visible Light Spectroscopy of GEO Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Lederer, Susan M.; Cowardin, Heather; Barker, Edwin S.; Abercromby, Kira J.

    2012-01-01

    Our goal is to understand the physical characteristics of debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO). Our approach is to compare the observed reflectance as a function of wavelength with laboratory measurements of typical spacecraft surfaces to understand what the materials are likely to be. Because debris could be irregular in shape and tumbling at an unknown rate, rapid simultaneous measurements over a range of wavelengths are required. Acquiring spectra of optically faint objects with short exposure times to minimize these effects requires a large telescope. We describe optical spectroscopy obtained during 12-14 March 2012 with the IMACS imaging spectrograph on the 6.5-m 'Walter Baade' Magellan telescope at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. When used in f/2 imaging mode for acquisition, this instrument has a field of view of 30 arc-minutes in diameter. After acquisition and centering of a GEO object, a 2.5 arc-second wide slit and a grism are moved into the beam for spectroscopy. We used a 200 l/mm grism blazed at 660 nm for wavelength coverage in the 500-900 nm region. Typical exposure times for spectra were 15-30 seconds. Spectra were obtained for five objects in the GEO regime listed as debris in the US Space Command public catalog, and one high area to mass ratio GEO object. In addition spectra were obtained of three cataloged IDCSP (Initial Defense Communications Satellite Program) satellites with known initial properties just below the GEO regime. All spectra were calibrated using white dwarf flux standards and solar analog stars. We will describe our experiences using Magellan, a telescope never used previously for orbital debris spectroscopy, and our initial results.

  19. Photoelectron spectroscopy and the dipole approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmers, O.; Hansen, D.L.; Wang, H. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is a powerful technique because it directly probes, via the measurement of photoelectron kinetic energies, orbital and band structure in valence and core levels in a wide variety of samples. The technique becomes even more powerful when it is performed in an angle-resolved mode, where photoelectrons are distinguished not only by their kinetic energy, but by their direction of emission as well. Determining the probability of electron ejection as a function of angle probes the different quantum-mechanical channels available to a photoemission process, because it is sensitive to phase differences among the channels. As a result, angle-resolved photoemission has been used successfully for many years to provide stringent tests of the understanding of basic physical processes underlying gas-phase and solid-state interactions with radiation. One mainstay in the application of angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is the well-known electric-dipole approximation for photon interactions. In this simplification, all higher-order terms, such as those due to electric-quadrupole and magnetic-dipole interactions, are neglected. As the photon energy increases, however, effects beyond the dipole approximation become important. To best determine the range of validity of the dipole approximation, photoemission measurements on a simple atomic system, neon, where extra-atomic effects cannot play a role, were performed at BL 8.0. The measurements show that deviations from {open_quotes}dipole{close_quotes} expectations in angle-resolved valence photoemission are observable for photon energies down to at least 0.25 keV, and are quite significant at energies around 1 keV. From these results, it is clear that non-dipole angular-distribution effects may need to be considered in any application of angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy that uses x-ray photons of energies as low as a few hundred eV.

  20. Electron spectroscopy with fast heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since about 1970 the spectroscopy of Auger-electrons and characteristic x-rays following energetic ion-atom collisions has received a great deal of attention. An increasing number of accelerators, capable of providing a large number of projectile ion species over a wide range of projectile energies, became available for studying ion-atom collision phenomena. Many charged particles from protons up to heavy ions like uranium can be accelerated to energies ranging over six orders of magnitude. This allows us to study systematically a great variety of effects accompanied by dynamic excitation processes of the atomic shells in either the projectile- or target-atoms. The studies yield fundamental information regarding the excitation mechanism (e.g., Coulomb and quasi-molecular excitation) and allow sensitive tests of atomic structure theories. This information in turn is valuable to other fields in physics like plasma-, astro-, or solid-state (surface) physics. It is a characteristic feature of fast heavy-ion accelerators that they can produce highly stripped ion species which have in turn the capability to highly ionize neutral target atoms or molecules in a single collision. The ionization process, mainly due to the strong electrical fields that are involved, allows us to study few-electron atoms with high atomic numbers Z. High resolution spectroscopy performed with these atoms allows a particularly good test of relativistic and QED effects. The probability of producing these few electron systems is determined by the charge state and the velocity of the projectile ions. In this contribution the possibilities of using electron spectroscopy as a tool to investigate fast ion-atom collisions is discussed and demonstrated with a few examples. 30 references

  1. Femtosecond infrared spectroscopy: study, development and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work has been devoted to the development and the applications of a new technique of infrared (5-20 μm) spectroscopy allowing a temporal resolution of 100 fs. This technique relies on a source of ultrashort infrared pulses obtained by frequency mixing in a nonlinear material. In particular, the optical rectification of 12-fs visible pulses in gallium arsenide has allowed us to obtain 40-fs infrared pulses with a spectrum extending from 5 pm up to 15 μm. Spectral resolution has been achieved by Fourier transform spectroscopy, using a novel device we have called Diffracting FTIR. These developments allow to study inter-subband transitions in quantum-well structures. The inter-subband relaxation time has been measured by a pump-probe experiment, in which the sample was excited with a visible pulse, and the variations of inter-subband absorption probed with an infrared pulse. Besides, we have developed a method of coherent emission spectroscopy allowing to monitor the electric field emitted by coherent charge oscillations in quantum wells. The decay of the oscillations due to the loss of coherence between excited levels yields a direct measurement of the dephasing time between these levels. Other applications include biological macromolecules like reaction centers of photosynthetic bacteria. We have shown that we were able to monitor variations of infrared absorption of about 10-4 optical densities with a temporal resolution of 100 fs. This would constitute a relevant tool to study the role of molecular vibrations during the primary steps of biological processes. (author)

  2. Spectral distributions in nuclei and statistical spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Haq, Rizwan ul

    2010-01-01

    This book, a first comprehensive review on statistical spectroscopy, deals with two related yet distinct topics - averages and fluctuations. While fluctuations have been dealt with in considerable detail in Porter's book entitled ""Statistical Theories of Spectra: Fluctuations"", and subsequent reviews and books, there does not exist at present a similar treatise on averages. This unique volume is designed to fill this significant gap. The book begins with an introductory review and overview of the subject of spectral distributions initiated by J Bruce French in the 60's followed by a collecti

  3. Iron oxides characterization by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work rust development on low carbon wire surface after the conformation process at different temperatures was studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy. The characterization was made by determining the following spectral parameters; 1) Quadrupole splitting, 2) Isomer shift, and 3) Magnetic splitting. The area quantification determined the percentage amount of three different iron oxides. These iron oxides were: a) Wustite (Fe O), b) Hematite (Fe2O3), and c) Magnetite (Fe3O4) which were present in the rust studied. With the results it was possible to establish the best temperature to favor the development of each of these iron oxides. (Author)

  4. Occlusal caries detection using polarized Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionita, I.; Bulou, A.

    2008-02-01

    The tooth enamel, because of its hydroxyapatite composition, must present a Raman spectrum with strong polarization anisotropy. Carious lesions of the enamel will produce an alteration of local symmetry and will increase much more scattering of light. This will reduce the anisotropy of the Raman spectra. Because of the difference between high sensitivity to polarization of the 959 cm -1 Raman peak in sound enamel and low sensitivity in carried enamel, Raman polarized spectroscopy could be a useful method to early detect teeth caries.

  5. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagna, P.; Cortelli, P.; Barbiroli, B. (Inst. of Medical Pathology, Univ. of Bologna (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe the method of [sup 31]phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Actual concepts of digital PAC-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In conventional perturbed angular correlation (PAC)-spectroscopy huge amounts of events are processed by fast electronics. Modern digital signal processing devices and the improvement in the computer technology in recent years allow today digital PAC-spectrometer setups capable to perform software-based data processing with all the benefits of storage, repeatable data analysis under different limits, and easy switching between different isotopes. In this paper we discuss experiences and concepts of a first realized digital PAC-spectrometer, which will be rebuild at ISOLDE/CERN/Geneva.

  7. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has become an important tool to study in vivo certain biochemical aspects of brain disorders. In the last decade this technique has been applied to the in vivo investigation of pathophysiological aspects of psychiatric disorders, extending knowledge of the related brain alterations. This review will focus on providing some background to clarify technical and biochemical issues and it will describe the studies that have been performed in schizophrenia. The results will be framed in a more general context to highlight what we have learned and what remains to be understood from the application of this technique to schizophrenia

  8. Detection of Endolithes Using Infrared Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dumas, S; Joncas, G

    2007-01-01

    On Earth, the Dry Valleys of Antarctica provide the closest martian-like environment for the study of extremophiles. Colonies of bacteries are protected from the freezing temperatures, the drought and UV light. They represent almost half of the biomass of those regions. Due to there resilience, endolithes are one possible model of martian biota. We propose to use infrared spectroscopy to remotely detect those colonies even if there is no obvious sign of their presence. This remote sensing approach reduces the risk of contamination or damage to the samples.

  9. Mid infrared upconversion spectroscopy using diffuse reflectance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanders, Nicolai Højer; Kehlet, Louis M.; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Beato, Pablo; Pedersen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    upconversion unit consists of a PP:LN crystal situated as an intracavity component in a Nd:YVO 4 laser. Mixing incoming spectrally and spatially incoherent light from the test sample with the high power intracavity beam of the Nd:YVO 4 laser results in enhanced conversion efficiency. The upconverted light is...... spectrally located in the near infrared (NIR) wavelength region easily accessible for low noise Silicon CCD camera technology. Thus the room temperature upconversion unit and the Silicon CCD camera replaces noisy mid infrared detectors used in existing Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. We demonstrate...

  10. Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) has been used for the sensitive detection of uranium. The apparatus consists of a laser system with three dye lasers and two pulsed copper vapour lasers and a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. The uranium atoms are ionized in a three step excitation with the third step leading to an autoionizing state. Several excitation schemes were investigated and for two schemes all three transitions could be saturated with the available laser power. The hyperfine structure splitting (HFS) of 235U, the isotopic shift (IS) between 235U and 238U as well as isotopic ratios in uranium samples were determined. (Author)

  11. A novel differential velocity modulation laser spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Experimental investigation of a novel differential velocity modulation laser spectroscopy is reported and demonstrated with the spectra of Meinel system. The S/N ratio excesses 500︰1, about 60 times higher than that with the traditional non-differential technique. With this technique, we obtained the high-resolution electronic absorption spectra of (1, 0) vibration-al band of CS+ for the first time. It is confirmed that this technique will be a powerful method and receive wide application in studies of new molecular ions.

  12. Implementation of the Electron conversion Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work has been exposed the principles of the Conversion Moessbauer Electron Spectroscopy and its possibilities of application. Is also described the operation of the parallel plate avalanche detector made at the CEADEN starting from modifications done to the Gancedo's model and is exposed examples of the use of this detector in the characterization of corroded surfaces, with chemical cleaning and in samples of welded joints. The experiences obtained of this work were extended to the National Polytechnic Institute of Mexico where a similar detector, made in our center, was installed there

  13. Time-resolved orbital angular momentum spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyan, Mehmet A.; Kikkawa, James M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    We introduce pump-probe magneto-orbital spectroscopy, wherein Laguerre-Gauss optical pump pulses impart orbital angular momentum to the electronic states of a material and subsequent dynamics are studied with 100 fs time resolution. The excitation uses vortex modes that distribute angular momentum over a macroscopic area determined by the spot size, and the optical probe studies the chiral imbalance of vortex modes reflected off the sample. First observations in bulk GaAs yield transients that evolve on time scales distinctly different from population and spin relaxation, as expected, but with surprisingly large lifetimes.

  14. Time-resolved orbital angular momentum spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce pump-probe magneto-orbital spectroscopy, wherein Laguerre-Gauss optical pump pulses impart orbital angular momentum to the electronic states of a material and subsequent dynamics are studied with 100 fs time resolution. The excitation uses vortex modes that distribute angular momentum over a macroscopic area determined by the spot size, and the optical probe studies the chiral imbalance of vortex modes reflected off the sample. First observations in bulk GaAs yield transients that evolve on time scales distinctly different from population and spin relaxation, as expected, but with surprisingly large lifetimes

  15. Spectroscopy of Moses Rock Kimberlite Diatreme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, C. M.; Mustard, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    Three types of remote sensing data (Airborne Imaging Spectroscopy (AIS), NS001, Zeiss IR-photographs) were obtained for the Moses Rock kimberlite dike in southern Utah. The goal is to identify and characterize the mantle derived mafic component in such volcanic features. The Zeiss and NS001 images provide information on the regional setting and allow units of the dike to be distinguished from surrounding material. A potential unmapped satellite dike was identified. The AIS data provide characterizing information of the surface composition of the dike. Serpentized olivine-bearing soils are (tentatively) identified from the AIS spectra for a few areas within the dike.

  16. Integral field spectroscopy of QSO host galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, K.; Wisotzki, L.; Sánchez, S. F.; Christensen, L.; Becker, T.; Kelz, A.; Roth, M. M.

    2004-02-01

    We describe a project to study the state of the ISM in ˜20 low redshift (z<0.3) QSO host galaxies observed with the PMAS integral field spectrograph. We describe the development of the method to access the stellar and gas components of the spectrum without the strong nuclear emission, in order to access the host galaxy properties in the central region. It shows that integral field spectroscopy promises to be very efficient in studying the gas distribution and its velocity field, and also the spatially resolved stellar population in the host galaxies of luminous AGN.

  17. Integral field spectroscopy of QSO host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Jahnke, K; Sánchez, S F; Christensen, L; Becker, T; Kelz, A; Roth, M M

    2003-01-01

    We describe a project to study the state of the ISM in ~20 low redshift (z<0.3) QSO host galaxies observed with the PMAS integral field spectrograph. We describe method developement to access the stellar and gas component of the spectrum without the strong nuclear emission to access the host galaxy properties also in the central region. It shows that integral field spectroscopy promises to be very efficient to study the gas distribution and its velocity field, and also spatially resolved stellar population in the host galaxies also of luminous AGN.

  18. The spectroscopy and chemistry of muonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectroscopy and chemistry of muonium is divided into two parts. Part I deals with muonium and the Breit-Rabi diagram, and explains the significance of muonium in atomic, molecular and solid state physics, as well as in chemistry. The identification of atomic muonium is described with reference to the Breit-Rabi diagram. Part II concerns muonic chemistry in gases and liquids, and deals with the physical processes by which implanted muons become thermalised in liquid and gaseous media. (U.K.)

  19. High-resolution flurescence spectroscopy in immunoanalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grubor, Nenad M.

    2005-05-01

    The work presented in this dissertation combines highly sensitive and selective fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopy (FLNS) detection with various modes of immunoanalytical techniques. It has been shown that FLNS is capable of directly probing molecules immunocomplexed with antibodies, eliminating analytical ambiguities that may arise from interferences that accompany traditional immunochemical techniques. Moreover, the utilization of highly cross-reactive antibodies for highly specific analyte determination has been demonstrated. Finally, they demonstrate the first example of the spectral resolution of diastereomeric analytes based on their interaction with a cross-reactive antibody.

  20. Atomic processes relevant to polarization plasma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When atoms (ions) are excited anisotropically, polarized excited atoms are produced and the radiation emitted by these atoms is polarized. From the standpoint of plasma spectroscopy research, we review the existing data for various atomic processes that are related to the polarization phenomena. These processes are: electron impact excitation, excitation by atomic and ionic collisions, photoexcitation, radiative recombination and bremsstrahlung. Collisional and radiative relaxation processes of atomic polarization follow. Other topics included are: electric-field measurement, self alignment, Lyman doublet intensity ratio, and magnetic-field measurement of the solar prominence. (author)