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Sample records for beam widths

  1. Beam-width spreading of vortex beams in free space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwei; Li, Jinhong; Duan, Meiling

    2018-01-01

    Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the definition of second-order moments of the Wigner distribution function, the analytical expression for the beam-width spreading of Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) vortex beams in free space are derived, and used to study the influence of beam parameters on the beam-width spreading of GSM vortex beams. With the increment of the propagation distance, the beam-width spreading of GSM vortex beams will increase; the bigger the topological charge, spatial correlation length, wavelength and waist width are, the smaller the beam-width spreading is.

  2. Crack width analysis of steel fibers reinforced concrete beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šahinagić-Isović Merima

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibre reinforced concrete in recent years has grown from experimental material to a practical usable material, due to its positive properties such as increased tensile strength, bending strength, toughness etc. However, still there are many unanswered questions that are the subject of many research. In this paper results and analysis of crack width of concrete beams with steel fibres are presented. This analysis considers influence of steel fibre addition on the crack width of reinforced concrete beams (dimensions 15/28/300 cm loaded up to fracture during short-term ultimate static load with one unloading cycle. Concrete beams were made of two types of concrete: ordinary strength concrete (OSC - C30/37 and high strength concrete (HSC - C60/70, with and without 0.45% of steel fibres. The results indicate that there is a significant influence of fibre addition on crack width, especially for ordinary concrete. At the end, empirical calculations of the concrete elements' crack width with steel fibres according to the recommendations of RILEM and ACI building code are given.

  3. Beam manipulating by metallic nano-slits with variant widths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haofei; Wang, Changtao; Du, Chunlei; Luo, Xiangang; Dong, Xiaochun; Gao, Hongtao

    2005-09-05

    A novel method is proposed to manipulate beam by modulating light phase through a metallic film with arrayed nano-slits, which have constant depth but variant widths. The slits transport electro-magnetic energy in the form of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in nanometric waveguides and provide desired phase retardations of beam manipulating with variant phase propagation constant. Numerical simulation of an illustrative lens design example is performed through finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and shows agreement with theory analysis result. In addition, extraordinary optical transmission of SPPs through sub-wavelength metallic slits is observed in the simulation and helps to improve elements' energy using factor.

  4. The optimization of pencil beam widths for use in an electron pencil beam algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pencil beam algorithms for the calculation of electron beam dose distributions have come into widespread use. These algorithms, however, have generally exhibited difficulties in reproducing dose distributions for small field dimensions or, more specifically, for those conditions in which lateral scatter equilibrium does not exist. The work described here has determined that this difficulty can arise from the manner in which the width of the pencil beam is calculated. A unique approach for determining the pencil beam widths required to accurately reproduce small field dose distributions in a homogeneous phantom is described and compared with measurements and the results of other calculations. This method has also been extended to calculate electron beam dose distributions in heterogeneous media and the results of this work are presented. Suggestions for further improvements are discussed.

  5. Dosimetric consequences of pencil beam width variations in scanned beam particle therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanrion, M A; Ammazzalorso, F; Wittig, A; Engenhart-Cabillic, R; Jelen, U

    2013-01-01

    Scanned ion beam delivery enables the highest degree of target dose conformation attainable in external beam radiotherapy. Nominal pencil beam widths (spot sizes) are recorded during treatment planning system commissioning. Due to changes in the beam-line optics, the actual spot sizes may differ from these commissioning values, leading to differences between planned and delivered dose. The purpose of this study was to analyse the dosimetric consequences of spot size variations in particle therapy treatment plans. For 12 patients with skull base tumours and 12 patients with prostate carcinoma, scanned-beam carbon ion and proton treatment plans were prepared and recomputed simulating spot size changes of (1) ±10% to simulate the typical magnitude of fluctuations, (2) ±25% representing the worst-case scenario and (3) ±50% as a part of a risk analysis in case of fault conditions. The primary effect of the spot size variation was a dose deterioration affecting the target edge: loss of target coverage and broadening of the lateral penumbra (increased spot size) or overdosage and contraction of the lateral penumbra (reduced spot size). For changes ⩽25%, the resulting planning target volume mean 95%-isodose line coverage (CI-95%) deterioration was ranging from negligible to moderate. In some cases changes in the dose to adjoining critical structures were observed. (paper)

  6. Effect of electron cyclotron beam width to neoclassical tearing mode stabilization by minimum seeking control in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Minho; Na, Yong-Su; Seo, Jaemin; Kim, M.; Kim, Kyungjin

    2018-01-01

    We report the effect of the electron cyclotron (EC) beam width on the full suppression time of neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) using the finite difference method (FDM) based minimum seeking controller in ITER. An integrated numerical system is setup for time-dependent simulations of the NTM evolution in ITER by solving the modified Rutherford equation together with the plasma equilibrium, transport, and EC heating and current drive. The calculated magnetic island width and growth rate is converted to the Mirnov diagnostic signal as an input to the controller to mimic the real experiment. In addition, 10% of the noise is enforced to this diagnostic signal to evaluate the robustness of the controller. To test the dependency of the NTM stabilization time on the EC beam width, the EC beam width scan is performed for a perfectly aligned case first, then for cases with the feedback control using the minimum seeking controller. When the EC beam is perfectly aligned, the narrower the EC beam width, the smaller the NTM stabilization time is observed. As the beam width increases, the required EC power increases exponentially. On the other hand, when the minimum seeking controller is applied, NTM stabilization sometimes fails as the EC beam width decreases. This is consistently observed in the simulation with various representations of the noise as well as without the noise in the Mirnov signal. The higher relative misalignment, misalignment divided by the beam width, is found to be the reason for the failure with the narrower beam widths. The EC stabilization effect can be lower for the narrower beam widths than the broader ones even at the same misalignment due to the smaller ECCD at the island O-point. On the other hand, if the EC beam is too wide, the NTM stabilization time takes too long. Accordingly, the optimal EC beam width range is revealed to exist in the feedback stabilization of NTM.

  7. Study on the E-beam pulse width scaling for a 25-kilojoule KrF amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, J.J.

    1983-02-01

    The KrF laser is being considered as an ICF driver candidate. Since this laser is not an energy storing system, the output energy of an amplifier is delivered over the entire pulse width of the excitation source. E-beam pumping is preferred for large energy systems. The e-beam pulse width is constrained to a few hundred nanoseconds by laser operation and pulsed power considerations. The target requires pulses of a few nanoseconds. Angular multiplexing of probe beams through the amplifier is a preferred scheme for bridging this difference in timing requirements. Progressively shorter target irradiation times may be obtained by using shorter pulse probe beams and by either increasing the number of angular multiplexed beams or by decreasing the e-beam pulse width. This report documents results of a study on the consequences of following the latter approach

  8. Interaction between corrosion crack width and steel loss in RC beams corroded under load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malumbela, Goitseone; Alexander, Mark; Moyo, Pilate

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results and discussions on an experimental study conducted to relate the rate of widening of corrosion cracks with the pattern of corrosion cracks as well as the level of steel corrosion for RC beams (153 x 254 x 3000 mm) that were corroded whilst subjected to varying levels of sustained loads. Steel corrosion was limited to the tensile reinforcement and to a length of 700 mm at the centre of the beams. The rate of widening of corrosion cracks as well as strains on uncracked faces of RC beams was constantly monitored during the corrosion process, along the corrosion region and along other potential cracking faces of beams using a demec gauge. The distribution of the gravimetric mass loss of steel along the corrosion region was measured at the end of the corrosion process. The results obtained showed that: the rate of widening of each corrosion crack is dependent on the overall pattern of the cracks whilst the rate of corrosion is independent of the pattern of corrosion cracks. A mass loss of steel of 1% was found to induce a corrosion crack width of about 0.04 mm.

  9. Research of Effective Width of FRP U-shaped Hoop Reinforcement Properties of Concrete Beams by Shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Baokun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paste fiber reinforced composite material (hereinafter referred to as FRP U-shaped hoop of reinforced concrete beams interfacial debonding is an important reinforcement technology research. For the effective width of the CFRP U-shaped hoop reinforcement, it is still a lack of in-depth research, only relying on the test research huge workload, this article (ANSYS and the numerical simulation in the whole process of the shear load release properties of finite element calculation software. According to the results of finite element analysis, the author studied the CFRP U-shaped hoop to increase the width of the shear capacity of reinforced concrete beams by the impact.

  10. Monitoring steel corrosion in reinforced concrete beams with variable crack widths under sustained load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blagojevic, A.; Koleva, D.A.; Walraven, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    This work reports on the investigation of steel corrosion behavior in 1000 mm in length reinforced concrete beams under sustained load, aiming to define a feasible experimental protocol for corrosion monitoring. The beams were subjected to wetting (5% NaCl for corroding cases and tap water for

  11. Vespertilionid bats control the width of their biosonar sound beam dynamically during prey pursuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lasse; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2010-01-01

    Animals using sound for communication emit directional signals, focusing most acoustic energy in one direction. Echolocating bats are listening for soft echoes from insects. Therefore, a directional biosonar sound beam greatly increases detection probability in the forward direction and decreases...... off-axis echoes. However, high directionality has context-specific disadvantages: at close range the detection space will be vastly reduced, making a broad beam favorable. Hence, a flexible system would be very advantageous. We investigated whether bats can dynamically change directionality...... of their biosonar during aerial pursuit of insects. We trained five Myotis daubentonii and one Eptesicus serotinus to capture tethered mealworms and recorded their echolocation signals with a multimicrophone array. The results show that the bats broaden the echolocation beam drastically in the terminal phase...

  12. Adaptive beam-width control of echolocation sounds by CF-FM bats, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum nippon, during prey-capture flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuta, Naohiro; Hiryu, Shizuko; Fujioka, Emyo; Yamada, Yasufumi; Riquimaroux, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yoshiaki

    2013-04-01

    The echolocation sounds of Japanese CF-FM bats (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum nippon) were measured while the bats pursued a moth (Goniocraspidum pryeri) in a flight chamber. Using a 31-channel microphone array system, we investigated how CF-FM bats adjust pulse direction and beam width according to prey position. During the search and approach phases, the horizontal and vertical beam widths were ±22±5 and ±13±5 deg, respectively. When bats entered the terminal phase approximately 1 m from a moth, distinctive evasive flight by G. pryeri was sometimes observed. Simultaneously, the bats broadened the beam widths of some emissions in both the horizontal (44% of emitted echolocation pulses) and vertical planes (71%). The expanded beam widths were ±36±7 deg (horizontal) and ±30±9 deg (vertical). When moths began evasive flight, the tracking accuracy decreased compared with that during the approach phase. However, in 97% of emissions during the terminal phase, the beam width was wider than the misalignment (the angular difference between the pulse and target directions). These findings indicate that bats actively adjust their beam width to retain the moving target within a spatial echolocation window during the final capture stages.

  13. Design of a multislit, variable width collimator for microplanar beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Nawrocky, M.M.; Spanne, P.; Gebbers, J.; Archer, D.W.; Laissue, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy of the intracerebral 9L gliosarcoma in rats, an experimental surrogate for human malignant gliomas, using mainly 30--130 keV wiggler-generated x rays, extended the residual lifespans of some rats ten or more times over those of untreated, similar gliosarcoma-bearing rats. The rats were exposed 300 or 600 times to an upright, 25-μm-wide, 4-mm-high x-ray beam. A multislit collimator has been designed to shorten the time required for the therapy

  14. Time-dependent Second Order Scattering Theory for Weather Radar with a Finite Beam Width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Tanelli, Simone; Im, Eastwood; Ito, Shigeo; Oguchi, Tomohiro

    2006-01-01

    Multiple scattering effects from spherical water particles of uniform diameter are studied for a W-band pulsed radar. The Gaussian transverse beam-profile and the rectangular pulse-duration are used for calculation. An second-order analytical solution is derived for a single layer structure, based on a time-dependent radiative transfer theory as described in the authors' companion paper. When the range resolution is fixed, increase in footprint radius leads to increase in the second order reflectivity that is defined as the ratio of the second order return to the first order one. This feature becomes more serious as the range increases. Since the spaceborne millimeter-wavelength radar has a large footprint radius that is competitive to the mean free path, the multiple scattering effect must be taken into account for analysis.

  15. If Frisch is true - impacts of varying beam width, resolution, frequency combinations and beam overlap when retrieving liquid water content profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küchler, N.; Kneifel, S.; Kollias, P.; Loehnert, U.

    2017-12-01

    Cumulus and stratocumulus clouds strongly affect the Earth's radiation budget and are a major uncertainty source in weather and climate prediction models. To improve and evaluate models, a comprehensive understanding of cloud processes is necessary and references are needed. Therefore active and passive microwave remote sensing of clouds can be used to derive cloud properties such as liquid water path and liquid water content (LWC), which can serve as a reference for model evaluation. However, both the measurements and the assumptions when retrieving physical quantities from the measurements involve uncertainty sources. Frisch et al. (1998) combined radar and radiometer observations to derive LWC profiles. Assuming their assumptions are correct, there will be still uncertainties regarding the measurement setup. We investigate how varying beam width, temporal and vertical resolutions, frequency combinations, and beam overlap of and between the two instruments influence the retrieval of LWC profiles. Especially, we discuss the benefit of combining vertically, high resolved radar and radiometer measurements using the same antenna, i.e. having ideal beam overlap. Frisch, A. S., G. Feingold, C. W. Fairall, T. Uttal, and J. B. Snider, 1998: On cloud radar and microwave radiometer measurements of stratus cloud liquid water profiles. J. Geophys. Res.: Atmos., 103 (18), 23 195-23 197, doi:0148-0227/98/98JD-01827509.00.

  16. Technical Note: Use of a beam width probe in an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer to monitor particle collection efficiency in the field

    OpenAIRE

    Salcedo, D.; Onasch, T. B.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Dzepina, K.; Huffman, J. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kolb, C. E.; Weimer, S.; Drewnick, F.; Allan, J. D.; Delia, A. E.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Two Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (Q-AMS) were deployed in Mexico City, during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field study (MCMA-2003) from 29 March?4 May 2003 to investigate particle concentrations, sources, and processes. We report the use of a particle beam width probe (BWP) in the field to quantify potential losses of particles due to beam broadening inside the AMS caused by particle shape (nonsphericity) and particle size. Data from this probe show that no...

  17. EFFECTS OF X-RAY BEAM ANGLE AND GEOMETRIC DISTORTION ON WIDTH OF EQUINE THORACOLUMBAR INTERSPINOUS SPACES USING RADIOGRAPHY AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djernaes, Julie D.; Nielsen, Jon V.; Berg, Lise C.

    2017-01-01

    The widths of spaces between the thoracolumbar processi spinosi (interspinous spaces) are frequently assessed using radiography in sports horses; however effects of varying X-ray beam angles and geometric distortion have not been previously described. The aim of this prospective, observational st...

  18. Binary moving-blocker-based scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography with width-truncated projections: proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho; Fahimian, Benjamin P; Xing, Lei

    2017-03-21

    This paper proposes a binary moving-blocker (BMB)-based technique for scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). In concept, a beam blocker consisting of lead strips, mounted in front of the x-ray tube, moves rapidly in and out of the beam during a single gantry rotation. The projections are acquired in alternating phases of blocked and unblocked cone beams, where the blocked phase results in a stripe pattern in the width direction. To derive the scatter map from the blocked projections, 1D B-Spline interpolation/extrapolation is applied by using the detected information in the shaded regions. The scatter map of the unblocked projections is corrected by averaging two scatter maps that correspond to their adjacent blocked projections. The scatter-corrected projections are obtained by subtracting the corresponding scatter maps from the projection data and are utilized to generate the CBCT image by a compressed-sensing (CS)-based iterative reconstruction algorithm. Catphan504 and pelvis phantoms were used to evaluate the method's performance. The proposed BMB-based technique provided an effective method to enhance the image quality by suppressing scatter-induced artifacts, such as ring artifacts around the bowtie area. Compared to CBCT without a blocker, the spatial nonuniformity was reduced from 9.1% to 3.1%. The root-mean-square error of the CT numbers in the regions of interest (ROIs) was reduced from 30.2 HU to 3.8 HU. In addition to high resolution, comparable to that of the benchmark image, the CS-based reconstruction also led to a better contrast-to-noise ratio in seven ROIs. The proposed technique enables complete scatter-corrected CBCT imaging with width-truncated projections and allows reducing the acquisition time to approximately half. This work may have significant implications for image-guided or adaptive radiation therapy, where CBCT is often used.

  19. Technical Note: Use of a beam width probe in an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer to monitor particle collection efficiency in the field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Salcedo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Two Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (Q-AMS were deployed in Mexico City, during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field study (MCMA-2003 from 29 March–4 May 2003 to investigate particle concentrations, sources, and processes. We report the use of a particle beam width probe (BWP in the field to quantify potential losses of particles due to beam broadening inside the AMS caused by particle shape (nonsphericity and particle size. Data from this probe show that no significant mass of particles was lost due to excessive beam broadening; i.e. the shape- and size-related collection efficiency (Es of the AMS during this campaign was approximately one. Comparison of the BWP data from MCMA-2003 with other campaigns shows that the same conclusion holds for several other urban, rural and remotes sites. This means that the aerodynamic lens in the AMS is capable of efficiently focusing ambient particles into a well defined beam and onto the AMS vaporizer for particles sampled in a wide variety of environments. All the species measured by the AMS during MCMA-2003 have similar attenuation profiles which suggests that the particles that dominate the mass concentration were internally mixed most of the time. Only for the smaller particles (especially below 300 nm, organic and inorganic species show different attenuation versus particle size which is likely due to partial external mixing of these components. Changes observed in the focusing of the particle beam in time can be attributed, in part, to changes in particle shape (i.e. due to relative humidity and size of the particles sampled. However, the relationships between composition, atmospheric conditions, and particle shape and size appear to be very complex and are not yet completely understood.

  20. Phase width reduction project summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.J.; Xie, Z.Q.; McMahan, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the phase width reduction project, 1993--96, was to reduce the phase width of the 88-Inch Cyclotron beam on target from 5--10 ns to 1--2 ns for certain experiments, such as Gammasphere, which use time-of-flight identification. Since reducing the phase width also reduces beam intensity, tuning should be done to also optimize the transmission. The Multi-turn Collimator slits in the cyclotron center region were used to collimate the early turns radially, thus reducing the phase width from about 5 ns to 1--2 ns FWHM for a Gammasphere beam. The effect of the slits on phase width was verified with a Fast Faraday Cup and with particle and gamma-ray detectors in the external beamline

  1. Pulse-width discriminators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budyashov, Yu.G.; Grebenyuk, V.M.; Zinov, V.G.

    1978-01-01

    A pulse duration discriminator is described which is intended for processing signals from multilayer scintillators. The basic elements of the scintillator are: an input gate, a current generator, an integrating capacitor, a Schmidt trigger and an anticoincidence circuit. The basic circuit of the discriminator and its time diagrams explaining its operating are given. The discriminator is based on microcircuits. Pulse duration discrimination threshold changes continuously from 20 to 100 ns, while its amplitude threshold changes within 20 to 100 mV. The temperature instability of discrimination thresholds (both in pulse width and in amplitude) is better than 0.1 per cent/deg C

  2. Energy and energy width measurement in the FNAL antiproton accumulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, M.; Hsueh, S.; Rapidis, P.; Werkema, S.

    1991-10-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator has recently been used to produce Charmonium resonances (charm quark, anti-charm quark bound states) in proton-antiproton annihilations using an internal H 2 gas jet target. A measurement of the resonance mass and width may be obtained from a precise knowledge of the antiproton beam energy and energy spread. The beam energy is measured to an accuracy of 1 part in 10 4 in the range 6.3 Gev to 4.1 Gev by measuring the orbit length and revolution frequency of the beam. The beam momentum spread is measured to an accuracy of 10% by measuring the beam frequency spread and the parameter η = (P beam /F rev )·(dF rev /dP beam ). These two measurement techniques are described in this report

  3. Energy and energy width measurement in the FNAL antiproton accumulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, M.; Hsueh, S.; Rapidis, P.; Werkema, S.

    1991-10-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator has recently been used to produce Charmonium resonances (charm quark, anti-charm quark bound states) in proton-antiproton annihilations using an internal H{sub 2} gas jet target. A measurement of the resonance mass and width may be obtained from a precise knowledge of the antiproton beam energy and energy spread. The beam energy is measured to an accuracy of 1 part in 10{sup 4} in the range 6.3 Gev to 4.1 Gev by measuring the orbit length and revolution frequency of the beam. The beam momentum spread is measured to an accuracy of 10% by measuring the beam frequency spread and the parameter {eta} = (P{sub beam}/F{sub rev}){center_dot}(dF{sub rev}/dP{sub beam}). These two measurement techniques are described in this report.

  4. A deterministic width function model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Puente

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of a deterministic fractal-multifractal (FM geometric method to model width functions of natural river networks, as derived distributions of simple multifractal measures via fractal interpolating functions, is reported. It is first demonstrated that the FM procedure may be used to simulate natural width functions, preserving their most relevant features like their overall shape and texture and their observed power-law scaling on their power spectra. It is then shown, via two natural river networks (Racoon and Brushy creeks in the United States, that the FM approach may also be used to closely approximate existing width functions.

  5. Probabilistic Analysis of Crack Width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marková

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic analysis of crack width of a reinforced concrete element is based on the formulas accepted in Eurocode 2 and European Model Code 90. Obtained values of reliability index b seem to be satisfactory for the reinforced concrete slab that fulfils requirements for the crack width specified in Eurocode 2. However, the reliability of the slab seems to be insufficient when the European Model Code 90 is considered; reliability index is less than recommended value 1.5 for serviceability limit states indicated in Eurocode 1. Analysis of sensitivity factors of basic variables enables to find out variables significantly affecting the total crack width.

  6. Probabilistic Analysis of Crack Width

    OpenAIRE

    J. Marková; M. Holický

    2000-01-01

    Probabilistic analysis of crack width of a reinforced concrete element is based on the formulas accepted in Eurocode 2 and European Model Code 90. Obtained values of reliability index b seem to be satisfactory for the reinforced concrete slab that fulfils requirements for the crack width specified in Eurocode 2. However, the reliability of the slab seems to be insufficient when the European Model Code 90 is considered; reliability index is less than recommended value 1.5 for serviceabi...

  7. Correlation between interalar width and intercommisural width against mesiodistal width of central upper incisor in Buginese tribe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahruddin Thalib

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Various types of anatomical landmarks of the face should match its proportions with the size of the teeth which is the interalar width, intercomissural width, interpupillary width, Intercanthal width, and byzigomatic width. Some of face landmarks can be used as a guide in the selection of anterior teeth in complete denture, especially if the pre extraction record such as radiography image, extracted teeth, model study, the remaining teeth, face shape, and the shape of the curved jaw have been lost. The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between interalar width and intercommisural width against mesiodistal incisivus centralis width in a group of Buginese tribe. Ninety nine Buginese tribe subjects aged 17-25 were selected. The interalar width, intercommisural width, and mesiodistal incisor centralis teeth were measured using caliper about three times for accuracy and precision. Mean of interalar width and mesiodistal incisor centralis maxilla width in males more width than females (p0.05. The degree of correlation between interalar width against mesiodistal incisor centralis maxilla width was 0.030, -0.246, 0,225 in Buginese tribe, males, and females (p>0.05. : The degree of correlation between intercommisural width against  mesiodistal incisor centralis maxilla width in Buginese tribe was 0,054, 0,013, 0,153 in Buginese tribe, males, and females (p>0.05. The degree of correlation between interalar width and intercommisural width was 0.301 and 0.356 in Buginese tribe and males (p0.05. In conclusion, there is no significant correlation between interalar width and intercommisural width against mesiodistal incisor centralis maxilla width in a group of Buginese tribe. Interalar width and intercommisural width  directly proportional to mesiodistal incisor centralis maxilla in a group of Buginese tribe. Interalar width and intercommisural width  inversely proportional to mesiodistal incisor centralis maxilla in males and directly

  8. Effect of step width manipulation on tibial stress during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meardon, Stacey A; Derrick, Timothy R

    2014-08-22

    Narrow step width has been linked to variables associated with tibial stress fracture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of step width on bone stresses using a standardized model of the tibia. 15 runners ran at their preferred 5k running velocity in three running conditions, preferred step width (PSW) and PSW±5% of leg length. 10 successful trials of force and 3-D motion data were collected. A combination of inverse dynamics, musculoskeletal modeling and beam theory was used to estimate stresses applied to the tibia using subject-specific anthropometrics and motion data. The tibia was modeled as a hollow ellipse. Multivariate analysis revealed that tibial stresses at the distal 1/3 of the tibia differed with step width manipulation (p=0.002). Compression on the posterior and medial aspect of the tibia was inversely related to step width such that as step width increased, compression on the surface of tibia decreased (linear trend p=0.036 and 0.003). Similarly, tension on the anterior surface of the tibia decreased as step width increased (linear trend p=0.029). Widening step width linearly reduced shear stress at all 4 sites (p<0.001 for all). The data from this study suggests that stresses experienced by the tibia during running were influenced by step width when using a standardized model of the tibia. Wider step widths were generally associated with reduced loading of the tibia and may benefit runners at risk of or experiencing stress injury at the tibia, especially if they present with a crossover running style. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of laser pulse width on laser-induced damage at K9 and UBK7 components surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinda; Ba, Rongsheng; Zheng, Yinbo; Yuan, Jing; Li, Wenhong; Chen, Bo

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effects of laser pulse width on laser-induced damage. We measured the damage threshold of K9 glass and UBK7 glass optical components at different pulse width, then analysis pulse-width dependence of damage threshold. It is shown that damage threshold at different pulse width conforms to thermal restriction mechanism, Because of cm size laser beam, defect on the optical component surface leads to laser-induced threshold decreased.

  10. Influence of MLC leaf width on biologically adapted IMRT plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedal, Jan; Soevik, Aaste; Malinen, Eirik (Dept. of Medical Physics, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway)), E-mail: jan.rodal@radiumhospitalet.no

    2010-10-15

    Introduction. High resolution beam delivery may be required for optimal biology-guided adaptive therapy. In this work, we have studied the influence of multi leaf collimator (MLC) leaf widths on the treatment outcome following adapted IMRT of a hypoxic tumour. Material and methods. Dynamic contrast enhanced MR images of a dog with a spontaneous tumour in the nasal region were used to create a tentative hypoxia map following a previously published procedure. The hypoxia map was used as a basis for generating compartmental gross tumour volumes, which were utilised as planning structures in biologically adapted IMRT. Three different MLCs were employed in inverse treatment planning, with leaf widths of 2.5 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm. The number of treatment beams and the degree of step-and-shoot beam modulation were varied. By optimising the tumour control probability (TCP) function, optimal compartmental doses were derived and used as target doses in the inverse planning. Resulting IMRT dose distributions and dose volume histograms (DVHs) were exported and analysed, giving estimates of TCP and compartmental equivalent uniform doses (EUDs). The impact of patient setup accuracy was simulated. Results. The MLC with the smallest leaf width (2.5 mm) consistently gave the highest TCPs and compartmental EUDs, assuming no setup error. The difference between this MLC and the 5 mm MLC was rather small, while the MLC with 10 mm leaf width gave considerably lower TCPs. When including random and systematic setup errors, errors larger than 5 mm gave only small differences between the MLC types. For setup errors larger than 7 mm no differences were found between non-uniform and uniform dose distributions. Conclusions. Biologically adapted radiotherapy may require MLCs with leaf widths smaller than 10 mm. However, for a high probability of cure it is crucial that accurate patient setup is ensured.

  11. Electrostatic beam-position monitor

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1969-01-01

    Electrostatic beam-position monitor installed in its final location (bake-out cover removed). The ISR will contain about 110 of these monitors. Their accuracy is better than 1 mm, their band width about 1 MHz.

  12. A correction for emittance-measurement errors caused by finite slit and collector widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    One method of measuring the transverse phase-space distribution of a particle beam is to intercept the beam with a slit and measure the angular distribution of the beam passing through the slit using a parallel-strip collector. Together the finite widths of the slit and each collector strip form an acceptance window in phase space whose size and orientation are determined by the slit width, the strip width, and the slit-collector distance. If a beam is measured using a detector with a finite-size phase-space window, the measured distribution is different from the true distribution. The calculated emittance is larger than the true emittance, and the error depends both on the dimensions of the detector and on the Courant-Snyder parameters of the beam. Specifically, the error gets larger as the beam drifts farther from a waist. This can be important for measurements made on high-brightness beams, since power density considerations require that the beam be intercepted far from a waist. In this paper we calculate the measurement error and we show how the calculated emittance and Courant-Snyder parameters can be corrected for the effects of finite sizes of slit and collector. (Author) 5 figs., 3 refs

  13. Crack widths in concrete with fibers and main reinforcement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Frede; Ulfkjær, Jens Peder; Brincker, Rune

    2015-01-01

    of the analytical model is to assume that the response of the structure can be described by the cracking response located within a fracture band. The model follows ideas previously used by other researchers in order to describe the fracture mechanics of concrete beams. These ideas are extended in this model to take...... relation is taken into account according to the crack width profile. Pullout of the main reinforcement is taken into account by assuming development of zones around the crack with constant friction stresses. In order to evaluate the capability of the model to produce reliable results, results are compared...

  14. A niche width model of optimal specialization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggeman, J.P.; Ó Nualláin, Breanndán

    2000-01-01

    Niche width theory, a part of organizational ecology, predicts whether “specialist” or “generalist” forms of organizations have higher “fitness,” in a continually changing environment. To this end, niche width theory uses a mathematical model borrowed from biology. In this paper, we first loosen the

  15. Constant Width Planar Computation Characterizes ACC0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K.A.

    2004-01-01

    We obtain a characterization of ACC 0 in terms of a natural class of constant width circuits, namely in terms of constant width polynomial size planar circuits. This is shown via a characterization of the class of acyclic digraphs which can be embedded on a cylinder surface in such a way that all...

  16. Constant Width Planar Computation Characterizes ACC0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt

    2006-01-01

    We obtain a characterization of ACC0 in terms of a natural class of constant width circuits, namely in terms of constant width polynomial size planar circuits. This is shown via a characterization of the class of acyclic digraphs which can be embedded on a cylinder surface in such a way that all...

  17. 7 CFR 29.1085 - Width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Width. 29.1085 Section 29.1085 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Heavy Fleshy Medium Thin Oil Lean Oily Rich Color intensity Pale Weak Moderate Strong Deep. Width...

  18. Measurement of the mass and width of the W boson

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2006-01-01

    The mass and width of the W boson are measured using e+e- -> W+W- events from the data sample collected by the OPAL experiment at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 170 GeV and 209 GeV. The mass (mw) and width (gw) are determined using direct reconstruction of the kinematics of W+W- -> qqbarlv and W+W- -> qqbarqqbar events. When combined with previous OPAL measurements using W+W- -> lvlv events and the dependence on mw of the WW production cross-section at threshold, the results are determined to be mw = 80.415 +- 0.042 +- 0.030 +- 0.009 GeV gw = 1.996 +- 0.096 +- 0.102 +- 0.003 GeV where the first error is statistical, the second systematic and the third due to uncertainties in the value of the LEP beam energy. By measuring mw with several different jet algorithms in the qqbarqqbar channel, a limit is also obtained on possible final-state interactions due to colour reconnection effects in W+W- -> qqbarqqbar events. The consistency of the results for the W mass and width with those inferred from other ele...

  19. Biologic width dimensions--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Julia C; Sahrmann, Philipp; Weiger, Roland; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Walter, Clemens

    2013-05-01

    Consideration of the biologic width in restorative dentistry seems to be important for maintaining periodontal health. To evaluate the dimensions of the biologic width in humans. A systematic literature search was performed for publications published by 28 September 2012 using five different electronic databases; this search was complemented by a manual search. Two reviewers conducted the study selection, data collection, and validity assessment. The PRISMA criteria were applied. From 615 titles identified by the search strategy, 14 publications were included and six were suitable for meta-analyses. Included studies were published from the years 1924 to 2012. They differed with regard to measurements of the biologic width. Mean values of the biologic width obtained from two meta-analyses ranged from 2.15 to 2.30 mm, but large intra- and inter-individual variances (subject sample range: 0.2 - 6.73 mm) were observed. The tooth type and site, the presence of a restoration and periodontal diseases/surgery affected the dimensions of the biologic width. Pronounced heterogeneity among studies regarding methods and outcome measures exists. No universal dimension of the biologic width appears to exist. Establishment of periodontal health is suggested prior to the assessment of the biologic width within reconstructive dentistry. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Direct measurement of the W boson width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, F.; Albrow, M.G.; Amidei, D.; Antos, J.; Anway-Wiese, C.; Apollinari, G.; Areti, H.; Atac, M.; Auchincloss, P.; Azfar, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Badgett, W.; Bailey, M.W.; Bao, J.; de Barbaro, P.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Bartalini, P.; Bauer, G.; Baumann, T.; Bedeschi, F.; Behrends, S.; Belforte, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Benlloch, J.; Bensinger, J.; Benton, D.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, J.P.; Bertolucci, S.; Bhatti, A.; Biery, K.; Binkley, M.; Bird, F.; Bisello, D.; Blair, R.E.; Blocker, C.; Bodek, A.; Bokhari, W.; Bolognesi, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boswell, C.; Boulos, T.; Brandenburg, G.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Budd, H.S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Byon-Wagner, A.; Byrum, K.L.; Cammerata, J.; Campagnari, C.; Campbell, M.; Caner, A.; Carithers, W.; Carlsmith, D.; Castro, A.; Cen, Y.; Cervelli, F.; Chapman, J.; Cheng, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chikamatsu, T.; Cihangir, S.; Clark, A.G.; Cobal, M.; Contreras, M.; Conway, J.; Cooper, J.; Cordelli, M.; Crane, D.; Cunningham, J.D.; Daniels, T.; DeJongh, F.; Delchamps, S.; Dell'Agnello, S.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Denby, B.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P.F.; Devlin, T.; Dickson, M.; Donati, S.; Drucker, R.B.; Dunn, A.; Einsweiler, K.; Elias, J.E.; Ely, R.; Engels, E. Jr.; Eno, S.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Fan, Q.; Farhat, B.; Fiori, I.; Flaugher, B.; Foster, G.W.; Franklin, M.; Frautschi, M.; Freeman, J.; Friedman, J.; Frisch, H.; Fry, A.; Fuess, T.A.; Fukui, Y.; Funaki, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Galeotti, S.; Gallinaro, M.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Geer, S.; Gerdes, D.W.; Giannetti, P.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Gladney, L.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Gonzalez, J.; Gordon, A.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Grassmann, H.; Grewal, A.; Grieco, G.; Groer, L.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S.R.; Hamilton, R.; Handler, R.; Hans, R.M.; Hara, K.; Harral, B.; Harris, R.M.; Hauger, S.A.; Hauser, J.; Hawk, C.; Heinrich, J.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Hollebeek, R.; Holloway, L.; Hoelscher, A.

    1995-01-01

    This Letter describes a direct measurement of the W boson decay width, Γ(W), using the high-mass tail of the transverse mass spectrum of W→eν decays recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We find Γ(W)=2.11±0.28(stat) ± 0.16(syst) GeV and compare this direct measurement with indirect means of obtaining the width

  1. Modification to the z-scan technique by widths measurements. Journal of Physics: Conference Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbuena, A; Davila, J A; Reynoso, E

    2011-01-01

    In this work we developed an automated system z-scan, which unlike the traditional technique, instead of measuring power, we measure change of Gaussian beam widths caused by the nonlinear sample, with the finality of improving the sensitivity and increasing the signal to noise ratio.

  2. Definition of Beam Diameter for Electron Beam Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgardt, Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pierce, Stanley W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dvornak, Matthew John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-11

    It is useful to characterize the dimensions of the electron beam during process development for electron beam welding applications. Analysis of the behavior of electron beam welds is simplest when a single number can be assigned to the beam properties that describes the size of the beam spot; this value we generically call the “beam diameter”. This approach has worked well for most applications and electron beam welding machines with the weld dimensions (width and depth) correlating well with the beam diameter. However, in recent weld development for a refractory alloy, Ta-10W, welded with a low voltage electron beam machine (LVEB), it was found that the weld dimensions (weld penetration and weld width) did not correlate well with the beam diameter and especially with the experimentally determined sharp focus point. These data suggest that the presently used definition of beam diameter may not be optimal for all applications. The possible reasons for this discrepancy and a suggested possible alternative diameter definition is the subject of this paper.

  3. Hard and software registration for ionizing beams parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artem'ev, A.N.; Artem'ev, N.A.; Latushkin, S.T.; Mikhajlov, V.G.; Rezvov, V.A.; Tsvetkov, A.A.; Yudin, L.I.

    2001-01-01

    TV-registration of the optical images of ionizing beams cross sections is used. Ionization detectors are used for visualization of the cross-section image. Commercial hardware for TV beam image digitizing is used for input information into computer. The codes for TV image processing give the possibility for numerical estimation of the size of the beam, the width of it's horizontal and vertical profiles, position of the gravity center of the beam. Statistical processing of the values of the beam gravity center using big amount of TV frames gives the error in the beam position of about some microns, while the width of the beam is about two millimeters [ru

  4. The decay width of stringy hadrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Sonnenschein

    2018-02-01

    We fit the theoretical decay width to experimental data for mesons on the trajectories of ρ, ω, π, η, K⁎, ϕ, D, and Ds⁎, and of the baryons N, Δ, Λ, and Σ. We examine both the linearity in L and the exponential suppression factor. The linearity was found to agree with the data well for mesons but less for baryons. The extracted coefficient for mesons A=0.095±0.015 is indeed quite universal. The exponential suppression was applied to both strong and radiative decays. We discuss the relation with string fragmentation and jet formation. We extract the quark–diquark structure of baryons from their decays. A stringy mechanism for Zweig suppressed decays of quarkonia is proposed and is shown to reproduce the decay width of ϒ states. The dependence of the width on spin and flavor symmetry is discussed. We further apply this model to the decays of glueballs and exotic hadrons.

  5. Relative Width and Height of Handwritten Letter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizega Rika, Joseba

    2018-01-01

    This is an exploratory study that analyzes the width and the height of letters in two texts written by each of the 21 writers analyzed. After detrending the linear, text, and allograph trends, we proceeded to comparing the sizes obtained in different texts. The different detrended series were compared by means of correlation and t-test. According to the results regarding the width of letters, the texts of 19 of 21 writers correlated strongly, whereas the texts of two writers did not correlate with the limits of the threshold. With regard to the height of letters, texts written by between 18 and 21 writers of 21 writers correlated strongly, whereas texts that did not correlate were within the threshold value. Regarding both the width and the height of letters, of 21 writers, texts written by between 19 and 21 individuals were found to correlate strongly. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  6. Alliances and Bisection Width for Planar Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Martin; Revsbæk, Morten

    2013-01-01

    An alliance in a graph is a set of vertices (allies) such that each vertex in the alliance has at least as many allies (counting the vertex itself) as non-allies in its neighborhood of the graph. We show that any planar graph with minimum degree at least 4 can be split into two alliances...... in polynomial time. We base this on a proof of an upper bound of n on the bisection width for 4-connected planar graphs with an odd number of vertices. This improves a recently published n + 1 upper bound on the bisection width of planar graphs without separating triangles and supports the folklore conjecture...... that a general upper bound of n exists for the bisection width of planar graphs....

  7. Line width of Josephson flux flow oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V.P.; Dmitriev, P.N.; Sobolev, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    A combination of wide-band electronic tunability and moderate free-running line width makes the Josephson flux flow oscillator (FFO) a perfect on-chip local oscillator for integrated submillimeter-wave SIS receivers. The possibility of FFO phase locking at all frequencies of interest has...... to be proven before one initiates real FFO applications. To achieve this goal a comprehensive set of line width measurements of the FFO operating in different regimes has been performed. FFOs with tapered shape have been successfully implemented in order to avoid the superfine resonant structure with voltage...... spacing of about 20 nV and extremely low differential resistance, recently observed in the IVC of the standard rectangular geometry. The obtained results have been compared with existing theories and FFO models in order to understand and possibly eliminate excess noise in the FFO. The intrinsic line width...

  8. The decay width of stringy hadrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenschein, Jacob; Weissman, Dorin

    2018-02-01

    In this paper we further develop a string model of hadrons by computing their strong decay widths and comparing them to experiment. The main decay mechanism is that of a string splitting into two strings. The corresponding total decay width behaves as Γ = π/2 ATL where T and L are the tension and length of the string and A is a dimensionless universal constant. We show that this result holds for a bosonic string not only in the critical dimension. The partial width of a given decay mode is given by Γi / Γ =Φi exp ⁡ (- 2 πCmsep2 / T) where Φi is a phase space factor, msep is the mass of the "quark" and "antiquark" created at the splitting point, and C is a dimensionless coefficient close to unity. Based on the spectra of hadrons we observe that their (modified) Regge trajectories are characterized by a negative intercept. This implies a repulsive Casimir force that gives the string a "zero point length". We fit the theoretical decay width to experimental data for mesons on the trajectories of ρ, ω, π, η, K*, ϕ, D, and Ds*, and of the baryons N, Δ, Λ, and Σ. We examine both the linearity in L and the exponential suppression factor. The linearity was found to agree with the data well for mesons but less for baryons. The extracted coefficient for mesons A = 0.095 ± 0.015 is indeed quite universal. The exponential suppression was applied to both strong and radiative decays. We discuss the relation with string fragmentation and jet formation. We extract the quark-diquark structure of baryons from their decays. A stringy mechanism for Zweig suppressed decays of quarkonia is proposed and is shown to reproduce the decay width of ϒ states. The dependence of the width on spin and flavor symmetry is discussed. We further apply this model to the decays of glueballs and exotic hadrons.

  9. Temperature dependence of giant dipole resonance width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vdovin, A.I.; Storozhenko, A.N.

    2005-01-01

    The quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model extended to finite temperature within the framework of the thermo field dynamics is applied to calculate a temperature dependence of the spreading width Γ d own of a giant dipole resonance. Numerical calculations are made for 12S n and 208 Pb nuclei. It is found that the width Γ d own increases with T. The reason of this effect is discussed as well as a relation of the present approach to other ones existing in the literature

  10. Radiative width of molecular-cluster states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhassid, Y.; Gai, M.; Bertsch, G.F.

    1982-01-01

    Molecular states are characterized by enhanced electromagnetic deexcitations of many different multipolarities. The expected enhancement of E1, E2, and E3 transitions is examined by deriving molecular sum rules for radiative deexcitation widths and via a dimensionality approach. The enhancement of the E1 transitions is the most striking

  11. Wireline equalization using pulse-width modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrader, J.H.R.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Visschers, J.L.; Nauta, Bram

    2006-01-01

    Abstract-High-speed data links over copper cables can be effectively equalized using pulse-width modulation (PWM) pre-emphasis. This provides an alternative to the usual 2-tap FIR filters. The use of PWM pre-emphasis allows a channel loss at the Nyquist frequency of ~30dB, compared to ~20dB for a

  12. Comparison of Arch Width Changes Following Orthodontic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-21

    Nov 21, 2015 ... they found optimal results are achieved when individual arch forms are maintained.[15]. This retrospective study used digital measurements of orthodontic models (1) to evaluate arch width changes in patients treated with fixed orthodontic appliances whose initial ovoid arch form was maintained following.

  13. Bounding the Higgs boson width through interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Lance J; Li, Ye

    2013-09-13

    We study the change in the diphoton-invariant-mass distribution for Higgs boson decays to two photons, due to interference between the Higgs resonance in gluon fusion and the continuum background amplitude for gg→γγ. Previously, the apparent Higgs mass was found to shift by around 100 MeV in the standard model in the leading-order approximation, which may potentially be experimentally observable. We compute the next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to the apparent mass shift, which reduce it by about 40%. The apparent mass shift may provide a way to measure, or at least bound, the Higgs boson width at the Large Hadron Collider through "interferometry." We investigate how the shift depends on the Higgs width, in a model that maintains constant Higgs boson signal yields. At Higgs widths above 30 MeV, the mass shift is over 200 MeV and increases with the square root of the width. The apparent mass shift could be measured by comparing with the ZZ* channel, where the shift is much smaller. It might be possible to measure the shift more accurately by exploiting its strong dependence on the Higgs transverse momentum.

  14. Beam Expansion of Blind Spot Detection Radar Antennas Using a Radome with Defected Corrugated Inner Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayeon Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A beam expanding radome for 76.5 GHz automotive radar antennas is presented whose inner surface is engraved with corrugations. The radar used for blind spot detection (BSD requires a very wide beam width to ensure longer time for tracking out-of-sight objects. It is found that the corrugations modulate the phase velocities of the waves along the surface, which increases beam width in the far field. In addition, defects in the corrugation increase beam width even further. The presented structure satisfies the beam width requirement while keeping a low profile.

  15. An inter-hemispheric, statistical study of nightside spectral width distributions from coherent HF scatter radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Woodfield

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A statistical investigation of the Doppler spectral width parameter routinely observed by HF coherent radars has been conducted between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres for the nightside ionosphere. Data from the SuperDARN radars at Thykkvibær, Iceland and Syowa East, Antarctica have been employed for this purpose. Both radars frequently observe regions of high (>200 ms-1 spectral width polewards of low (<200 ms-1 spectral width. Three years of data from both radars have been analysed both for the spectral width and line of sight velocity. The pointing direction of these two radars is such that the flow reversal boundary may be estimated from the velocity data, and therefore, we have an estimate of the open/closed field line boundary location for comparison with the high spectral widths. Five key observations regarding the behaviour of the spectral width on the nightside have been made. These are (i the two radars observe similar characteristics on a statistical basis; (ii a latitudinal dependence related to magnetic local time is found in both hemispheres; (iii a seasonal dependence of the spectral width is observed by both radars, which shows a marked absence of latitudinal dependence during the summer months; (iv in general, the Syowa East spectral width tends to be larger than that from Iceland East, and (v the highest spectral widths seem to appear on both open and closed field lines. Points (i and (ii indicate that the cause of high spectral width is magnetospheric in origin. Point (iii suggests that either the propagation of the HF radio waves to regions of high spectral width or the generating mechanism(s for high spectral width is affected by solar illumination or other seasonal effects. Point (iv suggests that the radar beams from each of the radars are subject either to different instrumental or propagation effects, or different geophysical conditions due to their locations, although we suggest that this result is more likely to

  16. An inter-hemispheric, statistical study of nightside spectral width distributions from coherent HF scatter radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Woodfield

    Full Text Available A statistical investigation of the Doppler spectral width parameter routinely observed by HF coherent radars has been conducted between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres for the nightside ionosphere. Data from the SuperDARN radars at Thykkvibær, Iceland and Syowa East, Antarctica have been employed for this purpose. Both radars frequently observe regions of high (>200 ms-1 spectral width polewards of low (<200 ms-1 spectral width. Three years of data from both radars have been analysed both for the spectral width and line of sight velocity. The pointing direction of these two radars is such that the flow reversal boundary may be estimated from the velocity data, and therefore, we have an estimate of the open/closed field line boundary location for comparison with the high spectral widths. Five key observations regarding the behaviour of the spectral width on the nightside have been made. These are (i the two radars observe similar characteristics on a statistical basis; (ii a latitudinal dependence related to magnetic local time is found in both hemispheres; (iii a seasonal dependence of the spectral width is observed by both radars, which shows a marked absence of latitudinal dependence during the summer months; (iv in general, the Syowa East spectral width tends to be larger than that from Iceland East, and (v the highest spectral widths seem to appear on both open and closed field lines. Points (i and (ii indicate that the cause of high spectral width is magnetospheric in origin. Point (iii suggests that either the propagation of the HF radio waves to regions of high spectral width or the generating mechanism(s for high spectral width is affected by solar illumination or other seasonal effects. Point (iv suggests that the radar beams from each of the radars are subject either to different instrumental or propagation effects, or different geophysical conditions due to their locations, although we suggest that this

  17. Exotic meson decay widths using lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, M. S.; Fiebig, H. R.

    2006-01-01

    A decay width calculation for a hybrid exotic meson h, with J PC =1 -+ , is presented for the channel h→πa 1 . This quenched lattice QCD simulation employs Luescher's finite box method. Operators coupling to the h and πa 1 states are used at various levels of smearing and fuzzing, and at four quark masses. Eigenvalues of the corresponding correlation matrices yield energy spectra that determine scattering phase shifts for a discrete set of relative πa 1 momenta. Although the phase shift data is sparse, fits to a Breit-Wigner model are attempted, resulting in a decay width of about 60 MeV when averaged over two lattice sizes having a lattice spacing of 0.07 fm

  18. Analysis of reduced widths and size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, H.C.; Ram Raj; Nath, N.

    1977-01-01

    Recent data on S-wave neutron reduced widths for a large number of nuclei have been analysed nucleus-wise and the calculations for the degree of freedom of the associated (chi) 2 -distribution have been made using the Porter and Thomas procedure. It is noted that a number of nuclei can be fitted by a (chi) 2 -distribution with degree of freedom one, while there are few which are identified to follow a (chi) 2 -distribution with degree of freedom two and even more than two. The present analysis thus contradicts the usual presumption according to which the degree of freedom is taken to be always unity. An analytical attempt has also been made to ascertain the suitability of the data on reduced widths to be used for the analysis. These considerations are likely to modify the neutron cross-section evaluations. (author)

  19. Palindromic widths of nilpotent and wreath products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This result was gen- eralized by Bardakov and Tolstykh [8] who proved that almost all free products have infinite palindromic width; the only exception is given by ..... Next, let X0 ⊆ X and Y0 ⊆ Y be sets of representatives of elements of ¯X and. ¯Y respectively. Let ¯g ∈ ¯Gn be the homomorphic image of g ∈ Gn, then ¯g =.

  20. Width and partial widths of unstable particles in the light of the Nielsen identities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, P.A.; Sirlin, A.; Kniehl, B.A.; Hamburg Univ.

    2001-09-01

    Fundamental properties of unstable particles, including mass, width, and partial widths, are examined on the basis of the Nielsen identities (NI) that describe the gauge dependence of Green functions. In particular, we prove that the pole residues and associated definitions of branching ratios and partial widths are gauge independent to all orders. A simpler, previously discussed definition of branching ratios and partial widths is found to be gauge independent through next-to-next-to-leading order. It is then explained how it may be modified in order to extend the gauge independence to all orders. We also show that the physical scattering amplitude is the most general combination of self-energy, vertex, and box contributions that is gauge independent for arbitrary s, discuss the analytical properties of the NI functions, and exhibit explicitly their one-loop expressions in the Z-γ sector of the Standard Model. (orig.)

  1. Ion and electron beam interaction on surfaces - a detection mechanism for obtaining visual ion beam images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine, J.; Gorden, R. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Two-dimensional images have been obtained of ion beam impact cross sections on solid surfaces by the coincident interaction of a rastered electron beam. This detection method is effective in producing images in real time on various insulator surfaces. The size of these images correlates well with ion beam current density profile measurements (at full width) and, therefore, can be very useful for ion beam diagnostics and alignment. (Auth.)

  2. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering on gold nanorod pairs with interconnection bars of different widths

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate that surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement could be tuned by adjusting the width of a connection bar at the bottom of a gold nanorod pair. Arrays of gold nanorod pairs with interconnection bars of different widths at the bottom of the interspace were fabricated by electron-beam lithography and used for the SERS study. Rhodamine 6G (R6G) was used as the probe molecule for the SERS. In addition to the large SERS enhancement observed in the nanostructured substrates, the SERS enhancement increases as the width of the connection bar increases. This result provides an important method for tuning SERS enhancement. Numerical simulations of electromagnetic properties on the nanostructures were performed with CST Microwave Studio, and the results correspond well with the experimental observations. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Line width of Josephson flux flow oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V.P.; Dmitriev, P.N.; Sobolev, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    spacing of about 20 nV and extremely low differential resistance, recently observed in the IVC of the standard rectangular geometry. The obtained results have been compared with existing theories and FFO models in order to understand and possibly eliminate excess noise in the FFO. The intrinsic line width...... increases considerably at voltages above the boundary voltage because of the abrupt increase of the internal damping due to Josephson self-coupling. The influence of FFO parameters, in particular the differential resistances associated both with the bias current and with the applied magnetic field...

  4. Pulse width modulation inverter with battery charger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slicker, James M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An inverter is connected between a source of DC power and a three-phase AC induction motor, and a microprocessor-based circuit controls the inverter using pulse width modulation techniques. In the disclosed method of pulse width modulation, both edges of each pulse of a carrier pulse train are equally modulated by a time proportional to sin .theta., where .theta. is the angular displacement of the pulse center at the motor stator frequency from a fixed reference point on the carrier waveform. The carrier waveform frequency is a multiple of the motor stator frequency. The modulated pulse train is then applied to each of the motor phase inputs with respective phase shifts of 120.degree. at the stator frequency. Switching control commands for electronic switches in the inverter are stored in a random access memory (RAM) and the locations of the RAM are successively read out in a cyclic manner, each bit of a given RAM location controlling a respective phase input of the motor. The DC power source preferably comprises rechargeable batteries and all but one of the electronic switches in the inverter can be disabled, the remaining electronic switch being part of a flyback DC-DC converter circuit for recharging the battery.

  5. CEBAF beam viewer imaging software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowling, B.A.; McDowell, C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the various software used in the analysis of beam viewer images at CEBAF. This software, developed at CEBAF, includes a three-dimensional viewscreen calibration code which takes into account such factors as multiple camera/viewscreen rotations and perspective imaging, and maintaining a calibration database for each unit. Additional software allows single-button beam spot detection, with determination of beam location, width, and quality, in less than three seconds. Software has also been implemented to assist in the determination of proper chopper RF control parameters from digitized chopper circles, providing excellent results

  6. Determination of the Ds0(2317) width with the PANDA detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertens, Marius Christian

    2012-01-01

    The D s0 *(2317) meson which was discovered at BaBar in 2003 has the interesting properties of a surprisingly narrow width and a mass just below the DK threshold. Different theoretical models try to explain the nature of its properties. A precise knowledge of the width is an important criterion to evaluate these models. However, only an upper limit of 3.8 MeV is known so far. A suitable method to determine the width of particles which are significantly narrower than the experimental mass resolution is to measure the production cross section as a function of the center of mass energy. The shape of this excitation function allows to deduce the width. At PANDA, the measurement of the production cross section will be possible in antiproton-proton collisions. The PANDA experiment at the future FAIR facility is designed to combine precisely adjustable beam momenta and high luminosities which make it an excellent tool for this kind of measurement. In the following we will describe the experimental procedure to carry out this measurement with the PANDA detector in order to achieve a resolution in the order of 0.1 MeV for the width of the D s0 *(2317).

  7. Three-dimensional evaluation of root dimensions and alveolar ridge width of maxillary lateral incisors in patients with unilateral agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlRushaid, Sharifah; Chandhoke, Taranpreet; Utreja, Achint; Tadinada, Aditya; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Uribe, Flavio

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this retrospective case-control study was to measure the maxillary lateral incisor root dimensions and quantify the labial and palatal bone in patients with unilateral maxillary lateral incisor agenesis (MLIA) after orthodontic treatment and compare them to non-agenesis controls using cone beam computed tomography. The labiopalatal and mesiodistal root dimensions, mesiodistal coronal dimensions, and labiopalatal bone and alveolar ridge widths of the maxillary lateral incisor were assessed on posttreatment cone beam computed tomography scans of 15 patients (mean age 16.5 ± 3.4 years, 9 females and 6 males) with maxillary lateral incisor agenesis and 15 gender-matched patients (mean age 16.08 ± 3.23 years) with no dental agenesis or anterior Bolton discrepancy. The Mann-Whitney test was used to distinguish any differences in root width, crown width, or changes in labial or palatal bone width between the two groups. The median labiopalatal root width was narrower in the MLIA group at the level of the cementoenamel junction (CEJ) to 8 mm apical of the CEJ compared to controls (p ≤ 0.009). The mesiodistal root width was significantly reduced in the MLIA group at the CEJ and at 4 mm apical to the CEJ. The labiopalatal alveolar ridge width was significantly decreased at 2 mm apical to the CEJ in MLIA group. The mesiodistal crown width was significantly smaller in the MLIA group at both the incisal edge and at the crown midpoint. The bone thickness was similar in both groups. Coronal and root dimensions in patients with MLIA were reduced compared to controls. Alveolar ridge width was also reduced in patients with MLIA, although bone thickness was not different than controls.

  8. Three-dimensional evaluation of root dimensions and alveolar ridge width of maxillary lateral incisors in patients with unilateral agenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifah AlRushaid

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this retrospective case-control study was to measure the maxillary lateral incisor root dimensions and quantify the labial and palatal bone in patients with unilateral maxillary lateral incisor agenesis (MLIA after orthodontic treatment and compare them to non-agenesis controls using cone beam computed tomography. Methods The labiopalatal and mesiodistal root dimensions, mesiodistal coronal dimensions, and labiopalatal bone and alveolar ridge widths of the maxillary lateral incisor were assessed on posttreatment cone beam computed tomography scans of 15 patients (mean age 16.5 ± 3.4 years, 9 females and 6 males with maxillary lateral incisor agenesis and 15 gender-matched patients (mean age 16.08 ± 3.23 years with no dental agenesis or anterior Bolton discrepancy. The Mann-Whitney test was used to distinguish any differences in root width, crown width, or changes in labial or palatal bone width between the two groups. Results The median labiopalatal root width was narrower in the MLIA group at the level of the cementoenamel junction (CEJ to 8 mm apical of the CEJ compared to controls (p ≤ 0.009. The mesiodistal root width was significantly reduced in the MLIA group at the CEJ and at 4 mm apical to the CEJ. The labiopalatal alveolar ridge width was significantly decreased at 2 mm apical to the CEJ in MLIA group. The mesiodistal crown width was significantly smaller in the MLIA group at both the incisal edge and at the crown midpoint. The bone thickness was similar in both groups. Conclusions Coronal and root dimensions in patients with MLIA were reduced compared to controls. Alveolar ridge width was also reduced in patients with MLIA, although bone thickness was not different than controls.

  9. Lake Basin Fetch and Maximum Length/Width

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Linear features representing the Fetch, Maximum Length and Maximum Width of a lake basin. Fetch, maximum length and average width are calcuated from the lake polygon...

  10. Direct measurement of the W boson width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M.; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, B.; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, M.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, B.S.; /Tata Inst.; Adams, M.; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Aguilo, E.; /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /McGill U.; Ahsan, M.; /Kansas State U.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, A.; /Michigan U. /Northeastern U.

    2009-09-01

    We present a direct measurement of the width of the W boson using the shape of the transverse mass distribution of W {yields} e{nu} candidates selected in 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We use the same methods and data sample that were used for our recently published W boson mass measurement, except for the modeling of the recoil, which is done with a new method based on a recoil library. Our result, 2.028 {+-} 0.072 GeV, is in agreement with the predictions of the standard model and is the most precise direct measurement result from a single experiment to date.

  11. Characterizing graphs of maximum matching width at most 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Jisu; Ok, Seongmin; Suh, Geewon

    2017-01-01

    The maximum matching width is a width-parameter that is de ned on a branch-decomposition over the vertex set of a graph. The size of a maximum matching in the bipartite graph is used as a cut-function. In this paper, we characterize the graphs of maximum matching width at most 2 using the minor...

  12. GAP WIDTH STUDY IN LASER BUTT-WELDING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Hui; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    In this paper the maximum allowable gap width in laser butt-welding is intensively studied. The gap width study (GWS) is performed on the material of SST of W1.4401 (AISI 316) under various welding conditions, which are the gap width : 0.00-0.50 mm, the welding speed : 0.5-2.0 m/min, the laser...

  13. Research on Durability of Big Recycled Aggregate Self-Compacting Concrete Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuai; Liu, Xuliang; Li, Jing; Li, Juan; Wang, Chang; Zheng, Jinkai

    2018-03-01

    Deflection and crack width are the most important durability indexes, which play a pivotal role in the popularization and application of the Big Recycled Aggregate Self-Compacting Concrete technology. In this research, comparative study on the Big Recycled Aggregate Self-Compacting Concrete Beam and ordinary concrete beam were conducted by measuring the deflection and crack width index. The results show that both kind of concrete beams have almost equal mid-span deflection value and are slightly different in the maximum crack width. It indicates that the Big Recycled Aggregate Self-Compacting Concrete Beam will be a good substitute for ordinary concrete beam in some less critical structure projects.

  14. Coherent beam-beam effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    There are two physical pictures that describe the beam-beam interaction in a storage ring collider: The weak-strong and the strong-strong pictures. Both pictures play a role in determining the beam-beam behavior. This review addresses only the strong-strong picture. The corresponding beam dynamical effects are referred to as the coherent beam-beam effects. Some basic knowledge of the weak-strong picture is assumed. To be specific, two beams of opposite charges are considered. (orig.)

  15. Global synchronization of parallel processors using clock pulse width modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Ellavsky, Matthew R.; Franke, Ross L.; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Liebsch, Thomas A.; Littrell, Daniel; Ohmacht, Martin; Reed, Don D.; Schenck, Brandon E.; Swetz, Richard A.

    2013-04-02

    A circuit generates a global clock signal with a pulse width modification to synchronize processors in a parallel computing system. The circuit may include a hardware module and a clock splitter. The hardware module may generate a clock signal and performs a pulse width modification on the clock signal. The pulse width modification changes a pulse width within a clock period in the clock signal. The clock splitter may distribute the pulse width modified clock signal to a plurality of processors in the parallel computing system.

  16. Narrow-width mechanism of a=5 Ξ-state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai-Fuse, I.; Akaishi, Y.

    1995-04-01

    Narrow-width mechanism of ≡ 5 H is discussed by calculating conversion widths to all its possible decay channels. Since the conversion processes have small reaction Q values, the three- and four- body decays are strongly suppressed owing to small phase volumes available. Decay widths to the two-body channels are significantly reduced by the distortion of emitted-particle waves. This mechanism brings about a narrow width of ≡ 5 H. The total width is estimated to be 0.87 MeV, in which the largest contribution comes from the decay into the Λ 4 H * +Λ channel. (author)

  17. Online measurement of electron beam parameters by image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Y.; Puntambekar, T.A.

    2010-01-01

    The basic image acquisition software which was developed earlier has been recently upgraded to support online measurement of beam centroid, beam height and beam width from the diagnostic devices namely fluorescent screen beam profile monitors and beam slit monitor installed in Transport Line -1(TL-1) at Indus Accelerator Complex at RRCAT, Indore. The online measurement of these electron beam parameters has helped the Indus operation team to take necessary corrective action if required before injection of the electron beam into booster synchrotron. This paper presents the methodology adopted for online measurement of above parameters in the software. (author)

  18. Two kinds of Airy-related beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yiqing; Zhou, Guoquan; Zhang, Lijun; Ru, Guoyun

    2015-01-01

    Two kinds of Airy-related beams are introduced in this manuscript. The normalized intensity distribution in the x-direction of the two kinds of Airy-related beams is close to that of the Gaussian beam. The normalized intensity distribution in the y-direction of the two kinds of Airy-related beams is close to that of the second-order and the third-order elegant Hermite–Gaussian beams, respectively. Analytical expressions of the two kinds of Airy-related beams passing through an ABCD paraxial optical system are derived. The beam propagation factors for the two kinds of Airy-related beams are 1.933 and 2.125, respectively. Analytical expressions of the beam half widths and the kurtosis parameters of the two kinds of Airy-related beams passing through an ABCD paraxial optical system are also presented. As a numerical example, the propagation properties of the two kinds of Airy-related beams are demonstrated in free space. Moreover, the comparison between the two kinds of Airy-related beams and their corresponding elegant Hermite–Gaussian beams along the two transverse directions are performed in detail. Upon propagation, the former kind of Airy-related beam will evolve from the central bright beam into the dark hollow beam. Contrarily, the latter kind of Airy-related beam will evolve from the dark hollow beam into the central bright beam. These two kinds of Airy-related beams can be used to describe specially distributed beams. (paper)

  19. Superresolution beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available zones capable of introducing a phase shift of zero or p on the alternately out of phase rings of the TEMp0 beams into a unified phase and then focusing the rectified beam to generate a high resolution beam which has a Gaussian beam intensity distribution...

  20. High-order nonuniformly correlated beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Wang, Fei; Cai, Yangjian

    2018-02-01

    We have introduced a class of partially coherent beams with spatially varying correlations named high-order nonuniformly correlated (HNUC) beams, as an extension of conventional nonuniformly correlated (NUC) beams. Such beams bring a new parameter (mode order) which is used to tailor the spatial coherence properties. The behavior of the spectral density of the HNUC beams on propagation has been investigated through numerical examples with the help of discrete model decomposition and fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm. Our results reveal that by selecting the mode order appropriately, the more sharpened intensity maxima can be achieved at a certain propagation distance compared to that of the NUC beams, and the lateral shift of the intensity maxima on propagation is closed related to the mode order. Furthermore, analytical expressions for the r.m.s width and the propagation factor of the HNUC beams on free-space propagation are derived by means of Wigner distribution function. The influence of initial beam parameters on the evolution of the r.m.s width and the propagation factor, and the relation between the r.m.s width and the occurring of the sharpened intensity maxima on propagation have been studied and discussed in detail.

  1. Distance-dependent penumbra and MLC-width: new insights in determinants of healthy tissue sparing in stereotactic irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bratengeier Klaus

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available For stereotactic irradiation, both, penumbra and MLC leaf width make an impact on the sparing of healthy tissue around the target. Mostly, MLC design is regarded as the one influenceable parameter. However, also penumbra can be varied by choosing different distances between the source of radiation and the patient. The authors investigate the distance- dependent penumbra effects of idealized collimators as well as for real 5 mm MLCs. Test objects are small spherical targets of varying diameters to be irradiated under differing prescription conditions. A method to calculate exact stereotactic radial dose distributions from beam profiles or 2D dose distributions of single beams is developed for circular and MLC shaped targets. Also, a planning study is performed using a Pinnacle3™ planning system. Also, in a theoretical analysis perfect top hat profile beams and beams with varying penumbra are compared for better understanding of penumbra effects with respect to radial dose distributions. It is shown, that the penumbra changes for small targets are more relevant than the beam shaping by 5 mm MLCs. Quasi-isotropic irradiated MLC shaped (quadratic beams at virtual SAD 700 mm produce steeper radial dose decrease than ideal circular beam shapes with a penumbra typical for SAD 1000 mm. A reduced source-to-patient distance allows better sparing of healthy tissue because of two reasons: The smaller effective leaf width but even more due to steeper penumbra. First, the authors suggest for future recommendations on stereotactic irradiations to specify not only MLC widths but also penumbra characteristics. Second, a so-called “virtual isocentre” could be useful to take advantage of the penumbra effect: Dependent on gantry angle and isocentric couch angle, the couch should be steered automatically in a way that the central axes of all beams always intersect in the same point at the same distance from the source.

  2. PIC simulations of the trapped electron filamentation instability in finite-width electron plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winjum, B. J.; Banks, J. W.; Berger, R. L.; Cohen, B. I.; Chapman, T.; Hittinger, J. A. F.; Rozmus, W.; Strozzi, D. J.; Brunner, S.

    2012-10-01

    We present results on the kinetic filamentation of finite-width nonlinear electron plasma waves (EPW). Using 2D simulations with the PIC code BEPS, we excite a traveling EPW with a Gaussian transverse profile and a wavenumber k0λDe= 1/3. The transverse wavenumber spectrum broadens during transverse EPW localization for small width (but sufficiently large amplitude) waves, while the spectrum narrows to a dominant k as the initial EPW width increases to the plane-wave limit. For large EPW widths, filaments can grow and destroy the wave coherence before transverse localization destroys the wave; the filaments in turn evolve individually as self-focusing EPWs. Additionally, a transverse electric field develops that affects trapped electrons, and a beam-like distribution of untrapped electrons develops between filaments and on the sides of a localizing EPW. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the Laboratory Research and Development Program at LLNL under project tracking code 12-ERD-061. Supported also under Grants DE-FG52-09NA29552 and NSF-Phy-0904039. Simulations were performed on UCLA's Hoffman2 and NERSC's Hopper.

  3. Beam-beam and impedance

    CERN Document Server

    White, S.

    2014-07-17

    As two counter-rotating beams interact they can give rise to coherent dipole modes. Under the influence of impedance these coherent beam-beam modes can couple to higher order head-tail modes and lead to strong instabilities. A fully self-consistent approach including beam-beam and impedance was used to characterize this new coupled mode instability and study possible cures such as a transverse damper and high chromaticity.

  4. Recent Advances in Global Measurement and Application of River Widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelsky, T.; Allen, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Among variables relevant to river form and discharge that can be observed from space, river width is perhaps the simplest to measure. Width can be extracted directly from optical or radar imagery, and application of remotely sensed widths to problems in hydrology, fluvial geomorphology, and ecology dates back more than two decades. Despite this long heritage, until very recently remotely sensed width measurements have largely been made on an ad-hoc basis for individual studies over relatively small regions. Global studies that required river widths have largely relied on estimates from downstream hydraulic geometry relationships with basin area, which inevitably simplify width variability and may, in practice, underestimate the fraction of wide rivers and the total river surface area in many basins. Over the last two years, multiple new regional- and global-scale, satellite-derived river width datasets have been developed that have substantially improved our global understanding of river form. These datasets include the Global Width Database for Large Rivers (GWD-LR), which provides width measurements for rivers wider than ~180 m, and all rivers wider than ~300 m, based on the SRTM water mask and the Global River Widths from Landsat (GRWL), which provides measurements for rivers as narrow as 30 m and all rivers wider than ~100 m. Several regional-scale datasets have also been developed. These datasets will facilitate improvements to regional and global scale hydrodynamic models, will provide more robust information on global river surface area for gas flux studies, and constitute novel information on global patterns of fluvial geomorphology. These datasets represent the beginning, not the end, of global river width measurements, however, as in the future multitemporal width measurements can be combined with recently developed algorithms to estimate river discharge for many rivers, globally.

  5. The significance of biometric parameters in determining anterior teeth width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strajnić Ljiljana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. An important element of prosthetic treatment of edentulous patients is selecting the size of anterior artificial teeth that will restore the natural harmony of one’s dentolabial structure as well as the whole face. The main objective of this study was to determine the correlation between the inner canthal distance (ICD and interalar width (IAW on one side and the width of both central incisors (CIW, the width of central and lateral incisors (CLIW, the width of anterior teeth (ATW, the width between the canine cusps (CCW, which may be useful in clinical practice. Methods. A total of 89 subjects comprising 23 male and 66 female were studied. Their age ranged from 19 to 34 years with the mean of 25 years. Only the subjects with the preserved natural dentition were included in the sample. All facial and intraoral tooth measurements were made with a Boley Gauge (Buffalo Dental Manufacturing Co., Brooklyn NY, USA having a resolution of 0.1mm. Results. A moderate correlation was established between the interalar width and combined width of anterior teeth and canine cusp width (r = 0.439, r = 0.374. A low correlation was established between the inner canthal distance and the width of anterior teeth and canine cusp width (r = 0.335, r = 0.303. The differences between the two genders were highly significant for all the parameters (p < 0.01. The measured facial distances and width of anterior teeth were higher in men than in women. Conclusion. The results of this study suggest that the examined interalar width and inner canthal distance cannot be considered reliable guidelines in the selection of artificial upper anterior teeth. However, they may be used as a useful additional factor combined with other methods for objective tooth selection. The final decision should be made while working on dentures fitting models with the patient’s consent.

  6. Measurement of radiative widths at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Krämer, Markus

    2014-01-01

    COMPASS is a multipurpose fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS, which addresses a wide variety of physic topics, in particular the structure and spectroscopy of hadrons. Diffractive dissociation of pions on nuclear targets allows for clean access to the light meson spectrum. In addition meson production can be studied in pion-photon reactions via the Primakoff effect, where high-energetic pions react with the quasi-real photon field surrounding the target nuclei. At low pion-photon center-of-mass energies, these reactions are governed by chiral dynamics and contain information relevant for chiral perturbation theory. At higher energies, resonances are produced and their radiative coupling is investigated. During a short run using a 190GeV $\\pi^-$ beam and a lead target in the year 2004, 3 million exclusive $\\pi^-\\pi^-\\pi^+$ events in the region of small squared four-momentum transfer, i.e. t' < 0:01GeV$^2$=c$^2$, have been recorded. At very low t' < 0:001GeV$^2$=c$^2$, the contribution from electroma...

  7. A Statistical Approach for Obtaining the Controlled Woven Fabric Width

    OpenAIRE

    Shaker Khubab; Umair Muhammad; Maqsood Muhammad; Nawab Yasir; Ahmad Sheraz; Rasheed Abher; Ashraf Munir; Basit Abdul

    2015-01-01

    A common problem faced in fabric manufacturing is the production of inconsistent fabric width on shuttleless looms in spite of the same fabric specifications. Weft-wise crimp controls the fabric width and it depends on a number of factors, including warp tension, temple type, fabric take-up pressing tension and loom working width. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of these parameters on the fabric width produced. Taguchi’s orthogonal design was used to optimise the weaving pa...

  8. A Statistical Approach for Obtaining the Controlled Woven Fabric Width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaker Khubab

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A common problem faced in fabric manufacturing is the production of inconsistent fabric width on shuttleless looms in spite of the same fabric specifications. Weft-wise crimp controls the fabric width and it depends on a number of factors, including warp tension, temple type, fabric take-up pressing tension and loom working width. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of these parameters on the fabric width produced. Taguchi’s orthogonal design was used to optimise the weaving parameters for obtaining controlled fabric width. On the basis of signal to noise ratios, it could be concluded that controlled fabric width could be produced using medium temple type and intense take-up pressing tension at relatively lower warp tension and smaller loom working width. The analysis of variance revealed that temple needle size was the most significant factor affecting the fabric width, followed by loom working width and warp tension, whereas take-up pressing tension was least significant of all the factors investigated in the study.

  9. Beam cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Danared, H

    2006-01-01

    Beam cooling is the technique of reducing the momentum spread and increasing the phase-space density of stored particle beams. This paper gives an introduction to beam cooling and Liouville’s theorem, and then it describes the three methods of active beam cooling that have been proven to work so far, namely electron cooling, stochastic cooling, and laser cooling. Ionization cooling is also mentioned briefly.

  10. Molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendelbury, J.M.; Smith, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Studies with directed collision-free beams of particles continue to play an important role in the development of modern physics and chemistry. The deflections suffered by such beams as they pass through electric and magnetic fields or laser radiation provide some of the most direct information about the individual constituents of the beam; the scattering observed when two beams intersect yields important data about the intermolecular forces responsible for the scattering. (author)

  11. Determination of normal maxillary transverse dimension by using intercanine width and interpalatal first molar width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banker, Alka M; Pillai, Jayasankar P; Patel, Kinjal D

    2016-01-01

    Malocclusion in the vertical and sagittal planes is easy to observe whereas it is difficult to diagnose malocclusion in the transverse plane. There are yet no criteria defining a normal transverse occlusion. The aim of this study was to identify a ratio that defines a normal transverse occlusion. This was a retrospective study. A total sample of 151 maxillary dental models (M = 55, F = 96) in the age range of 12-16 years were randomly selected, with 73 models in control group and 78 in the study group. All the models were mixed up and given to an operator for the measurement of intercanine width (ICW) and inter-palatal molar width (IPMW). The data were statistically analyzed using SPSS software version 16.0. Chi-square test was performed to test the statistical significance difference between the groups at p ≤ 0.05. Nearly 98.60% of normal arches were found to have an IPMW to ICW ratio of 1:1 ± 0.05. On further analysis, it was found that when IPMW ≥37.45 mm, then the case may be considered to have normal arches, and if the ratio between IPMW to ICW is 1.15:1 ± 0.05 or more and IPMW is dimension.

  12. Propagation of hypergeometric Gaussian beams in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bin; Bian, Lirong; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Kai

    2018-01-01

    Optical vortex beams have attracted lots of interest due to its potential application in image processing, optical trapping and optical communications, etc. In this work, we theoretically and numerically investigated the propagation properties of hypergeometric Gaussian (HyGG) beams in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media. Based on the Snyder-Mitchell model, analytical expressions for propagation of the HyGG beams in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media were obtained. The influence of input power and optical parameters on the evolutions of the beam width and radius of curvature is illustrated, respectively. The results show that the beam width and radius of curvature of the HyGG beams remain invariant, like a soliton when the input power is equal to the critical power. Otherwise, it varies periodically like a breather, which is the result of competition between the beam diffraction and nonlinearity of the medium.

  13. Numerical simulation on behaviour of timber-concrete composite beams in fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hao; Hu, Xiamin; Zhang, Bing; Minli, Yao

    2017-08-01

    This paper established sequentially coupled thermal-mechanical models of timber--concrete composite (TCC) beams by finite element software ANSYS to investigate the fire resistance of TCC beam. Existing experimental results were used to verify the coupled thermal-mechanical model. The influencing parameters consisted of the width of timber beam, the thickness of the concrete slab and the timber board. Based on the numerical results, the effects of these parameters on fire resistance of TCC beams were investigated in detail. The results showed that modeling results agreed well with test results, and verified the reliability of the finite element model. The width of the timber beam had a significant influence on the fire resistance of TCC beams. The fire resistance of TCC beams would be enhanced by increasing the width of timber beam, the thickness of concrete slab and the timber board.

  14. Stream water responses to timber harvest: Riparian buffer width effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton D. Clinton

    2011-01-01

    Vegetated riparian buffers are critical for protecting aquatic and terrestrial processes and habitats in southern Appalachian ecosystems. In this case study, we examined the effect of riparian buffer width on stream water quality following upland forest management activities in four headwater catchments. Three riparian buffer widths were delineated prior to cutting; 0m...

  15. Evolution of giant dipole resonance width at low temperatures ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The resonance width. GDR is defined as the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the GDR lineshape and is related to various damping mechanisms of the collective motion inside nuclear matter. The damping of giant collective vibration inside the nuclear medium occurs either due to escape of resonance energy by means ...

  16. A STATISTICAL APPROACH FOR OBTAINING THE CONTROLLED WOVEN FABRIC WIDTH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maqsood, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    A common problem faced in fabric manufacturing is the production of inconsistent fabric width on shuttleless looms in spite of the same fabric specifications. Weft-wise crimp controls the fabric width and it depends on a number of factors, including warp tension, temple type, fabric take-up pressing

  17. Enhancement of heat transfer using varying width twisted tape inserts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enhancement of heat transfer using varying width twisted tape inserts. ... International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology ... The present work shows the results obtained from experimental investigations of the augmentation of turbulent flow heat transfer in a horizontal tube by means of varying width twisted ...

  18. Beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the open-quotes Boosterclose quotes and open-quotes ATLASclose quotes linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates

  19. Difference of CBD width on US vs. ERCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Olga R; Suissa, Alain; Khamaysi, Iyad; Koren, Dorit; Gaitini, Diana

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between US and ERCP in the measurement of common bile duct (CBD) width after application of Compound and Harmonic imaging on ultrasound. We prospectively evaluated the CBD width as measured on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and ultrasonography (US), applying Compound and Harmonic US techniques, on 100 patients. Furthermore, we retrospectively re-examined US and ERCP images of 48 patients who underwent ERCP and US during the same hospitalization period. The average difference in measurements by US compared to ERCP was 2.3 mm (P CBD width. There was a good correlation between ERCP and US measurements of CBD width (r = 0.73 for all patients and r = 0.88 for patients with intact gallbladder, P CBD width on US and ERCP of about 2 mm. The application of Compound and Harmonic techniques in the prospective study probably enabled a more accurate sonographic measurement.

  20. Development of beam monitoring system for proton pencil beam scanning using fiber-optic radiation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jaeman; Koo, Jihye; Moon, Sunyoung; Yoon, Myonggeun; Jeong, Jonghwi; Kim, Sun-Young; Lim, Youngkyung; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Dongho; Kim, Meyoung; Kim, Dongwook

    2017-10-01

    We aimed to develop a beam monitoring system based on a fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS), which can be used in real time in a beam control room, to monitor a beam in proton therapy, where patients are treated using a pencil beam scanning (PBS) mode, by measuring the beam spot width (BSW) and beam spot position (BSP) of the PBS. We developed two-dimensional detector arrays to monitor the PBS beam in the beam control room. We measured the BSW for five energies of the PBS beam and compared the measurements with those of Lynx and EBT3 film. In order to confirm the BSP, we compared the BSP values of the PBS calculated from radiation treatment planning (RTP), to five BSP values measured using FORS at 224.2 MeV. When comparing BSW values obtained using developed monitoring system to the measurements obtained using commercial EBT3 film, the average difference in BSW value of the PBS beam was 0.1 ± 0.1 mm. In the comparison of BSW values with the measurements obtained using Lynx, the average difference was 0.2 ± 0.1 mm. When comparing BSP measurements to the values calculated from RTP, the average difference was 0.4 ± 0.2 mm. The study results confirmed that the developed FORS-based beam monitoring system can monitor a PBS beam in real time in a beam control room, where proton beam is controlled for the patient.

  1. Conceptual design of the PANDA luminosity monitor and reconstruction strategy to measure the width of the X(3872) state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randriamalala, Tsitohaina

    2012-04-19

    The PANDA experiment has a great potential to test with high precision QCD in the low momentum transfer region using an antiproton beam of unprecedented quality. The resonance scan method will be used to determine the lineshape of specific hadronic states. It requires a precise knowledge of the luminosity. This thesis develops the conceptual design of the PANDA luminosity monitor and a scan simulation to determine the width resolution of the X(3872) state. The luminosity monitor concept is based on the reconstruction of elastically scattered antiprotons from the interaction region. Monte Carlo performance studies of the detector were carried out. The implementation test was done using a detector prototype instrumented at the COSY accelerator and testing it with proton beam. The studies show that a precision of better than 3% on the luminosity and a width resolution for the X(3872) of about 2% can be achieved.

  2. A pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Hermann; Strobele, Julia; Schreiner, Thomas; Hirtl, Albert; Georg, Dietmar

    2012-11-01

    To develop a flexible pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy. Dose distributions were calculated using the newly developed pencil beam algorithm and validated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods. The algorithm was based on the established theory of fluence weighted elemental pencil beam (PB) kernels. Using a new real-time splitting approach, a minimization routine selects the optimal shape for each sub-beam. Dose depositions along the beam path were determined using a look-up table (LUT). Data for LUT generation were derived from MC simulations in water using GATE 6.1. For materials other than water, dose depositions were calculated by the algorithm using water-equivalent depth scaling. Lateral beam spreading caused by multiple scattering has been accounted for by implementing a non-local scattering formula developed by Gottschalk. A new nuclear correction was modelled using a Voigt function and implemented by a LUT approach. Validation simulations have been performed using a phantom filled with homogeneous materials or heterogeneous slabs of up to 3 cm. The beams were incident perpendicular to the phantoms surface with initial particle energies ranging from 50 to 250 MeV/A with a total number of 10(7) ions per beam. For comparison a special evaluation software was developed calculating the gamma indices for dose distributions. In homogeneous phantoms, maximum range deviations between PB and MC of less than 1.1% and differences in the width of the distal energy fall off of the Bragg-Peak from 80% to 20% of less than 0.1 mm were found. Heterogeneous phantoms using layered slabs satisfied a γ-index criterion of 2%/2mm of the local value except for some single voxels. For more complex phantoms using laterally arranged bone-air slabs, the γ-index criterion was exceeded in some areas giving a maximum γ-index of 1.75 and 4.9% of the voxels showed γ-index values larger than one. The calculation precision of the presented algorithm was considered to be sufficient

  3. Electron Beam Scanning in Industrial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongen, Yves; Herer, Arnold

    1996-05-01

    Scanned electron beams are used within many industries for applications such as sterilization of medical disposables, crosslinking of wire and cables insulating jackets, polymerization and degradation of resins and biomaterials, modification of semiconductors, coloration of gemstones and glasses, removal of oxides from coal plant flue gasses, and the curing of advanced composites and other molded forms. X-rays generated from scanned electron beams make yet other applications, such as food irradiation, viable. Typical accelerators for these applications range in beam energy from 0.5MeV to 10 MeV, with beam powers between 5 to 500kW and scanning widths between 20 and 300 cm. Since precise control of dose delivery is required in many of these applications, the integration of beam characteristics, product conveyance, and beam scanning mechanisms must be well understood and optimized. Fundamental issues and some case examples are presented.

  4. Modular low-voltage electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berejka, A.J.; Avnery, Tovi; Carlson, Carl

    2004-01-01

    Modular, low-voltage systems have simplified electron beam (EB) technology for industrial uses and for research and development. Modular EB units are produced in quantity as sealed systems that are evacuated at the factory eliminating the need for vacuum pumps at the point of use. A simple plug-out--plug-in method of replacement eliminates downtime for servicing. Use of ultra-thin beam windows (<10 μm of titanium foil), solid-state 19 in. (48 cm) rack-mounted power supplies, an innovative design to extract and spread the beam (enabling systems to be placed adjacent to each other to extend beam width) and touch-screen computer controls, combine for ease of use and electrical transfer efficiency at voltages that can be varied between 80 and 150 kV and with high beam currents (up to 40 mA across the 25 cm window). These electron systems are available in three widths, the standard 25 cm and new 5 and 40 cm beams. Traditional uses in the graphic arts and coatings areas as well as uses in surface sterilization have found these compact, lightweight (approximately 15 kg) modular beams of interest. Units have been configured around complex shapes to enable three-dimensional surface curing (as for coatings on aluminum tubing) to be achieved at high production rates. Details of the beam construction and some industrial uses are discussed

  5. Modular low-voltage electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berejka, Anthony J.; Avnery, Tovi; Carlson, Carl

    2004-09-01

    Modular, low-voltage systems have simplified electron beam (EB) technology for industrial uses and for research and development. Modular EB units are produced in quantity as sealed systems that are evacuated at the factory eliminating the need for vacuum pumps at the point of use. A simple plug-out—plug-in method of replacement eliminates downtime for servicing. Use of ultra-thin beam windows (innovative design to extract and spread the beam (enabling systems to be placed adjacent to each other to extend beam width) and touch-screen computer controls, combine for ease of use and electrical transfer efficiency at voltages that can be varied between 80 and 150 kV and with high beam currents (up to 40 mA across the 25 cm window). These electron systems are available in three widths, the standard 25 cm and new 5 and 40 cm beams. Traditional uses in the graphic arts and coatings areas as well as uses in surface sterilization have found these compact, lightweight (approximately 15 kg) modular beams of interest. Units have been configured around complex shapes to enable three-dimensional surface curing (as for coatings on aluminum tubing) to be achieved at high production rates. Details of the beam construction and some industrial uses are discussed.

  6. Flexural Cracks Development in Reinforced Concrete Beams Under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work attempts to describe the stress-strain state of beams which is gradually changing with the number of load cycles applied and, especially, to analyses formation and development of cracks which greatly affect the whole behaviour of the beams. The method of assessment of maximum cracks' width giving good ...

  7. An automatic method for the determination of saturation curve and metastable zone width of lysine monohydrochloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabesiaka, Mihasina; Porte, Catherine; Bonnin-Paris, Johanne; Havet, Jean-Louis

    2011-10-01

    An essential tool in the study of crystallization is the saturation curve and metastable zone width, since the shape of the solubility curve defines the crystallization mode and the supersaturation conditions, which are the driving force of crystallization. The purpose of this work was to determine saturation and supersaturation curves of lysine monohydrochloride by an automatic method based on the turbidity of the crystallization medium. As lysine solution is colored, the interest of turbidimetry is demonstrated. An automated installation and the procedure to determine several points on the saturation curve and metastable zone width were set up in the laboratory. On-line follow-up of the solution turbidity and temperature enabled the dissolution and nucleation temperatures of the crystals to be determined by measuring attenuation of the light beam by suspended particles. The thermal regulation system was programmed so that the heating rate took into account the system inertia, i.e. duration related to the dissolution rate of the compound. Using this automatic method, the saturation curve and the metastable zone width of lysine monohydrochloride were plotted.

  8. Optimizing rib width to height and rib spacing to deck plate thickness ratios in orthotropic decks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Fettahoglu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Orthotropic decks are composed of deck plate, ribs, and cross-beams and are frequently used in industry to span long distances, due to their light structures and load carrying capacities. Trapezoidal ribs are broadly preferred as longitudinal stiffeners in design of orthotropic decks. They supply the required stiffness to the orthotropic deck in traffic direction. Trapezoidal ribs are chosen in industrial applications because of their high torsional and buckling rigidity, less material and welding needs. Rib width, height, spacing, thickness of deck plate are important parameters for designing of orthotropic decks. In the scope of this study, rib width to height and rib spacing to deck plate thickness ratios are assessed by means of the stresses developed under different ratios of these parameters. For this purpose a FE-model of orthotropic bridge is generated, which encompasses the entire bridge geometry and conforms to recommendations given in Eurocode 3 Part 2. Afterwards necessary FE-analyses are performed to reveal the stresses developed under different rib width to height and rib spacing to deck plate thickness ratios. Based on the results obtained in this study, recommendations regarding these ratios are provided for orthotropic steel decks occupying trapezoidal ribs.

  9. Gyrator transform of Gaussian beams with phase difference and generation of hollow beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiyu; Xia, Hui; Yu, Tao; Xie, Ding; Xie, Wenke

    2018-03-01

    The optical expression of Gaussian beams with phase difference, which is caused by gyrator transform (GT), has been obtained. The intensity and phase distribution of transform Gaussian beams are analyzed. It is found that the circular hollow vortex beam can be obtained by overlapping two GT Gaussian beams with π phase difference. The effect of parameters on the intensity and phase distributions of the hollow vortex beam are discussed. The results show that the shape of intensity distribution is significantly influenced by GT angle α and propagation distance z. The size of the hollow vortex beam can be adjusted by waist width ω 0. Compared with previously reported results, the work shows that the hollow vortex beam can be obtained without any model conversion of the light source.

  10. Nightside studies of coherent HF Radar spectral width behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Woodfield

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available A previous case study found a relationship between high spectral width measured by the CUTLASS Finland HF radar and elevated electron temperatures observed by the EISCAT and ESR incoherent scatter radars in the post-midnight sector of magnetic local time. This paper expands that work by briefly re-examining that interval and looking in depth at two further case studies. In all three cases a region of high HF spectral width (>200 ms-1 exists poleward of a region of low HF spectral width (<200 ms-1. Each case, however, occurs under quite different geomagnetic conditions. The original case study occurred during an interval with no observed electrojet activity, the second study during a transition from quiet to active conditions with a clear band of ion frictional heating indicating the location of the flow reversal boundary, and the third during an isolated sub-storm. These case studies indicate that the relationship between elevated electron temperature and high HF radar spectral width appears on closed field lines after 03:00 magnetic local time (MLT on the nightside. It is not clear whether the same relationship would hold on open field lines, since our analysis of this relationship is restricted in latitude. We find two important properties of high spectral width data on the nightside. Firstly the high spectral width values occur on both open and closed field lines, and secondly that the power spectra which exhibit high widths are both single-peak and multiple-peak. In general the regions of high spectral width (>200 ms-1 have more multiple-peak spectra than the regions of low spectral widths whilst still maintaining a majority of single-peak spectra. We also find that the region of ion frictional heating is collocated with many multiple-peak HF spectra. Several mechanisms for the generation of high spectral width have been proposed which would produce multiple-peak spectra, these are discussed in relation to the data presented here. Since the

  11. Influence of pulse width and detuning on coherent phonon generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kazutaka G.; Shikano, Yutaka; Kayanuma, Yosuke

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the coherent phonon generation mechanism by irradiation of an ultrashort pulse with a simple two-level model. Our derived formulation shows that both impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) and impulsive absorption (IA) simultaneously occur, and phonon wave packets are generated in the electronic ground and excited states by ISRS and IA, respectively. We identify the dominant process from the amplitude of the phonon oscillation. For short pulse widths, ISRS is very small and becomes larger as the pulse width increases. We also show that the initial phase is dependent on the pulse width and the detuning.

  12. Nightside studies of coherent HF Radar spectral width behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Woodfield

    Full Text Available A previous case study found a relationship between high spectral width measured by the CUTLASS Finland HF radar and elevated electron temperatures observed by the EISCAT and ESR incoherent scatter radars in the post-midnight sector of magnetic local time. This paper expands that work by briefly re-examining that interval and looking in depth at two further case studies. In all three cases a region of high HF spectral width (>200 ms-1 exists poleward of a region of low HF spectral width (<200 ms-1. Each case, however, occurs under quite different geomagnetic conditions. The original case study occurred during an interval with no observed electrojet activity, the second study during a transition from quiet to active conditions with a clear band of ion frictional heating indicating the location of the flow reversal boundary, and the third during an isolated sub-storm. These case studies indicate that the relationship between elevated electron temperature and high HF radar spectral width appears on closed field lines after 03:00 magnetic local time (MLT on the nightside. It is not clear whether the same relationship would hold on open field lines, since our analysis of this relationship is restricted in latitude. We find two important properties of high spectral width data on the nightside. Firstly the high spectral width values occur on both open and closed field lines, and secondly that the power spectra which exhibit high widths are both single-peak and multiple-peak. In general the regions of high spectral width (>200 ms-1 have more multiple-peak spectra than the regions of low spectral widths whilst still maintaining a majority of single-peak spectra. We also find that the region of ion frictional heating is collocated with many multiple-peak HF spectra. Several mechanisms for the generation of high spectral width have been proposed which would produce multiple-peak spectra, these are discussed in relation to

  13. The effect of scattering interference term on the practical width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins do Amaral, C.; Martinez, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    The practical width Γ p has an important application in the characterization of the resonance type for the calculation of neutron average cross sections. Previous treatments ignore the interference term χζ,x for the Doppler broadening function in the practical width calculation. In the present paper, a rational approximation for the χζ,x function is derived, using a modified asymptotic Pade method. A new approximation for Γ p is obtained. The results which are presented here provide evidence that the practical width as a function of temperature varies considerably with the inclusion of the interference term χζ,x

  14. Finite-width plasmonic waveguides with hyperbolic multilayer cladding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia E; Shalaginov, Mikhail Y; Ishii, Satoshi; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Kildishev, Alexander V

    2015-04-20

    Engineering plasmonic metamaterials with anisotropic optical dispersion enables us to tailor the properties of metamaterial-based waveguides. We investigate plasmonic waveguides with dielectric cores and multilayer metal-dielectric claddings with hyperbolic dispersion. Without using any homogenization, we calculate the resonant eigenmodes of the finite-width cladding layers, and find agreement with the resonant features in the dispersion of the cladded waveguides. We show that at the resonant widths, the propagating modes of the waveguides are coupled to the cladding eigenmodes and hence, are strongly absorbed. By avoiding the resonant widths in the design of the actual waveguides, the strong absorption can be eliminated.

  15. Elliptical beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandres, Miguel A; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2008-12-08

    A very general beam solution of the paraxial wave equation in elliptic cylindrical coordinates is presented. We call such a field an elliptic beam (EB). The complex amplitude of the EB is described by either the generalized Ince functions or the Whittaker-Hill functions and is characterized by four parameters that are complex in the most general situation. The propagation through complex ABCD optical systems and the conditions for square integrability are studied in detail. Special cases of the EB are the standard, elegant, and generalized Ince-Gauss beams, Mathieu-Gauss beams, among others.

  16. Relationship between width of greater trochanters and width of iliac wings in tronchanteric bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viradia, Neal K; Berger, Alex A; Dahners, Laurence E

    2011-09-01

    Trochanteric bursitis is a common disorder that is characterized by inflammation of the bursa, superficial to the greater trochanter of the femur, leading to pain in the lateral hip, and often occurs because of acute trauma or repetitive friction involving the iliotibial band, the greater trochanter, and the bursa. In the study reported here, we hypothesized that the increased incidence of bursitis may be the result of the increased prominence of the trochanter in relation to the wings of the iliac crest. Distances between the outermost edges of trochanters and iliac wings were measured in 202 patients from the University of North Carolina Health Care System-101 without a known diagnosis and 101 with a clinical diagnosis of trochanteric bursitis. To determine significance, t tests for nonpaired data were used. Mean (SD) difference between trochanter and iliac wing widths was 28 (20) mm in the group diagnosed with trochanteric bursitis and 17 (18) mm in the control group. The difference between the groups in this regard was significant (Pbursitis group and 1.05 (.06) in the control group. The difference between these groups was significant (Pbursitis.

  17. Line Width Recovery after Vectorization of Engineering Drawings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gramblička Matúš

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Vectorization is the conversion process of a raster image representation into a vector representation. The contemporary commercial vectorization software applications do not provide sufficiently high quality outputs for such images as do mechanical engineering drawings. Line width preservation is one of the problems. There are applications which need to know the line width after vectorization because this line attribute carries the important semantic information for the next 3D model generation. This article describes the algorithm that is able to recover line width of individual lines in the vectorized engineering drawings. Two approaches are proposed, one examines the line width at three points, whereas the second uses a variable number of points depending on the line length. The algorithm is tested on real mechanical engineering drawings.

  18. The effect of buffer zone width on biodiversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navntoft, Søren; Sigsgaard, Lene; Kristensen, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    attention in previous studies. In this paper we report on finding for syrphids, spiders and carabids, three taxonomic groups with different mobility, all important for conservation biological control. For all groups we found an effect of buffer zone width on their density. A buffer width of 6m......Field margin management for conservation purposes is a way to protect both functional biodiversity and biodiversity per se without considerable economical loss as field margins are less productive. However, the effect of width of the buffer zone on achievable biodiversity gains has received little...... was the narrowest that consistently promoted a higher abundance or activity of arthropods within the field area (outside the hedge bottom). However, a further increase in buffer width always increased the abundance and activity of arthropods a little more....

  19. Band width and multiple-angle valence-state mapping of diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, I.; Terminello, L.J.; Sutherland, D.G.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The band width may be considered the single most important parameter characterizing the electronic structure of a solid. The ratio of band width and Coulomb repulsion determines how correlated or delocalized an electron system is. Some of the most interesting solids straddle the boundary between localized and delocalized, e.g. the high-temperature superconductors. The bulk of the band calculations available today is based on local density functional (DF) theory. Even though the Kohn-Sham eigenvalues from that theory do not represent the outcome of a band-mapping experiment, they are remarkably similar to the bands mapped via photoemission. Strictly speaking, one should use an excited state calculation that takes the solid`s many-body screening response to the hole created in photoemission into account. Diamond is a useful prototype semiconductor because of its low atomic number and large band width, which has made it a long-time favorite for testing band theory. Yet, the two experimental values of the band width of diamond have error bars of {+-}1 eV and differ by 3.2 eV. To obtain an accurate valence band width for diamond, the authors use a band-mapping method that collects momentum distributions instead of the usual energy distributions. This method has undergone extensive experimental and theoretical tests in determining the band width of lithium fluoride. An efficient, imaging photoelectron spectrometer is coupled with a state-of-the-art undulator beam line at the Advanced Light Source to allow collection of a large number of data sets. Since it takes only a few seconds to take a picture of the photoelectrons emitted into a 84{degrees} cone, the authors can use photon energies as high as 350 eV where the cross section for photoemission from the valence band is already quite low, but the emitted photoelectrons behave free-electron-like. This make its much easier to locate the origin of the inter-band transitions in momentum space.

  20. Estimating the Spectral Width of a Narrowband Optical Signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lading, Lars; Skov Jensen, A.

    1980-01-01

    Methods for estimating the spectral width of a narrowband optical signal are investigated. Spectral analysis and Fourier spectroscopy are compared. Optimum and close-to-optimum estimators are developed under the constraint of having only one photodetector.......Methods for estimating the spectral width of a narrowband optical signal are investigated. Spectral analysis and Fourier spectroscopy are compared. Optimum and close-to-optimum estimators are developed under the constraint of having only one photodetector....

  1. SM Higgs decay branching ratios and total Higgs width

    CERN Multimedia

    Daniel Denegri

    2001-01-01

    Upper: Higgs decay ratios as a function of Higgs mass. The largest branching ratio is not necessarily the most usefull one. The most usefull ones are gamma gamma bbar ZZ and WW as in those modes latter signal to background ratios can be achieved. Lower: Total Higgs decay width versus Higgs mass. At low masses the natural width is extremely small, thus observability depends on instrumental resolution primarily.

  2. Study of partial width fluctuations for 232Th radiative capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, H.; Hazoni, Y.; Michaudon, A.; Paya, D.

    1962-01-01

    The partial widths of radiative capture at the excited level at 1 MeV in 233 Th were measured. This measurement was achieved on 7 neutron resonances of 232 Th from 20 to 175 eV. The normalization methods used for deducing these widths are described. The most probable value of the number of degrees of freedom is found to be 4 and the probability that ν ≤ 1 is found to be 16 per cent. (authors) [fr

  3. Width of electromagnetic wave instability spectrum in tungsten plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinkevich, A.B.

    1995-01-01

    Based on the study of high-frequency signal modulation and spectrum analysis of the envelope a measurement of spectrum width for electromagnetic wave instability was carried out under conditions of current pulse action on tungsten plate in magnetic field. The existence of amplitude-frequency wave modulation was revealed. The width of current disturbance spectrum in a specimen was evaluated. Current disturbances are shown to cause the instability of electromagnetic wave. 11 refs.; 6 figs

  4. Quantum numbers and decay widths of the psi (3684)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luth, V.; Boyarski, A.M.; Lynch, H.L.; Breidenbach, M.; Bulos, F.; Feldman, G.J.; Fryberger, D.; Hanson, G.; Hartill, D.L.; Jean-Marie, B.; Larsen, R.R.; Luke, D.; Morehouse, C.C.; Paterson, J.M.; Perl, M.L.; Pun, T.P.; Rapidis, P.; Richter, B.; Schwitters, R.F.; Tanenbaum, W.; Vannucci, F.; Abrams, G.S.; Chinowsky, W.; Friedberg, C.E.; Goldhaber, G.; Kadyk, J.A.; Litke, A.M.; Lulu, B.A.; Pierre, F.M.; Sadoulet, B.; Trilling, G.H.; Whitaker, J.S.; Winkelmann, F.C.; Wiss, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    Cross sections for e + e - →hadrons, e + e - , and μ + μ - near 3684 MeV are presented. The psi(3684) resonance is established as having the assignment J/sup PC/=1 -- . The mass is 3684+-5 MeV. The partial width for decay to electrons is GAMMA/sube/=2.1+-0.3 keV and the total width is GAMMA=228+-56 keV

  5. Correlations for reduced-width amplitudes in 49V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, B.H.; Mitchell, G.E.; Bilpuch, E.G.; Westerfeldt, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    Measurement of the relative sign of inelastic proton-channel amplitudes permits the determination of amplitude correlations. Data were obtained for 45 5/2 + resonances in 49 V. Although the reduced widths in each channel followed a Porter-Thomas distribution, large amplitude correlations were observed. The results are compared with the reduced-width--amplitude distribution of Krieger and Porter. This is the first direct test of the Krieger-Porter distribution

  6. Superresolution beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available positions of p zeros of intensity distributions on the Gaussian beam, resulting to a generation of TEMp0 beams where there are minimum losses. The LGBs are well-known family of exact orthogonal solutions of free-space paraxial wave equation in cylindrical...

  7. Comprehensive intermaxillary tooth width proportion of Bangkok residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somchai Manopatanakul

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Proper occlusion depends on the correct width ratio between upper and lower teeth, known as Bolton's ratio. In fact, this ratio can be calculated for each pair of teeth from the central incisor to the first permanent molar. This set of ratios, known as comprehensive cumulative percentage ratios (CPRs, can be used not only to determine which tooth or teeth have a tooth width discrepancy, but can also enable the partial graphical analysis of tooth width discrepancy when there is agenesis of certain permanent teeth. Although CPRs have been calculated for Caucasians, tooth width is known to vary depending on racial origin. Therefore, a test of differences between racial groups should be carried out. If these ratios of the Caucasians and Bangkokians are significantly different, the ratio of the Bangkokians is recommended. The objective of this study was to measure tooth size disproportion for Thai patients and to calculate a corresponding set of CPRs. Thirty-seven pairs of dental models were made from a group of Bangkok residents with normal occlusion. Mesiodistal tooth width was measured for each model. The intra- and inter-examiner measurement errors were ascertained as insignificant (p > 0.05. CPRs were then calculated and compared to those derived from other studies. Ten of thirteen CPRs were significantly different from corresponding values derived from Caucasians. We conclude that tooth width ratios vary between different racial groups, and therefore that these should be calculated specifically for each patient racial group.

  8. Stieltjes-moment-theory technique for calculating resonance width's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazi, A.U.

    1978-12-01

    A recently developed method for calculating the widths of atomic and molecular resonances is reviewed. The method is based on the golden-rule definition of the resonance width, GAMMA(E). The method uses only square-integrable, L 2 , basis functions to describe both the resonant and the non-resonant parts of the scattering wave function. It employs Stieltjes-moment-theory techniques to extract a continuous approximation for the width discrete representation of the background continuum. Its implementation requires only existing atomic and molecular structure codes. Many-electron effects, such as correlation and polarization, are easily incorporated into the calculation of the width via configuration interaction techniques. Once the width, GAMMA(E), has been determined, the energy shift can be computed by a straightforward evaluation of the required principal-value integral. The main disadvantage of the method is that it provides only the total width of a resonance which decays into more than one channel in a multichannel problem. A review of the various aspects of the theory is given first, and then representative results that have been obtained with this method for several atomic and molecular resonances are discussed. 28 references, 3 figures, 4 tables

  9. Beam diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Raich, U

    2008-01-01

    Most beam measurements are based on the electro-magnetic interaction of fields induced by the beam with their environment. Beam current transformers as well as beam position monitors are based on this principle. The signals induced in the sensors must be amplified and shaped before they are converted into numerical values. These values are further treated numerically in order to extract meaningful machine parameter measurements. The lecture introduces the architecture of an instrument and shows where in the treatment chain digital signal analysis can be introduced. Then the use of digital signal processing is presented using tune measurements, orbit and trajectory measurements as well as beam loss detection and longitudinal phase space tomography as examples. The hardware as well as the treatment algorithms and their implementation on Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) or in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are presented.

  10. Physics studies with brilliant narrow-width -beams at the new ELI ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-04

    Nov 4, 2014 ... It is the first project within the European Strategic Forum for Research Infrastructure (ESFRI) agenda financed by the European Regional Development Fund. The nuclear physics research programme of the ... Dimiter L Balabanski1 ELI-NP Science Team1. ELI-NP, IFIN-HH, 30 Reactorului Str., 077125 ...

  11. Ion-optical studies for a range adaptation method in ion beam therapy using a static wedge degrader combined with magnetic beam deflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhri, Naved; Saito, Nami; Bert, Christoph; Franczak, Bernhard; Steidl, Peter; Durante, Marco; Schardt, Dieter; Rietzel, Eike

    2010-01-01

    Fast radiological range adaptation of the ion beam is essential when target motion is mitigated by beam tracking using scanned ion beams for dose delivery. Electromagnetically controlled deflection of a well-focused ion beam on a small static wedge degrader positioned between two dipole magnets, inside the beam delivery system, has been considered as a fast range adaptation method. The principle of the range adaptation method was tested in experiments and Monte Carlo simulations for the therapy beam line at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ions Research. Based on the simulations, ion optical settings of beam deflection and realignment of the adapted beam were experimentally applied to the beam line, and additional tuning was manually performed. Different degrader shapes were employed for the energy adaptation. Measured and simulated beam profiles, i.e. lateral distribution and range in water at isocentre, were analysed and compared with the therapy beam values for beam scanning. Deflected beam positions of up to ±28 mm on degrader were performed which resulted in a range adaptation of up to ±15 mm water equivalence (WE). The maximum deviation between the measured adapted range from the nominal range adaptation was below 0.4 mm WE. In experiments, the width of the adapted beam at the isocentre was adjustable between 5 and 11 mm full width at half maximum. The results demonstrate the feasibility/proof of the proposed range adaptation method for beam tracking from the beam quality point of view.

  12. Ion-optical studies for a range adaptation method in ion beam therapy using a static wedge degrader combined with magnetic beam deflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhri, Naved; Saito, Nami; Bert, Christoph; Franczak, Bernhard; Steidl, Peter; Durante, Marco; Rietzel, Eike; Schardt, Dieter

    2010-06-01

    Fast radiological range adaptation of the ion beam is essential when target motion is mitigated by beam tracking using scanned ion beams for dose delivery. Electromagnetically controlled deflection of a well-focused ion beam on a small static wedge degrader positioned between two dipole magnets, inside the beam delivery system, has been considered as a fast range adaptation method. The principle of the range adaptation method was tested in experiments and Monte Carlo simulations for the therapy beam line at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ions Research. Based on the simulations, ion optical settings of beam deflection and realignment of the adapted beam were experimentally applied to the beam line, and additional tuning was manually performed. Different degrader shapes were employed for the energy adaptation. Measured and simulated beam profiles, i.e. lateral distribution and range in water at isocentre, were analysed and compared with the therapy beam values for beam scanning. Deflected beam positions of up to ±28 mm on degrader were performed which resulted in a range adaptation of up to ±15 mm water equivalence (WE). The maximum deviation between the measured adapted range from the nominal range adaptation was below 0.4 mm WE. In experiments, the width of the adapted beam at the isocentre was adjustable between 5 and 11 mm full width at half maximum. The results demonstrate the feasibility/proof of the proposed range adaptation method for beam tracking from the beam quality point of view.

  13. Pulse Width Affects Scalp Sensation of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterchev, Angel V; Luber, Bruce; Westin, Gregory G; Lisanby, Sarah H

    Scalp sensation and pain comprise the most common side effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which can reduce tolerability and complicate experimental blinding. We explored whether changing the width of single TMS pulses affects the quality and tolerability of the resultant somatic sensation. Using a controllable pulse parameter TMS device with a figure-8 coil, single monophasic magnetic pulses inducing electric field with initial phase width of 30, 60, and 120 µs were delivered in 23 healthy volunteers. Resting motor threshold of the right first dorsal interosseus was determined for each pulse width, as reported previously. Subsequently, pulses were delivered over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex at each of the three pulse widths at two amplitudes (100% and 120% of the pulse-width-specific motor threshold), with 20 repetitions per condition delivered in random order. After each pulse, subjects rated 0-to-10 visual analog scales for Discomfort, Sharpness, and Strength of the sensation. Briefer TMS pulses with amplitude normalized to the motor threshold were perceived as slightly more uncomfortable than longer pulses (with an average 0.89 point increase on the Discomfort scale for pulse width of 30 µs compared to 120 µs). The sensation of the briefer pulses was felt to be substantially sharper (2.95 points increase for 30 µs compared to 120 µs pulse width), but not stronger than longer pulses. As expected, higher amplitude pulses increased the perceived discomfort and strength, and, to a lesser degree the perceived sharpness. Our findings contradict a previously published hypothesis that briefer TMS pulses are more tolerable. We discovered that the opposite is true, which merits further study as a means of enhancing tolerability in the context of repetitive TMS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Finite Element Investigation on Shear Lag in Composite Concrete-Steel Beams with Web Openings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafa'a Mahmood Abbas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, effective slab width for the composite beams is investigated with special emphasis on the effect of web openings. A three dimensional finite element analysis, by using finite element code ANSYS, is employed to investigate shear lag phenomenon and the resulting effective slab width adopted in the classical T-beam approach. According to case studies and comparison with limitations and rules stipulated by different standards and codes of practice it is found that web openings presence and panel proportion are the most critical factors affecting effective slab width, whereas concrete slab thickness and steel beam depth are less significant. The presence of web opening reduces effective slab width by about 21%. Concentrated load produces smaller effective slab width when compared with uniformly distributed and line loads. Generally, standard codes of practice overestimate effective slab width for concentrated load effect, while underestimate effective slab width for uniformly distributed and line load effect. Based on the data available, sets of empirical equations are developed to estimate the effective slab width in the composite beams with web openings to be used in the classical T-beam approach taking into account the key parameters investigated.

  15. Capacitor charging FET switcher with controller to adjust pulse width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalka, Alex M.

    1986-01-01

    A switching power supply includes an FET full bridge, a controller to drive the FETs, a programmable controller to dynamically control final output current by adjusting pulse width, and a variety of protective systems, including an overcurrent latch for current control. Power MOSFETS are switched at a variable frequency from 20-50 kHz to charge a capacitor load from 0 to 6 kV. A ferrite transformer steps up the DC input. The transformer primary is a full bridge configuration with the FET switches and the secondary is fed into a high voltage full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The peak current is held constant by varying the pulse width using predetermined timing resistors and counting pulses. The pulse width is increased as the capacitor charges to maintain peak current. A digital ripple counter counts pulses, and after the desired number is reached, an up-counter is clocked. The up-counter output is decoded to choose among different resistors used to discharge a timing capacitor, thereby determining the pulse width. A current latch shuts down the supply on overcurrent due to either excessive pulse width causing transformer saturation or a major bridge fault, i.e., FET or transformer failure, or failure of the drive circuitry.

  16. Test of an amorphous silicon detector in medical proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martisikova, M., E-mail: m.martisikova@dkfz.de [Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Hesse, B.M. [Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Nairz, O. [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum HIT am Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 450, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, O [Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum HIT am Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 450, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    Ion beam radiation therapy for cancer treatment allows for improved dose confinement to the target in comparison with the standard radiation therapy using high energy photons. Dose delivery to the patient using focused ion beam scanning over the target volume is going to be increasingly used in the upcoming years. The high precision of the dose delivery achieved in this way has to be met by practical methods for beam monitoring with sufficient spatial resolution in two dimensions. Flat panel detectors, used for photon portal imaging at the newest medical linear accelerators, are an interesting candidate for this purpose. Initial detector tests presented here were performed using proton beams with the highest available energy. The investigations include measurements of beam profiles at different beam intensities and for different beam width, as well as the signal linearity. Radiation damage was also investigated. The obtained results show that the detector is a promising candidate to be used in the therapeutic proton beams.

  17. Molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, N.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a timeless and rather complete theoretical and experimental treatment of electric and magnetic resonance molecular-beam experiments for studying the radio frequency spectra of atoms and molecules. The theory of interactions of the nucleus with atomic and molecular fields is extensively presented. Measurements of atomic and nuclear magnetic moments, electric multipole moments, and atomic fine and hyperfine structure are detailed. Useful but somewhat outdated chapters on gas kinetics, molecular beam design, and experimental techniques are also included

  18. Beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Considerable experience has now been gained with the various beam transport lines, and a number of minor changes have been made to improve the ease of operation. These include: replacement of certain little-used slits by profile monitors (harps or scanners); relocation of steering magnets, closer to diagnostic harps or profile scanners; installation of a scanner inside the isocentric neutron therapy system; and conversion of a 2-doublet quadrupole telescope (on the neutron therapy beamline) to a 2-triplet telescope. The beam-swinger project has been delayed by very late delivery of the magnet iron to the manufacturer, but is now progressing smoothly. The K=600 spectrometer magnets have now been delivered and are being assembled for field mapping. The x,y-table with its associated mapping equipment is complete, together with the driver software. One of the experimental areas has been dedicated to the production of collimated neutron beams and has been equipped with a bending magnet and beam dump, together with steel collimators fixed at 4 degrees intervals from 0 degrees to 16 degrees. Changes to the target cooling and shielding system for isotope production have led to a request for much smaller beam spot sizes on target, and preparations have been made for rearrangement of the isotope beamline to permit installation of quadrupole triplets on the three beamlines after the switching magnet. A practical system of quadrupoles for matching beam properties to the spectrometer has been designed. 6 figs

  19. Modelling the widths of fission observables in GEF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt K.-H.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The widths of the mass distributions of the different fission channels are traced back to the probability distributions of the corresponding quantum oscillators that are coupled to the heat bath, which is formed by the intrinsic degrees of freedom of the fissioning system under the influence of pairing correlations and shell effects. Following conclusion from stochastic calculations of Adeev and Pashkevich, an early freezing due to dynamical effects is assumed. It is shown that the mass width of the fission channels in low-energy fission is strongly influenced by the zero-point motion of the corresponding quantum oscillator. The observed variation of the mass widths of the asymmetric fission channels with excitation energy is attributed to the energy-dependent properties of the heat bath and not to the population of excited states of the corresponding quantum oscillator.

  20. Form factors and radiation widths of the giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, V.Yu.

    1990-01-01

    Simple analytic relations for the form factors of inelastic electron scattering in the Born approximation and radiation widths of the isovector and isoscalar giant multipole resonances are derived. The dynamic relationship between the volume and surface density vibrations were taken into account in this calculation. The form factors in the Born approximation were found to be in satisfactory agreement with experimental data in the region of small transferred momenta. The radiation widths of isoscalar multipole resonances increase when the number of nucleons increase as A 1/3 , and for isovector resonances this dependence has the form f(A)A 1/3 , where f(A) is a slowly increasing function of A. Radiation widths well fit the experimental data

  1. Analysis of edge stability for models of heat flux width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Makowski

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Detailed measurements of the ne, Te, and Ti profiles in the vicinity of the separatrix of ELMing H-mode discharges have been used to examine plasma stability at the extreme edge of the plasma and assess stability dependent models of the heat flux width. The results are strongly contrary to the critical gradient model, which posits that a ballooning instability determines a gradient scale length related to the heat flux width. The results of this analysis are not sensitive to the choice of location to evaluate stability. Significantly, it is also found that the results are completely consistent with the heuristic drift model for the heat flux width. Here the edge pressure gradient scales with plasma density and is proportional to the pressure gradient inferred from the equilibrium in accordance with the predictions of that theory.

  2. Fast and Robust Nanocellulose Width Estimation Using Turbidimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Michiko; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Iwamoto, Shinichiro; Yano, Hiroyuki; Isogai, Akira; Endo, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    The dimensions of nanocelluloses are important factors in controlling their material properties. The present study reports a fast and robust method for estimating the widths of individual nanocellulose particles based on the turbidities of their water dispersions. Seven types of nanocellulose, including short and rigid cellulose nanocrystals and long and flexible cellulose nanofibers, are prepared via different processes. Their widths are calculated from the respective turbidity plots of their water dispersions, based on the theory of light scattering by thin and long particles. The turbidity-derived widths of the seven nanocelluloses range from 2 to 10 nm, and show good correlations with the thicknesses of nanocellulose particles spread on flat mica surfaces determined using atomic force microscopy. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Approach to increase beam intensity extracted from a cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, M.; Hojo, S.; Katagiri, K.; Miyahara, N.; Noda, A.; Noda, K.; Sugiura, A.; Wakui, T.; Smirnov, V.; Vorozhtsov, S.; Goto, A.

    2017-09-01

    To increase the beam intensity of cyclotrons used for producing radionuclides, beam loss during extraction must be reduced. Extraction efficiency is limited by the beam parameters in front of the deflector, especially angular distribution. Computer simulation of the second harmonic mode for 18 MeV protons, which is frequently used, has been carried out to understand beam behavior in a cyclotron. The extraction efficiency is determined by the width of the angular distribution of particles in the phase space plot at the deflector. An effective method to reduce the width is to shorten the bunch at injection. The simulation shows that the bunch phase length at injection must be ⩽30° to realize a 30 μA extraction beam current and satisfy the deflector heat limit of 200 W.

  4. Similarity of Stream Width Distributions Across Headwater Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, G. H.; Pavelsky, T.; Barefoot, E. A.; Tashie, A.; Butman, D. E.

    2016-12-01

    The morphology and abundance of streams control the rates of hydraulic and biogeochemical exchange between streams, groundwater, and the atmosphere. In large river systems, studies have used remote sensing to quantify river morphology, and have found that the relationship between river width and abundance is fractal, such that narrow rivers are proportionally more common than wider rivers. However, in headwater systems (stream order 1-3), where many biogeochemical reactions are most rapid, the relationship between stream width and abundance is unknown, reducing the certainty of biogeochemical flux estimates. To constrain this uncertainty, we surveyed two components of stream morphology (wetted stream width and length) in seven physiographically contrasting stream networks in Kings Creek in Konza Prarie, KS; Sagehen Creek in the N. Sierra Nevada Mtns., CA; Elder Creek in Angelo Coast Range Preserve, CA; Caribou Creek in the Caribou Poker Creek Research Watershed, AK; V40 Stream, NZ; Blue Duck Creek, NZ; Stony Creek in Duke Forest, NC. To assess temporal variations, we also surveyed stream geometry in a subcatchment of Stony Creek six times over a range of moderate streamflow conditions (discharge less than 90 percentile of gauge record). Here we show a strikingly consistent gamma statistical distribution of stream width in all surveys and a characteristic most abundant stream width of 32±7 cm independent of flow conditions or basin size. This consistency is remarkable given the substantial physical diversity among the studied catchments. We propose a model that invokes network topology theory and downstream hydraulic geometry to show that, as active drainage networks expand and contract in response to changes in streamflow, the most abundant stream width remains approximately static. This framework can be used to better extrapolate stream size and abundance from large rivers to small headwater streams, with significant impact on understanding of the hydraulic

  5. Total Space in Resolution Is at Least Width Squared

    OpenAIRE

    Bonacina, Ilario

    2016-01-01

    Given an unsatisfiable k-CNF formula phi we consider two complexity measures in Resolution: width and total space. The width is the minimal W such that there exists a Resolution refutation of phi with clauses of at most W literals. The total space is the minimal size T of a memory used to write down a Resolution refutation of phi where the size of the memory is measured as the total number of literals it can contain. We prove that T = Omega((W - k)^2).

  6. Statistical analysis of s-wave neutron reduced widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandita Anita; Agrawal, H.M.

    1992-01-01

    The fluctuations of the s-wave neutron reduced widths for many nuclei have been analyzed with emphasis on recent measurements by a statistical procedure which is based on the method of maximum likelihood. It is shown that the s-wave neutron reduced widths of nuclei follow single channel Porter Thomas distribution (x 2 -distribution with degree of freedom ν = 1) for most of the cases. However there are apparent deviations from ν = 1 and possible explanation and significance of this deviation is given. These considerations are likely to modify the evaluation of neutron cross section. (author)

  7. Efficient algorithms for estimating the width of nearly normal distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akerlof, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Typical physics data samples often conform to Gaussian distributions with admixtures of more slowly varying backgrounds. Under such circumstances the standard deviation is known to be a poor statistical measure of distribution width. As an alternative, the performance of Gini's mean difference is compared with the standard deviation and the mean deviation. Variants which sum over subsets of all possible pairs are shown to have statistical efficiencies comparable to the mean difference and mean deviation but do not require extensive data storage or a priori knowledge of the sample mean. These statistics are reasonable candidates for monitoring the distribution width of a real time data stream. (orig.)

  8. Beam profiles for fast neutrons; and reply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bewley, D.K.; Parnell, C.J.; Bloch, P.

    1976-01-01

    The authors express surprise that Bloch et al. (Bloch, P.H., Hendry, G.O., Hilton, J.L., Quam, W.M., Reinhard, D.K., and Wilson, C., 1976, Phys. Med. Biol., Vol. 21, 450) justified a target size of 5.5 x 5.5 cm in a neutron generator by comparison with the profile given by a 2.5 MV X-ray generator. The penumbral width of this new neutron generator is more than twice that of a modern megavoltage X-ray machine, and larger than those of beams from standard 60 Co units, or of the Hammersmith Hospital cyclotron beam. The large target size of the neutron generator may have to be accepted as a necessary evil, but should not be considered satisfactory. In reply, one of the authors of the original note presents the results of calculations of beam profiles for 14 MeV neutron beams in a tissue-equivalent phantom, and suggests that the broader profiles are principally caused by the larger probability of side scatter, not by source size. The most fruitful approach to sharpening the neutron beam profile would seem to be to design a field flattening filter to increase relative dose near the edge inside the geometrically defined field. Calculations indicating that Bewley and Parnell have underestimated the penumbral widths of 60 Co beams are also presented. (U.K.)

  9. Design Study for Pulsed Proton Beam Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Sung Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fast neutrons with a broad energy spectrum, with which it is possible to evaluate nuclear data for various research fields such as medical applications and the development of fusion reactors, can be generated by irradiating proton beams on target materials such as beryllium. To generate short-pulse proton beam, we adopted a deflector and slit system. In a simple deflector with slit system, most of the proton beam is blocked by the slit, especially when the beam pulse width is short. Therefore, the available beam current is very low, which results in low neutron flux. In this study, we proposed beam modulation using a buncher cavity to increase the available beam current. The ideal field pattern for the buncher cavity is sawtooth. To make the field pattern similar to a sawtooth waveform, a multiharmonic buncher was adopted. The design process for the multiharmonic buncher includes a beam dynamics calculation and three-dimensional electromagnetic simulation. In addition to the system design for pulsed proton generation, a test bench with a microwave ion source is under preparation to test the performance of the system. The design study results concerning the pulsed proton beam generation and the test bench preparation with some preliminary test results are presented in this paper.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of Varian Linac for 6 MV photon beam with BEAMnrc code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Maged; El Bardouni, T.; Chakir, E.; Boukhal, H.; Saeed, M.; Ahmed, Abdul-Aziz

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the initial electron beam parameters on the absorbed dose distribution calculated with EGSnrc Monte Carlo code, for 6 MV photon beam. A proposed methodology for benchmarking the BEAMnrc model of Varian Linac has been used. Also, a new photon cross section data based on ENDF/B-VII release 8 evaluation has been employed. The parameters tested include mean energy, radial intensity distribution and angular spread of the initial electron beam. Mean energy and angular spread were tested for a square irradiation field 10 × 10 cm2, whereas beam width of the electron beam was studied for 10 × 10 cm2 at different depths and 30 × 30 cm2 at depth of 10 cm. The results obtained are compared with measurement data to select the optimal electron beam parameters. The differences between MC calculation and measurements data are analyzed using gamma index criteria which fixed within 1% -1 mm accuracy. The obtained results indicated that the depth-dose and dose-profile curves were considerably influenced by the mean energy of the electron beam. The depth-dose curves were unaffected by the beam width of the electron beam, for both irradiation fields. On the contrary, lateral dose-profile curves were affected by the beam width of initial electron beam. Both dose-profile and depth-dose curves were unaffected to the angular spread of the electron beam. A deep depth of 10 × 10 cm2 is very accurate to tune the beam width. Mean energy and beam width must be tuned precisely, to get the MC does distribution with acceptable accuracy.

  11. Quantum beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2003-01-01

    Present state and future prospect are described on quantum beams for medical use. Efforts for compactness of linac for advanced cancer therapy have brought about the production of machines like Accuray's CyberKnife and TOMOTHERAPY (Tomo Therapy Inc.) where the acceleration frequency of X-band (9-11 GHz) is used. For cervical vein angiography by the X-band linac, a compact hard X-ray source is developed which is based on the (reverse) Compton scattering through laser-electron collision. More intense beam and laser are necessary at present. A compact machine generating the particle beam of 10 MeV-1 GeV (laser-plasma accelerator) for cancer therapy is also developed using the recent compression technique (chirped-pulse amplification) to generate laser of >10 TW. Tokyo University is studying for the electron beam with energy of GeV order, for the laser-based synchrotron X-ray, and for imaging by the short pulse ion beam. Development of advanced compact accelerators is globally attempted. In Japan, a virtual laboratory by National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), a working group of universities and research facilities through the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, started in 2001 for practical manufacturing of the above-mentioned machines for cancer therapy and for angiography. Virtual Factory (Inc.), a business venture, is to be stood in future. (N.I.)

  12. Measurement of the W boson mass and width in e+e- collisions at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schael, S.; Barate, R.; Bruneliere, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocme, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Martinez, M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Barklow, T.; Buchmueller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J.M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Kraan, A.C.; Nilsson, B.S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S.A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; White, R.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Clarke, D.P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Sloan, T.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Hoelldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Mueller, A.-S.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huettmann, K.; Luetjens, G.; Maenner, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Villegas, M.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Ward, J.J.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Boehrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara III, P.A.; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y.B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    2006-01-01

    The mass of the W boson is determined from the direct reconstruction of W decays in WW→q anti qq anti q and WW→lνq anti q events in e + e - collisions at LEP. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 683 pb -1 collected with the ALEPH detector at centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV. To minimise any effect from colour reconnection a new procedure is adopted in which low energy particles are not considered in the mass determination from the q anti qq anti q channel. The combined result from all channels is m W=80.440 ±0.043 (stat.) ±0.024 (syst.) ±0.009 (FSI) ±0.009 (LEP) GeV/c 2 , where FSI represents the possible effects of final state interactions in the q anti qq anti q channel and LEP indicates the uncertainty in the beam energy. From two-parameter fits to the W mass and width, the W width is found to be Γ W = 2.14 ±0.09 (stat.) ±0.04 (syst.) ±0.05 (FSI) ±0.01 (LEP) GeV. (orig.)

  13. Fan beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick M.

    A fan beam proton therapy is developed which delivers intensity modulated proton therapy using distal edge tracking. The system may be retrofit onto existing proton therapy gantries without alterations to infrastructure in order to improve treatments through intensity modulation. A novel range and intensity modulation system is designed using acrylic leaves that are inserted or retracted from subsections of the fan beam. Leaf thicknesses are chosen in a base-2 system and motivated in a binary manner. Dose spots from individual beam channels range between 1 and 5 cm. Integrated collimators attempting to limit crosstalk among beam channels are investigated, but found to be inferior to uncollimated beam channel modulators. A treatment planning system performing data manipulation in MATLAB and dose calculation in MCNPX is developed. Beamlet dose is calculated on patient CT data and a fan beam source is manually defined to produce accurate results. An energy deposition tally follows the CT grid, allowing straightforward registration of dose and image data. Simulations of beam channels assume that a beam channel either delivers dose to a distal edge spot or is intensity modulated. A final calculation is performed separately to determine the deliverable dose accounting for all sources of scatter. Treatment plans investigate the effects that varying system parameters have on dose distributions. Beam channel apertures may be as large as 20 mm because the sharp distal falloff characteristic of proton dose provides sufficient intensity modulation to meet dose objectives, even in the presence of coarse lateral resolution. Dose conformity suffers only when treatments are delivered from less than 10 angles. Jaw widths of 1--2 cm produce comparable dose distributions, but a jaw width of 4 cm produces unacceptable target coverage when maintaining critical structure avoidance. Treatment time for a prostate delivery is estimated to be on the order of 10 minutes. Neutron production

  14. Downstream flow top width prediction in a river system | Choudhury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ANFIS, ARIMA and Hybrid Multiple Inflows Muskingum models (HMIM) were applied to simulate and forecast downstream discharge and flow top widths in a river system. The ANFIS model works on a set of linguistic rules while the ARIMA model uses a set of past values to predict the next value in a time series. The HMIM ...

  15. Detonation cell widths in hydrogen-air-diluent mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamps, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper I report on the influence of steam and carbon dioxide on the detonability of hydrogen-air mixtures. Data were obtained on the detonation cell width in a heated detonation tube that is 0.43 m in diameter and 13.1 m long. The detonation cell widths were correlated using a characteristic length calculated from a chemical kinetic model. The addition of either diluent to a hydrogen-air mixture increased the cell width for all equivalence ratios. For equal diluent concentrations, however, carbon dioxide not only yielded larger increases in the cell width than steam, but its efficacy relative to steam was predicted to increase with increasing concentration. The range of detonable hydrogen concentrations in a hydrogen-air mixture initially at 1 atm pressure was found to be between 11.6 percent and 74.9 percent for mixtures at 20 degree C and 9.4 percent and 76.9 percent for mixtures at 100 degree C. The detonation limit was between 38.8 percent and 40.5 percent steam for a stoichiometric hydrogen-air-steam mixture initially at 100 degree C and 1 atm. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  16. Prediction of concentrated flow width in ephemeral gully channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachtergaele, J.; Poesen, J.; Sidorchuk, A.; Torri, D.

    2002-07-01

    Empirical prediction equations of the form W = aQb have been reported for rills and rivers, but not for ephemeral gullies. In this study six experimental data sets are used to establish a relationship between channel width (W, m) and flow discharge (Q, m3 s-1) for ephemeral gullies formed on cropland. The resulting regression equation (W = 2·51 Q0·412; R2 = 0·72; n = 67) predicts observed channel width reasonably well. Owing to logistic limitations related to the respective experimental set ups, only relatively small runoff discharges (i.e. Q channel width was attributed to a calculated peak runoff discharge on sealed cropland, the application field of the regression equation was extended towards larger discharges (i.e. 5 × 10channels revealed that the discharge exponent (distribution over the wetted perimeter between rills, gullies and rivers, (ii) a decrease in probability of a channel formed in soil material with uniform erosion resistance from rills over gullies to rivers and (iii) a decrease in average surface slope from rills over gullies to rivers.channel width equation for concentrated flow on cropland. For the frozen soils the equation

  17. Echo width of foam supports used in scattering measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen; Solodukhov, V. V.

    1979-01-01

    Theoretically and experimentally determined echo widths of dielectric cylinders having circular, triangular, and quadratic cross sections have been compared. The cylinders were made of foam material having a relative dielectric constant of about 1.035. The purpose of the investigation was to find...

  18. Joint space width in dysplasia of the hip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Søballe, K

    2005-01-01

    . Neither subjects with dysplasia nor controls had radiological signs of ongoing degenerative disease at admission. The primary radiological discriminator of degeneration of the hip was a change in the minimum joint space width over time. There were no significant differences between these with dysplasia...

  19. Femoral Intercondylar Notch (ICN) width in Nigerians: Its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is suggested that the difference could be the result of dominant use of one foot over the other or to occupational habit. This needs further investigation. The Femoral Intercondylar Notch (ICN) width is not related to Femur length as no relationship was found to exist between the two (p > 0.05). We conclude that since ...

  20. Utility Interfaced Pulse-Width Modulation of Solar Fed Voltage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper describes a utility interfaced pulse-width modulation of solar-fed voltage source single phase full bridge inverter. The proposed system has to do with the conversion of solar energy into electrical energy; boosting the dc power; inversion of the dc to ac and then synchronization of the inverter output with the utility, ...

  1. Frequency width of open channels in multiple scattering media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, J.; Goorden, S.A.; Mosk, Allard

    2016-01-01

    We report optical measurements of the spectral width of open transmission channels in a three-dimensional diffusive medium. The light transmission through a sample is enhanced by efficiently coupling to open transmission channels using repeated digital optical phase conjugation. The spectral

  2. Writer identification using directional ink-trace width measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, A. A.; Smit, J.; Bulacu, M. L.; Schomaker, L. R. B.

    As suggested by modern paleography, the width of ink traces is a powerful source of information for off-line writer identification, particularly if combined with its direction. Such measurements can be computed using simple, fast and accurate methods based on pixel contours, the combination of which

  3. The effect of buffer zone width on biodiversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navntoft, Søren; Sigsgaard, Lene; Kristensen, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Field margin management for conservation purposes is a way to protect both functional biodiversity and biodiversity per se without considerable economical loss as field margins are less productive. However, the effect of width of the buffer zone on achievable biodiversity gains has received little...

  4. Application of activity pencil beam algorithm using measured distribution data of positron emitter nuclei for therapeutic SOBP proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyatake, Aya; Nishio, Teiji

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, much research on imaging the clinical proton-irradiated volume using positron emitter nuclei based on target nuclear fragment reaction has been carried out. The purpose of this study is to develop an activity pencil beam (APB) algorithm for a simulation system for proton-activated positron-emitting imaging in clinical proton therapy using spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) beams.Methods: The target nuclei of activity distribution calculations are 12 C nuclei, 16 O nuclei, and 40 Ca nuclei, which are the main elements in a human body. Depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations were obtained from the material information of ridge filter (RF) and depth activity distributions of compounds of the three target nuclei measured by BOLPs-RGp (beam ON-LINE PET system mounted on a rotating gantry port) with mono-energetic Bragg peak (MONO) beam irradiations. The calculated data of depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations were sorted in terms of kind of nucleus, energy of proton beam, SOBP width, and thickness of fine degrader (FD), which were verified. The calculated depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations were compared with the measured ones. APB kernels were made from the calculated depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations to construct a simulation system using the APB algorithm for SOBP beams.Results: The depth activity distributions were prepared using the material information of RF and the measured depth activity distributions with MONO beam irradiations for clinical therapy using SOBP beams. With the SOBP width widening, the distal fall-offs of depth activity distributions and the difference from the depth dose distributions were large. The shapes of the calculated depth activity distributions nearly agreed with those of the measured ones upon comparison between the two. The APB kernels of SOBP beams were prepared by making use of the data on depth activity distributions with SOBP beam

  5. Modeling of dislocation channel width evolution in irradiated metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Peter J.; Benensky, Kelsa M.; Zinkle, Steven J.

    2018-02-01

    Defect-free dislocation channel formation has been reported to promote plastic instability during tensile testing via localized plastic flow, leading to a distinct loss of ductility and strain hardening in many low-temperature irradiated materials. In order to study the underlying mechanisms governing dislocation channel width and formation, the channel formation process is modeled via a simple stochastic dislocation-jog process dependent upon grain size, defect cluster density, and defect size. Dislocations traverse a field of defect clusters and jog stochastically upon defect interaction, forming channels of low defect-density. Based upon prior molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and in-situ experimental transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, each dislocation encounter with a dislocation loop or stacking fault tetrahedron (SFT) is assumed to cause complete absorption of the defect cluster, prompting the dislocation to jog up or down by a distance equal to half the defect cluster diameter. Channels are predicted to form rapidly and are comparable to reported TEM measurements for many materials. Predicted channel widths are found to be most strongly dependent on mean defect size and correlated well with a power law dependence on defect diameter and density, and distance from the dislocation source. Due to the dependence of modeled channel width on defect diameter and density, maximum channel width is predicted to slowly increase as accumulated dose increases. The relatively weak predicted dependence of channel formation width with distance, in accordance with a diffusion analogy, implies that after only a few microns from the source, most channels observed via TEM analyses may not appear to vary with distance because of limitations in the field-of-view to a few microns. Further, examinations of the effect of the so-called "source-broadening" mechanism of channel formation showed that its effect is simply to add a minimum thickness to the channel

  6. TFTR neutral beam power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deitz, A.; Murray, H.; Winje, R.

    1977-01-01

    The TFTR NB System will be composed of four beam lines, each containing three ion sources presently being developed for TFTR by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (LBL). The Neutral Beam Power System (NBPS) will provide the necessary power required to operate these Ion Sources in both an experimental or operational mode as well as test mode. This paper describes the technical as well as the administrative/management aspects involved in the development and building of this system. The NBPS will combine the aspects of HV pulse (120 kV) and long pulse width (0.5 sec) together to produce a high power system that is unique in the Electrical Engineering field

  7. Introduction of beam flatness filter for 60Co teletherapy beam and its efficacy in clinical radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathiyan, S.; Ravichandran, R.; Ravikumar, M.

    2003-01-01

    In the western countries cobalt-60 machines have become obsolete, whereas in India we have about 250 machines operational for clinical radiotherapy. The basic differences of 6 MV x-ray beam and cobalt-60 beam are: a) build-up d max point, b) flatness of beam at depths, and c) sharpness of the beam edge. We looked at the homogeneity of delivered dose in the target volume in a 3 field SAD technique for 60 Co (80 cm, 100 cm) and 6 MV treatments. More dose variations are seen in 60 Co treated volume. The excess curvature of isodose curves of 60 Co at depths may be one of the reasons for this inhomogeneity in dose to target volume. Therefore, there is need for achieving perfect flatness in the isodose curves at desired depths. A flattening filter was fabricated using dental wax impression material to account for depths of curvature of 50% 60 Co isodose curve. The filter was fabricated for the Theratron 780C machine for necessary flatness. The beam flatness with filter was measured with a) ionization and b) TL dosimetry methods. The flattened beam profile was compared with 6 MV x-ray beam (Clinac-1800, M/s Varian, USA). Our measurements show uniform flatness of cobalt-60 isodose curve at desired depth and useful radiation field width comparable to 6 MV x-ray photon profile at full width at half maximum (FWHM). If this concept is extendable to short field widths, it appears that there is scope for use of such filter in the treatments of oesophagus, larynx, and pituitary tumours to achieve dose homogeneity. Using this flatness filter and penumbra trimmer, we may achieve better quality cobalt-60 beam for radiotherapy. (author)

  8. BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR DOUBLE-GAUSSIAN BEAMS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MONTAG, C.; MALITSKY, N.; BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-05-16

    Electron cooling together with intra-beam scattering results in a transverse distribution that can best be described by a sum of two gaussians, one for the high-density core and one for the tails of the distribution. Simulation studies are being performed to understand the beam-beam interaction of these double-gaussian beams. Here we report the effect of low-frequency random tune modulations on diffusion in double-gaussian beams and compare the effects to those in beam-beam interactions with regular gaussian beams and identical tune shift parameters.

  9. BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR DOUBLE-GAUSSIAN BEAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MONTAG, C.; MALITSKY, N.; BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling together with intra-beam scattering results in a transverse distribution that can best be described by a sum of two gaussians, one for the high-density core and one for the tails of the distribution. Simulation studies are being performed to understand the beam-beam interaction of these double-gaussian beams. Here we report the effect of loW--frequency random tune modulations on diffusion in double-gaussian beams and compare the effects to those in beam-beam interactions with regular gaussian beams and identical tune shift parameters

  10. Beam-Beam Simulations for Double-Gaussian Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Montag, Christoph; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; Malitsky, Nikolay

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling together with intra-beam scattering results in a transverse distribution that can best be described by a sum of two Gaussians, one for the high-density core and one for the tails of the distribution. Simulation studies are being performed to understand the beam-beam interaction of these double-Gaussian beams. Here we report the effect of low-frequency random tune modulations on diffusion in double-Gaussian beams and compare the effects to those in beam-beam interactions with regular Gaussian beams and identical tuneshift parameters.

  11. Characterization of low energy radioactive beams using direct reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J.G.; Fraser, M.A.; Bildstein, V.

    2013-01-01

    of an accelerated radioactive beam produced at ISOLDE. We use data from an experiment with an 11Be beam incident on a deuteron target producing 10Be from a (d,t) reaction. The T-REX Si detector array was used for particle detection, but the technique is applicable for other setups.......We demonstrate a new technique to determine the beam structure of low energy radioactive beams using coincidence events from a direct reaction. The technique will be described and tested using Geant4 simulations. We use the technique to determine for the first time the width, divergence and energy...

  12. Possibility of designing television control system for welded joint formation on electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifshits, M.L.; Lobanova, N.G.

    1987-01-01

    Regression equations (models), connecting seam characteristics: width and depth with the welding bath leading front in joint gap and seam width respectively - are obtained at electron beam welding of circular articles with guaranteed clearance with application of television control system. Dispersion analysis showed the models adequancy to the process in the range, where they were identified

  13. High precision electron beam diagnostic system for high current long pulse beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y J; Fessenden, T; Holmes, C; Nelson, S D; Selchow, N.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the effort to develop a multi-axis electron beam transport system using stripline kicker technology for DARHT II applications, it is necessary to precisely determine the position and extent of long high energy beams (6-40 MeV, 1-4 kA, 2 microseconds) for accurate position control. The kicker positioning system utilizes shot-to-shot adjustments for reduction of relatively slow (<20 MHz) motion of the beam centroid. The electron beams passing through the diagnostic systems have the potential for large halo effects that tend to corrupt measurements performed using capacitive pick-off probes. Likewise, transmission line traveling wave probes have problems with multi-bounce effects due to these longer pulse widths. Finally, the high energy densities experienced in these applications distort typical foil beam position measurements

  14. Uniform irradiation system using beam scanning method for cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agematsu, Takashi; Okumura, Susumu; Arakawa, Kazuo

    1994-03-01

    JAERI AVF-cyclotron is equipped with an ion beam scanner for large area irradiation. The two-dimensional fluence distribution of ion beam obtained using cellulose triacetate film dosimeter was not uniform. This is resulted from the distortion of excitation current for electromagnet of the scanner. So, the beam scanning condition, i.e., the relation between the ion species, the beam profile and the scanning width, was extremely limited to make a good uniformity. We have developed a beam scanning simulator to get fluence distributions by calculation and then compared the simulated distributions with the measured ones. It was revealed that the both of them are in good agreement and the beam scanning condition to get good uniformity was led by using this simulator. On the basis of these results, the power supply of scanner was improved. A good uniformity of beam distribution was available. (author)

  15. Beam position dependence of a wall-current monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamiya, K.; Asami, A.; Suwada, T.; Urano, T.; Kobayashi, H.

    1995-01-01

    It was pointed out recently that there exists an appreciable beam position dependence in the wall-current monitor widely used in electron accelerators. Detailed study of this dependence is performed on a test bench varying the pulse width and the frequency of the input signal simulating the beam. The results of experiments show that when the pulse width becomes shorter more appreciable becomes the dependence, and it approaches to that of calculated from the method of images. A unified analysis is under way. (author)

  16. Laser ion source with long pulse width for RHIC-EBIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a new heavy ion-projector for RHIC and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory. Laser Ion Source (LIS) with solenoid can supply many kinds of ion from solid targets and is suitable for long pulse length with low current as ion provider for RHIC-EBIS. In order to understand a plasma behavior for fringe field of solenoid, we measure current, pulse width and total ion charges by a new ion probe. The experimental result indicates that the solenoid confines the laser ablation plasma transversely. Laser ion source needs long pulse length with limited current as primary ion provider for RHIC-EBIS. New ion probe can measure current distribution for the radial positions along z axis. The beam pulse length is not effected by magnetic field strength. However, the currents and charges decay with the distance from the end of solenoid. These results indicate that solenoid field has important role for plasma confinement not longitudinally but transversely and solenoid is able to have long pulse length with sufficient total ion charges. Moreover, the results are useful for a design of the extraction system for RHIC-EBIS.

  17. Beam limiter for thermonuclear fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminsky, M.S.

    1976-01-01

    A beam limiter circumscribes the interior surface of a vacuum vessel to inhibit collisions of contained plasma and the vessel walls. The cross section of the material making up the limiter has a flatsided or slightly concave portion of increased width towards the plasma and portions of decreased width towards the interior surface of the vessel. This configuration is designed to prevent a major fraction of the material sputtered, vaporized and blistered from the limiter from reaching the plasma. It also allows adequate heat transfer from the wider to the narrower portions. The preferred materials for the beam limiter are solids of sintered, particulate materials of low atomic number with low vapor pressure and low sputtering and blistering yields. 7 claims, 3 figures

  18. Beam profile for Malaysian electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Bakar Ghazali; Muhamad Zahidee Taat

    2007-01-01

    This paper comprises of two calculations that require in designing a dose profile for an electron accelerator machine before its fabrication. The first is to calculate the beam deflection due to changes of high voltage (HV) supply as well as the deflection coil currents so that the electron beam will only scan at the window foil of 18 cm length and 6 cm width. Secondly, we also require to calculate the beam profile at 50 mm underneath the window foil. The electron gun that produces a beam of 10 mm diameter has to be oscillated in a sawtooth wave for the prescribed window size at frequencies of 50 Hz and 400 Hz along the length and width directions respectively. For the beam deflection, we apply a basic formula from Lorentz force law to obtain a set of HV supply and the coil current that is suitable for both deflections and this result can assist in designing the coil current against HV changes via an electronic controller. The dose profile was calculated using the RMS current formulation along the length direction. We found that the measured and the calculated RMS currents are in comparable for the case of 1 MeV, 50 mA accelerator facility that is going to be installed at Nuclear Malaysia complex. A similar measurement will be carried out for our locally designed accelerator of 150 KeV, 10 mA after fabrication and installation of the machine are completed. (Author)

  19. Verification of micro-beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiongge; Juang, Titania; Beth, Rachel; Chang, Sha; Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Micro-beam Radiation Therapy (MRT) is an experimental radiation therapy with provocative experimental data indicating potential for improved efficacy in some diseases. Here we demonstrated a comprehensive micro-beam verification method utilizing high resolution (50pm) PRESAGE/Micro-Optical-CT 3D Dosimetry. A small PRESAGE cylindrical dosimeter was irradiated by a novel compact Carbon-Nano-Tube (CNT) field emission based MRT system. The Percentage Depth Dose (PDD), Peak-to-Valley Dose Ratio (PVDR) and beam width (FWHM) data were obtained and analyzed from a three strips radiation experiment. A fast dose drop-off with depth, a preserved beam width with depth (an averaged FWHM across three beams remains constant (405.3um, sigma=13.2um) between depth of 3.0~14.0mm), and a high PVDR value (increases with depth from 6.3 at 3.0mm depth to 8.6 at 14.0mm depth) were discovered during this verification process. Some operating procedures such as precise dosimeter mounting, robust mechanical motions (especially rotation) and stray-light artifact management were optimized and developed to achieve a more accurate and dosimetric verification method.

  20. Simple discretization method for autoionization widths. III. Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macas, A.; Martn, F.; Riera, A.; Yanez, M.

    1987-01-01

    We apply a new method to calculate widths of two-electron Feshbach resonances, which was described in detail and applied to atomic systems in preceding articles (this issue), to molecular and quasimolecular autoionizing states. For simplicity in the programming effort, we restrict our calculations to the small-R region where one-centered expansions are sufficiently accurate to describe the wave functions. As test cases, positions and widths for the H 2 , He 2 /sup 2+/, HeH + , and LiHe/sup 3+/ resonances of lowest energy are computed for R<0.6 a.u. The advantage of using block-diagonalization techniques to define diabatic resonant states instead of generalizing the Feshbach formalism is pointed out

  1. A Direct Measurement of the $W$ Decay Width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vine, Troy [Univ. of College, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-01

    A direct measurement of the W boson total decay width is presented in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using data collected by the CDF II detector. The measurement is made by fitting a simulated signal to the tail of the transverse mass distribution in the electron and muon decay channels. An integrated luminosity of 350 pb-1 is used, collected between February 2002 and August 2004. Combining the results from the separate decay channels gives the decay width as 2.038 ± 0.072 GeV in agreement with the theoretical prediction of 2.093 ± 0.002 GeV. A system is presented for the management of detector calibrations using a relational database schema. A description of the implementation and monitoring of a procedure to provide general users with a simple interface to the complete set of calibrations is also given.

  2. Determination of the width of the top quark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Camacho-Pérez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Ćwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De la Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De la Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S

    2011-01-14

    We extract the total width of the top quark, Γ(t), from the partial decay width Γ(t → Wb) measured using the t-channel cross section for single top-quark production and from the branching fraction B(t → Wb) measured in tt events using up to 2.3  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron pp Collider. The result is Γ(t) = 1.99(-0.55)(+0.69)  GeV, which translates to a top-quark lifetime of τ(t) = (3.3(-0.9)(+1.3)) × 10(-25)   s. Assuming a high mass fourth generation b' quark and unitarity of the four-generation quark-mixing matrix, we set the first upper limit on |V(tb')| < 0.63 at 95% C.L.

  3. Statistical analysis of P-wave neutron reduced widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, G.C.; Agrawal, H.M.

    2000-01-01

    The fluctuations of the p-wave neutron reduced widths for fifty one nuclei have been analyzed with emphasis on recent measurements by a statistical procedure which is based on the method of maximum likelihood. It is shown that the p-wave neutron reduced widths of even-even nuclei fallow single channel Porter Thomas distribution (χ 2 -distribution with degree of freedom ν=1) for most of the cases where there are no intermediate structure. It is emphasized that the distribution in nuclei other than even-even may differ from a χ 2 -distribution with one degree of freedom. Possible explanation and significance of this deviation from ν=1 is given. (author)

  4. The SOL width and the MHD interchange instability in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerner, W. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Pogutse, O. [Kurchatov institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-07-01

    Instabilities in the SOL plasma can strongly influence the SOL plasma behaviour and in particular the SOL width. The SOL stability analysis shows that there exists a critical ratio of the thermal energy and the magnetic energy. If the SOL beta is greater than this critical value, the magnetic field cannot prevent the plasma displacement and a strong MHD instability in the SOL occurs. In the opposite case only slower resistive instabilities can develop. A theoretical investigation of the SOL plasma stability is presented for JET single-null and double-null divertor configurations. The dependence of the stability threshold on the SOL beta and on the sheath resistance is established. Applying a simple mixing length argument gives the scaling of the SOL width. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Numerical Solution of the Modified Equal Width Wave Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seydi Battal Gazi Karakoç

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical solution of the modified equal width wave equation is obtained by using lumped Galerkin method based on cubic B-spline finite element method. Solitary wave motion and interaction of two solitary waves are studied using the proposed method. Accuracy of the proposed method is discussed by computing the numerical conserved laws 2 and ∞ error norms. The numerical results are found in good agreement with exact solution. A linear stability analysis of the scheme is also investigated.

  6. Pulse-Width-Modulating Driver for Brushless dc Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Phil M.

    1991-01-01

    High-current pulse-width-modulating driver for brushless dc motor features optical coupling of timing signals from low-current control circuitry to high-current motor-driving circuitry. Provides high electrical isolation of motor-power supply, helping to prevent fast, high-current motor-driving pulses from being coupled through power supplies into control circuitry, where they interfere with low-current control signals.

  7. Synchronization Technique for Random Switching Frequency Pulse-Width Modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Apinan Aurasopon; Worawat Sa-ngiavibool

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a synchronized random switching frequency pulse width modulation (SRSFPWM). In this technique, the clock signal is used to control the random noise frequency which is produced by the feedback voltage of a hysteresis circuit. These make the triangular carrier frequency equaling to the random noise frequency in each switching period with the symmetrical positive and negative slopes of triangular carrier. Therefore, there is no error voltage in PWM signal. The PSpice simulate...

  8. Penning ionization widths by Fano-algebraic diagrammatic construction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Renjie; Narevicius, Edvardas; Averbukh, Vitali

    2018-03-01

    We present an ab initio theory and computational method for Penning ionization widths. Our method is based on the Fano theory of resonances, algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) scheme for many-electron systems, and Stieltjes imaging procedure. It includes an extension of the Fano-ADC scheme [V. Averbukh and L. S. Cederbaum, J. Chem. Phys. 123, 204107 (2005)] to triplet excited states. Penning ionization widths of various He*-H2 states are calculated as a function of the distance R between He* and H2. We analyze the asymptotic (large-R) dependences of the Penning widths in the region where the well-established electron transfer mechanism of the decay is suppressed by the multipole- and/or spin-forbidden energy transfer. The R-12 and R-8 power laws are derived for the asymptotes of the Penning widths of the singlet and triplet excited states of He*(1s2s1,3S), respectively. We show that the electron transfer mechanism dominates Penning ionization of He*(1s2s 3S)-H2 up until the He*-H2 separation is large enough for the radiative decay of He* to become the dominant channel. The same mechanism also dominates the ionization of He*(1s2s 1S)-H2 when R < 5 Å. We estimate that the regime of energy transfer in the He*-H2 Penning ionization cannot be reached by approaching zero collisional temperature. However, the multipole-forbidden energy transfer mechanism can become important for Penning ionization in doped helium droplets.

  9. Pole mass, width, and propagators of unstable fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniehl, B.A.; Sirlin, A.

    2008-01-01

    The concepts of pole mass and width are extended to unstable fermions in the general framework of parity-nonconserving gauge theories, such as the Standard Model. In contrast with the conventional on-shell definitions, these concepts are gauge independent and avoid severe unphysical singularities, properties of great importance since most fundamental fermions in nature are unstable particles. General expressions for the unrenormalized and renormalized dressed propagators of unstable fermions and their field-renormalization constants are presented. (orig.)

  10. Sonar beam dynamics in leaf-nosed bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnenschmidt, Meike; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2016-07-07

    Ultrasonic emissions of bats are directional and delimit the echo-acoustic space. Directionality is quantified by the aperture of the sonar beam. Recent work has shown that bats often widen their sonar beam when approaching movable prey or sharpen their sonar beam when navigating through cluttered habitats. Here we report how nose-emitting bats, Phyllostomus discolor, adjust their sonar beam to object distance. First, we show that the height and width of the bats sonar beam, as imprinted on a parabolic 45 channel microphone array, varies even within each animal and this variation is unrelated to changes in call level or spectral content. Second, we show that these animals are able to systematically decrease height and width of their sonar beam while focusing on the approaching object. Thus it appears that sonar beam sharpening is a further, facultative means of reducing search volume, likely to be employed by stationary animals when the object position is close and unambiguous. As only half of our individuals sharpened their beam onto the approaching object we suggest that this strategy is facultative, under voluntary control, and that beam formation is likely mediated by muscular control of the acoustic aperture of the bats' nose leaf.

  11. Three-dimensional dose distribution of proton beams derived from luminescence images of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, S.; Watabe, H.; Toshito, T.; Komori, M.

    2017-05-01

    We recently found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation at lower energy than the Cerenkov-light threshold and imaging was possible by using a CCD camera. However, since the measured distributions were projection images of the luminescence, precise dose estimations from the images were not possible. If the 3 dimensional images can be formed from the projection images, more precise dose information could be obtained. For this purpose, we calculate the 3-dimensional distribution of the proton beams from the luminescence images and use them for beam width estimations. We assumed that the proton beams have circular shape and the transverse images were reconstructed from the projection images using the filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm for positron emission tomography (PET). The reconstructed images were compared to estimate the proton-beam widths with those obtained from the projection images and simulation results. We obtained 3-dimensional distributions of the proton beams from the projection images and also the reconstructed sagittal, coronal, and transverse images as well as volume rendering images. The estimated beam widths from the reconstructed images, which were slightly smaller than those obtained from the projection images, were identical to those calculated with the simulation. The 3-dimensional distributions of the luminescence images of water of proton beams could be reconstructed from the projection images and showed improved accuracy in estimating the beam widths of the proton beams.

  12. Balance (perceived and actual) and preferred stance width during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, John; Hsiao, Katherine T; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T

    2008-05-01

    Pregnant women often remark that their balance degrades during pregnancy; however, it appears that no studies have documented the gravida's perception of her balance nor measured direction-specific changes in balance throughout pregnancy or after delivery. Thirty women, fifteen pregnant and fifteen non-pregnant controls, were tested monthly and through 6-month postpartum. For each session, perceived degradation in sense of balance, laboratory-based balance measures, stance width, and the number of falls since the previous session were recorded. Laboratory-based balance measures, quantified by direction-specific measures of postural sway, were computed from ten 30s quiet-standing trials on a stationary force platform. Repeated-measures analysis of variance, paired t-tests, and Pearson correlations were use to examine group and time effects. For the pregnant group, perceived balance degradation and stance width were highly correlated (r = 0.94). Both increased during pregnancy (P r > 0.72) and also decreased significantly between the third trimester and postpartum (P pregnancy, but increased after delivery. Contrary to recent work suggesting fall rates of 25%, only 13% of our subjects (n = 2) fell during pregnancy. Perceived degradation in balance during pregnancy was strongly related to increasing postural sway instability in the anterior-posterior direction. Lateral stability was maintained during pregnancy and likely accomplished by increasing stance width.

  13. Predictors of the peak width for networks with exponential links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troutman, B.M.; Karlinger, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    We investigate optimal predictors of the peak (S) and distance to peak (T) of the width function of drainage networks under the assumption that the networks are topologically random with independent and exponentially distributed link lengths. Analytical results are derived using the fact that, under these assumptions, the width function is a homogeneous Markov birth-death process. In particular, exact expressions are derived for the asymptotic conditional expectations of S and T given network magnitude N and given mainstream length H. In addition, a simulation study is performed to examine various predictors of S and T, including N, H, and basin morphometric properties; non-asymptotic conditional expectations and variances are estimated. The best single predictor of S is N, of T is H, and of the scaled peak (S divided by the area under the width function) is H. Finally, expressions tested on a set of drainage basins from the state of Wyoming perform reasonably well in predicting S and T despite probable violations of the original assumptions. ?? 1989 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Stark widths regularities within spectral series of sodium isoelectronic sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trklja, Nora; Tapalaga, Irinel; Dojčinović, Ivan P.; Purić, Jagoš

    2018-02-01

    Stark widths within spectral series of sodium isoelectronic sequence have been studied. This is a unique approach that includes both neutrals and ions. Two levels of problem are considered: if the required atomic parameters are known, Stark widths can be calculated by some of the known methods (in present paper modified semiempirical formula has been used), but if there is a lack of parameters, regularities enable determination of Stark broadening data. In the framework of regularity research, Stark broadening dependence on environmental conditions and certain atomic parameters has been investigated. The aim of this work is to give a simple model, with minimum of required parameters, which can be used for calculation of Stark broadening data for any chosen transitions within sodium like emitters. Obtained relations were used for predictions of Stark widths for transitions that have not been measured or calculated yet. This system enables fast data processing by using of proposed theoretical model and it provides quality control and verification of obtained results.

  15. The splitted laser beam filamentation in interaction of laser and an exponential decay inhomogeneous underdense plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Xiongping; Yi Lin; Xu Bin; Lu Jianduo

    2011-01-01

    The splitted beam filamentation in interaction of laser and an exponential decay inhomogeneous underdense plasma is investigated. Based on Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation and paraxial/nonparaxial ray theory, simulation results show that the steady beam width and single beam filamentation along the propagation distance in paraxial case is due to the influence of ponderomotive nonlinearity. In nonparaxial case, the influence of the off-axial of α 00 and α 02 (the departure of the beam from the Gaussian nature) and S 02 (the departure from the spherical nature) results in more complicated ponderomotive nonlinearity and changing of the channel density and refractive index, which led to the formation of two/three splitted beam filamentation and the self-distortion of beam width. In addition, influence of several parameters on two/three splitted beam filamentation is discussed.

  16. Helical cardiac cone beam reconstruction using retrospective ECG gating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grass, M; Manzke, R; Nielsen, T; Koken, P; Proksa, R; Natanzon, M; Shechter, G

    2003-01-01

    In modern computer tomography (CT) systems, the fast rotating gantry and the increased detector width enable 3D imaging of the heart. Cardiac volume CT has a high potential for non-invasive coronary angiography with high spatial resolution and short scan time. Due to the increased detector width, true cone beam reconstruction methods are needed instead of adapted 2D reconstruction schemes. In this paper, the extended cardiac reconstruction method is introduced. It integrates the idea of retrospectively gated cardiac reconstruction for helical data acquisition into a cone beam reconstruction framework. It leads to an efficient and flexible algorithmic scheme for the reconstruction of single- and multi-phase cardiac volume datasets. The method automatically adapts the number of cardiac cycles used for the reconstruction. The cone beam geometry is fully taken into account during the reconstruction process. Within this paper, results are presented on patient datasets which have been acquired using a 16-slice cone beam CT system

  17. Application of Beam Diagnostics for Intense Heavy Ion Beams at the GSI UNILAC

    CERN Document Server

    Barth, W; Glatz, J; Groening, L; Richter, S; Yaramishev, S

    2003-01-01

    With the new High Current Injector (HSI) of the GSI UNILAC the beam pulse intensity had been increased by approximately two orders of magnitudes. The HSI was mounted and commissioned in 1999; since this time the UNILAC serves as an injector for the synchrotron SIS, especially for high uranium intensities. Considering the high beam power of up to 1250 kW and the short stopping range for the UNILAC beam energies (≤12 MeV/u), accelerator components could be destroyed, even during a single beam pulse. All diagnostic elements had to be replaced preferably by non-destructive devices. The beam current is mainly measured by beam transformers instead of Faraday cups, beam positions are measured with segmented capacitive pick-ups and secondary beam monitors instead of profile harps. The 24 installed pick-ups are also used to measure intensities, widths and phase of the bunches, as well beam energies by evaluating pick-ups at different positions. The residual gas ionization monitors allow on-line measurements ...

  18. Beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The beam diagnostic components for both the transfer and the high-energy beamlines perform well except for some of the scanners whose noise pick-up has become a problem, especially at low beam intensities. This noise pick-up is primarily due to deterioration of the bearings in the scanner. At some locations in the high-energy beamlines, scanners were replaced by harps as the scanners proved to be practically useless for the low-intensity beams required in the experimental areas. The slits in the low-energy beamline, which are not water-cooled, have to be repaired at regular intervals because of vacuum leaks. Overheating causes the ceramic feedthroughs to deteriorate resulting in the vacuum leaks. Water-cooled slits have been ordered to replace the existing slits which will later be used in the beamlines associated with the second injector cyclotron SPC2. The current-measurement system will be slightly modified and should then be much more reliable. 3 figs

  19. Beam lifetime measurement and analysis in Indus-2 electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    injection septum, four injection kickers, four RF cavities and five insertion devices. Indus-2 synchrotron radiation facility consists of a pre-injector (microtron, which deliv- ers 20 MeV electron beam of 0.5 μs pulse width), an injector (booster synchrotron, which raises beam energy from 20 MeV to 550 MeV) and the storage ring ...

  20. Analysis Of The Effect Of Flow Channel Width On The Performance Of PEMFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Eker

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, it was analysed the effect of different channel width on performance of PEM fuel cell. Current density were measured on the single cells of parallel flow fields that has 25 cm² active layer, using three different kinds of channel width. The cell width and the channel height remain constant.The results show that increasing the channel width while the cell width remains constant decreases the current density.

  1. Probing the top-quark width through ratios of resonance contributions of e{sup +}e{sup -}→W{sup +}W{sup -}b anti b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebler, Stefan [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Papanastasiou, Andrew S. [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Cavendish Lab.

    2015-11-15

    We exploit offshell regions in the process e{sup +}e{sup -} → W{sup +}W{sup -}b anti b to gain access to the top-quark width. Working at next-to-leading order in QCD we show that carefully selected ratios of offshell regions to onshell regions in the reconstructed top and antitop invariant mass spectra are, independently of the coupling g{sub tbW}, sensitive to the top-quark width. We explore this approach for different centre of mass energies and initial-state beam polarisations at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders and briefly comment on the applicability of this method for a measurement of the top-quark width at the LHC.

  2. Evaluation of beam quality for high-power lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongru; Wu, Lei; Wang, Xuexin; Shi, Jifang; Li, Gaoping; Ji, Xiao

    2008-03-01

    High-power lasers are widely used in various scientific, industrial and military applications. There is currently a desire for precision measurement the beam quality of high-power lasers in order to evaluate the performance of the laser systems and the operational effectiveness of chemical and solid-state high-power laser weapons. There are many methods of beam quality determination, such as beam parameter product, encircled energy ratio BQ, Strehi ratio, diffraction limit factor β and beam propagation factor M2. In this paper, a beam quality measurement device is developed for high-power lasers. This device consists of a beam attenuator with large reflective ratio and minimal wavefront distortion, an off-axis parabolic mirror, an imaging lens and an infrared focal plane array detector. The laser beam intensity distribution, beam width, beam divergence and beam pointing stability can be obtained in real-time and the beam quality can be evaluated by the various determinations through imaging process. Advantages and disadvantages of these beam quality determination for evaluation the performance of the high-power lasers are analyzed and discussed. The measurement uncertainties of relative parameters are also analyzed and discussed.

  3. Laser control of atomic beam motion and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balykin, V.I.; Letokhov, V.S.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present the results of an experimental investigation of the control of atomic beam motion by the light pressure of laser radiation. Collimation, focusing and reflection of the atomic beam are considered. Collimation of the atomic beam is achieved by the interaction of laser radiation with atoms, when the light pressure force depends only on the atom's velocity. A similar regime of atomic beam interaction with radiation was performed with transversal irradiation of a beam by the axis-symmetrical field. The axis-symmetrical field was formed by laser radiation reflected from the conical mirror surface of a reflecting axicon. The axis of the atomic beam coincided with that of the axicon. The collimation regime was reached under negative detuning of the laser radiation frequency from the atomic transition frequency by a value equal to several homogeneous widths. With positive detuning by the same value the regime of beam decollimation was observed. The density of atoms on the beam axis was changed by 10 3 times, when the collimation regime was replaced by that of decollimation. Focusing of the atomic beam was achieved by light pressure dependent on the atomic coordinate. Focusing was performed within the field configuration formed by divergent laser Gaussian beams propagating in the direction +- X, +- Y of a Cartesian coordinate system. Waists of the laser beams were an equal distance from the atomic beam axis. With an atomic beam propagating along the z axis, expressions for local distance and a formula for the laser lens were obtained. Focusing of the atomic beam was experimentally accomplished, and the image of the atomic beam was received. In this work they also investigated reflection of the atomic beam by laser radiation. The possibility of creating the optics of a neutral atomic beam is shown

  4. SU-E-T-467: Definition of the Proper Tolerances for Beam-Position Accuracy and Beam Width for Quality Assurance in Active Proton Pencil Beam Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safai, S [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen - PSI (Switzerland)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate the correlation between different dosimetric indices and the clinical outcome, which was recorded at different time points after the treatment, regarding the structure of salivary glands in head and neck cancer radiotherapy. Methods: 218 salivary glands from patients with head and neck tumours treated at IPOCFG from 2007 to 2013 were included in this study. The follow up of those patients consisted on weekly medical visits during the treatment that take about seven weeks. After that the patients had consults every three months. Treatment complications were graded using the RTOG/EORTC guidelines. The response of the salivary glands (both parotids, oral cavity and both submandibular glands) was analyzed for six time periods: 7th week, 3rd, 7th, 12th, 18th and 24th months after the start of the radiotherapy. The total dose distributions, converted to a fractionation scheme of 2Gy fractional doses, were used to calculate the DVHs and dose-response plots of salivary glands. Results: The small differences obtained between the mean DVHs showed that patients should be grouped into: with complications (G1+G2) and without complications (G0). The mean dose/2Gy was 22.2±13.2 Gy (G0) and 33.2±8.0 Gy (G1+G2) for the 7th week, 31.9±9.6 Gy (G0) and 34.6±6.8 Gy (G1+G2) for the 12th month and, 32.9±9.3 Gy (G0) and 37.2±8.5 Gy (G1+G2) for the 24th month. The dose-response plots for the 7th week and 24th month were similar to the dose-response curves published in the literature. Conclusion: In some cases, there were not major differences between the mean DVHs of the groups with and without complications in the salivary glands, when comparing them at different time periods. More radiobiological analysis should thus be made to estimate the clinical impact of those differences.

  5. Beam divergence scaling in neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, A.J.T.

    1976-01-01

    One of the main considerations in the design of neutral beam injectors is to monimize the divergence of the primary ion beam and hence maximize the beam transport and minimize the input of thermal gas. Experimental measurements of the divergence of a cylindrical ion beam are presented and these measurements are used to analyze the major components of ion beam divergence, namely: space charge expansion, gas-ion scattering, emittance and optical aberrations. The implication of these divergence components in the design of a neutral beam injector system is discussed and a method of maximizing the beam current is described for a given area of source plasma

  6. Width of the confining string in Yang-Mills theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliozzi, F; Pepe, M; Wiese, U-J

    2010-06-11

    We investigate the transverse fluctuations of the confining string connecting two static quarks in (2+1)D SU(2) Yang-Mills theory using Monte Carlo calculations. The exponentially suppressed signal is extracted from the large noise by a very efficient multilevel algorithm. The resulting width of the string increases logarithmically with the distance between the static quark charges. Corrections at intermediate distances due to universal higher-order terms in the effective string action are calculated analytically. They accurately fit the numerical data.

  7. Bernstein width of a class of functions of finite smoothness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, S. N.

    1999-04-01

    A weak asymptotic formula is obtained for the Bernstein n-width in the space L_q(I^d) of the class F_p^{l,\\omega }(I^d) of functions on the cube I^d such that their generalized partial derivatives up to order l belong to L_p(I^d) and the moduli of continuity in the space L_p(I^d) of all their derivatives of order l are majorized by a fixed modulus of continuity \\omega.

  8. Orbit width scaling of TAE instability growth rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, H.V.; Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.

    1995-07-01

    The growth rate of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) driven unstable by resonant coupling of energetic charged particles is evaluated in the ballooning limit over a wide range of parameters. All damping effects are ignored. Variations in orbit width, aspect ratio, and the ratio of alfven velocity to energetic particle birth velocity, are explored. The relative contribution of passing and trapped particles, and finite Larmor radius effects, are also examined. The phase space location of resonant particles with interact strongly with the modes is described. The accuracy of the analytic results with respect to growth rate magnitude and parametric dependence is investigated by comparison with numerical results.

  9. Energy detection UWB system based on pulse width modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Cui

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A new energy detection ultra-wideband system based on pulse width modulation is proposed. The bit error rate (BER performance of this new system is slightly worst than that of a pulse position modulation (PPM system in additive white Gaussian noise channels. In multipath channels, this system does not suffer from cross-modulation interference as PPM, so it can achieve better BER performance than PPM when cross-modulation interference occurs. In addition, when synchronisation errors occur, this system is more robust than PPM.

  10. Pulse-width modulated DC-DC power converters

    CERN Document Server

    Kazimierczuk, Marian K

    2008-01-01

    This book studies switch-mode power supplies (SMPS) in great detail. This type of converter changes an unregulated DC voltage into a high-frequency pulse-width modulated (PWM) voltage controlled by varying the duty cycle, then changes the PWM AC voltage to a regulated DC voltage at a high efficiency by rectification and filtering. Used to supply electronic circuits, this converter saves energy and space in the overall system. With concept-orientated explanations, this book offers state-of-the-art SMPS technology and promotes an understanding of the principle operations of PWM converters,

  11. New insights on dyke width and upward velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taisne, B.; Jaupart, C.; Tait, S.

    2012-04-01

    Striking observations have been made that challenge our understanding of magma migration through the Earth's crust. How may a volatile rich magma stall at shallow depth as a growing crypto-dome such as during the 1980 Mount Saint Helens eruption? How can we explain the width of the 2005 mega-dyke intrusion in Afar, that attained more than 8 meters with a very small amount of magma emitted at the surface? We show that changes in the geometry and the dynamics of the propagation can be attributed to density variations in the host rocks, to solidification, to volatile exsolution and expansion or to changes in the input flux of magma at depth. We focus on the relationship between dyke width and ascent rate. Shallow levels are commonly made of low density rocks or volcanic deposits with strong impact on dyke ascent. The dynamics and width of the upper part of the dyke (the nose region) are determined by a local buoyancy balance, independently of the total buoyancy of the magma column between source and tip. In such conditions, the dyke swells and slows down and, in some cases, may not breach the surface. Using laboratory experiments we show that solidification of the magma may lead to a regime of intermittent propagation, even with constant physical conditions at the source. Interestingly the time between two steps can be related to the input flux at the source region. With volatile-bearing magmas, dyke propagation proceeds in two markedly different ways depending on whether or not fragmentation occurs. With no fragmentation, magma expansion leads to acceleration and thinning of the dyke. With fragmentation, the sharp drop of head loss that occurs in gas-rich fragmented material generates large internal overpressure and swelling of the nose region, leading to deceleration of the dyke. All the above effects lead to rapid and large changes of ascent rate. Large variations of magma flux at the source would be required to have similar impacts on dyke propagation. In an

  12. Beam screens for the LHC beam pipes

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    1997-01-01

    Cross-section of LHC prototype beam pipes showing the beam screens. Slits in the screens allow residual gas molecules to be pumped out and become frozen to the walls of the ultra-cold beam pipe. Beam screens like these have been designed to line the beam pipes, absorbing radiation before it can hit the magnets and warm them up, an effect that would greatly reduce the magnetic field and cause serious damage.

  13. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popple, Richard A; Brezovich, Ivan A; Fiveash, John B

    2014-05-01

    The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify arrangements equivalent to equiangular

  14. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popple, Richard A., E-mail: rpopple@uabmc.edu; Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify

  15. Propagation of coherently combined truncated laser beam arrays with beam distortions in non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Rumao; Si, Lei; Ma, Yanxing; Zhou, Pu; Liu, Zejin

    2012-08-10

    The propagation properties of coherently combined truncated laser beam arrays with beam distortions through non-Kolmogorov turbulence are studied in detail both analytically and numerically. The analytical expressions for the average intensity and the beam width of coherently combined truncated laser beam arrays with beam distortions propagating through turbulence are derived based on the combination of statistical optics methods and the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. The effect of beam distortions, such as amplitude modulation and phase fluctuation, is studied by numerical examples. The numerical results reveal that phase fluctuations have significant influence on the spreading of coherently combined truncated laser beam arrays in non-Kolmogorov turbulence, and the effects of the phase fluctuations can be negligible as long as the phase fluctuations are controlled under a certain level, i.e., a>0.05 for the situation considered in the paper. Furthermore, large phase fluctuations can convert the beam distribution rapidly to a Gaussian form, vary the spreading, weaken the optimum truncation effects, and suppress the dependence of spreading on the parameters of the non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

  16. Planar electron beams in a wiggler magnet array

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-02-01

    Feb 1, 2013 ... magnet array. The calculation includes self-consistent effects of beam-generated fields. Our results ... width. The feasibility calculation addresses to a system expected to drive for 13–20 GHz BWO with rippled waveguide ... designed by Read et al. Owing to the relatively low voltage, self-magnetic fields were.

  17. 2.5 MHz Line-Width High-energy, 2 Micrometer Coherent Wind Lidar Transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2007-01-01

    2 micron solid-state lasers are the primary choice for coherent Doppler wind detection. As wind lidars, they are used for wake vortex and clear air turbulence detection providing air transport safety. In addition, 2 micron lasers are one of the candidates for CO2 detection lidars. The rich CO2 absorption line around 2 micron, combined with the long upper state life of time, has made Ho based 2 micron lasers a viable candidate for CO2 sensing DIAL instrument. The design and fabrication of a compact coherent laser radar transmitter for Troposphere wind sensing is under way. This system is hardened for ground as well as airborne applications. As a transmitter for a coherent wind lidar, this laser has stringent spectral line width and beam quality requirements. Although the absolute wavelength does not have to be fixed for wind detection, to maximize return signal, the output wavelength should avoid atmospheric CO2 and H2O absorption lines. The base line laser material is Ho:Tm:LuLF which is an isomorph of Ho:Tm:YLF. LuLF produces 20% more output power than Ho:Tm:YLF. In these materials the Tm absorption cross-section, the Ho emission cross-section, the Tm to Ho energy transfer parameters and the Ho (sup 5) I (sub 7) radiative life time are all identical. However, the improved performance of the LuLF is attributed to the lower thermal population in the (sup 5) I (sub 8) manifold. It also provides higher normal mode to Q-switch conversion than YLF at high pump energy indicating a lower up-conversion. The laser architecture is composed of a seed laser, a ring oscillator, and a double pass amplifier. The seed laser is a single longitudinal mode with a line width of 13 KHz. The 100mJ class oscillator is stretched to 3 meters to accommodate the line-width requirement without compromising the range resolution of the instrument. The amplifier is double passed to produce greater than 300mJ energy.

  18. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  19. Measurement of the Higgs decay width in the diphoton channel

    CERN Document Server

    Adolfsson, Jonatan

    2014-01-01

    In this note, a projected measurement of the Higgs decay width ($\\Gamma_{H}$) is presented, based on interference in the diphoton channel. Two different hypotheses were tested. Hypothesis A assumes that the $H\\to\\gamma\\gamma$ cross-section is proportional to $\\Gamma_{H}^{-1}$, whereas hypothesis B assumes that this cross-section is constant and instead uses the overall change in $m_{\\gamma\\gamma}$ line shape. Events were simulated using Sherpa 2.1, and were used to produce test statistics in order to obtain a 95 % confidence limit of $\\Gamma_{H}$. The standard model width was tested using Asimov data sets, which were validated using pseudo-experiments for the integrated luminosities of Run 1, Run 2 and HL-LHC. The obtained limits are significantly improved with respect to previous studies, but further validations of the test are required. The expected limits for 300 fb$^{-1}$ are $1.19\\times\\Gamma_{H\\,SM}$ for hypothesis A and $24\\times\\Gamma_{H\\,SM}$ for hypothesis B.

  20. Baryon Masses and Hadronic Decay Widths with Explicit Pionic Contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R. A.; Plessas, W.; Schweiger, W.; Canton, L.

    2017-01-01

    We report results from studies of baryon ground and resonant states by taking explicit mesonic degrees of freedom into account. We are following a relativistic coupled-channels approach relying on a Poincaré-invariant mass operator in matrix form. Generally, it corresponds to a bare particle that is coupled to a number of further mesonic channels. Here we present results, where the bare particle is either a bare nucleon or a bare Delta coupled to pion–nucleon and pion–Delta channels, respectively. For the pion–baryon vertices we employ coupling constants and form factors from different models in the literature. From the mass-operator eigenvalue equation we obtain the pion-dressing effects on the nucleon mass as well as the mass and pion-decay width of the Delta. The dressed masses become smaller than the bare ones, and a finite width of the Delta is naturally generated. The results are relevant for the construction of constituent-quark models for baryons, which have so far not included explicit mesonic degrees of freedom, but have rather relied on three-quark configurations only. (author)

  1. Direct top-quark width measurement at CDF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Álvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Brisuda, A; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Bucciantonio, M; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T

    2010-12-03

    We present a measurement of the top-quark width in the lepton+jets decay channel of tt events produced in p p collisions at Fermilab's Tevatron collider and collected by the CDF II detector. From a data sample corresponding to 4.3 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity, we identify 756 candidate events. The top-quark mass and the mass of the hadronically decaying W boson that comes from the top-quark decay are reconstructed for each event and compared with templates of different top-quark widths (Γ(t)) and deviations from nominal jet energy scale (Δ(JES)) to perform a simultaneous fit for both parameters, where Δ(JES) is used for the in situ calibration of the jet energy scale. By applying a Feldman-Cousins approach, we establish an upper limit at 95% confidence level (CL) of Γ(t) quark mass of 172.5 GeV/c(2), which are consistent with the standard model prediction.

  2. Tooth width predictions in a sample of Black South Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M I; Seedat, A K; Hlongwa, P

    2007-07-01

    Space analysis during the mixed dentition requires prediction of the mesiodistal widths of the unerupted permanent canines and premolars and prediction tables and equations may be used for this purpose. The Tanaka and Johnston prediction equations, which were derived from a North American White sample, is one example which is widely used. This prediction equation may be inapplicable to other race groups due to racial tooth size variability. Therefore the purpose of this study was to derive prediction equations that would be applicable to Black South African subjects. One hundred and ten pre-treatment study casts of Black South African subjects were analysed from the Department of Orthodontics' records at the University of Limpopo. The sample was equally divided by gender with all subjects having Class I molar relationship and relatively well aligned teeth. The mesiodistal widths of the maxillary and mandibular canines and premolars were measured with a digital vernier calliper and compared with the measurements predicted with the Tanaka and Johnston equations. The relationship between the measured and predicted values were analysed by correlation and regression analyses. The results indicated that the Tanaka and Johnston prediction equations were not fully applicable to the Black South African sample. The equations tended to underpredict the male sample, while slight overprediction was observed in the female sample. Therefore, new equations were formulated and proposed that would be accurate for Black subjects.

  3. Determination of the width of the top quark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, Maris A.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-09-01

    We extract the total width of the top quark, {Lambda}{sub t}, from the partial decay width {Lambda}(t {yields} Wb) measured using the t-channel cross section for single top quark production and from the branching fraction B(t {yields} Wb) measured in t{bar t} events using up to 2.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. The result is {Lambda}{sub t} = 1.99{sub -0.55}{sup +0.69} GeV, which translates to a top-quark lifetime of {tau}{sub t} = (3.3{sub -0.9}{sup +1.3}) x 10{sup -25} s. Assuming a high mass fourth generation b{prime} quark and unitarity of the four-generation quark-mixing matrix, we set the first upper limit on |V{sub tb{prime}}| < 0.63 at 95% C.L.

  4. Flexural and Thermal Properties of Novel Energy Conservation Slotted Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional solid reinforced concrete (RC beams were modified to slotted beams for consideration as thermal insulation structural components. The slotted beam consisted of an outer and an inner beam, respectively, with a slot located near the middle of the beam along its width direction for filling thermal insulation material. Flexural and thermal behavior of the slotted beams were investigated. Three RC reference solid beams and six slotted beams were fabricated and tested under four-point bending tests. The test results indicated that the failure mode of both slotted beams and the solid beams was flexural failure. However, the damage process of the slotted beams was different from that of the solid beams at the final loading stage. The moment curvature analysis indicated that the tensile reinforcement ratio of the outer and inner beams had an important effect on the flexural behavior, especially the ductility of the slotted beams. Thermal study indicated that the heat transfer coefficient of the slotted beam was greatly reduced and the thermal inertia factor increased a lot, compared with the solid beam. In addition, FE simulation results showed that a new frame structure using slotted beams exhibited obvious and attractive thermal insulation property.

  5. Requirements to gap widths and clamping for CO2 laser butt welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Hui; Juhl, Thomas Winther

    1999-01-01

    In the experimental study of fixturing and gap width requirements a clamping device for laser butt welding of steel sheets has been developed and tested. It has fulfilled the work and made the gap width experiments possible.It has shown that the maximum allowable gap width to some extent is inver......In the experimental study of fixturing and gap width requirements a clamping device for laser butt welding of steel sheets has been developed and tested. It has fulfilled the work and made the gap width experiments possible.It has shown that the maximum allowable gap width to some extent...

  6. RC T beams strengthened to shear with carbon fiber composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Spagnolo JR

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental data of the behavior of reinforced concrete beams strengthened to shear with carbon fiber composites. The tests were composed of eight T beams, b w=15 cm, h=40 cm, flange width 40 cm, flange height 8 cm, and length 300 cm, divided into two series with the same longitudinal steel reinforcement and a reference beam without strengthening in each series. The beams had two types of arrangement of internal steel stirrups. The test variables were the internal and external geometric ratio of the transverse reinforcement and the mechanical ratio of carbon fiber composites stirrups. All the beams were loaded at two points. The strengthened beams were submitted to a preloading and the strengthening was applied to the cracked beam. All the beams were designed in order to guarantee shear failure, and the ultimate load of the strengthened beams was 36% to 54% greater than the reference beams. The Cracking Sliding Model applied to the strengthened beams was evaluated and showed good agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Experimental study of heating scheme effect on the inner divertor power footprint widths in EAST lower single null discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, G. Z.; Xu, J. C.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. J.; Liu, J. B.; Zhang, H.; Liu, S. C.; Chen, L.; Yan, N.; Feng, W.; Liu, H.; Xia, T. Y.; Zhang, B.; Shao, L. M.; Ming, T. F.; Xu, G. S.; Guo, H. Y.; Xu, X. Q.; Gao, X.; Wang, L.

    2018-04-01

    A comprehensive work of the effects of plasma current and heating schemes on divertor power footprint widths is carried out in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). The divertor power footprint widths, i.e., the scrape-off layer heat flux decay length λ q and the heat spreading S, are crucial physical and engineering parameters for fusion reactors. Strong inverse scaling of λ q and S with plasma current have been demonstrated for both neutral beam (NB) and lower hybrid wave (LHW) heated L-mode and H-mode plasmas at the inner divertor target. For plasmas heated by the combination of the two kinds of auxiliary heating schemes (NB and LHW), the divertor power widths tend to be larger in plasmas with higher ratio of LHW power. Comparison between experimental heat flux profiles at outer mid-plane (OMP) and divertor target for NB heated and LHW heated L-mode plasmas reveals that the magnetic topology changes induced by LHW may be the main reason to the wider divertor power widths in LHW heated discharges. The effect of heating schemes on divertor peak heat flux has also been investigated, and it is found that LHW heated discharges tend to have a lower divertor peak heat flux compared with NB heated discharges under similar input power. All these findings seem to suggest that plasmas with LHW auxiliary heating scheme are better heat exhaust scenarios for fusion reactors and should be the priorities for the design of next-step fusion reactors like China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor.

  8. Beam Shear Design According to Eurocode 2 - Limitations for the Concrete Strut Inclinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagsten, Lars German; Hestbech, Lars; Fisker, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    and are presented. These beams are all designed to fail in shear and the shear reinforcement is designed for different values of the concrete strut inclinations (cot θ varies from 1.5 to 3.4). These tests indicate a clear connection between the values of the concrete strut inclinations and crack width in the SLS......The beam shear design method adopted in Eurocode 2 is based on a lower bound plastic solution. This method is combined with limitations on the concrete strut inclination, θ. These limitations are introduced to ensure acceptable crack width in the SLS. 7 full scale beams have been tested....... In cases where larger crack widths (w > 0.4 mm) can be accepted, larger values of the concrete strut inclinations can be chosen. This will lead to less shear reinforcements. The results are also compared with analytical analysis based on energy methods. At the SLS the beams are expected to be cracked...

  9. Long-pulse high-power VUV molecular F2 laser pumped by a beam of relativistic electrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, P.J.M.; Lankhorst, Frank T.; Lankhorst, F.T.J.L.; Bastiaens, Hubertus M.J.; Botma, H.; Botma, Hako; Witteman, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    A long pulse molecular F2 laser ((lambda) equals 157 nm) with an optical pulse width of 160 ns and an output energy of 1.7 J (4.6 MW/cm2) pumped by an electron beam has been realized. The only restriction for the optical pulse width of the laser seems to be the duration of the excitation pulse. No

  10. Production of plasma from diatomic gases by relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cary, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The theory of the production of plasma by the interaction of a relativistic electron beam with a diatomic gas is presented. The theory includes atomic species as well as molecular species; this is shown to be necessary when nearly fully ionized plasma are produced. In addition, the theory models magnetic field diffusion by an effective time constant, which allows extensive parameter studies to be performed. The dependence of the production process on the beam intensity and width and the gas pressure is presented. It is shown that the thin beams produced by foil-less diodes are not capable of ionizing high pressure (> or approx. = 3 Torr) targets

  11. Antenna Beam Pattern Characteristics of HAPS User Terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Bon-Jun; Oh, Dae Sub; Kim, Nam; Ahn, Do-Seob

    High Altitude Platform Stations (HAPS) are recently considered as a green infrastructure to provide high speed multimedia services. The critical issue of HAPS is frequency sharing with satellite systems. Regulating antenna beam pattern using adaptive antenna schemes is one of means to facilitate the sharing with a space receiver for fixed satellite services on the uplink of a HAPS system operating in U bands. In this letter, we investigate antenna beam pattern characteristics of HAPS user terminals with various values of scan angles of main beam, null position angles, and null width.

  12. Formation of focused laser beams with a hollow metal cone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Pinghui; Pan, Quanjun; Wei, Kaihua; Wu, Bo; Jiang, Peipei; Li, Jia; Peng, Xuefeng

    2015-01-01

    A hollow metal cone is designed to focus a laser beam into a tiny highly localized beam spot. The finite difference time domain method has been introduced to investigate the beam focusing effect along the propagation direction. Without considering the laser–plasma nonlinear interaction, the numerical calculation results show that a focal spot with a full width at half maximum of ∼0.7λ at greatly enhanced intensity and a depth of focus of ∼3λ can be achieved. In addition, the influences of cone angle, cone tip size, metal materials, sidewall thickness and incident wavelength on the focusing properties are analyzed in detail. (letter)

  13. Beam-beam effects in the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Lebedev, V.; Lebrun, P.; Moore, R.S.; Sen, T.; Tollestrup, A.; Valishev, A.; Zhang, X.L.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with 6 times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Electromagnetic long-range and head-on interactions of high intensity proton and antiproton beams have been significant sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations. We present observations of the beam-beam phenomena in the Tevatron and results of relevant beam studies. We analyze the data and various methods employed in operations, predict the performance for planned luminosity upgrades, and discuss ways to improve it.

  14. Crystalline beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffer, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Ions in a storage ring are confined to a mean orbit by focusing elements. To a first approximation these may be described by a constant harmonic restoring force: F = -Kr. If the particles in the frame moving along with the beam have small random thermal energies, then they will occupy a cylindrical volume around the mean orbit and the focusing force will be balanced by that from the mutual repulsion of the particles. Inside the cylinder only residual two-particle interactions will play a significant role and some form of ordering might be expected to take place. The results of some of the first MD calculations showed a surprising result: not only were the particles arranged in the form of a tube, but they formed well-defined layers: concentric shells, with the particles in each shell arranged in a hexagonal lattice that is characteristic of two-dimensional Coulomb systems. This paper discusses the condense layer structure

  15. Evolution of giant dipole resonance width at low temperatures ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    techniques. Several experiments have been performed by bombarding 7–12 MeV/nucleon alpha beam on various targets (63Cu, 115In and 197Au) and new datasets ... appears to be constant at its ground state value until a critical temperature is reached and subse- ..... it was 38.6 MeV for 63Cu at 35 MeV incident energy.

  16. The influence of beam boundaries and velocity reduction on Pierce instability in laboratory plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, D.

    1982-01-01

    The influences of the beam-plasma boundary and of weak nonlinearities on the Pierce instability are investigated. It is shown that the finite width of the beam has negligible influence on both the stability of the system and growth rate. In the nonlinear regime the wavelength decreases and enhancement of the wave potential close to the beam inlet boundary is observed. The relationship between this effect and the formation of double layers is discussed. (Auth.)

  17. Beam uniformity of flat top lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chao; Cramer, Larry; Danielson, Don; Norby, James

    2015-03-01

    Many beams that output from standard commercial lasers are multi-mode, with each mode having a different shape and width. They show an overall non-homogeneous energy distribution across the spot size. There may be satellite structures, halos and other deviations from beam uniformity. However, many scientific, industrial and medical applications require flat top spatial energy distribution, high uniformity in the plateau region, and complete absence of hot spots. Reliable standard methods for the evaluation of beam quality are of great importance. Standard methods are required for correct characterization of the laser for its intended application and for tight quality control in laser manufacturing. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has published standard procedures and definitions for this purpose. These procedures have not been widely adopted by commercial laser manufacturers. This is due to the fact that they are unreliable because an unrepresentative single-pixel value can seriously distort the result. We hereby propose a metric of beam uniformity, a way of beam profile visualization, procedures to automatically detect hot spots and beam structures, and application examples in our high energy laser production.

  18. Experimental study and theoretical modeling of bidimensional beam fanning: application to DPCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailhan, C.; Goetz, M.; Fressengeas, N.; Kugel, G.

    2001-10-01

    Features like efficiency and stability of the double phase conjugate mirror (DPCM) in BaTiO 3 obviously depend on the beam fanning (BF) experienced by each incident beam. We propose here a new approach to DPCM optimization which consists in studying the BF phenomenon for each interacting beam. This allows one to choose the best angular configuration of the incident beams in DPCM. The investigation is experimental, by recording the fanning patterns, and also theoretical, by interpreting numerically these patterns on the basis of the coupling gain maximization in the two-wave mixing theory. We focus on the influence of the incident beam width and incidence angle.

  19. Acoustic beam splitting in a sonic crystal around a directional band gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicek Ahmet; Kaya Olgun Adem; Ulug Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Beam splitting upon refraction in a triangular sonic crystal composed of aluminum cylinders in air is experimentally and numerically demonstrated to occur due to finite source size, which facilitates circumvention of a directional band gap. Experiments reveal that two distinct beams emerge at crystal output, in agreement with the numerical results obtained through the finite-element method. Beam splitting occurs at sufficiently-small source sizes comparable to lattice periodicity determined by the spatial gap width in reciprocal space. Split beams propagate in equal amplitude, whereas beam splitting is destructed for oblique incidence above a critical incidence angle

  20. Free-edge delamination - Laminate width and loading conditions effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1989-01-01

    The width and loading conditions effects on free-edge stress fields in composite laminates are investigated using a three-dimensional finite element analysis. This analysis includes a special free-edge region refinement or superelement with progressive substructuring (mesh refinement) and finite thickness interply layers. The different loading conditions include in-plane and out-of-plane bending, combined axial tension and in-plane shear, twisting, uniform temperature and uniform moisture. Results obtained indicate that: axial tension causes the smallest magnitude of interlaminar free edge stress compared to other loading conditions; free-edge delamination data obtained from laboratory specimens cannot be scaled to structural components; and composite structural components are not likely to delaminate.

  1. Monte Carlo evaluation of magnetically focused proton beams for radiosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, Grant A.; Heczko, Sarah L.; Nguyen, Theodore T.; Slater, James M.; Slater, Jerry D.; Wroe, Andrew J.

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the advantages in dose distribution and delivery of proton beams focused by a triplet of quadrupole magnets in the context of potential radiosurgery treatments. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using various configurations of three quadrupole magnets located immediately upstream of a water phantom. Magnet parameters were selected to match what can be commercially manufactured as assemblies of rare-earth permanent magnetic materials. Focused unmodulated proton beams with a range of ~10 cm in water were target matched with passive collimated beams (the current beam delivery method for proton radiosurgery) and properties of transverse dose, depth dose and volumetric dose distributions were compared. Magnetically focused beams delivered beam spots of low eccentricity to Bragg peak depth with full widths at the 90% reference dose contour from ~2.5 to 5 mm. When focused initial beam diameters were larger than matching unfocused beams (10 of 11 cases) the focused beams showed 16%–83% larger peak-to-entrance dose ratios and 1.3 to 3.4-fold increases in dose delivery efficiency. Peak-to-entrance and efficiency benefits tended to increase with larger magnet gradients and larger initial diameter focused beams. Finally, it was observed that focusing tended to shift dose in the water phantom volume from the 80%–20% dose range to below 20% of reference dose, compared to unfocused beams. We conclude that focusing proton beams immediately upstream from tissue entry using permanent magnet assemblies can produce beams with larger peak-to-entrance dose ratios and increased dose delivery efficiencies. Such beams could potentially be used in the clinic to irradiate small-field radiosurgical targets with fewer beams, lower entrance dose and shorter treatment times.

  2. Measurement of inner wall limiter SOL widths in KSTAR tokamak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.G. Bak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Scrape-off layer (SOL widths λq are presented from the KSTAR tokamak using fast reciprocating Langmuir probe assembly (FRLPA measurements at the outboard mid-plane (OMP and the infra-Red (IR thermography at inboard limiter tiles in moderately elongated (κ = 1.45 – 1.55 L-mode inner wall-limited (IWL plasmas under experimental conditions such as BT = 2.0 T, PNBI = 1.4 – 1.5 MW, line averaged densities 2.5 – 5.1 × 1019 m−3 and plasma current Ip = 0.4 − 0.7 MA. There is clear evidence for a double exponential structure in q||(r from the FRLPA such that, for example at Ip = 0.6 MA, a narrow feature, λq,near (=3.5 mm is found close to the LFCS, followed by a broader width, λq,main (=57.0 mm. Double exponential profiles (λq,near = 1.5 – 2.8 mm, λq,main = 17.0 – 35.0 mm can be also observed in the IR heat flux mapped to the OMP throughout the range of Ip investigated. In addition, analysis of SOL turbulence statistics obtained with the FRLPA shows high relative fluctuation levels and positively skewed distributions in electron temperature and ion particle flux across the SOL, with both properties increasing for longer distance from the LCFS, as often previously observed in the tokamaks. Interestingly, the fluctuation character expressed in terms of spectral distributions remains unchanged in passing from the narrow to the broad SOL heat flux channel.

  3. Variable Width Riparian Model Enhances Landscape and Watershed Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abood, S. A.; Spencer, L.

    2017-12-01

    Riparian areas are ecotones that represent about 1% of USFS administered landscape and contribute to numerous valuable ecosystem functions such as wildlife habitat, stream water quality and flows, bank stability and protection against erosion, and values related to diversity, aesthetics and recreation. Riparian zones capture the transitional area between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems with specific vegetation and soil characteristics which provide critical values/functions and are very responsive to changes in land management activities and uses. Two staff areas at the US Forest Service have coordinated on a two phase project to support the National Forests in their planning revision efforts and to address rangeland riparian business needs at the Forest Plan and Allotment Management Plan levels. The first part of the project will include a national fine scale (USGS HUC-12 digits watersheds) inventory of riparian areas on National Forest Service lands in western United States with riparian land cover, utilizing GIS capabilities and open source geospatial data. The second part of the project will include the application of riparian land cover change and assessment based on selected indicators to assess and monitor riparian areas on annual/5-year cycle basis.This approach recognizes the dynamic and transitional nature of riparian areas by accounting for hydrologic, geomorphic and vegetation data as inputs into the delineation process. The results suggest that incorporating functional variable width riparian mapping within watershed management planning can improve riparian protection and restoration. The application of Riparian Buffer Delineation Model (RBDM) approach can provide the agency Watershed Condition Framework (WCF) with observed riparian area condition on an annual basis and on multiple scales. The use of this model to map moderate to low gradient systems of sufficient width in conjunction with an understanding of the influence of distinctive landscape

  4. Beam halo in high-intensity beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wangler, T.P.

    1993-01-01

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. The beam-halo is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied to intense neutron generators for nuclear materials processing. The author describes what has been learned about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams using numerical simulations of initial laminar beams in uniform linear focusing channels. Initial results are presented from a study of beam entropy for an intense space-charge dominated beam

  5. Determination of metastable zone width of potassium sulfate in aqueous solution by ultrasonic sensor and FBRM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mengjie; Liu, Chenglin; Xue, Jin; Li, Ping; Yu, Jianguo

    2017-07-01

    The metastable zone width (MSZW) and nucleation kinetics of potassium sulfate in the aqueous solution were investigated. MSZW was measured using both the ultrasonic velocity sensor and the focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) at different cooling rate, stirring rate and impurities concentration (aluminum ions and silicon ions), and the effects of these conditions on MSZW were discussed in details. In addition, the accuracy and sensitivity of detectors to measure the nucleation temperature of potassium sulfate in the aqueous solution were compared between the ultrasonic velocity sensor and FBRM over a wider range of operating conditions. Although two detectors measured MSZW with an acceptable accuracy, the ultrasonic velocity sensor had a higher sensitivity to the phase transition of potassium sulfate in solution since it directly detected the concentration change of potassium sulfate in solution. Furthermore, both self-consistent Nývlt-like equation method and classical 3D nucleation theory approach were applied to estimate MSZW of potassium sulfate in aqueous solution. According to these classical theories, the nucleation kinetics parameters were calculated based on the measured MSZW data for potassium sulfate aqueous solution with 40 °C, 50 °C and 60 °C saturation temperature, respectively. It was found two approaches could describe MSZW of potassium sulfate aqueous system very well.

  6. B-dot monitor for intense electron beam measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qin; Li Hong; Chen Nan; Gao Feng; Wang Yongwei; Wang Liping

    2009-01-01

    Azimuthal arrays of B-dot loops are often used to measure the time-resolved beam centroid position of a pulsed, intense electron beam propagating in a metallic tube. This paper describes the designing principle, parameters and calibration of the B-dot monitors. According to the beam current pulse rise time, fall time and the pulse width, the B-dot is designed to work as a differential loop, the loop inductance is about 60 nH. The B-dot monitor's sensitivity and the displacement curve are calibrated in the test stand. The sensitivity of the B-dots and the passive RC integrator is averagely 4 147 A/V, integrate constant is about 1 μs. The B-dot monitors are used to measure the Dragon-I electron beam and the experimental results show that the B-dot monitors can measure the beam current and centroid position accurately. (authors)

  7. Cracking and Strain Analysis of Beams Reinforced with Composite Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgaras Timinskas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the results of experimental and numerical modelling using two beams reinforced with GFRP bars. One beam was made of plain concrete while the other contained short steel fibres. The influence of steel fibres on deflection and cracking behaviour was studied. A comparative analysis of experimental results has shown that steel fibres significantly reduce deflections and average crack width of the beam. Moreover, an addition of steel fibres to the concrete mix led to a more ductile failure mode of the beam. Numerical analysis employing nonlinear finite element software ATENA has revealed that a good agreement between calculated and experimental results regarding an ordinary concrete GFRP reinforced beam can be obtained.

  8. Shear strength of steel fiber-reinforced concrete beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel de Lima Araújo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the mechanical behavior of shear strength of steel fiber-reinforced concrete beams. Six beams subjected to shear loading were tested until failure. Additionally, prisms were tested to evaluate fiber contribution to the concrete shear strength. Steel fibers were straight, hook-ended,35 mmlong and aspect ratio equal to 65. Volumetric fractions used were 1.0 and 2.0%. The results demonstrated a great contribution from steel fibers to shear strength of reinforced concrete beams and to reduce crack width, which can reduce the amount of stirrups in reinforced concrete structures. Beam capacity was also evaluated by empirical equations, and it was found that these equations provided a high variability, while some of them have not properly predicted the ultimate shear strength of the steel fiber-reinforced concrete beams.

  9. Innovative energy efficient low-voltage electron beam emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felis, Kenneth P.; Avnery, Tovi; Berejka, Anthony J.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced electron beams (AEB) has developed a modular, low voltage (80-125 keV), high beam current (up to 40 ma), electron emitter with typically 25 cm of beam width, that is housed in an evacuated, returnable chamber that is easy to plug in and connect. The latest in nanofabrication enables AEB to use an ultra-thin beam window. The power supply for AEB's emitter is based on solid-state electronics. This combination of features results in a remarkable electrical efficiency. AEB's electron emitter relies on a touch screen, computer control system. With 80 μm of unit density beam penetration, AEB's electron emitter has gained market acceptance in the curing of opaque, pigmented inks and coatings used on flexible substrates, metals and fiber composites and in the curing of adhesives in foil based laminates

  10. Innovative energy efficient low-voltage electron beam emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felis, Kenneth P.; Avnery, Tovi; Berejka, Anthony J.

    2002-03-01

    Advanced electron beams (AEB) has developed a modular, low voltage (80-125 keV), high beam current (up to 40 ma), electron emitter with typically 25 cm of beam width, that is housed in an evacuated, returnable chamber that is easy to plug in and connect. The latest in nanofabrication enables AEB to use an ultra-thin beam window. The power supply for AEB's emitter is based on solid-state electronics. This combination of features results in a remarkable electrical efficiency. AEB's electron emitter relies on a touch screen, computer control system. With 80 μm of unit density beam penetration, AEB's electron emitter has gained market acceptance in the curing of opaque, pigmented inks and coatings used on flexible substrates, metals and fiber composites and in the curing of adhesives in foil based laminates.

  11. First Metatarsal Head and Medial Eminence Widths with and Without Hallux Valgus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Robin C; Nagesh, Darshan; Park, Hannah K; Grady, John

    2016-09-02

    Resection of the medial eminence in hallux valgus surgery is common. True hypertrophy of the medial eminence in hallux valgus is debated. No studies have compared metatarsal head width in patients with hallux valgus and control patients. We reviewed 43 radiographs with hallux valgus and 27 without hallux valgus. We measured medial eminence width, first metatarsal head width, and first metatarsal shaft width in patients with and without radiographic hallux valgus. Medial eminence width was 1.12 mm larger in patients with hallux valgus (P hallux valgus (P hallux valgus. However, frontal plane rotation of the first metatarsal likely accounts for this difference.

  12. Slow positron beam at the JINR, Dubna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horodek Paweł

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Low Energy Positron Toroidal Accumulator (LEPTA at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR proposed for generation of positronium in flight has been adopted for positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS. The positron injector generates continuous slow positron beam with positron energy range between 50 eV and 35 keV. The radioactive 22Na isotope is used. In distinction to popular tungsten foil, here the solid neon is used as moderator. It allows to obtain the beam intensity of about 105 e+/s width energy spectrum characterized by full width at half maximum (FWHM of 3.4 eV and a tail to lower energies of about 30 eV. The paper covers the characteristic of variable energy positron beam at the LEPTA facility: parameters, the rule of moderation, scheme of injector, and transportation of positrons into the sample chamber. Recent status of the project and its development in the field of PAS is discussed. As an example, the measurement of the positron diffusion length in pure iron is demonstrated.

  13. Electron beam control for barely separated beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, David R.; Ament, Lucas J. P.

    2017-04-18

    A method for achieving independent control of multiple beams in close proximity to one another, such as in a multi-pass accelerator where coaxial beams are at different energies, but moving on a common axis, and need to be split into spatially separated beams for efficient recirculation transport. The method for independent control includes placing a magnet arrangement in the path of the barely separated beams with the magnet arrangement including at least two multipole magnets spaced closely together and having a multipole distribution including at least one odd multipole and one even multipole. The magnetic fields are then tuned to cancel out for a first of the barely separated beams to allow independent control of the second beam with common magnets. The magnetic fields may be tuned to cancel out either the dipole component or tuned to cancel out the quadrupole component in order to independently control the separate beams.

  14. Literature in Focus Beta Beams: Neutrino Beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    By Mats Lindroos (CERN) and Mauro Mezzetto (INFN Padova, Italy) Imperial Press, 2009 The beta-beam concept for the generation of electron neutrino beams was first proposed by Piero Zucchelli in 2002. The idea created quite a stir, challenging the idea that intense neutrino beams only could be produced from the decay of pions or muons in classical neutrino beams facilities or in future neutrino factories. The concept initially struggled to make an impact but the hard work by many machine physicists, phenomenologists and theoreticians over the last five years has won the beta-beam a well-earned position as one of the frontrunners for a possible future world laboratory for high intensity neutrino oscillation physics. This is the first complete monograph on the beta-beam concept. The book describes both technical aspects and experimental aspects of the beta-beam, providing students and scientists with an insight into the possibilities o...

  15. Beam Techniques - Beam Control and Manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minty, Michiko G

    2003-04-24

    We describe commonly used strategies for the control of charged particle beams and the manipulation of their properties. Emphasis is placed on relativistic beams in linear accelerators and storage rings. After a brief review of linear optics, we discuss basic and advanced beam control techniques, such as transverse and longitudinal lattice diagnostics, matching, orbit correction and steering, beam-based alignment, and linac emittance preservation. A variety of methods for the manipulation of particle beam properties are also presented, for instance, bunch length and energy compression, bunch rotation, changes to the damping partition number, and beam collimation. The different procedures are illustrated by examples from various accelerators. Special topics include injection and extraction methods, beam cooling, spin transport and polarization.

  16. Maxillary arch width and buccal corridor changes with Damon and conventional brackets: A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shook, Corey; Kim, Sohyon Michelle; Burnheimer, John

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of Damon self-ligating and conventional bracket systems on buccal corridor widths and areas. A retrospective sample of consecutively treated patients using either conventional (CG, n  =  45) or Damon self-ligating (SL, n  =  39) brackets was analyzed to determine any differences in buccal corridor widths and areas both within and between groups. Pretreatment and posttreatment frontal photographs were transferred to Photoshop CC, standardized using intercanthal width, and linear and area measurements were performed with tools in Photoshop CC. Ratios were then calculated for statistical analysis. Relationships between arch widths and buccal corridors were also examined. There were no significant differences in the posttreatment intercanine or intermolar widths either within or between the CG and SL groups. There were no significant differences in any buccal corridor width or area measurement either within or between the CG and SL groups. There were strong correlations with the intercanine width and the corresponding buccal corridor smile width measurements. There was an inverse correlation with the buccal corridor area in relation to the canine and the total smile width. It is likely that posttreatment increases in arch width can be seen in patients treated with either a conventional bracket system or the Damon system. It is highly unlikely that there is any significant difference in buccal corridor width or area in patients treated with the Damon self-ligating system or a conventional bracket system.

  17. Spot-scanning beam delivery with laterally- and longitudinally-mixed spot size pencil beams in heavy ion radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuan-Lin; Liu, Xin-Guo; Dai, Zhong-Ying; Ma, Yuan-Yuan; He, Peng-Bo; Shen, Guo-Sheng; Ji, Teng-Fei; Zhang, Hui; Li, Qiang

    2017-09-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) spot-scanning method is one of the most commonly used irradiation methods in charged particle beam radiotherapy. Generally, spot-scanning beam delivery utilizes the same size pencil beam to irradiate the tumor targets. Here we propose a spot-scanning beam delivery method with laterally- and longitudinally-mixed size pencil beams for heavy ion radiotherapy. This uses pencil beams with a bigger spot size in the lateral direction and wider mini spread-out Bragg peak (mini-SOBP) to irradiate the inner part of a target volume, and pencil beams with a smaller spot size in the lateral direction and narrower mini-SOBP to irradiate the peripheral part of the target volume. Instead of being controlled by the accelerator, the lateral size of the pencil beam was adjusted by inserting Ta scatterers in the beam delivery line. The longitudinal size of the pencil beam (i.e. the width of the mini-SOBP) was adjusted by tilting mini ridge filters along the beam direction. The new spot-scanning beam delivery using carbon ions was investigated theoretically and compared with traditional spot-scanning beam delivery. Our results show that the new spot-scanning beam delivery has smaller lateral penumbra, steeper distal dose fall-off and the dose homogeneity (1-standard deviation/mean) in the target volume is better than 95%. Supported by Key Project of National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1232207), National Key Technology Support Program of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2015BAI01B11), National Key Research and Development Program of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2016YFC0904602) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11075191, 11205217, 11475231, 11505249)

  18. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques.Methods: A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0–255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets.Results: Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage

  19. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques. A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0-255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets. Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage. Overall, the sharp distal

  20. Width of gene expression profile drives alternative splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wegmann

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing generates an enormous amount of functional and proteomic diversity in metazoan organisms. This process is probably central to the macromolecular and cellular complexity of higher eukaryotes. While most studies have focused on the molecular mechanism triggering and controlling alternative splicing, as well as on its incidence in different species, its maintenance and evolution within populations has been little investigated. Here, we propose to address these questions by comparing the structural characteristics as well as the functional and transcriptional profiles of genes with monomorphic or polymorphic splicing, referred to as MS and PS genes, respectively. We find that MS and PS genes differ particularly in the number of tissues and cell types where they are expressed.We find a striking deficit of PS genes on the sex chromosomes, particularly on the Y chromosome where it is shown not to be due to the observed lower breadth of expression of genes on that chromosome. The development of a simple model of evolution of cis-regulated alternative splicing leads to predictions in agreement with these observations. It further predicts the conditions for the emergence and the maintenance of cis-regulated alternative splicing, which are both favored by the tissue specific expression of splicing variants. We finally propose that the width of the gene expression profile is an essential factor for the acquisition of new transcript isoforms that could later be maintained by a new form of balancing selection.

  1. ISR beam scrapers

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1972-01-01

    Beam scrapers seen in the direction of the beam. The two horizontal scraper foils are near the centre of the beam pipe andthe two scrapers for protection of the vacuum chamber are further outside. In the lower part of the beam pipe is the vertical halo scraping blade.

  2. Telecommunication using muon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location

  3. Analysis of orthotropic beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen Y. Liu; S. Cheng

    1979-01-01

    A plane-stress analysis of orthotropic or isotropic beams is presented. The loading conditions considered are: (1) a concentrated normal load arbitrarily located on the beam, and (2) a distributed normal load covering an arbitrary length of the beam. exhibit close agreement with existing experimental data from Sitka spruce beams. Other loading conditions can similarly...

  4. Telecommunication using muon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Richard C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location.

  5. LANSCE beam current limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the Beam Current Limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beam line below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described

  6. Study of the nonlinearities in micromechanical clamped–clamped beam resonators using stroboscopic SEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, L C; Wong, C L; Palaniapan, M

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive study of the nonlinearities in micromechanical clamped–clamped beam resonators using a stroboscopic scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique. Stroboscopic SEM allows direct imaging and measurement of the resonator's momentary displacement, hence eliminating the uncertainties associated with the conventional characterization methods. Five different silicon-on-insulator (SOI) comb-drive clamped–clamped beam resonators with resonant frequencies ranging from 113 kHz to 239 kHz were designed, fabricated and tested to investigate how their nonlinearities are related to the device dimensions. Both the theoretical analysis and experimental results conclusively show that the critical vibration amplitude of the resonator is around 1% of the beam width in a vacuum and is relatively independent of the beam length. Furthermore, it is found that the maximum storable energy of the resonator can be significantly increased by increasing the beam width and/or reducing the beam length if there are no restrictions on these dimensions. On the other hand, if a specific resonant frequency needs to be maintained, the maximum storable energy can be improved by increasing both the beam width and length by the same factor. Such a study not only helps to reveal the intrinsic nonlinear properties of the micromechanical clamped–clamped beam resonators, but also provides useful design guidelines for engineers to optimize the overall device performance

  7. Three-beam double stimulated Raman scatterings: Cascading configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B. Jayachander; Cho, Minhaeng

    2018-03-01

    present a theoretical expression and numerical simulation results for the full-width-at-half-maximum of SRS imaging point spread function, assuming that the pump and Stokes beam profiles are Gaussian and the second Stokes beam has a doughnut-shaped spatial profile. It is clear that the spatial resolution with the present 3-beam cascading SRS method can be enhanced well beyond the diffraction limit. We anticipate that the present work will provide a theoretical framework for a super-resolution stimulated Raman scattering microscopy that is currently under investigation.

  8. Retrofitting of Reinforced Concrete Beams using Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, S.; Sundaravadivelu, Karthik

    2017-07-01

    Strengthening of existing damaged structures is one of the leading studies in civil engineering. The purpose of retrofitting is to structurally treat the member with an aim to restore the structure to its original strength. The focus of this project is to study the behaviour of damaged Reinforced Concrete beam retrofitted with Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC) Overlay. Reinforced concrete beams of length 1200 mm, width 100 mm and depth 200 mm were casted with M30 grade of concrete in the laboratory and cured for 28 days. One beam is taken as control and are tested under two point loading to find out ultimate load. Remaining beams are subjected to 90 % ultimate load of control beams. The partially damaged beams are retrofitted with Reactive Powder Concrete Overlay at the full tension face of the beam and side overlay depends upon the respectable retrofitting techniques with 10 mm and 20 mm thick layer to find optimum. Materials like steel fibres are added to enhance the ductility by eliminating coarse particle for homogeneity of the structure. Finally, the modes of failure for retrofitted beams are analysed experimentally under two point loading & compared the results with Control beam.

  9. The beam dump tunnels

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    In these images workers are digging the tunnels that will be used to dump the counter-circulating beams. Travelling just a fraction under the speed of light, the beams at the LHC will each carry the energy of an aircraft carrier travelling at 12 knots. In order to dispose of these beams safely, a beam dump is used to extract the beam and diffuse it before it collides with a radiation shielded graphite target.

  10. Ion beam diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strehl, P.

    1994-04-01

    This report is an introduction to ion beam diagnosis. After a short description of the most important ion beam parameters measurements of the beam current by means of Faraday cups, calorimetry, and beam current transformers and measurements of the beam profile by means of viewing screens, profile grids and scanning devices, and residual gas ionization monitors are described. Finally measurements in the transverse and longitudinal phase space are considered. (HSI)

  11. Effects of Lane Width, Lane Position and Edge Shoulder Width on Driving Behavior in Underground Urban Expressways: A Driving Simulator Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study tested the effects of lane width, lane position and edge shoulder width on driving behavior for a three-lane underground urban expressway. A driving simulator was used with 24 volunteer test subjects. Five lane widths (2.85, 3.00, 3.25, 3.50, and 3.75 m and three shoulder widths (0.50, 0.75, and 1.00 m were studied. Driving speed, lane deviation and subjective perception of driving behavior were collected as performance measures. The results show that lane and shoulder width have significant effects on driving speed. Average driving speed increases from 60.01 km/h in the narrowest lane to 88.05 km/h in the widest lane. While both narrower lanes and shoulders result in reduced speed and lateral lane deviation, the effect of lane width is greater than that of shoulder width. When the lane and shoulder are narrow, drivers in the left or right lane tend to shy away from the tunnel wall, even encroaching into the neighboring middle lane. As the lane or shoulder gets wider, drivers tend to stay in the middle of the lane. An interesting finding is that although few participants acknowledged that lane position had any great bearing on their driving behaviors, the observed driving speed is statistically higher in the left lane than in the other two lanes when the lane width is narrow (in 2.85, 3 and 3.25 m lanes. These findings provided support for amending the current design specifications of urban underground roads, such as the relationship between design speed and lane width, speed limit, and combination form of lanes.

  12. FE Model Updating on an In-Service Self-Anchored Suspension Bridge with Extra-Width Using Hybrid Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Xia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, many more bridges with extra-width have been needed for vehicle throughput. In order to obtain a precise finite element (FE model of those complex bridge structures, the practical hybrid updating method by integration of Gaussian mutation particle swarm optimization (GMPSO, Kriging meta-model and Latin hypercube sampling (LHS was proposed. By demonstrating the efficiency and accuracy of the hybrid method through the model updating of a damaged simply supported beam, the proposed method was applied to the model updating of a self-anchored suspension bridge with extra-width which showed great necessity considering the results of ambient vibration test. The results of bridge model updating showed that both of the mode frequencies and shapes had relatively high agreement between the updated model and experimental structure. The successful model updating of this bridge fills in the blanks of model updating of a complex self-anchored suspension bridge. Moreover, the updating process enables other model updating issues for complex bridge structures

  13. Alveolar bone width preservation after decoronation of ankylosed anterior incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaul; Schwarz-Arad, Dvorah; Ashkenazi, Malka

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the alteration of alveolar ridge dimensions after decoronation procedures in children and adolescents at least 1 year after surgery. Twelve children who underwent decoronation of ankylosed maxillary anterior incisors with at least 1 year after surgery follow-up were recalled for reevaluation. All decoronations were performed when the ankylosed teeth were submerged 1-1.5 mm. During the recall appointment, impressions of the upper arch were obtained. The bucco-palatal alveolar dimensions of the decoronated teeth were measured on the cast at the mid-mesiodistal distance from the missing tooth and were compared with the distance from the contralateral healthy incisor. Overall, 12 children (9 male and 3 female) were reevaluated up to 82 months after decoronation (mean, 49.58 ± 24 months). The mean age of the patients at the time of trauma was 9.83 ± 2.8 years. The average bucco-palatal dimension of the alveolar ridge at the mid-decoronation area was 9 ± 1 mm compared with 10.17 ± 0.9 mm at the contralateral homologous tooth (difference of 1.67 ± 1.12, P = .004). The findings show a positive statistical correlation between the duration of the follow-up period and the bucco-palatal dimension of the alveolar ridge (P = .027). Although decoronation of ankylosed young permanent incisors resulted in a decrease in the bucco-palatal dimension with time, it did not prevent additional alveolar growth that occurs with age in a developing child and thus may help maintain the alveolar bone ridge width, height, and continuity and assist in future rehabilitation with less invasive ridge augmentation procedures required for implant placement. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Errors when shock waves interact due to numerical shock width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, R.

    1993-03-04

    A simple test problem proposed by Noh, a strong shock reflecting from a rigid wall, demonstrates a generic problem with numerical shock capturing algorithms at boundaries that Noh called ``excess wall heating.`` We show that the same type of numerical error occurs in general when shock waves interact. The underlying cause is the non-uniform convergence to the hyperbolic solution of the inviscid limit of the solution to the PDEs with viscosity. The error can be understood from an analysis of the asymptotic solution. For a propagating shock, there is a difference in the total energy of the parabolic wave relative to the hyperbolic shock. Moreover, the relative energy depends on the strength of the shock. The error when shock waves interact is due to the difference in the relative energies between the incoming and outgoing shock waves. It is analogous to a phase shift in a scattering matrix. A conservative differencing scheme correctly describes the Hugoniot jump conditions for a steady propagating shock. Therefore, the error from the asymptotics occurs in the transient when the waves interact. The entropy error that occurs in the interaction region remains localized but does not dissipate. A scaling argument shows that as the viscosity coefficient goes to zero, the error shrinks in spatial extend but is constant in magnitude. Noh`s problem of the reflection of a shock from a rigid wall is equivalent to the symmetric impact of two shock waves of the opposite family. The asymptotic argument shows that the same type of numerical error would occur when the shocks are of unequal strength. Thus, Noh`s problem is indicative of a numerical error that occurs when shocks interact due to the numerical shock width.

  15. Errors when shock waves interact due to numerical shock width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, R.

    1993-03-04

    A simple test problem proposed by Noh, a strong shock reflecting from a rigid wall, demonstrates a generic problem with numerical shock capturing algorithms at boundaries that Noh called excess wall heating.'' We show that the same type of numerical error occurs in general when shock waves interact. The underlying cause is the non-uniform convergence to the hyperbolic solution of the inviscid limit of the solution to the PDEs with viscosity. The error can be understood from an analysis of the asymptotic solution. For a propagating shock, there is a difference in the total energy of the parabolic wave relative to the hyperbolic shock. Moreover, the relative energy depends on the strength of the shock. The error when shock waves interact is due to the difference in the relative energies between the incoming and outgoing shock waves. It is analogous to a phase shift in a scattering matrix. A conservative differencing scheme correctly describes the Hugoniot jump conditions for a steady propagating shock. Therefore, the error from the asymptotics occurs in the transient when the waves interact. The entropy error that occurs in the interaction region remains localized but does not dissipate. A scaling argument shows that as the viscosity coefficient goes to zero, the error shrinks in spatial extend but is constant in magnitude. Noh's problem of the reflection of a shock from a rigid wall is equivalent to the symmetric impact of two shock waves of the opposite family. The asymptotic argument shows that the same type of numerical error would occur when the shocks are of unequal strength. Thus, Noh's problem is indicative of a numerical error that occurs when shocks interact due to the numerical shock width.

  16. Development of picosecond pulsed electron beam monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosono, Y.; Nakazawa, M.; Ueda, T.; Kobayasi, T.; Yosida, Y.; Ohkuma, J.; Okuda, S.; Suemine, S.

    1993-01-01

    For the picosecond pulsed electron beam of a linear accelerator a simple monitor using an electric connector has been developed which is constructed with SMA, BNC, N type electric connector through pipe (inner diameter = 50 mm or 100 mm). Under the measurement conditions of peak current (26A-900A) and narrow pulse width (Pw = 10 ps(FWHM), Pw = 30 ps(FWHM)), the following characteristics of this monitor were obtained, (A) rise time is less than 25 ps (B) the amplitude of the monitor output pulse is proportional directly to the area of cross section of the electrode. (author)

  17. A generalized 2D pencil beam scaling algorithm for proton dose calculation in heterogeneous slab geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerly, David C; Mo, Xiaohu; Tomé, Wolfgang A; Mackie, Thomas R; DeLuca, Paul M

    2013-06-01

    Pencil beam algorithms are commonly used for proton therapy dose calculations. Szymanowski and Oelfke ["Two-dimensional pencil beam scaling: An improved proton dose algorithm for heterogeneous media," Phys. Med. Biol. 47, 3313-3330 (2002)] developed a two-dimensional (2D) scaling algorithm which accurately models the radial pencil beam width as a function of depth in heterogeneous slab geometries using a scaled expression for the radial kernel width in water as a function of depth and kinetic energy. However, an assumption made in the derivation of the technique limits its range of validity to cases where the input expression for the radial kernel width in water is derived from a local scattering power model. The goal of this work is to derive a generalized form of 2D pencil beam scaling that is independent of the scattering power model and appropriate for use with any expression for the radial kernel width in water as a function of depth. Using Fermi-Eyges transport theory, the authors derive an expression for the radial pencil beam width in heterogeneous slab geometries which is independent of the proton scattering power and related quantities. The authors then perform test calculations in homogeneous and heterogeneous slab phantoms using both the original 2D scaling model and the new model with expressions for the radial kernel width in water computed from both local and nonlocal scattering power models, as well as a nonlocal parameterization of Molière scattering theory. In addition to kernel width calculations, dose calculations are also performed for a narrow Gaussian proton beam. Pencil beam width calculations indicate that both 2D scaling formalisms perform well when the radial kernel width in water is derived from a local scattering power model. Computing the radial kernel width from a nonlocal scattering model results in the local 2D scaling formula under-predicting the pencil beam width by as much as 1.4 mm (21%) at the depth of the Bragg peak for a 220

  18. Beam diagnostics for low energy beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Harasimowicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-energetic ion and antimatter beams are very attractive for a number of fundamental studies. The diagnostics of such beams, however, is a challenge due to low currents down to only a few thousands of particles per second and significant fraction of energy loss in matter at keV beam energies. A modular set of particle detectors has been developed to suit the particular beam diagnostic needs of the ultralow-energy storage ring (USR at the future facility for low-energy antiproton and ion research, accommodating very low beam intensities at energies down to 20 keV. The detectors include beam-profile monitors based on scintillating screens and secondary electron emission, sensitive Faraday cups for absolute intensity measurements, and capacitive pickups for beam position monitoring. In this paper, the design of all detectors is presented in detail and results from beam measurements are shown. The resolution limits of all detectors are described and options for further improvement summarized. Whilst initially developed for the USR, the instrumentation described in this paper is also well suited for use in other low-intensity, low-energy accelerators, storage rings, and beam lines.

  19. Influence of Lateral-Medial Sinus Width on No-Grafting Inlay Osteotome Sinus Augmentation Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaohui; Hu, Xiucheng; Wan, Shuangquan; Li, Xiachen; Li, Yiming; Deng, Feilong

    2017-08-01

    Intrasinus new bone formation (BF) has been observed after no-grafting osteotome sinus augmentation, and it is hypothesized to be influenced by the dimensions of the maxillary sinus. The aim of this clinical trial is to evaluate the influence of lateral-medial sinus width (SW) on no-grafting osteotome sinus augmentation outcomes using cone-beam computed tomography. All patients recruited for this prospective study were treated with no-grafting osteotome sinus augmentation with simultaneous implant placement. Cone-beam computed tomography was obtained before, immediately after, and 6 months after the surgical procedure to use for measurements. Descriptive statistics were calculated and univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analysis were conducted to evaluate the influence of average SW and other relevant factors on procedure outcomes, including new BF, residual bone resorption (BR), and change of peri-implant bone height (CPBH). A total of 48 implants placed in 32 elevated sinuses of 29 patients were included. The average SW was 11.3 ± 1.8 mm. Intrasinus BF measured 1.7 ± 0.9 mm at 6 months after surgery. The amount of BR was 0.3 ± 0.9 mm, and CPBH was calculated as 1.3 ± 1.3 mm. Multivariate analysis showed a negative correlation between SW and BF (r = -0.469, P = .001), as well as between SW and CPBH (r = -0.562, P = .001). A positive correlation was discovered between SW and BR (r = 0.311, P = .027) in general. The lateral-medial SW was observed to have a negative correlation with new BF and CPBH after no-grafting osteotome sinus augmentation. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Revisit of combined parallel-beam/cone-beam or fan-beam/cone-beam imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Gengsheng L

    2013-10-01

    This aim of this paper is to revisit the parallel-beam/cone-beam or fan-beam/cone-beam imaging configuration, and to investigate whether this configuration has any advantages. Twenty years ago, it was suggested to simultaneously use a parallel-beam (or a fan-beam) collimator and a cone-beam collimator to acquire single photon emission computed tomography data. The motivation was that the parallel-beam (or the fan-beam) collimator can provide sufficient sampling, while the cone-beam collimator is able to provide higher photon counts. Even with higher total counts, this hybrid system does not give significant improvement (if any) in terms of image noise and artifacts reduction. If a conventional iterative maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization algorithm is used to reconstruct the image, the resultant reconstruction may be worse than the parallel-beam-only (or fan-beam-only) system. This paper uses the singular value decomposition (SVD) analysis to explain this phenomenon. The SVD results indicate that the parallel-beam-only and the fan-beam-only system outperform the combined systems. The optimal imaging system does not necessary to be the one that generates the projections with highest signal-to-noise ratio and best resolution.

  1. Short-pulse chemical beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Suian; Cui, Jie; Aoyagi, Yoshinobu (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Saitama (Japan)); Tanaka, Akihiko (Bentec Co., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-03-10

    Short-pulse chemical beam epitaxy has been proposed and studied. The short pulses with supersonic characteristics and a width of milliseconds were generated by high speed valves and the related pumping lines on a purpose-built CBE system. Using a time-of-fight technique, we verified the dependence of pulse properties on the source pressures and the valve on-time. The results indicate that modulation of molecular kinetic energy and accurate control of molecule supply were obtained. GaAs epitaxial growth with use of trimethylgallium pulses was carried out and investigated by means of RHEED (reflection high-energy electron diffraction) observation. It was demonstrated that the newly developed short-pulse chemical beam epitaxy has the advantage of high controllability

  2. Beam echoes in the presence of coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Axel [Case Western Reserve U.

    2017-10-03

    Transverse beam echoes could provide a new technique of measuring diusion characteristics orders of magnitude faster than the current methods; however, their interaction with many accelerator parameters is poorly understood. Using a program written in C, we explored the relationship between coupling and echo strength. We found that echoes could be generated in both dimensions, even with a dipole kick in only one dimension. We found that the echo eects are not destroyed even when there is strong coupling, falling o only at extremely high coupling values. We found that at intermediate values of skew quadrupole strength, the decoherence time of the beam is greatly increased, causing a destruction of the echo eects. We found that this is caused by a narrowing of the tune width of the particles. Results from this study will help to provide recommendations to IOTA (Integrable Optics Test Accelerator) for their upcoming echo experiment.

  3. Red cell distribution width in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nada, Aml Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    To study the indices of some elements of the complete blood count, in type 2 diabetic patients, in comparison with nondiabetic healthy controls; and to find out the effects of glycemic control and different medications on these indices. To the best of our knowledge, this study is novel in our environment and will serve as a foundation for other researchers in this field. This retrospective study included 260 type 2 diabetic patients on treatment and 44 healthy control subjects. Sex, age, weight, height, blood pressure, complete blood count, fasting plasma glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and lipid profile data, were available for all of the study population. For diabetic patients, data on duration of diabetes and all medications were also available. Red cell distribution width (RDW) was significantly higher in diabetic patients than in control subjects (P=0.008). It was also higher in patients with uncontrolled glycemia (HbA1c >7%) than those with good control (HbA1c ≤7%; P=0.035). Mean platelet volume (MPV) was comparable in both diabetic patients and healthy controls (P=0.238). RDW and MPV did not significantly correlate with fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, or duration of diabetes. Both aspirin and clopidogrel did not show a significant effect on MPV. Both insulin and oral hypoglycemic agents did not show a significant effect on RDW, mean corpuscular volume, MPV, platelet count, or white blood cell count. Diabetic patients treated with indapamide or the combined thiazides and angiotensin receptor blockers showed no significant difference in RDW when compared with the control subjects. RDW, which is recently considered as an inflammatory marker with a significant predictive value of mortality in diseased and healthy populations, is significantly higher in diabetic patients than healthy subjects and is particularly higher in uncontrolled glycemia. None of the studied hypoglycemic agents showed a significant effect on RDW. Diabetic hypertensive patients receiving

  4. Red cell distribution width in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada AM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aml Mohamed Nada Department of Internal Medicine, Unit of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Objective: To study the indices of some elements of the complete blood count, in type 2 diabetic patients, in comparison with nondiabetic healthy controls; and to find out the effects of glycemic control and different medications on these indices. To the best of our knowledge, this study is novel in our environment and will serve as a foundation for other researchers in this field. Methods: This retrospective study included 260 type 2 diabetic patients on treatment and 44 healthy control subjects. Sex, age, weight, height, blood pressure, complete blood count, fasting plasma glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, and lipid profile data, were available for all of the study population. For diabetic patients, data on duration of diabetes and all medications were also available. Results: Red cell distribution width (RDW was significantly higher in diabetic patients than in control subjects (P=0.008. It was also higher in patients with uncontrolled glycemia (HbA1c >7% than those with good control (HbA1c ≤7%; P=0.035. Mean platelet volume (MPV was comparable in both diabetic patients and healthy controls (P=0.238. RDW and MPV did not significantly correlate with fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, or duration of diabetes. Both aspirin and clopidogrel did not show a significant effect on MPV. Both insulin and oral hypoglycemic agents did not show a significant effect on RDW, mean corpuscular volume, MPV, platelet count, or white blood cell count. Diabetic patients treated with indapamide or the combined thiazides and angiotensin receptor blockers showed no significant difference in RDW when compared with the control subjects. Conclusion: RDW, which is recently considered as an inflammatory marker with a significant predictive value of mortality in diseased and healthy populations, is significantly higher in

  5. Statistical distribution of partial widths in the microscopic theory of nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunakov, V.E.; Ogloblin, S.G.

    1978-01-01

    Using the microscopic theory of nuclear reaction the distribution function of neutron reduced partial widths is obtained. It is shown that the distribution of reduced partial widths of a radiative transition is of the same form. The distribution obtained differs from the Porter-Thomas law for neutron widths only in the presence of intermediate structures. It is noteworthy that the presence of an intermediate structure leads to a greater dispersion

  6. Comparison of tibiofemoral joint space width measurements from standing CT and fixed flexion radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Neil A; Frick, Eric; Duryea, Jeffrey; Nevitt, Michael C; Niu, Jingbo; Torner, James C; Felson, David T; Anderson, Donald D

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this project was to determine the relationship between medial tibiofemoral joint space width measured on fixed-flexion radiographs and the three-dimensional joint space width distribution on low-dose, standing CT (SCT) imaging. At the 84-month visit of the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study, 20 participants were recruited. A commercial SCT scanner for the foot and ankle was modified to image knees while standing. Medial tibiofemoral joint space width was assessed on radiographs at fixed locations from 15% to 30% of compartment width using validated software and on SCT by mapping the distances between three-dimensional subchondral bone surfaces. Individual joint space width values from radiographs were compared with three-dimensional joint space width values from corresponding sagittal plane locations using paired t-tests and correlation coefficients. For the four medial-most tibiofemoral locations, radiographic joint space width values exceeded the minimal joint space width on SCT by a mean of 2.0 mm and were approximately equal to the 61st percentile value of the joint space width distribution at each respective sagittal-plane location. Correlation coefficients at these locations were 0.91-0.97 and the offsets between joint space width values from radiographs and SCT measurements were consistent. There were greater offsets and variability in the offsets between modalities closer to the tibial spine. Joint space width measurements on fixed-flexion radiographs are highly correlated with three-dimensional joint space width from SCT. In addition to avoiding bony overlap obscuring the joint, a limitation of radiographs, the current study supports a role for SCT in the evaluation of tibiofemoral OA. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1388-1395, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Location specific solidification microstructure control in electron beam melting of Ti-6Al-4V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narra, Sneha P.; Cunningham, Ross; Beuth, Jack; Rollett, Anthony D.

    2018-01-01

    Relationships between prior beta grain size in solidified Ti-6Al-4V and melting process parameters in the Electron Beam Melting (EBM) process are investigated. Samples are built by varying a machine-dependent proprietary speed function to cover the process space. Optical microscopy is used to measure prior beta grain widths and assess the number of prior beta grains present in a melt pool in the raster region of the build. Despite the complicated evolution of beta grain sizes, the beta grain width scales with melt pool width. The resulting understanding of the relationship between primary machine variables and prior beta grain widths is a key step toward enabling the location specific control of as-built microstructure in the EBM process. Control of grain width in separate specimens and within a single specimen is demonstrated.

  8. Low current beam techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint, A.; Laird, J.S.; Bardos, R.A.; Legge, G.J.F. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Nishijima, T.; Sekiguchi, H. [Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan).

    1993-12-31

    Since the development of Scanning Transmission Microscopy (STIM) imaging in 1983 many low current beam techniques have been developed for the scanning (ion) microprobe. These include STIM tomography, Ion Beam Induced Current, Ion Beam Micromachining and Microlithography and Ionoluminense. Most of these techniques utilise beam currents of 10{sup -15} A down to single ions controlled by beam switching techniques This paper will discuss some of the low beam current techniques mentioned above, and indicate, some of their recent applications at MARC. A new STIM technique will be introduced that can be used to obtain Z-contrast with STIM resolution. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Laser spectroscopy in an lithium beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, A.; Sylvester, G.; Olivares, I.E.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The absorption and fluorescence spectra were measured in a collimated and non-collimated atomic lithium beam by means of a diode laser. Spectral lines with a similar linewidth as the lines observed before in a stationary lithium vapor were observed in the non-collimated beam. The spatial structure of the gas region which emits fluorescence permits to observe in situ the hyperfine levels of lithium atoms: each level corresponds to a relatively plane and well defined region. This indicates that the atoms leave the oven following straight lines (otherwise the collisions would produce diffuse regions), which is in correspondence to the high values of the free mean path expected for the gas at this density, and the extension of the shadow left at the condensation plate. In the collimated beam (diameter D=1 mm, and divergence of 90 mrad), the absorption spectra has a width of 450 MHz (12 deg K or less), which permits the measurement of the hyperfine structure. In this case, from the absorption data we obtained ρD=2 x 10 14 atoms/m 2 . The temperature obtained from the Doppler width is consistent with the temperature obtained from the beam geometry. The lithium atom flow was measured with a quartz thickness monitor and based on estimates of the initial oven temperature and density measurements. Fluorescence measurements have better sensitivity ab do not present problems in the base line due to etalon effects. It is possible to observe the detail structure of the side wings in the line spectra

  10. Evaluation of width and width uniformity of near-field electrospinning printed micro and sub-micrometer lines based on optical image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Libo; Xia, Yong; Hebibul, Rahman; Wang, Jiuhong; Zhou, Xiangyang; Hu, Yingjie; Li, Zhikang; Luo, Guoxi; Zhao, Yulong; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents an experimental study using image processing to investigate width and width uniformity of sub-micrometer polyethylene oxide (PEO) lines fabricated by near-filed electrospinning (NFES) technique. An adaptive thresholding method was developed to determine the optimal gray values to accurately extract profiles of printed lines from original optical images. And it was proved with good feasibility. The mechanism of the proposed thresholding method was believed to take advantage of statistic property and get rid of halo induced errors. Triangular method and relative standard deviation (RSD) were introduced to calculate line width and width uniformity, respectively. Based on these image processing methods, the effects of process parameters including substrate speed (v), applied voltage (U), nozzle-to-collector distance (H), and syringe pump flow rate (Q) on width and width uniformity of printed lines were discussed. The research results are helpful to promote the NFES technique for fabricating high resolution micro and sub-micro lines and also helpful to optical image processing at sub-micro level.

  11. Steel–CFRP Composite (CFRP Laminate Sandwiched between Mild Steel Strips) and It-s Behavior as Stirrup in Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Faris Abbas Jawad Uriayer; Mehtab Alam

    2013-01-01

    In this present study, experimental work was conducted to study the effectiveness of newly innovated steel-CFRP composite (CFRP laminates sandwiched between two steel strips) as stirrups. A total numbers of eight concrete beams were tested under four point loads. Each beam measured 1600 mm long, 160mm width and 240 mm depth. The beams were reinforced with different shear reinforcements; one without stirrups, one with steel stirrups and six with different types and numbers...

  12. Propagation of a general-type beam through a truncated fractional Fourier transform optical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chengliang; Cai, Yangjian

    2010-03-01

    Paraxial propagation of a general-type beam through a truncated fractional Fourier transform (FRT) optical system is investigated. Analytical formulas for the electric field and effective beam width of a general-type beam in the FRT plane are derived based on the Collins formula. Our formulas can be used to study the propagation of a variety of laser beams--such as Gaussian, cos-Gaussian, cosh-Gaussian, sine-Gaussian, sinh-Gaussian, flat-topped, Hermite-cosh-Gaussian, Hermite-sine-Gaussian, higher-order annular Gaussian, Hermite-sinh-Gaussian and Hermite-cos-Gaussian beams--through a FRT optical system with or without truncation. The propagation properties of a Hermite-cos-Gaussian beam passing through a rectangularly truncated FRT optical system are studied as a numerical example. Our results clearly show that the truncated FRT optical system provides a convenient way for laser beam shaping.

  13. Synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy for rat brain tumor palliation-influence of the microbeam width at constant valley dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serduc, Raphael; Fonta, Caroline; Renaud, Luc; Bouchet, Audrey; Braeuer-Krisch, Elke; Sarun, Sukhena; Bravin, Alberto; Le Duc, Geraldine; Laissue, Jean A; Spiga, Jenny; Boutonnat, Jean; Siegbahn, Erik Albert; Esteve, Francois

    2009-01-01

    To analyze the effects of the microbeam width (25, 50 and 75 μm) on the survival of 9L gliosarcoma tumor-bearing rats and on toxicity in normal tissues in normal rats after microbeam radiation therapy (MRT), 9L gliosarcomas implanted in rat brains, as well as in normal rat brains, were irradiated in the MRT mode. Three configurations (MRT25, MRT50, MRT75), each using two orthogonally intersecting arrays of either 25, 50 or 75 μm wide microbeams, all spaced 211 μm on center, were tested. For each configuration, peak entrance doses of 860, 480 and 320 Gy, respectively, were calculated to produce an identical valley dose of 18 Gy per individual array at the center of the tumor. Two, 7 and 14 days after radiation treatment, 42 rats were killed to evaluate histopathologically the extent of tumor necrosis, and the presence of proliferating tumors cells and tumor vessels. The median survival times of the normal rats were 4.5, 68 and 48 days for MRT25, 50 and 75, respectively. The combination of the highest entrance doses (860 Gy per array) with 25 μm wide beams (MRT25) resulted in a cumulative valley dose of 36 Gy and was excessively toxic, as it led to early death of all normal rats and of ∼50% of tumor-bearing rats. The short survival times, particularly of rats in the MRT25 group, restricted adequate observance of the therapeutic effect of the method on tumor-bearing rats. However, microbeams of 50 μm width led to the best median survival time after 9L gliosarcoma MRT treatment and appeared as the better compromise between tumor control and normal brain toxicity compared with 75 μm or 25 μm widths when used with a 211 μm on-center distance. Despite very high radiation doses, the tumors were not sterilized; viable proliferating tumor cells remained present at the tumor margin. This study shows that microbeam width and peak entrance doses strongly influence tumor responses and normal brain toxicity, even if valley doses are kept constant in all groups. The use

  14. Beam Dynamics and Beam Losses - Circular Machines

    CERN Document Server

    Kain, V

    2016-01-01

    A basic introduction to transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics as well as the most relevant beam loss mechanisms in circular machines will be presented in this lecture. This lecture is intended for physicists and engineers with little or no knowledge of this subject.

  15. T10 Beam Studies & Beam Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Bergmann, Michael Georges; Van Dijk, Maarten; CERN. Geneva. EN Department

    2017-01-01

    In order to test detector components before their installation in actual experiments, one uses test beams in which one can control particle typ, momentum and size to high degree. For this project the focus of a secondary beam at T10 in the East Area at CERN was analysed using an AZALEA telescope from DESY.

  16. Design and Characterization of X-Band Sheet Beam Klystron Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmala Devi, A. S.; Bandyopadhyay, A. K.; Joshi, L. M.; Kumar, B.; Meena, R.

    2012-11-01

    Sheet Beam Klystron (SBK) is a device employing rectangular/elliptical cross section beam. The barbell cavity for SBK has been designed providing uniform flat electric field profile across the width of the cavity. The loop coupling arrangement has also been designed using CST Microwave studio software tool and optimized for maximum return loss. The designed barbell cavity has been re-optimized after the insertion of the loop coupling to provide flat electric field profile across the width of the cavity. The cavity has also been fabricated and initial characterization has been carried out. The simulated results and the experimental results matches closely.

  17. Spin-valley splitting of electron beam in graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Song

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We study spatial separation of the four degenerate spin-valley components of an electron beam in a EuO-induced and top-gated ferromagnetic/pristine/strained graphene structure. We show that, in a full resonant tunneling regime for all beam components, the formation of standing waves can lead sudden phase jumps ∼−π and giant lateral Goos-Hänchen shifts as large as the transverse beam width, while the interplay of the spin and valley imaginary wave vectors in the modulated regions can lead differences of resonant angles for the four spin-valley flavors, manifesting a spin-valley beam splitting effect. The splitting effect is found to be controllable by the gating and strain.

  18. Electrostatic dispersion lenses and ion beam dispersion methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Appelhans, Anthony D [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-12-28

    An EDL includes a case surface and at least one electrode surface. The EDL is configured to receive through the EDL a plurality of ion beams, to generate an electrostatic field between the one electrode surface and either the case surface or another electrode surface, and to increase the separation between the beams using the field. Other than an optional mid-plane intended to contain trajectories of the beams, the electrode surface or surfaces do not exhibit a plane of symmetry through which any beam received through the EDL must pass. In addition or in the alternative, the one electrode surface and either the case surface or the other electrode surface have geometries configured to shape the field to exhibit a less abrupt entrance and/or exit field transition in comparison to another electrostatic field shaped by two nested, one-quarter section, right cylindrical electrode surfaces with a constant gap width.

  19. Production of simultaneous, variable energy beams from the TRIUMF cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, J.R.; Blackmore, E.W.; Dutto, G.; Kost, C.J.; Mackenzie, G.H.; Craddock, M.K.

    1975-01-01

    An extracted beam at the design energy of 500 MeV was obtained at TRIUMF in December, 1974. Later, beams of varying energies between 180 and 520 MeV were extracted down beam line 4, and further work resulted in the simultaneous extraction of a 506 MeV beam down beam line 1 and variable energy beams down line 4. In order to reduce initial activation of cyclotron components, time average beams were restricted to 100 nA, but 12 μA in a pulsed beam was very easily obtained at 500 MeV. Without optimization of the injection conditions and without use of the harmonic trim coils, an energy spread (full width) of 2.5 to 3.0 MeV was observed. Ordinarily, the macro-duty factor was 100 percent, and the micro-duty factor corresponded to a 5 ns pulse every 44 ns. The transmission to 500 MeV is consistent with the expected loss due to gas stripping. (auth)

  20. Repair of reinforced concrete beams using carbon fiber reinforced polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karzad Abdul Saboor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research paper is part of an ongoing research on the behaviour of Reinforced Concrete (RC beams retrofitted with Externally Bonded Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (EB-CFRP. A total of 5 large-scale rectangular beams, previously damaged due to shear loading, were repaired and strengthened with EB-CFRP and tested in this study. The major cracks of the damaged beams were injected with epoxy and the beams were wrapped with 2 layers of EB-CFRP discrete strips with 100mm width and 150mm center to center spacing. The beams were instrumented and tested to failure under three points loading in simply supported configuration. The measured test parameters were the beams deflection, maximum load, and the strain in the FRP strips. The failure mode was also observed. The results showed that applying EB-FRP strips increased the shear strength significantly relative to the original shear capacity of the beam. The results demonstrate that the application of EB-FRP strips used in this study is an effective repair method that can be used to repair and strengthen damaged beams.

  1. Design and cooling of BESIII beryllium beam pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xunfeng; Ji, Quan; Wang, Li; Zheng, Lifang

    2008-01-01

    The beryllium beam pipe was restructured according to the requirements of the upgraded BESIII (Beijing Spectrometer) experiment. SMO-1 (sparking machining oil no. 1) was selected as the coolant for the central beryllium beam pipe. The cooling gap width of the beryllium beam pipe was calculated, the influence of concentrated heat load on the wall temperature of the beryllium beam pipe was studied, and the optimal velocity of the SMO-1 in the gap was determined at the maximum heat load. A cooling system for the beam pipe was developed to control the outer wall temperature of the beam pipe. The cooling system is reported in this paper with regard to the following two aspects: the layouts and the automation. The performance of the cooling system was tested on the beam pipe model with trim size. The test results show that the design of the beryllium beam pipe is reasonable and that the cooling system achieves the BESIII experimental aim. The cooling system has already passed the acceptance test and has been installed in position. It will be put into practice for the BESIII experiment in 2008.

  2. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  3. Successful Beam-Beam Tuneshift Compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishofberger, Kip Aaron [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The performance of synchrotron colliders has been limited by the beam-beam limit, a maximum tuneshift that colliding bunches could sustain. Due to bunch-to-bunch tune variation and intra-bunch tune spread, larger tuneshifts produce severe emittance growth. Breaking through this constraint has been viewed as impossible for several decades. This dissertation introduces the physics of ultra-relativistic synchrotrons and low-energy electron beams, with emphasis placed on the limits of the Tevatron and the needs of a tuneshift-compensation device. A detailed analysis of the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) is given, comparing theoretical models to experimental data whenever possible. Finally, results of Tevatron operations with inclusion of the TEL are presented and analyzed. It is shown that the TEL provides a way to shatter the previously inescapable beam-beam limit.

  4. Beam Loss in Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Plum, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Beam loss is a critical issue in high-intensity accelerators, and much effort is expended during both the design and operation phases to minimize the loss and to keep it to manageable levels. As new accelerators become ever more powerful, beam loss becomes even more critical. Linacs for H- ion beams, such as the one at the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, have many more loss mechanisms compared to H+ (proton) linacs, such as the one being designed for the European Spallation Neutron Source. Interesting H- beam loss mechanisms include residual gas stripping, H+ capture and acceleration, field stripping, black-body radiation and the recently discovered intra-beam stripping mechanism. Beam halo formation, and ion source or RF turn on/off transients, are examples of beam loss mechanisms that are common for both H+ and H- accelerators. Machine protection systems play an important role in limiting the beam loss.

  5. Beam scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enge, H.A.

    1977-01-01

    A system for deflecting a beam of particles having different momenta, preferably through a 90 0 angle, so as to cause the beam to impinge upon a moving target and to scan across the target is described. The system includes a means responsive to a beam from a suitable source for causing the beam to periodically scan in a scanning plane and further means for deflecting the periodically scanned beam through the desired angle in a deflection plane so that the deflected beam impinges on the target. Means are included in the system for reducing the momentum dispersion at the target in both the deflection and the scanning planes and for spatially focussing the beam so as to produce a desired beam diameter at the target

  6. Intercanine width as a tool in two dimensional reconstruction of face: An aid in forensic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivhare, Peeyush; Shankarnarayan, Lata; Basavaraju, Sowbhagya Malligere; Gupta, Ashish; Vasan, Vinitra; Jambunath, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Dental evidence is a valuable tool in identifying individuals, especially when disasters befall. Reference points in faciomaxillary region such as interpupillary distance, intercanthal distance, interalar distance and bizygomatic width can significantly contribute toward reconstruction of two-dimensional (2D) facial profiles. This study was researched upon to determine the relationship between the maxillary intercanine width and the different reference points of the face. The aim of the following study is to ascertain whether maxillary intercanine width can be used to detect interpupillary distance, intercanthal distance, interalar distance and bizygomatic distance and to evaluate the role of maxillary intercanine width in the 2D reconstruction of the face. The study was carried out by consent and involved 90 subjects-45 males and 45 females who satisfied the inclusion criteria. Subjects were divided into three age groups, i.e. 18-24, 25-28, 29-35. Four parameters were measured- intercanine width, interpupillary distance, intercanthal distance and interalar distance. All the measurements were carried out with a digital Vernier caliper. The bizygomatic width was measured from posterior-anterior view. Two empiricists were assigned for the task. Each test was carried out twice to validate the soundness of the findings and to reduce bias. Analysis of variance and Pearson correlation was established. Regression analysis was performed to predict the study variables by intercanine width. Intercanine width showed a significant relationship with different points. The width varied with age and gender. Inter canine width can be used as a valuable parameter in the reconstruction of face in two dimensional as it shows significant relationship with faciomaxillary reference point such as interpupillary distance, intercanthal distance, interalar distance and bizygomatic width.

  7. Generation of subnanosecond electron beams in air at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Rybka, D. V.

    2009-11-01

    Optimum conditions for the generation of runaway electron beams with maximum current amplitudes and densities in nanosecond pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure are determined. A supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with a current amplitude of ˜30 A, a current density of ˜20 A/cm2, and a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜100 ps has been observed behind the output foil of an air-filled diode. It is shown that the position of the SAEB current maximum relative to the voltage pulse front exhibits a time shift that varies when the small-size collector is moved over the foil surface.

  8. Propagation of obstructed Bessel and Bessel–Gauss beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Litvin, IA

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available . 7062 706218-1 2 0 )/(1)( rzzz += ωω ])/(1[)( 2zzzzR r+= )/(tan)( 1 rzzz −=Φ These equations represent the Rayleigh length, the beam width, the radius of curvature of the wavefronts and the Guoy phase of a Gaussian beam respectively..., and similarly a2 and b2 due to CW2, then one can show that at some distance z after the obstacle we have: Proc. of SPIE Vol. 7062 706218-5 θ θ θ θ tan tan tan tan 2 1 2 1 zbb zbb zaa zaa...

  9. Pulsar average wave forms and hollow-cone beam models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    Pulsar wave forms have been analyzed from observations conducted over a wide radio-frequency range to assess the wave-form morphologies and to measure wave-form widths. The results of the analysis compare favorably with the predictions of a model with a hollow-cone beam of fixed dimensions and with random orientation of both the observer and the cone axis with respect to the pulsar spin axis. A class of three-component wave forms is included in the model by adding a central pencil beam to the hollow-cone hypothesis. The consequences of a number of discrepancies between observations and quantitative predictions of the model are discussed.

  10. Analysis for Behavior of Reinforcement Lap Splices in Deep Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar Yaser Ali

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study includes an experimental and theoretical investigation of reinforced concrete deep beams containing tensile reinforcement lap splices at constant moment zone under static load. The study included two stages: in the first one, an experimental work included testing of eight simply supported RC deep beams having a total length (L = 2000 mm, overall depth (h= 600 mm and width (b = 150 mm. The tested specimens were divided into three groups to study the effect of main variables: lap length, location of splice, internal confinement (stirrups and external confinement (strengthening by CFRP laminates. The experimental results showed that the use of CFRP as external strengthening in deep beam with lap spliced gives best behavior such as increase in stiffness, decrease in deflection, delaying the cracks appearance and reducing the crack width. The reduction in deflection about (14-21 % than the unstrengthened beam and about (5-14 % than the beam with continuous bars near ultimate load. Also, it was observed that the beams with unstrengthened tensile reinforcement lap splices had three types of cracks: flexural, flexural-shear and splitting cracks while the beams with strengthened tensile reinforcement lap splices or continuous bars don’t observe splitting cracks. In the second stage, a numerical analysis of three dimensional finite element analysis was utilized to explore the behavior of the RC deep beams with tensile reinforcement lap splices, in addition to parametric study of many variables. The comparison between the experimental and theoretical results showed reasonable agreement. The average difference of the deflection at service load was less than 5%.

  11. Crossed beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolder, K.T.

    1976-01-01

    Many natural phenomena can only be properly understood if one has a detailed knowledge of interactions involving atoms, molecules, ions, electrons or photons. In the laboratory these processes are often studied by preparing beams of two types of particle and observing the reactions which occur when the beams intersect. Some of the more interesting of these crossed beam experiments and their results are discussed. Proposals to extend colliding beam techniques to high energy particle physics are also outlined. (author)

  12. An Electromagnetic Beam Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to an electromagnetic beam converter and a method for conversion of an input beam of electromagnetic radiation having a bell shaped intensity profile a(x,y) into an output beam having a prescribed target intensity profile l(x',y') based on a further development...

  13. Beams 92: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, D.; Cooperstein, G.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Ion beam papers; electron beam, bremsstrahlung, and diagnostics papers; radiating Z- pinch papers; microwave papers; electron laser papers; advanced accelerator papers; beam and pulsed power applications papers; pulsed power papers; and these papers have been indexed separately elsewhere

  14. Numeric estimation of the possibilities of ionizing detectors for monitoring SR beam space parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artemiev, A.N.; Artemiev, N.A.; Ioudin, L.I.; Mikhailov, V.G.; Moryakov, V.P.; Odintsov, D.G.; Rezvov, V.A.; Cerenius, Y.; Svensson, A.

    2000-01-01

    An ionizing detector for on-line registration and representation of the geometric SR beam parameters was developed in RRC KI. The detector analyses the products of the residual gas ionization, which was done by the investigated beam. Special electrostatic optics and open image converter tube (ICT) form optical image of the real beam on the screen of ICT. The detector was checked on SR beams of the next storage rings: DCI (LURE, Orsey, France), KSRS (RRC KI, Moscow, Russia) and MAX-2 (MAX-lab, Lund, Sweden). The codes for TV image processing give a possibility for numeric estimation of the beam size, the width of its horizontal and vertical profiles and position of the beam gravity. Statistic processing of the beam gravity center using big amount of TV frames gives uncertainty in the beam position of about 2 μm while the width of the beam is about 2 mm. Summation of big amount of TV frames was used. This method significantly increases signal-to-noise ratio

  15. Temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate in one dimensional optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Ahmed S.; Soliman, Shemi S.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a conventional method of quantum statistical mechanics is used to study the temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate bosons in 1D optical potential. We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the temperature dependence of the in situ widths becomes perceivable. The calculated results showed that the temperature dependence of the in situ widths is completely different from that of a rotating condensate or trapped bosons in the optical lattice separately. The z-width shows distinct behavior from x- and y-widths due to the rotation effect. The obtained results provide useful qualitative theoretical results for future Bose Einstein condensation experiments in such traps. - Highlights: • The temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate boson in 1D optical potential is investigated. • We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the in situ widths become perceivable. • The above mentioned parameters exhibit a characteristic rotation rate and optical potential depth dependence. • Characteristic dependence of the effective widths on temperature is investigated. • Our results provide useful qualitatively and quantitative theoretical results for experiments in various traps.

  16. Temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate in one dimensional optical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Ahmed S., E-mail: ahmedhassan117@yahoo.com; Soliman, Shemi S.M.

    2016-01-08

    In this paper, a conventional method of quantum statistical mechanics is used to study the temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate bosons in 1D optical potential. We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the temperature dependence of the in situ widths becomes perceivable. The calculated results showed that the temperature dependence of the in situ widths is completely different from that of a rotating condensate or trapped bosons in the optical lattice separately. The z-width shows distinct behavior from x- and y-widths due to the rotation effect. The obtained results provide useful qualitative theoretical results for future Bose Einstein condensation experiments in such traps. - Highlights: • The temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate boson in 1D optical potential is investigated. • We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the in situ widths become perceivable. • The above mentioned parameters exhibit a characteristic rotation rate and optical potential depth dependence. • Characteristic dependence of the effective widths on temperature is investigated. • Our results provide useful qualitatively and quantitative theoretical results for experiments in various traps.

  17. The temperature dependence of the width of the giant-dipole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ormand, W.E.; Bortignon, P.F.; Broglia, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    The giant-dipole resonance (GDR) in 120 Sn and 208 Pb is studied as a function of excitation energy, angular momentum, and intrinsic width within the context of the adiabatic model. Theoretical evaluations of the full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) for the GDR strength function are compared with recent experimental data and are found to be in good agreement. (orig.)

  18. The effect of interaural-time-difference fluctuations on apparent source width

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Käsbach, Johannes; May, Tobias; Oskarsdottir, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    For the perception of spaciousness, the temporal fluctuations of the interaural time differences (ITDs) and interaural level differences (ILDs) provide important binaural cues. One major characteristic of spatial perception is apparent source width (ASW), which describes the perceived width of a ...

  19. Case study: Equivalent widths of the Middle Rio Grande, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudia Leon; Pierre Y. Julien; Drew C. Baird

    2009-01-01

    Successive reaches of the Rio Grande have maintained equivalent channel widths of 50 and 250 m, respectively, over long periods of time. It is hypothesized that alluvial channels adjust bed slope to match the long-term changes in channel width. Analytical relationships show that wider river reaches develop steeper slopes. A modeling approach using daily water and...

  20. Analysis of equivalent widths of alluvial channels and application for instream habitat in the Rio Grande

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudia A. Leon

    2003-01-01

    Rivers are natural systems that adjust to variable water and sediment discharges. Channels with spatial variability in width that are managed to maintain constant widths over a period of time are able to transport the same water and sediment discharges by adjusting the bed slope. Methods developed to de ne equilibrium hydraulic geometry characteristics of alluvial...

  1. Suppression of high-frequency perturbations in pulse-width modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    A method suppresses high-frequency perturbations in a pulse-width modulated signal. The pulse-width modulation may superpose a carrier signal onto an input signal having a predetermined modulation frequency. The carrier signals may be phase-shifted. The resulting modulated signals may...

  2. Modeling wildland fire containment with uncertain flame length and fireline width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romain Mees; David Strauss; Richard Chase

    1993-01-01

    We describe a mathematical model for the probability that a fireline succeeds in containing a fire. The probability increases as the fireline width increases, and also as the fire's flame length decreases. More interestingly, uncertainties in width and flame length affect the computed containment probabilities, and can thus indirectly affect the optimum allocation...

  3. A New Selective Harmonic Elimination Pulse- Width and Amplitude Modulation (SHEPWAM) for Drive Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghoreishy, Hoda; Varjani, Ali Yazdian; Mohamadian, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Compared to the conventional selective harmonic elimination-pulse width modulation (SHE-PWM), the selective harmonic elimination-pulse width and amplitude modulation (SHE-PWAM) control strategy results in significant improvements in the performance of CHB inverters. This fact is due to considerin...

  4. Analytical model for double split ring resonators with arbitrary ring width

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Jensen, Thomas; Krozer, Viktor

    2008-01-01

    For the first time, the analytical model for a double split ring resonator with unequal width rings is developed. The proposed models for the resonators with equal and unequal widths are based on an impedance matrix representation and provide the prediction of performance in a wide frequency range...

  5. Effects of strip and full-width tillage on soil carbon IV oxide-carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... determine the effects of strip tillage and full-width tillage treatments on soil carbon IV oxide-carbon (CO2-C) fluxes, bacterial and fungal populations in growing period of sunflower (Helianthus annus). A row-crop rotary hoe with C type blades was used to create three strip widths by changing the connection of blades of the ...

  6. Reliability of permanent mandibular first molars and incisors widths as predictor for the width of permanent mandibular and maxillary canines and premolars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhulika Mittar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Preventive measures are necessary to prevent a potential irregularity from progressing into a more severe malocclusion. The determination of the tooth size-arch length discrepancy in mixed dentition requires an accurate prediction of the mesiodistal widths of the unerupted permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: For the study, 200 subjects in the age group of 16-25 years were selected from various colleges of M. M. University. The mesiodistal width of permanent mandibular incisors, first molars, canines and premolars of both arches were measured on the subject cast using an electronic digital caliper. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference between mesiodistal tooth widths of males and females. Linear regression equation was determined to predict the sum of mandibular and maxillary permanent canines and premolars using mandibular first molars plus the four mandibular incisors as predictors. Results: There was no significant difference between the actual and predicted width of sum of permanent canines and premolars using regression equations. The predicted widths of both arches using Tanaka and Johnston equations showed significant differences. Determined regression equations for males were accurate in male samples and determined regression equation for females were accurate in female samples for both arches.

  7. Flexural Cracking Behavior Of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Abdalkader

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Steel fibers are added to concrete due to its ability to improve the tensile strength and control propagation of cracks in reinforced concrete members. Steel fiber reinforced concrete is made of cement fine water and coarse aggregate in addition to steel fibers. In this experimental work flexural cracking behavior of reinforced concrete beams contains different percentage of hooked-end steel fibers with length of 50 mm and equivalent diameter of 0.5 mm was studied. The beams were tested under third-point loading test at 28 days. First cracking load maximum crack width cracks number and load-deflection relations were investigated to evaluate the flexural cracking behavior of concrete beams with 34 MPa target mean strength. Workability wet density compressive and splitting tensile strength were also investigated. The results showed that the flexural crack width is significantly reduced with the addition of steel fibers. Fiber contents of 1.0 resulted in 81 reduction in maximum crack width compared to control concrete without fiber. The results also showed that the first cracking load and maximum load are increased with the addition of steel fibers.

  8. Atomic physics using relativistic H- beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, H.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: An 8 GeV hydrogen atom can traverse a focused laser beam of width of 1 micron in a time of 353 attoseconds in its rest frame. A design is currently underway at Fermilab for a superconducting linear accelerator that will accelerate H - ions to 8 GeV. This 'Proton Driver' beam is intended to be injected, after stripping down to protons, into the 120 GeV Main Injector for the mass production of neutrinos aimed at a neutrino detector (MINOS) in a mine shaft in Soudan, Minnesota (USA) for the study of neutrino oscillations. It has not passed unnoticed that with some advance planning a few nanoamps from the up-to-250 mA beam could be diverted for atomic physics experiments. Relativistic kinematics enable the creation of extreme conditions for a beam atom. For example, the Doppler shift allows a very large tuning range in the atom's rest frame of a laser beam that is fixed- frequency in the lab. At 8 GeV the rest frame Doppler shift ranges from a factor of 19 in the forward direction to 0.05 backward. The laser intensity is enhanced by the square of the Doppler shift, so that the world's most intense laser beam would be amplified by a factor of 360 in the atom's rest frame. Furthermore, although there are extreme changes in the frequency and intensity in the atom's frame as one changes the intersection angle, the ponderomotive potential remains constant, as it is a relativistic invariant. One of the interesting problems that arises in the planning for this accelerator is the stripping of electrons from the negative ions by photodetachment from Doppler shifted thermal photons. We estimate that, if the transfer lines are kept at 300 K (room temperature), the mean free path at 8 GeV for stripping from collisions with cavity radiation is about 1300 km. The physics of the interactions of such a beam with very thin material foils, again in the attosecond regime, has been treated theoretically, but has not been studied experimentally at such high energies. We will

  9. Probing the top-quark width through ratios of resonance contributions of e{sup +}e{sup −}→W{sup +}W{sup −}bb̄

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebler, Stefan [DESY, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron,Notkestraße 85, Hamburg, D-22607 (Germany); Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid [DESY, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron,Notkestraße 85, Hamburg, D-22607 (Germany); II. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Hamburg,Luruper Chaussee 149, Hamburg, 22761 (Germany); Papanastasiou, Andrew S. [DESY, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron,Notkestraße 85, Hamburg, D-22607 (Germany); Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge,J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    In this paper we propose a method to gain access to the top-quark width which exploits off-shell regions in the process e{sup +}e{sup −}→W{sup +}W{sup −}bb̄. Working at next-to-leading order in QCD we show that carefully selected ratios of off-shell regions to on-shell regions in the reconstructed top and anti-top invariant mass spectra are, independently of the coupling g{sub tbW}, sensitive to the top-quark width. We explore this approach for different centre of mass energies and initial-state beam polarisations at e{sup +}e{sup −} colliders and briefly comment on the applicability of this method for a measurement of the top-quark width at the LHC.

  10. Flexural Strength Of Prestressed Concrete Beams With Openings And Strengthened With CFRP Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Mustafa B. Dawood

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents an experimental investigation of flexural strength of pretensioned prestressed concrete beams with openings and strengthened with CFRP sheets tested as simply supported span subjected under two-point loading. The experimental work includes testing of nine prestressed concrete beams specimens with dimensions effective length 1800mm depth 300mm width 130mm two of which were without openings as a control beams one without and the other with strengthening by CFRP three were with openings and the remaining four with openings and strengthened with CFRP sheets. The opening was made at square shape 100100 mm in flexure zone at mid span of beam. Several design parameters were varied such as opening width opening depth and strengthening of openings of beams by CFRP sheets at compression and tension zone. Experimental results showed that the presence of square opening with ratio hH 0.333 and rectangular opening with ratio hH from 0.333-0.5 at mid span of beams decreased the ultimate load about 5.5 and 5.5-33.1 respectively when compared with beam without openings control beam. The externally strengthened prestressed concrete beams with bonded CFRP sheets showed a significant increase at the ultimate load this increase was about 10.9-28.8 for flexure beams when compared with the unstrengthened beams. Moreover the load-deflection curves for flexure beams strengthened with CFRP sheets were stiffer than the unstrengthened beams. Therefore this results gave a good indication about using CFRP sheets in improvement of deflection.

  11. Modified model of neutron resonances widths distributions. Results of reduced neutron widths approximation for mass region 35 ≤ A ≤ 249

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhovoj, A.M.; Khitrov, V.A.

    2011-01-01

    The distributions of the reduced neutron widths of s-, p- and d-resonances of nuclei of any type from nuclear mass region 35 ≤ A ≤ 249 were approximated with maximal precision by the model which presents experimental data set as a superposition of a maximum of four independent neutron amplitudes. Under the assumption that each of these amplitudes has the Gauss distribution with the unique maximum there were determined the most probable values of contribution of each amplitude in summary width distribution, their most probable mean values and dispersions. Comparison of the obtained χ 2 values with value χ 2 at description of the experimental data by one distribution of neutron amplitudes with best fitted parameters shows that all widths from more than 157 analyzed data sets can have different types of wave functions

  12. Matching extended-SSD electron beams to multileaf collimated photon beams in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel, Jared; Stewart, Allan; Satory, Philip

    2009-01-01

    electron beam SSD increased the penumbra width (defined as the lateral distance of the 80% and 20% isodose contours) by 8-10 mm at the depths of 10-20 mm. Mean photon beam penumbra width increased with increased MLC stepping, and the mean MLC penumbra was ≅1.5 times greater than that across the corresponding Cerrobend shielding. Intraleaf dose discrepancy in the direction orthogonal to the beam edge also increased with MLC stepping. Conclusions: The weighted DDVH comparison techniques allowed the composite dosimetry resulting from the interplay of the abovementioned variables to be ranked. The MLC dosimetry ranked as good or better than that resulting from beam matching with Cerrobend for all except large field overlaps (-2.5 mm gap). The results for the linear-weighted DDVH comparison suggest that optimal MLC abutment dosimetry results from an optical surface gap of around 1±0.5 mm. Furthermore, this appears reasonably lenient to abutment gap variation, such as that arising from uncertainty in beam markup or other setup errors.

  13. Diffractive beam shaping for enhanced laser polymer welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschenberger, J.; Vogler, D.; Raab, C.; Gubler, U.

    2015-03-01

    Laser welding of polymers increasingly finds application in a large number of industries such as medical technology, automotive, consumer electronics, textiles or packaging. More and more, it replaces other welding technologies for polymers, e. g. hot-plate, vibration or ultrasonic welding. At the same rate, demands on the quality of the weld, the flexibility of the production system and on processing speed have increased. Traditionally, diode lasers were employed for plastic welding with flat-top beam profiles. With the advent of fiber lasers with excellent beam quality, the possibility to modify and optimize the beam profile by beam-shaping elements has opened. Diffractive optical elements (DOE) can play a crucial role in optimizing the laser intensity profile towards the optimal M-shape beam for enhanced weld seam quality. We present results on significantly improved weld seam width constancy and enlarged process windows compared to Gaussian or flat-top beam profiles. Configurations in which the laser beam diameter and shape can be adapted and optimized without changing or aligning the laser, fiber-optic cable or optical head are shown.

  14. Propagation of an Airy beam through the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaoling; Eyyuboğlu, Halil T; Ji, Guangming; Jia, Xinhong

    2013-01-28

    In this paper, the effect of thermal blooming of an Airy beam propagating through the atmosphere is examined, and the effect of atmospheric turbulence is not considered. The changes of the intensity distribution, the centroid position and the mean-squared beam width of an Airy beam propagating through the atmosphere are studied by using the four-dimensional (4D) computer code of the time-dependent propagation of Airy beams through the atmosphere. It is shown that an Airy beam can't retain its shape and the structure when the Airy beam propagates through the atmosphere due to thermal blooming except for the short propagation distance, or the short time, or the low beam power. The thermal blooming results in a central dip of the center lobe, and causes the center lobe to spread and decrease. In contrast with the center lobe, the side lobes are less affected by thermal blooming, such that the intensity maximum of the side lobe may be larger than that of the center lobe. However, the cross wind can reduce the effect of thermal blooming. When there exists the cross wind velocity vx in x direction, the dependence of centroid position in x direction on vx is not monotonic, and there exists a minimum, but the centroid position in y direction is nearly independent of vx.

  15. Precision measurements of the total and partial widths of the psi(2S) charmonium meson with a new complementary-scan technique in anti-p p annihilations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreotti, M.; Bagnasco, S.; Baldini, W.; Bettoni, D.; Borreani, G.; Buzzo, A.; Calabrese, R.; Cester, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Dalpiaz, P.; Garzoglio, G.

    2007-03-01

    We present new precision measurements of the {Psi}(2S) total and partial widths from excitation curves obtained in antiproton-proton annihilations by Fermilab experiment E835 at the Antiproton Accumulator in the year 2000. A new technique of complementary scans was developed to study narrow resonances with stochastically cooled antiproton beams. It relies on precise revolution-frequency and orbit-length measurements, while making the analysis of the excitation curve almost independent of machine lattice parameters. For the {Psi}(2S) meson, by studying the processes {bar p}p {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} and {bar p}p {yields} J/{Psi} + X {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} + X, we measure the width {Gamma} = 290 {+-} 25(sta) {+-} 4(sys) keV and the combination of partial widths {Gamma}{sub e{sup +}e{sup -}}{Gamma}{sub {bar p}p}/{Gamma} = 579 {+-} 38(sta) {+-} 36(sys) meV, which represent the most precise measurements to date.

  16. Precision measurements of the total and partial widths of the {psi}(2S) charmonium meson with a new complementary-scan technique in p-bar p annihilations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreotti, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Ferrara, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Bagnasco, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Genova, 16146 Genova (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Torino, 10125 Turin (Italy); Baldini, W.; Bettoni, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Ferrara, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Borreani, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Torino, 10125 Turin (Italy); Buzzo, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Genova, 16146 Genova (Italy); Calabrese, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Ferrara, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Cester, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Torino, 10125 Turin (Italy); Cibinetto, G.; Dalpiaz, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Ferrara, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Garzoglio, G.; Gollwitzer, K.E. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Graham, M. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Hu, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Joffe, D.; Kasper, J. [Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Lasio, G. [University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Lo Vetere, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Genova, 16146 Genova (Italy); Luppi, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Ferrara, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Macri, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Genova, 16146 Genova (Italy)] (and others)

    2007-10-11

    We present new precision measurements of the {psi}(2S) total and partial widths from excitation curves obtained in antiproton-proton annihilations by Fermilab experiment E835 at the Antiproton Accumulator in the year 2000. A new technique of complementary scans was developed to study narrow resonances with stochastically cooled antiproton beams. The technique relies on precise revolution-frequency and orbit-length measurements, while making the analysis of the excitation curve almost independent of machine lattice parameters. We study the {psi}(2S) meson through the processes p-bar p{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -} and p-bar p{yields}J/{psi}+X{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -}+X. We measure the width to be {gamma}=290{+-}25(sta){+-}4(sys) keV and the combination of partial widths {gamma}{sub e{sup +}}{sub e{sup -}}{gamma}{sub p-bar} p/{gamma}=579{+-}38(sta){+-}36(sys) meV, which represent the most precise measurements to date.

  17. Interface width effect on the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the weakly nonlinear regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; Li, Y. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the interface width effects (i.e., the density gradient effects or the density transition layer effects) on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in the weakly nonlinear (WN) regime are investigated by numerical simulation (NS). It is found that the interface width effects dramatically influence the linear growth rate in the linear growth regime and the mode coupling process in the WN growth regime. First, the interface width effects decrease the linear growth rate of the RTI, particularly for the short perturbation wavelengths. Second, the interface width effects suppress (reduce) the third-order feedback to the fundamental mode, which induces the nonlinear saturation amplitude (NSA) to exceed the classical prediction, 0.1λ. The wider the density transition layer is, the larger the NSA is. The NSA in our NS can reach a half of its perturbation wavelength. Finally, the interface width effects suppress the generation and the growth of the second and the third harmonics. The ability to suppress the harmonics' growth increases with the interface width but decreases with the perturbation wavelength. On the whole, in the WN regime, the interface width effects stabilize the RTI, except for an enhancement of the NSA, which is expected to improve the understanding of the formation mechanism for the astrophysical jets, and for the jetlike long spikes in the high energy density physics.

  18. Computer-aided system for measuring the mandibular cortical width on panoramic radiographs in osteoporosis diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifin, Agus Zainal; Asano, Akira; Taguchi, Akira; Nakamoto, Takashi; Ohtsuka, Masahiko; Tanimoto, Keiji

    2005-04-01

    Osteoporotic fractures are associated with substantial morbidity, increased medical cost and high mortality risk. Several equipments of bone assessment have been developed to identify individuals, especially postmenopausal women, with high risk of osteoporotic fracture; however, a large segment of women with low skeletal bone mineral density (BMD), namely women with high risk of osteoporotic fractures, cannot be identified sufficiently because osteoporosis is asymptomatic. Recent studies have been demonstrating that mandibular inferior cortical width manually measured on panoramic radiographs may be useful for the identification of women with low BMD. Automatic measurement of cortical width may enable us to identify a large number of asymptomatic women with low BMD. The purpose of this study was to develop a computer-aided system for measuring the mandibular cortical width on panoramic radiographs. Initially, oral radiologists determined the region of interest based on the position of mental foramen. Some enhancing image techniques were applied so as to measure the cortical width at the best point. Panoramic radiographs of 100 women who had BMD assessments of the lumbar spine and femoral neck were used to confirm the efficacy of our new system. Cortical width measured with our system was compared with skeletal BMD. There were significant correlation between cortical width measured with our system and skeletal BMD. These correlations were similar with those between cortical width manually measured by the dentist and skeletal BMD. Our results suggest that our new system may be useful for mass screening of osteoporosis.

  19. Relationship between width and length ratios of upper anterior teeth in young Chilean population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Troncoso-Pazos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Knowledge about the size and proportion of upper anterior teeth allows dental rehabilitation taking into consideration the local parameters of a population. The aim of this research is to determine the width, length and the relationship between width and length of central incisor, lateral incisor and canine teeth in both sexes in young Chilean population. Methodology: A cross-sectional study was performed. Study subjects included 187 dentistry students from two Chilean cities (mean age 21.35±2.7 years, 52.9% men. The teeth width and height were measured and the width/height ratio was calculated. Differences in measurements according to sex was analyzed (p<0.05; STATA v.10.0. Results: The width and height of the teeth were statistically and proportionally larger in men (p<0.05. The width/height ratio of lateral and canine incisors was significantly higher in women (p<0.05. Conclusion: In a sample of young Chileans, upper anterior teeth were longer and wider in men. However, the width/height ratio of teeth was found to be significantly higher in women.

  20. Strong-strong beam-beam simulation on parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, Ji

    2004-08-02

    The beam-beam interaction puts a strong limit on the luminosity of the high energy storage ring colliders. At the interaction points, the electromagnetic fields generated by one beam focus or defocus the opposite beam. This can cause beam blowup and a reduction of luminosity. An accurate simulation of the beam-beam interaction is needed to help optimize the luminosity in high energy colliders.

  1. Strong-strong beam-beam simulation on parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang, Ji

    2004-01-01

    The beam-beam interaction puts a strong limit on the luminosity of the high energy storage ring colliders. At the interaction points, the electromagnetic fields generated by one beam focus or defocus the opposite beam. This can cause beam blowup and a reduction of luminosity. An accurate simulation of the beam-beam interaction is needed to help optimize the luminosity in high energy colliders

  2. Correlation between facial measurements and the mesiodistal width of the maxillary anterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Vanderlei Luiz; Gonçalves, Luiz Carlos; do Prado, Célio Jesus; Junior, Itamar Lopes; de Lima Lucas, Bárbara

    2006-01-01

    One of the most difficult aspects during the selection of maxillary anterior teeth for a removable prosthesis is determining the appropriate mesiodistal width of the six maxillary anterior teeth. Many attempts have been made to establish methods of estimating the combined width of these anterior teeth, and improving the esthetic outcome. The proportion of facial structures and the relationship between facial measurements and natural teeth could be used as a guide in selecting denture teeth. The aim of this study was to verify the relation between the combined mesiodistal width of the six maxillary anterior teeth and the facial segments: the width of the eyes, the inner canthal distance (ICD), the interpupillary distance (IPD), the interalar width, and the intercommissural width (ICm). Standardized digital images of 81 dentate Brazilian subjects were used to measure both facial and oral segments when viewed from the frontal aspect through an image processing program. To measure the distance between the upper canines on a curve, accurate casts were made from the upper right first premolar to the upper left first premolar. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient was conducted to measure the strength of the associations between the variables (alpha = 0.05). The results showed a significant correlation between all facial elements and the combined mesiodistal width of the six teeth, when observed from the frontal aspect. The ICD, IPD, and ICm showed the highest probability of being correlated to the mesiodistal width of the teeth (p = 0.000). This article considers facial analysis with digital photography as a practical and efficient application to select the mesiodistal width of artificial anterior teeth in an esthetically pleasing and natural appearance during an oral rehabilitation treatment.

  3. Arch width changes from 6 weeks to 45 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, S E; Jakobsen, J R; Treder, J; Nowak, A

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate on a longitudinal basis, the changes in intercanine and intermolar widths over a 45-year span. The subjects in this study were from two pools of normal persons: (1) 28 male and 33 female infants evaluated longitudinally at approximately 6 weeks, 1 year, and 2 years of age (before the complete eruption of the deciduous dentition); and (2) 15 male and 15 female subjects from the Iowa facial growth study evaluated at ages 3, 5, 8, 13, 26, and 45. Arch width measurements on maxillary and mandibular dental casts were obtained independently by two investigators. Intraexaminer and interexaminer reliability were predetermined at 0.5 mm. From the findings in the current study, the following conclusions can be made: (1) Between 6 weeks and 2 years of age, i.e., before the complete eruption of the deciduous dentition, there were significant increases in the maxillary and mandibular anterior and posterior arch widths in both male and female infants. (2) Intercanine and intermolar widths significantly increased between 3 and 13 years of age in both the maxillary and mandibular arches. After the complete eruption of the permanent dentition, there was a slight decrease in the dental arch widths, more in the intercanine than in the intermolar widths. (3) Mandibular intercanine width, on the average, was established by 8 years of age, i.e., after the eruption of the four incisors. After the eruption of the permanent dentition, the clinician should either expect no changes or a slight decrease in arch widths. In conclusion, although the dental arch widths undergo changes from birth until midadulthood, the magnitude as well as the direction of these changes do not provide a scientific basis for expanding the arches, in the average patient, beyond its established dimensions at the time of the complete eruption of the canines and molars. Both patients and clinicians should be aware of these limitations.

  4. Random source generating far field with elliptical flat-topped beam profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yongtao; Cai, Yangjian

    2014-01-01

    Circular and rectangular multi-Gaussian Schell-model (MGSM) sources which generate far fields with circular and rectangular flat-topped beam profiles were introduced just recently (Sahin and Korotkova 2012 Opt. Lett. 37 2970; Korotkova 2014 Opt. Lett. 39 64). In this paper, a random source named an elliptical MGSM source is introduced. An analytical expression for the propagation factor of an elliptical MGSM beam is derived. Furthermore, an analytical propagation formula for an elliptical MGSM beam passing through a stigmatic ABCD optical system is derived, and its propagation properties in free space are studied. It is interesting to find that an elliptical MGSM source generates a far field with an elliptical flat-topped beam profile, being qualitatively different from that of circular and rectangular MGSM sources. The ellipticity and the flatness of the elliptical flat-topped beam profile in the far field are determined by the initial coherence widths and the beam index, respectively. (paper)

  5. Quantitative evaluation of potential irradiation geometries for carbon-ion beam grid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubouchi, Toshiro; Henry, Thomas; Ureba, Ana; Valdman, Alexander; Bassler, Niels; Siegbahn, Albert

    2018-03-01

    Radiotherapy using grids containing cm-wide beam elements has been carried out sporadically for more than a century. During the past two decades, preclinical research on radiotherapy with grids containing small beam elements, 25 μm-0.7 mm wide, has been performed. Grid therapy with larger beam elements is technically easier to implement, but the normal tissue tolerance to the treatment is decreasing. In this work, a new approach in grid therapy, based on irradiations with grids containing narrow carbon-ion beam elements was evaluated dosimetrically. The aim formulated for the suggested treatment was to obtain a uniform target dose combined with well-defined grids in the irradiated normal tissue. The gain, obtained by crossfiring the carbon-ion beam grids over a simulated target volume, was quantitatively evaluated. The dose distributions produced by narrow rectangular carbon-ion beams in a water phantom were simulated with the PHITS Monte Carlo code. The beam-element height was set to 2.0 cm in the simulations, while the widths varied from 0.5 to 10.0 mm. A spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) was then created for each beam element in the grid, to cover the target volume with dose in the depth direction. The dose distributions produced by the beam-grid irradiations were thereafter constructed by adding the dose profiles simulated for single beam elements. The variation of the valley-to-peak dose ratio (VPDR) with depth in water was thereafter evaluated. The separation of the beam elements inside the grids were determined for different irradiation geometries with a selection criterion. The simulated carbon-ion beams remained narrow down to the depths of the Bragg peaks. With the formulated selection criterion, a beam-element separation which was close to the beam-element width was found optimal for grids containing 3.0-mm-wide beam elements, while a separation which was considerably larger than the beam-element width was found advantageous for grids containing 0.5-mm

  6. Sharper focal spot formed by higher-order radially polarized laser beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozawa, Yuichi; Sato, Shunichi

    2007-06-01

    The intensity distributions near the focal point for radially polarized laser beams including higher-order transverse modes are calculated based on vector diffraction theory. For higher-order radially polarized mode beams as well as a fundamental mode (R-TEM01*) beam, the strong longitudinal component forms a sharper spot at the focal point under a high-NA focusing condition. In particular, double-ring-shaped radially polarized mode (R-TEM11*) beams can effectively reduce the focal spot size because of destructive interference between the inner and the outer rings with pi phase shift. Compared with an R-TEM01* beam focusing in a limit of NA=1, the full width at half-maximum values of the focal spot for an R-TEM11* beam are decreased by 13.6% for the longitudinal component and 25.8% for the total intensity.

  7. Longitudinal Fracture Analysis of a Two-Dimensional Functionally Graded Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizov, V.

    2017-11-01

    Longitudinal fracture in a two-dimensional functionally graded beam is analyzed. The modulus of elasticity varies continuously in the beam cross-section. The beam is clamped in its right-hand end. The external loading consists of one longitudinal force applied at the free end of the lower crack arm. The longitudinal crack is located in the beam mid-plane. The fracture is studied in terms of the strain energy release rate. The solution derived is used to elucidate the effects of material gradients along the height as well as along the width of the beam cross-section on the fracture behaviour. The results obtained indicate that the fracture in two-dimensional functionally graded beams can be regulated efficiently by employing appropriate material gradients.

  8. Beam formation in molecular flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottwald, B.A.

    1974-01-01

    Comparison of experimental angular distribution data with theoretical models has show a considerable disagreement with the Clausing model (free molecular flow with diffuse reflexion). For a real system this idealized model has to be modified by taking into consideration possible perturbations of the Clausing flow chemical reactions, surface diffusion and deviations from diffuse reflexion. By comparison with the diffusion differential equation and Monte Carlo stimulations, it has been shown that the iteration of a system of appropriately modified Clausing integral equations is especially suited for solving this complex problem. Suitable characterized parameters for angular distribution data are the beam half-width upsilon 1/2 and the peaking factor chi defined according to Olander and Jones. The computer program in a first step calculates the real steady state of molecular flow. In a second step the computer program calculates the dependence of upsilon 1/2 and chi upon the parameters L/2R (orifice geometry) and m' (order of the surface reaction preceding the desorption from the inner wall of the cylindrical orifice). For the real steady state of molecular flow

  9. The ρ radiative decay width: A measurement at 200 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capraro, L.; Levy, P.; Querrou, M.; Hecke, B. van; Verbeken, M.; Amendolia, S.R.; Batignani, G.; Bedeschi, A.; Bellamy, E.H.; Bertolucci, E.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bradaschia, C.; Fidecaro, F.; Foa, L.; Focardi, E.; Giannetti, P.; Giorgi, M.A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Menzione, A.; Ristori, L.; Scribano, A.; Stefanini, A.; Tonelli, G.; Beck, G.A.; Bologna, G.; D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; Mannocchi, G.; Picchi, P.; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati; Budinich, M.; Liello, F.; Paver, N.; Rolandi, L.; Green, M.G.; March, P.V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Strong, J.A.; Tenchini, R.

    1987-01-01

    The ρ - radiative decay width has been measured by studying the production of ρ - via the Primakoff effect by 200 GeV incident π - on Cu and Pb targets. This width was obtained by fitting the measured dσ/dt for ρ production with the theoretical coherent differential cross section including both the electromagnetic and strong contributions. The measured radiative width value is 81±4±4 keV: it is consistent with the ratio Γ(ρ → πγ)/Γ(ω → πγ) ∝ 1/9 as expected from the vector dominance and the quark model. (orig.)

  10. Attention demanding tasks during treadmill walking reduce step width variability in young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy Karen L

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The variability of step time and step width is associated with falls by older adults. Further, step time is significantly influenced when performing attention demanding tasks while walking. Without exception, step time variability has been reported to increase in normal and pathologically aging older adults. Because of the role of step width in managing frontal plane dynamic stability, documenting the influence of attention-demanding tasks on step width variability may provide insight to events that can disturb dynamic stability during locomotion and increase fall risk. Preliminary evidence suggests performance of an attention demanding task significantly decreases step width variability of young adults walking on a treadmill. The purpose of the present study was to confirm or refute this finding by characterizing the extent and direction of the effects of a widely used attention demanding task (Stroop test on the step width variability of young adults walking on a motorized treadmill. Methods Fifteen healthy young adults walked on a motorized treadmill at a self-selected velocity for 10 minutes under two conditions; without performing an attention demanding task and while performing the Stroop test. Step width of continuous and consecutive steps during the collection was derived from the data recorded using a motion capture system. Step width variability was computed as the standard deviation of all recorded steps. Results Step width decreased four percent during performance of the Stroop test but the effect was not significant (p = 0.10. In contrast, the 16 percent decrease in step width variability during the Stroop test condition was significant (p = 0.029. Conclusion The results support those of our previous work in which a different attention demanding task also decreased step width variability of young subjects while walking on a treadmill. The decreased step width variability observed while performing an attention

  11. Clinical Utility of Red Cell Distribution Width in Alcoholic and Non-alcoholic Liver Cirrhosis

    OpenAIRE

    Milić, Sandra; Mikolašević, Ivana; Radić, Mladen; Hauser, Goran; Štimac, Davor

    2011-01-01

    Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is a measure of the variation of red blood cell width that is reported as a part of standard complete blood count. Red blood cell distribution width results are often used together with mean corpuscular volume (MCV) results to figure out mixed anemia. The aim of our study was to compare the values of RDW in alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis and to determine if RDW follows the severity of disease according to Child-Pugh score. We re...

  12. Energy spectrum control for modulated proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsi, Wen C.; Moyers, Michael F.; Nichiporov, Dmitri; Anferov, Vladimir; Wolanski, Mark; Allgower, Chris E.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Mascia, Anthony E.; Schreuder, Andries N.

    2009-01-01

    In proton therapy delivered with range modulated beams, the energy spectrum of protons entering the delivery nozzle can affect the dose uniformity within the target region and the dose gradient around its periphery. For a cyclotron with a fixed extraction energy, a rangeshifter is used to change the energy but this produces increasing energy spreads for decreasing energies. This study investigated the magnitude of the effects of different energy spreads on dose uniformity and distal edge dose gradient and determined the limits for controlling the incident spectrum. A multilayer Faraday cup (MLFC) was calibrated against depth dose curves measured in water for nonmodulated beams with various incident spectra. Depth dose curves were measured in a water phantom and in a multilayer ionization chamber detector for modulated beams using different incident energy spreads. Some nozzle entrance energy spectra can produce unacceptable dose nonuniformities of up to ±21% over the modulated region. For modulated beams and small beam ranges, the width of the distal penumbra can vary by a factor of 2.5. When the energy spread was controlled within the defined limits, the dose nonuniformity was less than ±3%. To facilitate understanding of the results, the data were compared to the measured and Monte Carlo calculated data from a variable extraction energy synchrotron which has a narrow spectrum for all energies. Dose uniformity is only maintained within prescription limits when the energy spread is controlled. At low energies, a large spread can be beneficial for extending the energy range at which a single range modulator device can be used. An MLFC can be used as part of a feedback to provide specified energy spreads for different energies.

  13. Laser beam shaping techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DICKEY,FRED M.; WEICHMAN,LOUIS S.; SHAGAM,RICHARD N.

    2000-03-16

    Industrial, military, medical, and research and development applications of lasers frequently require a beam with a specified irradiance distribution in some plane. A common requirement is a laser profile that is uniform over some cross-section. Such applications include laser/material processing, laser material interaction studies, fiber injection systems, optical data image processing, lithography, medical applications, and military applications. Laser beam shaping techniques can be divided into three areas: apertured beams, field mappers, and multi-aperture beam integrators. An uncertainty relation exists for laser beam shaping that puts constraints on system design. In this paper the authors review the basics of laser beam shaping and present applications and limitations of various techniques.

  14. Beam induced RF heating

    CERN Document Server

    Salvant, B; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Baglin, V; Barnes, M J; Bartmann, W; Baudrenghien, P; Berrig, O; Bracco, C; Bravin, E; Bregliozzi, G; Bruce, R; Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cattenoz, G; Caspers, F; Claudet, S; Day, H; Garlasche, M; Gentini, L; Goddard, B; Grudiev, A; Henrist, B; Jones, R; Kononenko, O; Lanza, G; Lari, L; Mastoridis, T; Mertens, V; Métral, E; Mounet, N; Muller, J E; Nosych, A A; Nougaret, J L; Persichelli, S; Piguiet, A M; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Rumolo, G; Salvachua, B; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Shaposhnikova, E; Tavian, L; Timmins, M; Uythoven, J; Vidal, A; Wenninger, J; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    After the 2011 run, actions were put in place during the 2011/2012 winter stop to limit beam induced radio frequency (RF) heating of LHC components. However, some components could not be changed during this short stop and continued to represent a limitation throughout 2012. In addition, the stored beam intensity increased in 2012 and the temperature of certain components became critical. In this contribution, the beam induced heating limitations for 2012 and the expected beam induced heating limitations for the restart after the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) will be compiled. The expected consequences of running with 25 ns or 50 ns bunch spacing will be detailed, as well as the consequences of running with shorter bunch length. Finally, actions on hardware or beam parameters to monitor and mitigate the impact of beam induced heating to LHC operation after LS1 will be discussed.

  15. Craft Stick Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karplus, Alan K.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this exercise is to provide a phenomenological 'hands-on' experience that shows how geometry can affect the load carrying capacity of a material used in construction, how different materials have different failure characteristics, and how construction affects the performance of a composite material. This will be accomplished by building beams of a single material and composite beams of a mixture of materials (popsicle sticks, fiberboard sheets, and tongue depressors); testing these layered beams to determine how and where they fail; and based on the failure analysis, designing a layered beam that will fail in a predicted manner. The students will learn the effects of lamination, adhesion, and geometry in layered beam construction on beam strength and failure location.

  16. Dual scattering foil design for poly-energetic electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainz, K K; Antolak, J A; Almond, P R; Bloch, C D; Hogstrom, K R

    2005-03-07

    The laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) mechanism can accelerate electrons to energies within the 6-20 MeV range desired for therapy application. However, the energy spectrum of LWFA-generated electrons is broad, on the order of tens of MeV. Using existing laser technology, the therapeutic beam might require a significant energy spread to achieve clinically acceptable dose rates. The purpose of this work was to test the assumption that a scattering foil system designed for a mono-energetic beam would be suitable for a poly-energetic beam with a significant energy spread. Dual scattering foil systems were designed for mono-energetic beams using an existing analytical formalism based on Gaussian multiple-Coulomb scattering theory. The design criterion was to create a flat beam that would be suitable for fields up to 25 x 25 cm2 at 100 cm from the primary scattering foil. Radial planar fluence profiles for poly-energetic beams with energy spreads ranging from 0.5 MeV to 6.5 MeV were calculated using two methods: (a) analytically by summing beam profiles for a range of mono-energetic beams through the scattering foil system, and (b) by Monte Carlo using the EGS/BEAM code. The analytic calculations facilitated fine adjustments to the foil design, and the Monte Carlo calculations enabled us to verify the results of the analytic calculation and to determine the phase-space characteristics of the broadened beam. Results showed that the flatness of the scattered beam is fairly insensitive to the width of the input energy spectrum. Also, results showed that dose calculated by the analytical and Monte Carlo methods agreed very well in the central portion of the beam. Outside the useable field area, the differences between the analytical and Monte Carlo results were small but significant, possibly due to the small angle approximation. However, these did not affect the conclusion that a scattering foil system designed for a mono-energetic beam will be suitable for a poly

  17. Development of stereotactic radiosurgery using carbon beams (carbon-knife)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keawsamur, Mintra; Matsumura, Akihiko; Souda, Hikaru; Kano, Yosuke; Torikoshi, Masami; Nakano, Takashi; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this research is to develop a stereotactic-radiosurgery (SRS) technique using carbon beams to treat small intracranial lesions; we call this device the carbon knife. A 2D-scanning method is adapted to broaden a pencil beam to an appropriate size for an irradiation field. A Mitsubishi slow extraction using third order resonance through a rf acceleration system stabilized by a feed-forward scanning beam using steering magnets with a 290 MeV/u initial beam energy was used for this purpose. Ridge filters for spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) with widths of 5 mm, 7.5 mm, and 10 mm were designed to include fluence-attenuation effects. The collimator, which defines field shape, was used to reduce the lateral penumbra. The lateral-penumbra width at the SOBP region was less than 2 mm for the carbon knife. The penumbras behaved almost the same when changing the air gap, but on the other hand, increasing the range-shifter thickness mostly broadened the lateral penumbra. The physical-dose rates were approximate 6 Gy s‑1 and 4.5 Gy s‑1 for the 10  ×  10 mm2 and 5  ×  5 mm2 collimators, respectively.

  18. Beam Extraction and Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Kalvas, T.

    2013-12-16

    This chapter gives an introduction to low-energy beam transport systems, and discusses the typically used magnetostatic elements (solenoid, dipoles and quadrupoles) and electrostatic elements (einzel lens, dipoles and quadrupoles). The ion beam emittance, beam space-charge effects and the physics of ion source extraction are introduced. Typical computer codes for analysing and designing ion optical systems are mentioned, and the trajectory tracking method most often used for extraction simulations is described in more detail.

  19. Mechanical beam isolator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.; Vann, C.S.

    1996-10-01

    Back-reflections from a target, lenses, etc. can gain energy passing backwards through a laser just like the main beam gains energy passing forwards. Unless something blocks these back-reflections early in their path, they can seriously damage the laser. A Mechanical Beam Isolator is a device that blocks back-reflections early, relatively inexpensively, and without introducing aberrations to the laser beam

  20. Cyclotron radiation beam control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominke, P.

    1983-01-01

    This patent application describes an apparatus for attenuating a beam of particulate radiation comprising a series of modules, each module being constituted by a sphere having a passage, a cupola covering said sphere and a base supporting said sphere, and means for causing movement of the spheres for aligning said passages with an axis of a beam line and arranging said passages out of alignment so as to attenuate the beam. (author)

  1. Chilled beam application guidebook

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, David; Gräslund, Jonas; Hogeling, Jaap; Lund Kristiansen, Erik; Reinikanen, Mika; Svensson, Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    Chilled beam systems are primarily used for cooling and ventilation in spaces, which appreciate good indoor environmental quality and individual space control. Active chilled beams are connected to the ventilation ductwork, high temperature cold water, and when desired, low temperature hot water system. Primary air supply induces room air to be recirculated through the heat exchanger of the chilled beam. In order to cool or heat the room either cold or warm water is cycled through the heat exchanger.

  2. Who needs hyperon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    Hyperon beams can provide new interesting information about hadron structure and their strong, electromagnetic and weak interactions. The dependence of hadron interactions on strangeness and baryon number is not understood, and data from hyperon beams can provide new clues to paradoxes which arise in the interpretation of data from conventional beams. Examples of interesting data are total and differential cross sections, magnetic moments and values of Gsub(A)/Gsub(V) for weak semileptonic decays. (author)

  3. Performance of Focused Ion Beam Trimmed Yoke-Type Magnetoresistive Heads for Magnetic Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips, G.N.; Eisenberg, M.; Eisenberg, Martin; Draaisma, Eddie A.; Abelmann, Leon; Lodder, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Thin-film yoke-type magnetoresistive (MR) tape heads with eight channels have been used for scanning mag-netoresistance microscopy. The NiFe read flux guides of the channels have been trimmed down from 12 um to widths varying between 5 um and 100 nm by focused ion-beam milling with Ga+ions. The

  4. Impact of Cyclic Loading on Chloride Diffusivity and Mechanical Performance of RC Beams under Seawater Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Pang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was conducted to investigate the impact of cyclic loading on the mechanical performance and chloride diffusivity of RC beams exposed to seawater wet-dry cycles. To induce initial damage to RC beam specimen, cyclic loading controlled by max load and cycles was applied. Then beam specimens underwent 240 wet-dry cycles of seawater. Results show that the chloride content increased as max load and cycle increased. The chloride content at steel surface increased approximatively linearly as average crack width increased. Moreover, the max load had more influence on chloride content at steel surface than cycle. The difference of average chloride diffusion coefficient between tension and compression concrete was little at uncracked position. Average chloride diffusion coefficient increased as crack width increased when crack width was less than 0.11 mm whereas the increasing tendency was weak when crack width exceeded 0.11 mm. The residual yield load and ultimate load of RC beams decreased as max load and cycle increased. Based on univariate analysis of variance, the max load had more adverse effect on yield load and ultimate load than cycle.

  5. Instability of compensated beam-beam collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Autin, B.; Chen, Pisin.

    1989-01-01

    The beam-beam disruption phenomena in linear colliders are increasingly seen as a source of serious problems for these machines. A plasma compensation scheme, in which the motion of the plasma electrons in the presence of the colliding beams provides neutralizing charge and current densities, has been proposed and studied. But natural alternative to this scheme is to consider the overlapping of nearly identical high energy e + and e/sup /minus// bunches, and the collision of two such pairs - in other words, collision of two opposing relativistic positronium plasmas. It should be noticed that while the luminosity for all collisions is increased by a factor of four in this scheme, the event rate for e + e/sup /minus// collisions is only increased by a factor of two. The other factor of two corresponds to the addition of e + e + and e/sup /minus//e/sup /minus// collisions to the interaction point. This beam compensation scheme, which has been examined through computer simulation by Balakin and Solyak in the Soviet Union, promises full neutralization of beam charges and currents. These numerical investigations have shown that plasma instabilities exist in this nominally neutral system. Although the implementation of this idea seems technically daunting, the potential benefits (beamstrahlung and disruption suppression, relaxation of final focus system constraints) are such that we should consider the physics of these collisions further. In the remainder of this paper, we theoretically analyze the issues of stability and bunch parameter tolerances in this scheme. 11 refs

  6. Effect of surface texture by ion beam sputtering on implant biocompatibility and soft tissue attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, D. F.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives in this report were to use the ion beam sputtering technique to produce surface textures on polymers, metals, and ceramics. The morphology of the texture was altered by varying both the width and depth of the square pits which were formed by ion beam erosion. The width of the ribs separating the pits were defined by the mask used to produce the texture. The area of the surface containing pits varies as the width was changed. The biological parameters used to evaluate the biological response to the texture were: (1) fibrous capsule and inflammatory response in subcutaneous soft tissue; (2) strength of the mechanical attachment of the textured surface by the soft tissue; and (3) morphology of the epidermal layer interfacing the textured surface of percutaneous connectors. Because the sputter yield on teflon ribs was approximately an order of magnitude larger than any other material the majority of the measurements presented in the report were obtained with teflon.

  7. Determination by transfer reaction of alpha widths in fluorine for astrophysical interest; Determination par reaction de transfert de largeurs alpha dans le fluor 19. Applications a l'astrophysique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira Santos, F. de

    1995-04-15

    The nucleosynthesis of fluorine is not known. Several astrophysical models predict the alpha radiative capture onto N{sup 15} as the main fluorine production reaction. In the expression of the reaction rate, one parameter is missing: the alpha width of the resonance on the E = 4.377 MeV level in fluorine. A direct measurement is excluded due to the very low cross-section expected. We have determined this alpha width using a transfer reaction followed by analyses with FR-DWBA (Finite Range Distorted Wave Born Approximation) in a simple cluster alpha model. This experiment was carried out with a Li{sup 7} beam with E = 28 MeV onto a N{sup 15} gas target. The 16 first levels were studied. Spectroscopic factors were extracted for most of them. Alpha widths for unbound levels were determined. Many alpha width were compared with known values from direct reaction and the differences lie within the uncertainty range (factor 2). The alpha width for the E = 4.377 MeV level was determined ({gamma}{sub {alpha}} = 1.5*10{sup -15} MeV), its value is about 60 times weaker than the used value. The influence of our new rate was studied in AGB (Asymptotic Giant Branch) stars during thermal pulses. In this model the alteration is sensitive. (author)

  8. Dual-beam CRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A dual-beam cathode-ray tube having a pair of electron guns and associated deflection means disposed side-by-side on each side of a central axis is described. The electron guns are parallel and the deflection means includes beam centering plates and angled horizontal deflection plates to direct the electron beams toward the central axis, precluding the need for a large-diameter tube neck in which the entire gun structures are angled. Bowing control plates are disposed adjacent to the beam centering plates to minimize trace bowing, and an intergun shield is disposed between the horizontal deflection plates to control and correct display pattern geometry distortion

  9. GANIL beam profile detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribouillard, C.

    1997-01-01

    In the design phase of GANIL which started in 1977, one of the priorities of the project management was equipping the beamlines with a fast and efficient system for visualizing the beam position, thus making possible adjustment of the beam transport lines optics and facilitating beam control. The implantation of some thirty detectors was foreseen in the initial design. The assembly of installed detectors (around 190) proves the advantages of these detectors for displaying all the beams extracted from GANIL: transfer and transport lines, beam extracted from SISSI, very high intensity beam, secondary ion beams from the production target of the LISE and SPEG spectrometers, different SPIRAL project lines. All of these detectors are based on standard characteristics: - standard flange diameter (DN 160) with a standard booster for all the sensors; - identical analog electronics for all the detectors, with networking; - unique display system. The new micro-channel plate non-interceptive detectors (beam profile and ion packet lengths) make possible in-line control of the beam quality and accelerator stability. (author)

  10. ALFA beam halo

    CERN Document Server

    Komarek, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    This note serves as a final report about CERN Summer Student Programme 2014 project. The beam halo is an undesired phenomenon for physics analyses on particle accelerators. It surrounds the beam core and constitutes an important part of background for signal measurements on some detectors, eg. in the forward region. In this study, the data from the ALFA detector were used, specifically from the run 191373 ($\\beta^*=90\\unit{m}$) and the run 213268 ($\\beta^*=1\\unit{km}$). Using the ROOT framework, a software for beam halo events selection was created and beam halo properties were examined. In the run 213268, excessive beam halo is suspected to be the reason for multiple beam scrapings that occurred. A kinematic reconstruction of beam halo particles is attempted in order to understand beam halo properties in the interaction point. Some further simulations are employed to find constraints for beam halo particles in order to survive in the accelerator for a longer time/many revolutions. This work represents a st...

  11. Simulation of Beam-Beam Background at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Sailer, Andre

    2010-01-01

    The dense beams used at CLIC to achieve a high luminosity will cause a large amount of background particles through beam-beam interactions. Generator level studies with GuineaPig and full detector simulation studies with an ILD based CLIC detector have been performed to evaluate the amount of beam-beam background hitting the vertex detector.

  12. Simulation of Beam-Beam Background at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Sailer, A

    2010-01-01

    The dense beams used at CLIC to achieve a high luminosity will cause a large amount of background particles through beam-beam interactions. Generator level studies with GUINEAPIG and full detector simulation studies with an ILD based CLIC detector have been performed to evaluate the amount of beam-beam back- ground hitting the vertex detector.

  13. Spatial modifications of three-dimensional elliptic Gaussian beam scattered by two-dimensional periodic array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gribovsky

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The diffraction problem of a three-dimensional elliptic p- polarized Gaussian beam on an aperture array of rectangular holes is solved. The new algorithm for the solution of three-dimensional scattering problems of linearly polarized wave beams on two-dimensional periodic structures is offered. The given algorithm allows exploring of wave beams with any allocation of a field on cross section. The case of oblique incidence of linearly polarized elliptic Gaussian wave beam on two-dimensional periodic structure is viewed. As structure the rectangular waveguides phased antenna array is chosen. The elliptic shape of a beam cross section gives the chance to proportion energy of an incident field in a plane of an antenna array in the chosen direction. The frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient intensity for the Gaussian beam is calculated. For the analysis of patterns of the reflected and transmitted beams in a far zone the frequencies on which the strongest interaction between next waveguides channels is observed have been chosen. Dynamics of patterns transformation of the reflected and transmitted beams depending on the form of cross-section and a polarization direction of an incident beam on different frequencies is investigated. It is determined that shape of the pattern of reflected and transmitted beams (symmetry, asymmetry, bifurcation, amplitude, width depends on chosen spatial orientation of the ellipse axes of the cross section in the incident beam. Frequency ranges, in which the form of the reflected and transmitted beams is not Gaussian, are defined. The nature of transformation of the patterns of scattered beams was examined. Narrowing effect of the pattern of transmitted beam and deformation of the pattern of reflected beam is detected. A physical explanation of these effects is given. The results are presented in the form of two- and three-dimensional patterns of the scattered field of beams in the far field.

  14. Limits on estimating the width of thin tubular structures in 3D images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörz, Stefan; Rohr, Karl

    2006-01-01

    This work studies limits on estimating the width of thin tubular structures in 3D images. Based on nonlinear estimation theory we analyze the minimal stochastic error of estimating the width. Given a 3D analytic model of the image intensities of tubular structures, we derive a closed-form expression for the Cramér-Rao bound of the width estimate under image noise. We use the derived lower bound as a benchmark and compare it with three previously proposed accuracy limits for vessel width estimation. Moreover, by experimental investigations we demonstrate that the derived lower bound can be achieved by fitting a 3D parametric intensity model directly to the image data.

  15. Thermal conductivity engineering in width-modulated silicon nanowires and thermoelectric efficiency enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zianni, Xanthippi

    2018-03-01

    Width-modulated nanowires have been proposed as efficient thermoelectric materials. Here, the electron and phonon transport properties and the thermoelectric efficiency are discussed for dimensions above the quantum confinement regime. The thermal conductivity decreases dramatically in the presence of thin constrictions due to their ballistic thermal resistance. It shows a scaling behavior upon the width-modulation rate that allows for thermal conductivity engineering. The electron conductivity also decreases due to enhanced boundary scattering by the constrictions. The effect of boundary scattering is weaker for electrons than for phonons and the overall thermoelectric efficiency is enhanced. A ZT enhancement by a factor of 20-30 is predicted for width-modulated nanowires compared to bulk silicon. Our findings indicate that width-modulated nanostructures are promising for developing silicon nanostructures with high thermoelectric efficiency.

  16. Optimum filters with time width constraints for liquid argon total-absorption detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatti, E.; Radeka, V.

    1977-10-01

    Optimum filter responses are found for triangular current input pulses occurring in liquid argon ionization chambers used as total absorption detectors. The filters considered are subject to the following constraints: finite width of the output pulse having a prescribed ratio to the width of the triangular input current pulse and zero area of a bipolar antisymmetrical pulse or of a three lobe pulse, as required for high event rates. The feasibility of pulse shaping giving an output equal to, or shorter than, the input one is demonstrated. It is shown that the signal-to-noise ratio remains constant for the chamber interelectrode gap which gives an input pulse width (i.e., electron drift time) greater than one third of the required output pulse width

  17. Total Ionizing Dose Test Report for the UC1823A Pulse Width Modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dakai; Forney, James

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the total ionizing dose susceptibility for the UC1823A pulse width modulator manufactured by Texas Instruments, Inc. The part is suspected to be vulnerable to enhanced low dose rate sensitivity (ELDRS).

  18. Correlation of masseter muscle thickness and intermolar width - an ultrasonography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tircoveluri, Saritha; Singh, Johar Rajvinder; Rayapudi, Naveen; Karra, Arjun; Begum, Mohammadi; Challa, Padmalatha

    2013-04-01

    To determine the association between the thickness of masseter muscle and the maxillary dental arch width. To explore the influence of gender on masseter muscle thickness. Seventy subjects (35 females and 35 males) of age 18 to 25 years were selected for the study based on class I molar relationship. The masseter muscle thickness of the right and left sides in every subject were found out through ultrasound scanning of the muscle, in both relaxed and clenched states. The maxillary dental arch width was measured on the study model with an electronic caliper. Student t test, Pearson's Correlation Coefficient was performed to assess the sample. Masseter Muscle Thickness showed a positive correlation with Maxillary Dental Arch Width r ≤0.74. The masseter muscle thickness is greater in male subjects in both relaxed (0.001Challa P L. Correlation of Masseter Muscle Thickness and Intermolar Width - An Ultrasonography Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(2):28-34.

  19. Factors determining variations in otolith microincrement width of demersal juvenile Baltic cod Gadus morhua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüssy, Karin; Mosegaard, Henrik; Hinrichsen, H.H.

    2003-01-01

    Pelagic and demersal juvenile Baltic cod Gadus morhua L. were collected on the slope and the top of Rønne bank in the Baltic Sea during 2 cruises in November and December 1998. The objective of this study was to evaluate distinct changes in otolith increment width observed in demersal juveniles...... by comparison with laboratory-reared individuals, and to investigate the factors determining variation in these increments. The different increment-width patterns were identified with a method based on the widths of consecutive increments. Otolith increment widths of juvenile cod were found to be highly...... on otolith growth rates of juvenile cod reared in the laboratory under different conditions. In this model, otolith growth rate was expressed as a function of rearing temperature and fish dry weight. Otolith growth of the field samples was calculated using ambient temperatures obtained from a 3D...

  20. Ab initio calculation of ICD widths in photoexcited HeNe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabbari, G.; Klaiman, S.; Chiang, Y.-C.; Gokhberg, K., E-mail: kirill@pci.uni-heidelberg.de [Theoretische Chemie, Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 229, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Trinter, F.; Jahnke, T. [Institut für Kernphysik, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2014-06-14

    Excitation of HeNe by synchrotron light just below the frequency of the 1s → 3p transition of isolated He has been recently shown to be followed by resonant interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD). The vibrationally resolved widths of the ICD states were extracted with high precision from the photoion spectra. In this paper, we report the results of ab initio calculations of these widths. We show that interaction between electronic states at about the equilibrium distance of HeNe makes dark states of He accessible for the photoexcitation and subsequent electronic decay. Moreover, the values of the calculated widths are shown to be strongly sensitive to the presence of the non-adiabatic coupling between the electronic states participating in the decay. Therefore, only by considering the complete manifold of interacting decaying electronic states a good agreement between the measured and computed ICD widths can be achieved.

  1. Geometric optimization using Monte Carlo simulations of mini-beams of radiation synchrotron; Optimizacion geometrica mediante simulacion Monte Carlo de minihaces de radiacion sincrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manchado de Sola, F.; Vilches Pacheco, M.; Lallena Rojo, A. M.; Prezado, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Still in testing phase, radiation therapy with mini-beams is presented as a promising form of treatment. The irradiation with beams constituted by a group of parallel strips of radiation and shade (peaks and valleys), each an of the which has a width of the order of microns. We studied using Monte Carlo simulation, the effect of the brain caused by the heartbeat pulsed on the reason of dose peak-valley in cranial radiotherapy with mini-beams, depending on the width of peak and the rate of irradiation. (Author)

  2. Changes in soft tissue nasal widths associated with rapid maxillary expansion in prepubertal and postpubertal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bret M; McNamara, James A; Bandeen, Roger L; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate changes in the soft tissue width of the nose induced by rapid maxillary expansion (RME). Data on greater alar cartilage (GAC) and alar base (AB) widths were compared with a normative sample within the same age range. This prospective study consisted of an RME sample of 79 patients treated with an RME protocol. Mean age at the start of RME treatment was 13.5 years; average duration of treatment was 6.7 months. Patients were grouped into prepubertal and postpubertal groups based on their cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) stage. AB and GAC widths were determined at three separate time points. The normative sample consisted of 437 orthodontically untreated whites, aged 10-16 years. A repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine group differences. In addition, independent sample t-tests were used to compare posttreatment nasal width values vs the untreated normative sample. Increases in AB and GAC widths of the nose in the RME sample were less than 1.5 mm. No significant differences were noted in width changes between the prepubertal and postpubertal subgroups. Comparisons of T3 values showed that on average nasal width increases were greater in the RME group than in untreated norms by 1.7 mm for the GAC measure (statistically significant), and by less than 1 mm for the AB measure. RME has no significant clinical effects on the widths of the apical base and the greater alar cartilage of the nose; no differences were observed between the two maturational subgroups.

  3. Measurment of the masses and widths of [ital L]=1 charmed mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frabetti, P.L.; Cheung, H.W.K.; Cumalat, J.P.; Dallapiccola, C.; Ginkel, J.F.; Greene, S.V.; Johns, W.E.; Nehring, M.S.; Butler, J.N.; Cihangir, S.; Gaines, I.; Garbincius, P.H.; Garren, L.; Gourlay, S.A.; Harding, D.J.; Kasper, P.; Kreymer, A.; Lebrun, P.; Shukla, S.; Vittone, M.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.L.; Sarwar, S.; Zallo, A.; Culbertson, R.; Gardner, R.W.; Greene, R.; Wiss, J.; Alimonti, G.; Bellini, G.; Caccianiga, B.; Cinquini, L.; Di Corato, M.; Giammarchi, M.; Inzani, P.; Leveraro, F.; Malvezzi, S.; Menasce, D.; Meroni, E.; Moroni, L.; Pedrini, D.; Perasso, L.; Sala, A.; Sala, S.; Torretta, D.; Buchholz, D.; Claes, D.; Gobbi, B.; O' Reilly, B.; Bishop, J.M.; Cason, N.M.; Kennedy, C.J.; Kim, G.N.; Lin, T.F.; Puseljic, D.L.; Ruchti, R.C.; Shephard, W.D.; Swiatek, J.A.; Wu, Z.Y.; Arena, V.; Boca, G.; Castoldi, C.; Gianini, G.; Ratti, S.P.; Riccardi, C.; Vitulo, P.; Lopez, A.; Grim, G.P.; Paolone, V.S.; Yager, P.M.; Wilson, J.R.; Sheldon, P.D.; Davenport, F.; Filaseta, J.F.; Blacket; (E687 Collaboration)

    1994-01-17

    We report the measurement of masses and widths of the following [ital L]=1 charm mesons by the E687 Collaboration at Fermilab: a [ital D][sub 2][sup *0] state of mass (width) 2453[plus minus]3[plus minus]2 (25[plus minus]10[plus minus]5) MeV/[ital c][sup 2] decaying to [ital D][sup +][pi][sup [minus

  4. Effect of width and boundary conditions on meeting maneuvers on two-way separated cycle tracks

    OpenAIRE

    García García, Alfredo; Agustin Gomez, Fernando; Llorca Garcia, Carlos; Angel-Domenech, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Cycle track design guidelines are rarely based on scientific studies. In the case of off-road two-way cycle tracks, a minimum width must facilitate both passing and meeting maneuvers, being meeting maneuvers the most frequent. This study developed a methodology to observe meeting maneuvers using an instrumented bicycle, equipped with video cameras, a GPS tracker, laser rangefinders and speed sensors. This bicycle collected data on six two-way cycle tracks ranging 13-2.15 m width delimitated b...

  5. Study of the fluctuations of the partial and total radiative widths by neutron capture resonance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huynh, V.D.

    1965-06-01

    Radiative capture experiments by neutron time-of-flight methods have been made for following studies: distribution of partial radiative widths, effects of correlation between different radiative transitions, fluctuations of total radiative widths Γ γ from resonance to resonance, variation of Γ γ with number of mass and the search for the existence of potential capture. Also, some other experiments with the use of neutron capture gamma-rays spectra have been investigated. (author) [fr

  6. Study of curved crystal spectrometer and investigation of variation of line width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javahery, R.

    1975-01-01

    In this study different types of spectrometer curved crystals, NaI(T1) scintillation detectors, and semiconductors are compared for efficiency and line width. Although the efficiencies of curved crystal spectrometers are very low, their resolution is better than any other α and γ rays spectrometer. The design, the automation for crystal rotation and automation for angular position reading are briefly explained. For curved crystal spectrometer, the calibration curve is obtained and the line width versus the diaphragm aperture is measured

  7. Progressive changes in arch width from primary to early mixed dentition period: A longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    S Sangwan; H S Chawla; A Goyal; K Gauba; U Mohanty

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The present study was conducted to evaluate, on a longitudinal basis, the changes in intercanine and intermolar widths form the primary to the early mixed dentition periods. Materials and Methods: A total of 38 children aged 4-5 years, with normal occlusion without any proximal caries or any dental anomalies, were selected. The impressions were recorded and casts were prepared. Intercanine and intermolar widths were measured on these dental casts with the help of a digital vernier ...

  8. Residual-interaction renormalization effect on the spherical-nuclei α-decay absolute widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitresku, T.; Kadmenskij, S.G.; Lomachenkov, I.A.; Kholan, S.; Furman, V.I.

    1978-01-01

    In the framework of the shell model approximation for the probabilities of alpha-decay the exact formulas (for alpha-widths) taking into account the contribution of density dependent effective interaction between nucleons forming the emitted alpha-particle are obtained. In agreement with previous estimations the numerical calculation reveals that the inclusion of the above-mentioned interaction is followed by some decrease of absolute alpha-widths

  9. Quark-mixing renormalization effects on the W-boson partial decay widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almasy, A.A.; Kniehl, B.A.; Sirlin, A.

    2008-10-01

    We briefly review existing proposals for the renormalization of the Cabibbo- Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix and study their numerical effects on the W-boson partial decay widths. The differences between the decay widths predicted by the various renormalization schemes are generally negligible, while their deviations from the MS results are very small, except for W + → u anti b and W + →c anti b, where they reach approximately 4%. (orig.)

  10. 16 CFR 500.12 - Measurement of commodities by length and width, how expressed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... square foot (929 cm2) be expressed in terms of length and width in linear measure. The customary inch... of 1 square foot (929 cm2) or more, but less than 4 square feet (37.1 dm2), be expressed in terms of... (10.16 cm) or less, the declaration of net quantity shall be expressed in terms of width and length in...

  11. Fast pencil beam dose calculation for proton therapy using a double-Gaussian beam model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joakim eda Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The highly conformal dose distributions produced by scanned proton pencil beams are more sensitive to motion and anatomical changes than those produced by conventional radiotherapy. The ability to calculate the dose in real time as it is being delivered would enable, for example, online dose monitoring, and is therefore highly desirable. We have previously described an implementation of a pencil beam algorithm running on graphics processing units (GPUs intended specifically for online dose calculation. Here we present an extension to the dose calculation engine employing a double-Gaussian beam model to better account for the low-dose halo. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first such pencil beam algorithm for proton therapy running on a GPU. We employ two different parametrizations for the halo dose, one describing the distribution of secondary particles from nuclear interactions found in the literature and one relying on directly fitting the model to Monte Carlo simulations of pencil beams in water. Despite the large width of the halo contribution, we show how in either case the second Gaussian can be included whilst prolonging the calculation of the investigated plans by no more than 16%, or the calculation of the most time-consuming energy layers by about 25%. Further, the calculation time is relatively unaffected by the parametrization used, which suggests that these results should hold also for different systems. Finally, since the implementation is based on an algorithm employed by a commercial treatment planning system, it is expected that with adequate tuning, it should be able to reproduce the halo dose from a general beam line with sufficient accuracy.

  12. An efficient forward model of the climate controls on interannual variation in tree-ring width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolwinski-Ward, Susan E. [University of Arizona, Program in Applied Mathematics, Tucson, AZ (United States); Evans, Michael N. [University of Maryland, Department of Geology, College Park, MD (United States); Hughes, Malcolm K. [University of Arizona, Laboratory of Tree Ring Research, Tucson, AZ (United States); Anchukaitis, Kevin J. [Columbia University, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Pallisades, NY (United States)

    2011-06-15

    We present a simple, efficient, process-based forward model of tree-ring growth, called Vaganov-Shashkin-Lite (VS-Lite), that requires as inputs only latitude and monthly temperature and precipitation. Simulations of six bristlecone pine ring-width chronologies demonstrate the interpretability of model output as an accurate representation of the climatic controls on growth. Ensemble simulations by VS-Lite of two networks of North American ring-width chronologies correlate with observations at higher significance levels on average than simulations formed by regression of ring width on the principal components of the same monthly climate data. VS-Lite retains more skill outside of calibration intervals than does the principal components regression approach. It captures the dominant low- and high-frequency spatiotemporal ring-width signals in the network with an inhomogeneous, multivariate relationship to climate. Because continuous meteorological data are most widely available at monthly temporal resolution, our model extends the set of sites at which forward-modeling studies are possible. Other potential uses of VS-Lite include generation of synthetic ring-width series for pseudo-proxy studies, as a data level model in data assimilation-based climate reconstructions, and for bias estimation in actual ring-width index series. (orig.)

  13. Occlusal Classification in Relation to Original Cleft Width in Patients With Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Andrew H; Patel, Kamlesh B; Maschhoff, Clayton W; Huebener, Donald V; Skolnick, Gary B; Naidoo, Sybill D; Woo, Albert S

    2015-09-01

    To determine a correlation between the width of the cleft palate measured at the time of lip adhesion, definitive lip repair, and palatoplasty and the subsequent occlusal classification of patients born with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Retrospective, observational study. Referral, urban, children's hospital Participants : Dental models and records of 270 patients were analyzed. None. Angle occlusion classification. The mean age at which occlusal classification was determined was 11 ± 0.3 years. Of the children studies, 84 were diagnosed with Class I or II occlusion, 67 were diagnosed with Class III occlusion, and 119 were lost to follow up or transferred care. Mean cleft widths were significantly larger in subjects with Class III occlusion for all measures at time of lip adhesion and definitive lip repair (P cleft widths were significantly greater at the alveolus (P = .025) but not at the midportion of the hard palate (P = .35) or posterior hard palate (P = .10). Cleft widths from the lip through to the posterior hard palate are generally greater in children who are diagnosed with Class III occlusion later in life. Notably, the alveolar cleft width is significantly greater at each time point for patients who went on to develop Class III occlusion. There were no significant differences in cleft widths between patients diagnosed later with Class I and Class II occlusions.

  14. Influence of slot width on the performance of multi-stage overtopping wave energy converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirirat Jungrungruengtaworn

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A two-dimensional numerical investigation is performed to study the influence of slot width of multi-stage stationary floating overtopping wave energy devices on overtopping flow rate and performance. The hydraulic efficiency based on captured crest energy of different device layouts is compared with that of single-stage device to determine the effect of the geometrical design. The results show optimal trends giving a huge increase in overtopping energy. Plots of efficiency versus the relative slot width show that, for multi-stage devices, the greatest hydraulic efficiency is achieved at an intermediate value of the variable within the parametric range considered, relative slot width of 0.15 and 0.2 depending on design layouts. Moreover, an application of adaptive slot width of multi-stage device is investigated. The numerical results show that the overall hydraulic efficiency of non-adaptive and adaptive slot devices are approximately on par. The effect of adaptive slot width on performance can be negligible. Keywords: Wave energy converter, Overtopping, Multi-stage, Slot width

  15. Skyrmion dynamics in width-varying nanotracks and implications for skyrmionic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Kang, Wang; Zhu, Daoqian; Zhang, Xichao; Lei, Na; Zhang, Youguang; Zhou, Yan; Zhao, Weisheng

    2017-11-01

    A comprehensive study of the magnetic skyrmion dynamics in terms of size, velocity, energy, and stability in width-varying nanotracks is reported by micromagnetic simulations. We find that the diameter of a skyrmion reduces with the decrease in the nanotrack width in the spin Hall effect (SHE)-induced skyrmion motion. Accordingly, the skyrmion energy increases giving rise to the growing instability of the skyrmion. It is also numerically demonstrated that the velocity of the skyrmion varies during the motion, since the repulsive force of the nanotrack edges acting on the skyrmion as well as the driving force created by the SHE associated with the size of the skyrmion have a joint impact on the skyrmion motion dynamics in the width-varying nanotrack. In addition, one interesting finding reveals that skyrmions with small sizes, which may be inaccessible to typical approaches by means of directly injecting a spin-polarized current, could be obtained by utilizing this structure. This finding is potential for generating nanoscale skyrmions in skyrmionic applications with ultra-dense density. Finally, inspired by the skyrmion dynamics in the width-varying nanotrack, a general summary on the tradeoff between the nanotrack width (storage density) and the skyrmion velocity (data access speed) is given by further analyzing the skyrmion dynamics in parallel nanotracks with different widths, which may provide guidelines in designing racetrack-type skyrmionic applications.

  16. Statistical evaluation of metal fill widths for emulated metal fill in parasitic extraction methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    J-Me, Teh; Noh, Norlaili Mohd.; Aziz, Zalina Abdul

    2015-05-01

    In the chip industry today, the key goal of a chip development organization is to develop and market chips within a short time frame to gain foothold on market share. This paper proposes a design flow around the area of parasitic extraction to improve the design cycle time. The proposed design flow utilizes the usage of metal fill emulation as opposed to the current flow which performs metal fill insertion directly. By replacing metal fill structures with an emulation methodology in earlier iterations of the design flow, this is targeted to help reduce runtime in fill insertion stage. Statistical design of experiments methodology utilizing the randomized complete block design was used to select an appropriate emulated metal fill width to improve emulation accuracy. The experiment was conducted on test cases of different sizes, ranging from 1000 gates to 21000 gates. The metal width was varied from 1 x minimum metal width to 6 x minimum metal width. Two-way analysis of variance and Fisher's least significant difference test were used to analyze the interconnect net capacitance values of the different test cases. This paper presents the results of the statistical analysis for the 45 nm process technology. The recommended emulated metal fill width was found to be 4 x the minimum metal width.

  17. Anomalous width variation of rarefactive ion acoustic solitary waves in the context of auroral plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Ghosh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of dynamic, large amplitude solitary waves in the auroral regions of space is well known. Since their velocities are of the order of the ion acoustic speed, they may well be considered as being generated from the nonlinear evolution of ion acoustic waves. However, they do not show the expected width-amplitude correlation for K-dV solitons. Recent POLAR observations have actually revealed that the low altitude rarefactive ion acoustic solitary waves are associated with an increase in the width with increasing amplitude. This indicates that a weakly nonlinear theory is not appropriate to describe the solitary structures in the auroral regions. In the present work, a fully nonlinear analysis based on Sagdeev pseudopotential technique has been adopted for both parallel and oblique propagation of rarefactive solitary waves in a two electron temperature multi-ion plasma. The large amplitude solutions have consistently shown an increase in the width with increasing amplitude. The width-amplitude variation profile of obliquely propagating rarefactive solitary waves in a magnetized plasma have been compared with the recent POLAR observations. The width-amplitude variation pattern is found to fit well with the analytical results. It indicates that a fully nonlinear theory of ion acoustic solitary waves may well explain the observed anomalous width variations of large amplitude structures in the auroral region.

  18. Non-invasive monitoring of therapeutic carbon ion beams in a homogeneous phantom by tracking of secondary ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwosch, K.; Hartmann, B.; Jakubek, J.; Granja, C.; Soukup, P.; Jäkel, O.; Martišíková, M.

    2013-06-01

    Radiotherapy with narrow scanned carbon ion beams enables a highly accurate treatment of tumours while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. Changes in the patient’s geometry can alter the actual ion range in tissue and result in unfavourable changes in the dose distribution. Consequently, it is desired to verify the actual beam delivery within the patient. Real-time and non-invasive measurement methods are preferable. Currently, the only technically feasible method to monitor the delivered dose distribution within the patient is based on tissue activation measurements by means of positron emission tomography (PET). An alternative monitoring method based on tracking of prompt secondary ions leaving a patient irradiated with carbon ion beams has been previously suggested. It is expected to help in overcoming the limitations of the PET-based technique like physiological washout of the beam induced activity, low signal and to allow for real-time measurements. In this paper, measurements of secondary charged particle tracks around a head-sized homogeneous PMMA phantom irradiated with pencil-like carbon ion beams are presented. The investigated energies and beam widths are within the therapeutically used range. The aim of the study is to deduce properties of the primary beam from the distribution of the secondary charged particles. Experiments were performed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center, Germany. The directions of secondary charged particles emerging from the PMMA phantom were measured using an arrangement of two parallel pixelated silicon detectors (Timepix). The distribution of the registered particle tracks was analysed to deduce its dependence on clinically important beam parameters: beam range, width and position. Distinct dependencies of the secondary particle tracks on the properties of the primary carbon ion beam were observed. In the particular experimental set-up used, beam range differences of 1.3 mm were detectable. In addition, variations

  19. To the Theory of a TEM-Horn with Beams Excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirichenko, Yu.V.; Lonin, Yu.F.; Onishchenko, I.N.

    2006-01-01

    In operation the theoretical model of beams excitation of a TEM-horn surveyed, at generation of a UWB-signal by a ultrashort high-current relativistic beams. At excitation of the isolated helical antenna by a high-current relativistic beams of nanosecond duration. Infinite is considered lengthwise axis x a thick enough theoretically carrying out bar of width L. On edge of this bar at z=) there is a charge with known time-dependent density ρ (t). It is supposed, what ρ (t) fast enough decreases at t→ ∞ and t→ ∞. The numerical analysis of a normalized directional diagram is reduced

  20. Generation and investigation of terahertz Airy beam realized using parallel-plate waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mengru; Lang, Tingting; Shi, Guohua; Han, Zhanghua

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the launching of Airy beam in the terahertz region using waveguiding structures was proposed, designed and numerically characterized. By properly designing the waveguide slit width and the packing number in different sections of parallel-plate waveguides (PPWGs) array, arbitrary phase delay and lateral position-dependent amplitude transmission through the structure, required to realize the target Airy beam profile, can be easily fulfilled. Airy beams working at the frequency of 0.3 THz with good non-diffracting, self-bending, and self-healing features are demonstrated. This study represents a new alternative to scattering-based metasurface structures, and can be utilized in many modern applications.

  1. Neutral Beam Injection for Plasma and Magnetic Field Diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vainionpaa, Jaakko Hannes; Leung, Ka Ngo; Kwan, Joe W.; Levinton, Fred

    2007-01-01

    At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) a diagnostic neutral beam injection system for measuring plasma parameters, flow velocity, and local magnetic field is being developed. High proton fraction and small divergence is essential for diagnostic neutral beams. In our design, a neutral hydrogen beam with an 8 cm x 11 cm (or smaller) elliptical beam spot at 2.5 m from the end of the extraction column is produced. The beam will deliver up to 5 A of hydrogen beam to the target with a pulse width of ∼1 s, once every 1-2 min. The H1+ ion species of the hydrogen beam will be over 90 percent. For this application, we have compared two types of RF driven multicusp ion sources operating at 13.56MHz. The first one is an ion source with an external spiral antenna behind a dielectric RF-window. The second one uses an internal antenna in similar ion source geometry. The source needs to generate uniform plasma over a large (8 cm x 5 cm) extraction area. We expect that the ion source with internal antenna will be more efficient at producing the desired plasma density but might have the issue of limited antenna lifetime, depending on the duty factor. For both approaches there is a need for extra shielding to protect the dielectric materials from the backstreaming electrons. The source walls will be made of insulator material such as quartz that has been observed to generate plasma with higher atomic fraction than sources with metal walls. The ion beam will be extracted and accelerated by a set of grids with slits, thus forming an array of 6 sheet-shaped beamlets. The multiple grid extraction will be optimized using computer simulation programs. Neutralization of the beam will be done in neutralization chamber, which has over 70 percent neutralization efficiency

  2. Electron beam diagnostics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garganne, P.

    1989-08-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a study on beam diagnostics, using carbon wire scanners and optical transition radiation (DTR) monitors. The main consideration consists in the material selection, taking their thermal properties and their effect on the beam into account [fr

  3. Atomic Ferris wheel beams

    OpenAIRE

    Lembessis, Vasileios E.

    2017-01-01

    We study the generation of atom vortex beams in the case where an atomic wave-packet, moving in free space, is diffracted from a properly tailored light mask with a spiral transverse profile. We show how such a diffraction scheme could lead to the production of an atomic Ferris wheel beam.

  4. Atomic Ferris wheel beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembessis, Vasileios E.

    2017-07-01

    We study the generation of atom vortex beams in the case where a Bose-Einstein condensate, released from a trap and moving in free space, is diffracted from a properly tailored light mask with a spiral transverse profile. We show how such a diffraction scheme could lead to the production of an atomic Ferris wheel beam.

  5. Ionization beam scanner

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    Inner structure of an ionization beam scanner, a rather intricate piece of apparatus which permits one to measure the density distribution of the proton beam passing through it. On the outside of the tank wall there is the coil for the longitudinal magnetic field, on the inside, one can see the arrangement of electrodes creating a highly homogeneous transverse electric field.

  6. Experimental study of the molecular beam destruction by beam-beam and beam-background scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossel, U.; Dettleff, G.

    1974-01-01

    The extraction of flow properties related to the molecular motion normal to stream lines of an expanding gas jet from observed intensity profiles of supersonic beams is critically assessed. The perturbation of the profile curves by various effects is studied for a helium beam. Exponential laws appear to describe scattering effects to a satisfactory degree

  7. Electron beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudjak, Yu.V.; Vladyko, V.B.

    1993-01-01

    The electron beam transport in ion channel has been investigated. The influence of the external longitudinal magnetic field and self beam magnetic field on the charge neutralization process was defined. Beam head erosion under channel is curved or the availability of transverse external magnetic field was numerically simulated. The numerical investigation of the ion-hose instability was performed. The conditions, when as a result of ion-hose instability development may be coming out of the channel by beam tail, were founded. It was shown, that supplementary creation of plasma by electron beam and ions did not lead to the reduction of ion-hose instability. Sufficient slowing down of ion-hose instability development could be achieved if betatron length increased to impulse tail. In the case of a weak initial nonsymmetrical perturbation, sausage instability was investigated. Numerical simulation showed that this instability could lead to beam radius increasing in order. The electron beam guiding by low conductive plasma channel was considered. The attractive force of beam to this channel under nonsymmetrical injection was defined analytically

  8. Durnin-Whitney beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesús Cabrera-Rosas, Omar; Espíndola-Ramos, Ernesto; Alejandro Juárez-Reyes, Salvador; Julián-Macías, Israel; Ortega-Vidals, Paula; Rickenstorff-Parrao, Carolina; Silva-Ortigoza, Gilberto; Silva-Ortigoza, Ramón; Sosa-Sánchez, Citlalli Teresa

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present work is to define a Durnin-Whitney beam as a nondiffracting beam such that its associated caustic locally only has singularities of the fold and cusp types. Since the caustic is structurally stable then the intensity pattern of this beam is also stable and this property is what makes its definition and its theoretical and experimental study worthwhile. These properties are important in applications such as uniform optical drilling in waveguides and communications through weak turbulent atmosphere. We find that in accordance with Whitney's theorem on the stability of maps from a two-dimensional manifold to a two-dimensional manifold the phase g({{Φ }}), of the complex function A({{Φ }}) characterizing the beam, locally is given by g({{Φ }})=a{{Φ }} for a fold and g({{Φ }})=b{{{Φ }}}2 for a cusp. This result implies that the Bessel beam of order zero is not stable and that any other Bessel beam is stable because locally it has a caustic of fold type. Finally, we present an example of a Durnin-Whitney beam given by g({{Φ }})=m{{Φ }}+b{{{Φ }}}2, which is a natural generalization of the Bessel beam of order m with a singularity of cusp ridge type.

  9. Dosimetry of pion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicello, J.F.

    1975-01-01

    Negative pion beams are probably the most esoteric and most complicated type of radiation which has been suggested for use in clinical radiotherapy. Because of the limited availability of pion beams in the past, even to nuclear physicists, there exist relatively fewer basic data for this modality. Pion dosimetry is discussed

  10. Beaming teaching application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovic, Milos; Madsen, Esben; Olesen, Søren Krarup

    2012-01-01

    BEAMING is a telepresence research project aiming at providing a multimodal interaction between two or more participants located at distant locations. One of the BEAMING applications allows a distant teacher to give a xylophone playing lecture to the students. Therefore, rendering of the xylophon...

  11. High energy gain electron beam acceleration by 100TW laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kando, Masaki; Kondo, Shuji; Hosokai, Tomonao; Kanazawa, Shuhei; Yokoyama, Takashi; Matoba, Toru; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    A laser wakefield acceleration experiment using a 100TW laser is planed at JAERI-Kansai. High quality and short pulse electron beams are necessary to accelerate the electron beam by the laser. Electron beam - laser synchronization is also necessary. A microtron with a photocathode rf-gun was prepared as a high quality electron injector. The quantum efficiency (QE) of the photocathode of 2x10 -5 was obtained. A charge of 100pC from the microtron was measured. The emittance and pulse width of the electron beam was 6π mm-mrad and 10ps, respectively. In order to produce a short pulse electron beam, and to synchronize between the electron beam and the laser pulse, an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) is planned. One of problems of LWFA is the short acceleration length. In order to overcome the problem, a Z-pinch plasma waveguide will be prepared as a laser wakefield acceleration tube for 1 GeV acceleration. (author)

  12. DARHT-II Long-Pulse Beam-Dynamics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Ekdahl, Carl; Bartsch, Richard; Bender, Howard; Briggs, Richard J; Broste, William; Carlson, Carl; Caudill, Larry; Chan, Kwok-Chi D; Chen Yu Jiuan; Dalmas, Dale; Durtschi, Grant; Eversole, Steven; Eylon, Shmuel; Fawley, William M; Frayer, Daniel; Gallegos, Robert J; Harrison, James; Henestroza, Enrique; Holzscheiter, M H; Houck, Timothy L; Hughes, Thomas P; Jacquez, Edward; Johnson, Douglas; Johnson, Jeffrey; Jones, Kenneth; McCuistian, Brian T; Meidinger, Alfred; Montoya, Nicholas; Mostrom, Chris; Moy, Kenneth; Nath, Subrata; Nielsen, Kurt; Oro, David; Rodriguez, Leroy; Rodriguez, Patrick; Rowton, Larry J; Sanchez, Manolito; Scarpetti, Raymond; Schauer, Martin; Schulze, Martin E; Simmons, David; Studebaker, Jan; Sturgess, Ronald; Sullivan, Gary; Swinney, Charles; Tang, Yan; Temple, Rodney; Tipton, Angela; Tom, C Y; Vernon Smith, H; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    When completed, the DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) will produce a 2-kA, 18-MeV electron beam with more than 1500-ns current/energy "flat-top." In initial tests DARHT-II has already accelerated beams with current pulse lengths from 500-ns to 1200-ns full-width at half maximum (FWHM) with more than1.2-kA, 12.5-MeV peak current and energy. Experiments are now underway with a ~2000-ns pulse length, but reduced current and energy. These pulse lengths are all significantly longer than any other multi-MeV LIA, and they define a novel regime for high-current beam dynamics, especially with regard to beam stability. Although the initial tests demonstrated absence of BBU, the pulse lengths were too short to test the predicted protection against ion-hose instability. The present experiments are designed to resolve these and other beam-dynamics issues with a ~2000-ns pulse length beam.

  13. Small angle scatter imaging from wide beam diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, Steven J; Rogers, Keith D; Hall, Chris J; Round, Adam R

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we report on the extension of the technique of mapping small angle x-ray scatter (SAXS) across a soft material specimen several millimetres square. In the conventional SAXS mapping technique a pencil beam of x-rays is raster scanned over the specimen with the scatter pattern recorded from each point in the raster. In our technique a wide, parallel beam is used, speeding up the data collection time considerably. An image processing algorithm is used to separate the scatter pattern features from individual points along the line of the beam. To test the efficacy of the technique a phantom was constructed using gelatin and rat tail tendon collagen. Collagen fibres in the phantom were arranged in quarters horizontally, diagonally and vertically leaving one quarter with just gelatin. The phantom was used to collect both raster scanned sets of SAXS patterns spaced at 0.25 mm horizontally and vertically and also a wide beam data set. The width of the beam in this case was approximately 7 mm. Using the third-order diffraction of rat tail tendon intensity data were gathered from each SAXS pattern and used to construct a map. Data from the raster scan image and that from the wide beam are compared. Finally using a phantom made from dehydrated rat tail tendon and paraffin wax a tomographic slice constructed using data from SAXS patterns is shown

  14. Performance of the EUDET-type beam telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Jansen, H; Bulgheroni, A.; Claus, G.; Corrin, E.; Cussans, D.G.; Dreyling-Eschweiler, J.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Goffe, M.; Gregor, I.M.; Haas, D.; Muhl, C.; Perrey, H.; Peschke, R.; Roloff, P.; Rubinskiy, I.; Winter, M.

    2016-01-01

    Test beam measurements at the test beam facilities of DESY have been conducted to characterise the performance of the EUDET-type beam telescopes originally developed within the EUDET project. The beam telescopes are equipped with six sensor planes using MIMOSA26 monolithic active pixel devices. A programmable Trigger Logic Unit provides trigger logic and time stamp information on particle passage. Both data acquisition framework and offline reconstruction software packages are available. User devices are easily integrable into the data acquisition framework via predefined interfaces. The biased residual distribution is studied as a function of the beam energy, plane spacing and sensor threshold. Its width at the two centre pixel planes using all six planes for tracking in a 6 GeV electron/positron-beam is measured to be $(2.88\\,\\pm\\,0.08)\\,\\upmu\\meter$. Iterative track fits using the formalism of General Broken Lines are performed to estimate the intrinsic resolution of the individual pixel planes. The mean i...

  15. Beam director design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younger, F.C.

    1986-08-01

    A design and fabrication effort for a beam director is documented. The conceptual design provides for the beam to pass first through a bending and focusing system (or ''achromat''), through a second achromat, through an air-to-vacuum interface (the ''beam window''), and finally through the vernier steering system. Following an initial concept study for a beam director, a prototype permanent magnet 30 0 beam-bending achromat and prototype vernier steering magnet were designed and built. In volume II, copies are included of the funding instruments, requests for quotations, purchase orders, a complete set of as-built drawings, magnetic measurement reports, the concept design report, and the final report on the design and fabrication project

  16. Vortices in Gaussian beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available , t0)} = P(du, dv) {FR{g(u, v, t0)}} Replacement: u→ du = t− t0 i2 ∂ ∂u′ v → dv = t− t0 i2 ∂ ∂v′ CSIR National Laser Centre – p.13/30 Differentiation i.s.o integration Evaluate the integral over the Gaussian beam (once and for all). Then, instead... . Gaussian beams with vortex dipoles CSIR National Laser Centre – p.2/30 Gaussian beam notation Gaussian beam in normalised coordinates: g(u, v, t) = exp ( −u 2 + v2 1− it ) u = xω0 v = yω0 t = zρ ρ = piω20 λ ω0 — 1/e2 beam waist radius; ρ— Rayleigh range ω ω...

  17. Bunched beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, R.H.

    1989-01-01

    There is a remarkable diversity in the field of accelerator physics. Look at the proceedings of any conference. Papers range from Hamiltonian dynamics to the latest improvements of performance in accelerator X to the engineering of specialized equipment. Beam diagnostics is somewhere in the middle of this. Diagnostic instruments make the connection between theories and observations, and the capabilities of these instruments influence strongly our ability to improve performance. The gave a series of lectures in 1987 on the general topic of Principles of Beam Observation. The emphasis was on frequency domain analysis of beam generated signals in storage rings, and that is the subject of this paper. The goal is to connect spectrum analyzer observations to what the beam is doing. In addition, understanding beam spectra is essential for understanding coherent effects and instabilities in storage rings, and this is discussed extensively. 23 figures, 4 tables

  18. Atom beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franks, J.

    1984-01-01

    Ion beam V etching may give rise to undesirable effects such as uneven erosion and ion migration in dielectrics, even when the surface is neutralized by electron flooding. The effects appear due to a remaining charge imbalance on a microscopic scale, which is absent when bombarding with an uncharged beam. Saddle field sources provide a convenient means of producing energetic neutral beams of inert and reactive gases (which may be dissociated into radicals). The construction and characteristics of the sources are described and a mechanism of internal neutralization proposed. Evidence is given that uncharged beams introduce less damage than equivalent ion beams. Disruptive effects may be initiated by charge accumulation or possibly by neutralization processes which occur when ions closely approach the target surface. (author)

  19. Ion beam monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    An ion beam analyzer is specified, having an ion source for generating ions of a sample to be analyzed, means for extracting the sample ions, means for focusing the sample ions into a beam, separation means positioned along the ion beam for selectively deflecting species of ions, and means for detecting the selected species of ions. According to the specification, the analyzer further comprises (a) means for disabling at least a portion of the separation means, such that the ion beam from the source remains undeflected; (b) means located along the path of the undeflected ion beam for sensing the sample ions; and (c) enabling means responsive to the sensing means for automatically re-enabling the separation means when the sample ions reach a predetermined intensity level. (author)

  20. Beam director design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younger, F.C.

    1986-08-01

    A design and fabrication effort for a beam director is documented. The conceptual design provides for the beam to pass first through a bending and focusing system (or ''achromat''), through a second achromat, through an air-to-vacuum interface (the ''beam window''), and finally through the vernier steering system. Following an initial concept study for a beam director, a prototype permanent magnet 30/sup 0/ beam-bending achromat and prototype vernier steering magnet were designed and built. In volume II, copies are included of the funding instruments, requests for quotations, purchase orders, a complete set of as-built drawings, magnetic measurement reports, the concept design report, and the final report on the design and fabrication project. (LEW)

  1. Survey of beam-beam limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courant, E.; Cornacchia, M.; Donald, M.M.R.; Evans, L.R.; Tazzari, S.; Wilson, E.J.N.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of beam-beam interaction is known to limit the luminosity of electron-positron storage rings and will, no doubt, limit the proton-antiproton collision scheme for the SPS. While theorists are struggling to explain this phenomenon it is more instructive to list their failures than their rather limited successes, in the hope that experiments may emerge which will direct their endeavors. The search for a description of a nonlinear system as it approaches the limit in which ordered motion breaks down, is the nub of the problem. It has engaged many fine mathematical intellects for decades and will no doubt continue to do so long after ISABELLE, the p antip and LEP are past achievements. Empirical scaling laws are emerging which relate electron machines to each other but their extrapolation to proton machines remain a very speculative exercise. Experimental data on proton limits is confined to one machine, the ISR, which does not normally suffer the beam-beam effect and where it must be artificially induced or simulated. This machine is also very different in important ways from the p antip collider. The gloomy picture which has emerged recently is that the fixed limits which were conventionally assumed for proton and electron machines can only be said to be valid for the machines which engendered them - the best guess that could be made at the time. They are very difficult to extrapolate to other sets of parameters

  2. Asymmetric fan beams (AFB) for improvement of the craniocaudal dose distribution in helical tomotherapy delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladwish, Adam; Kron, Tomas; McNiven, Andrea; Bauman, Glenn; Van Dyk, Jake

    2004-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy (HT) is a novel radiotherapy technique that utilizes intensity modulated fan beams that deliver highly conformal dose distributions in a helical beam trajectory. The most significant limitation in dose delivery with a constant fan beam thickness (FBT) is the penumbra width of the dose distribution in the craniocaudal direction, which is equivalent to the FBT. We propose to employ a half-blocked fan beam at start and stop location to reduce the penumbra width by half. By opening the jaw slowly during the helical delivery until the desired FBT is achieved it is possible to create a sharper edge in the superior and inferior direction from the target. The technique was studied using a tomotherapy beam model implemented on a commercial treatment planning system (Theraplan Plus V3.0). It was demonstrated that the dose distribution delivered using a 25 mm fan beam can be improved significantly, to reduce the dose to normal structures located superiorly and inferiorly of the target. Dosimetry for this technique is straightforward down to a FBT of 15 mm and implementation should be simple as no changes in couch movement are required compared to a standard HT delivery. We conclude that the use of asymmetric collimated fan beams for the start and stop of the helical tomotherapeutic dose delivery has the potential of significantly improving the dose distribution in helical tomotherapy

  3. Evaluation of Maxillary Interpremolar, Molar Width by DRNA Indices and Arch Dimension, Arch Form in Maratha Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Dungarwal

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Significant correlation was found between the sum of maxillary incisors and interpremolar width but not with the intermolar width while sum of mandibular incisors showed significant correlation with the interpremolar and intermolar arch width. There is no single arch form unique to any of the ethnic groups. A new formula is proposed to determine the premolar and molar index.

  4. Composite optical vortices in noncollinear Laguerre–Gaussian beams and their propagation in free space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ke; Liu Pusheng; Lü Baida

    2008-01-01

    Taking two Laguerre—Gaussian beams with topological charge l = ± 1 as an example, this paper studies the composite optical vortices formed by two noncollinear Laguerre—Gaussian beams with different phases, amplitudes, waist widths, off-axis distances, and their propagation in free space. It is shown by detailed numerical illustrative examples that the number and location of composite vortices at the waist plane are variable by varying the relative phase β, amplitude ratio η, waist width ratio ζ, or off-axis distance ratio μ. The net topological charge l net is not always equal to the sum l sum of charges of the two component beams. The motion, creation and annihilation of composite vortices take place in the free-space propagation, and the net charge during the propagation remains unchanged and equals to the net charge at the waist plane

  5. Solar harvesting by a heterostructured cell with built-in variable width quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, W.; Wang, H.; Mil'shtein, S.

    2018-02-01

    We propose cascaded heterostructured p-i-n solar cells, where inside of the i-region is a set of Quantum Wells (QWs) with variable thicknesses to enhance absorption of different photonic energies and provide quick relaxation for high energy carriers. Our p-i-n heterostructure carries top p-type and bottom n-type 11.3 Å thick AlAs layers, which are doped by acceptors and donor densities up to 1019/cm3. The intrinsic region is divided into 10 segments where each segment carries ten QWs of the same width and the width of the QWs in each subsequent segment gradually increases. The top segment consists of 10 QWs with widths of 56.5Å, followed by a segment with 10 wider QWs with widths of 84.75Å, followed by increasing QW widths until the last segment has 10 QWs with widths of 565Å, bringing the total number of QWs to 100. The QW wall height is controlled by alternating AlAs and GaAs layers, where the AlAs layers are all 11.3Å thick, throughout the entire intrinsic region. Configuration of variable width QWs prescribes sets of energy levels which are suitable for absorption of a wide range of photon energies and will dissipate high electron-hole energies rapidly, reducing the heat load on the solar cell. We expect that the heating of the solar cell will be reduced by 8-11%, enhancing efficiency. The efficiency of the designed solar cell is 43.71%, the Fill Factor is 0.86, the density of short circuit current (ISC) will not exceed 338 A/m2 and the open circuit voltage (VOC) is 1.51V.

  6. Influence of lip closure on alveolar cleft width in patients with cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmelzle Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The influence of surgery on growth and stability after treatment in patients with cleft lip and palate are topics still under discussion. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of early lip closure on the width of the alveolar cleft using dental casts. Methods A total of 44 clefts were investigated using plaster casts, 30 unilateral and 7 bilateral clefts. All infants received a passive molding plate a few days after birth. The age at the time of closure of the lip was 2.1 month in average (range 1-6 months. Plaster casts were obtained at the following stages: shortly after birth, prior to lip closure, prior to soft palate closure. We determined the width of the alveolar cleft before lip closure and prior to soft palate closure measuring the alveolar cleft width from the most lateral point of the premaxilla/anterior segment to the most medial point of the smaller segment. Results After lip closure 15 clefts presented with a width of 0 mm, meaning that the mucosa of the segments was almost touching one another. 19 clefts showed a width of up to 2 mm and 10 clefts were still over 2 mm wide. This means a reduction of 0% in 5 clefts, of 1-50% in 6 clefts, of 51-99% in 19 clefts, and of 100% in 14 clefts. Conclusions Early lip closure reduces alveolar cleft width. In most cases our aim of a remaining cleft width of 2 mm or less can be achieved. These are promising conditions for primary alveolar bone grafting to restore the dental bony arch.

  7. Alluvial cover controlling the width, slope and sinuosity of bedrock channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turowski, Jens Martin

    2018-02-01

    Bedrock channel slope and width are important parameters for setting bedload transport capacity and for stream-profile inversion to obtain tectonics information. Channel width and slope development are closely related to the problem of bedrock channel sinuosity. It is therefore likely that observations on bedrock channel meandering yields insights into the development of channel width and slope. Active meandering occurs when the bedrock channel walls are eroded, which also drives channel widening. Further, for a given drop in elevation, the more sinuous a channel is, the lower is its channel bed slope in comparison to a straight channel. It can thus be expected that studies of bedrock channel meandering give insights into width and slope adjustment and vice versa. The mechanisms by which bedrock channels actively meander have been debated since the beginning of modern geomorphic research in the 19th century, but a final consensus has not been reached. It has long been argued that whether a bedrock channel meanders actively or not is determined by the availability of sediment relative to transport capacity, a notion that has also been demonstrated in laboratory experiments. Here, this idea is taken up by postulating that the rate of change of both width and sinuosity over time is dependent on bed cover only. Based on the physics of erosion by bedload impacts, a scaling argument is developed to link bedrock channel width, slope and sinuosity to sediment supply, discharge and erodibility. This simple model built on sediment-flux-driven bedrock erosion concepts yields the observed scaling relationships of channel width and slope with discharge and erosion rate. Further, it explains why sinuosity evolves to a steady-state value and predicts the observed relations between sinuosity, erodibility and storm frequency, as has been observed for meandering bedrock rivers on Pacific Arc islands.

  8. The nose shape as a predictor of maxillary central and lateral incisor width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sülün, Tonguç; Ergin, Ugur; Tuncer, Necat

    2005-09-01

    One of the primary aspects of complete denture prosthodontics is determining the correct proportion for the maxillary central incisor width to the lateral incisor width. It has been suggested that the anatomy of the patient's nose is a reliable guide for deciding this ratio. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis about the relationship between the shape of the nose and the proportion of the central incisor width (CIW) to the lateral incisor width (LIW). The CIW and LIW from a total of 138 subjects (73 males, 65 females) were measured intraorally. The interalar width (IAW) and the width of the root of the nose (WRN) were measured on standard photographs of the subjects. Spearman's rho test was used to analyze the correlation between the proportions of the CIW to the LIW and the IAW to the WRN. The Mann-Whitney Utest was applied to test for any possible gender differences. The IAW, the WRN, and the nose angle (NA) were statistically significantly wider in male subjects than in female subjects. The correlation between IAW/WRN, NA, and CIW/LIW was statistically significant only in female subjects. In the general population, the only statistically significant relationship was between CIW/LIW on the left side and IAW/WRN. Within the results of the IAW, WRN, and NA measurements, we suggest that males have wider, more triangular-shaped noses than females. The proportion of IAW to WRN seems to be a reliable guide for deciding the proportion of the maxillary central incisor width to the lateral incisor.

  9. Electron Beam Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriott, Lloyd R.

    1997-04-01

    Electron beams have played a significant role in semiconductor technology for more than twenty years. Early electron beam machines used a raster scanned beam spot to write patterns in electron-sensitive polymer resist materials. The main application of electron beam lithography has been in mask making. Despite the inherently high spatial resolution and wide process margins of electron beam lithography, the writing rate for semiconductor wafers has been too slow to be economically viable on a large scale. In the late 1970's, variable shape electron beam writing was developed, projecting a rectangular beam whose size can be varied for each "shot" exposure of a particular pattern, allowing some integrated circuits to be made economically where a variety of "customized" patterns are desired. In the cell or block projection electron beam exposure technique, a unit cell of a repetitive pattern is projected repeatedly to increase the level of parallelism. This can work well for highly repetitive patterns such as memory chips but is not well suited to complex varying patterns such as microprocessors. The rapid progress in the performance of integrated circuits has been largely driven by progress in optical lithography, through improvements in lens design and fabrication as well as the use of shorter wavelengths for the exposure radiation. Due to limitations from the opacity of lens and mask materials, it is unlikely that conventional optical printing methods can be used at wavelengths below 193 nm or feature sizes much below 180 nm. One candidate technology for a post-optical era is the Scattering with Angular Limitation Projection Electron-beam Lithography (SCALPEL) approach, which combines the high resolution and wide process latitude inherent in electron beam lithography with the throughput of a parallel projection system. A mask consisting of a low atomic number membrane and a high atomic number pattern layer is uniformly illuminated with high energy (100 ke

  10. High bandwidth beam current monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltrusaitis, R.M.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Cooper, R.G.; Peterson, E.; Warn, C.E.

    1993-01-01

    A stripline directional coupler beam current monitor capable of measuring the time structure of a 30-ps electron beam bunch has been developed. The time response performance of the monitor compares very well with Cherenkov light produced in quartz by the electron beam. The four-pickup monitor is now used on a routine basis for measuring the beam duration, tuning for optimized beam bunching, and centering the bunch in the beam pipe

  11. Beam-beam limit in e+e- circular colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmi, K.; Tawada, M.; Kamada, S.; Oide, K.; Cai, Y.; Qiang, J.

    2004-01-01

    Beam-beam effects limit the luminosity of circular colliders. Once the bunch population exceeds a threshold, the luminosity increases at a slower rate. This phenomenon is called the beam-beam limit. Onset of the beam-beam limit has been analyzed with various simulation methods based on the weak-strong and strong-strong models. We have observed that an incoherent phenomenon is mainly concerned in the beam-beam limit. The simulation have shown that equilibrium distributions of the two colliding beams are distorted from Gaussians when the luminosity is limited. The beam-beam limit is estimated to be ξ∼0.1 for a B factory with damping time of several thousand turns

  12. 3D Terahertz Beam Profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Strikwerda, Andrew; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2013-01-01

    We present a characterization of THz beams generated in both a two-color air plasma and in a LiNbO3 crystal. Using a commercial THz camera, we record intensity images as a function of distance through the beam waist, from which we extract 2D beam profiles and visualize our measurements into 3D beam...... profiles. For the two-color air-plasma, we measure a conical beam profile that is focused to a bell-shape at the beam waist, whereas we observe a Gaussian beam profile for the THz beam generated from the LiNbO3 crystal....

  13. Limits on the Higgs boson lifetime and width from its decay to four charged leptons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; El-Khateeb, E.; Elkafrawy, T.; Mohamed, A.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.

    2015-10-01

    Constraints on the lifetime and width of the Higgs boson are obtained from H →Z Z →4 ℓ events using data recorded by the CMS experiment during the LHC run 1 with an integrated luminosity of 5.1 and 19.7 fb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of 7 and 8 TeV, respectively. The measurement of the Higgs boson lifetime is derived from its flight distance in the CMS detector with an upper bound of τH3.5 ×10-9 MeV . The measurement of the width is obtained from an off-shell production technique, generalized to include anomalous couplings of the Higgs boson to two electroweak bosons. From this measurement, a joint constraint is set on the Higgs boson width and a parameter fΛ Q that expresses an anomalous coupling contribution as an on-shell cross-section fraction. The limit on the Higgs boson width is ΓH<46 MeV with fΛ Q unconstrained and ΓH<26 MeV for fΛ Q=0 at the 95% C.L. The constraint fΛ Q<3.8 ×10-3 at the 95% C.L. is obtained for the expected standard model Higgs boson width.

  14. Effect of serial extraction alone on crowding: relationships between tooth width, arch length, and crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, T; Matsumoto, Y; Suzuki, J; Sato, N; Oguchi, H

    1999-12-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of serial extraction alone on crowding. We also investigated the relationships between tooth width, arch length, and irregularity index. Maxillary dental casts from 32 subjects who had undergone only serial extraction were analyzed at 3 stages: before deciduous canines extraction, after first premolars extraction, and at the end of the observation period. The mean of the irregularity index decreased significantly as serial extraction proceeded and further decreased during the observation period. In cases where the width of the incisor was more than 2 standard deviations above the means for the control subjects, there was a significant correlation between tooth width of the lateral incisors and irregularity index before extraction as well as a significant correlation between the summation of tooth widths of the central and lateral incisors and irregularity index at that time. There was a significant negative correlation between arch length discrepancy and irregularity index before extraction and also a significant correlation between arch length discrepancy and correction of the irregularity index from before deciduous canines extraction to after first premolars extraction. These results suggest that tooth width and arch length discrepancy might preferentially affect the degree of anterior crowding in cases of severe crowding. There was no aggravation of the average crowding level during the observation period in the present study. The present study quantitatively suggested that serial extraction was useful for the purpose of correcting crowding in most cases.

  15. The dynamics of growth of width in distance, velocity and acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, T; Kneip, A; Ziegler, P; Largo, R; Molinari, L; Prader, A

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the dynamics and intensity of the growth of bihumeral and biiliac width and of humerus and femur bicondylar diameter are studied and compared, and sex differences are established. The analysis is based on a newly introduced statistical tool, the structural average curve for distance, velocity and acceleration. It accounts for individual developmental tempo and allows pooling data for a sample of subjects. In all four variables studied, a sharp decline in velocity after birth is followed by a more gradual decline in infancy and childhood. A mid-growth spurt (MS) at about age 7 can be found in all variables, of about equal timing and intensity for the two sexes. The pubertal spurt (PS) is earlier for girls, and less intense except for biiliac width. The study shows a characteristic pattern across variables of width regarding the intensity of growth in different periods. The accentuated MS and PS for bihumeral width, contrasting with relatively early and small PS for the bicondylar width of femur, are remarkable.

  16. Linear intra-bone geometry dependencies of the radius: Radius length determination by maximum distal width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumbach, S.F.; Krusche-Mandl, I.; Huf, W.; Mall, G.; Fialka, C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to investigate possible linear intra-bone geometry dependencies by determining the relation between the maximum radius length and maximum distal width in two independent populations and test for possible gender or age effects. A strong correlation can help develop more representative fracture models and osteosynthetic devices as well as aid gender and height estimation in anthropologic/forensic cases. Methods: First, maximum radius length and distal width of 100 consecutive patients, aged 20–70 years, were digitally measured on standard lower arm radiographs by two independent investigators. Second, the same measurements were performed ex vivo on a second cohort, 135 isolated, formalin fixed radii. Standard descriptive statistics as well as correlations were calculated and possible gender age influences tested for both populations separately. Results: The radiographic dataset resulted in a correlation of radius length and width of r = 0.753 (adj. R 2 = 0.563, p 2 = 0.592) and side no influence on the correlation. Radius length–width correlation for the isolated radii was r = 0.621 (adj. R 2 = 0.381, p 2 = 0.598). Conclusion: A relatively strong radius length–distal width correlation was found in two different populations, indicating that linear body proportions might not only apply to body height and axial length measurements of long bones but also to proportional dependency of bone shapes in general.

  17. Limits on the Higgs boson lifetime and width from its decay to four charged leptons

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hamer, Matthias; Hensel, Carsten; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael

    2015-10-22

    Constraints on the lifetime and width of the Higgs boson are obtained from $\\mathrm{H} \\to \\mathrm{ZZ} \\to 4\\ell$ events using data recorded by the CMS experiment during the LHC run 1 with an integrated luminosity of 5.1 and 19.7 fb$^{-1}$ at a center-of-mass energy of 7 and 8 TeV, respectively. The measurement of the Higgs boson lifetime is derived from its flight distance in the CMS detector with an upper bound of $\\tau_{\\mathrm{H}} $ lower than $ 1.9 \\times 10^{-13}$ s at the 95% confidence level (CL), corresponding to a lower bound on the width of $\\Gamma_{\\mathrm{H}} $ larger than $ 3.5 \\times 10^{-9} $ MeV. The measurement of the width is obtained from an off-shell production technique, generalized to include anomalous couplings of the Higgs boson to two electroweak bosons. From this measurement, a joint constraint is set on the Higgs boson width and a parameter $f_{\\Lambda Q}$ that expresses an anomalous coupling contribution as an on-shell cross-section fraction. The limit on the Higgs boson width is ...

  18. Controlling ρ width effects for a precise value of α in B→ρρ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gronau

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been pointed out that the currently most precise determination of the weak phase ϕ2=α of the Cabibbo–Kobayashi–Maskawa (CKM matrix achieved in B→ρρ decays is susceptible to a small correction at a level of (Γρ/mρ2 due to an I=1 amplitude caused by the ρ width. Using Breit–Wigner distributions for the two pairs of pions forming ρ mesons, we study the I=1 contribution to B→ρρ decay rates as function of the width and location of the ρ band. We find that in the absence of a particular enhancement of the I=1 amplitude reducing a single band to a width Γρ at SuperKEKB leads to results which are completely insensitive to the ρ width. If the I=1 amplitude is dynamically enhanced relative to the I=0,2 amplitude one could subject its contribution to a “magnifying glass” measurement using two separated ρ bands of width Γρ. Subtraction of the I=1 contribution from the measured decay rate would lead to a very precise determination of the I=0,2 amplitude needed for performing the isospin analysis.

  19. Stochastic Mixed-Effects Parameters Bertalanffy Process, with Applications to Tree Crown Width Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petras Rupšys

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A stochastic modeling approach based on the Bertalanffy law gained interest due to its ability to produce more accurate results than the deterministic approaches. We examine tree crown width dynamic with the Bertalanffy type stochastic differential equation (SDE and mixed-effects parameters. In this study, we demonstrate how this simple model can be used to calculate predictions of crown width. We propose a parameter estimation method and computational guidelines. The primary goal of the study was to estimate the parameters by considering discrete sampling of the diameter at breast height and crown width and by using maximum likelihood procedure. Performance statistics for the crown width equation include statistical indexes and analysis of residuals. We use data provided by the Lithuanian National Forest Inventory from Scots pine trees to illustrate issues of our modeling technique. Comparison of the predicted crown width values of mixed-effects parameters model with those obtained using fixed-effects parameters model demonstrates the predictive power of the stochastic differential equations model with mixed-effects parameters. All results were implemented in a symbolic algebra system MAPLE.

  20. The Width of High Burnup Structure in LWR UO2 Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ho; Oh, Jae-Yong; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2007-01-01

    The measured data available in the open literature on the width of high burnup structure (HBS) in LWR UO 2 fuel were analyzed in terms of pellet average burnup, enrichment, and grain size. Dependence of the HBS width on pellet average burnup was shown to be divided into three regions; while the HBS width is governed by accumulation of fission damage (i.e., burnup) for burnup below 60 GWd/tU, it seems to be restricted to some limiting value of around 1.5 mm for burnup above 75 GWd/tU due to high temperature which might have caused extensive annealing of irradiation damage. As for intermediate burnup between 60 and 75 GWd/tU, although temperature would not have been so high as to induce extensive annealing, the microstructural damage could have been partly annealed, resulting in the reduction of the HBS width. It was found that both enrichment and grain size also affects the HBS width. However, as long as the pellet average burnup is lower than about 75 GWd/tU, the effect does not appear to be significant for the enrichment and grain size that are typically used in current LWR fuel. (authors)

  1. Critical width of tidal flats triggers marsh collapse in the absence of sea-level rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Giulio; Fagherazzi, Sergio

    2013-04-02

    High rates of wave-induced erosion along salt marsh boundaries challenge the idea that marsh survival is dictated by the competition between vertical sediment accretion and relative sea-level rise. Because waves pounding marshes are often locally generated in enclosed basins, the depth and width of surrounding tidal flats have a pivoting control on marsh erosion. Here, we show the existence of a threshold width for tidal flats bordering salt marshes. Once this threshold is exceeded, irreversible marsh erosion takes place even in the absence of sea-level rise. This catastrophic collapse occurs because of the positive feedbacks among tidal flat widening by wave-induced marsh erosion, tidal flat deepening driven by wave bed shear stress, and local wind wave generation. The threshold width is determined by analyzing the 50-y evolution of 54 marsh basins along the US Atlantic Coast. The presence of a critical basin width is predicted by a dynamic model that accounts for both horizontal marsh migration and vertical adjustment of marshes and tidal flats. Variability in sediment supply, rather than in relative sea-level rise or wind regime, explains the different critical width, and hence erosion vulnerability, found at different sites. We conclude that sediment starvation of coastlines produced by river dredging and damming is a major anthropogenic driver of marsh loss at the study sites and generates effects at least comparable to the accelerating sea-level rise due to global warming.

  2. Scale orientated analysis of river width changes due to extreme flood hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Krapesch

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the morphological effects of extreme floods (recurrence interval >100 years and examines which parameters best describe the width changes due to erosion based on 5 affected alpine gravel bed rivers in Austria. The research was based on vertical aerial photos of the rivers before and after extreme floods, hydrodynamic numerical models and cross sectional measurements supported by LiDAR data of the rivers. Average width ratios (width after/before the flood were calculated and correlated with different hydraulic parameters (specific stream power, shear stress, flow area, specific discharge. Depending on the geomorphological boundary conditions of the different rivers, a mean width ratio between 1.12 (Lech River and 3.45 (Trisanna River was determined on the reach scale. The specific stream power (SSP best predicted the mean width ratios of the rivers especially on the reach scale and sub reach scale. On the local scale more parameters have to be considered to define the "minimum morphological spatial demand of rivers", which is a crucial parameter for addressing and managing flood hazards and should be used in hazard zone plans and spatial planning.

  3. CORRELATION OF H-MODE BARRIER WIDTH AND NEUTRAL PENTRATION LENGTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GROEBNER, R.J.; MAHDAVI, M.A.; LEONARD, A.W.; OSBORNE, T.H.; WOLF, N.S.; PORTER, G.D.; STANGEBY, P.C.; BROOKS, N.H.; COLCHIN, R.J.; HEIDBRINK, W.W.; LUCE, T.C.; MCKEE, G.R.; OWEN, L.W.; WANG, G.; WHYTE, D.G.

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 CORRELATION OF H-MODE BARRIER WIDTH AND NEUTRAL PENTRATION LENGTH. Pedestal studies in DIII-D find a good correlation between the width of the region of steep gradient in the H-mode density and the neutral penetration length. These results are obtained by comparing experimental density profiles to the predictions of an analytic model for the profile, obtained from the particle continuity equations for electrons and deuterium atoms. In its range of validity (edge temperature between 40-500 eV), the analytic model quantitatively predicts the observed decrease of the width as the pedestal density increases, the observed strong increase of the gradient of the density as the pedestal density increases and the observation that L-mode and H-mode profiles with the same pedestal density have very similar shapes. The width of the density barrier, measured from the edge of the electron temperature barrier, is the lower limit for the observed width of the temperature barrier. These results support the hypothesis that particle fueling provides a dominant control for the size of the H-mode transport barrier

  4. Assessment of Upper and Lower Pharyngeal Airway Width in Skeletal Class I, II and III Malocclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalu Jain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a close relationship between the dimensions of airway and the sagittal skeletal malocclusion which makes it reasonable to expect that width of airway is a reflection of determining patency of airway in different skeletal malocclusion groups. So, aim of this study was to assess the upper and lower pharyngeal airway width in skeletal Class I, II and III malocclusion groups and also to evaluate sexual dimorphism in western Uttar Pradesh population. Materials and methods: A sample of 150 subjects in the age group of 18 to 25 years, from Western Uttar Pradesh adult population was selected on the basis of skeletal Class I, II and III malocclusion. Digital lateral cephalograms were taken in natural head position. Nine variables were selected which included four upper and five lower pharyngeal airway variables. Results: Upper and lower pharynx showed statistical significant difference among the skeletal Class I, II and III malocclusion and also between males and females. Conclusion: Wider upper and lower pharyngeal airway width was seen in males than in females in both skeletal Class I as well as Class III malocclusion groups respectively. Skeletal Class III malocclusion subjects had the widest airway width as compared to skeletal Class I malocclusion group. Skeletal Class II malocclusion, airway width was found to be narrowest.

  5. A microelectrostatic repulsive-torque rotation actuator with two-width fingers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Chao; He, Siyuan

    2015-01-01

    A microelectrostatic repulsive-torque rotation actuator with two-width fingers is presented. The actuator consists of finger-shaped electrodes and is made of two thin film layers, i.e. one movable layer and one fixed layer. There are two types of finger electrodes, namely constant-width and two-width fingers. The two-width finger has a narrow lower segment and a wide top segment. The constant-width finger has only the narrow lower segment. Each rotation finger has its corresponding aligned and unaligned fixed fingers. The electrostatic repulsive torque is generated and acts on the rotation fingers to rotate them up and away from the substrate. As a result, rotation is not limited by the gap between the movable and fixed layers and the ‘pull-in’ instability is avoided. Thus a large out-of-plane rotation and high operational stability can be achieved. The actuator is suitable for two-layer surface micromachining. The model of the actuator is developed. Prototypes are fabricated and tested. The experimental tests show that the actuator achieved a mechanical rotation of 7.65° at a driving voltage of 150 V. The settling time for a mechanical rotation of 5° is 5.7 ms. (paper)

  6. Precision measurement of the mass and width of the W boson at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Sarah Alam [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-01

    A precision measurement of the mass and width of the W boson is presented. The W bosons are produced in proton antiproton collisions occurring at a centre of mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron accelerator. The data used for the analyses is collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and corresponds to an average integrated luminosity of 350 pb-1 for the W width analysis for the electron and muon channels and an average integrated luminosity of 2350 pb-1 for the W mass analysis. The mass and width of the W boson is extracted by fitting to the transverse mass distribution, with the peak of the distribution being most sensitive to the mass and the tail of the distribution sensitive to the width. The W width measurement in the electron and muon channels is combined to give a final result of 2032 ± 73 MeV. The systematic uncertainty on the W mass from the recoil of the W boson against the initial state gluon radiation is discussed. A systematic study of the recoil in Z → e+e- events where one electron is reconstructed in the central calorimeter and the other in the plug calorimeter and its effect on the W mass is presented for the first time in this thesis.

  7. Laser cutting of various materials: Kerf width size analysis and life cycle assessment of cutting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Shaukat, Mian Mobeen; Ashraf, Farhan

    2017-08-01

    Laser cutting of various materials including Ti-6Al-4V alloy, steel 304, Inconel 625, and alumina is carried out to assess the kerf width size variation along the cut section. The life cycle assessment is carried out to determine the environmental impact of the laser cutting in terms of the material waste during the cutting process. The kerf width size is formulated and predicted using the lump parameter analysis and it is measured from the experiments. The influence of laser output power and laser cutting speed on the kerf width size variation is analyzed using the analytical tools including scanning electron and optical microscopes. In the experiments, high pressure nitrogen assisting gas is used to prevent oxidation reactions in the cutting section. It is found that the kerf width size predicted from the lump parameter analysis agrees well with the experimental data. The kerf width size variation increases with increasing laser output power. However, this behavior reverses with increasing laser cutting speed. The life cycle assessment reveals that material selection for laser cutting is critical for the environmental protection point of view. Inconel 625 contributes the most to the environmental damages; however, recycling of the waste of the laser cutting reduces this contribution.

  8. Investigation of pump-to-seed beam matching on output features of Rb and Cs vapor laser amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Binglin; Huang, Jinghua; Xu, Xingqi; Xia, Chunsheng; Pan, Bailiang

    2018-05-01

    Taking into account the beam radii of pump light and seed laser along the entire length of the cell and their intensities in the cross section, a physical model with ordinary differential equation methods for alkali vapor amplifiers is established. Applied to the reported optically pumped Rb and diode-pumped Cs vapor amplifiers, the model shows good agreement between the calculated and measured dependence of amplified power on the seed power. A larger width of the spontaneous emission region as compared to the widths of pump absorption and laser emission regions, which will result in very high energy losses, is observed in the cell. Influence of pump and seed beam waists on output performance is calculated, showing that the pump and seed beam should match each other not only in shape but also in size, thus an optimal combination of beam radii is very important for efficient operation of alkali vapor amplifiers.

  9. Luminescent beam stop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Diane; Morton, Simon A.

    2017-10-25

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to beam stops. In one aspect, a device comprises a luminescent material, a beam stop plate, and an optical fiber. The luminescent material is a parallelepiped having a first side and a second side that are squares and having a third side that is a rectangle or a square. The first side and the second side are perpendicular to the third side. The beam stop plate is attached to the first side of the luminescent material. The optical fiber has a first end and a second end, with the first end of the optical fiber attached to the third side of the luminescent material.

  10. WORKSHOP: Crystalline beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Following pioneer work by specialists at the Soviet Novosibirsk Laboratory some ten years ago, interest developed in the possibility of 'freezing' ion beams in storage rings by pushing cooling (to smooth out beam behaviour) to its limits, the final goal being to lock the ions into a neat crystal pattern. After advances by groups working on laser cooled ions in traps, and with several cooling rings now in operation, a workshop on crystalline ion beams was organized recently by the GSI (Darmstadt) Laboratory and held at Wertheim in Germany

  11. Mass spectrometer beam monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    Improved apparatus and system were developed for determining the field desorption characteristics of a sample prior to field desorption mass spectrometry. A portion of the ion beam from the ion source is disabled so that it is undeflected in the beam analyzer. When sample ions are detected by a sensor in this portion of the beam it is then allowed to be deflected and the mass analysis occurs. Thus the source position, temperature and electric field strength can be varied until ions are produced from the sample and the field desorption characteristics can be determined. The source characteristics can be varied either automatically or manually. (DN)

  12. Is every quasar beamed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Peter D.

    1989-01-01

    A companion paper (Barthel et al.) reports the discovery of superluminal motion in the core of 4C 34.47, the largest known quasi-stellar radio source. Superluminal motion, the apparent continuity of small- and large-scale one-sided radio jets, and the recently established depolarization asymmetry in luminous quasars find a natural explanation in the effects of relativistic beaming. In the frameworkof of this relativistic beaming model, the available data imply that all radio-loud quasars are beamed toward the earth. Powerful radio galaxies may well form the unbeamed parent population. Radio-quiet QSOs and powerful infrared galaxies can be unified using similar orientation effects.

  13. Secondary beams at GANIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doubre, H.

    1992-01-01

    GANIL, a user's facility since 1983, can deliver a broad spectrum of heavy-ion beams, from He to U, to well-equipped experimental areas. Their very large intensities are to be exploited to produce secondary beams, either using the fragmentation method (beams at energy per nucleon larger than 30 MeV/u), or the ISOL method. With the latter one, these ions have to be re-accelerated. The project of a cyclotron as a post-accelerator is described. (author) 11 refs.; 7 figs.; 3 tabs

  14. ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikin, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-11-21

    Electron beam ion sources technology made significant progress since 1968 when this method of producing highly charged ions in a potential trap within electron beam was proposed by E. Donets. Better understanding of physical processes in EBIS, technological advances and better simulation tools determined significant progress in key EBIS parameters: electron beam current and current density, ion trap capacity, attainable charge states. Greatly increased the scope of EBIS and EBIT applications. An attempt is made to compile some of EBIS engineering problems and solutions and to demonstrate a present stage of understanding the processes and approaches to build a better EBIS.

  15. The parameters effect on the structural performance of damaged steel box beam using Taguchi method

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-taly, Boshra A.; Abd El Hameed, Mohamed F.

    2018-01-01

    In the current study, the influence of notch or opening parameters and the positions of the applied load on the structural performance of steel box beams up to failure was investigated using Finite Element analysis program, ANSYS. The Taguchi-based design of experiments technique was used to plan the current study. The plan included 12 box steel beams; three intact beams, and nine damaged beams (with opening) in the beams web. The numerical studies were conducted under varying the spacing between the two concentrated point loads (location of applied loads), the notch (opening) position, and the ratio between depth and width of the notch with a constant notch area. According to Taguchi analysis, factor X (location of the applied loads) was found the highest contributing parameters for the variation of the ultimate load, vertical deformation, shear stresses, and the compressive normal stresses.

  16. Influences of Dynamic Moving Forces on the Functionally Graded Porous-Nonuniform Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Dinh Kien

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic response of functionally graded (FG porous-nonuniform beams subjected to moving forces is investigated. The beam cross-section is assumed to vary longitudinally in the width direction by a linear or quadratic function. A modified rule of mixture, taking the effect of porosities into account, is adopted in evaluating the effective material properties. Based on Timoshenko beam theory, governing equations of motion are derived from Hamilton's principle, and they are solved by a finite element model. The dynamic response of a simply supported FG porous beam is computed with the aid of the Newmark method. The validation of the derived formulation is confirmed by comparing the obtained numerical results with the data available in the literature. A parametric study is conducted to highlight the effect of the material inhomogeneity, porosity volume fraction, section profile and loading parameters on the dynamic behavior of the beams.

  17. The effect of aberrated recording beams on reflecting Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    SeGall, Marc; Ott, Daniel; Divliansky, Ivan; Glebov, Leonid B.

    2013-03-01

    The effect of aberrations present in the recording beams of a holographic setup is discussed regarding the period and spectral response of a reflecting volume Bragg grating. Imperfect recording beams result in spatially varying resonant wavelengths and the side lobes of the spectrum are washed out. Asymmetrical spectra, spectral broadening, and a reduction in peak diffraction efficiency may also be present, though these effects are less significant for gratings with wider spectral widths. Reflecting Bragg gratings (RBGs) are used as elements in a variety of applications including spectral beam combining1,2, mode locking3,4, longitudinal and transverse mode selection in lasers5,6, and sensing7,8. For applications requiring narrow spectral selectivity9, or large apertures10, these gratings must have a uniform period throughout the length of the recording medium, which may be on the order of millimeters. However, when using typical recording techniques such as two-beam interference for large aperture gratings and phase-mask recording of fiber gratings, aberrations from the optical elements in the system result in an imperfect grating structure11-13. In this paper we consider the effects of aberrations on large aperture gratings recorded in thick media using the two-beam interference technique. Previous works in analyzing the effects of aberrations have considered the effects of aberrations in a single recording plane where the beams perfectly overlap. Such an approach is valid for thin media (on the order of tens of microns), but for thick recording media (on the order of several millimeters) there will be a significant shift in the positions of the beams relative to each other as they traverse the recording medium. Therefore, the fringe pattern produced will not be constant throughout the grating if one or both beams have a non-uniform wavefront. Such non-uniform gratings may have a wider spectral width, a shifted resonant wavelength, or other problems. It is

  18. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  19. Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. H. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS))

    2012-03-27

    The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

  20. Quantitative analysis of beam delivery parameters and treatment process time for proton beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kazumichi; Gillin, Michael T.; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhu, X. Ronald; Lee, Andrew K.; Lippy, Denise

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate patient census, equipment clinical availability, maximum daily treatment capacity, use factor for major beam delivery parameters, and treatment process time for actual treatments delivered by proton therapy systems. Methods: The authors have been recording all beam delivery parameters, including delivered dose, energy, range, spread-out Bragg peak widths, gantry angles, and couch angles for every treatment field in an electronic medical record system. We analyzed delivery system downtimes that had been recorded for every equipment failure and associated incidents. These data were used to evaluate the use factor of beam delivery parameters, the size of the patient census, and the equipment clinical availability of the facility. The duration of each treatment session from patient walk-in and to patient walk-out of the treatment room was measured for 82 patients with cancers at various sites. Results: The yearly average equipment clinical availability in the last 3 yrs (June 2007-August 2010) was 97%, which exceeded the target of 95%. Approximately 2200 patients had been treated as of August 2010. The major disease sites were genitourinary (49%), thoracic (25%), central nervous system (22%), and gastrointestinal (2%). Beams have been delivered in approximately 8300 treatment fields. The use factor for six beam delivery parameters was also evaluated. Analysis of the treatment process times indicated that approximately 80% of this time was spent for patient and equipment setup. The other 20% was spent waiting for beam delivery and beam on. The total treatment process time can be expressed by a quadratic polynomial of the number of fields per session. The maximum daily treatment capacity of our facility using the current treatment processes was estimated to be 133 ± 35 patients. Conclusions: This analysis shows that the facility has operated at a high performance level and has treated a large number of patients with a variety of diseases. The use

  1. Solutal Marangoni convection in a Hele-Shaw geometry: Impact of orientation and gap width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köllner, T.; Schwarzenberger, K.; Eckert, K.; Boeck, T.

    2015-03-01

    We study Marangoni roll cell convection in a ternary mass transfer system composed of cyclohexanol, water and butanol (transferred species) placed in a Hele-Shaw cell. A detailed comparison of experimental and numerical results is carried out for four different cases including horizontal and vertical orientation as well as small and large gap width of the Hele-Shaw cell. The numerical simulations are based on a common gap-averaged model. For the small gap width, the numerical results qualitatively represent the experimental results. However, by comparison with the experiments, the time evolution in the simulation appears generally retarded. The results show that three-dimensional flow effects have to be expected in particular for a horizontal orientation and a large gap width.

  2. Cenozoic tectonics of western North America controlled by evolving width of Farallon slab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellart, W P; Stegman, D R; Farrington, R J; Freeman, J; Moresi, L

    2010-07-16

    Subduction of oceanic lithosphere occurs through two modes: subducting plate motion and trench migration. Using a global subduction zone data set and three-dimensional numerical subduction models, we show that slab width (W) controls these modes and the partitioning of subduction between them. Subducting plate velocity scales with W(2/3), whereas trench velocity scales with 1/W. These findings explain the Cenozoic slowdown of the Farallon plate and the decrease in subduction partitioning by its decreasing slab width. The change from Sevier-Laramide orogenesis to Basin and Range extension in North America is also explained by slab width; shortening occurred during wide-slab subduction and overriding-plate-driven trench retreat, whereas extension occurred during intermediate to narrow-slab subduction and slab-driven trench retreat.

  3. Analysis of bus width and delay on a fully digital signum nonlinearity chaotic oscillator

    KAUST Repository

    Mansingka, Abhinav S.

    2012-07-29

    This paper introduces the first fully digital implementation of a 3rd order ODE-based chaotic oscillator with signum nonlinearity. A threshold bus width of 12-bits for reliable chaotic behavior is observed, below which the system output becomes periodic. Beyond this threshold, the maximum Lyapunov exponent (MLE) is shown to improve up to a peak value at 16-bits and subsequently decrease with increasing bus width. The MLE is also shown to gradually increase with number of introduced internal delay cycles until a peak value at 14 cycles, after which the system loses chaotic properties. Introduced external delay cycles are shown to rotate the attractors in 3-D phase space. Bus width and delay elements can be independently modulated to optimize the system to suit specifications. The experimental results of the system show low area and high performance on a Xilinx Virtex 4 FPGA with throughput of 13.35 Gbits/s for a 32-bit implementation.

  4. In vivo diffusion analysis with quantum dots and dextrans predicts the width of brain extracellular space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Robert G.; Nicholson, Charles

    2006-04-01

    Diffusion within the extracellular space (ECS) of the brain is necessary for chemical signaling and for neurons and glia to access nutrients and therapeutics; however, the width of the ECS in living tissue remains unknown. We used integrative optical imaging to show that dextrans and water-soluble quantum dots with Stokes-Einstein diameters as large as 35 nm diffuse within the ECS of adult rat neocortex in vivo. Modeling the ECS as fluid-filled "pores" predicts a normal width of 38-64 nm, at least 2-fold greater than estimates from EM of fixed tissue. ECS width falls below 10 nm after terminal ischemia, a likely explanation for the small ECS visualized in electron micrographs. Our results will improve modeling of neurotransmitter spread after spillover and ectopic release and establish size limits for diffusion of drug delivery vectors such as viruses, liposomes, and nanoparticles in brain ECS. drug delivery | integrative optical imaging | nanoparticles | restricted diffusion | somatosensory cortex

  5. Damping width of giant dipole resonances of cold and hot nuclei: A macroscopic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mughabghab, S.F.; Sonzogni, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    A phenomenological macroscopic model of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) damping width of cold and hot nuclei with ground-state spherical and near-spherical shapes is developed. The model is based on a generalized Fermi liquid model which takes into account the nuclear surface dynamics. The temperature dependence of the GDR damping width is accounted for in terms of surface and volume components. Parameter-free expressions for the damping width and the effective deformation are obtained. The model is validated with GDR measurements of the following nuclides: 39,40 K, 42 Ca, 45 Sc, 59,63 Cu, 109-120 Sn, 147 Eu, 194 Hg, and 208 Pb, and is compared with the predictions of other models

  6. Optimal Channel Width Adaptation, Logical Topology Design, and Routing in Wireless Mesh Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio frequency spectrum is a finite and scarce resource. How to efficiently use the spectrum resource is one of the fundamental issues for multi-radio multi-channel wireless mesh networks. However, past research efforts that attempt to exploit multiple channels always assume channels of fixed predetermined width, which prohibits the further effective use of the spectrum resource. In this paper, we address how to optimally adapt channel width to more efficiently utilize the spectrum in IEEE802.11-based multi-radio multi-channel mesh networks. We mathematically formulate the channel width adaptation, logical topology design, and routing as a joint mixed 0-1 integer linear optimization problem, and we also propose our heuristic assignment algorithm. Simulation results show that our method can significantly improve spectrum use efficiency and network performance.

  7. Gap Width Study and Fixture Design in Laser Butt-Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Hui; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    .5-2.0 m/min, the laser power : 2 and 2.6 kW and the focal point position : 0 and -1.2 mm. Quality of all the butt welds are destructively tested according to ISO 13919-1.Influences of the variable process parameters to the maximum allowable gap width are observed as (1) the maximum gap width is inversely......This paper discusses some practical consideration for design of a mechanical fixture, which enables to accurately measure the width of a gap between two stainless steel workpieces and to steadfastly clamp the workpieces for butt-welding with a high power CO2 laser.With such a fixture, a series...

  8. Fabrication and characterization on width of spiral interdigitated electrodes based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelyn, P. Y. P.; Hashim, U.; Arshad, M. K. Md; Ruslinda, A. R.; Voon, C. H.; Ayub, R. M.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Liu, Wei-Wen; Kahar, S. M.; Huda, A. R. N.; Lee, H. Cheun

    2017-03-01

    Simple and inexpensive mask layout design on a transparency film were demonstrated using the conventional complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technique to produce interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) for biomedical biosensors applications. Lift-off techniques were implemented during photolithography process in order to pattern an electrode widths of 200µm, 300µm, 400µm and 500µm, respectively with a standardized 400µm gap spacing spiral IDEs. Due to the effect of the transparent mask, a fabrication of these spiral IDEs resulted in shrinkage of electrode width and increment of the gap spacing. Among these electrode sizes, the conductance of 300µm, 400µm and 500µm electrode width were successfully examined as compared to 200µm.

  9. Measurement of giant dipole resonance width at low temperature: A new experimental perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pandit, Deepak; Pal, Surajit; Bhattacharya, Srijit; De, A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T.K.; Mukherjee, G.; Pandey, R.; Gohil, M.; Pai, H.; Meena, J.K.; Banerjee, S.R.

    2012-01-01

    The systematic evolution of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) width in the temperature region of 0.9-1.4 MeV has been measured experimentally for 119 Sb using alpha induced fusion reaction and employing the LAMBDA high energy photon spectrometer. The temperatures have been precisely determined by simultaneously extracting the vital level density parameter from the neutron evaporation spectrum and the angular momentum from gamma multiplicity filter using a realistic approach. The systematic trend of the data seems to disagree with the thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM). The model predicts the gradual increase of GDR width from its ground state value whereas the measured GDR widths appear to remain constant at the ground state value till T∼1 MeV and increase thereafter, indicating towards a failure of the adiabatic assumption of the model at low temperature.

  10. Can red cell distribution width be used as a predictor of acute cholecystitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arer, İlker Murat; Yabanoğlu, Hakan; Çalışkan, Kenan

    2017-01-01

    Objective Acute cholecystitis is a common disease requiring accurate markers for diagnosis and proper treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of red cell distribution width (RDW) in acute cholecystitis. Material and Methods 299 were included in the study. The subjects were divided into 2 groups; group 1 (n: 46) acute cholecystitis group and group 2 (n: 253) chronic cholecystitis group. The patients were compared with respect to demographic characteristics, white blood cell count, C-reactive protein, and red cell distribution width. Results A statistically significant difference was observed between groups with respect to gender, white blood cell count, C-reactive protein, and red cell distribution width level (pcholecystitis. Multicenter prospective studies should be performed to elucidate the exact role of RDW level in acute cholecystitis. PMID:28740954

  11. Nano-scaled graphene platelets with a high length-to-width aspect ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z.

    2010-09-07

    This invention provides a nano-scaled graphene platelet (NGP) having a thickness no greater than 100 nm and a length-to-width ratio no less than 3 (preferably greater than 10). The NGP with a high length-to-width ratio can be prepared by using a method comprising (a) intercalating a carbon fiber or graphite fiber with an intercalate to form an intercalated fiber; (b) exfoliating the intercalated fiber to obtain an exfoliated fiber comprising graphene sheets or flakes; and (c) separating the graphene sheets or flakes to obtain nano-scaled graphene platelets. The invention also provides a nanocomposite material comprising an NGP with a high length-to-width ratio. Such a nanocomposite can become electrically conductive with a small weight fraction of NGPs. Conductive composites are particularly useful for shielding of sensitive electronic equipment against electromagnetic interference (EMI) or radio frequency interference (RFI), and for electrostatic charge dissipation.

  12. Direct measurement of the total decay width of the top quark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; D'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2013-11-15

    We present a measurement of the total decay width of the top quark using events with top-antitop quark pair candidates reconstructed in the final state with one charged lepton and four or more hadronic jets. We use the full Tevatron run II data set of sqrt[s]=1.96  TeV proton-antiproton collisions recorded by the CDF II detector. The top quark mass and the mass of the hadronically decaying W boson are reconstructed for each event and compared with distributions derived from simulated signal and background samples to extract the top quark width (Γtop) and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. For a top quark mass Mtop=172.5  GeV/c2, we find 1.10quark width to date.

  13. The effect of gap width on viscous stresses within the leakage across a bileaflet valve pivot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Travis, Brandon R; Andersen, Morten E; Fründ, Ernst Torben

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: Stresses of leakage flow may contribute to the increased tendency for thromboembolic complications in patients with mechanical valves. In bileaflet valves, leakage occurs primarily in the pivots, and the width of the pivot gap influences viscous stress magnitudes...... were performed, varying gap width between the leaflet and housing in the pivot region. To validate these calculations, steady leakage across a scaled in-vitro model of a single pivot was initiated, and velocity measurements at specific locations within flow the pivot were obtained using one......-component laser Doppler velocimetry. RESULTS: The average viscous stresses on the housing surface of the pivot increased from 198 to 299 Pa, and on the leaflet surface from 242 to 271 Pa, as gap width was increased from 100 to 300 microm. These stresses were similar in magnitude to the maximum turbulent stresses...

  14. Stark width regularities within spectral series of the lithium isoelectronic sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapalaga, Irinel; Trklja, Nora; Dojčinović, Ivan P.; Purić, Jagoš

    2018-03-01

    Stark width regularities within spectral series of the lithium isoelectronic sequence have been studied in an approach that includes both neutrals and ions. The influence of environmental conditions and certain atomic parameters on the Stark widths of spectral lines has been investigated. This study gives a simple model for the calculation of Stark broadening data for spectral lines within the lithium isoelectronic sequence. The proposed model requires fewer parameters than any other model. The obtained relations were used for predictions of Stark widths for transitions that have not yet been measured or calculated. In the framework of the present research, three algorithms for fast data processing have been made and they enable quality control and provide verification of the theoretically calculated results.

  15. Doppler-width thermodynamic thermometry by means of line-absorbance analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castrillo, A.; De Vizia, M. D.; Gianfrani, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Universita di Napoli, Caserta (Italy); Moretti, L. [Dipartimento di Matematica, Seconda Universita di Napoli, Caserta (Italy); Galzerano, G.; Laporta, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano and Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie (IFN-CNR), Milano (Italy); Merlone, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Torino (Italy)

    2011-09-15

    A clean and effective implementation of Doppler-width thermometry is described. Exploiting the relationship between line-center absorbance and integrated absorbance, the Doppler width of a molecular spectral line can be retrieved from a set of profiles resulting from different gas pressures. The method is validated by its application to numerically simulated spectra. Preliminary experiments, in water vapor samples, turn out to be successful, demonstrating Doppler-widths' retrieval in the near-infrared with a precision of 8x10{sup -5}, at the water triple point temperature. The direct link to the Boltzmann constant makes the proposed method very attractive for temperature metrology as a tool for the realization of a new thermodynamic temperature scale.

  16. Contributions to the width difference in the neutral $D$ system from hadronic decays

    CERN Document Server

    Gershon, T; Wilkinson, G

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of several multi-body $D^0$ meson decays have revealed that the final states are dominantly $CP$-even. However, the small value of the width difference between the two physical eigenstates of the $D^0$-$\\overline{D}{}^0$ system indicates that the total widths of decays to $CP$-even and $CP$-odd final states should be the same to within about a percent. The known contributions to the width difference from hadronic $D^0$ decays are discussed, and it is shown that an apparent excess of quasi-$CP$-even modes is balanced, within current uncertainty, by interference effects in quasi-flavour-specific decays. Decay modes which may significantly affect the picture with improved measurements are considered.

  17. Reappraising Transition Region Line Widths in Light of Recent Alfvén Wave Discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Scott W.; De Pontieu, Bart; Tarbell, Theodore D.

    2008-02-01

    We provide a new interpretation of ultraviolet transition region emission line widths observed by the SUMER instrument on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). This investigation is prompted by observations of the chromosphere at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on Hinode revealing that all chromospheric structures above the limb display significant transverse (Alfvénic) perturbations. We demonstrate that the magnitude, network sensitivity, and apparent center-to-limb isotropy of the measured line widths (formed below 250,000 K) can be explained by an observationally constrained forward model in which the line width is caused by the line-of-sight superposition of longitudinal and Alfvénic motions on the small-scale (spicular) structures that dominate the chromosphere and low transition region.

  18. Proton beam writing using the high energy ion nanoprobe LIPSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, F.; Spemann, D.; Lenzner, J.; Vogt, J.; Butz, T.

    2005-01-01

    Proton beam writing (PBW) is a very unique technique capable of the direct creation of three dimensional structures with a very high aspect ratio. Since the high energy ion nanoprobe LIPSION has a very high spatial resolution and is therefore well suited for the creation of structures in the micrometre range or below, it is planned to establish the PBW technique at the University of Leipzig. The results of the first proton beam writing experiments at the LIPSION nanoprobe are presented in this article. Structures with high aspect ratio and smooth side walls with an edge definition of ∼0.2 μm were created in negative SU-8 photo resist using 2.25 MeV protons. Furthermore, investigations were carried out concerning the mechanical stability of single free standing walls in order to collect information for the targeted production of samples with smaller feature sizes in the submicrometre range. Up to now, wall widths down to 1.5 μm were achieved. However, smaller feature sizes could not be obtained due to beam spot fluctuations which enlarge the wall width by a factor of three. Self-supported structures were produced using 2.25 MeV protons and subsequently 1.5 MeV helium ions demonstrating the stability and accuracy of these real three dimensional structures. In addition, different methods for online dose normalization were tested showing that ionoluminescence is the most suitable method for this purpose

  19. Electron beam curing paint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Tsutomu

    1991-04-01

    Electron beam curing (EBC) type paint is paint that is specially prepared so that it can be cured and dried by electron beam irradiation. Electron beam irradiation achieves hardly any curing and drying of ordinary normal-temperature drying type paint or heat-drying type paint. The main type of paint in which an electron beam produces a curing reaction is one in which a radical polymerization reaction takes place under irradiation. The use of this EBC painting - drying system has been considered for a variety of fields since it has a number of special features such as the fact that the paint dries instantaneously, no heat is applied and no solvent is used. (Author)

  20. Electron Beam Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Zschornacka, G.; Thorn, A.

    2013-12-16

    Electron beam ion sources (EBISs) are ion sources that work based on the principle of electron impact ionization, allowing the production of very highly charged ions. The ions produced can be extracted as a DC ion beam as well as ion pulses of different time structures. In comparison to most of the other known ion sources, EBISs feature ion beams with very good beam emittances and a low energy spread. Furthermore, EBISs are excellent sources of photons (X-rays, ultraviolet, extreme ultraviolet, visible light) from highly charged ions. This chapter gives an overview of EBIS physics, the principle of operation, and the known technical solutions. Using examples, the performance of EBISs as well as their applications in various fields of basic research, technology and medicine are discussed.

  1. Final focus test beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration

  2. HIRENASD Beam FEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This contains attempts to create BEAM FEM model. I have started a Blog to discuss this... please put your comments there and I will attempt to keep everything...

  3. Single Beam Holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsuan; Ruterbusch, Paul H.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses how holography can be used as part of undergraduate physics laboratories. The authors propose a single beam technique of holography, which will reduce the recording scheme as well as relax the isolation requirements. (HM)

  4. Beam spread functions calculated using Feynman path integrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgo, Paul; Tessendorf, Jerry

    2017-07-01

    A method of solving the radiative transfer equation using Feynman path integrals (FPIs) is discussed. The FPI approach is a mathematical framework for computing multiple scattering in participating media. Its numerical behavior is not well known, and techniques are being developed to solve the FPI approach numerically. A missing numerical technique is detailed and used to calculate beam spread functions (BSFs), a commonly studied experimental property of many types of media. The calculations are compared against measured BSFs of sea ice. Analysis shows differently-shaped BSFs, and suggests the width parameter of the calculated BSF's Gaussian fit approaches a value in the limit of the number of path segments. A projection is attempted, but suggests a larger number of path segments would not increase the width of the calculated BSF. The trial suggests the approach is numerically stable, but requires further testing to ensure scientific accuracy.

  5. Shear Behavior of Concrete Beams Reinforced with GFRP Shear Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heecheul Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the shear capacities of concrete beams reinforced with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP plates as shear reinforcement. To examine the shear performance, we manufactured and tested a total of eight specimens. Test variables included the GFRP strip-width-to-spacing ratio and type of opening array. The specimen with a GFRP plate with a 3×2 opening array showed the highest shear strength. From the test results, the shear strength increased as the strip-width-to-strip-spacing ratio increased. Also, we used the experimental results to evaluate whether the shear strength equations of ACI 318-14 and ACI 440.1R can be applied to the design of GFRP shear reinforcement. In the results, the ACI 440 equation underestimated the experimental results more than that of ACI 318.

  6. Statistical characteristics of Doppler spectral width as observed by the conjugate SuperDARN radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hosokawa

    Full Text Available We performed a statistical analysis of the occurrence distribution of Doppler spectral width around the day-side high-latitude ionosphere using data from the conjugate radar pair composed of the CUTLASS Iceland-East radar in the Northern Hemisphere and the SENSU Syowa-East radar in the Southern Hemisphere. Three types of spectral width distribution were identified: (1 an exponential-like distribution in the lower magnetic latitudes (below 72°, (2 a Gaussian-like distribution around a few degrees magnetic latitude, centered on 78°, and (3 another type of distribution in the higher magnetic latitudes (above 80°. The first two are considered to represent the geophysical regimes such as the LLBL and the cusp, respectively, because they are similar to the spectral width distributions within the LLBL and the cusp, as classified by Baker et al. (1995. The distribution found above 80° magnetic latitude has been clarified for the first time in this study. This distribution has similarities to the exponential-like distribution in the lower latitude part, although clear differences also exist in their characteristics. These three spectral width distributions are commonly identified in conjugate hemispheres. The latitudinal transition from one distribution to another exhibits basically the same trend between two hemispheres. There is, however, an interhemispheric difference in the form of the distribution around the cusp latitudes, such that spectral width values obtained from Syowa-East are larger than those from Iceland-East. On the basis of the spectral width characteristics, the average locations of the cusp and the open/closed field line boundary are estimated statistically.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere-magnetosphere inter-actions; plasma convection – Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp, and boundary layers

  7. Regression methods to investigate the relationship between facial measurements and widths of the maxillary anterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Zakiah Mohd; Tawfiq, Omar Farouq; Noor, Norliza Mohd; Shamsudheen, Mohd Iqbal; Rijal, Omar Mohd

    2010-03-01

    In rehabilitating edentulous patients, selecting appropriately sized teeth in the absence of preextraction records is problematic. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between some facial dimensions and widths of the maxillary anterior teeth to potentially provide a guide for tooth selection. Sixty full dentate Malaysian adults (18-36 years) representing 2 ethnic groups (Malay and Chinese), with well aligned maxillary anterior teeth and minimal attrition, participated in this study. Standardized digital images of the face, viewed frontally, were recorded. Using image analyzing software, the images were used to determine the interpupillary distance (IPD), inner canthal distance (ICD), and interalar width (IA). Widths of the 6 maxillary anterior teeth were measured directly from casts of the subjects using digital calipers. Regression analyses were conducted to measure the strength of the associations between the variables (alpha=.10). The means (standard deviations) of IPD, IA, and ICD of the subjects were 62.28 (2.47), 39.36 (3.12), and 34.36 (2.15) mm, respectively. The mesiodistal diameters of the maxillary central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines were 8.54 (0.50), 7.09 (0.48), and 7.94 (0.40) mm, respectively. The width of the central incisors was highly correlated to the IPD (r=0.99), while the widths of the lateral incisors and canines were highly correlated to a combination of IPD and IA (r=0.99 and 0.94, respectively). Using regression methods, the widths of the anterior teeth within the population tested may be predicted by a combination of the facial dimensions studied. (c) 2010 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Beam-beam diagnostics from closed-orbit distortion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furman, M.; Chin, Y.H.; Eden, J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Kozanecki, W. [DAPNIA/SPP, CEN Saclay Gif-sur-Yvette, (FR)]|[Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Tennyson, J.; Ziemann, V. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1992-07-01

    We study the applicability of beam-beam deflection techniques as a tuning tool for asymmetric B factories, focusing on PEP-II as an example. Assuming that the closed orbits of the two beams are separated vertically at the interaction point by a local orbit bump that is nominally closed, we calculate the residual beam orbit distortions due to the beam-beam interaction. Difference orbit measurements, performed at points conveniently distant from the interaction point (IP), provide distinct signatures that can be used to maintain the beams in collision and perform detailed optical diagnostics at the IP. A proposal to test this method experimentally at the TRISTAN ring is briefly discussed.

  9. SPIDER beam dump as diagnostic of the particle beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaupa, M., E-mail: matteo.zaupa@igi.cnr.it; Sartori, E. [Università degli Studi di Padova, Via 8 Febbraio 2, Padova 35122 (Italy); Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, Padova 35127 (Italy); Dalla Palma, M.; Brombin, M.; Pasqualotto, R. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, Padova 35127 (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    The beam power produced by the negative ion source for the production of ion of deuterium extracted from RF plasma is mainly absorbed by the beam dump component which has been designed also for measuring the temperatures on the dumping panels for beam diagnostics. A finite element code has been developed to characterize, by thermo-hydraulic analysis, the sensitivity of the beam dump to the different beam parameters. The results prove the capability of diagnosing the beam divergence and the horizontal misalignment, while the entity of the halo fraction appears hardly detectable without considering the other foreseen diagnostics like tomography and beam emission spectroscopy.

  10. Beam-beam simulation of Möbius-modified CESR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talman, R.; Malitsky, N.; Koyama, T.

    1997-05-01

    Colliding beam experiments at CESR with beams made round by running on the coupling resonance have been performed,(E. Young et al.), abstract, this conference and runs are planned with the beams made round by Möbius modification.(R. Talman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74), 1590, (1995) Performance in these configurations has been simulated using TEAPOT++ tracking, map generation, stochastic, and beam-beam modules within the Unified Accelerator Libraries(N. Malitsky et al.), abstract, this conference The true CESR lattice including sextupoles and element apertures is used. Outputs from the calculation include beam profile modification, tune optimization, maximum luminosity, and (with extrapolation) beam lifetimes.

  11. Beam-beam simulations: dynamical effects and beam-beam limit for LEP3

    CERN Document Server

    Ohmi, K

    2012-01-01

    Beam-beam simulations are reported for LEP3 and TLEP-H, including a rough tune scan. The results suggest that to achieve the design luminosity in LEP3, 10% higher bunch population may be necessary, while TLEP-H can achieve the design performance without any changes. The simulations indicate that the large synchrotron tune, in conjunction with a large hourglass effect, degrades the luminosity performance. This talk was given at CERN on 4 December 2012.

  12. Betatrons with kiloampere beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, J.M.

    1982-11-01

    Although the magnetic-induction method of acceleration used in the betatron is inherently capable of accelerating intense particle beams to high energy, many beam-instability questions arise when beams in the kilo-ampere range are considered. The intense electromagnetic fields produced by the beam, and by the image currents and charges induced in the surrounding walls, can produce very disruptive effects. Several unstable modes of collective oscillation are possible; the suppression of any one of them usually involves energy spread for Landau damping and careful design of the electrical character of the vacuum chamber. The various design criteria are often mutually incompatible. Space-charge detuning can be severe unless large beam apertures and high-energy injection are used. In order to have an acceptably low degree of space-charge detuning in the acceleration of a 10-kilo-ampere electron beam, for example, an injection energy on the order of 50 MeV seems necessary, in which case the forces due to nearby wall images can have a larger effect than the internal forces of the beam. A method of image compensation was invented for reducing the net image forces; it serves also to decrease the longitudinal beam impedance and thus helps alleviate the longitudinal instability as well. In order to avoid the ion-electron collective instability a vacuum in the range of 10 - 8 torr is required for an acceleration time of 1 millisecond. A multi-ring betatron system using the 50-MeV Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL as an injector was conceptually designed

  13. LHCb: Beam Pipe portrait

    CERN Multimedia

    LHCb, Collaboration

    2005-01-01

    The proton beams circulate in the accelerator in Ultra High Vacuum to make them interact only with each other when colliding at the interaction point. A special beam pipe "holds" the vacuum where they pass through the LHCb detector: it has to be mechanically very strong to stand the difference in pressure between the vacuum inside it and the air in the cavern but also be as transparent as possible for the particles originating in the proton−proton collisions.

  14. LHCb: Beam Pipe

    CERN Multimedia

    LHCb, Collaboration

    2005-01-01

    The proton beams circulate in the accelerator in Ultra High Vacuum to make them interact only with each other when colliding at the interaction point. A special beam pipe "holds" the vacuum where they pass through the LHCb detector:it has to be mechanically very strong to stand the difference in pressure between the vacuum inside it and the air in the cavern but also be as transparent as possible for the particles originating in the proton−proton collisions.

  15. PARTICLE BEAMS: Frontier course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Driven by the quest for higher energies and optimal physics conditions, the behaviour of particle beams in accelerators and storage rings is the subject of increasing attention. Thus the second course organized jointly by the US and CERN Accelerator Schools looked towards the frontiers of particle beam knowledge. The programme held at South Padre Island, Texas, from 23-29 October attracted 125 participants including some 35 from Europe

  16. LHC First Beam 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    Tuura, L

    2008-01-01

    The CMS Centre played a major part in the LHC First Beam Event on September 10th 2008: it was a central point for CMS, hosting journalists from all over the world and providing live link-ups to collaborating institutes as well as, of course, monitoring events as they happened at Point 5. It was also a venue for celebration as the beam completed circuits of the LHC in both directions, passing successfully through the detector (Courtesy of Lassi Tuura)

  17. Terascale Beam-Beam Simulations for Tevatron, RHIC and LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, J.

    2005-05-16

    In this paper, we report on recent advances in terascale simulations of the beam-beam interaction in Tevatron, RHIC and LHC.Computational methods for self consistent calculation of beam-beam forces are reviewed. New method for solving the two-dimensional Poisson equation with open boundary conditions is proposed and tested. This new spectral-finite difference method is a factor of four faster than the widely used FFT based Green function method for beam-beam interaction on axis. We also present applications to the study of antiproton losses during the injection stage at Tevatron, to the study of multiple bunch coherent beam-beam modes at RHIC, and to the study of beam-beam driven emittance growth at LHC.

  18. Terascale Beam-Beam Simulations for Tevatron, RHIC and LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang, J.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we report on recent advances in terascale simulations of the beam-beam interaction in Tevatron, RHIC and LHC.Computational methods for self consistent calculation of beam-beam forces are reviewed. New method for solving the two-dimensional Poisson equation with open boundary conditions is proposed and tested. This new spectral-finite difference method is a factor of four faster than the widely used FFT based Green function method for beam-beam interaction on axis. We also present applications to the study of antiproton losses during the injection stage at Tevatron, to the study of multiple bunch coherent beam-beam modes at RHIC, and to the study of beam-beam driven emittance growth at LHC

  19. Transverse equilibria in linear collider beam-beam collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Chen, Pisin

    1991-01-01

    It has been observed in simulations of the beam-beam interaction in linear colliders that a near equilibrium pinched state of the colliding beams develops when the disruption parameter is large (D much-gt 1). In this state the beam transverse density distributions are peaked at center, with long tails. The authors present here an analytical model of the equilibrium approached by the beams, that of a generalized Bennett pinch which develops through collisionless damping due to the strong nonlinearity of the beam-beam interaction. In order to calculate the equilibrium pinched beam size, an estimation of the rms emittance growth is made which takes into account the partial adiabaticity of the collision. This pinched beam size is used to derive the luminosity enhancement factors whose scaling is in agreement with the simulation results for both D and thermal factor A = σ z /β * large, and explains the previously noted cubic relationship between round and flat beam enhancement factors

  20. Beam structure studies of low-energy ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatmand, K.; Schneider, J. D.; Geisik, C.; Stevens, R. R.

    1991-05-01

    The ion beam structure at various axial positions along the beam-transport line has been monitored and studied utilizing a fluor screen and a video camera. The fluor material is aluminum oxide that is plasma-jet sprayed onto the surface of an aluminum or a water-cooled copper substrate. The visual representation of the beam structure is digitized and enhanced through use of false-color coding and displayed on a TV monitor for the on-line viewing by the experimentalist. Digitized video signals are stored for further off-line processing and extracting more information about the beam, such as beam profiles. This inexpensive and effective diagnostic enables the experimentalist to observe the real-time beam response (such as evolution of the beam structure, shifts in the beam intensity at various spatial locations within the beam perimeter, and shifts in the beam center and position) to parameter changes.