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Sample records for beam welded superalloys

  1. Fundamental studies on electron beam welding on heat resistant superalloys for nuclear plants, 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susei, Syuzo; Shimizu, Sigeki; Nagai, Hiroyoshi; Aota, Toshikazu; Satoh, Keisuke

    1980-01-01

    In this report, base metal of superalloys for nuclear plants, its electron beam and TIG weld joints were compared with each other in the mechanical properties. Obtained conclusions are summarized as follows: 1) TIG weld joint is superior to electron beam weld joint and base metal in 0.2% proof stress irrespective of the material, and electron beam weld joint is also superior to base metal. There is an appreciable difference in tensile stress between base metal and weld joint regardless of the materials. Meanwhile, electron beam weld joint is superior to TIG weld joint in both elongation and reduction of area. 2) Electron beam weld joint has considerably higher low-cycle fatigue properties at elevated temperatures than TIG weld joint, and it is usually as high as base metal. 3) In the secondary creep rate, base metal of Hastelloy X (HAEM) has higher one than its weld joints. However, electron beam weld joint is nearly comparable to the base metal. 4) There is hardly any appreciable difference between base metal and weld joint in the creep rupture strength without distinction of the material. In the ductility, base metal is much superior and is followed by electron beam weld joint and TIG weld joint in the order of high ductility. However, electron beam weld joint is rather comparable to base metal. 5) In consideration of welded pipe with a circumferential joint, the weld joint should be evaluated in terms of secondary creep rate, elongation and rupture strength. As the weld joint of high creep rupture strength approaches the base metal in the secondary creep rate and the elongation, it seems to be more resistant against the fracture due to creep deformation. In this point of view, electron beam weld joint is far superior to TIG weld joint and nearly comparable to the base metal. (author)

  2. Modern fiber laser beam welding of the newly-designed precipitation-strengthened nickel-base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naffakh Moosavy, Homam; Aboutalebi, Mohammad-Reza; Seyedein, Seyed Hossein; Goodarzi, Massoud; Khodabakhshi, Meisam; Mapelli, Carlo; Barella, Silvia

    2014-04-01

    In the present research, the modern fiber laser beam welding of newly-designed precipitation-strengthened nickel-base superalloys using various welding parameters in constant heat input has been investigated. Five nickel-base superalloys with various Ti and Nb contents were designed and produced by Vacuum Induction Melting furnace. The fiber laser beam welding operations were performed in constant heat input (100 J mm-2) and different welding powers (400 and 1000 W) and velocities (40 and 100 mm s-1) using 6-axis anthropomorphic robot. The macro- and micro-structural features, weld defects, chemical composition and mechanical property of 3.2 mm weldments were assessed utilizing optical and scanning electron microscopes equipped with EDS analysis and microhardness tester. The results showed that welding with higher powers can create higher penetration-to-width ratios. The porosity formation was increased when the welding powers and velocities were increased. None of the welds displayed hot solidification and liquation cracks in 400 and 1000 W welding powers, but liquation phenomenon was observed in all the heat-affected zones. With increasing the Nb content of the superalloys the liquation length was increased. The changing of the welding power and velocity did not alter the hardness property of the welds. The hardness of welds decreased when the Ti content declined in the composition of superalloys. Finally, the 400 and 1000 W fiber laser powers with velocity of 40 and 100 m ms-1 have been offered for hot crack-free welding of the thin sheet of newly-designed precipitation-strengthened nickel-base superalloys.

  3. Heat affected zone liquation cracking in electron beam welded third generation nickel base superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojo, O.A.; Wang, Y.L.; Chaturvedi, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    The weldability of directionally solidified nickel base superalloy TMS-75 and TMS-75+C was investigated by autogenous bead-on-plate electron beam welding. The analysis of microsegregation that occurred during solidification of the as-cast alloys indicated that while W and Re segregated into the γ dendrites of both the alloys, Ta, Hf and C were rejected into the interdendritic liquid in the TMS-75+C. Heat affected zone intergranular liquation cracking was observed in both the materials and was observed to be closely associated with liquated γ-γ' eutectic microconstituent. The TMS-75+C alloy, however, exhibited a reduced extent of HAZ cracking compared to TMS-75. Suppression of terminal solidification reaction involving non-invariant γ-γ' eutectic transformation due to modification of primary solidification path by carbon addition is suggested to be an important factor contributing to reduced susceptibility of TMS-75+C alloy to HAZ liquation cracking relative to the TMS-75 superalloy

  4. Atom-probe field-ion microscopy investigation of CMSX-4 Ni-base superalloy laser beam welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Miller, M.K.

    1996-01-01

    CMSX-4 superalloy laser beam welds were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM). The weld microstructure consisted of fine (10- to 50-nm) irregularly shaped γ' precipitates (0.65 to 0.75 volume fraction) within the γ matrix. APFIM compositions of the γ and γ' phases were found to be different from those in the base metal. Concentration profiles across the γ and γ' phases showed extensive variations of Cr, Co and Al concentrations as a function of distance within the γ phase. Calculated lattice misfits near the γ/γ' interface in the welds are positive values compared to the negative values for base metal. (orig.)

  5. Analysis of laser beam weldability of Inconel 738 superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbewande, A.T.; Buckson, R.A.; Ojo, O.A.

    2010-01-01

    The susceptibility of pre-weld heat treated laser beam welded IN 738 superalloy to heat affected zone (HAZ) cracking was studied. A pre-weld heat treatment that produced the minimal grain boundary liquation resulted in a higher level of cracking compared to those with more intergranular liquation. This deviation from the general expectation of influence of intergranular liquation extent on HAZ microfissuring is attributable to the reduction in the ability of the base alloy to accommodate welding tensile stress that accompanied a pre-weld heat treatment condition designed to minimize intergranular liquation. Furthermore, in contrast to what has been generally reported in other nickel-based superalloys, a decrease in laser welding speed resulted in increased HAZ cracking in the IN 738, which can be attributed to exacerbated process instability at lower welding speeds.

  6. Microstructural analysis of laser weld fusion zone in Haynes 282 superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osoba, L.O. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 5V6 (Canada); Ding, R.G. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Ojo, O.A., E-mail: ojo@cc.umanitoba.ca [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 5V6 (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Analytical electron microscopy and spectroscopy analyses of the fusion zone (FZ) microstructure in autogenous laser beam welded Haynes 282 (HY 282) superalloy were performed. The micro-segregation patterns observed in the FZ indicate that Co, Cr and Al exhibited a nearly uniform distribution between the dendrite core and interdendritic regions while Ti and Mo were rejected into the interdendritic liquid during the weld solidification. Transmission electron diffraction analysis and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis revealed the second phase particles formed along the FZ interdendritic region to be Ti-Mo rich MC-type carbide particles. Weld FZ solidification cracking, which is sometimes associated with the formation of {gamma}-{gamma}' eutectic in {gamma}' precipitation strengthened nickel-base superalloys, was not observed in the HY 282 superalloy. Modified primary solidification path due to carbon addition in the newly developed superalloy is used to explain preclusion of weld FZ solidification cracking in the material. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A newly developed superalloy was welded by CO{sub 2} laser beam joining technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron microscopy characterization of the weld microstructure was performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identified interdendritic microconstituents consist of MC-type carbides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modification of primary solidification path is used to explain cracking resistance.

  7. Microstructural analysis of laser weld fusion zone in Haynes 282 superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osoba, L.O.; Ding, R.G.; Ojo, O.A.

    2012-01-01

    Analytical electron microscopy and spectroscopy analyses of the fusion zone (FZ) microstructure in autogenous laser beam welded Haynes 282 (HY 282) superalloy were performed. The micro-segregation patterns observed in the FZ indicate that Co, Cr and Al exhibited a nearly uniform distribution between the dendrite core and interdendritic regions while Ti and Mo were rejected into the interdendritic liquid during the weld solidification. Transmission electron diffraction analysis and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis revealed the second phase particles formed along the FZ interdendritic region to be Ti–Mo rich MC-type carbide particles. Weld FZ solidification cracking, which is sometimes associated with the formation of γ–γ' eutectic in γ' precipitation strengthened nickel-base superalloys, was not observed in the HY 282 superalloy. Modified primary solidification path due to carbon addition in the newly developed superalloy is used to explain preclusion of weld FZ solidification cracking in the material. - Highlights: ► A newly developed superalloy was welded by CO 2 laser beam joining technique. ► Electron microscopy characterization of the weld microstructure was performed. ► Identified interdendritic microconstituents consist of MC-type carbides. ► Modification of primary solidification path is used to explain cracking resistance.

  8. Fiber laser welding of nickel based superalloy Inconel 625

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Damian M.

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes the application of single mode high power fiber laser (HPFL) for the welding of nickel based superalloy Inconel 625. Butt joints of Inconel 625 sheets 0,8 mm thick were laser welded without an additional material. The influence of laser welding parameters on weld quality and mechanical properties of test joints was studied. The quality and mechanical properties of the joints were determined by means of tensile and bending tests, and micro hardness tests, and also metallographic examinations. The results showed that a proper selection of laser welding parameters provides non-porous, fully-penetrated welds with the aspect ratio up to 2.0. The minimum heat input required to achieve full penetration butt welded joints with no defect was found to be 6 J/mm. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the joints are essentially equivalent to that for the base material.

  9. Gas metal arc welding in refurbishment of cobalt base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriary, M. S.; Miladi Gorji, Y.; Kolagar, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Refurbishments of superalloys which are used in manufacturing gas turbine hot components usually consists of removing cracks and other defects by blending and then repair welding in order to reconstruct damaged area. In this study, the effects of welding parameters on repair of FSX-414 superalloy, as the most applicable cobalt base superalloy in order to manufacture gas turbine nozzles, by use of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) technic were investigated. Results then were compared by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW). Metallographic and SEM studies of the microstructure of the weld and HAZ showed that there are no noticeable defects in the microstructure by use of GMAW. Also, chemical analysis and morphologies of carbide in both methods are similar. Hardness profile of the GM AW structure then also compared with GTAW and no noticeable difference was observed between the profiles. Also, proper tensile properties, compared with GTAW, can be achieved by use of optimum parameters that can be obtained by examining the current and welding speed. Tensile properties of optimized condition of the GMAW then were compared with GTAW. It was seen that the room and high temperature tensile properties of the GMAW structure is very similar and results confirmed that changing the technic did not have any significant influence on the properties.

  10. Microstructural study of weld fusion zone of TIG welded IN 738LC nickel-based superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojo, O.A.; Richards, N.L.; Chaturvedi, M.C.

    2004-01-01

    The weld fusion zone microstructure of a commercial aerospace superalloy IN 738 was examined. Elemental segregation induced interdendritic microconstituents were identified to include terminal solidification product M 3 B 2 and Ni 7 Zr 2 in association with γ-γ' eutectic constituent, which require proper consideration during the development of optimum post weld heat treatment

  11. Microstructural analysis of weld cracking in 718 Plus superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, Krutika

    Allvac 718RTM PLUS(TM) (718 Plus) is a new Ni-base superalloy developed to be used in land and aero gas turbine applications. 718 Plus was developed to have high temperature properties superior to its baseline superalloy Inconel 718, while maintaining its workability. Besides its high temperature properties superior to Inconel 718, limited information exists about its physical metallurgy or weldability. This project studied the microstructure and electron beam welding response of this new superalloy in two selected pre-weld heat treated conditions. To further understand the effect of minor alloying elements on its weldability, two versions of 718 Plus with varying concentrations of boron and phosphorus, HC 49 with higher B and P and HC 20 with normal B and P, were also studied. Finally, the weldability of 718 Plus alloys was compared to that of Inconel 718 and Waspaloy under similar welding conditions. Hot rolled wrought plates of Inconel 718, Waspaloy and 718 Plus alloys were supplied by ALLVAC Inc. 12.7 mm x 12.7 mm x 101.6 mm sections were cut normal to the rolling direction of the plates and were subjected to their recommended respective solution heat treatments, viz., 950°C for 1 hour for 718 Plus alloys and Inconel 718 and 1020°C for 1 hour for Waspaloy. 718 Plus alloys and Inconel 718 were also examined after another solution heat treatment at 1050°C for 1 hour. All the heat treatments were followed by water quenching. Thorough microstructural characterization before and after welding was carried out using optical microscopy, analytical scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis and analytical transmission electron microscopy. In addition, Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (SIMS) was used to study the grain boundary segregation in the two 718 Plus alloys. Interestingly, the microstructure of 718 Plus alloy, in the heat treated conditions it was studied, was very similar to that of Inconel 718 despite of the considerable difference in their

  12. Comparative Studies on Microstructure, Mechanical and Pitting Corrosion of Post Weld Heat Treated IN718 Superalloy GTA and EB Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilkush; Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to weld Inconel 718 nickel-base superalloy (IN718 alloy) using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and electron beam welding (EBW) processes. Both the weldments were subjected to post-weld heat treatment condition as follows -980°C / 20 min followed by direct aging condition (DA) as 720°C/8 h/FC followed by 620°C/8 h/AC. The GTA and EB welds of IN718 alloy were compared in two conditions as-received and 980STA conditions. Welds were characterized to observe mechanical properties, pitting corrosion resistance by correlating with observed microstructures. The rate of higher cooling ranges, the fusion zone of EBW exhibited discrete and relative finer lave phases whereas the higher niobium existed laves with coarser structure were observed in GTAW. The significant dissolution of laves were observed at 980STA of EBW. Due to these effects, the EBW of IN718 alloy showed the higher mechanical properties than GTAW. The electrochemical potentiostatic etch test was carried out in 3.5wt% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution to study the pitting corrosion behaviour of the welds. Results of the present investigation established that mechanical properties and pitting corrosion behaviour are significantly better in post weld heat treated condition. The comparative studies showed that the better combination of mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance were obtained in 980STA condition of EBW than GTAW.

  13. Modeling cast IN-738 superalloy gas tungsten arc welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonifaz, E.A.; Richards, N.L.

    2009-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-element thermal model has been developed to generate weld profiles, and to analyze transient heat flow, thermal gradients and thermal cycles in cast IN-738 superalloy gas tungsten arc welds. Outputs of the model (cooling rates, the thermal gradient G and the growth rate R) were used to describe solidification structures found around the weld pool for three different welding speeds at constant heat input. Calculations around the weld pool indicate that the cooling rate increases from the fusion line to the centerline at all welding speeds. It was also observed that the cooling rate (G x R) and the ratio G/R fall with welding speed. For instance, as the welding speed is increased, the cooling rates at the centerline, fusion line and penetration depth decrease. Moreover, it was observed that as the power and welding speed both increase (but keeping the heat input constant), the weld pool becomes wider and more elongated, shifting from circular to elliptical shaped. The calculations were performed using ABAQUS FE code on the basis of a time-increment Lagrangian formulation. The heat source represented by a moving Gaussian power density distribution is applied over the top surface of the specimen during a period of time that depends on the welding speed. Temperature-dependent material properties and the effect of forced convection due to the flow of the shielding gas are included in the model. Numerically predicted sizes of the melt-pool zone and dendrite secondary arm spacing induced by the gas tungsten arc welding process are also given

  14. A Review on Inertia and Linear Friction Welding of Ni-Based Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamanfar, Ahmad; Jahazi, Mohammad; Cormier, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Inertia and linear friction welding are being increasingly used for near-net-shape manufacturing of high-value materials in aerospace and power generation gas turbines because of providing a better quality joint and offering many advantages over conventional fusion welding and mechanical joining techniques. In this paper, the published works up-to-date on inertia and linear friction welding of Ni-based superalloys are reviewed with the objective to make clarifications on discrepancies and uncertainties reported in literature regarding issues related to these two friction welding processes as well as microstructure, texture, and mechanical properties of the Ni-based superalloy weldments. Initially, the chemical composition and microstructure of Ni-based superalloys that contribute to the quality of the joint are reviewed briefly. Then, problems related to fusion welding of these alloys are addressed with due consideration of inertia and linear friction welding as alternative techniques. The fundamentals of inertia and linear friction welding processes are analyzed next with emphasis on the bonding mechanisms and evolution of temperature and strain rate across the weld interface. Microstructural features, texture development, residual stresses, and mechanical properties of similar and dissimilar polycrystalline and single crystal Ni-based superalloy weldments are discussed next. Then, application of inertia and linear friction welding for joining Ni-based superalloys and related advantages over fusion welding, mechanical joining, and machining are explained briefly. Finally, present scientific and technological challenges facing inertia and linear friction welding of Ni-based superalloys including those related to modeling of these processes are addressed.

  15. Horizontal electron beam welding for stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.; Olivera, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    Stainless steel samples have been realized by local vacuum apparatus for electron beam welding applications to reactor core shell realizations. The best welding parameters have been determined by a systematic study. The welds have been characterized by mechanical tests [fr

  16. On Post-Weld Heat Treatment of a Single Crystal Nickel-Based Superalloy Joint by Linear Friction Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Ma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Three types of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT, i.e. solution treatment + primary aging + secondary aging (I, secondary aging (II, and primary aging + secondary aging (III, were applied to a single crystal nickel-based superalloy joint made with linear friction welding (LFW. The results show that the grains in the thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ coarsen seriously and the primary γ' phase in the TMAZ precipitates unevenly after PWHT I. The primary γ' phase in the TMAZ and weld zone (WZ precipitates insufficiently and fine granular secondary γ' phase is observed in the matrix after PWHT II. After PWHT III, the primary γ' phase precipitates more sufficiently and evenly compared to PWHTs I and II. Moreover, the grains in the TMAZ have not coarsened seriously and fine granular secondary γ' phase is not found after PWHT III. PWHT III seems more suitable to the LFWed single crystal nickel-based superalloy joints when performing PWHT.

  17. Electron beam welding fundamentals and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mara, G.L.; Armstrong, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    The electron beam welding process is described and the unique mode of operation and penetration explained by a description of the forces operating within the weld pool. This penetration model is demonstrated by high speed cinematography of the weld pool on several materials. The conditions under which weld defects are formed are discussed and examples are presented. (auth)

  18. Low heat input welding of nickel superalloy GTD-111 with Inconel 625 filler metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athiroj, Athittaya; Wangyao, Panyawat; Hartung, Fritz; Lothongkum, Gobboon [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering

    2018-03-01

    GTD-111 precipitation-strengthened nickel-based superalloy is widely used in blades of gas turbine engines which operate at high temperature and in a hot localized corrosion atmosphere. After long-term exposure to high temperature, γ' precipitate is known to exhibit catastrophic changes in size and distribution which cause deterioration of its properties and failure of the component. In this study, a damaged blade removed from a land-based gas turbine generator was subjected to nonpre-heat-treated GTAW and laser welding repair with various welding powers in the range of 135 to 295 J x mm{sup -1}, followed by post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1473 K for 7200 s and strain aging at 1118 K for 86 400 s. Results show no significant relationship between welding powers, size and area fraction of the γ' precipitate in the fcc γ matrix in both GTAW and laser-welded specimens. The final γ' precipitate size and distribution depend mainly on PWHT parameters as γ' precipitates in all GTAW and laser welded specimens showed similar size and area fraction independently of the heat input from welding. Unmixed zones are observed in all laser welding specimens which may cause preferential weld corrosion during service. Microcrack occurrence due to welding and PWHT processes is also discussed.

  19. Definition of Beam Diameter for Electron Beam Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgardt, Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pierce, Stanley W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dvornak, Matthew John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-11

    It is useful to characterize the dimensions of the electron beam during process development for electron beam welding applications. Analysis of the behavior of electron beam welds is simplest when a single number can be assigned to the beam properties that describes the size of the beam spot; this value we generically call the “beam diameter”. This approach has worked well for most applications and electron beam welding machines with the weld dimensions (width and depth) correlating well with the beam diameter. However, in recent weld development for a refractory alloy, Ta-10W, welded with a low voltage electron beam machine (LVEB), it was found that the weld dimensions (weld penetration and weld width) did not correlate well with the beam diameter and especially with the experimentally determined sharp focus point. These data suggest that the presently used definition of beam diameter may not be optimal for all applications. The possible reasons for this discrepancy and a suggested possible alternative diameter definition is the subject of this paper.

  20. Effect of heat input on heat affected zone cracking in laser welded ATI Allvac 718Plus superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idowu, O.A.; Ojo, O.A.; Chaturvedi, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    The heat affected zones (HAZs) of low and high heat input laser welds of a newly developed superalloy, ATI Allvac 718Plus, were studied. Low heat input welds suffered significant HAZ grain boundary liquation cracking, while no cracking was observed in spite of a more extensive HAZ intergranular liquation in the higher heat input welds. Combination of lower welding stresses generated during cooling, and relaxation of these stresses by thick intergranular liquid were suggested to be the factors that contributed to the absence of cracking in the high heat input welds. Further, healing of some of the HAZ cracks in lower heat input welds by fusion zone interdendritic liquid occurred through liquid backfilling

  1. Underwater laser beam welding of Alloy 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Takehisa; Tamura, Masataka; Kono, Wataru; Kawano, Shohei; Yoda, Masaki

    2009-01-01

    Stress Corrosion Clacking (SCC) has been reported at Alloy 600 welds between nozzles and safe-end in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plant. Alloy 690, which has higher chromium content than Alloy 600, has been applied for cladding on Alloy 600 welds for repairing damaged SCC area. Toshiba has developed Underwater Laser Beam Welding technique. This method can be conducted without draining, so that the repairing period and the radiation exposure during the repair can be dramatically decreased. In some old PWRs, high-sulfur stainless steel is used as the materials for this section. It has a high susceptibility of weld cracks. Therefore, the optimum welding condition of Alloy 690 on the high-sulfur stainless steel was investigated with our Underwater Laser Beam Welding unit. Good cladding layer, without any crack, porosity or lack of fusion, could be obtained. (author)

  2. Characterization of the Microstructures and the Cryogenic Mechanical Properties of Electron Beam Welded Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soon Il; Bae, Sang Hyun; Do, Jeong Hyeon; Jo, Chang Yong; Hong, Hyun Uk

    2016-02-01

    The microstructures and the cryogenic mechanical properties of electron beam (EB) welds between cast and forged Inconel 718 superalloys with a thickness of 10 mm were investigated in comparison with gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds. EB welding with a heat input lower than 250 J/mm caused the formation of liquation microfissuring in the cast-side heat-affected-zone (HAZ) of the EB welds. HAZ liquation microfissuring appeared to be associated with the constitutional liquation of primary NbC carbides at the grain boundaries. Compared with the GTA welding process, the EB welding produced welds with superior microstructure, exhibiting fine dendritic structure associated with the reduction in size and fraction of the Laves phase due to the rapid cooling rate. This result was responsible for the superior mechanical properties of the EB welds at 77 K (-196 °C). Laves particles in both welds were found to provide the preferential site for the crack initiation and propagation, leading to a significant decrease in the Charpy impact toughness at 77 K (-196 °C). Crack initiation and propagation induced by Charpy impact testing were discussed in terms of the dendrite arm spacing, the Laves size and the dislocation structure ahead of the crack arisen from the fractured Laves phase in the two welds.

  3. Effect of Process Variables on the Inertia Friction Welding of Superalloys LSHR and Mar-M247

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, D. W.; Senkov, O. N.; Shivpuri, R.; Semiatin, S. L.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of inertia friction welding process parameters on microstructure evolution, weld plane quality, and the tensile behavior of welds between dissimilar nickel-base superalloys was established. For this purpose, the fine-grain, powder metallurgy alloy LSHR was joined to coarse-grain cast Mar-M247 using a fixed level of initial kinetic energy, but different combinations of the flywheel moment of inertia and initial rotation speed. It was found that welds made with the largest moment of inertia resulted in a sound bond with the best microstructure and room-temperature tensile strength equal to or greater than that of the parent materials. A relationship between the moment of inertia and weld process efficiency was established. The post-weld tensile behavior was interpreted in the context of observed microstructure gradients and weld-line defects.

  4. Studies on the Corrosion Resistance of Laser-Welded Inconel 600 and Inconel 625 Nickel-Based Superalloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łyczkowska K.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the electrochemical corrosion tests of Inconel 600 and Inconel 625 laser-welded superalloys. The studies were conducted in order to assess the resistance to general and pitting corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution. It was found that Inconel 600 possesses good corrosion resistance, however Inconel 625 is characterized by a greater resistance to general and also to pitting corrosion of the weld as well as the base metal.

  5. Studies on the Corrosion Resistance of Laser-Welded Inconel 600 and Inconel 625 Nickel-Based Superalloys

    OpenAIRE

    Łyczkowska K.; Michalska J.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the electrochemical corrosion tests of Inconel 600 and Inconel 625 laser-welded superalloys. The studies were conducted in order to assess the resistance to general and pitting corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution. It was found that Inconel 600 possesses good corrosion resistance, however Inconel 625 is characterized by a greater resistance to general and also to pitting corrosion of the weld as well as the base metal.

  6. Electron Beam Welding of Gear Wheels by Splitted Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dřímal Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution deals with the issue of electron beam welding of high-accurate gear wheels composed of a spur gearing and fluted shaft joined with a face weld for automotive industry. Both parts made of the high-strength low-alloy steel are welded in the condition after final machining and heat treatment, performed by case hardening, whereas it is required that the run-out in the critical point of weldment after welding, i. e. after the final operation, would be 0.04 mm max..

  7. Study on local vacuum electron beam welding of flange rim

    CERN Document Server

    He Cheng Dan; Ying Lei; Xu Qi Jin

    2002-01-01

    Local vacuum electron beam welding and its application prospect in military and civil industry are introduced. A home made local vacuum electron beam welding is completed. Its main technical parameters and key techniques are also presented

  8. Evaluation of the Low Heat Input Process for Weld Repair of Nickel-Base Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durocher, J.; Richards, N. L.

    2011-10-01

    The repair of turbine blades and vanes commonly involves gas tungsten arc welding or an equivalent process, but unfortunately these components are often susceptible to heat-affected zone (HAZ) cracking during the weld repair process. This is a major problem especially in cast alloys due to their coarse-grain size and where the (Al + Ti) contents is in excess of 3-4%; vacuum brazing is also used but mainly on low stress non-rotating components such as vanes. Micro-welding has the potential to deposit small amounts of filler at low heat input levels with minimum HAZ and thus is an attractive process for depositing a quality weld. As with conventional fusion processes, the filler alloy is deposited by the generation of a low power arc between a consumable electrode and the substrate. The low heat input of this process offers unique advantages over more common welding processes such as gas tungsten arc, plasma arc, laser, and electron beam welding. In this study, the low heat input characteristic of micro-welding has been used to simulate weld repair using Inconel (IN) (Inconel and IN are trademarks of INCO Alloys International) 625, Rene (Rene is a trademark of General Electric Company) 41, Nimonic (Nimonic is a trademark of INCO Alloys International) 105 and Inconel 738LC filler alloys, to a cast Inconel 738LC substrate. The effect of micro-welding process parameters on the deposition rate, coating quality, and substrate has been investigated.

  9. Modeling Long-term Creep Performance for Welded Nickel-base Superalloy Structures for Power Generation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Chen [GE Global Research, NIskayuna, NY (United States); Gupta, Vipul [GE Global Research, NIskayuna, NY (United States); Huang, Shenyan [GE Global Research, NIskayuna, NY (United States); Soare, Monica [GE Global Research, NIskayuna, NY (United States); Zhao, Pengyang [GE Global Research, NIskayuna, NY (United States); Wang, Yunzhi [GE Global Research, NIskayuna, NY (United States)

    2017-02-28

    The goal of this project is to model long-term creep performance for nickel-base superalloy weldments in high temperature power generation systems. The project uses physics-based modeling methodologies and algorithms for predicting alloy properties in heterogeneous material structures. The modeling methodology will be demonstrated on a gas turbine combustor liner weldment of Haynes 282 precipitate-strengthened nickel-base superalloy. The major developments are: (1) microstructure-property relationships under creep conditions and microstructure characterization (2) modeling inhomogeneous microstructure in superalloy weld (3) modeling mesoscale plastic deformation in superalloy weld and (4) a constitutive creep model that accounts for weld and base metal microstructure and their long term evolution. The developed modeling technology is aimed to provide a more efficient and accurate assessment of a material’s long-term performance compared with current testing and extrapolation methods. This modeling technology will also accelerate development and qualification of new materials in advanced power generation systems. This document is a final technical report for the project, covering efforts conducted from October 2014 to December 2016.

  10. Numerical simulation of electron beam welding with beam oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushnikov, D. N.; Permyakov, G. L.

    2017-02-01

    This research examines the process of electron-beam welding in a keyhole mode with the use of beam oscillations. We study the impact of various beam oscillations and their parameters on the shape of the keyhole, the flow of heat and mass transfer processes and weld parameters to develop methodological recommendations. A numerical three-dimensional mathematical model of electron beam welding is presented. The model was developed on the basis of a heat conduction equation and a Navier-Stokes equation taking into account phase transitions at the interface of a solid and liquid phase and thermocapillary convection (Marangoni effect). The shape of the keyhole is determined based on experimental data on the parameters of the secondary signal by using the method of a synchronous accumulation. Calculations of thermal and hydrodynamic processes were carried out based on a computer cluster, using a simulation package COMSOL Multiphysics.

  11. On the role of liquated γ' precipitates in weld heat affected zone microfissuring of a nickel-based superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojo, O.A.; Chaturvedi, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    The role of γ' precipitate particles, which is the principal strengthening phase of most of the precipitation hardened nickel base superalloys, on weld heat affected zone (HAZ) cracking was investigated. The HAZ microstructures around welds in a commercial nickel-based superalloy IN 738LC were simulated using Gleeble thermomechanical simulation system. Microstructural examination of the simulated HAZs and those present in actual tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded specimens showed that γ' particles persisted during heating to the welding simulation temperatures, where they reacted with the surrounding γ matrix producing liquid film by a eutectic-type reaction, which subsequently infiltrated the grain boundary regions. The on-cooling ductility of the alloy was significantly reduced as shown by the comparatively low ductility recovery temperature. Correlation of simulated HAZ microstructures with hot ductility properties of the alloy revealed that HAZ cracking resistance was damaged by liquation reaction involving the γ' precipitate particles. The results support previously reported observations which indicated that γ' precipitate particles could contribute to HAZ microfissuring in superalloys through liquation reaction besides the generally reported rapid solid-state re-precipitation of γ' phase

  12. Microstructure and deformation behavior of nickel based superalloy Inconel 740 prepared by electron beam smelting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Yi, E-mail: tanyi@dlut.edu.cn; You, Xiaogang; You, Qifan; Li, Jiayan; Shi, Shuang; Li, Pengting

    2016-04-15

    Electron beam smelting (EBS) has been used to fabricate the Inconel 740 superalloy. Microstructures, hardness, and deformation characteristics of the alloy are studied. It is observed that carbides and fine secondary phase nuclei are distributed in the hot worked EBS 740 superalloy. The Ostwald ripening occurs during solution treatment and leads to aggregation of the γ′ precipitates, the size of γ′ precipitates varies from several nanometers to more than one hundred nanometers as a result. The average size of the secondary phase is < 30 nm after aging treatment and the average Vickers hardness is measured to be about 370. The critical shear stress is calculated to be 0.627 GPa with governing mechanism of shearing, causing a stronger strengthening effect than the traditionally prepared Inconel 740 superalloy. The compression behavior indicates that the EBS 740 superalloy shows higher flow stress than 740H at low Zener-Hollomon parameter, which may arise from the undissolved γ′ precipitates and higher activation energy Q. The tensile results show that the fracture surface exhibits a ductile fracture pattern, in contrast to no obvious plastic deformation on the macroscopic fracture. Crack propagation proceeds in a transgranular fracture mode with facets and voids presented on the fracture surface. - Graphical abstract: Electron beam smelting (EBS) has been used to fabricate the Inconel 740 superalloy. Microstructures, hardness, and deformation characteristics of the alloy are studied. The average size of the secondary phase is < 30 nm after aging treatment and the average Vickers hardness is measured to be about 370. The critical shear stress is calculated to be 0.627 GPa with governing mechanism of shearing, causing a stronger strengthening effect than the traditionally prepared Inconel 740 superalloy. The EBS 740 superalloy shows higher flow stress than 740H at low Zener-Hollomon parameter, which may arise from the undissolved γ′ precipitates and higher

  13. On the Occurrence of Liquation During Linear Friction Welding of Ni-Based Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoumi, F.; Shahriari, D.; Jahazi, M.; Cormier, J.; Flipo, B. C. D.

    2017-06-01

    A combination of experimental and analytical methods was used to study the possible occurrence of liquation during LFW of the newly developed AD730TM Ni-based superalloy. LFWed joints were produced using a semi-industrial size facility and the interfaces of the joints as well as the ejected flash were examined using optical and Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron Microscopy (FEG-SEM). Physical simulation of the LFW thermal cycle, using thermomechanical simulator Gleeble™ 3800, showed that incipient melting started from 1473 K (1200 °C). The analytical model, calibrated by experiments, predicted that the highest temperature of the interface was about 1523 K (1250 °C). The constitutive equations based on lattice and pipe diffusion models were developed to quantify the self-diffusivity of the elements and control the extent of liquation by considering the effect of LFW process parameters. Analytical results show that the application of compressive stresses during LFW results in 25 times increase in the diffusion of Ni atoms at the weld interface. Therefore, no presence of re-solidified phases, i.e., occurrence of liquation, was observed in the microstructure of the weld zone or the flash in the present study. Based on the obtained results, a methodology was developed for designing the optimum pressure above which no liquation, and hence cracking, will be observable.

  14. Effect of beam oscillation on borated stainless steel electron beam welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RajaKumar, Guttikonda [Tagore Engineering College, Chennai (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Ram, G.D. Janaki [Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Chennai (India). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering; Rao, S.R. Koteswara [SSN College of Engineering, Chennai (India). Mechanical Engineering

    2015-07-01

    Borated stainless steels are used in nuclear power plants to control neutron criticality in reactors as control rods, shielding material, spent fuel storage racks and transportation casks. In this study, bead on plate welds were made using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and electron beam welding (EBW) processes. Electron beam welds made using beam oscillation technique exhibited higher tensile strength values compared to that of GTA welds. Electron beam welds were found to show fine dendritic microstructure while GTA welds exhibited larger dendrites. While both processes produced defect free welds, GTA welds are marked by partially melted zone (PMZ) where the hardness is low. EBW obviate the PMZ failure due to low heat input and in case of high heat input GTA welding process failure occurs in the PMZ.

  15. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Laser Welded Joints of DZ125L and IN718 Nickel Base Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Taosha; Wang, Lei; Liu, Yang; Song, Xiu

    2018-03-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of the laser welded joint of DZ125L and IN718 nickel base superalloys were investigated. The results show that the fusion zone (FZ) mainly consists of fine dendrite structure with fine γ', Laves phases and MC carbides inhomogeneously distributed. The high welding temperature induces the partial dissolution of γ' in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of DZ125L and liquation of grain boundaries in both of the HAZs. After post-weld heat treatment (PWHT), fine γ″ and γ' phases precipitate in the FZ, IN718 HAZ and IN718 base metal (BM), and fine γ' precipitate in the γ channel of the HAZ and BM of DZ125L. With tensile testing, the joints after PWHT show higher strengths than that of the weaker DZ125L alloy. Plastic deformation mainly concentrates in the weaker DZ125L and the joint finally fails in the DZ125L BM.

  16. Measuring and recording system for electron beam welding parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobanova, N.G.; Lifshits, M.L.; Efimov, I.I.

    1987-01-01

    The observation possibility during electron beam welding of circular articles with guaranteed clearance of welding bath leading front in joint gap and flare cloud over the bath by means of television monitor is considered. The composition and operation mode of television measuring system for metric characteristics of flare cloud and altitude of welding bath leading front in the clearance are described

  17. The Precipitation Behavior and Hot Deformation Characteristics of Electron Beam Smelted Inconel 740 Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Xiaogang; Tan, Yi; Wu, Chang; You, Qifan; Zhao, Longhai; Li, Jiayan

    2018-03-01

    The Inconel 740 superalloy was prepared by the electron beam smelting (EBS) technology, the precipitation behavior and strengthening mechanism were studied, and the hot deformation characteristics of EBS 740 superalloy were investigated. The results indicate that the EBS 740 superalloy is mainly strengthened by the mechanism of weakly coupled dislocation shearing, and the resulting critical shear stress is calculated to be 234.6 MPa. The deformation parameters show a great influence on the flow behavior of EBS 740 superalloy. The strain rate sensitivity exponent increases with the increasing of deformation temperature, and the strain hardening exponent shows a decreasing trend with the increasing of strain. The activation energy of EBS 740 above 800 °C is measured to be 408.43 kJ/mol, which is higher than the 740H superalloy. A hyperbolic-sine-type relationship can be observed between the peak stress and Zener-Hollomon parameter. Nevertheless, the influence of deformation parameters is found to be considerably different at temperatures below and above 800 °C. The size of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) grains decreases with the increasing of strain rate when the strain rate is lower than 1/s, and reverse law can be found at higher strain rate. As a result, a piecewise function is established between the DRX grain size and hot working parameters.

  18. Capacitor discharge welded bars of Inconel 718 and TiAl6V4 superalloys under fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiozzi, S.; Dattoma, V.; Panella, F.

    2008-01-01

    This work concerns the mechanical behaviour analysis of Capacitor Discharge Welded joints made with Inconel 718 and TiAl6V4 superalloys in the form of cylindrical bars. The research activities have been conducted in the frame of AWFORS project, financed by the European Community. The Capacitor Discharge Welding (CDW) technique is of particular interest for repair processes; it allows the substitution of the damaged part after its removal and the replacement of the new component without consistent additional machining. Good mechanical properties and geometrical integrity are to be achieved; consequently, the multipoint contact profile for the CDW process has been conceived to enhance the microstructural weld characteristics and improve the fatigue and creep behaviour at high temperatures. Fatigue tests have been performed both at room and working temperature, comparing the results between base material and as-welded specimens with the same heat treatment. The microstructure has been deeply analyzed through optic and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations; this way the microstructural modifications and the Heat Affected Zones have been studied in the welded section as well as the interaction between the weld layers material and the parent metal

  19. Fatigue behaviour of post weld heat treated electron beam welded AA2219 aluminium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malarvizhi, S.; Raghukandan, K.; Viswanathan, N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the effect of post weld heat treatment on fatigue behaviour of electron beam welded AA2219 aluminium alloy. An attempt has been made to enhance the fatigue strength of the electron beam welded joints through post weld heat treatment methods such as solution treatment, artificial aging, solution treatment and artificial aging. Electron beam welding machine with 100 kV capacity has been used to fabricate the square butt joints. Servo hydraulic controlled fatigue testing machine with a capacity of 100 kN has been used to evaluate the fatigue life of the welded joints. Of the three post weld heat treated joints, the solution treated and aged joints are enduring higher number of cycles under the action of cyclic loads

  20. Electron backscattering for process control in electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardenne, T. von; Panzer, S.

    1983-01-01

    A number of solutions to the automation of electron beam welding is presented. On the basis of electron backscattering a complex system of process control has been developed. It allows an enlarged imaging of the material's surface, improved adjustment of the beam focusing and definite focus positioning. Furthermore, both manual and automated positioning of the electron beam before and during the welding process has become possible. Monitoring of the welding process for meeting standard welding requirements can be achieved with the aid of a control quantity derived from the results of electronic evaluation of the high-frequency electron backscattering

  1. Hybrid welding of hollow section beams for a telescopic lifter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernstroem, Petteri

    2003-03-01

    Modern lifting equipment is normally constructed using hollow section beams in a telescopic arrangement. Telescopic lifters are used in a variety number of applications including e.g. construction and building maintenance. Also rescue sector is one large application field. It is very important in such applications to use a lightweight and stable beam construction, which gives a high degree of flexibility in working high and width. To ensure a high weld quality of hollow section beams, high efficiency and minimal distortion, a welding process with a high power density is needed. The alternatives, in practice, which fulfill these requirements, are laser welding and hybrid welding. In this paper, the use of hybrid welding process (combination of CO2 laser welding and GMAW) in welding of hollow section beam structure is presented. Compared to laser welding, hybrid welding allows wider joint tolerances, which enables joints to be prepared and fit-up less accurately, aving time and manufacturing costs. A prerequisite for quality and effective use of hybrid welding is, however, a complete understanding of the process and its capabilities, which must be taken into account during both product design and manufacture.

  2. Design of automatic tracking system for electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Chengdan; Chinese Academy of Space Technology, Lanzhou; Li Heqi; Li Chunxu; Ying Lei; Luo Yan

    2004-01-01

    The design and experimental process of an automatic tracking system applied to local vacuum electron beam welding are dealt with in this paper. When the annular parts of an exactitude apparatus were welded, the centre of rotation of the electron gun and the centre of the annular weld are usually not superposed because of the machining error, workpiece's setting error and so on. In this teaching process, a little bundle of electron beam is used to scan the weld groove, the amount of the secondary electrons reflected from the workpiece is different when the electron beam scans the both sides and the centre of the weld groove. The difference can indicate the position of the weld and then a computer will record the deviation between the electron beam spot and the centre of the weld groove. The computer will analyze the data and put the data into the storage software. During the welding process, the computer will modify the position of the electron gun based on the deviation to make the electron beam spot centered on the annular weld groove. (authors)

  3. Laser beam welding and friction stir welding of 6013-T6 aluminium alloy sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, R.; Dalle Donne, C.; Staniek, G.

    2000-01-01

    Butt welds of 1.6 mm thick 6013-T6 sheet were produced using laser beam welding and friction stir welding processes. Employing the former joining technique, filler powders of the alloys Al-5%Mg and Al-12%Si were used. Microstructure, hardness profiles, tensile properties and the corrosion behaviour of the welds in the as-welded condition were investigated. The hardness in the weld zone was lower compared to that of the base material in the peak-aged temper. Hardness minima were measured in the fusion zone and in the thermomechanically affected zone for laser beam welded and friction stir welded joints, respectively. Metallographic and fractographic examinations revealed pores in the fusion zone of the laser beam welds. Porosity was higher in welds made using the filler alloy Al-5%Mg than using the filler metal Al-12%Si. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that the β '' (Mg 2 Si) hardening precipitates were dissolved in the weld zone due to the heat input of the joining processes. Joint efficiencies achieved for laser beam welds depended upon the filler powders, being about 60 and 80% using the alloys Al-5%Mg and Al-12%Si, respectively. Strength of the friction stir weld approached over 80% of the ultimate tensile strength of the 6013-T6 base material. Fracture occurred in the region of hardness minima unless defects in the weld zone led to premature failure. The heat input during welding did not cause a degradation of the corrosion behaviour of the welds, as found in continuous immersion tests in an aqueous chloride-peroxide solution. In contrast to the 6013-T6 parent material, the weld zone was not sensitive to intergranular corrosion. Alternate immersion tests in 3.5% NaCl solution indicated high stress corrosion cracking resistance of the joints. For laser beam welded sheet, the weld zone of alternately immersed specimens suffered severe degradation by pitting and intergranular corrosion, which may be associated with galvanic coupling of filler metal and

  4. Diffractive beam shaping for enhanced laser polymer welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschenberger, J.; Vogler, D.; Raab, C.; Gubler, U.

    2015-03-01

    Laser welding of polymers increasingly finds application in a large number of industries such as medical technology, automotive, consumer electronics, textiles or packaging. More and more, it replaces other welding technologies for polymers, e. g. hot-plate, vibration or ultrasonic welding. At the same rate, demands on the quality of the weld, the flexibility of the production system and on processing speed have increased. Traditionally, diode lasers were employed for plastic welding with flat-top beam profiles. With the advent of fiber lasers with excellent beam quality, the possibility to modify and optimize the beam profile by beam-shaping elements has opened. Diffractive optical elements (DOE) can play a crucial role in optimizing the laser intensity profile towards the optimal M-shape beam for enhanced weld seam quality. We present results on significantly improved weld seam width constancy and enlarged process windows compared to Gaussian or flat-top beam profiles. Configurations in which the laser beam diameter and shape can be adapted and optimized without changing or aligning the laser, fiber-optic cable or optical head are shown.

  5. Electron beam welding of high-purity copper accelerator cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delis, K.; Haas, H.; Schlebusch, P.; Sigismund, E.

    1986-01-01

    The operating conditions of accelerator cells require high thermal conductivity, low gas release in the ultrahigh vacuum, low content of low-melting metals and an extremely good surface quality. In order to meet these requirements, high-purity copper (OFHC, Grade 1, according to ASTM B 170-82 and extra specifications) is used as structural material. The prefabricated components of the accelerator cells (noses, jackets, flanges) are joined by electron beam welding, the weld seam being assessed on the basis of the same criteria as the base material. The welding procedures required depend, first, on the material and, secondly, on the geometries involved. Therefore experimental welds were made first on standardized specimens in order to study the behaviour of the material during electron beam welding and the influence of parameter variations. The welded joints of the cell design were planned on the basis of these results. Seam configuration, welding procedures and the parameters were optimized on components of original geometry. The experiments have shown that high-quality joints of this grade of copper can be produced by the electron beam welding process, if careful planning and preparation of the seams and adequate containment of the welding pool are assured. (orig.)

  6. Development of laser beam welding for the lip seal configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Ashish; Joshi, Jaydeep; Singh, Dhananjay Kumar; Natu, Harshad; Rotti, Chandramouli; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Chakraborty, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Laser welding parameter optimization for required weld penetration. • Parametric study of actual scenarios like air gap, plate & beam misalignment. • Destructive and non-destructive examination of the welds and He-leak testing. - Abstract: A vacuum seal using the lip sealing technique is emerging as the most likely choice for fusion devices, to comply with the requirement of maintainability. The welding technology considered for lip sealing is laser welding, due to the attributes of small spot diameter, low concentrated heat input, high precision and penetration. To establish the process, an experiment has been conducted on a sample size of 150 mm × 50 mm having thickness of 2 mm, material AISI304L to assess the dependence of beam parameters like, laser power, speed and focusing distance on penetration and quality of weld joint. Further, the assessment of the effect of welding set-up variables like air-gap between plates, plate misalignment, and laser beam misalignment on the weld quality is also required. This paper presents the results of this experimental study and also the plan for developing a large (∼10 m) size laser welded seal, that simulates, appropriately, the configuration required in large dimension fusion devices.

  7. Development of laser beam welding for the lip seal configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Ashish, E-mail: ashish.yadav@iter-india.org [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Sector 25, Gandhinagar 382016, Gujarat (India); Joshi, Jaydeep; Singh, Dhananjay Kumar [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Sector 25, Gandhinagar 382016, Gujarat (India); Natu, Harshad [Magod Laser Machining Pvt. Ltd., KIADB Ind. Area, Jigani, Anekal Taluk, Bengaluru 560105 (India); Rotti, Chandramouli; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Chakraborty, Arun [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Sector 25, Gandhinagar 382016, Gujarat (India)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Laser welding parameter optimization for required weld penetration. • Parametric study of actual scenarios like air gap, plate & beam misalignment. • Destructive and non-destructive examination of the welds and He-leak testing. - Abstract: A vacuum seal using the lip sealing technique is emerging as the most likely choice for fusion devices, to comply with the requirement of maintainability. The welding technology considered for lip sealing is laser welding, due to the attributes of small spot diameter, low concentrated heat input, high precision and penetration. To establish the process, an experiment has been conducted on a sample size of 150 mm × 50 mm having thickness of 2 mm, material AISI304L to assess the dependence of beam parameters like, laser power, speed and focusing distance on penetration and quality of weld joint. Further, the assessment of the effect of welding set-up variables like air-gap between plates, plate misalignment, and laser beam misalignment on the weld quality is also required. This paper presents the results of this experimental study and also the plan for developing a large (∼10 m) size laser welded seal, that simulates, appropriately, the configuration required in large dimension fusion devices.

  8. austenitic stainless steel by electron beam welding process

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ijest.v4i2.13. 1. Introduction. Due to an increasing demand for high-speed and low distortion welding, electron beam welding (EBW) has become useful in the fabrication of engineering parts with low-distortion joints, ...

  9. Possibility of designing television control system for welded joint formation on electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifshits, M.L.; Lobanova, N.G.

    1987-01-01

    Regression equations (models), connecting seam characteristics: width and depth with the welding bath leading front in joint gap and seam width respectively - are obtained at electron beam welding of circular articles with guaranteed clearance with application of television control system. Dispersion analysis showed the models adequancy to the process in the range, where they were identified

  10. Investigation on fracture toughness of laser beam welded steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riekehr, S.; Cam, G.; Santos, J.F. dos; Kocak, M. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany); Klein, R.M.; Fischer, R. [Thyssen Laser-Technik GmbH, Aachen (Germany)

    1999-11-01

    Laser beam welding is currently used in the welding of a variety of structural materials including hot and cold rolled steels, high strength low alloy and stainless steels, aluminium and titanium alloys, refractory and high temperature alloys and dissimilar materials. This high power density welding process has unique advantages of cost effectiveness, low distortion, high welding speed, easy automation, deep penetration, narrow bead width, and narrow HAZ compared to the conventional fusion welding processes. However, there is a need to understand the deformation and fracture properties of laser beam weld joints in order to use this cost effective process for fabrication of structural components fully. In the present study, an austenitic stainless steel, X5CrNi18 10 (1.4301) and a ferritic structural steel, RSt37-2 (1.0038), with a thickness of 4 mm were welded by 5 kW CO{sub 2} laser process. Microhardness measurements were conducted to determine the hardness profiles of the joints. Flat microtensile specimens were extracted from the base metal, fusion zone, and heat affected zone of ferritic joint to determine the mechanical property variation across the joint and the strength mismatch ratio between the base metal and the fusion zone. Moreover, fracture mechanics specimens were extracted from the joints and tested at room temperature to determine fracture toughness, Crack Tip Opening Displacement (CTOD), of the laser beam welded specimens. The effect of the weld region strenght mis-matching on the fracture toughness of the joints have been evaluated. Crack initiation, crack growth and crack deviation processes have also been examined. These results were used to explain the influence of mechanical heterogeneity of the weld region on fracture behaviour. This work is a part of the ongoing Brite-Euram project Assessment of Quality of Power Beam Weld Joints (ASPOW). (orig.)

  11. Structural behaviour of a welded superalloy cylinder with internal pressure in a high temperature environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udoguchi, T.; Nakanishi, T.

    1981-01-01

    Steady and cyclic creep tests with internal pressure were performed at temperatures of 800 to 1000 0 C on Hastelloy X cylinders with and without a circumferential Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding technique. The creep rupture strength of the TIG welded cylinders was much lower than that of the non-welded cylinders whilst creep rupture strength reduction by the TIG technique was not observed in uniaxial creep tests. The reason for the low creep strength of welded cylinders is discussed and it is noted that the creep ductility of weld metal plays an essentially important role. In order to improve the creep strength of the TIG welded cylinder, various welding procedures with assorted weld metals were investigated. Some improvements were obtained by using welding techniques which had either Incoloy 800 or a modified Hastelloy X material as the filler metal. (U.K.)

  12. Laser Beam Oscillation Strategies for Fillet Welds in Lap Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Alexander; Goecke, Sven-F.; Sievi, Pravin; Albert, Florian; Rethmeier, Michael

    Laser beam oscillation opens up new possibilities of influencing the welding process in terms of compensation of tolerances and reduction of process emissions that occur in industrial applications, such as in body-in-white manufacturing. The approaches are to adapt the melt pool width in order to generate sufficient melt volume or to influence melt pool dynamics, e.g. for a better degassing. Welding results are highly dependent on the natural frequency of the melt pool, the used spot diameter and the oscillation speed of the laser beam. The conducted investigations with an oscillated 300 μm laser spot show that oscillation strategies, which are adjusted to the joining situation improve welding result for zero-gap welding as well as for bridging gaps to approximately 0.8 mm. However, a complex set of parameters has to be considered in order to generate proper welding results. This work puts emphasize on introducing them.

  13. Assessment of the effects of heat input on microstructure and mechanical properties in laser beam welded Haynes 188 undermatched joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odabas Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I , A., E-mail: odabasia@firat.edu.tr [F Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I rat University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, 23119 Elaz Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I g (Turkey); Uenlue, N.; Goeller, G.; Kayal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I , E.S.; Eruslu, M.N. [Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, 34469 Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2013-01-01

    CO{sub 2} laser butt-welding of Co-base superalloy Haynes 188 was performed on 2.1 mm-thick sheets with an average grain size of 21 {mu}m (ASTM no. 8). Nine different heat inputs in the range of 61.3-90.1 J mm{sup -1} were used. The corresponding solidification rates at the weld fusion zone were in the range of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} to 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} Degree-Sign C s{sup -1}. The distribution coefficients for the alloying elements in the laser beam welded samples were close to unity. The yield and tensile strengths, the strain hardening exponents, and the strength mismatch ratios decreased with increasing heat input. The corresponding joint efficiencies of the high and low heat input trials were 84% and 93%, respectively. Fractography analysis of the base material and laser beam welded sheets revealed dimple-like ductile fracture characteristics.

  14. Thermal and dynamic effects in electron beam welding cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauer, D.A.

    1977-08-01

    An experimental and analytical study of the temperature distributions along the molten metal surface in an electron beam welding cavity is described. Surface temperature distributions in cavities were measured with a narrow band infrared radiation pyrometer. The availability of the cavity temperature measurements allowed estimates to be made for the vapor pressure and surface energy forces as a function of cavity position. The results indicated a force imbalance occurred in the cavity. It is postulated that at the location of the force imbalance a liquid material projection forms periodically and moves into the path of the electron beam. The liquid in this projection is driven towards the bottom, partially filling the cavity. This action is followed by the electron beam pushing the liquid aside to form a maximum depth cavity. This process is then repeated. An analysis for predicting cavity oscillation frequency shows reasonable agreement with frequencies measured at the weld root determined from weld sections. A study of the measured temperature distributions in cavities of varying depth combined with the force imbalance observations led to an interpretation of when spiking might occur. A procedure is proposed for determining the spiking tendency for a given set of weld parameters. The results of this study permit a designer to select apriori the best set of weld parameters to achieve a weld of predictable quality.

  15. Thermal and dynamic effects in electron beam welding cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schauer, D.A.

    1977-08-01

    An experimental and analytical study of the temperature distributions along the molten metal surface in an electron beam welding cavity is described. Surface temperature distributions in cavities were measured with a narrow band infrared radiation pyrometer. The availability of the cavity temperature measurements allowed estimates to be made for the vapor pressure and surface energy forces as a function of cavity position. The results indicated a force imbalance occurred in the cavity. It is postulated that at the location of the force imbalance a liquid material projection forms periodically and moves into the path of the electron beam. The liquid in this projection is driven towards the bottom, partially filling the cavity. This action is followed by the electron beam pushing the liquid aside to form a maximum depth cavity. This process is then repeated. An analysis for predicting cavity oscillation frequency shows reasonable agreement with frequencies measured at the weld root determined from weld sections. A study of the measured temperature distributions in cavities of varying depth combined with the force imbalance observations led to an interpretation of when spiking might occur. A procedure is proposed for determining the spiking tendency for a given set of weld parameters. The results of this study permit a designer to select apriori the best set of weld parameters to achieve a weld of predictable quality

  16. Measuring penetration depth of electron beam welds. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.W.; Collins, M.C.; Mentesana, C.P.; Watterson, C.E.

    1975-07-01

    The feasibility of evaluating electron beam welds using state-of-the-art techniques in the fields of holographic interferometry, micro-resistance measurements, and heat transfer was studied. The holographic study was aimed at evaluating weld defects by monitoring variations in weld strength under mechanical stress. The study, along with successful work at another facility, proved the feasibility of this approach for evaluating welds, but it did not assign any limitations to the technique. The micro-resistance study was aimed at evaluating weld defects by measuring the electrical resistance across the weld junction as a function of distance along the circumference. Experimentation showed this method, although sensitive, is limited by the same factors affecting other conventional nondestructive tests. Nevertheless, it was successful at distinguishing between various depths of penetration. It was also shown to be a sensitive thickness gage for thin-walled parts. The infrared study was aimed at evaluating weld defects by monitoring heat transfer through the weld under transient thermal conditions. Experimentation showed that this theoretically sound technique is not workable with the infrared equipment currently available at Bendix Kansas City. (U.S.)

  17. Today's status of application of high power electron beam welding to heavy electric machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Hisanao; Okuni, Tetsuo; Sejima, Itsuhiko.

    1980-01-01

    The progress in high energy welding is remarkable in recent years, and electron beam welding is now widely used in heavy industries. However, there are number of problems to be solved in the application of high power electron beam welding to ultra thick steel plates (over 100 mm). The following matters are described: the economy of high power electron beam welding; the development of the welding machines; the problems in the actual application; the instances of the welding in a high-pressure spherical gas tank, non-magnetic steel structures and high-precision welded structures; weldor training; etc. For the future rise in the capacities of heavy electric machinery, the high efficiency by high power electron beam welding will be useful. The current status is its applications to the high-precision welding of large structures with 6 m diameter and the high-quality welding of heavy structures with 160 mm thickness. (J.P.N.)

  18. Creep-Fatigue Cracking Near the Welded Interface in Friction Welding Dissimilar Superalloys INCONEL 718 and MAR-M247

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tra, Tran Hung; Okazaki, Masakazu

    2017-08-01

    A forged INCONEL 718 and a cast MAR-M247 alloy were joined by a friction welding process. The creep-fatigue strength of this joint was investigated. The life of the joint was significantly shorter than that of the base alloys. The joint failed near the interface of the INCONEL 718 side, although the life of INCONEL 718 was longer than that of MAR-M247. To understand this behavior, the stress field in the welding was numerically analyzed using a visco-elastic model. The results suggested that triaxiality in the stress state could be promoted near the welded interface and lead to an acceleration of creep-fatigue crack nucleation.

  19. Tube to tubesheet welding by electron beam for heat exchanger application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noller, F.; Mayer, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    The EB-process can successfully be used to weld in tubes into tubesheet also for those materials which are sensitiv to hot cracking. The range of qualified welding parameters has been evaluated based on a lot of metallographic and microanalysis inspections. To obtain reproducable and perfect welds a microcomputer controlled welding cycle is recommended using beam deflection, automatic seam tracking, beam current- and focus control. The results can be adopted to the specific conditions of mobile welding equipment with local vacuum. (orig.)

  20. Studies on post weld heat treatment of dissimilar aluminum alloys by laser beam welding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, B.; Krishna, N. Murali; Cheepu, Muralimohan; Sivaprasad, K.; Muthupandi, V.

    2018-03-01

    The present study mainly focuses on post weld heat treatment (PWHT) of AA5083 and AA6061 alloys by joining these using laser beam welding at three different laser power and two different beam spot sizes and three different welding speeds. Effects of these parameters on microstructural and mechanical properties like hardness, tensile strength were studied at PWHT condition and significant changes had been observed. The PWHT used was artificial aging technique. The microstructural observations revealed that there was a appreciable changes were taken place in the grain size. The microhardness observations proven that the change in the hardness profile in AA6061 was appreciable than in the AA5083. The tensile strength of 246 MPa was recorded as highest. The fractured surfaces observed are predominantly ductile in nature.

  1. Application of Electron Beams for Surface Modification of Nickel-base Superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sah, In Jin; Kim, Dong Hoon; Koo, Ja Hyun; Jang, Chang Heui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Wrought Ni-base superalloy, Alloy 617, is considered as candidate metallic materials for intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) of very high temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR). IHX will be exposed to the highest temperature over 900 .deg. C for the various applications including hydrogen production. Chromium is essentially added to make Cr-rich oxide layers on the surface. However, it is reported that Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} reduction phenomena happens under helium coolant with certain amounts of impurities. Protective oxide layer is necessary for long-term stability of the components, and an excessive supply of resources to make that kind of stable oxide is required near the surface when it is destroyed at operating temperature. In this study, proper depth of Al-rich zone is developed using PVD (Physical Vapor Deposition) and EB (Electron Beam) surface alloying methods. The effects of surface modification on high temperature oxidation and self-healing capability are demonstrated

  2. Experimental Characterization of Electron Beam Welded SAE 5137H Thick Steel Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattire, Prakash; Bhawar, Valmik; Thakare, Sandeep; Patil, Sachin; Mane, Santosh; Singh, Rajkumar, Dr.

    2017-09-01

    Electron beam welding is known for its narrow weld zone with high depth to width ratio, less heat affected zone, less distortion and contamination. Electron beam welding is fusion welding process, where high velocity electrons impinge on material joint to be welded and kinetic energy of this electron is transformed into heat upon impact to fuse the material. In the present work electron beam welding of 60 mm thick SAE 5137H steel is studied. Mechanical and metallurgical properties of electron beam welded joint of SAE 5137H were evaluated. Mechanical properties are analysed by tensile, impact and hardness test. Metallurgical properties are investigated through optical and scanning electron microscope. The hardness traverse across weld zone shows HV 370-380, about 18% increase in the tensile strength and very low toughness of weld joint compared to parent metal. Microstructural observation shows equiaxed dendrite in the fusion zone and partial grain refinement was found in the HAZ.

  3. Development of laser beam welding transverse-varestraint test for assessment of solidification cracking susceptibility in laser welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Eun-Joon; Baba, Hayato; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2015-05-01

    In order to quantitatively evaluate the solidification cracking susceptibility in laser welds of type 310S stainless steel, a transverse-Varestraint testing system using a laser beam welding apparatus was newly constructed. The timing-synchronization between the laser oscillator, welding robot and hydraulic pressure devices was established by employing high-speed camera observations together with electrical signal control among the three components. Moreover, the yoke-drop time measured by the camera was used to prevent underestimation of the crack length. The laser beam melt-run welding used a variable welding speed from 10.0 to 40.0 mm/s, while the gas tungsten arc welding varied the welding speed from 1.67 to 5.00 mm/s. As the welding speed increased from 1.67 to 40.0mm/s, the solidification brittle temperature range of type 310S stainless steel welds was reduced from 146 to 120 K. It follows that employing the laser beam welding process mitigates the solidification cracking susceptibility for type 310S stainless steel welds.

  4. Electron beam welding using fusion and cold wire fill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuncz, F.F.

    1977-01-01

    A straight-fusion (self-filler) welding technique generally poses no problem for electron beam welding. However, where control of penetration is a critical item and burn-through cannot be tolerated, this technique may not be satisfactory. To assure against beam-spike burn-through on a 1/4-inch deep weld joint, a low-power root-fusion pass, supplemented by numerous filler passes, was selected. However, this technique proved to have numerous problems. Voiding and porosity showed frequently in the first applications of this cold-wire filler process. Taper-out cratering, bead-edge undercutting, and spatter were also problems. These imperfections, however, were overcome. Employment of a circle generator provided the necessary heating of the joint walls to eliminate voids. The moving beam spot also provided a stirring action, lessening porosity. Taper-out cratering was eliminated by adjusting the timing of the current cutoff and wire-feed cutoff. Undercutting, bead height, and spatter were controlled by beam defocus

  5. Studies of the Influence of Beam Profile and Cooling Conditions on the Laser Deposition of a Directionally-Solidified Superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Yang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the laser deposition of single crystal and directionally-solidified superalloys, it is desired to form laser deposits with high volume fractions of columnar grains by suppressing the columnar-to-equiaxed transition efficiently. In this paper, the influence of beam profile (circular and square shapes and cooling conditions (natural cooling and forced cooling on the geometric morphology and microstructure of deposits were experimentally studied in the laser deposition of a directionally-solidified superalloy, IC10, and the mechanisms of influence were revealed through a numerical simulation of the thermal processes during laser deposition. The results show that wider and thinner deposits were obtained with the square laser beam than those with the circular laser beam, regardless of whether natural or forced cooling conditions was used. The heights and contact angles of deposits were notably increased due to the reduced substrate temperatures by the application of forced cooling for both laser beam profiles. Under natural cooling conditions, columnar grains formed epitaxially at both the center and the edges of the deposits with the square laser beam, but only at the center of the deposits with the circular laser beam; under forced cooling conditions, columnar grains formed at both the center and the edges of deposits regardless of the laser beam profile. The high ratios of thermal gradient and solidification velocity in the height direction of the deposits were favorable to forming deposits with higher volume fractions of columnar grains.

  6. Microstructural Characteristic of Dissimilar Welded Components (AISI 430 Ferritic-AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steels) by CO2 Laser Beam Welding (LBW)

    OpenAIRE

    CALIGULU, Ugur; DIKBAS, Halil; TASKIN, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    In this study, microstructural characteristic of dissimilar welded components (AISI 430 ferritic-AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels) by CO2 laser beam welding (LBW) was investigated. Laser beam welding experiments were carried out under argon and helium atmospheres at 2000 and 2500 W heat inputs and 100-200-300 cm/min. welding speeds. The microstructures of the welded joints and the heat affected zones (HAZ) were examined by optical microscopy, SEM, EDS and XRD analysis. The tensile strengt...

  7. Microstructural Characteristic of Dissimilar Welded Components (AISI 430 Ferritic-AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steels) by CO2 Laser Beam Welding (LBW)

    OpenAIRE

    ÇALIGÜLÜ, Uğur; CALIGULU, Ugur; DIKBAS, Halil; TASKIN, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    In this study, microstructural characteristic of dissimilar welded components (AISI 430 ferritic-AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels) by CO2 laser beam welding (LBW) was investigated. Laser beam welding experiments were carried out under argon and helium atmospheres at 2000 and 2500 W heat inputs and 100-200-300 cm/min. welding speeds. The microstructures of the welded joints and the heat affected zones (HAZ) were examined by optical microscopy, SEM, EDS and XRD analysis. The tensile strengt...

  8. Upgrade of laser and electron beam welding database

    CERN Document Server

    Furman, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this project was to fix existing issues and update the existing database holding parameters of laser-beam and electron-beam welding machines. Moreover, the database had to be extended to hold the data for the new machines that arrived recently at the workshop. As a solution - the database had to be migrated to Oracle framework, the new user interface (using APEX) had to be designed and implemented with the integration with the CERN web services (EDMS, Phonebook, JMT, CDD and EDH).

  9. Effects of Sealing Run Welding with Defocused Laser Beam on the Quality of T-joint Fillet Weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unt, Anna; Poutiainen, Ilkka; Salminen, Antti

    Fillet weld is the predominant weld type used for connecting different elements e.g. in shipbuilding, offshore and bridge structures. One of prevalent research questions is the structural integrity of the welded joint. Post weld improvement techniques are being actively researched, as high stress areas like an incomplete penetration on the root side or fluctuations in penetration depth cannot be avoided. Development of laser and laser-arc hybrid welding processes have greatly contributed to increase of production capacity and reduction of heat-induced distortions by producing single pass full penetration welds in thin- and medium thickness structural steel parts. Present study addresses the issue of how to improve the quality of the fillet welds by welding the sealing run on the root side with defocused laser beam. Welds having incomplete or excessive penetration were produced with several beam angles and laser beam spot sizes on surface. As a conclusion, significant decrease or even complete elimination of the seam irregularities, which act as the failure starting points during service, is achieved.

  10. Effect of intense pulsed ion beams irradiation on the oxidation behavior of gamma sup ' -based superalloy

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Hong Tao; Han Bao Xi; Yan Sha; Zhao Wei Jiang; Han Ya Fan

    2002-01-01

    Intense pulsed ion beams (IPIB) with three different power densities (25, 37.5 and 50 MW/cm sup 2) are employed for the surface treatment of gamma sup ' -based superalloy IC6. The influence of IPIB irradiation on the oxidation behavior of IC6 at 1100 degree sign C for up to 100 h is investigated. It is found that the phase states of IC6 are dramatically changed after IPIB irradiation and the oxidation behavior of the irradiated coupons depends greatly on the power density of IPIB. IPIB irradiation with a power density of 25 or 37.5 MW/cm sup 2 significantly reduces the oxidation rate with respect to the unirradiated coupon. The improvement of the oxidation resistance can be attributed to a change in the oxidation products from a three-layered scale of Ni-rich oxides for the unirradiated coupon to a two-layered scale of Mo- and Al-rich oxides. In contrast, IPIB irradiation with a power density of 50 MW/cm sup 2 proves to be detrimental, causing a higher oxidation rate. The oxidation mechanism for IPIB irradiat...

  11. Influence of Welding Parameters on Weld Formation and Microstructure of Dual-Laser Beams Welded T-Joint of Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focused on the welding 1.8 mm thick 6061 aluminum alloy plates in T-joint form using dual lasers that introduced by a Nd: YAG laser and a CO2 laser with 4043 aluminum filler wire. The effects of welding parameters on the T-joint weld appearance, microstructure and the joint mechanical properties were studied systematically, The influence of welding parameters included the distance between two laser beams, welding speed, laser power and the laser beam offset toward the stringer. The weld appearance, microstructure, hardness of the joint were evaluated by optical microscope and micro-hardness test. A monotonic quasi-static tensile test was conducted by a self-made clamping device to obtain the tensile property of welded joints. At the optimized parameters, the welded T-joint showed good weld appearance without macro defects; the micro hardness of welds ranged from 75 to 85 HV0.3, and the tensile strength was about 254 MPa with the fracture at the heat affected zone on the stringer side.

  12. Keyhole depth instability in case of CW CO2 laser beam welding of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gives rise to irregular humps. Keywords. Ambient and under water welding; keyhole collapse; weld depth instabilities; humps. 1. Introduction. The high-power CO2 laser sources with Gaussian beam distribution are currently used for welding of thick stainless steels (Binda et al 2004). In the case of LBW, heat and fluid flow.

  13. Effect of Beam Oscillation on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AISI 316L Electron Beam Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Jyotirmaya; Roy, Sanat Kumar; Roy, Gour Gopal

    2017-04-01

    The properties of electron beam-welded AISI 316L stainless steel butt joints prepared with and without beam oscillation were evaluated by microstructural analysis, mechanical testing like microhardness measurements, tensile tests at room and elevated temperature 973 K (700 °C), three-point bend, and Charpy impact tests. All joints, irrespective of being prepared with or without beam oscillation, were found to be defect free. Welds produced by beam oscillation exhibited narrower fusion zone (FZ) with lathy ferrite morphology, while the weld without beam oscillation was characterized by wider FZ and skeletal ferrite morphology. During tensile tests at room and elevated temperature 973 K (700 °C), all samples fractured in the base metal (BM) and showed almost the same tensile properties as that of the BM. However, the notch tensile tests at room temperature demonstrated higher strength for joints prepared with the oscillating beam. Besides, face and root bend tests, as well as Charpy impact tests, showed higher bending strength and notch toughness, respectively, for joints prepared with beam oscillation.

  14. Distortion and residual stresses in laser beam weld shaft-hub joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschenhenke, F.; Hofmann, M.; Seefeld, T.; Vollertsen, F.

    In laser beam welding, a serious challenge is to control the distortion during the process. Understanding the whole process chain in view of different distortion potentials applied in each processing step provides the ability to control the distortion of the welded components. Every manufacturing step induces residual stresses in the component which can be released by the heat of the welding process, while further residual stresses are introduced into the welded parts upon cooling. The laser beam sources of the new generation permit a high power welding process and high beam quality at the same time. These laser beams are capable of producing deep and narrow seams. Thus the thermal strains of the joined parts are expected to be minimized. Especially axial welded shaft-hub joints show an irregular distribution of bending deformation, which is caused by the self-influencing welding gap. This work deals with the investigation of different laser beam sources and their effect on the welding distortion in axial welded shafthub joints made of steel (20MnCr5). The aim of the work done was to achieve minimal distortion after the welding process. To characterize the influences on the distortion behaviour of the welded parts, residual stresses have been determined by neutron diffraction.

  15. Effects of heat treatment and welding process on superelastic behaviour and microstructure of micro electron beam welded NiTi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balz Isabel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Medical devices with small dimensions made of superelastic NiTi become more popular, but joining these parts remains challenging. Since laser welding was found to be an option, electron beam welding seems to be an interesting alternative as it provides additional advantages due to the precise beam positioning and the high vacuum. Superelasticity is influenced by microstructure and surface layer composition that are mainly affected by welding process and by heat treatment and therefore will be investigated in the present paper.

  16. E-beam welding characteristic of the ARAA steel for the KO HCCR TBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jae Sung; Kim, Suk-Kwon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To develop the next generation technologies, the one of the important objects of ITER project is to investigate the heat extraction from the blanket module in a fusion reactor and tritium extraction experiments. Korea has decided to test a helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) test blanket module (TBM) in the ITER. The HCCR TBM is composed of four sub-modules and a back manipulator (BM). And each sub-module is composed of a first wall (FW), a breeding box with s even-layer breeding zone (BZ), and side walls (SW) with the cooling path. In addition, Korea is being developed and evaluated advanced reduced activation alloy (ARAA) material as the HCCR TBM structure. In this study, two thickness of ARAA plates, 8 and 13 mm, were carried out by electron beam (E-beam) weld to optimize the welding procedure considering weld speed and current, and investigated the variations in the weld bead width, an amount of dross, and the weld depth in both ARAA plates to optimize the fabrication procedure. Moreover, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) conditions were also carried out considering a different temperature and a cooling time. The micro-hardness measurements and Charpy Impact test in Base, heat affected zone (HAZ), and weld metal (WM) were carried out on E-beam welded joints after PWHT. The microstructural observation in the E-beam weld joints was also analyzed before and after PWHT condition. The purpose of this study is to find the optimized Ebeam weld condition, and analyze the mechanical properties and the influence of microstructure by Ebeam weld of ARAA materials. To optimize the E-beam welding procedure from ARAA material, two kinds of ARAA plates, 8 and 13 mm, were prepared and carried out E-beam weld considering the weld speed and the current, and investigated the variations in the weld bead width, an amount of dross, and the weld depth. Based on the results 1200 mm/min of welding speed and 65 mA current in 8 mm thickness and 110 mA weld current in 13 mm thickness in

  17. Laser beam-plasma plume interaction during laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jacek; Moscicki, Tomasz; Szymanski, Zygmunt

    2003-10-01

    Laser welding process is unstable because the keyhole wall performs oscillations which results in the oscillations of plasma plume over the keyhole mouth. The characteristic frequencies are equal to 0.5-4 kHz. Since plasma plume absorbs and refracts laser radiation, plasma oscillations modulate the laser beam before it reaches the workpiece. In this work temporary electron densities and temperatures are determined in the peaks of plasma bursts during welding with a continuous wave CO2 laser. It has been found that during strong bursts the plasma plume over the keyhole consists of metal vapour only, being not diluted by the shielding gas. As expected the values of electron density are about two times higher in peaks than their time-averaged values. Since the plasma absorption coefficient scales as ~N2e/T3/2 (for CO2 laser radiation) the results show that the power of the laser beam reaching the metal surface is modulated by the plasma plume oscillations. The attenuation factor equals 4-6% of the laser power but it is expected that it is doubled by the refraction effect. The results, together with the analysis of the colour pictures from streak camera, allow also interpretation of the dynamics of the plasma plume.

  18. Evaluation of ARAA steel E-beam welding characteristics for the fabrication of KO HCCR TBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jae Sung, E-mail: jsyoon2@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Research Energy Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suk-Kwon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Research Energy Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyu In [Gentec Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • For confirming the evaluation of ARAA steel E-beam welding characteristics for the fabrication of KO HCCR TBM, the followings are performed. • E-beam welding in ARAA plate. • Evaluation for the penetration depth and beam width according to the E-beam welding current. • Performed micro-hardness and Charpy impact test after PWHT. • Determine the optimized PWHT condition. - Abstract: Korea has designed a helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) test blanket module (TBM), including a TBM shield, called a TBM set, that will be tested in ITER. Korean RAFM steel was developed as a structural material for the HCCR TBM, and advanced reduced activation alloy (ARAA) was selected as the primary candidate from various program alloys. Fabrication technologies for the HCCR TBM were developed using ARAA to provide the method and procedure for fabricating the TBM for testing in ITER based on RCC-MRx, which was selected as the design and fabrication code and standard for the HCCR TBM. To establish and optimize welding procedures for electron beam welding of an ARAA material, variations in welding current and speed were investigated. A series of performance tests was performed before and after post-weld heat treatment to evaluate the welded specimen under the determined welding conditions.

  19. Electron-beam welding of thorium-doped iridium alloy sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.A.; Liu, C.T.; Hudson, J.D.

    1979-04-01

    Modified iridium alloys containing 100 ppM Th were found to be very susceptible to hot-cracking during gas tungsten-arc and electron-beam welding. However, the electron-beam welding process showed greater promise of success in welding these alloys, in particular Ir--0.3% W doped with 200 ppM Th and 50 ppM Al. The weldability of this particular alloy was extremely sensitive to the welding parameters, such as beam focus condition and welding speed, and the resulting fusion zone structure. At low speed successful electron-beam welds were made over a narrow range of beam focus conditions. However, at high speeds successful welds can be made over an extended range of focus conditions. The fusion zone grain structure is a strong function of welding speed and focus condition, as well. In the welds that showed hot-cracking, a region of positive segregation of thorium was identified at the fusion boundary. This highly thorium-segregated region seems to act as a potential source for the nucleation of a liquation crack, which later grows as a centerline crack

  20. Study of residual stresses in CT test specimens welded by electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papushkin, I. V.; Kaisheva, D.; Bokuchava, G. D.; Angelov, V.; Petrov, P.

    2018-03-01

    The paper reports result of residual stress distribution studies in CT specimens reconstituted by electron beam welding (EBW). The main aim of the study is evaluation of the applicability of the welding technique for CT specimens’ reconstitution. Thus, the temperature distribution during electron beam welding of a CT specimen was calculated using Green’s functions and the residual stress distribution was determined experimentally using neutron diffraction. Time-of-flight neutron diffraction experiments were performed on a Fourier stress diffractometer at the IBR-2 fast pulsed reactor in FLNP JINR (Dubna, Russia). The neutron diffraction data estimates yielded a maximal stress level of ±180 MPa in the welded joint.

  1. Strain signatures associated to the formation of hot cracks during laser beam welding of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenlocher, Christian; Stritt, Peter; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The local surface displacement during the laser beam welding process of MgSi alloyed aluminum sheets (AA6014) in overlap configuration was optically determined near the weld seam by means of digital correlation of images recorded with a high-speed video camera. The analysis allowed the time- and space-resolved determination of the plane strain in the immediate vicinity of the solidification zone behind the weld pool. The observations revealed characteristic signatures in the temporal evolution of the strain that are related to the formation of centerline cracks in laser beam welding.

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF Pro-Beam LOW VOLTAGE ELECTRON BEAM WELDING MACHINE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgardt, Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pierce, Stanley W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-18

    The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss data related to the performance of a newly acquired low voltage electron beam welding machine. The machine was made by Pro-Beam AG &Co. KGaA of Germany. This machine was recently installed at LANL in building SM -39; a companion machine was installed in the production facility. The PB machine is substantially different than the EBW machines typically used at LANL and therefore, it is important to understand its characteristics as well as possible. Our basic purpose in this paper is to present basic machine performance data and to compare those with similar results from the existing EBW machines. It is hoped that this data will provide a historical record of this machine’s characteristics as well as possibly being helpful for transferring welding processes from the old EBW machines to the PB machine or comparable machines that may be purchased in the future.

  3. Effect of Travel Speed and Beam Focus on Porosity in Alloy 690 Laser Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Julie D.; Nolan, Terrance K.; Martin, Anthony J.; Young, George A.

    2012-12-01

    Advances in laser welding technology, including fiber optic delivery and high power density, are increasing the applicability of this joining technique. The inherent benefits of laser welding include small heat-affected zones, minimal distortion, and limited susceptibility to cracking. These advantages are of special interest to next-generation nuclear power systems where welding solute-rich alloys is expected to increase. Alloy 690 (A690) is an advanced corrosion-resistant structural material used in many replacement components and in construction of new commercial power plants. However, the application of A690 is hindered by its difficult weldability using conventional arc welding, and laser welding is a promising alternate. This work studies the effects of travel speed and beam focus on porosity formation in partial penetration, autogenous A690 laser welds. Porosity has been characterized by light optical microscopy and x-ray computed tomography to quantify its percent volume in the welds. This work describes the tradeoff between weld penetration and defect density as a function of beam defocus and travel speed. Additionally, the role of shield gas in porosity formation is discussed to provide a mitigation strategy for A690 laser welding. A process map is provided that shows the optimal combinations of travel speed and beam defocus to minimize porosity and maximize weld penetration at a laser power of 4 kW.

  4. Effect of PWHT on Microstructure, Mechanical and Corrosion Behaviour of Gas Tungsten Arc Welds of IN718 Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilkush; Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present work aims to improve corrosion resistance and mechanical behavior of the welds with suitable post weld heat treatment i.e. direct aging and solutionizing treatments (980STA, 1080STA). Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) has been performed on Inconel 718 (IN718) nickel based super alloy plates with 3mm thickness. The structural –property relationship of the post weld heat treated samples is judged by correlating the microstructural changes with observed mechanical behavior and pitting corrosion resistance of the welds As-recevied, direct aging (DA), 980STA,1080STA were studied. Welds were characterized for microstructure changes with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM).Vickers micro- hardness tester was used to measure the hardness of the weldments. Potential-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance in 3.5%NaCl (Sodium chloride) solution at 30°C.Results of the present study established that post weld heat treatments resulted in promoting the element segregation diffusion and resolve them from brittle laves particles in the matrix. Increased precipitation of strengthening phases lead to a significant increase in fusion zone hardness of 1080STA post weld heat treated condition compared to as welded, direct aged, 980STA conditions. Due to significant changes in the microstructural behavior of 1080STA condition resulted in superior pitting corrosion resistance than 980STA, direct aged and as- recevied conditions of IN718 GTA welds

  5. Characterising electron beam welded dissimilar metal joints to study residual stress relaxation from specimen extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Abburi Venkata, Kiranmayi; Truman, Christopher E; Smith, David J; Bhaduri, Arun K

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear power plants require dissimilar metal weld joints to connect the primary steam generator made from ferritic steel to the intermediate heat exchanger made from austenitic steel. Such joints are complex because of the mismatch in the thermal and the mechanical properties of the materials used in the joint. Electron Beam (EB) welding is emerging as a promising technique to manufacture dissimilar joints providing a great many advantages over conventional welding techniques, in terms of lo...

  6. Qualification of electron-beam welded joints between copper and stainless steel for cryogenic application

    OpenAIRE

    Lusch, C.; Borsch, M.; Heidt, C.; Magginetti, N.; Sas, J.; Weiss, K.-P.; Grohmann, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Joints between copper and stainless steel are commonly applied in cryogenic systems. A relatively new and increasingly important method to combine these materials is electron-beam (EB) welding. Typically, welds in cryogenic applications need to withstand a temperature range from 300K down to 4 K, and pressures of several MPa. However, few data are available for classifying EB welds between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel. A broad test program was conducted in order to qualify this kind o...

  7. Effect of Post Weld Heat Treatment on Corrosion Behavior of AA2014 Aluminum – Copper Alloy Electron Beam Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Ramana, V. S. N.; Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present work pertains to the study of corrosion behavior of aluminum alloy electron beam welds. The aluminium alloy used in the present study is copper containing AA2014 alloy. Electron Beam Welding (EBW) was used to weld the alloys in annealed (O) condition. Microstructural changes across the welds were recorded and the effect of post weld heat treatment (PWHT) in T4 (Solutionized and naturally aged) condition on pitting corrosion resistance was studied. A software based PAR basic electrochemical system was used for potentio-dynamic polarization tests. From the study it is observed that weld in O condition is prone to more liquation than that of PWHT condition. This may be attributed to re-melting and solidification of excess eutectic present in the O condition of the base metal. It was also observed that slightly higher hardness values are recorded in O condition than that of PWHT condition. The pitting corrosion resistance of the PMZ/HAZ in PWHT condition is better than that of O condition. This is attributed to copper segregation at the grain boundaries of PMZ in O condition.

  8. Characterization of an Additive Manufactured TiAl Alloy—Steel Joint Produced by Electron Beam Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Basile

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the characterization of the assembly of a steel shaft into a γ-TiAl part for turbocharger application, obtained using Electron Beam Welding (EBW technology with a Ni-based filler, was carried out. The Ti-48Al-2Nb-0.7Cr-0.3Si (at % alloy part was produced by Electron Beam Melting (EBM. This additive manufacturing technology allows the production of a lightweight part with complex shapes. The replacement of Nickel-based superalloys with TiAl alloys in turbocharger automotive applications will lead to an improvement of the engine performance and a substantial reduction in fuel consumption and emission. The welding process allows a promising joint to be obtained, not affecting the TiAl microstructure. Nevertheless, it causes the formation of diffusive layers between the Ni-based filler and both steel and TiAl, with the latter side being characterized by a very complex microstructure, which was fully characterized in this paper by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, and nanoindentation. The diffusive interface has a thickness of about 6 µm, and it is composed of several layers. Specifically, from the TiAl alloy side, we find a layer of Ti3Al followed by Al3NiTi2 and AlNi2Ti. Subsequently Ni becomes more predominant, with a first layer characterized by abundant carbide/boride precipitation, and a second layer characterized by Si-enrichment. Then, the chemical composition of the Ni-based filler is gradually reached.

  9. Mechanical properties of weldings by electron beams on alloy 8090 (CP 271)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Poac, P.; Nomine, A.M.; Miannay, D.

    1987-06-01

    Weldings by electron beams got on rings in alloy 8090 in the T4 and T6 state are mechanically tested in traction in the original state of welding or after a thermal processing of 12 hours at 210 0 C [fr

  10. Experimental Evaluation and Characterization of Electron Beam Welding of 2219 AL-Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Sobih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to reduce the weight of components, thus allowing a profit in terms of energy saving, automotive industry as well as aircraft industry extensively uses aluminum alloys. The most widely used joining technology in aircraft industry is riveting, while welding seems to be used in the car industry in the case of aluminum alloys. However, welding technology is characterized by many defects, such as gas porosity; oxide inclusions; solidification cracking (hot tearing; and reduced strength in both the weld and the heat affected zones which could limit its development. Many techniques are used for aluminum alloys welding, among them is electron beam welding (EBW, which has unique advantages over other traditional fusion welding methods due to high-energy density, deep penetration, large depth-to-width ratio, and small heat affected zone. The welding parameters that yield to optimal weld joint have been previously obtained. These optimal parameters were validated by welding a specimen using these parameters. To evaluate this optimal weld joint, complete, microstructural observations and characterization have been carried out using scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. This evaluation leads to description and quantification of the solidification process within this weld joint.

  11. Evaluation of a method to shield a welding electron beam from magnetic interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    It is known that electron beams are easily deflected by magnetic and electrostatic fields. Therefore, to prevent weld defects, stray electromagnetic fields are avoided in electron beam welding chambers if at all possible. The successful results of tests conducted at MSFC to evaluate a simple magnetic shield made from steel tubing are reported. Tests indicate that this shield was up to 85 percent effective in reducing magnetic effects on the electron beam of a welding machine. In addition, residual magnetic fields within the shield were so nearly uniform that the net effect on the beam alignment was negligible. It is concluded that the shield, with the addition of a tungsten liner, could be used in production welding.

  12. Electron beam welding and laser welding of FRAGEMA fuel assembly components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, J.M.; Etellin, B.; Duthoo, B.; Wache, C.; Taillandier, T.

    1988-01-01

    Neutron balance and activity of the primary coolant circuit are improved in PWR if inconel 718 is replaced by a zirconium alloy for fuel element grids. This paper examines laser welding and EB welding of these zirconium alloy grids [fr

  13. Metallurgical and mechanical examinations of steel–copper joints arc welded using bronze and nickel-base superalloy filler materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velu, M.; Bhat, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Optical and scanning electron microscopy show defect free weld interfaces. ► Energy dispersive spectroscopy shows low dilution level of the weld by Fe. ► XRD studies show no brittle intermetallic phases in the weld interfaces. ► Weld interfaces did not fail during tensile, transverse bending and impact tests. ► The joint exhibits superior strength properties than that of bronze filler. - Abstract: The paper presents metallurgical and mechanical examinations of joints between dissimilar metals viz. copper (UNSC11000) and alloy steel (En31) obtained by Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) using two different filler materials, bronze and nickel-base super alloy. The weld bead of the joint with bronze-filler displayed porosity, while that with nickel-filler did not. In tension tests, the weldments with bronze-filler fractured in the centre of the weld, while those with nickel-filler fractured in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of copper. Since the latter exhibited higher strength than the former, all the major tests were undertaken over the joints with nickel-filler alone. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) coupled with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) indicated corrugated weld interfaces and favorable elemental diffusions across them. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies around the weld interfaces did not reveal any detrimental intermetallic compounds. Transverse bending tests showed that flexural strengths of the weldments were higher than the tensile strengths. Transverse side bend tests confirmed good ductility of the joints. Shear strength of the weld-interface (Cu–Ni or Ni–steel) was higher than the yield strength of weaker metal. Microhardness and Charpy impact values were measured at all the important zones across the weldment

  14. Potentiodynamic corrosion studies on laser beam welded austenitic stainless steel AISI 321

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Adithya R.; Niranjhan, P.; Abijith, M. N.; Arivarasu, M.; Manikandan, M.; Padmanaban, R.; Arivazhagan, N.

    2017-11-01

    In this study, the microstructure and corrosion characteristics of laser beam welded austenitic stainless plates has been studied. CO2 Laser beam produced defect free weldments in AISI 321 with no trace of heat affected zone. The microstructural studies revealed distributed ferrites in the weld zone. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were carried out on the weldments in 5% NaCl environment in order to understand corrosion current, potential and rate.

  15. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  16. Optimization of welding parameters of Ti6Al4V alloy using electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Havlík

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Titanium alloys and their weld joints find wide application, in particular in the aircraft, automotive and chemical industries, because of their outstanding specific strength and corrosion resistance. The high reactivity of these alloys and the strong degradation effect of elements contained in the atmosphere (H, N and O make it necessary for these alloys to be welded in protective atmospheres or in vacuum. From this viewpoint, Electron Beam Welding is an advantageous welding technology, especially in large series production. In the literature, there is sufficient information about the effect of the basic welding parameters, namely accelerating voltage, current and welding speed, on the properties of welded joints. In the paper, the effects of the spot diameter and beam focusing on the penetration depth and the weld shape in the Ti6Al4V alloy are studied. The results obtained are complemented by an analysis of the microstructure and microhardness measurements across the welds.

  17. Transmission Electron Microscopy of a CMSX-4 Ni-Base Superalloy Produced by Selective Electron Beam Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza B. Parsa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the microstructures of superalloy specimens produced using selective electron beam melting additive manufacturing were characterized. The materials were produced using a CMSX-4 powder. Two selective electron beam melting processing strategies, which result in higher and lower effective cooling rates, are described. Orientation imaging microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy and conventional high resolution transmission electron microscopy are used to investigate the microstructures. Our results suggest that selective electron beam melting processing results in near equilibrium microstructures, as far as γ′ volume fractions, the formation of small amounts of TCP phases and the partitioning behavior of the alloy elements are concerned. As expected, higher cooling rates result in smaller dendrite spacings, which are two orders of magnitude smaller than observed during conventional single crystal casting. During processing, columnar grains grow in <100> directions, which are rotated with respect to each other. There are coarse γ/γ′ microstructures in high angle boundary regions. Dislocation networks form low angle boundaries. A striking feature of the as processed selective electron beam melting specimens is their high dislocation density. From a fundamental point of view, this opens new possibilities for the investigation of elementary dislocation processes which accompany solidification.

  18. Metallurgical characterization of pulsed current gas tungsten arc, friction stir and laser beam welded AZ31B magnesium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmanaban, G.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the influences of welding processes such as friction stir welding (FSW), laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding (PCGTAW) on mechanical and metallurgical properties of AZ31B magnesium alloy. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-Ray diffraction technique were used to evaluate the metallurgical characteristics of welded joints. LBW joints exhibited superior tensile properties compared to FSW and PCGTAW joints due to the formation of finer grains in weld region, higher fusion zone hardness, the absence of heat affected zone, presence of uniformly distributed finer precipitates in weld region.

  19. Effect of Beam Energy on Weld Geometric Characteristics in Nd:YAG Laser Overlapping Spot Welding of Thin AISI 304 Stainless Steel Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapsanska, Hana; Chmelickova, Hana; Hrabovsky, Miroslav

    2010-10-01

    Weld geometric characteristics in laser overlapping spot welding of 0.6-mm AISI 304 stainless steel sheets were investigated. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser with maximal average power of 150 W was used for welding experiments with different laser beam energies in the range of 3.5 J to 6.2 J, keeping all other processing parameters constant. The main objective of these experiments was to study the effect of energy changes and to identify the welding mode in dependency on the beam effective peak power density. Each weld surface and its cross section were analyzed using a laser scanning confocal microscope. The spot diameter on the specimen, weld width, and penetration depth were measured. Three-dimensional surface reconstruction was realized to describe the effect of energy changes on weld surface properties.

  20. A study of electron beam welding of Mo based TZM alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, S.P.; Krishnamurthy, N.

    2013-12-01

    Mo based TZM alloy is one of the most promising refractory alloy having several unique high temperature properties suitable for structural applications in the new generation advanced nuclear reactors. However, this alloy easily picks up interstitial impurities such as N 2 , H 2 and C from air during welding due to its reactive nature. High melting point of TZM alloy also restricts use of conventional welding technique for welding. Hence, Electron beam welding (EBW) technique with its deep penetration power to produce narrow heat affected zones under high vacuum was employed to overcome the above welding constraints by conducting a systematic study using both processes of bead on plate and butt joint configuration. Uniform and defect free weld joints were produced. Weld joints were subjected to optical characterization, chemical homogeneity analysis and microhardness profile study across the width of welds. Improved grain structure with equiaxed grains was obtained in the weld zone as compared to fibrous base structure. Original chemical composition was retained in the weld zone. The detailed results are described in this report. (author)

  1. Qualification of electron-beam welded joints between copper and stainless steel for cryogenic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusch, C.; Borsch, M.; Heidt, C.; Magginetti, N.; Sas, J.; Weiss, K.-P.; Grohmann, S.

    2015-12-01

    Joints between copper and stainless steel are commonly applied in cryogenic systems. A relatively new and increasingly important method to combine these materials is electron-beam (EB) welding. Typically, welds in cryogenic applications need to withstand a temperature range from 300K down to 4K, and pressures of several MPa. However, few data are available for classifying EB welds between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel. A broad test program was conducted in order to qualify this kind of weld. The experiments started with the measurement of the hardness in the weld area. To verify the leak-tightness of the joints, integral helium leak tests at operating pressures of 16 MPa were carried out at room- and at liquid nitrogen temperature. The tests were followed by destructive tensile tests at room temperature, at liquid nitrogen and at liquid helium temperatures, yielding information on the yield strength and the ultimate tensile strength of the welds at these temperatures. Moreover, nondestructive tensile tests up to the yield strength, i.e. the range in which the weld can be stressed during operation, were performed. Also, the behavior of the weld upon temperature fluctuations between room- and liquid nitrogen temperature was tested. The results of the qualification indicate that EB welded joints between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel are reliable and present an interesting alternative to other technologies such as vacuum brazing or friction welding.

  2. Study on laser welding of austenitic stainless steel by varying incident angle of pulsed laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nikhil; Mukherjee, Manidipto; Bandyopadhyay, Asish

    2017-09-01

    In the present work, AISI 304 stainless steel sheets are laser welded in butt joint configuration using a robotic control 600 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser system. The objective of the work is of twofold. Firstly, the study aims to find out the effect of incident angle on the weld pool geometry, microstructure and tensile property of the welded joints. Secondly, a set of experiments are conducted, according to response surface design, to investigate the effects of process parameters, namely, incident angle of laser beam, laser power and welding speed, on ultimate tensile strength by developing a second order polynomial equation. Study with three different incident angle of laser beam 89.7 deg, 85.5 deg and 83 deg has been presented in this work. It is observed that the weld pool geometry has been significantly altered with the deviation in incident angle. The weld pool shape at the top surface has been altered from semispherical or nearly spherical shape to tear drop shape with decrease in incident angle. Simultaneously, planer, fine columnar dendritic and coarse columnar dendritic structures have been observed at 89.7 deg, 85.5 deg and 83 deg incident angle respectively. Weld metals with 85.5 deg incident angle has higher fraction of carbide and δ-ferrite precipitation in the austenitic matrix compared to other weld conditions. Hence, weld metal of 85.5 deg incident angle achieved higher micro-hardness of ∼280 HV and tensile strength of 579.26 MPa followed by 89.7 deg and 83 deg incident angle welds. Furthermore, the predicted maximum value of ultimate tensile strength of 580.50 MPa has been achieved for 85.95 deg incident angle using the developed equation where other two optimum parameter settings have been obtained as laser power of 455.52 W and welding speed of 4.95 mm/s. This observation has been satisfactorily validated by three confirmatory tests.

  3. Influence of laser beam incidence angle on laser lap welding quality of galvanized steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Lifang; Yan, Dongbing; Chen, Genyu; Wang, Zhenhui; Chen, Shuixuan

    2017-11-01

    Based on the characteristics of laser welded structural parts of auto bodies, the influence of variation in laser beam incidence angle on the lap welding performance of galvanized auto-body sheets was studied. Lap welding tests were carried out on the galvanized sheets for auto-body application at different laser beam incidence angles by using the optimal welding parameters obtained through orthogonal experiment. The effects of incidence angle variation on seam appearance, cross-sectional shape, joint mechanical properties and microstructure of weldments were analyzed. In addition, the main factors influencing the value of incidence angle were investigated. According to the results, the weld seams had a good appearance as well as a fine, and uniform microstructure when the laser beam incidence angle was smaller than the critical incidence angle, and thus they could withstand great tensile and shear loads. Moreover, all tensile-shear specimens were fractured in the base material zone. When the laser beam incidence angle was larger than the critical incidence angle, defects like shrinkage and collapse tended to emerge, thereby resulting in the deteriorated weldability of specimens. Meanwhile, factors like the type and thickness of sheet, weld width as well as inter-sheet gap all had a certain effect on the value of laser beam incidence angle. When the sheet thickness was small and the weld width was narrow, the laser beam incidence angle could be increased appropriately. At the same time, small changes in the inter-sheet gap could greatly impact the value of incidence angle. When the inter-sheet gap was small, the laser beam incidence angle should not be too large.

  4. Four examples of non-ferrous metal electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommeria, J.

    1989-01-01

    The welding of superconducting cavity resonators made of niobium for particle accelerators is described. Then the welding of four plates in zircaloy 2 containing the fuel of the Orphee reactor is presented. The two other examples concern power transistor and motor support for planes. 9 figs [fr

  5. Fatigue crack growth resistance of gas tungsten arc, electron beam and friction stir welded joints of AA2219 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malarvizhi, S.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-01-01

    AA2219 aluminium alloy square butt joints without filler metal addition were fabricated using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), electron beam welding (EBW) and friction stir welding (FSW) processes. The effect of three welding processes on fatigue crack growth behaviour is reported in this paper. Transverse tensile properties of the welded joints were evaluated. Microstructure analysis was also carried out using optical and electron microscopes. It was found that the FSW joints are exhibiting superior fatigue crack growth resistance compared to EBW and GTAW joints. This was mainly due to the formation of very fine, dynamically recrystallised grains and uniform distribution of fine precipitates in the weld region.

  6. Modeling Long-term Creep Performance for Welded Nickel-base Superalloy Structures for Power Generation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Chen

    2015-01-01

    We report here a constitutive model for predicting long-term creep strain evolution in’ strengthened Ni-base superalloys. Dislocation climb-bypassing’, typical in intermediate’ volume fraction (~20%) alloys, is considered as the primary deformation mechanism. Dislocation shearing’ to anti-phase boundary (APB) faults and diffusional creep are also considered for high-stress and high-temperature low-stress conditions, respectively. Additional damage mechanism is taken into account for rapid increase in tertiary creep strain. The model has been applied to Alloy 282, and calibrated in a temperature range of 1375-1450°F, and stress range of 15-45ksi. The model parameters and a MATLAB code are provided. This report is prepared by Monica Soare and Chen Shen at GE Global Research. Technical discussions with Dr. Vito Cedro are greatly appreciated. This work was supported by DOE program DE-FE0005859

  7. Scanning of electron beam by X-shaped trajectory as a means of root weld defect minimizing in EBW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belen'kij, V.Ya.

    1986-01-01

    The application of X-shaped electron beam scanning for welding to eliminate peak-formation and accompanying root weld defects. It is shown that the use of X-shaped scanning allows one to attain substantial decrease of root penetration peaks amplitude with a slight decrease of its depth. It is advisable to perform welding with optimum electron beam focusing which can be established by maximum value of oscillations amplitude of the alternating-current spectrum component in the circuit of the welded product or collector with frequency in the 3-15 kHz range with motionless as well as oscillating beam

  8. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Weld Metal and Heat-Affected Zone of Electron Beam-Welded Joints of HG785D Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Han, Jianmin; Tan, Caiwang; Yang, Zhiyong; Wang, Junqiang

    2016-12-01

    Vacuum electron beam welding (EBW) process was employed to butt weld 10-mm-thick HG785D high-strength steels. The penetration into the steel was adjusted by beam current. Microstructures at weld metal and heat-affected zone (HAZ) regions were comparatively observed. Mechanical properties of the EBWed joints including Vickers hardness, tensile and Charpy impact tests were evaluated. The results indicated that microstructures at the weld metal consisted of coarse lath martensite and a small amount of acicular martensite, while that in the HAZ was tempered sorbite and martensite. The grain size in the weld metal was found to be larger than that in the HAZ, and its proportion in weld metal was higher. The hardness in the weld metal was higher than the HAZ and base metal. The tensile strength and impact toughness in the HAZ was higher than that in the weld metal. All the behaviors were related to microstructure evolution caused by higher cooling rates and state of base metal. The fracture surfaces of tensile and impact tests on the optimized joint were characterized by uniform and ductile dimples. The results differed significantly from that obtained using arc welding process.

  9. Effect of gaussian beam on microstructural and mechanical properties of dissimilarlaser welding ofAA5083 and AA6061 alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, B.; Cheepu, Muralimohan; Sivaprasad, K.; Muthupandi, V.

    2018-03-01

    The present study focuses on a sheet thickness of 4 mm using different laser power and welding rate by the laser beam welding (LBW) at a beam size180 μm. The observations on the weldments are showing that thermal conductivity of the materials plays a major role on microstructural changes. The as-welded mechanical properties were studied by correlation with its microstructures. Due to the steeper temperature gradient during the laser beam welding AA6061 was showing the greater variation compares with AA5083 side in the micro hardness studies.Also, the tensile strength of 241 MPa has been reported as highest with the welds made of laser powerat 3.5 kW and welding rate at 3.5 mmin-1.

  10. Laser Beam Welding of Thick Titanium Sheets in the Field of Marine Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, André; Gumenyuk, Andrey; Lammers, Marco; Malletschek, Andreas; Rethmeier, Michael

    The ever larger requirements of the material selection in the range of maritime industry necessitate the application of high-tech materials. Titanium because of its excellent mechanical properties at low weight is an attractive alternative for the construction of ships. The goal of this investigation was to design a welding method for joining samples of 16 mm thick Ti3Al2.5 V. The welding experiments with a 20 kW Yb-fiber laser source and varying combinations of parameters were intended to qualify the laser beam welding process. The welding results were analyzed by non-destructive and destructive testing. In addition, the welding tests were recorded with two high-speed cameras to observe the weld pool and the vapor plume. The evaluation of the high-speed images in correlation with the results of non-destructive testing shows, that a significant improvement of process stability and weld quality can be achieved by the suppression of the vapor plume.

  11. An analysis of electron beam welds in a dual coolant liquid metal breeder blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cizelj, L.; Riesch-Oppermann, H.; Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH

    1994-10-01

    Numerical simulation of electron beam welding of blanket segments was performed using non-linear finite element code ABAQUS. The thermal and stress fields were assumed uncoupled, while preserving the temperature dependency of all material parameters. The martensite-austenite and austenite-martensite transformations were taken into account through volume shrinking/expansion effects, which is consistent with available data. The distributions of post welding residual stress in a complex geometry of the first wall are obtained. Also, the effects of preheating and post-welding heat treatment were addressed. Time dependent temperature and stress-strain fields obtained provide good insight into the welding process. They may be used directly to support reliability and life-time studies of blanket structures. On the other hand, they provide useful hints about the feasibility of the geometrical configurations as proposed by different design concepts. (orig.) [de

  12. Effect of post-weld heat treatments on strength and toughness behavior of T-250 maraging steel welded by laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Kun; Shan, Jiguo; Wang, Chunxu; Tian, Zhiling

    2016-01-01

    This paper elucidates here the strength and toughness behavior of T-250 maraging steel welded by laser beam under different approaches of three post-weld heat treatments, i.e. aging (A), solutionizing+aging (SA) and homogenizing+solutionizing+aging (HSA). The microstructures of the weld metals with A and SA processes both comprised of finely dispersive Ni 3 (Ti, Mo) precipitates, small martensite lath and reverted austenite along the grain boundary. However, in the weld metal with HSA process, it exhibited the same Ni 3 (Ti, Mo) precipitate with the large martensite lath and the absence of reverted austenite. The ultimate tensile strength and static toughness of the welded joint with HSA process were 1350.6 MPa and 63.8 MJ m −3 , respectively. The static toughness has been remarkably improved from 71% to 91% of the applied parent metal compared with that of the welded joint with A process. The present study underscores that the Ni 3 (Ti, Mo) precipitate and martensite are significant to ensure the high strength of welded joints. Due to its inconsistent deformation with the matrix of martensite, the reverted austenite has a notable influence on the toughness of welded joints. It shows that the post-weld heat treatments of HSA process can influence the mechanical behavior of welded joints by eliminating the reverted austenite.

  13. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The safety issue has been raised with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate if molten metal could detach and come in contact with astronauts and burn through the fabric of the astronauts' Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) during electron beam welding in space. Molten metal detachments from either the weld/cut substrate or weld wire could present harm to a astronaut if the detachment was to burn through the fabric of the EMU. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The primary molten metal detachment concerns were those cases of molten metal separation from the metal surface due to metal cutting, weld pool splashing, entrainment and release of molten metal due to filler wire snap-out from the weld puddle, and molten metal accumulation and release from the end of the weld wire. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were developed for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. The surface tension represents the force opposing the liquid metal drop from detaching whereas the weight of the liquid metal droplet represents a force that is tending to detach the molten metal drop. Theoretical calculations have indicated that only a small amount of energy is required to detach a liquid metal drop; however, much of the energy of an impact is absorbed in the sample or weld plate before it reaches the metal drop on the cut edge or surface. The tendency for detachment is directly proportional to the weld pool radius and metal density and inversely proportional to the surface

  14. Characterising electron beam welded dissimilar metal joints to study residual stress relaxation from specimen extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abburi Venkata, K.; Truman, C.E.; Smith, D.J.; Bhaduri, A.K.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear power plants require dissimilar metal weld joints to connect the primary steam generator made from ferritic steel to the intermediate heat exchanger made from austenitic steel. Such joints are complex because of the mismatch in the thermal and the mechanical properties of the materials used in the joint. Electron Beam (EB) welding is emerging as a promising technique to manufacture dissimilar joints providing a great many advantages over conventional welding techniques, in terms of low heat input, high heat intensity, narrow fusion and heat affected zones, deeper penetration and increased welding speeds. However before this method can be considered for implementation in an actual plant, it is essential for a careful and a comprehensive outlining of the joint characteristics and the apparent effects on performance during service. In the present study, an EB welded joint was manufactured using austenitic AISI 316LN stainless steel and a ferritic-martensitic P91 steel, without the addition of filler material. Neutron diffraction measurement was conducted on the welded plate to measure the residual stress distribution across the weld as well as through the thickness of the plate. A finite element analysis was conducted on a two-dimensional cross-sectional model using ABAQUS code to simulate the welding process and predict the residual stresses, implementing the effects of solid-state phase transformation experienced by P91 steel. The predicted residual stresses were transferred to a 3D finite element model of the plate to simulate the machining and extraction of a C(T) blank specimen from the welded plate and the extent of stress relaxation is studied.

  15. Feasibility study of electron beam welding of spent nuclear fuel canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, A.; Szluha, T.F.; Turner, J.L.; Leggatt, R.H.

    1983-04-01

    A thick walled copper container is presently the prime Swedish alternative for encapsulation of spent nuclear fuel. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of encapsulating high-level nuclear waste in copper containers, a study of electron beam welding of thick copper has been performed. Two copper qualities have been investigated, oxygen free high conductivity (OFHC) copper and phosphorous desoxydized high conductivity copper (PDO). The findings in this study are summarized below. In 100 mm thick copper penetration can be achived at power level of about 75 kW (typically 150 kV x 500 mA) at welding speed of 100 mm/min. The welds in OFHC copper made under these conditions are free from major defects during constant welding conditions. The welds in PDO copper show a microporosity level considerably higher than those in OFHC copper, but no major defects are produced in the welds in PDO copper. In the ending of the weld (ie the fade out) it is still not possible to completely eliminate root and cold-shut defects. A semi-full-scale lid weld has been performed successfully. Automatic ultrasonic C-scan has been shown to be useful in detecting and displaying defects, but some problems still remain with defect sizing. The different speciments of OFHS copper had different attenuation of the ultrasonic signal, forged copper showing a far lower attenuation than hot extruded copper, indicating that attention must be paid in choosing copper that allows accurate ultrasonic testing. Resiudal stresses in the welded zone has been measured and are found to lie in the range -32N/mm 2 to +36N/mm 2 . The peak stress was less than half the assumed value of the proof stress of the fused metal. (authors)

  16. Feedback control of laser welding based on frequency analysis of light emissions and adaptive beam shaping

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrňa, Libor; Šarbort, Martin; Řeřucha, Šimon; Jedlička, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 39, NOV (2012), s. 784-791 ISSN 1875-3892. [LANE 2012. Laser Assisted Net Shape Engineering /7./ International Conference on Photonic Technologies. Fürth, 12.11.2012-15.12.2012] Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : laser weld ing * feedback control * frequency analysis * adaptive beam shaping Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  17. Low cycle fatigue behavior of electron beam and friction welded joints of an α-β titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohandas, T.; Varma, V.K.; Banerjee, D.; Kutumbarao, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Fusion welds in titanium alloys, with intermediate β stabilizing additions, show poor mechanical properties due to large fusion zone grain size coupled with a brittle plate martensitic microstructure and hydrogen induced microporosity. These problems, associated with fusion welding, have been reported to be overcome by friction welding. The alloy used in this study is a Soviet composition (VT9) of the α-β class with the nominal chemical composition Ti-6.5Al-3.3Mo-1.6Zr-0.3 Si (in weight percent), intended to be used as discs and blades in compressor stages of gas turbine engine where low cycle fatigue (LCF) loading is experienced. Electron beam welding of the alloy was largely unsuccessful for the reasons described above. Fatigue properties of such welds had large scatter due to the presence of microporosity. A continuous drive friction welding technique was investigated to overcome this problem These welds showed encouraging results in that microporosity, a problem in the electron beam welding, was not observed and the mechanical properties were at par or better than those of the base metal. This paper deals with the study of stress controlled LCF behavior of friction welds and electron beam welds of the α-β titanium alloy at ambient temperature and the results are compared with those of base metal

  18. A comparative evaluation of microstructural and mechanical behavior of fiber laser beam and tungsten inert gas dissimilar ultra high strength steel welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiteerth R. Joshi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different welding processes on the mechanical properties and the corresponding variation in the microstructural features have been investigated for the dissimilar weldments of 18% Ni maraging steel 250 and AISI 4130 steel. The weld joints are realized through two different fusion welding processes, tungsten inert arc welding (TIG and laser beam welding (LBW, in this study. The dissimilar steel welds were characterized through optical microstructures, microhardness survey across the weldment and evaluation of tensile properties. The fiber laser beam welds have demonstrated superior mechanical properties and reduced heat affected zone as compared to the TIG weldments.

  19. Effect of post-weld heat treatment on the mechanical properties of electron beam welded joints for CLAM steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingsheng; Zheng, Shuhui; Liu, Shaojun; Li, Chunjing; Huang, Qunying

    2013-11-01

    In this paper the microstructure and mechanical properties of electron beam weld (EBW) joints for China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel, which underwent a series of different post weld heat treatments (PWHTs) were studied. The aim of the study was to identify suitable PWHTs that give a good balance between strength and toughness of the EBW joints. The microstructural analyses were performed by means of optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The mechanical properties were determined via tensile tests and Charpy impact tests. The results showed that the tensile strength of the as-weld joint (i.e. without any PWHT) were close to that of the base metal, but the impact toughness was only 13% of that of the base metal due to the existence of a delta-ferrite microstructure. To achieve a significant improvement in toughness a PWHT needs to be performed. If a one-step PWHT is applied tempering at 760 °C for 2 h gives EBW joints with high strength at a still acceptable toughness level. If a two-step PWHT is applied, a process involving quenching at 980 °C for 0.5 h followed by tempering at 740 °C or 760 °C for 2 h gives EBW joints with high strength and toughness properties. Whenever possible a two-step PWHT should be applied in favor of a one-step process, because of higher resulting strength and toughness properties.

  20. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in the Space Shuttle Bay at LEO for the International Space Welding Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M.

    1996-01-01

    In 1997, the United States [NASA] and the Paton Electric Welding Institute are scheduled to cooperate in a flight demonstration on the U.S. Space Shuttle to demonstrate the feasibility of welding in space for a possible repair option for the International Space Station Alpha. This endeavor, known as the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE), will involve astronauts performing various welding exercises such as brazing, cutting, welding, and coating using an electron beam space welding system that was developed by the E.O. Paton Electric Welding Institute (PWI), Kiev Ukraine. This electron beam welding system known as the "Universal Weld System" consists of hand tools capable of brazing, cutting, autogeneous welding, and coating using an 8 kV (8000 volts) electron beam. The electron beam hand tools have also been developed by the Paton Welding Institute with greater capabilities than the original hand tool, including filler wire feeding, to be used with the Universal Weld System on the U.S. Space Shuttle Bay as part of ISWE. The hand tool(s) known as the Ukrainian Universal Hand [Electron Beam Welding] Tool (UHT) will be utilized for the ISWE Space Shuttle flight welding exercises to perform welding on various metal alloy samples. A total of 61 metal alloy samples, which include 304 stainless steel, Ti-6AI-4V, 2219 aluminum, and 5456 aluminum alloys, have been provided by NASA for the ISWE electron beam welding exercises using the UHT. These samples were chosen to replicate both the U.S. and Russian module materials. The ISWE requires extravehicular activity (EVA) of two astronauts to perform the space shuttle electron beam welding operations of the 61 alloy samples. This study was undertaken to determine if a hazard could exist with ISWE during the electron beam welding exercises in the Space Shuttle Bay using the Ukrainian Universal Weld System with the UHT. The safety issue has been raised with regard to molten metal detachments as a result of several

  1. Mehanical Properties of Electron Beam Welded Joints in Thick Gage CA6NM Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafan, Sheida; Wanjara, Priti; Gholipour, Javad; Champliaud, Henri; Mathieu, Louis

    2017-10-01

    Design of hydroelectric turbine components requires high integrity welds (without detectable volumetric defects) in heavy gage sections of stainless steel materials, such as ASTM A743 grade CA6NM—a low carbon 13% Cr-4% Ni martensitic stainless steel that is manufactured in cast form. In this work, 90-mm-thick plates of CA6NM were joined using a single-pass autogenous electron beam (EB) welding process and the mechanical properties were evaluated in the as-welded condition to characterize the performance of the joints. The static tensile properties that were evaluated in two directions—transverse and longitudinal to the EB weld seam—demonstrated conformance of the joints with the requirements of the ASME Section IX standard. The Charpy impact energies of the EB welds—measured at -18 °C on samples with V-notch roots located in the fusion and heat-affected zones—met the minimum requirements of 27 J specified in ASME Section VIII standard. In addition, bend tests that were conducted on the entire weld cross section displayed no discontinuities on the tension side of the bent joints. Hence, the developed EB welding process was demonstrated to render high-performance joints and promises key advantages for industrialization, such as cost savings through reductions in consumable material, production time and labor intensity.

  2. Vapor plume oscillation mechanisms in transient keyhole during tandem dual beam fiber laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Zhang, Xiaosi; Pang, Shengyong; Hu, Renzhi; Xiao, Jianzhong

    2018-01-01

    Vapor plume oscillations are common physical phenomena that have an important influence on the welding process in dual beam laser welding. However, until now, the oscillation mechanisms of vapor plumes remain unclear. This is primarily because mesoscale vapor plume dynamics inside a millimeter-scale, invisible, and time-dependent keyhole are difficult to quantitatively observe. In this paper, based on a developed three-dimensional (3D) comprehensive model, the vapor plume evolutions in a dynamical keyhole are directly simulated in tandem dual beam, short-wavelength laser welding. Combined with the vapor plume behaviors outside the keyhole observed by high-speed imaging, the vapor plume oscillations in dynamical keyholes at different inter-beam distances are the first, to our knowledge, to be quantitatively analyzed. It is found that vapor plume oscillations outside the keyhole mainly result from vapor plume instabilities inside the keyhole. The ejection velocity at the keyhole opening and dynamical behaviors outside the keyhole of a vapor plume both violently oscillate with the same order of magnitude of high frequency (several kHz). Furthermore, the ejection speed at the keyhole opening and ejection area outside the keyhole both decrease as the beam distance increases, while the degree of vapor plume instability first decreases and then increases with increasing beam distance from 0.6 to 1.0 mm. Moreover, the oscillation mechanisms of a vapor plume inside the dynamical keyhole irradiated by dual laser beams are investigated by thoroughly analyzing the vapor plume occurrence and flow process. The vapor plume oscillations in the dynamical keyhole are found to mainly result from violent local evaporations and severe keyhole geometry variations. In short, the quantitative method and these findings can serve as a reference for further understanding of the physical mechanisms in dual beam laser welding and of processing optimizations in industrial applications.

  3. Technical assistance to AECL: electron beam welding of thick-walled copper containers for nuclear fuel waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maak, P.Y.Y.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the results of Phase Two of the copper electron beam welding project for the final closure of copper containers for nuclear fuel waste disposal. It has been demonstrated that single pass, electron beam square butt welds (depth of weld penetration > 25 mm) can be made without preheat in both electrolytic tough-pitch copper and oxygen-free copper plates. The present results show that oxygen-free copper exhibits better weldability than the electrolytic tough-pitch copper in terms of weld penetration and vulnerability to weld defects such as gas porosity, erratic metal overflow and blow holes. The results of ultrasonic inspection studies of the welds are also discussed

  4. Neutron diffraction study of residual strains across electron beam welds in AISI 316L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braham, C.; Ceretti, M.; Coppola, R.; Lodini, A.; Rustichelli, F.; Tosto, S.

    1995-01-01

    The results of neutron diffraction investigation of the strains produced across an electron-beam (EB) weld in SA AISI 316L reference steel for NET are presented. The sample size was 10 x 5 x 3 cm 3 and the measurements have been carried out at different distances from the weld plane with a spatial resolution of approximately 8 mm 3 in the bulk of the material. Grain size and crystallographic texture effects were investigated, on the same sample, by means of X-ray diffraction and metallography. A method to determine the stress field from the neutron diffraction data even in the presence of strong texture is discussed. (orig.)

  5. Residual stress measurements by neutron diffraction in laser and electron beam welded joints in 9Cr-1Mo(V, Nb) steel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Santosh; Viswanadham, C.S.; Bhanumurthy, K.; Dey, G.K.; Kundu, Amrita; Bouchard, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Residual stresses are invariably associated with welded joints and have serious implications for integrity of welded components in service conditions. Laser and electron beam welding produces weld joints with narrow fusion zone and heat affected zone. Therefore, there exists very high spatial gradient of residual stresses across the weld joints; measurement of which is indeed a challenging task. Residual stress measurements in laser and electron beam welded 9Cr-1Mo (V, Nb) steel plates were carried out by neutron diffraction. Measurements for laser welded plates were carried out using monochromatic neutron beam at ILL, France and that for electron beam welded plates were carried out using white neutron beam at ISIS, UK. Measurements were made across the weld joints as well as along the weld centre-line for the three orthogonal components-longitudinal, transverse and normal of the residual stress. The cross-weld residual stress profile showed a low tensile/compressive trough in the fusion zone and a high tensile peak on the either side of the joint in the parent metal just outside of metallurgical HAZ. Besides, longitudinal and normal components of the residual stress are significant while the transverse component is the least significant. Residual stress profiles showed very similar characteristics in the weld joints made by laser and electron beam welding processes. These results are presented in this paper and discussed in the context of the metallurgical attributes of the material

  6. An Experimental Evaluation of Electron Beam Welded Thixoformed 7075 Aluminum Alloy Plate Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ava Azadi Chegeni

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Two plates of thixoformed 7075 aluminum alloy were joined using Electron Beam Welding (EBW. A post-welding-heat treatment (PWHT was performed within the semi-solid temperature range of this alloy at three temperatures, 610, 617 and 628 °C, for 3 min. The microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of EB welded plates, as well as the heat-treated specimens, were investigated in the Base Metal (BM, Heat Affected Zone (HAZ, and Fusion Zone (FZ, using optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis, and Vickers hardness test. Results indicated that after EBW, the grain size substantially decreased from 67 µm in both BM and HAZ to 7 µm in the FZ, and a hardness increment was observed in the FZ as compared to the BM and HAZ. Furthermore, the PWHT led to grain coarsening throughout the material, along with a further increase in hardness in the FZ.

  7. Secondary hazards of high power laser beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulmeister, K.; Schmitzer, C.; Duftschmid, K.; Liedl, G.; Schroeder, K.; Schuoecker, D.

    1996-01-01

    Hazardous UV-radiation and short-wavelength visible (blue) light is emitted by the high temperature plasma above the welding-keyhole. Ozone and NO x is produced due to UV-induced photodissociation of oxygen and high temperature gas-phase reactions. Spectral measurements of the plasma emission show that the allowed dose for UV-radiation and blue light exposure per work day can be exceeded in as short as a few seconds. Similarly, measurements and models of the ozone and NO x concentration show that the maximum workplace concentrations might be reached quickly if no appropriate exhaust and filter system is installed. (author)

  8. Stress corrosion cracking tests on electron beam welded carbon steel specimens in carbonate-bicarbonate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkins, R.N.

    1985-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking tests have been performed on tapered carbon steel test pieces containing electron beam welds with a view to defining susceptibility to such cracking in a carbonate-bicarbonate solution at 90 C and an appropriate electrode potential. The tests involved applying cyclic loads to the specimens and it is shown that the threshold stress for cracking reduces linearly with increase in the magnitude of the cyclic load component. Extrapolation of these trends to zero fluctuating stress indicates static load threshold stresses in the vicinity of the yield stress (i.e. about 300 N/mm 2 for parent plate without a weld, 400 N/mm 2 for specimens with welds on one side only and 600 N/mm 2 for specimens having welds penetrating through the thickness of the specimen). The averages of the maximum crack velocities observed were least for parent plate material and greatest for weld metal, the former being essentially intergranular in morphology and the latter mostly transgranular, with heat affected zone material being intermediate between these extremes. (author)

  9. Welding for fusion grade neutral beam components - requirements, challenges, experiences and learnings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Jaydeep; Patel, Hitesh; Yadav, Ashish; Rotti, Chandramouli; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Chakraborty, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Negative ion based Neutral Beam Injectors (NBI) are the integral part of large size fusion devices where Neutral Beams of Hydrogen/Deuterium atoms are injected into the fusion reactor to heat the plasma, drive a plasma current, provide fuel to the plasma and also help to diagnose the plasma through spectroscopic measurements. The presentation shares the experiences of handling, some of special welding activities applicable for fusion prototypes developments, experiments, methodology developed for the inspection/tests, criteria considered with the appropriate justifications. This also shares the view point of authors code should further be supplement and incorporate the fusion specific applications considering future needs. In addition, explorations to meet our future needs of welding with specific attention to indigenous developments have been described

  10. Electron-beam weld solidification structures and properties in Al-3Li-X alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowden, D.M.; Meschter, P.J.

    1984-09-01

    This paper examines the effects of various additions to binary Al-3Li on electron-beam weld solidification structures and tensile properties. These additions include Zr for grain refinement, Mg for solid solution strengthening, Cu for precipitation strengthening, and Co for dispersion strengthening. Aluminum-lithium alloys containing 3 wt% lithium are candidates to replace commercial 2xxx and 7xxx aluminum alloys in structural applications.

  11. Tensile Behavior of Electron Beam-Welded and Post-Weld Vacuum-Annealed Nb-10% Hf-1% Ti Refractory Alloy Weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anil Kumar, V.; Gupta, R. K.; Venkateswaran, T.; Ram Kumar, P.

    2018-02-01

    Nb-10% Hf-1% Ti refractory alloy is a high performance material extensively used for high temperature applications. Electron beam welding is one of the most widely used techniques to join refractory and reactive alloys. Bigger sizes of nozzles for rocket propulsion applications can be either made through deep drawing and flow turning route or by roll bending and welding route both using sheets/plates as input material for fabrication. The latter is a more economical option for mass production of the hardware using such exotic and expensive alloys. In view of this, both as-welded (AW) coupon and weld plus post-weld vacuum-annealed (AW + VA) coupon have been prepared to study their mechanical behavior. It has been observed that tensile strength and ductility have not been reduced in both these conditions vis-à-vis the base metal, confirming weld efficiency of the alloy to be 100%. Microhardness is found to be 150-160 VHN in the base metal and 200-225 VHN in the weld fusion zone in AW condition, which became uniform (145-155 VHN) throughout the weldment in AW + VA condition. Microstructure of the weldment in AW condition is found to be consisting of grains solidified by epitaxial mode from base metal toward the weld centre. In AW + VA condition, improvement in tensile elongation is observed, which is found to be due to the presence of homogenized grains/more uniform microstructure near the heat-affected zone as compared to the steep gradient in grain size in different zones in the weld in AW condition.

  12. Metallographic Preparation of Space Shuttle Reaction Control System Thruster Electron Beam Welds for Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, James

    2011-01-01

    A Space Shuttle Reaction Control System (RCS) thruster failed during a firing test at the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF), Las Cruces, New Mexico. The firing test was being conducted to investigate a previous electrical malfunction. A number of cracks were found associated with the fuel closure plate/injector assembly (Fig 1). The firing test failure generated a flight constraint to the launch of STS-133. A team comprised of several NASA centers and other research institutes was assembled to investigate and determine the root cause of the failure. The JSC Materials Evaluation Laboratory was asked to compare and characterize the outboard circumferential electron beam (EB) weld between the fuel closure plate (Titanium 6Al-4V) and the injector (Niobium C-103 alloy) of four different RCS thrusters, including the failed RCS thruster. Several metallographic challenges in grinding/polishing, and particularly in etching were encountered because of the differences in hardness, ductility, and chemical resistance between the two alloys and the bimetallic weld. Segments from each thruster were sectioned from the outboard weld. The segments were hot-compression mounted using a conductive, carbon-filled epoxy. A grinding/polishing procedure for titanium alloys was used [1]. This procedure worked well on the titanium; but a thin, disturbed layer was visible on the niobium surface by means of polarized light. Once polished, each sample was micrographed using bright field, differential interference contrast optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using a backscatter electron (BSE) detector. No typical weld anomalies were observed in any of the cross sections. However, areas of large atomic contrast were clearly visible in the weld nugget, particularly along fusion line interfaces between the titanium and the niobium. This prompted the need to better understand the chemistry and microstructure of the weld (Fig 2). Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS

  13. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  14. An inexpensive electron beam annealing apparatus with line focus, made from a converted electron welding machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krimmel, E.F.; Lutsch, AG.K.; Meyer, H.P.; Theron, S.B.K.

    1985-01-01

    Electron beam annealing has, after an active period of research, become an established technology in the production of semiconductor devices, since high quality restoration practically without out-diffusion, can be achieved. Many universities and research institutions cannot afford to purchase a dedicated electron beam annealing apparatus. In the following a conversion of an industrial electron beam welding apparatus into an annealing apparatus with line focus is described, which could easily be copied by interested institutions. A magnetic quadrupole-lens is described which converts the point into a line focus. Standard-TV deflections with a special generator circuit for the X and Y deflection are used. Electron currents of 4 to 5 mA cause silicon to melt (1415 deg C). Annealing results obtained with the apparatus are discussed. (author)

  15. Electron beam deflection control system of a welding and surface modification installation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleva, E.; Dzharov, V.; Gerasimov, V.; Tsvetkov, K.; Mladenov, G.

    2018-03-01

    In the present work, we examined the patterns of the electron beam motion when controlling the transverse with respect to the axis of the beam homogeneous magnetic field created by the coils of the deflection system the electron gun. During electron beam processes, the beam motion is determined the process type (welding, surface modification, etc.), the technological mode, the design dimensions of the electron gun and the shape of the processed samples. The electron beam motion is defined by the cumulative action of two cosine-like control signals generated by a functional generator. The signal control is related to changing the amplitudes, frequencies and phases (phase differences) of the generated voltages. We realized the motion control by applying a graphical user interface developed by us and an Arduino Uno programmable microcontroller. The signals generated were calibrated using experimental data from the available functional generator. The free and precise motion on arbitrary trajectories determines the possible applications of an electron beam process to carrying out various scientific research tasks in material processing.

  16. Hydrogen assisted stress-cracking behaviour of electron beam welded supermartensitic stainless steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bala Srinivasan, P.; Sharkawy, S.W.; Dietzel, W.

    2004-01-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steel (SMSS) grades are gaining popularity as an alternate material to duplex and super duplex stainless steels for applications in oil and gas industries. The weldability of these steels, though reported to be better when compared to conventional martensitic stainless steels, so far has been addressed with duplex stainless steel electrodes/fillers. This work addresses the stress-cracking behaviour of weldments of a high-grade supermartensitic stainless steel (11% Cr, 6.5% Ni and 2% Mo) in the presence of hydrogen. Welds were produced with matching consumables, using electron beam welding (EBW) process. Weldments were subjected to slow strain rate tests in 0.1 M NaOH solution, with introduction of hydrogen into the specimens by means of potentiostatic cathodic polarisation at a potential of -1200 mV versus Ag/AgCl electrode. Reference tests were performed in air for comparison, and the results suggest that both the SMSS base material and the EB weld metal are susceptible to embrittlement under the conditions of hydrogen charging

  17. Numerical investigation on the variation of welding stresses after material removal from a thick titanium alloy plate joined by electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chuan; Zhang, Jianxun; Wu, Bing; Gong, Shuili

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → After less materials removal from the top, stresses on the bottom remain unchanged. → The transverse stress within the weld decreases significantly with material removal. → Local material removal does not influence the longitudinal stress significantly. -- Abstract: The stress modification after material removal from a 50 mm thick titanium alloy plate jointed by electron beam welding (EBW) was investigated through the finite element method (FEM). The welding experiment and milling process were carried out to experimentally determine the stresses induced by EBW and their modification after local material removal. The modification of as-welded stresses due to the local material removal method and the whole layer removal method was discussed with the finite element analysis. Investigated results showed that with less materials removal from the top, the stresses on the bottom surface remain almost unchanged; after material removal from the top and bottom part, the transverse stress on the newly-formed surface decreases significantly as compared to the as-welded stresses at the same locations; however, the stress modification only occurs at the material removal region in the case of local region removal method; the longitudinal stress decreases with the whole layer removal method while remains almost unchanged with the local region removal method.

  18. Application of e-beam welding in W/Cu divertor project for EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wanjing, E-mail: wjwang@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ASIPP), Hefei, Anhui (China); Li, Qiang; Zhao, Sixiang; Xu, Yue; Wei, Ran; Cao, Lei; Yao, Damao [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ASIPP), Hefei, Anhui (China); Qin, Sigui; Peng, Lingjian; Shi, Yingli; Pan, Ningjie; Liu, Guohui [Advanced Technology and Materials Company - AT& M, Beijing (China); Li, Hui [Beijing Zhongke Electric Co. Ltd., Beijing (China); Luo, Guang-Nan [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ASIPP), Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • To develop the actively cooled W/Cu components, we have to meet the application of EBW. • In this work, the microstructure of the fusion zone and the mechanical properties of Cu−Cu and Cu−Ni joint welded by EBW have been investigated. • In the practice of quality control, it was found that under present standard the helium leak detection is unreliable. Thus the UT has been introduced and the premier results have shown it's effective. • In addition, the control of configuration tolerance has also been investigated. And a solidified welding procedure with jigs was established before the batch production. - Abstract: In the development of EAST actively cooled W/Cu components, the ITER-grade CuCrZr has been chosen as the heat sink material for its good thermomechanics properties. To realize the seal joint of the heat sink, a large number of electron beam welding (EBW) of CuCrZr/CuCrZr or CuCrZr/Inconel625 has been carried out. In the quality control of the W/Cu components, the helium leak detection at thermal condition has been performed on the entire components before delivery. However, in the operation of EAST device some micro leak on the components was detected indicating that the helium leak detection under present standard was unreliable for the quality control. Therefore, the ultrasonic non-destructive testing technique was introduced to exclude the defects. In addition, the welding shrinkage and bending has also been investigated to meet the required tight tolerances for plasma-facing components in vacuum vessel.

  19. CFD-based model for melt flow in laser beam welding of aluminium with coaxial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatzen, M.; Tang, Z.

    The use of magnetic fields to influence weld bead shape and dilution in laser welding of aluminium alloys was recently suggested. For the case of laser welding of hot-cracking sensitive aluminium alloys with silicon-containing filler wire it was already demonstrated that applying alternating magnetic fields has an impact on the dilution of silicon in the melt pool, yielding sufficient silicon content throughout the weld to suppress hot-cracking. This is due to the changed melt flow condition resulting from induced magnetic volume forces. In this paper, a CFD-based model will be presented that was used to numerically calculate the resulting velocity field for laser beam welding of aluminium with external applied magnetic fields. The model includes temperaturedepending material properties, surface tension and buoyancy. The inhomogeneous magnetic flux density distribution implemented in this model has been derived from Hall sensor probes of a welding head prototype used for experimental investigations. It is shown that a steady magnetic field applied coaxially to the laser beam will affect the direction of melt flow and can be described as an inhomogeneous electromagnetic break.

  20. Residual stress reduction in beam welded joints by means of stress redistribution using defocused electron or laser beams; Eigenspannungsreduktion in strahlgeschweissten Naehten mittels Spannungsumlagerung durch den Einsatz defokussierter Elektronen- bzw. Laserstrahlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toelle, Florian

    2013-08-01

    Among the multiple advantages of beam welding processes the high longitudinal residual stresses in beam welds ranging till the local yield stress are one disadvantage. These high stresses can influence the service life of the welded components. The residual stresses in other welding processes exist in an equal high level but primarily in the transverse direction to the weld. To mitigate the high residual stresses a couple of methods were developed for these welding processes in the last decades. However these methods need large contact surfaces next to the welds for the installation of matched heating and cooling elements and other additional equipment. Furthermore, the previous developed stress mitigating processes offer a low efficiency for the small beam welds. The stress reduction by using the welding source after the welding process for a remote heat treatment of the welded components afford a flexible tool for the stress mitigation in beam welds. This method does not need any additional equipment and it is applicable for complex welding and component geometries. During this post welding heat treatment the material next to the weld is heated by the defocused electron or by the defocused laser beam, respectively, to temperatures of some hundreds degree Celsius. Hereby low plastic deformations in these regions are generated. While cooling down due to the thermal shrinkage the material between the weld and the heat treated region is compressed in longitudinal direction to the weld. This intermediate material zone constrained the shrinkage of the weld while cooling down from the melting temperature and leads to the high longitudinal residual stresses in the weld. In consequence of the compression of this intermediate zones by the heat treated zones the resistance to the shrinkage of the weld is lowered and the longitudinal stresses in the weld are reduced. In the process the quantity of the stress reduction is controlled by the selection of the process parameters

  1. Refurbishment of damaged tools using the combination of GTAW and laser beam welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tušek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the use of two welding processes for the refurbishment of damaged industrial tools. In the first part the problem is presented followed by the comparison of GTAW and laser welding in terms of repair welding of damaged tools. The macrosections of the welds show the difference between both welding processes in repairing of damaged tools. At the conclusion the main findings are presented. In many cases it is useful to use both welding processes in order to achieve better weld quality and to make welding more economical. The order of the technology used depends on the tool material, the use of the tool and the tool damage.

  2. Focused Ion Beam Nanotomography of ruthenium-bearing nickel-base superalloys with focus on cast-microstructure and phase stability; Focused Ion Beam Nanotomographie von rutheniumhaltigen Nickelbasis-Superlegierungen mit Fokus auf Gussgefuege und Phasenstabilitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cenanovic, Samir

    2012-12-03

    The influence of rhenium and ruthenium on the multi component system nickel-base superalloy is manifold and complex. An experimental nickel-base superalloy containing rhenium and ruthenium within defined contents, named Astra, was used to investigate the influences of these two elements on the alloy system. The last stage solidification of nickel-base superalloys after Bridgman casting and the high temperature phase stability of these alloys, could be explored with the aid of focused ion beam nanotomography. FIB-nt therefore was introduced and realized at the chair of General Materials Properties of the University Erlangen-Nuremberg. Cast Astra alloys are like other nickel-base superalloys morphologically very inhomogeneous and affected by segregation. In the interdendritic region different structures with huge γ' precipitates are formed. These inhomogeneities and remaining eutectics degrade the mechanical properties, witch makes an understanding of the subsiding processes at solidification of residual melt important for the casting process and the heat treatment. This is why the last stage solidification in the interdendritic region was analyzed. With the help of focused ion beam nanotomography, three different structures identified from 2-D sections could be assigned to one original 3-D structure. It was pointed out, that only the orientation of the plane of the 2-D cut influences the appearance in the 2-D section. The tomography information was used to explain the development during solidification and to create a model of last stage solidification. The interdendritic region is solidifying under the development of eutectic islands. The structure nucleates eutectically epitaxially at primary dendrite arms, with formation of fine γ/γ' precipitates. During solidification the γ' precipitates coarsen in a rod-like structure, and end up in large γ' precipitates. Simulations and other investigations could approve this model. First three

  3. Influence of heat input in electron beam process on microstructure and properties of duplex stainless steel welded interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Jing, Hongyang; Xu, Lianyong; Han, Yongdian; Zhao, Lei; Lv, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jianyang

    2018-03-01

    The influence of heat input in electron beam (EB) process on microstructure, mechanical properties, and pitting corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel (DSS) welded interface was investigated. The rapid cooling in EB welding resulted in insufficient austenite formation. The austenite mainly consisted of grain boundary austenite and intragranular austenite, and there was abundant Cr2N precipitation in the ferrite. The Ni, Mo, and Si segregation indicated that the dendritic solidification was primarily ferrite in the weld. The weld exhibited higher hardness, lower toughness, and poorer pitting corrosion resistance than the base metal. The impact fractures of the welds were dominated by the transgranular cleavage failure of the ferrite. The ferrite was selectively attacked because of its lower pitting resistance equivalent number than that of austenite. The Cr2N precipitation accelerated the pitting corrosion. In summary, the optimised heat input slightly increased the austenite content, reduced the segregation degree and ferrite texture intensity, decreased the hardness, and improved the toughness and pitting corrosion resistance. However, the effects were limited. Furthermore, optimising the heat input could not suppress the Cr2N precipitation. Taking into full consideration the microstructure and properties, a heat input of 0.46 kJ/mm is recommended for the EB welding of DSS.

  4. Effect of dual laser beam on dissimilar welding-brazing of aluminum to galvanized steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, Masoud; Yazdian, Nima; Yang, Guang; Wang, Hui-Ping; Carlson, Blair; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2018-01-01

    In this investigation, the joining of two types of galvanized steel and Al6022 aluminum alloy in a coach peel configuration was carried out using a laser welding-brazing process in dual-beam mode. The feasibility of this method to obtain a sound and uniform brazed bead with high surface quality at a high welding speed was investigated by employing AlSi12 as a consumable material. The effects of alloying elements on the thickness of intermetallic compound (IMC) produced at the interface of steel and aluminum, surface roughness, edge straightness and the tensile strength of the resultant joint were studied. The comprehensive study was conducted on the microstructure of joints by means of a scanning electron microscopy and EDS. Results showed that a dual-beam laser shape and high scanning speed could control the thickness of IMC as thin as 3 μm and alter the failure location from the steel-brazed interface toward the Al-brazed interface. The numerical simulation of thermal regime was conducted by the Finite Element Method (FEM), and simulation results were validated through comparative experimental data. FEM thermal modeling evidenced that the peak temperatures at the Al-steel interface were around the critical temperature range of 700-900 °C that is required for the highest growth rate of IMC. However, the time duration that the molten pool was placed inside this temperature range was less than 1 s, and this duration was too short for diffusion-control based IMC growth.

  5. Correlation between corrosion resistance properties and thermal cycles experienced by gas tungsten arc welding and laser beam welding Alloy 690 butt weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H T; Wu, J L

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the correlation between the thermal cycles experienced by Alloy 690 weldments fabricated using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and laser beam welding (LBW) processes, and their corresponding corrosion resistance properties. The corrosion resistance of the weldments is evaluated using a U-bend stress corrosion test in which the specimens are immersed in a boiling, acid solution for 240 h. The experimental results reveal that the LBW inputs significantly less heat to the weldment than the GTAW, and therefore yields a far faster cooling rate. Moreover, the corrosion tests show that in the GTAW specimen, intergranular corrosion (IGC) occurs in both the fusion zone (FZ) and the heat affected zone (HAZ). By contrast, the LBW specimen shows no obvious signs of IGC.

  6. Electron beam welding of copper lids. Status report up to 2001-12-31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claesson, Soeren; Ronneteg, Ulf

    2003-10-01

    The report describes a summary of achieved results from 21 lid welds and numerous test block welds, performed at SKB Canister Laboratory in Oskarshamn for the period 1999-02-12 to 2001-12-31. Good weld quality has been achieved and some welds fulfilled the preliminary interpretation criteria, but the weld process need to be further developed before process qualification. Many different parameter settings have been tested and the influence on the weld profile has been mapped and documented. Deformations of the canister after welding have been measured and found to be very small. The preliminary inspection methods of the weld quality works satisfactory for the need of the development of the weld process. The welding machine is a new design developed for welding of thick copper in reduced pressure and performs well, but suffers from teething problems, which has delayed the work with development of the weld process. The welding system needs to be further developed and improved to work more reliably in a production plant

  7. Electron beam welding of copper lids. Status report up to 2001-12-31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claesson, Soeren; Ronneteg, Ulf

    2003-10-01

    The report describes a summary of achieved results from 21 lid welds and numerous test block welds, performed at SKB Canister Laboratory in Oskarshamn for the period 1999-02-12 to 2001-12-31. Good weld quality has been achieved and some welds fulfilled the preliminary interpretation criteria, but the weld process need to be further developed before process qualification. Many different parameter settings have been tested and the influence on the weld profile has been mapped and documented. Deformations of the canister after welding have been measured and found to be very small. The preliminary inspection methods of the weld quality works satisfactory for the need of the development of the weld process. The welding machine is a new design developed for welding of thick copper in reduced pressure and performs well, but suffers from teething problems, which has delayed the work with development of the weld process. The welding system needs to be further developed and improved to work more reliably in a production plant.

  8. Developments in electrons beam welding. Application of EB welding to the manufacture of valves for the Super Phenix sodium circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnin, P.

    1982-05-01

    The units described are related in particular to high power welding installations (100 kW gun) and the latest generation of local vacuum welding machines with related automation. The industrial application described concerns the manufacture of valves for the secondary sodium circuit of Super-Phenix. It reveals the different steps leading to the adoption of this manufacturing process, including the metallurgical weldability study and procedure, the definition of the assembly geometries, analysis of operational sequences, determination of control specifications, type approval of the procedure, a manufacturing process complying with quality assurance organization requirements, and an overall review of a quantity production system [fr

  9. The Low Pressure Gas Effects On The Potency Of An Electron Beam On Ceramic Fabric Materials For Space Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Fragomeni, James M.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to evaluate if molten metal or electron beam impingement could damage or burn through the fabric of the astronauts Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) during electron beam welding exercises performed in space. An 8 kilovolt electron beam with a current in the neighborhood of 100 milliamps from the Ukrainian space welding "Universal Hand Tool" burned holes in Nextel AF-62 ceramic cloth designed to withstand temperatures up to 1427 C. The burnthrough time was on the order of 8 seconds at standoff distances between UHT and cloth ranging from 6 to 24 inches. At both closer (2") and farther (48") standoff distances the potency of the beam against the cloth declined and the burnthrough time went up significantly. Prior to the test it had been expected that the beam would lay down a static charge on the cloth and be deflected without damaging the cloth. The burnthrough is thought to be an effect of partial transmission of beam power by a stream of positive ions generated by the high voltage electron beam from contaminant gas in the "vacuum" chamber. A rough quantitative theoretical computation appears to substantiate this possibility.

  10. Impact properties of electron beam welds of V–4Ti–4Cr alloys NIFS-HEAT-2 and CEA-J57

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsisar, Valentyn, E-mail: valentyn_tsisar@ipm.lviv.ua [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Physical–Mechanical Institute of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (PhMI NASU), 5 Naukova Street, 79601 Lviv (Ukraine); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials – Material Process Technology (IAM-WPT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz, 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Nagasaka, Takuya [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Le Flem, Marion [CEA, DEN, DMN, SRMA, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Yeliseyeva, Olga [Physical–Mechanical Institute of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (PhMI NASU), 5 Naukova Street, 79601 Lviv (Ukraine); Konys, Jürgen [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials – Material Process Technology (IAM-WPT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz, 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Muroga, Takeo [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Electron beam welding was applied for V–4Ti–4Cr alloys NIFS-HEAT-2 and CEA-J57. • Weld metal showed superior impact properties in comparison with base metal. • Expected shift in DBTT to higher temperatures does not take place. - Abstract: The Charpy impact properties and microstructure of bead-on-plate electron beam welds of V–4Ti–4Cr alloys NIFS-HEAT-2 (NH-2) and CEA-J57 (J57) were investigated. Weld metal of both grades demonstrated increase in hardness (HV{sub 100} ∼ 180) in comparison with base metal (HV{sub 100} ∼ 135) due to decomposition of Ti–C,O,N precipitates followed by the solid-solution hardening of V-matrix with oxygen. Hardness decreases gradually from the weld metal through the heat affected zone toward the base metal indicating partial decomposition of precipitation bands from the side of heat affected zone directly adjoining weld metal. The latter consists of columnar crystallites (grains) possessing with inner dendritic structure and elongated from the center of weld belt in the direction of heat removal. Thickness of weld metal does not exceed 1 mm while heat affected zone is about 3 mm thick. Absorbed energies of weld metal are superior in comparison with base metal for both grades (NH-2 and J57) while the fracture mode is mainly ductile in the temperature range of impact test from 17 to −196 °C.

  11. Electron beam welding application to sodium valve fabrication of Superphenix reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnin, P.; Papezyk, F.; Verdurand, G.; Rolland, G.; Force, H.

    1983-01-01

    The EB process has been used to assemble the welded-in seat rings of AISI 316 L valve bodies for the sodium secondary circuit of Superphenix reactor (BOUVIER DARLING valves). The requirements in respect of accuracy and reliability are very stringent for these high temperature service components. (550 0 C). The weldability studies, the welding, welding repair and control qualifications are presented. 126 valve bodies have been welded and controled. The EB process and the shielded metal arc process are compared in respect of preparation of the parts to be joined, welding and control time, reliability [fr

  12. Laser Welding Of Stainless Steel By Means Of "Flat-Top" Energy Distribution Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionoro, G.; Minutolo, F. Memola C.; Tagliaferri, V.

    1989-06-01

    Laser welding of stainless steel AISI 304 and AISI 405 is investigated. Laser source with "flat-top" energy distribution is employed which produces welded joints with similar geometry to other conventional welding techniques. Mechanical properties of the welds are however very similar to those typical of deep penetration processes. Microhardness and bend tests as well as micrograph examinations have been carried out on the welds. The test pieces exhibited good mechanical strength and in particular acceptable ductility. Theoretical considerations based on widely accepted thermal models have also confirmed that the process proceeds at high efficiency energy transfer.

  13. Bending fatigue of electron-beam-welded foils. Application to a hydrodynamic air bearing in the Chrysler/DOE upgraded automotive gas tubine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltsman, J. F.; Halford, G. R.

    1984-01-01

    A hydrodynamic air bearing with a compliment surface is used in the gas generator of an upgraded automotive gas turbine engine. In the prototype design, the compliant surface is a thin foil spot welded at one end to the bearing cartridge. During operation, the foil failed along the line of spot welds which acted as a series of stress concentrators. Because of its higher degree of geometric uniformity, electron beam welding of the foil was selected as an alternative to spot welding. Room temperature bending fatigue tests were conducted to determine the fatigue resistance of the electron beam welded foils. Equations were determined relating cycles to crack initiation and cycles to failure to nominal total strain range. A scaling procedure is presented for estimating the reduction in cyclic life when the foil is at its normal operating temperature of 260 C (500 F).

  14. Microstructural Characterization and Mechanical Properties of Electron Beam Welded Joint of High Strength Steel Grade S690QL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błacha S.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the results of metallographic examination and mechanical properties of electron beam welded joint of quenched and tempered steel grade S690QL are presented. Metallographic examination revealed that the concentrated electron beam significantly affect the changes of microstructure in the steel. Parent material as a delivered condition (quenched and tempered had a bainitic-martensitic microstructure at hardness about 290 HV0.5. After welding, the microstructure of heat affected zone is composed mainly of martensite (in the vicinity of the fusion line of hardness 420 HV0.5. It should be noted, however, that the microstructure of steel in the heat affected zone varies with the distance from the fusion line. The observed microstructural changes were in accordance with the CCT-S transformation diagram for the examined steel.

  15. Temperature profiles induced by a stationary CW laser beam in a multi-layer structure: application to solar cell interconnect welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, J.E.; Ianno, N.J.; Ahmed, A.U.

    1985-01-01

    A three-dimensional heat transfer model for heating of a multilayer structure by a stationary Gaussian CW CO/sub 2/ laser beam is developed and applied to solar cell interconnect welding. This model takes into account the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity as well as free carrier absorption of the incident beam in the silicon where appropriate. Finally, the theoretical temperature profiles are used to determine the weld spot size and these values are compared to results obtained from a simple welding experiment, where excellent agreement is obtained. 18 references, 13 figures.

  16. Heat affected zone microfissuring in a laser beam welded directionally solidified Ni3Al-base alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojo, O.A.; Ding, R.G.; Chaturvedi, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    The laser beam weld heat affected zone (HAZ) microstructure of a newly developed aerospace alloy, IC 6, was examined. HAZ microfissuring was observed and found to be associated with grain boundary liquation facilitated by subsolidus eutectic-type transformation of the alloy's major phase, γ' precipitates, and interfacial melting of M 6 C-type carbide and (Mo 2 Ni)B 2 -type boride particles

  17. Nanosize boride particles in heat-treated nickel base superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H.R.; Ojo, O.A.; Chaturvedi, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    Grain boundary microconstituents in aged nickel-based superalloys were studied by transmission electron microscopy techniques. A nanosized M 5 B 3 boride phase, possibly formed by intergranular solute desegregation-induced precipitation, was positively identified. The presence of these intergranular nanoborides provides reasonable clarification of a previously reported reduction of grain boundary liquation temperature during the weld heat affected zone thermal cycle

  18. Laser beam welding of titanium nitride coated titanium using pulse-shaping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Sergio Fernandes de Lima

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A new welding method which allows the assembly of two titanium nitride coated titanium parts is proposed. The welding procedure utilizes the possibility for pulse-shaping in order to change the energy distribution profile during the laser pulse. The pulse-shaping is composed of three elements: a a short high power pulse for partial ablation at the surface; b a long pulse for thermal penetration; and c a quenching slope for enhanced weldability. The combination of these three elements produces crack-free welds. The weld microstructure is changed in comparison to normal welding, i.e. with a rectangular pulse, as the nitrogen and the microhardness are more homogenously distributed in the weld under pulse-shaping conditions. This laser pulse dissolves the TiN layer and allows nitrogen to diffuse into the melt pool, also contributing to an enhanced weldability by providing suitable thermal conditions.

  19. Electron-beam-induced welding of 3D nano-objects from beneath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskalenko, A V [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Burbridge, D J [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Viau, G [ITODYS, UMR CNRS 7086, Universite Paris 7-Denis Diderot, case 7090, 2 place Jussieu, F-75251 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Gordeev, S N [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-17

    Exposure of a sample to the electron beam in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) results in the growth of a film of amorphous carbon due to decomposition of hydrocarbon molecules, which are always present in small quantities in the SEM chamber. This growth is induced mainly by secondary electrons backscattered by atoms of both the sample and substrate. We show that, because the secondary electrons are spread beyond the exposed area, this deposit can be grown in areas of geometric shadow and therefore can be used for bonding of different complex 3D nano-objects to a substrate. This is demonstrated by welding 100 nm Fe-Co-Ni nanoparticles to the surface of 2D graphite. The tip of an atomic force microscope was used to probe the mechanical properties of the formed nanostructures. We observed that, for layers thicker than 25 nm, the nanoparticle is bonded so strongly that it is easier to break the particle than to separate it from the substrate.

  20. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 21-6-9 Stainless Steel Electron Beam Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, John W.; Ellsworth, G. Fred; Florando, Jeffrey N.; Golosker, Ilya V.; Mulay, Rupalee P.

    2017-04-01

    Welds can either be stronger or weaker than the base metals that they join depending on the microstructures that form in the fusion and heat-affected zones of the weld. In this paper, weld strengthening in the fusion zone of annealed 21-6-9 stainless steel is investigated using cross-weld tensile samples, hardness testing, and microstructural characterization. Due to the stronger nature of the weld, the cross-weld tensile tests failed in the base metal and were not able to generate true fusion zone mechanical properties. Nanoindentation with a spherical indenter was instead used to predict the tensile behavior for the weld metal. Extrapolation of the nanoindentation results to higher strains was performed using the Steinberg-Guinan and Johnson-Cook strength models, and the results can be used for weld strength modeling purposes. The results illustrate how microstructural refinement and residual ferrite formation in the weld fusion zone can be an effective strengthener for 21-6-9 stainless steel.

  1. Analysis of the effect of the Electron-Beam welding sequence for a fixed manufacturing route using finite element simulations applied to ITER vacuum vessel manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martín-Menéndez, Cristina, E-mail: cristina@natec-ingenieros.com [Numerical Analysis Technologies, S.L. Marqués de San Esteban No. 52, 33206 Gijón (Spain); Rodríguez, Eduardo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus de Gijón, 33203 Gijón (Spain); Ottolini, Marco [Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso Perrone 25, 16152 Genova (Italy); Caixas, Joan [F4E, c/Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Guirao, Julio [Numerical Analysis Technologies, S.L. Marqués de San Esteban No. 52, 33206 Gijón (Spain)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • The simulation methodology employed in this paper is able to adapt inside a complex manufacturing route. • The effect of the sequence is lower in a highly constrained assembly than in a lowly constrained one. • The most relevant influence on the distortions is the jigs design, instead of the welding sequence. • The welding distortion analysis should be used as a guidance to design and improve the manufacturing strategy. - Abstract: The ITER Vacuum Vessel Sectors have very tight tolerances and high density of welding. Therefore, prediction and reduction of welding distortion are critical to allow the final assembly with the other Vacuum Vessel Sectors without the production of a full scale prototype. In this paper, the effect of the welding sequence in the distortions inside a fixed manufacturing route and in a highly constrained assembly is studied in the poloidal segment named inboard (PS1). This is one of the four poloidal segments (PS) assembled for the sector. Moreover, some restrictions and limitations in the welding sequence related to the manufacturing process are explained. The results obtained show that the effect of the sequence is lower in a highly constrained assembly than in a low constrained one. A prototype manufactured by AMW consortium (PS1 mock-up) is used in order to validate the finite element method welding simulation employed. The obtained results confirmed that for Electron-Beam welds, both the welding simulation and the mock-up show a low value of distortions.

  2. Advantages of fibre lasers in 3D metal cutting and welding applications supported by a 'beam in motion (BIM)' beam delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Torsten; Bastick, André; Griebel, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Modern laser technology is continuously opening up new fields of applications. Driven by the development of increasingly efficient laser sources, the new technology is successfully entering classical applications such as 3D cutting and welding of metals. Especially in light weight applications in the automotive industry laser manufacturing is key. Only by this technology the reduction of welding widths could be realised as well as the efficient machining of aluminium and the abrasion free machining of hardened steel. The paper compares the operation of different laser types in metal machining regarding wavelength, laser power, laser brilliance, process speed and welding depth to give an estimation for best use of single mode or multi mode lasers in this field of application. The experimental results will be presented by samples of applied parts. In addition a correlation between the process and the achieved mechanical properties will be made. For this application JENOPTIK Automatisierungstechnik GmbH is using the BIM beam control system in its machines, which is the first one to realize a fully integrated combination of beam control and robot. The wide performance and wavelength range of the laser radiation which can be transmitted opens up diverse possibilities of application and makes BIM a universal tool.

  3. Aspectos metalúrgicos de revestimentos dissimilares com a superliga à base de níquel inconel 625 Metallurgical aspects of dissimilar weld overlays of inconel 625 nickel based superalloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleiton Carvalho Silva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Prolongar a vida útil e aumentar a confiabilidade de equipamentos e tubulações de plantas de produção e processamento de petróleo é uma busca constante no setor de petróleo e gás. Tais aspectos dependem essencialmente do uso de ligas resistentes à corrosão. Neste contexto, a soldagem de revestimento com superligas à base de níquel tem sido uma alternativa interessante, pois confere aos equipamentos uma alta resistência à corrosão com um custo inferior, se comparado à fabricação de componentes ou tubulações maciças com superligas. Assim, o objetivo do presente trabalho foi investigar o comportamento metalúrgico de revestimento de superliga à base de níquel do tipo Inconel 625 depositados pelo processo TIG com alimentação de arame frio. As soldagens foram realizadas em uma bancada robotizada, empregando uma fonte eletrônica de soldagem com sistema de aquisição de dados para o monitoramento dos sinais de corrente e tensão. A caracterização microestrutural foi realizada através das técnicas de microscopia eletrônica de varredura (MEV e transmissão (MET, espectroscopia de energia dispersiva de raios-X (EDS. Os resultados mostraram que a microestrutura do metal de solda foi constituída por uma matriz γ com fases secundárias ricas em Nb. Foi encontrada a formação de precipitados complexos de carbonetos/nitretos de Ti e Nb.To extend the life and reliability of pipes and equipment in oil & gas production and processing settings is a continuous demand. These aspects are essentially dependent on corrosion resistant alloys used. In this context, the weld overlay with Ni-based superalloys is a great interesting alternative, since improve the corrosion resistance without increase the cost of manufacture when compared to massive equipment. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the metallurgical aspects of Inconel 625 weld overlays deposited by GTAW cold wire feed process. The welds were performed using a

  4. Keyhole depth instability in case of CW CO2 laser beam welding of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LBW) is essential to understand welding process and appearance of weld seam defects. The main cause of keyhole collapse is the instability in KH dynamics during the LBW process. This is mainly due to the surface tension forces associated with ...

  5. Laser Beam Welding of a Ti–6Al–4V Support Flange for Buy-to-Fly Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizia Caiazzo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Titanium and its alloys are increasingly being used in aerospace, although a number of issues must be addressed. Namely, in the framework of welding to produce complex parts, the same mechanical strength and a reduced buy-to-fly ratio are desired in comparison with the same components resulting from machining. To give grounds to actual application of autogenous laser beam welding, Ti–6Al–4V L- and T-joints have been investigated in this paper, as they are a common occurrence in general complex components. Discussions in terms of possible imperfections, microstructure, and microhardness have been conducted. Then, a real part consisting of a support flange for aerospace application has been chosen as a valuable test-article to be compared with its machined counterpart both in terms of strength and buy-to-fly. The feasibility and the effectiveness of the process are shown.

  6. Microstructural Architecture, Microstructures, and Mechanical Properties for a Nickel-Base Superalloy Fabricated by Electron Beam Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murr, L. E.; Martinez, E.; Gaytan, S. M.; Ramirez, D. A.; Machado, B. I.; Shindo, P. W.; Martinez, J. L.; Medina, F.; Wooten, J.; Ciscel, D.; Ackelid, U.; Wicker, R. B.

    2011-11-01

    Microstructures and a microstructural, columnar architecture as well as mechanical behavior of as-fabricated and processed INCONEL alloy 625 components produced by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting (EBM) of prealloyed precursor powder are examined in this study. As-fabricated and hot-isostatically pressed ("hipped") [at 1393 K (1120 °C)] cylinders examined by optical metallography (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive (X-ray) spectrometry (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) exhibited an initial EBM-developed γ″ (bct) Ni3Nb precipitate platelet columnar architecture within columnar [200] textured γ (fcc) Ni-Cr grains aligned in the cylinder axis, parallel to the EBM build direction. Upon annealing at 1393 K (1120 °C) (hot-isostatic press (HIP)), these precipitate columns dissolve and the columnar, γ, grains recrystallized forming generally equiaxed grains (with coherent {111} annealing twins), containing NbCr2 laves precipitates. Microindentation hardnesses decreased from 2.7 to 2.2 GPa following hot-isostatic pressing ("hipping"), and the corresponding engineering (0.2 pct) offset yield stress decreased from 0.41 to 0.33 GPa, while the UTS increased from 0.75 to 0.77 GPa. However, the corresponding elongation increased from 44 to 69 pct for the hipped components.

  7. Characterization of the inhomogeneous constitutive properties of laser welding beams by the micro-Vickers hardness test and the rule of mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yanli; Hua, Lin; Chu, Dongning; Lan, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Relationship between Vickers hardness and material parameters was quantitatively built. ► Inhomogeneous weld properties were determined by hardness test combined the rule of mixture. ► Instrumented indentation tests verified these calculated properties of welds. ► Deviations between the calculated and experimental results were limited to 8.0%. -- Abstract: A novel approach has been proposed to characterize the inhomogeneous mechanical properties of weld materials by using the micro-Vickers hardness test combined with the rule of mixture. This proposed method has introduced the influences of the inhomogeneous properties of weld materials by considering the variations in plastic behaviour across the weld cross-section. The inhomogeneous properties of laser welding beams for tailor welded blanks (TWBs), which were three different types of combinations of DX56D and DP600 automotive steel sheets, were extracted by using this proposed method. The instrumented indentation tests were conducted to verify the measured inhomogeneous properties of weld materials. The fact that the calculated true stress–strain curves agreed well with the experimental ones has confirmed the reliability and accuracy of the proposed method.

  8. Effect of Heat Treatment on Low Temperature Toughness of Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Weld Metal of Type 316L Stainless Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, H.; Fujii, H.; Tamura, M.

    2006-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are considered to be the candidate materials for liquid hydrogen vessels and the related equipments, and those welding parts that require high toughness at cryogenic temperature. The authors have found that the weld metal of Type 316L stainless steel processed by reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding has high toughness at cryogenic temperature, which is considered to be due to the single-pass welding process without reheating effect accompanied by multi-pass welding process.In this work, the effect of heat treatment on low temperature toughness of the RPEB weld metal of Type 316L was investigated by Charpy impact test at 77K. The absorbed energy decreased with higher temperature and longer holding time of heat treatment. The remarkable drop in the absorbed energy was found with heat treatment at 1073K for 2 hours, which is as low as that of conventional multi-pass weld metal such as tungsten inert gas welding. The observations of fracture surface and microstructure revealed that the decrease in the absorbed energy with heat treatment resulted from the precipitation of intermetallic compounds near delta-ferrite phase

  9. Developments in welding and joining methods of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilarczyk, J.

    2007-01-01

    The impact of the welding technology on the economy development. The welding and joining methods review. The particular role of the laser welding and its interesting applications: with filler metal, twin spot laser welding, hybrid welding process, remote welding. The fiber lasers. The high intensity electron beams applications for surface modification. The TIG welding with the use of the active flux. Friction welding, friction stir welding and friction linear welding. (author)

  10. A quantitative evaluation of the L.B.W. efficiency on AISI 304 bead on plates welded under different focusing and tilted laser beam conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daurelio, Giuseppe; Ludovico, Antonio D.; Lugara, M. P.; De Filippis, L. A. C.; Spera, A. M.; Rocco, S.

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this search is to evaluate the WE (Welding Efficiency) of each beads versus the different positions of the laser beam optical focus (positive or negative or zero values) respect to the work-piece surface and also versus different laser beam incidence angles (80° and 70°) by using two laser power levels (2 and 2.5 KW) and two welding speeds (3 and 6 m/min). The WE values have been reported on two DA.LU. method plots and the relate evaluations regarding the same ones as well as the recorded best parameters have been evidenced.

  11. Effect of laser beam position on mechanical properties of F82H/SUS316L butt-joint welded by fiber laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serizawa, Hisashi, E-mail: serizawa@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Mori, Daiki; Ogiwara, Hiroyuki; Mori, Hiroaki [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The micro hardness of weld metal in F82H/SUS316L joint partially decreases after PWHT by shifting beam position to SUS316L. • Charpy impact energy of F82H/SUS316L joint obviously increases after PWHT due to the release of residual stress. • The tensile strength of weld metal in F82H/SUS316L joint is higher than that of SUS316L. • The fiber laser welding seems to be one of the most candidate methods to join between F82H and SUS316L pipes practically. - Abstract: A dissimilar butt-joint between reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel F82H and SUS316L austenitic stainless steel was made by 4 kW fiber laser and the influence of laser beam position on its mechanical properties before and after post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) was examined at room temperature. From the nano-indentation measurements and the microstructural observations, it is found that the micro hardness of weld metal partially decreases after PWHT by shifting beam position to SUS316L because its phase seems to move from only the martensitic phase to the mixture of austenitic and martensitic phases. In addition, Charpy impact test suggests that the impact energy slightly increases by shifting beam position before PWHT and obviously increases after PWHT due to the release of residual stress. Moreover, the tensile test indicates that the tensile strength of weld metal is higher than that of SUS316L and the fracture occurs at the base metal of SUS316L regardless of laser beam position.

  12. The structure and properties of filler metal-free laser beam welded joints in steel S700MC subjected to TMCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górka, Jacek; Stano, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    The research-related tests aimed to determine the effect of filer-metal free laser beam welding on the structure and properties of 10 mm thick steel S700MC subjected to the Thermo-Mechanical Control Process (TMCP). The nondestructive tests revealed that the welded joints represented quality level B according to the requirements of standard 13919-1. The destructive tests revealed that the joints were characterised by tensile strength being by approximately 5% lower than that of the base material. The tests of thin foils performed using a high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope revealed that filler metal-free welding led to the increased amount of alloying microagents (Ti and Nb) in the weld (particularly near fusion line) in comparison with welding performed using a filler metal. The significant content of hardening phases in the welds during cooling resulted in considerable precipitation hardening through finedispersive (Ti,Nb)(C,N) type precipitates (several nm in size) leading to the deterioration of plastic properties. The destructive tests revealed that the joints were characterised by tensile strength being by approximately 5% lower than that of the base material. The increase in the concentration of microagents responsible for steel hardening (Ti and Nb) also contributed to the decrease in weld toughness being below the allowed value of 25 J/cm2.

  13. Microstructure and Properties of Hybrid Laser Arc Welded Joints (Laser Beam-MAG in Thermo-Mechanical Control Processed S700MC Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Górka

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the microstructure and properties of joints welded using the Hybrid Laser Arc Welding (HLAW method laser beam-Metal Active Gas (MAG. The joints were made of 10-mm-thick steel S700MC subjected to the Thermo-Mechanical Control Process (TMCP and characterised by a high yield point. In addition, the welding process involved the use of solid wire GMn4Ni1.5CrMo having a diameter of 1.2 mm. Non-destructive tests involving the joints made it possible to classify the joints as representing quality level B in accordance with the ISO 12932 standard. Destructive tests of the joints revealed that the joints were characterised by tensile strength similar to that of the base material. The hybrid welding (laser beam-MAG of steel S700MC enabled the obtainment of good plastic properties of welded joints. In each area of the welded joints, the toughness values satisfied the criteria related to the minimum allowed toughness value. Tests involving the use of a transmission electron microscope and performed in the weld area revealed the decay of the precipitation hardening effect (i.e., the lack of precipitates having a size of several nm and the presence of coagulated titanium-niobium precipitates having a size of 100 nm, restricting the growth of recrystallised austenite grains, as well as of spherical stable TiO precipitates (200 nm responsible for the nucleation of ferrite inside austenite grains (significantly improving the plastic properties of joints. The tests demonstrated that it is possible to make welded joints satisfying quality-related requirements referred to in ISO 15614-14.

  14. Laser weld jig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Blarigan, Peter; Haupt, David L.

    1982-01-01

    A system is provided for welding a workpiece (10, FIG. 1) along a predetermined weld line (12) that may be of irregular shape, which includes the step of forming a lip (32) on the workpiece to extend parallel to the weld line, and moving the workpiece by engaging the lip between a pair of rotatable members (34, 36). Rotation of one of the members at a constant speed, causes the workpiece to move so that all points on the weld line sequentially pass a fixed point in space (17) at a constant speed, so that a laser welding beam can be directed at that fixed point to form a weld along the weld line. The workpiece can include a reuseable jig (24) forming the lip, and with the jig constructed to detachably hold parts (22, 20) to be welded at a position wherein the weld line of the parts extends parallel to the lip on the jig.

  15. Heat treatment for superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harf, Fredric H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A cobalt-free nickel-base superalloy composed of in weight % 15 Cr-5 Mo-3.5 Ti-4 Al-0.07 (max) C-remainder Ni is given a modified heat treatment. With this heat treatment the cobalt-free alloy achieves certain of the mechanical properties of the corresponding cobalt-containing nickel-base superalloy at 1200 F (650 C). Thus, strategic cobalt can be replaced by nickel in the alloy.

  16. Extending the process limits of laser polymer welding with high-brilliance beam sources (recent status and prospects of POLYBRIGHT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olowinsky, A.; Boglea, A.

    2011-03-01

    Plastics play an important role in almost every facet of our lives and constitute a wide variety of products, from everyday products such as food and beverage packaging, over furniture and building materials to high tech products in the automotive, electronics, aerospace, white goods, medical and other sectors [1]. The objective of PolyBright, the European Research project on laser polymer welding, is to provide high speed and flexible laser manufacturing technology and expand the limits of current plastic part assembly. New laser polymer joining processes for optimized thermal management in combination with adapted wavelengths will provide higher quality, high processing speed up to 1 m/s and robust manufacturing processes at lower costs. Key innovations of the PolyBright project are fibre lasers with high powers up to 500 W, high speed scanning and flexible beam manipulation systems for simultaneous welding and high-resolution welding, such as dynamic masks and multi kHz scanning heads. With this initial step, PolyBright will break new paths in processing of advanced plastic products overcoming the quality and speed limitations of conventional plastic part assembly. Completely new concepts for high speed processing, flexibility and quality need to be established in combination with high brilliance lasers and related equipment. PolyBright will thus open new markets for laser systems with a short term potential of over several 100 laser installations per year and a future much larger market share in the still growing plastic market. PolyBright will hence establish a comprehensive and sustainable development activity on new high brilliance lasers that will strengthen the laser system industry.

  17. The effect of CO{sub 2} laser beam welded AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel on the viability of fibroblast cells, in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Köse, Ceyhun, E-mail: ceyhun.kose@gop.edu.tr [Faculty of Natural Sciences and Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Gaziosmanpaşa University, Tokat (Turkey); Kaçar, Ramazan, E-mail: rkacar@karabuk.edu.tr [Faculty of Technology Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Karabuk University, Karabuk 78050 (Turkey); Zorba, Aslı Pınar, E-mail: aslipinarzorba@gmail.com [Graduate School of Natural and Applied Sciences, Department of Bioengineering Cell Culture and Tissue Engineering, Yıldız Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey); Bağırova, Melahat, E-mail: mbagir@yildiz.edu.tr [Department of Bioengineering Cell Culture and Tissue Engineering, Yıldız Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey); Allahverdiyev, Adil M., E-mail: adil@yildiz.edu.tr [Department of Bioengineering Cell Culture and Tissue Engineering, Yıldız Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2016-03-01

    It has been determined by the literature research that there is no clinical study on the in vivo and in vitro interaction of the cells with the laser beam welded joints of AISI 316L biomaterial. It is used as a prosthesis and implant material and that has adequate mechanical properties and corrosion resistance characteristics. Therefore, the interaction of the CO{sub 2} laser beam welded samples and samples of the base metal of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel with L929 fibroblast cells as an element of connective tissue under in vitro conditions has been studied. To study the effect of the base metal and the laser welded test specimens on the viability of the fibroblast cells that act as an element of connective tissues in the body, they were kept in DMEMF-12 medium for 7, 14, 28 days and 18 months. The viability study was experimentally studied using the MTT method for 7, 14, 28 days. In addition, the direct interaction of the fibroblast cells seeded on 6 different plates with the samples was examined with an inverted microscope. The MTT cell viability experiment was repeated on the cells that were in contact with the samples. The statistical relationship was analyzed using a Tukey test for the variance with the GraphPad statistics software. The data regarding metallic ion release were identified with the ICP-MS method after the laser welded and main material samples were kept in cell culture medium for 18 months. The cell viability of the laser welded sample has been detected to be higher than that of the base metal and the control based on 7th day data. However, the laser welded sample's viability of the fibroblast cells has diminished by time during the test period of 14 and 28 days and base metal shows better viability when compared to the laser welded samples. On the other hand, the base metal and the laser welded sample show better cell viability effect when compared to the control group. According to the ICP-MS results of the main material and

  18. Effects of the Electron Beam Welding Process on the Microstructure, Tensile, Fatigue and Fracture Properties of Nickel Alloy Nimonic 80A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Huang, Chongxiang; Guan, Zhongwei; Li, Jiukai; Liu, Yongjie; Chen, Ronghua; Wang, Qingyuan

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate rotary bending high-cycle fatigue properties and crack growth of Nimonic 80A-based metal and electron beam-welded joints. All the tests were performed at room temperature. Fracture surfaces under high-cycle fatigue and fatigue crack growth were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Microstructure, hardness and tensile properties were also evaluated in order to understand the effects on the fatigue results obtained. It was found that the tensile properties, hardness and high-cycle fatigue properties of the welded joint are lower than the base metal. The fracture surface of the high-cycle fatigue shows that fatigue crack initiated from the surface under the high stress amplitude and from the subsurface under the low stress amplitude. The effect of the welding process on the statistical fatigue data was studied with a special focus on probabilistic life prediction and probabilistic lifetime limits. The fatigue crack growth rate versus stress intensity factor range data were obtained from the fatigue crack growth tests. From the results, it was evident that the fatigue crack growth rates of the welded are higher than the base metal. The mechanisms and fracture modes of fatigue crack growth of welded specimens were found to be related to the stress intensity factor range ΔK. In addition, the effective fatigue crack propagation thresholds and mismatch of welded joints were described and discussed.

  19. METHOD AND SYSTEM FOR LASER WELDING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to laser welding of at least two adjacent, abutting or overlapping work pieces in a welding direction using multiple laser beams guided to a welding region, wherein at least two of the multiple laser beams are coupled into the welding region so as to form a melt and at least...

  20. Mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in pressurized water reactor (PWR) piping systems using the mechanical stress improvement process (MSIPR) or underwater laser beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rick, Grendys; Marc, Piccolino; Cunthia, Pezze; Badlani, Manu

    2009-01-01

    A current issue facing pressurized water reactors (PWRs) is primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of bi metallic welds. PWSCC in a PWR requires the presence of a susceptible material, an aggressive environment and a tensile stress of significant magnitude. Reducing the potential for SCC can be accomplished by eliminating any of these three elements. In the U.S., mitigation of susceptible material in the pressurizer nozzle locations has largely been completed via the structural weld overlay (SWOL) process or NuVision Engineering's Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP R) , depending on inspectability. The next most susceptible locations in Westinghouse designed power plants are the Reactor Vessel (RV) hot leg nozzle welds. However, a full SWOL Process for RV nozzles is time consuming and has a high likelihood of in process weld repairs. Therefore, Westinghouse provides two distinctive methods to mitigate susceptible material for the RV nozzle locations depending on nozzle access and utility preference. These methods are the MSIP and the Underwater Laser Beam Welding (ULBW) process. MSIP applies a load to the outside diameter of the pipe adjacent to the weld, imposing plastic strains during compression that are not reversed after unloading, thus eliminating the tensile stress component of SCC. Recently, Westinghouse and NuVision successfully applied MSIP on all eight RV nozzles at the Salem Unit 1 power plant. Another option to mitigate SCC in RV nozzles is to place a barrier between the susceptible material and the aggressive environment. The ULBW process applies a weld inlay onto the inside pipe diameter. The deposited weld metal (Alloy 52M) is resistant to PWSCC and acts as a barrier to prevent primary water from contacting the susceptible material. This paper provides information on the approval and acceptance bases for MSIP, its recent application on RV nozzles and an update on ULBW development

  1. Improvement of solidification cracking susceptibility of electron beam weld metal of fully austenitic type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Yoshikuni; Katsu, Shinichiro

    1986-01-01

    The effect of rare earth metals (REM) addition on the solidification cracking susceptibility of electron beam weld metals in fully austenitic Type 316 stainless steel was researched. The cracking susceptibility of this steel is put in order by REM and P or (P + S) content. Adding proper content of REM (about 0.25 % REM for 0.025 % P steel) is effective to improve the cracking susceptibility of this steel. However, the cracking susceptibility of this steel is deteriorated again by adding excess content of REM (about 0.37 % REM for 0.025 % P steel). Free P and S atoms being fixed as phosphides, oxyphosphides, sulfides and oxysulfides by REM atoms is the main reason why the cracking susceptibility of this steel is improved by adding REM. (author)

  2. The effect of CO2 laser beam welded AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel on the viability of fibroblast cells, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köse, Ceyhun; Kaçar, Ramazan; Zorba, Aslı Pınar; Bağırova, Melahat; Allahverdiyev, Adil M

    2016-03-01

    It has been determined by the literature research that there is no clinical study on the in vivo and in vitro interaction of the cells with the laser beam welded joints of AISI 316L biomaterial. It is used as a prosthesis and implant material and that has adequate mechanical properties and corrosion resistance characteristics. Therefore, the interaction of the CO2 laser beam welded samples and samples of the base metal of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel with L929 fibroblast cells as an element of connective tissue under in vitro conditions has been studied. To study the effect of the base metal and the laser welded test specimens on the viability of the fibroblast cells that act as an element of connective tissues in the body, they were kept in DMEMF-12 medium for 7, 14, 28 days and 18 months. The viability study was experimentally studied using the MTT method for 7, 14, 28 days. In addition, the direct interaction of the fibroblast cells seeded on 6 different plates with the samples was examined with an inverted microscope. The MTT cell viability experiment was repeated on the cells that were in contact with the samples. The statistical relationship was analyzed using a Tukey test for the variance with the GraphPad statistics software. The data regarding metallic ion release were identified with the ICP-MS method after the laser welded and main material samples were kept in cell culture medium for 18 months. The cell viability of the laser welded sample has been detected to be higher than that of the base metal and the control based on 7th day data. However, the laser welded sample's viability of the fibroblast cells has diminished by time during the test period of 14 and 28 days and base metal shows better viability when compared to the laser welded samples. On the other hand, the base metal and the laser welded sample show better cell viability effect when compared to the control group. According to the ICP-MS results of the main material and laser welded

  3. Solidification process control for advanced superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, H. R.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The importance of understanding and controlling the basic solidification process in high temperature alloy technology as applied to gas turbine engine production is discussed. Resultant tailoring of the superalloy macro- and microstructure offers significant potential for continued advances in superalloy use temperatures in turbine engines. Atomized superalloy powders, rapidly solidified superalloys, microstructural control, and advanced superalloys are discussed.

  4. Mechanical properties and microstructure of F-82H welded joints using CO{sub 2} laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanouchi, N.; Shiba, K.

    1996-10-01

    The laser welding of F-82H was successfully conducted. The heat affected zone of the welding, was about 21 mm width. It was quite adequate to make small specimens, such as SS-3 type sheet tensile specimen.

  5. An investigation into the microstructure and weldability of a tantalum-containing cast cobalt-based superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montazeri, Mojtaba; Ghaini, Farshid Malek; Farnia, Amirreza [Tarbiat Modares Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Materials Engineering

    2011-12-15

    The weld metal microstructures and the weldability of a tantalum-containing cast cobalt-based superalloy were investigated using gas tungsten arc welding. It was found that the tantalum carbides in the base metal have remained stable up to the fusion line. The results showed that the formation of Ta-rich carbides (TaC) is very sensitive to time and temperature; so the as-weld microstructure is unstable from a metallurgical aspect. The formation of fine precipitates due to the high cooling rate of the welding process resulted in a weld metal with an undesirable hardness and microstructure after autogenous welding, especially after post weld heat treatment. Further results revealed that using a filler metal containing significantly less carbon and tantalum has solved the mentioned problems and made acceptable welds after post weld heat treatment. (orig.)

  6. Effects of filler wire on residual stress in electron beam welded QCr0.8 copper alloy to 304 stainless steel joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bing-Gang; Zhao, Jian; Li, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The electron beam welding (EBW) of 304 stainless steel to QCr0.8 copper alloy with or without copper filler wire was studied in detail. The temperature fields and magnitude and distribution of stress fields in the joints during the welding process were numerically simulated using finite element method. The temperature cycles and residual stresses were also experimentally measured by thermometric and hole-drilling methods, respectively. The accuracy of the modeling procedure was verified by the good agreement between the calculated results and experimental data. The temperature distribution in the joint was found to be asymmetric along the center of weld. In particular, the temperature in the copper alloy plate is much higher than that in the 304 SS plate owing to the great difference in thermal conductivity between the two materials. The peak three-dimensional residual stresses all appeared at the interface between the copper and steel in the two different joints. Furthermore, the weld was subjected to tensile stress. The longitudinal residual stress, generally the most harmful to the integrity of the structure among the stress components in EBW with filler wire (EBFW), was 53 MPa lower than that of autogenous EBW (AEBW), and the through-thickness residual stress was 12 MPa lower. The transverse residual stress of EBFW was 44 MPa higher than that of AEBW. However, analysis of the von Mises stress showed that the EBFW process effectively reduced the extent of the high residual stress region in the weld location and the magnitude of the residual stresses in the copper side compared with those of the AEBW joint. - Highlights: • Copper and steel was welded by electron beam welding with copper filler wire. • The copper wire fed into gap can reduce the peak value of residual stress. • The peak value of longitudinal stress can be reduced 53 MPa by the filler wire. • The range of nov Mises stress in the weld could be reduced by the wire

  7. Microstructure Evolution of Electron Beam Physical Vapour Deposited Ni-23.5Cr-2.66Co-1.44Al Superalloy Sheet During Annealing at 600 °C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Mingwei

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure evolution of electron beam physical vapour deposited (EB-PVD Ni‑23.5Cr‑2.66Co‑1.44Al superalloy sheet during annealing at 600 °C was investigated. The results showed that the as-deposited alloy was composed of only g phase. After annealing at 600 °C, the locations of diffraction peaks were still the same. The (220 diffraction peak of the deposition side increased with annealing time. The sheet on deposited side had a tendency toward forming (220 texture during post-annealing. No obvious texture was observed at as-deposited and annealed sheet at 600 °C in substrate side. The count and size of "voids" decreased with time. The size of grains increased obviously with annealing time. The ultimate tensile strength of EB-PVD Ni-23.5Cr-2.66Co-1.44Al alloy sheet increased from 641 MPa to 829 MPa after annealing at 600 °C for 30 hours.

  8. Evaluation of residual stresses in electron-beam welded Zr2.5Nb0.9Hf Zircadyne flange mock-up of a reflector vessel beam tube flange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muránsky, O., E-mail: ondrej.muransky@ansto.gov.au [Institute of Material Engineering, ANSTO, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, 2234 NSW (Australia); Holden, T.M. [Northern Stress Technologies, Deep River, Ontario, Canada K0J 1P0 (Canada); Kirstein, O. [European Spallation Source, EES AB, Tunavagen 24, SE-211 00 Lund (Sweden); James, J.A. [Open University, Materials Engineering, Milton Keynes MK7 6BJ (United Kingdom); Paradowska, A.M. [Bragg Institute, ANSTO, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, 2234 NSW (Australia); Edwards, L. [Institute of Material Engineering, ANSTO, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, 2234 NSW (Australia)

    2013-07-15

    The dual-phase alloy Zr2.5Nb alloy is an important nuclear material, because of its use in current and possible use in future nuclear reactors. It is, however, well-known that Zr2.5Nb weldments can fail through a time-dependent mechanism called delayed hydride cracking which is typically driven by the presence of tensile residual stresses. With a view to understanding the development of residual stresses associated with Zr2.5Nb welds the current study focuses on the evaluation of the residual stresses in a mock-up of a reactor beam tube flange made from Zr2.5Nb0.9Hf. The present results suggests that, like ferritic welds which undergo a solid-state phase transformation upon welding, Zr2.5Nb0.9Hf welds also develop high tensile residual stresses in the heat-affected zone whereas the stresses closer to the weld tip are reduced by the effects of the β → α solid-state phase transformation.

  9. Double-sided laser beam welded T-joints for aluminum-lithium alloy aircraft fuselage panels: Effects of filler elements on microstructure and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Tao, Wang; Chen, Yanbin; Li, Hao

    2017-08-01

    In the current work, T-joints consisting of 2.0 mm thick 2060-T8/2099-T83 aluminum-lithium alloys for aircraft fuselage panels have been fabricated by double-sided fiber laser beam welding with different filler wires. A new type wire CW3 (Al-6.2Cu-5.4Si) was studied and compared with conventional wire AA4047 (Al-12Si) mainly on microstructure and mechanical properties. It was found that the main combined function of Al-6.2%Cu-5.4%Si in CW3 resulted in considerable improvements especially on intergranular strength, hot cracking susceptibility and hoop tensile properties. Typical non-dendritic equiaxed zone (EQZ) was observed along welds' fusion boundary. Hot cracks and fractures during the load were always located within the EQZ, however, this typical zone could be restrained by CW3, effectively. Furthermore, changing of the main intergranular precipitated phase within the EQZ from T phase by AA4047 to T2 phase by CW3 also resulted in developments on microscopic intergranular reinforcement and macroscopic hoop tensile properties. In addition, bridging caused by richer substructure dendrites within CW3 weld's columnar zone resulted in much lower hot cracking susceptibility of the whole weld than AA4047.

  10. Effect of beam energy on weld geometric characteristics in Nd:YAG laser overlapping spot welding of thin AISI 304 stainless steel sheets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lapšanská, Hana; Chmelíčková, Hana; Hrabovský, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 5 (2010), 1108-1115 ISSN 1073-5615 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN301370701 Grant - others:7FP EU(XE) 222279 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : Nd:YAG laser * laser weld ing Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.963, year: 2010

  11. Laser weld jig. [Patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Blarigan, P.; Haupt, D.L.

    1980-12-05

    A system is provided for welding a workpiece along a predetermined weld line that may be of irregular shape, which includes the step of forming a lip on the workpiece to extend parallel to the weld line, and moving the workpiece by engaging the lip between a pair of rotatable members. Rotation of one of the members at a constant speed, causes the workpiece to move so that all points on the weld line sequentially pass a fixed point in space at a constant speed, so that a laser welding beam can be directed at that fixed point to form a weld along the weld line. The workpiece can include a reusable jig forming the lip, and with the jig constructed to detachably hold parts to be welded at a position wherein the weld line of the parts extends parallel to the lip on the jig.

  12. Microstructural response to heat affected zone cracking of prewelding heat-treated Inconel 939 superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González, M.A.; Martínez, D.I.; Pérez, A.; Guajardo, H.; Garza, A.

    2011-01-01

    The microstructural response to cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a nickel-based IN 939 superalloy after prewelding heat treatments (PWHT) was investigated. The PWHT specimens showed two different microstructures: 1) spherical ordered γ′ precipitates (357–442 nm), with blocky MC and discreet M 23 C 6 carbides dispersed within the coarse dendrites and in the interdendritic regions; and 2) ordered γ′ precipitates in “ogdoadically” diced cube shapes and coarse MC carbides within the dendrites and in the interdendritic regions. After being tungsten inert gas welded (TIG) applying low heat input, welding speed and using a more ductile filler alloy, specimens with microstructures consisting of spherical γ′ precipitate particles and dispersed discreet MC carbides along the grain boundaries, displayed a considerably improved weldability due to a strong reduction of the intergranular HAZ cracking associated with the liquation microfissuring phenomena. - Highlights: ► Homogeneous microstructures of γ′ spheroids and discreet MC carbides of Ni base superalloys through preweld heat treatments. ► γ′ spheroids and discreet MC carbides reduce the intergranular HAZ liquation and microfissuring of Nickel base superalloys. ► Microstructure γ′ spheroids and discreet blocky type MC carbides, capable to relax the stress generated during weld cooling. ► Low welding heat input welding speeds and ductile filler alloys reduce the HAZ cracking susceptibility.

  13. Industrial Robot Automation in Solving Non-Vacuum Electron-Beam Welding Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borovik Vasiliy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes one modeling automated hardware-software system to develop additive technologically - based products. Algorithm synthesis for industrial robot control was performed. In this case, the operating tool is an electron -beam projector with plasma emitter. The model testing results of thermal processes (in 3D-enqueuing proceeding within additive substrate material system have been described. The modeling results revealed those required parameters of emission power which would provide the melting of additive material (TiC excluding boiling.

  14. Influence of Yb:YAG Laser Beam Parameters on Haynes 188 Weld Fusion Zone Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graneix, Jérémie; Beguin, Jean-Denis; Alexis, Joël; Masri, Talal

    2017-08-01

    The weldability of 1.2 mm thick Haynes 188 alloy sheets by a disk Yb:YAG laser welding was examined. Butt joints were made, and the influence of parameters such as power, size, and shape of the spot, welding speed, and gas flow has been investigated. Based on an iconographic correlation approach, optimum process parameters were determined. Depending on the distribution of the power density (circular or annular), acceptable welds were obtained. Powers greater than 1700 W, welding speeds higher than 3.8 m mm-1, and spot sizes between 160 and 320 μm were needed in the circular (small fiber) configuration. By comparison, the annular (large fiber) configuration required a power as high as 2500 W, and a welding speed less than 3.8 m min-1. The mechanical properties of the welds depended on their shape and microstructure, which in turn depended on the welding conditions. The content of carbides, the proportion of areas consisting of cellular and dendritic substructures, and the size of these substructures were used to explain the welded joint mechanical properties.

  15. Fusion zone microstructure of laser beam welded directionally solidified Ni3Al-base alloy IC6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, R.G.; Ojo, O.A.; Chaturvedi, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    The fusion zone microstructure of laser welded alloy IC6 was examined. Extensive weld-metal cracking was observed to be closely associated with non-equilibrium eutectic-type microconstituents identified as consisting of γ, γ' and NiMo (Y) phases. Their formation has been related to modification of primary solidification path due to reduced solutal microsegregation

  16. Effect of heat treatment on the properties of laser-beam welded rheo-cast F357 aluminum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theron, M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Semi-solid metal rheo-cast F357 aluminum plates were joined by autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding and were welded in either the as-cast (F) condition, T4 temper or T6 temper condition. The weldability of this age-hardenable Al–7%Si–0.6%Mg casting alloy...

  17. Critical comparison of two independent measurements of residual stress in an electron-beam welded uranium cylinder: Neutron diffraction and the contour method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D.W., E-mail: dbrown@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Holden, T.M. [Northern Stress Technologies, Deep River, Ontario, K0J 1P0 (Canada); Clausen, B.; Prime, M.B.; Sisneros, T.A.; Swenson, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Vaja, J. [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Neutron diffraction and contour method measurements were conducted to assess the stresses associated with an electron-beam, circumferential, partial penetration weld of a uranium tube. To obtain reasonable results in the coarse-grained base metal, the specimen was continuously rotated during the neutron experiments to average over the entire circumference. The severe anisotropic character of uranium, which has an orthorhombic crystal structure, forces a number of judicious choices to be made in the neutron analysis. For the contour method, the cylindrical geometry necessitated the development of a two-step process, and discontinuities across the unwelded portion of the joint required special treatment. High tensile hoop stresses ({approx}300 MPa) were found in the center of the weld close to the outside diameter. Balancing hoop compression was observed in the far-field stress profile. Also, a tensile axial stress (85 {+-} 25 MPa) was observed near the outer diameter.

  18. Study of residual stresses i electron-beam welded F82H modified martensitic steel using X-ray and neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppola, R.; Braham, C.; Ceretti, M.

    1998-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels are presently considered as one of the most realistic options for the construction of the 'first-wall' and other components in future fusion reactors. More specifically the modified martensitic Chromium steel F82H is being characterised as a reference material in view of a possible utilisation in the DEMO reactor. This work presents the results of a study, carried out using X-ray and neutron diffraction to investigate the stress field in a prototype F82H-mod. weld obtained using the electron-beam welding technique. The stress has been measured, both with X-rays and neutrons, at different distances from the heat-affected zone. The differences between the results obtained with X-ray and neutron diffraction are tentatively discussed in terms of phase inhomogeneity inside the HAZ. (author)

  19. Multiple Reflections and Fresnel Absorption of Gaussian Laser Beam in an Actual 3D Keyhole during Deep-Penetration Laser Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangzhong Jin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In deep penetration laser welding, a keyhole is formed in the material. Based on an experimentally obtained bending keyhole from low- and medium-speed laser penetration welding of glass, the keyhole profiles in both the symmetric plane are determined by polynomial fitting. Then, a 3D bending keyhole is reconstructed under the assumption of circular cross-section of the keyhole at each keyhole depth. In this paper, the behavior of focused Gaussian laser beam in the keyhole is analyzed by tracing a ray of light using Gaussian optics theory, the Fresnel absorption and multiple reflections in the keyhole are systematically studied, and the laser intensities absorbed on the keyhole walls are calculated. Finally, the formation mechanism of the keyhole is deduced.

  20. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikie, B.L.; Wagg, A.R.; Whittle, M.J.; Yapp, D.

    1976-01-01

    The ultrasonic examination of austenitic stainless steel weld metal has always been regarded as a difficult proposition because of the large and variable ultrasonic attenuations and back scattering obtained from apparently similar weld deposits. The work to be described shows how the existence of a fibre texture within each weld deposit (as a result of epitaxial growth through successive weld beads) produces a systematic variation in the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and the velocity of sound, depending upon the angle between the ultrasonic beam and the fibre axis. Development work has shown that it is possible to adjust the welding parameters to ensure that the crystallographic texture within each weld is compatible with improved ultrasonic transmission. The application of the results to the inspection of a specific weld in type 316 weld metal is described

  1. Flaw preparations for HSST program vessel fracture mechanics testing: mechanical-cyclic pumping and electron-beam weld-hydrogen-charge cracking schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holz, P.P.

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of the document is to present schemes for flaw preparations in heavy section steel. The ability of investigators to grow representative sharp cracks of known size, location, and orientation is basic to representative field testing to determine data for potential flaw propagation, fracture behavior, and margin against fracture for high-pressure-, high-temperature-service steel vessels subjected to increasing pressurization and/or thermal shock. Gaging for analytical stress and strain procedures and ultrasonic and acoustic emission instrumentation can then be applied to monitor the vessel during testing and to study crack growth. This report presents flaw preparations for HSST fracture mechanics testing. Cracks were grown by two techniques: (1) a mechanical method wherein a premachined notch was sharpened by pressurization and (2) a method combining electron-beam welds and hydrogen charging to crack the chill zone of a rapidly placed autogenous weld. The mechanical method produces a naturally occurring growth shape controlled primarily by the shape of the machined notch; the welding-electrochemical method produces flaws of uniform depth from the surface of a wall or machined notch. Theories, details, discussions, and procedures are covered for both of the flaw-growing schemes

  2. Laser beam welding of NiTi-shape memory alloys; Laserstrahl-Schweissen von NiTi-Formgedaechtnislegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, T.

    1996-04-01

    Using a Nd:YAG laser, the weldability of binary nickel-titanium shape memory alloys containing 50.0 and 48.5 at.-% Ti respectively was investigated. By tensile tests within a temperature range of -80 C to +200 C the mechanical properties of the laser welded joints were examined. Changes in the transformation behaviour were detected by calorimetric measurements (DSC method). The stress-strain behaviour was attributed to the microstructure of the welds, revealed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), the mechanisms of failure were examined. Joints of the martensitic Ti-rich alloy were brittle, showing an ultimate tensile strength of 600 MPa, corresponding to half of the value of the base material. The reduction in strength was explained by the formation of Ti{sub 2}Ni precipitations along grain boundaries in the weld. Since the welds still exhibited twin deformation, pseudoplastic strains of 7% were achieved. Ultimate strength data showed a very low scatter. Therefore it was possible to use the shape memory effect up to a strain of 6% without failure. After a total elongation to 6% strain, the laser welded joints showed a free recovery with an amnesia of 0.3%. The shape memory effect was shown to be retained in the laser welded joints. 154 refs.

  3. Wrought cobalt- base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarstrom, D. L.

    1993-08-01

    Wrought cobalt-base superalloys are used extensively in gas turbine engines because of their excellent high-temperature creep and fatigue strengths and resistance to hot corrosion attack. In addition, the unique character of the oxide scales that form on some of the alloys provides outstanding resistance to high-temperature sliding wear. This article provides a review of the evolutionary development of wrought cobalt-base alloys in terms of alloy design and physical metallurgy. The topics include solid-so-lution strengthening, carbide precipitation characteristics, and attempts to introduce age hardening. The use of PHACOMP to enhance thermal stability characteristics and the incorporation of rare-earth ele-ments to improve oxidation resistance is also reviewed and discussed. The further development of cobalt-base superalloys has been severely hampered by past political events, which have accentuated the strategic vulnerability of cobalt as a base or as an alloying element. Consequently, alternative alloys have been developed that use little or no cobalt. One such alternative, Haynes® 230TMalloy, is discussed briefly.

  4. Rafting in superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabarro, F.R.N. [Univ. of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    1996-03-01

    The phenomenon of rafting in superalloys is described, with particular reference to modern superalloys with a high volume fraction of the particulate {gamma}{prime} phase. It is shown that in the elastic regime, the thermodynamic driving force for rafting is proportional to the applied stress, to the difference between the lattice parameters of the {gamma} matrix and the {gamma}{prime} particles, and to the difference of their elastic constants. A qualitative argument gives the sign of this driving force, which agrees with that determined by Pineau for a single isolated particle. Drawing on the work of Pollock and Argon and of Socrate and Parks, it is shown that after a plastic strain of the sample of order 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}, the driving force is proportional to the product of the applied stress and the lattice misfit, in agreement with the results of the calculations of Socrate and Parks. The rate of rafting is controlled by the diffusion of alloying elements. Here, the tendency of large atoms to move from regions of high hydrostatic pressure to those of low may outweigh the influence of concentration gradients. The deformation of the sample directly produced by rafting is small, of order 4.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. The rafted structure is resistant to creep under low stresses at high temperatures. Under most experimental conditions at relatively high stresses, rafting accelerates creep; this effect may be less pronounced at the small strains acceptable under operational conditions.

  5. Combined thermochemical treatment and electron beam treatment of weld edges. Final report; Kombination einer thermochemischen Behandlung mit einer Elektronenstrahl-Randschichtbehandlung. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenker, R. [Ratoma Consulting-Engineering GmbH-ETC, Chemnitz (Germany); Spies, H.J. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofftechnik; Finkbeiner, S. [Arburg Maschinenfabrik Hehl und Soehne GmbH und Co. KG, Lossburg (Germany)

    1996-01-01

    A process for generating weld edges of high abrasive strength was developed. It is a combination of two processes: Nitration - electron beam hardening and boration - electron beam hardening. Experiments were made on the steels X155CrVMo12 1 (1 2379) and X220CrVMo13 4 (1 2380). Further experiments were made on steel 39 CrMoV13 9 (1.8523) as reference steel. (orig./MM) [Deutsch] Das Ziel des Vorhabens bestand in der Erzeugung von Randschichten hoher Verschleissbestaendigkeit durch die Verfahrenskombinationen Nitrieren - Elektronenstrahlhaerten (N+ESH) und Borieren - Elektronenstrahlhaerten (B+ESH). Fuer die Versuche wurden die Staehle X155CrVMo12 1 (1.2379) und X220CrVMo13 4 (1.2380) ausgewaehlt. Untersuchungen an dem Stahl 39CrMoV13 9 (1.8523) dienten Vergleichszwecken. (orig./MM)

  6. Hardness distribution and tensile properties in an electron-beam-welded F82H irradiated in HFIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, N.; Oka, H.; Muroga, T.; Kimura, A.; Sokolov, M.A.; Yamamoto, T.

    2014-01-01

    F82H-IEA and its EB-weld joint were irradiated at 573 and 773 K up to 9.6 dpa in the HFIR and the irradiation effect on its mechanical properties and microstructure were investigated. A hardness profile across the weld joint before irradiation showed the hardness in transformed region (TR) was high and especially that in the edge of TR was the highest (high hardness region: HHR) compared to base metal. This hardness distribution corresponds to grain size distribution. After irradiation, hardening in HHR was small compared to other region in the sample. In tensile test, the amount of hardening in yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of F82H EB-weld joint was almost similar to that of F82H-1EA but the fracture position of EB-weld joint was at the boundary of TR and BM. Therefore, the TR/BM boundary is the structural weak point in F82H EB-weld joint after irradiation. As the plastic instability was observed, the dislocation channeling deformation can be expected though the dislocation channel was not observed in this study. (author)

  7. Laser-Beam Welding Impact on the Deformation Properties of Stainless Steels When Used for Automotive Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evin Emil

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Materials other than standard and advanced high strength steels are remarkable for the thin-walled structures of the car-body in recent years in order to safety enhancement, weight and emission reduction, corrosion resistance improvement. Thus, there are presented in the paper the deformation properties of laser welded austenitic AISI 304 and ferritic AISI 430 stainless steels compared to these one measured for the high strength low alloyed steel H220PD. The properties were researched by tensile test and 3-point bending test with fixed ends on specimens made of basic material and laser welded one. The specimens were welded by solid state fiber laser YLS-5000 in longitudinal direction (the load direction. The deformation properties such as strength, stiffness and deformation work were evaluated and compared. The strength and stiffness were calculated from tensile test results and the deformation work was calculated from both, tensile test and 3-point bending test results. There has been found only minor effect of laser welding to the deformation properties for high strength low alloyed steel H220PD and austenitic stainless steel AISI 304. Otherwise, the laser welding strongly influenced the deformation work of the ferritic stainless steel AISI 430 as well as the elongation at tensile test.

  8. Welding hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Welding technology is advancing rapidly in the developed countries and has converted into a science. Welding involving the use of electricity include resistance welding. Welding shops are opened in residential area, which was causing safety hazards, particularly the teenagers and children who eagerly see the welding arc with their naked eyes. There are radiation hazards from ultra violet rays which irritate the skin, eye irritation. Welding arc light of such intensity could damage the eyes. (Orig./A.B.)

  9. Laser Welding in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1989-01-01

    Solidification type welding process experiments in conditions of microgravity were performed. The role of convection in such phenomena was examined and convective effects in the small volumes obtained in the laser weld zone were observed. Heat transfer within the weld was affected by acceleration level as indicated by the resulting microstructure changes in low gravity. All experiments were performed such that both high and low gravity welds occurred along the same weld beam, allowing the effects of gravity alone to be examined. Results indicate that laser welding in a space environment is feasible and can be safely performed IVA or EVA. Development of the hardware to perform the experiment in a Hitchhiker-g platform is recomended as the next step. This experiment provides NASA with a capable technology for welding needs in space. The resources required to perform this experiment aboard a Shuttle Hitchhiker-pallet are assessed. Over the four year period 1991 to 1994, it is recommended that the task will require 13.6 manyears and $914,900. In addition to demonstrating the technology and ferreting out the problems encountered, it is suggested that NASA will also have a useful laser materials processing facility for working with both the scientific and the engineering aspects of materials processing in space. Several concepts are also included for long-term optimization of available solar power through solar pumping solid state lasers directly for welding power.

  10. Mechanical properties of electron beam welds of 316LN austenitic steels at low temperature for ITER gravity support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, P.Y.; Huo, B.L.; Kuai, K.W.

    2007-01-01

    The gravity support system in ITER not only sustains magnet system, the vacuum vessel and in-vessel components, but also endures several large forces, such as electromagnetic force, thermal load and seismic loads. Based on the ITER design report, the maximum displacement of the gravity support system is estimated to be 32 mm in radial direction at the top flange of the flexible plates during the TF coil cool down from room temperature to 80 k. Welds are located in the peak stress region and subject to cyclic loads in the top flange is a potential problem. Therefore, the mechanical properties of the welds are extremely important for this system. 316LN austenitic stainless steel has been selected as the gravity support structure materials. However, there is still lack of the related mechanical data of the welding components of 316LN stainless steel at present. In this study, we are systematically investigated the mechanical properties of the welding components at low temperature. (authors)

  11. Welding of Thin Steel Plates by Hybrid Welding Process Combined TIG Arc with YAG Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taewon; Suga, Yasuo; Koike, Takashi

    TIG arc welding and laser welding are used widely in the world. However, these welding processes have some advantages and problems respectively. In order to improve problems and make use of advantages of the arc welding and the laser welding processes, hybrid welding process combined the TIG arc with the YAG laser was studied. Especially, the suitable welding conditions for thin steel plate welding were investigated to obtain sound weld with beautiful surface and back beads but without weld defects. As a result, it was confirmed that the shot position of the laser beam is very important to obtain sound welds in hybrid welding. Therefore, a new intelligent system to monitor the welding area using vision sensor is constructed. Furthermore, control system to shot the laser beam to a selected position in molten pool, which is formed by TIG arc, is constructed. As a result of welding experiments using these systems, it is confirmed that the hybrid welding process and the control system are effective on the stable welding of thin stainless steel plates.

  12. Microstructure modeling in weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.A.; Babu, S.S.

    1995-01-01

    Since microstructure development in the weld metal region is controlled by various physical processes, there is a need for integrated predictive models based on fundamental principles to describe and predict the effect of these physical processes. These integrated models should be based on various tools available for modeling microstructure development in a wide variety of alloy systems and welding processes. In this paper, the principles, methodology, and future directions of modeling thermochemical reactions in liquid, solidification, and solid state transformations are discussed with some examples for low-alloy steel, stainless steel, and Ni-base superalloy. Thermochemical deoxidation reactions in liquid low-alloy steel lead to oxide inclusion formation. This inclusion formation has been modeled by combining principles of ladle metallurgy and overall transformation kinetics. The model's comparison with the experimental data and the ongoing work on coupling this inclusion model with the numerical models of heat transfer and fluid flow are discussed. Also, recent advances in theoretical and physical modeling of the solidification process are reviewed with regard to predicting the solidification modes, grain structure development, segregation effects, and nonequilibrium solidification in welds. The effects of solid state phase transformations on microstructure development and various methods of modeling these transformations are reviewed. Successful models, based on diffusion-controlled growth and plate growth theories, on microstructure development in low-alloy steel and stainless steel weld metals are outlined. This paper also addresses the importance of advanced analytical techniques to understand the solid state transformation mechanisms in welds

  13. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been examined and evaluated. It is found that both diamond turned DOE’s in zinc sulphide and multilevel etched DOE’s (Diffractive Optical Elements) in fused silica have a good performance. Welding with multiple beams in a butt joint configuration has been tested. Results are presented, showing it has...

  14. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...

  15. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  16. Refractory metal based superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Paula R.; Vicente, Eduardo E.; Rubiolo, Gerardo H.

    1999-01-01

    Refractory metals are looked as promising materials for primary circuits in fission reactors and even as fusion reactor components. Indeed, superalloys could be developed which take advantage of their high temperature properties together with the benefits of a two- phase (intermetallic compound-refractory metal matrix) coherent structure. In 1993, researchers of the Office National d'Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales of France reported the observation of such a coherent structure in the Ta-Ti-Zr-Al-Nb-Mo system although the exact composition is not reported. The intermetallic compound would be Ti 2 AlMo based. However, the formation of this compound and its possible coexistence with a disordered bcc phase in the ternary system Ti-Al-Mo is a controversial subject in the related literature. In this work we develop a technique to obtain homogeneous alloys samples with 50 Ti-25 Al-25 Mo composition. The resulting specimens were characterized by optical and electronic metallography (SEM), microprobe composition measurements (EPMA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. The results show the evidence for a bcc (A2→B2) ordering reaction in the Ti-Al-Mo system in the 50 Ti-25 Al-25 Mo composition. (author)

  17. Comparative evaluation of tungsten inert gas and laser beam ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, the bead-on-plate welds were made on AA5083-H321 alloy plates using both tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and laser beam (LB) welding processes to study the enhancement of mechanical properties such as weld yield strength and hardness. The low heat input of laser beam welding effectively reduced the ...

  18. Comparative evaluation of tungsten inert gas and laser beam ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this study, the bead-on-plate welds were made on AA5083-H321 alloy plates using both tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and laser beam (LB) welding pro- cesses to study the enhancement of mechanical properties such as weld yield strength and hardness. The low heat input of laser beam welding effectively ...

  19. Factors affecting weld root morphology in laser keyhole welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frostevarg, Jan

    2018-02-01

    Welding production efficiency is usually optimised if full penetration can be achieved in a single pass. Techniques such as electron and laser beam welding offer deep high speed keyhole welding, especially since multi-kilowatt lasers became available. However, there are limitations for these techniques when considering weld imperfections such as weld cap undercuts, interior porosity or humps at the root. The thickness of sheets during full penetration welding is practically limited by these root humps. The mechanisms behind root morphology formation are not yet satisfactory understood. In this paper root humping is studied by reviewing previous studies and findings and also by sample examination and process observation by high speed imaging. Different process regimes governing root quality are presented, categorized and explained. Even though this study mainly covers laser beam and laser arc hybrid welding, the presented findings can generally be applied full penetration welding in medium to thick sheets, especially the discussion of surface tension effects. As a final result of this analysis, a map of methods to optimise weld root topology is presented.

  20. Fatigue of superalloys and intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoloff, N.S.

    1993-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of intermetallic alloys and their composites is contrasted to that of nickel-base superalloys. The roles of microstructure and slip planarity are emphasized. Obstacles to use of intermetallics under cyclic loading conditions are described and future research directions are suggested

  1. Reduction of Biomechanical and Welding Fume Exposures in Stud Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fethke, Nathan B; Peters, Thomas M; Leonard, Stephanie; Metwali, Mahmoud; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A

    2016-04-01

    The welding of shear stud connectors to structural steel in construction requires a prolonged stooped posture that exposes ironworkers to biomechanical and welding fume hazards. In this study, biomechanical and welding fume exposures during stud welding using conventional methods were compared to exposures associated with use of a prototype system that allowed participants to weld from an upright position. The effect of base material (i.e. bare structural beam versus galvanized decking) on welding fume concentration (particle number and mass), particle size distribution, and particle composition was also explored. Thirty participants completed a series of stud welding simulations in a local apprenticeship training facility. Use of the upright system was associated with substantial reductions in trunk inclination and the activity levels of several muscle groups. Inhalable mass concentrations of welding fume (averaged over ~18 min) when using conventional methods were high (18.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 65.7 mg m(-3) for through deck), with estimated mass concentrations of iron (7.8 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), zinc (0.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), and manganese (0.9 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 1.5 mg m(-3) for through deck) often exceeding the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values (TLVs). Number and mass concentrations were substantially reduced when using the upright system, although the total inhalable mass concentration remained above the TLV when welding through decking. The average diameters of the welding fume particles for both bare beam (31±17 nm) through deck conditions (34±34 nm) and the chemical composition of the particles indicated the presence of metallic nanoparticles. Stud welding exposes ironworkers to potentially high levels of biomechanical loading (primarily to the low back) and welding fume. The upright system used in this study improved exposure

  2. Effects of Surface Alloying and Laser Beam Treatment on the Microstructure and Wear Behaviour of Surfaces Modified Using Submerged Metal Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regita BENDIKIENE

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of surface alloying of cheap plain carbon steel using submerged metal arc technique and subsequent laser beam treatment on the microstructure and wear behaviour of surfaced layers were studied. This method is the cheapest one to obtain high alloyed coatings, because there is no need to apply complex technologies of powder making (metal powder is spread on the surface of base metal or inserted into the flux, it is enough to grind, granulate and blend additional materials. On the other hand, strengthening of superficial layers of alloys by thermal laser radiation is one of the applications of laser. Surface is strengthened by concentrated laser beam focused into teeny area (from section of mm till some mm. Teeny area of metal heat up rapidly and when heat is drain to the inner metal layers giving strengthening effect. Steel surface during this treatment exceeds critical temperatures, if there is a need to strengthen deeper portions of the base metal it is possible even to fuse superficial layer. The results presented in this paper are based on micro-structural and micro-chemical analyses of the surfaced and laser beam treated surfaces and are supported by analyses of the hardness, the wear resistance and resultant microstructures. Due to the usage of waste raw materials a significant improvement (~ 30 % in wear resistance was achieved. The maximum achieved hardness of surfaced layer was 62 HRC, it can be compared with high alloyed conventional steel grade. Wear properties of overlays with additional laser beam treatment showed that weight loss of these layers was ~10 % lower compared with overlays after welding; consequently it is possible to replace high alloyed conventional steel grades forming new surfaces or restoring worn machine elements and tools.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.1.7621

  3. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  4. Resistance seam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueler, A.W.

    1977-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of the resistance seam welding process are presented. Types of seam welds, types of seam welding machines, seam welding power supplies, resistance seam welding parameters and seam welding characteristics of various metals

  5. Gas Shielding Technology for Welding and Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur J.; Gradl, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Welding is a common method that allows two metallic materials to be joined together with high structural integrity. When joints need to be leak-tight, light-weight, or free of contaminant-trapping seams or surface asperities, welding tends to be specified. There are many welding techniques, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Some of these techniques include Forge Welding, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, Friction Stir Welding, and Laser Beam Welding to name a few. Whichever technique is used, the objective is a structural joint that meets the requirements of a particular component or assembly. A key practice in producing quality welds is the use of shielding gas. This article discusses various weld techniques, quality of the welds, and importance of shielding gas in each of those techniques. Metallic bonds, or joints, are produced when metals are put into intimate contact. In the solid-state "blacksmith welding" process, now called Forge Welding (FOW), the site to be joined is pounded into intimate contact. The surfaces to be joined usually need to be heated to make it easier to deform the metal. The surfaces are sprinkled with a flux to melt surface oxides and given a concave shape so that surface contamination can be squeezed out of the joint as the surfaces are pounded together; otherwise the surface contamination would be trapped in the joint and would weaken the weld. In solid-state welding processes surface oxides or other contamination are typically squeezed out of the joint in "flash."

  6. Local zone wise elastic and plastic properties of electron beam welded Ti-6Al-4V alloy using digital image correlation technique: A comparative study between uniform stress and virtual fields method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranath, K. M.; Ramji, M.

    2015-05-01

    Joining of materials using welding results in the formation of material zones with varying microstructure across the weld. Extraction of the mechanical properties of those individual heterogeneous zones are important in designing components and structures comprised of welds. In this study, the zone wise local extraction of the elastic and plastic properties of an electron beam welded Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy has been carried out using both the uniform stress method (USM) and the virtual fields method (VFM) involving digital image correlation (DIC) technique. The surface strain field obtained using DIC technique from a transverse weld specimen tensile testing is used for extracting the zone wise strain evolution. Initially, using uniform stress assumption, zone wise full range stress-strain curves are extracted. In USM methodology, the elastic and plastic material models are fitted to the zone wise stress-strain curves and required parameters are extracted from it. But inherent disadvantage is lot of images need to be processed for the parameter extraction. Recently, VFM is gaining lot of popularity in characterization domain as it is robust, accurate and faster. VFM is based on the principle of virtual work where, the weak form of local equilibrium equations and kinematically admissible virtual displacement fields are utilized for parameter extraction. Hollomon's power law is used here as the hardening rule. Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, yield stress, strength coefficient and strain hardening exponent are the parameters extracted zone wise using both USM and VFM. A Vicker's microhardness measurement is also conducted across the weld zone towards mapping the strength behavior. Fusion zone has reported higher yield strength, strength coefficient and Poisson's ratio. Young's modulus value is found decreasing from base metal towards the fusion zone. The trend observed in parameter variation across the weld zone obtained by both USM and VFM compares very well. Due

  7. Automatic inspection of electron beam weld for stainless steel using phased array method; Controle automatique par ultrasons multielements de soudures inox realisees par faisceau d'electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleuze, A. [Metalscan - Groupe Tecnatom, 71100 Saint-Remy (France); Schwartz, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Valduc - 21120 Is-Sur-Tille - (France)

    2007-07-01

    The CEA laboratory of Non destructive testing of Valduc implements various techniques of controls (radiography, sealing by tracer gas helium, ultrasounds...) to check the quality of the welding and health matter of materials. To have a perfect command of the manufacture of the welding and to detect any anomaly during the manufacturing process (lacks of penetration, defects of joining, porosities...), it developed in partnership with company METALSCAN an ultrasonic technique of imagery phased array designed to the complete and automatic control of homogeneous stainless steel welding carried out by electron beam. To achieve this goal, an acoustic study by simulation with software CIVA was undertaken in order to determine the optimal characteristics of the phased array probes (their number and their site). Finally, the developed method allows, on the one hand, to locate lacks of fusion of welding equivalents to flat holes with bottom 0,5 mms in diameter, and on the other hand, to detect lacks of penetration of 0,1 mm. In order to ensure a perfect reproducibility of controls, a mechanical system ensuring the setting in rotation of the part, allows to inspect the whole of the welding. The results are then analyzed automatically using application software ensuring the traceability of controls. The method was first of all validated using parts spread out, then it was brought into service after confrontation of the results obtained on real defects with other techniques (metallographic radiography and characterizations). (authors) [French] Le laboratoire de Controles Non Destructifs du CEA de Valduc met en oeuvre differentes techniques de controles (radiographie, etancheite par gaz traceur helium, ultrasons...) pour verifier la qualite des soudures et la sante matiere des materiaux. Pour maitriser parfaitement la fabrication des soudures et detecter toute anomalie durant le processus de fabrication (manques de penetration, defauts de collage, porosites...), il a developpe

  8. Laser beam welding quality monitoring system based in high-speed (10 kHz) uncooled MWIR imaging sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Rodrigo; Vergara, German; Gutiérrez, Raúl; Fernández, Carlos; Villamayor, Víctor; Gómez, Luis; González-Camino, Maria; Baldasano, Arturo; Castro, G.; Arias, R.; Lapido, Y.; Rodríguez, J.; Romero, Pablo

    2015-05-01

    The combination of flexibility, productivity, precision and zero-defect manufacturing in future laser-based equipment are a major challenge that faces this enabling technology. New sensors for online monitoring and real-time control of laserbased processes are necessary for improving products quality and increasing manufacture yields. New approaches to fully automate processes towards zero-defect manufacturing demand smarter heads where lasers, optics, actuators, sensors and electronics will be integrated in a unique compact and affordable device. Many defects arising in laser-based manufacturing processes come from instabilities in the dynamics of the laser process. Temperature and heat dynamics are key parameters to be monitored. Low cost infrared imagers with high-speed of response will constitute the next generation of sensors to be implemented in future monitoring and control systems for laser-based processes, capable to provide simultaneous information about heat dynamics and spatial distribution. This work describes the result of using an innovative low-cost high-speed infrared imager based on the first quantum infrared imager monolithically integrated with Si-CMOS ROIC of the market. The sensor is able to provide low resolution images at frame rates up to 10 KHz in uncooled operation at the same cost as traditional infrared spot detectors. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the new sensor technology, a low-cost camera was assembled on a standard production laser welding head, allowing to register melting pool images at frame rates of 10 kHz. In addition, a specific software was developed for defect detection and classification. Multiple laser welding processes were recorded with the aim to study the performance of the system and its application to the real-time monitoring of laser welding processes. During the experiments, different types of defects were produced and monitored. The classifier was fed with the experimental images obtained. Self

  9. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  10. Investigation on edge joints of Inconel 625 sheets processed with laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiazzo, F.; Alfieri, V.; Cardaropoli, F.; Sergi, V.

    2017-08-01

    Laser welding of Inconel 625 edge joint beads in square groove configuration was investigated. The use of different weld geometries in new aerospace solutions explains research on edge joints. A structured plan was carried out in order to characterize the process defining the influence of laser power and welding speed and to study possible interactions among the governing factors. As weld pool protection is crucial in order to obtain sound joints when processing superalloys, a special glove box for gas supply was designed to upgrade the welding head. Welded joints were characterized referring to bead profile, microstructure and X-rays. It was found that heat input plays an important role as it affects welding stability, porosity content and bead shape. Results suggest operating with low values of heat input to reduce porosity and guarantee stable bead conformation. Furthermore, a decrease in the grain size has been observed as a consequence of decreasing heat input.

  11. SUPERALLOYS: AN INTRODUCTION WITH THERMAL ANALYSIS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-01

    Sep 1, 2015 ... J Fundam Appl Sci. 2015, 7(3), 364-374. 365 resistance, corrosion and oxidation resistance. The base metal is usually nickel, cobalt or nickel- iron. Superalloys are classified into three classes; nickel-based, cobalt-based and iron-based superalloys. These alloys are commonly used in the aerospace or gas ...

  12. Laser welding of sheet metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jian

    Laser welding of sheet metals is an important application of high power lasers, and has many advantages over conventional welding techniques. Laser welding has a great potential to replace other welding technique in the car-body manufacturing because of high laser weld quality and relatively low manufacturing cost associated with the laser technique. However, a few problems related to the laser welding of sheet metals limit its applications in industries. To have a better understanding of the welding process, laser welding experimental studies and theoretical analysis are necessary. Temperature-dependent absorptivities of various metals are obtained theoretically for COsb2, COIL (Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser) and Nd:YAG lasers. It is found that the absorptivities for COIL and Nd:YAG lasers are 2.84 and 3.16 times higher than for the COsb2 laser, and the absorptivity increases with increasing temperature of the metals. Surface roughness and oxide films can enhance the absorption significantly. The reflectivity of as-received steel sheets decreases from 65-80% to 30-40% with surface oxide films for COsb2 lasers. Laser welding experiments show that the tensile strengths of the weld metals are higher than the base metals. For samples with surface oxide films, the oxygen concentration in the weld metals is found to be higher than in the specimens without oxidation, and the toughness of the weld metals is degraded. When steel powders are added to bridge the gap between two sheets, the oxygen content in the weld metals decreases and the toughness increases. A mathematical model is developed for the melt depth due to a stationary laser beam. The model results show that the melt depth increases rapidly with time at the beginning of laser irradiation and then increases slowly. Also, the melt depth is found to increase rapidly with laser intensities and then increases slowly for higher intensity. The average rate of melting and the times to reach the melting and boiling

  13. Welding complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, V.K.; Kuchuk-Yatsenko, S.I.; Sakharnov, V.A.; Galyan, B.A.; Krivenko, V.G.; Asoyants, G.B.

    1992-10-27

    A welding complex for construction of a continuous underwater pipeline is adapted to be installed aboard a ship. The complex includes a welding machine positionable at a joint of the pipeline with a pipe section to be welded, burr-removing trimmers positionable coaxially with the pipeline for displacement relative to the pipeline in the joint area, and a support device for the end part of the pipeline. A rotatably mounted holding device for setting, holding, and retaining the pipe section to be welded, the welding machine, and the trimmers is axially aligned with the end part of the pipeline. An accumulator is provided for storing and delivering successive pipe sections at a loading position laterally offset from the common axis of the pipeline and of the pipe section to be welded to it. The holding device includes a platform movable along the common axis of the pipeline and of the pipe section to be welded to it by a resistance butt welding machine, and a plate with a means for carrying the pipe section to be welded which is mounted on a pivot carried by the platform for rotation between the loading position and the aligning position. The welding complex of the invention provides for implementing resistance butt welding in construction of continuous underwater pipelines and ensures the accuracy of alignment and permanence of the gap between the edges being welded. The welding complex's structure allows handling of longer pipe sections, thus reducing the overall number of joints to be welded. 7 figs.

  14. Bond and electron beam welding quality control of the aluminum stabilized and reinforced CMS conductor by means of ultrasonic phased-array technology

    CERN Document Server

    Neuenschwander, J; Horváth, I L; Luthi, T; Marti, H

    2002-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the general-purpose detectors to be provided for the LHC project at CERN. The design field of the CMS superconducting magnet is 4 T, the magnetic length is 12.5 m and the free bore is 6 m. The coils for CNIS are wound of aluminum-stabilized Rutherford type superconductors reinforced with high-strength aluminum alloy. For optimum performance of the conductor a void-free metallic bonding between the high-purity aluminum and the Rutherford type cable as well as between the electron beam welded reinforcement and the high-purity aluminum must be guaranteed. It is the main task of this development work to assess continuously the bond quality over the whole width and the total length of the conductors during manufacture. To achieve this goal we use the ultrasonic phased-array technology. The application of multi- element transducers allows an electronic scanning perpendicular to the direction of production. Such a testing is sufficiently fast in order to allow a continuous a...

  15. Development of high productivity pipeline girth welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yapp, David; Liratzis, Theocharis

    2010-01-01

    The trend for increased oil and gas consumption implies a growth of long-distance pipeline installations. Welding is a critical factor in the installation of pipelines, both onshore and offshore, and the rate at which the pipeline can be laid is generally determined by the speed of welding. This has resulted in substantial developments in pipeline welding techniques. Arc welding is still the dominant process used in practice, and forge welding processes have had limited successful application to date, in spite of large investments in process development. Power beam processes have also been investigated in detail and the latest laser systems now show promise for practical application. In recent years the use of high strength steels has substantially reduced the cost of pipeline installation, with X70 and X80 being commonly used. This use of high strength pipeline produced by thermomechanical processing has also been researched. They must all meet three requirments, high productivity, satisfactory weld properties, and weld quality

  16. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  17. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  18. Metallographic study of cracks formation factors in Inconel 718 and waspaloy during welding by electron beam and the tungsten inert gas process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varela, Danilo.

    1976-01-01

    Study of physico-chemical aspects of cracks formation during welding of Inconel 718 and waspaloy. In both alloys cracks are caused by an intergranular or interdendritic decohesion at the level of liquid films under stress produced by the welding thermal cycle. Constraints repartition, liquation and external sollicitations influence are studied [fr

  19. High quality, high efficiency welding technology for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Shigeyuki; Nagura, Yasumi

    1996-01-01

    For nuclear power plants, it is required to ensure the safety under the high reliability and to attain the high rate of operation. In the manufacture and installation of the machinery and equipment, the welding techniques which become the basis exert large influence to them. For the purpose of improving joint performance and excluding human errors, welding heat input and the number of passes have been reduced, the automation of welding has been advanced, and at present, narrow gap arc welding and high energy density welding such as electron beam welding and laser welding have been put to practical use. Also in the welding of pipings, automatic gas metal arc welding is employed. As for the welding of main machinery and equipment, there are the welding of the joints that constitute pressure boundaries, the build-up welding on the internal surfaces of pressure vessels for separating primary water from them, and the sealing welding of heating tubes and tube plates in steam generators. These weldings are explained. The welding of pipings and the state of development and application of new welding methods are reported. (K.I.)

  20. Superalloy applications in the nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, L.V.; Padilha, A.F.

    1984-01-01

    The process conditions in the areas of nuclear fuel processing, fabrication, utilization, reprocessing and disposal are severe, demanding therefore the use of materials with high temperature mechanical strength and corrosion resistance. A number of refractory metal containing superalloys have found application in the diferrent areas of the nuclear field. The main aspects of the microstructure, strengthening mechanisms and corrosion resistance of 3 superalloys, namely Incoloy 825, Inconel 718 and Hastelloy C have been discussed. The role of the refractory metal elements in influencing the mechanical strength and corrosion resistance of superalloys has been emphasised. (Author) [pt

  1. Material-analytical investigations on crack initiation and progression in notched laser beam welds. Final report; Makro- und mikrostrukturelle Eigenschaften laserstrahlgeschweisster Verbindungen. Teilprojekt: Werkstoffanalytische Untersuchungen zu Risseinleitung und -verlauf an gekerbten Laserstrahlschweissnaehten. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goede, M.; Schmid, C.; Bormann, A.; Haferkamp, H.

    2000-07-28

    Laser technology is a fast-growing market segment in particular for the German industry. While lasers with their economical and technical advantages are already widely used in the automotive industry, there are still quite some barriers in other fields of application for the use of lasers as a joining tool. The elaborated project results provide a possibility to prove the strength of laser-welded joints. The results of this innovative technology thus contribute, in conjunction with their description in the laser manual 'Laser Beam Welding', to an advanced use in a multitude of fields of application in industrial manufacturing. Especially within the legally defined area, the modified tensile and bend test specimen offer geometries which are easy and consistently to produce and which do not only stress the weld but also the heat-affected zone up to an initiation of cracks. This allows for a an evaluation of the laser beam weld. (orig.) [German] Die Lasertechnik stellt insbesondere fuer die deutsche Industrie ein Marktsegment mit grossem Wachstumspotential dar. Waehrend die wirtschaftlichen und technischen Vorteile des Lasereinsatzes im Automobilbau bereits stark genutzt werden, bestehen in anderen Anwendungsbereichen eine Reihe von Barrieren, den Laser als Fuegewerkzeug zu verwenden. Die erarbeiteten Projektergebnisse zeigen eine Moeglichkeit zum Nachweis der Festigkeit lasergeschweisster Verbindungen auf und leisten in Verbindung mit der Darstellung im Handbuch 'Laserstrahlschweissen' einen wichtigen Schritt zum Einsatz dieser innovativen Technologie in weiten Anwendungsbereichen der industriellen Fertigung. Insbesondere fuer den gesetzlich geregelten Bereich bieten die modifizierten Zug- und Biegeproben einfach und reproduzierbar zu fertigende Geometrien, die sowohl die Schweissnaht als auch die Waermeeinflusszone bis zur Risseinleitung belasten und damit eine Bewertung der Laserstrahlschweissnaht ermoeglichen. (orig.)

  2. The characteristics of welded joints for air conditioning application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weglowski, M. St.; Weglowska, A.; Miara, D.; Kwiecinski, K.; Błacha, S.; Dworak, J.; Rykala, J.; Pikula, J.; Ziobro, G.; Szafron, A.; Zimierska-Nowak, P.; Richert, M.; Noga, P.

    2017-10-01

    In the paper the results of metallographic examination of welded joints for air-conditioning elements are presented. The European directives 2006/40/EC on the greenhouse gasses elimination demand to stop using traditional refrigerant and to change it to R744 (CO2) medium in air conditioning installation. The R744 refrigerant is environmental friendly medium if compared with standard solution such as R12, R134a or R1234yf and safer for passengers than R1234yf. The non-standard thermodynamic parameters of the R744 which translate into high pressure and high temperature require specific materials to develop the shape and to specify the technology of manufacturing for the particular elements of the conduits and moreover the technologies of joining for the whole structure, which would meet the exploitation requirements of the new air-conditioning system. To produce the test welded joints of stainless steels four different joining technologies were applied: laser welding, plasma welding, electron beam welding as well as high speed rotation welding. This paper describes the influence of the selected welding process on the macrostructure and microstructure of welded joints of AISI 304 and AISI 316L steels. The results indicated that plasma welding laser welding and electron beam welding technologies guaranty the proper quality of welded joints and can be used for the air conditioning application in automotive industry. However, high speed rotation welding not guarantee the good quality of welded joints and cannot be used for above application.

  3. Laser welding engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhieh, N. M.; El Eesawi, M. E.; Hashkel, A. E.

    2007-01-01

    Laser welding was in its early life used mainly for unusual applications where no other welding process would be suitable that was twenty five years ago. Today, laser welding is a fully developed part of the metal working industry, routinely producing welds for common items such as cigarette lighters, which springs, motor/transformer lamination, hermetic seals, battery and pacemaker cans and hybrid circuit packages. Yet very few manufacturing engineering have seriously considers employing lasers in their own operations. Why? There are many reasons, but a main one must be not acquainted with the operation and capabilities of a laser system. Other reasons, such as a relatively high initial cost and a concern about using lasers in the manufacturing environment, also are frequently cited, and the complexity of the component and flexibility of the light delivery system. Laser welding could be used in place of many different standard processes, such as resistance (spot or seam), submerged arc, RF induction, high-frequency resistance, ultrasonic and electronic and electron-beam. while each of these techniques has established an independent function in the manufacturing world, the flexible laser welding approach will operate efficiently and economically in many different applications. Its flexibility will even permit the welding system to be used for other machining function, such as drilling, scribing, sealing and serializing. In this article, we will look at how laser welding works and what benefits it can offer to manufacturing engineers. Some industry observers state that there are already 2,000 laser machine tools being used for cutting, welding and drilling and that the number could reach 30,000 over the next 15 years as manufacturing engineers become more aware of the capabilities of lasers [1). While most laser applications are dedicated to one product or process that involves high-volume, long-run manufacturing, the flexibility of a laser to supply energy to hard

  4. Residual stress measurements in a ferritic steel/In625 superalloy dissimilar metal weldment using neutron diffraction and deep-hole drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skouras, A.; Paradowska, A.; Peel, M.J.; Flewitt, P.E.J.; Pavier, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the use of non-invasive and semi-invasive techniques to measure the residual stresses in a large dissimilar weldment. This took the form of a butt weld between two sections of a P92 steel pipe, joined using an In625 welding consumable. Residual stress measurements have been carried out on the 30 mm thick welded pipe using the deep-hole drilling technique to characterise the through wall section residual stress distribution for the weld metal, HAZ and parent material. In addition, neutron diffraction measurements have been carried out within the weld zone. Diffraction patterns presented a high intensity and sharp peaks for the base P92 steel material. However measurements in the weld superalloy material were proven problematic as very weak diffraction patterns were observed. A thorough examination of the weld material suggested that the likely cause of this phenomenon was texture in the weld material created during the solidification phase of the welding procedure. This paper discusses the challenges in the execution and interpretation of the neutron diffraction results and demonstrates that realistic measurements of residual stresses can be achieved, in complex dissimilar metal weldments. Highlights: ► One of the few papers to measure residual stresses on dissimilar metal welds. ► Paper managed to provide realistic measurements of residual stresses using the DHD and ND technique. ► Results of this study have demonstrated the effect of texture during the ND measurements.

  5. Superalloy resources: Supply and availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Joseph R.

    1987-01-01

    Over the past several decades there have been shortages of strategic materials because of our near total import dependence on such metals as chromium, cobalt, and tantalum. In response to the continued vulnerability of U.S. superalloy producers to disruptions in resource supplies, NASA has undertaken a program to address alternatives to the super-alloys containing significant quantities of the strategic materials such as chromium, cobalt, niobium, and tantalum. The research program called Conservation of Strategic Aerospace Materials (COSAM) focuses on substitution, processing, and alternate materials to achieve its goals. In addition to NASA Lewis Research Center, universities and industry play an important role in the COSAM Program. This paper defines what is meant by strategic materials in the aerospace community, presents a strategic materials index, and reviews the resource supply and availability picture from the U.S. point of view. In addition, research results from the COSAM Program are highlighted and future directions for the use of low strategic material alloys or alternate materials are discussed.

  6. Zircaloy welding in OPAL reactor reflector vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, L.; Martinez, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: This paper describes the development of the Zircaloy 4 welding processes applied in the fabrication of the Reflector Vessel for the OPAL reactor. As an introduction, a brief description is made of the geometric design of the Reflector Vessel, which is very complex, as it has many irradiation positions, beams tubes, channels, outer connections, and reinforcements. The complexity of this component demanded different welded joints and a careful manufacturing sequence, which comprised welding, machining, heat treatments, and quality control operations. Design and fabrication of different ad-hoc devices was also required, some of which are described in the present paper. For the purposes of issuing reliable welding procedures, the joints were previously set up through tests using samples and mock-ups. Procedures and welders were qualified in accordance with the ASME Code, Section IX. The welding methods used in the fabrication were GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) and PAW (Plasma Arc Welding), processes deemed adequate to weld these alloys, as they do not contaminate the material, for they are carried out within an inert gas atmosphere. Contrary to other welding methods commonly used for other materials, no welding fluxes or chemically-active gases are applied in these two processes. The advantages of both methods used are discussed. The welds were carried out in manual, orbital, or mechanized mode depending on the type of joint

  7. Robotic Vision for Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Vision system for robotic welder looks at weld along axis of welding electrode. Gives robot view of most of weld area, including yet-unwelded joint, weld pool, and completed weld bead. Protected within welding-torch body, lens and fiber bundle give robot closeup view of weld in progress. Relayed to video camera on robot manipulator frame, weld image provides data for automatic control of robot motion and welding parameters.

  8. Evaluation of the AISI 904L Alloy Weld Overlays Obtained by GMAW and Electro-Slag Welding Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Jorge C. F.; Meira, O. G.; Madalena, F. C. A.; de Souza, L. F. G.; Araujo, L. S.; Mendes, M. C.

    2017-05-01

    The use of superaustenitic stainless steels (SASS) as an overlay replacement for nickel-based alloys can be an interesting alternative for the oil and gas industries, due to its lower cost, when compared to superalloys. Usually, the deposition is made with several welding passes by using conventional arc welding processes, such as gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. In this respect, electro-slag welding (ESW), which promotes high heat inputs and low dilution of the welds, can also be attractive for this application, as it provides a higher productivity, once only one layer is needed for the deposition of the minimum thickness required. The present work evaluates the behavior of an AISI 904L SASS weld overlay deposited on a carbon steel ASTM A516 Grade 70 by ESW and GMAW processes. Both as-welded and heat-treated conditions were evaluated and compared. A multipass welding by GMAW process with three layers and 48 passes was performed on 12.5 × 200 × 250 mm steel plates with average welding energy of 1.0 kJ/mm. For ESW process, only one layer was deposited on 50 × 400 × 400 mm steel plates with average welding energy of 11.7 kJ/mm. After welding, a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 620 °C for 10 h was performed in half of the steel plate, in order to allow the comparison between this condition and the as-welded one. For both processes, the austenitic microstructure of the weld deposits was characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with electron backscatter diffraction. A low proportion of secondary phases were observed in all conditions, and the PWHT did not promote significant changes on the hardness profile. Martensite for GMAW process and bainite for ESW process were the microstructural constituents observed at the coarse grain heat-affected zone, due to the different cooling rates. For ESW process, no evidences of partially diluted zones were found. As a consequence of the microstructural

  9. Investigations on Microstructure and Corrosion behavior of Superalloy 686 weldments by Electrochemical Corrosion Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulmurugan, B.; Manikandan, M.

    2018-02-01

    In the present study, microstructure and the corrosion behavior of Nickel based superalloy 686 and its weld joints has been investigated by synthetic sea water environment. The weldments were fabricated by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (PCGTAW) techniques with autogenous mode and three different filler wires (ERNiCrMo-4, ERNiCrMo-10 and ERNiCrMo-14). Microstructure and Scanning electron microscope examination was carried out to evaluate the structural changes in the fusion zones of different weldments. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis was carried out to evaluate the microsegregation of alloying elements in the different weld joints. Potentiodynamic polarization study was experimented on the base metal and weld joints in the synthetic sea water environment to evaluate the corrosion rate. Tafel’s interpolation technique was used to obtain the corrosion rate. The microstructure examination revealed that the fine equiaxed dendrites were observed in the pulsed current mode. EDS analysis shows the absence of microsegregation in the current pulsing technique. The corrosion rates of weldments are compared with the base metal. The results show that the fine microstructure with the absence of microsegregation in the PCGTA weldments shows improved corrosion resistance compared to the GTAW. Autogenous PCGTAW shows higher corrosion resistance irrespective of all weldments employed in the present study.

  10. WELDING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  11. Low expansion superalloy with improved toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Darrell F.; Stein, Larry I.; Hwang, Il S.

    1995-01-01

    A high strength, low coefficient of thermal expansion superalloy exhibiting improved toughness over a broad temperature range down to about 4.degree. K. The composition is adapted for use with wrought superconducting sheathing.

  12. The Evolution of Cast Microstructures on the HAZ Liquation Cracking of Mar-M004 Weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsin Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The causes of liquation cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ of a cast Mar-M004 superalloy weld were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD, electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA, and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD were applied to identify the final microconstituents at the solidification boundaries of the cast alloy. Fine borides and lamellar eutectics were present in front of some γ-γ′ colonies, which were expected to be liquefied prematurely during welding. The metal carbide (MC enriched in Nb, Hf; M3B2 and M5B3 borides enriched in Cr and Mo; and lamellar Ni-Hf intermetallics were mainly responsible for the induced liquation cracking of the Mar-M004 weld, especially the MC carbides. Scanning electron microscope (SEM fractographs showed that the fracture features of those liquation cracks were associated with the interdendritic constituents in the cast superalloy.

  13. Study of Gravity Effects on Titanium Laser Welding in the Vertical Position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baohua Chang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available To obtain satisfactory welds in positional laser beam welding, it is necessary to know how process parameters will influence the quality of welds in different welding positions. In this study, the titanium alloy Ti6Al4V sheets were laser welded in two vertical welding positions (vertical up and vertical down, and the appearance, porosity, strength, and ductility of the laser joints were evaluated. Results show that undercuts of the vertical up welds were greater than that of vertical down welds, while the porosity contents were much higher in vertical down welds than that in vertical up welds. When welding with a higher heat input, the vertical up welding position resulted in poor weld profiles (undercuts and burn-through holes, whereas the vertical down welding position led to excessive porosity contents in welds. Both severe undercut and excessive porosity were detrimental to the tensile properties of the welds. Weld appearance was improved and porosity contents were reduced by using a lower heat input, achieving better weld quality. Therefore, it is suggested that process parameter settings with relatively high laser powers and welding speeds, which can result in lower heat inputs, are used when laser welding the Ti6Al4V titanium alloys vertically.

  14. The metallurgy of superalloys part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelazim, M.E.; Hammad, F.H.

    1990-01-01

    This is part II of the report titled 'the metallurgy of superalloys'. It deals with the effect of heat treatment and operating conditions (thermal exposure and environment) on the mechanical properties of superalloys. The heat treatment is important in the development of superalloys through that it controls type, amount, size shape and distribution of the precipitate and the grain size of the matrix. The thermal exposure leads to reduction in the amount of the primary carbides and to precipitation of secondary carbides. Also it leads to the agglomeration and coarsening of gamma or the transformation of gamma phase to phase. The environment may lead to the internal oxidation, carburization, decarburization or sulphidization of the superalloys which may result in the degradation of their mechanical properties. This part gives also an example of applications of superalloys in the field of nuclear reactors especially high temperature-gas cooled reactors. Joined with this part a table which contains the major superalloys including its chemical analysis, creep rupture strength and some of its applications. 1 tab

  15. Welding with high power fiber lasers - A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintino, L.; Costa, A.; Miranda, R.; Yapp, D.; Kumar, V.; Kong, C.J.

    2007-01-01

    The new generation of high power fiber lasers presents several benefits for industrial purposes, namely high power with low beam divergence, flexible beam delivery, low maintenance costs, high efficiency and compact size. This paper presents a brief review of the development of high power lasers, and presents initial data on welding of API 5L: X100 pipeline steel with an 8 kW fiber laser. Weld bead geometry was evaluated and transition between conduction and deep penetration welding modes was investigated

  16. Laser Assisted Plasma Arc Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FUERSCHBACH,PHILLIP W.

    1999-10-05

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effecter to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (< 1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  17. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  18. Importance of crystal orientation in linear friction joining of single crystal to polycrystalline nickel-based superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadge, M.; Preuss, M.; Withers, P.J.; Bray, S.

    2008-01-01

    Effects of crystal orientation on weldability and microstructural evolution occurring during linear friction joining of single crystal nickel-base superalloy to polycrystalline nickel-base superalloy were studied. Electron microscopy was used to characterize deformation and microstructural development. Changes in friction coefficient with changes in crystal orientation were observed and correlated to the metallurgical adhesion. These changes were explained by taking into consideration the single crystal deformation mechanisms. It was concluded that the orientation of the single crystal with reference to the principal axes of the pressure force is of utmost importance during linear friction welding (LFW) due to changes in orientation of the primary slip system in the fcc-based single crystal lattice

  19. Device for electron beam machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panzer, S.; Ardenne, T. von; Liebergeld, H.

    1984-01-01

    The invention concerns a device for electron beam machining, in particular welding. It is aimed at continuous operation of the electron irradiation device. This is achieved by combining the electron gun with a beam guiding chamber, to which vacuum chambers are connected. The working parts to be welded can be arranged in the latter

  20. Overview of advanced process control in welding within ERDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    The special kinds of demands placed on ERDA weapons and reactors require them to have very reliable welds. Process control is critical in achieving this reliability. ERDA has a number of advanced process control projects underway with much of the emphasis being on electron beam welding. These include projects on voltage measurement, beam-current control, beam focusing, beam spot tracking, spike suppression, and computer control. A general discussion of process control in welding is followed by specific examples of some of the advanced joining process control projects in ERDA

  1. Solid-state resistance upset welding: A process with unique advantages for advanced materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Solid-state resistance upset welding is suitable for joining many alloys that are difficult to weld using fusion processes. Since no melting takes place, the weld metal retains many of the characteristics of the base metal. Resulting welds have a hot worked structure, and thereby have higher strength than fusion welds in the same mate. Since the material being joined is not melted, compositional gradients are not introduced, second phase materials are minimally disrupted, and minor alloying elements, do not affect weldability. Solid-state upset welding has been adapted for fabrication of structures considered very large compared to typical resistance welding applications. The process has been used for closure of capsules, small vessels, and large containers. Welding emphasis has been on 304L stainless steel, the material for current applications. Other materials have, however, received enough attention to have demonstrated capability for joining alloys that are not readily weldable using fusion welding methods. A variety of other stainless steels (including A-286), superalloys (including TD nickel), refractory metals (including tungsten), and aluminum alloys (including 2024) have been successfully upset welded

  2. Elucidation of high-power fibre laser welding phenomena of stainless steel and effect of factors on weld geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahito, Yousuke; Mizutani, Masami; Katayama, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    The fibre laser has been receiving great attention due to its advantages of high efficiency, high power and high beam quality, and is expected to be one of the most desirable heat sources for high-speed and deep-penetration welding. In this study, therefore, in bead-on-plate welding of Type 304 stainless steel plates with 6 kW fibre laser, the effects of laser power, power density and welding speed on the formation of sound welds were investigated with four laser beams of 130, 200, 360 and 560 μm in spot diameter, and their welding phenomena were clarified with high-speed video cameras and an x-ray transmission real-time imaging system. The weld beads showed a keyhole type of penetration at any diameter, and the maximum penetration of 11 mm in depth was obtained at 130 μm spot diameter and 0.6 m min -1 welding speed. It was found that the laser power density exerted a remarkable effect on the increase in weld penetration at higher welding speeds, and sound partially penetrated welds without welding defects such as porosity, underfilling or humping could be produced at wide process windows of welding speeds between 4.5 and 10 m min -1 with fibre laser beams of 360 μm or 560 μm in spot diameter. The high-speed video observation pictures and the x-ray images of the welding phenomena at 6 m min -1 welding speed and 360 μm spot diameter show that a sound weld bead was formed owing to a long molten pool suppressing and accommodating spattering and a stable keyhole generating no bubbles from the tip, respectively

  3. Structural and mechanical properties of welded joints of reduced activation martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filacchioni, G. E-mail: gianni.filacchioni@casaccia.enea.it; Montanari, R.; Tata, M.E.; Pilloni, L

    2002-12-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding and electron beam welding methods were used to realise welding pools on plates of reduced activation martensitic steels. Structural and mechanical features of these simulated joints have been investigated in as-welded and post-welding heat-treated conditions. The research allowed to assess how each welding technique affects the original mechanical properties of materials and to find suitable post-welding heat treatments. This paper reports results from experimental activities on BATMAN II and F82H mod. steels carried out in the frame of the European Blanket Project - Structural Materials Program.

  4. Energy Losses Estimation During Pulsed-Laser Seam Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebestova, Hana; Havelkova, Martina; Chmelickova, Hana

    2014-06-01

    The finite-element tool SYSWELD (ESI Group, Paris, France) was adapted to simulate pulsed-laser seam welding. Besides temperature field distribution, one of the possible outputs of the welding simulation is the amount of absorbed power necessary to melt the required material volume including energy losses. Comparing absorbed or melting energy with applied laser energy, welding efficiencies can be calculated. This article presents achieved results of welding efficiency estimation based on the assimilation both experimental and simulation output data of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser bead on plate welding of 0.6-mm-thick AISI 304 stainless steel sheets using different beam powers.

  5. Structural Performance of Inconel 625 Superalloy Brazed Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianqiang; Demers, Vincent; Cadotte, Eve-Line; Turner, Daniel; Bocher, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate tensile and fatigue behaviors of Inconel 625 superalloy brazed joints after transient liquid-phase bonding process. Brazing was performed in a vacuum furnace using a nickel-based filler metal in a form of paste to join wrought Inconel 625 plates. Mechanical tests were carried out on single-lap joints under various lap distance-to-thickness ratios. The fatigue crack initiation and crack growth modes were examined via metallographic analysis, and the effect of local stress on fatigue life was assessed by finite element simulations. The fatigue results show that fatigue strength and endurance limit increase with overlap distance, leading to a relatively large scatter of results. Fatigue cracks nucleated in the high-stressed region of the weld fillets from brittle eutectic phases or from internal brazing cavities. The present work proposes to rationalize the results by using the local stress at the brazing fillet. When using this local stress, all fatigue-obtained results find themselves on a single S- N curve, providing a design curve for any joint configuration in fatigue solicitation.

  6. Numerical Simulation Of The Laser Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Siwek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The model takes into consideration thermophysical and metallurgical properties of theremelting steel, laser beam parameters and boundary conditions of the process. As a resultof heating the material, in the area of laser beam operation a weld pool is being created,whose shape and size depends on convection caused by the Marangoni force. The directionof the liquid stream depends on the temperature gradient on the surface and on the chemicalcomposition as well. The model created allows to predict the weld pool shape depending onmaterial properties, beam parameters, and boundary conditions of the sample.

  7. Residual stress in repair welds measured with neutron diffraction with and without post weld heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, J.W.H.; Paradowska, A.M.; Finlayson, T.

    2010-01-01

    In welding, residual stresses (RS) are formed in the structure as the result of differential contractions which occur as the weld metal solidifies and cools to ambient temperature. The tensile stresses can have significant effects on the susceptibility of a material to degradation mechanisms such as fatigue, corrosion, fracture resistance, and creep. Welding repairs have increasingly become a structural integrity concern for aging pressure vessel and piping components. Both the repair procedure and the subsequent safety assessment, such as BS7910 and R6 require a better understanding of the welding effect on structural components. The use of a neutron beam as a non-destructive method of measuring residual stress due to repair welding has been explored. Two types of full penetration butt weld repairs on 25 mm ferritic steel were examined. From the findings of this research in terms of residual stress, temper bead welding repair may not be better than stringer bead welding. Post-weld heat treatment may be still advisable for temper bead weld repairs on ferritic steel.

  8. Studies on Fusion Welding of High Nitrogen Stainless Steel: Microstructure, Mechanical and corrosion Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    An attempt has been made in the present investigation to weld high nitrogen steel of 5mm thick plates using various process i.e., shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and autogenous electron beam welding (EBW) process. Present work is aimed at studying the microstructural changes and its effects on mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Microstructure is characterized by optical, scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction technique. Vickers hardness, tensile properties, impact toughness and face bend ductility testing of the welds was carried out. Pitting corrosion resistance of welds was determined using potentio-dynamic polarization testing in 3.5%NaCl solution. Results of the present investigation established that SMA welds made using Cr-Mn-N electrode were observed to have a austenite dendritic grain structure in the weld metal and is having poor mechanical properties but good corrosion resistance. GTA welds made using 18Ni (MDN 250) filler wire were observed to have a reverted austenite in martensite matrix of the weld metal and formation of unmixed zone at the fusion boundary which resulted in better mechanical properties and poor corrosion resistance. Fine grains and uniform distribution of delta ferrite in the austenite matrix and narrow width of weld zone are observed in autogeneous electron beam welds. A good combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance was achieved for electron beam welds of high nitrogen steel when compared to SMA and GTA welds.

  9. Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Shunichi; Hida, Yoshio; Yamamoto, Michio; Ando, Tomozumi; Shirai, Tasuku.

    1982-05-01

    Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds has been considered difficult because of the high noise level and remarkable attenuation of ultrasonic waves. To improve flaw detectability in this kind of steel, various inspection techniques have been studied. A series of tests indicated: (1) The longitudinal angle beam transducers newly developed during this study can detect 4.8 mm dia. side drilled holes in dissimilar metal welds (refraction angle: 55 0 from SUS side, 45 0 from CS side) and in cast stainless steel welds (refraction angle: 45 0 , inspection frequency: 1 MHz). (2) Cracks more than 5% t in depth in the heat affected zones of fine-grain stainless steel pipe welds can be detected by the 45 0 shear wave angle beam method (inspection frequency: 2 MHz). (3) The pattern recognition method using frequency analysis technology was presumed useful for discriminating crack signals from spurious echoes. (author)

  10. Electron beam generated in low pressure noble gas atmosphere – Compact device construction and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawada, A.; Konarski, P.

    2013-01-01

    During the process of low vacuum electron beam welding the energy of electrons is lower than the energy of electrons in the classical electron beam welding equipment. The classical electron beam welding can not always be used to weld of small work-piece details. Sometimes it’s impossible to reduce the electron beam energy because of poor focusing in the conventional electron beam welding machines. Low vacuum electron beam welding technique is well suitable to several niche products, such as thermocouples or aluminium seals. It also allows to treat the surface of dielectric materials, which is not possible using classical electron beam welding technique. The costs of low vacuum electron beam welding process are very low. (authors)

  11. Oxidation corrosion resistant superalloys and coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Melvin R. (Inventor); Rairden, III, John R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An article of manufacture having improved high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance comprising: (a) a superalloy substrate containing a carbide reinforcing phase, and (b) a coating consisting of chromium, aluminum, carbon, at least one element selected from iron, cobalt or nickel, and optionally an element selected from yttrium or the rare earth elements.

  12. Characterization of nanoporous superalloy by SANS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strunz, Pavel; Mukherji, D.; Nath, O.; Gilles, R.; Rösler, J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 385, č. 1 (2006), s. 626-629 ISSN 0921-4526 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/06/0601 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : superalloy * pores * small - angle neutron scattering Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.872, year: 2006

  13. Chemical driving force for rafting in superalloys

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nabarro, FRN

    1997-08-15

    Full Text Available The author provides a brief overview of the chemical driving forces for rafting in superalloys. Until recently, all theories of the driving force for rafting have considered the compositions of the two phases to be fixed, although accepting...

  14. Fatigue studies of superalloys in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Masaki

    1985-01-01

    In the past 15 years, several national projects were advanced to develop high temperature machinery, such as high temperature gas-cooled reactors, gas turbines and fusion reactors. Before, the studies on the strength of superalloys were rarely carried out, however, by the above research works, superalloys are in rapid progress. Because these machinery are subjected to temperature cycles and vibration stress, the fatigue failure is the main concern in the safety analysis of the components. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the present status of the fatigue research on the alloys for high temperature use in Japan. The superalloys used for gas turbine and HTGR components are listed, and the materials tested were mostly the alloys of nickel base, cobalt base or iron base. In the above national projects, the main purpose was to clarify the high temperature properties including fatigue properties, to develop the method of forecasting the life span and to develop better materials. As the topics about the fatigue research on superalloys, the development of the method for forecasting the life span, the effect of directional solidification, coating and HIP process on the fatigue strength of gas turbine materials, the effect of helium and aging on the fatigue strength of HTGR materials, the fatigue strength of weldment of HTGR materials and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  15. SUPERALLOYS: AN INTRODUCTION WITH THERMAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Raza

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nickel based superalloys are commonly used materials in the aero industry and more specifically in the hot section of aero engines. These nickel and nickel iron based superalloys are precipitation strengthened alloys with a face centered cubic gamma matrix. Alloy 718, Allvac 718Plus and Waspaloy have been of great interest in the present study. Alloy 718 is a precipitation strengthened nickel-iron based alloy having gamma double prime phase (Ni3Nb as a main strengthening phase up to 650 °C. Waspaloy, another precipitation strengthened nickel base superalloy, has a very good strength at temperatures up to ~750 °C whereas Allvac 718Plus is a newly developed nickel based precipitation strengthened superalloy which retains good mechanical properties at up to ~700 °C. These three alloys were investigated in terms of how their respective solidification process reveals upon cooling.Latent heat of soloidification has been estimated for all three alloys. Differential thermal analyses (DTA have been used to approach the task. It was seen that Waspaloy has the smallest solidification range whereas Allvac 718Plus has the largest solidification interval in comparison. 

  16. Welding of Prosthetic Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciechowska M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the techniques of joining metal denture elements, used in prosthetic dentistry: the traditional soldering technique with a gas burner and a new technique of welding with a laser beam; the aim of the study was to make a comparative assessment of the quality of the joints in view of the possibility of applying them in prosthetic structures. Fractographic examinations were conducted along with tensile strength and impact strength tests, and the quality of the joints was assessed compared to the solid metal. The experiments have shown that the metal elements used to make dentures, joined by the technique which employs a laser beam, have better strength properties than those achieved with a gas burner.

  17. Progress in welding studies for Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maak, P.Y.Y.

    1985-11-01

    This report describes the progress in the development of closure-welding technology for Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal containers. Titanium, copper and Inconel 625 are being investigated as candidate materials for fabrication of these containers. Gas-tungsten-arc welding, gas metal-arc-welding, resistance-heated diffusion bonding and electron beam welding have been evaluated as candidate closure welding processes. Characteristic weldment properties, relative merits of welding techniques, suitable weld joint configurations and fit-up tolerances, and welding parameter control ranges have been identified for various container designs. Furthermore, the automation requirements for candidate welding processes have been assessed. Progress in the development of a computer-controlled remote gas-shielded arc welding system is described

  18. Residual stress measurement round robin on an electron beam welded joint between austenitic stainless steel 316L(N) and ferritic steel P91

    OpenAIRE

    Javadi, Y.; Smith, M.C.; Abburi Venkata, K.; Naveed, N.; Forsey, A.N.; Francis, J.A.; Ainsworth, R.A.; Truman, C.E.; Smith, D.J.; Hosseinzadeh, F.; Gungor, S.; Bouchard, P. J.; Dey, H.C.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Mahadevan, S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper is a research output of DMW-Creep project which is part of a national UK programme through the RCUK Energy programme and India's Department of Atomic Energy. The research is focussed on understanding the characteristics of welded joints between austenitic stainless steel and ferritic steel that are widely used in many nuclear power generating plants and petrochemical industries as well as conventional coal and gas-fired power systems. The members of the DMW-Creep project have under...

  19. Precision welding unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanke, R.

    1982-01-01

    The advantages of mechanized orbital-welding in TIG-pulse-technique are exact calculated heat input welding data adapted the certain welding position, reproducibility, high quality standard, lower physical, requirements of the operator. (orig.)

  20. Distortion Control during Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ methods to control welding distortion. In these methods local heating and/or cooling strategies are applied during welding. Additional heating and/or cooling sources can be implemented either stationa...

  1. Quality status display for a vibration welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, John Patrick; Abell, Jeffrey A.; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Bracey, Jennifer; Wang, Hui; Tavora, Peter W.; Davis, Jeffrey S.; Hutchinson, Daniel C.; Reardon, Ronald L.; Utz, Shawn

    2017-11-28

    A method includes receiving, during a vibration welding process, a set of sensory signals from a collection of sensors positioned with respect to a work piece during formation of a weld on or within the work piece. The method also includes receiving control signals from a welding controller during the process, with the control signals causing the welding horn to vibrate at a calibrated frequency, and processing the received sensory and control signals using a host machine. Additionally, the method includes displaying a predicted weld quality status on a surface of the work piece using a status projector. The method may include identifying and display a quality status of a suspect weld. The laser projector may project a laser beam directly onto or immediately adjacent to the suspect welds, e.g., as a red, green, blue laser or a gas laser having a switched color filter.

  2. WELDING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  3. Single-pulse Conduction Limited Laser Welding Using A Diffractive Optical Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, C. Y.; Bolut, M.; Sundqvist, J.; Kaplan, A. F. H.; Assunção, E.; Quintino, L.; Blackburn, J.

    Conduction limited laser welding is commonly used in electronic and battery applications, where a high width-to-depth ratio weld is desirable. A laser beam with Gaussian or top-hat distributions is often used to produce conduction limited spot welds. Both these energy distributions result in a higher proportion of the laser beam energy being introduced towards the centre of the welded spot and consequently, a reduced penetration weld towards the circumference of the beam spot. The use of diffractive optical elements to tailor the energy distribution of the laser beam has been evaluated. An incident laser beam with an energy distribution in the shape of a ring or C-shape was projected onto the material, which results in heat propagating towards the centre, producing a shallow weld with a consistent depth of penetration across the entire overlapped joint. The results confirmed a corresponding thermal model which predicted an even distribution of heat at the joint interface.

  4. Weld metal characterization of 316L(N) austenitic stainless steel by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present work is focused on EBW of 316L(N) austenitic stainless steel varying the welding parameters such as beam power and welding speed. This study is carried out by analyzing the mechanical and metallurgical properties of the welded material. The mechanical properties have been evaluated using tensile, impact, ...

  5. Comparative evaluation of tungsten inert gas and laser beam ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    - cluded that LB welding process is more suitable to join AA5083-H321. Keywords. Aluminum alloys; laser beam welding; mechanical properties; vapourization. 1. Introduction. Aluminum and its alloys are widely used in the transportation, ...

  6. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  7. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  8. Melt pool vorticity in deep penetration laser material welding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, the vorticity of melt motion in the keyhole and weld pool has been evaluated in case of high power CO2 laser beam welding. The circulation of vorticity is obtained as a function of Reynolds number for a given keyhole volume which is linked to Mach number variation. The shear stress and thermal fluxes ...

  9. Melt pool vorticity in deep penetration laser material welding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bility of stationary laser weld keyholes have been investigated using numerical simulation. The effect of ... with a high aspect ratio and this is the most advantageous feature of welding by high-energy- density beams. .... Cg is a gas flow parameter, Cg (Re) in equation (4) depends on the Reynolds number Re = rkhvl vg.

  10. Comparison of Plasma, Metal Inactive Gas (MIG) and Tungsten Inactive Gas (TIG) Processes for Laser Hybrid Welding (302)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2003-01-01

    source, ignition and running torch stability, weld phase transformation and change in ductility and overall weld quality are described. The results show that all three processes can successfully be integrated with a CO2 laser beam for hybrid welding. Due to the pilot arc in plasma welding, this process......, the MIG process is more difficult to control than laser/plasma and laser/TIG processes. All three types of secondary heat sources enable an increased ductility of the weld as compared to pure laser welding when welding 1.8 mm GA 260 with a TIG torch and 2.13 mm CMn steel with a plasma arc or MIG...

  11. The microstructure and mechanical properties of a welded molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadsworth, J.; Morse, G.R.; Chewey, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    Wrought Ti-Zr-Mo (TZM) alloy has been welded using electron beam, laser and tungsten-inert gas welding techniques. The microstructure, tensile properties and fracture surfaces of these welded samples have been examined. Although the welds have been found to be defect free, a disparity in grain size leading to large strength differences exists between the weld and parent metal. Tensile tests have revealed that fusion zone strengths are typical of those expected for the grain size in the weld metal. However, brittle behavior is also always observed, with fracture initiating at grain boundaries and propagating by intergranular and cleavage modes. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis has eliminated oxygen or other interstitial elements as sources of grain boundary embrittlement. It is proposed that brittle behavior is a result of local high strain rates in the weld zone. These local high strain rates arise from the strength difference between the wrought parent metal and the weld metal as a result of the strong grain size dependence of TZM. It is shown that, either by reducing the strain rate of testing or by removing the grain size difference between the parent and weld metals by heat treatment, significant ductility can in fact be achieved in tensile-tested butt-welded TZM. Thus, it is proposed that TZM welds are not inherently brittle as had commonly been believed. (Auth.)

  12. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  13. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ

  14. Welding and cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drews, P.; Schulze Frielinghaus, W.

    1978-01-01

    This is a survey, with 198 literature references, of the papers published in the fields of welding and cutting within the last three years. The subjects dealt with are: weldability of the materials - Welding methods - Thermal cutting - Shaping and calculation of welded joints - Environmental protection in welding and cutting. (orig.) [de

  15. Effects of helium impurities on superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selle, J.E.

    1977-07-01

    A review of the literature on the effects of helium impurities on superalloys at elevated temperatures was undertaken. The actual effects of these impurities vary depending on the alloy, composition of the gas atmosphere, and temperature. In general, exposure in helium produces significant but not catastrophic changes in the structure and properties of the alloys. The effects of these treatments on the structure, creep, fatigue, and mechanical properties of the various alloys are reviewed and discussed. Suggestions for future work are presented.

  16. Effects of helium impurities on superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selle, J.E.

    1977-07-01

    A review of the literature on the effects of helium impurities on superalloys at elevated temperatures was undertaken. The actual effects of these impurities vary depending on the alloy, composition of the gas atmosphere, and temperature. In general, exposure in helium produces significant but not catastrophic changes in the structure and properties of the alloys. The effects of these treatments on the structure, creep, fatigue, and mechanical properties of the various alloys are reviewed and discussed. Suggestions for future work are presented

  17. The Influence of Welding Parameters on the Nugget Formation of Resistance Spot Welding of Inconel 625 Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei Ashtiani, Hamid Reza; Zarandooz, Roozbeh

    2015-09-01

    A 2D axisymmetric electro-thermo-mechanical finite element (FE) model is developed to investigate the effect of current intensity, welding time, and electrode tip diameter on temperature distributions and nugget size in resistance spot welding (RSW) process of Inconel 625 superalloy sheets using ABAQUS commercial software package. The coupled electro-thermal analysis and uncoupled thermal-mechanical analysis are used for modeling process. In order to improve accuracy of simulation, material properties including physical, thermal, and mechanical properties have been considered to be temperature dependent. The thickness and diameter of computed weld nuggets are compared with experimental results and good agreement is observed. So, FE model developed in this paper provides prediction of quality and shape of the weld nuggets and temperature distributions with variation of each process parameter, suitably. Utilizing this FE model assists in adjusting RSW parameters, so that expensive experimental process can be avoided. The results show that increasing welding time and current intensity lead to an increase in the nugget size and electrode indentation, whereas increasing electrode tip diameter decreases nugget size and electrode indentation.

  18. Influence of shielding gas pressure on welding characteristics in CO2 laser-MIG hybrid welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanbin; Lei, Zhenglong; Li, Liqun; Wu, Lin

    2006-01-01

    The droplet transfer behavior and weld characteristics have been investigated under different pressures of shielding gas in CO2 laser and metal inert/active gas (laser-MIG) hybrid welding process. The experimental results indicate that the inherent droplet transfer frequency and stable welding range of conventional MIG arc are changed due to the interaction between CO2 laser beam and MIG arc in laser-MIG hybrid welding process, and the shielding gas pressure has a crucial effect on welding characteristics. When the pressure of shielding gas is low in comparison with MIG welding, the frequency of droplet transfer decreases, and the droplet transfer becomes unstable in laser-MIG hybrid welding. So the penetration depth decreases, which shows the characteristic of unstable hybrid welding. However, when the pressure of shielding gas increases to a critical value, the hybrid welding characteristic is changed from unstable hybrid welding to stable hybrid welding, and the frequency of droplet transfer and the penetration depth increase significantly.

  19. Static recrystallization behavior of AEREX350 superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinifar, Mehdi, E-mail: hossem@mcmaster.ca [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asgari, Sirous, E-mail: sasgari@sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-25

    Research highlights: {yields} The static recrystallization behavior of a complex superalloy, AEREX 350, is investigated. {yields} It is found that this alloy resists recrystallization to very high temperatures (1025 deg. C, 0.81T{sub m}). {yields} TEM investigation showed evidence of grain boundary pinning by the Widmanstaetten {eta} platelets. {yields} Recrystallization of the AEREX 350 superalloy proceeds by the discontinuous precipitation of the {eta} particles behind the moving boundary. - Abstract: The recrystallization behavior of a commercial nickel-cobalt base superalloy, AEREX 350, is investigated by means of hardness test, X-ray diffraction, and microscopy. It is found that the alloy resists recrystallization up to a high temperature of 1025 deg. C. Recrystallized grains are readily formed at grain boundaries below this temperature; however, the growth of these new grains is inhibited by Widmanstaetten {eta} particles having coherent facets with the nickel matrix ({gamma}). The passage of the recrystallization front results in coherency loss and consequently dissolution of the {eta} platelets. Recrystallization proceeds with a discontinuous precipitation of the {eta} phase behind the moving boundary.

  20. L12-Strengthened Cobalt-Base Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Akane; Inui, Haruyuki; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2015-07-01

    The discovery of the γ'-Co3(Al,W) phase with an L12 structure provided Co-base alloys with a new strengthening mechanism, enabling a new class of high-temperature material: Co-base superalloys. This review discusses the current understanding of the phase stability, deformation, and oxidation behaviors of γ' single-phase and γ + γ' two-phase alloys in comparison with Ni-base γ'-L12 phase and γ + γ' superalloys. Relatively low stacking fault energies and phase stability of the γ' phase compared with those in Ni-base alloys are responsible for the unique deformation behaviors observed in Co-base γ' and γ + γ' alloys. Controlling energies of planar defects, such as stacking faults and antiphase boundaries, by alloying is critical for alloy development. Experimental and density functional theory studies indicate that additions of Ta, Ti, Nb, Hf, and Ni are effective in simultaneously increasing the phase stability and stacking fault energy of γ'-Co3(Al,W), thus improving the high-temperature strength of Co-base γ' phase and γ + γ' two-phase superalloys.

  1. Development of a Refractory High Entropy Superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg N. Senkov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure, phase composition and mechanical properties of a refractory high entropy superalloy, AlMo0.5NbTa0.5TiZr, are reported in this work. The alloy consists of a nano-scale mixture of two phases produced by the decomposition from a high temperature body-centered cubic (BCC phase. The first phase is present in the form of cuboidal-shaped nano-precipitates aligned in rows along <100>-type directions, has a disordered BCC crystal structure with the lattice parameter a1 = 326.9 ± 0.5 pm and is rich in Mo, Nb and Ta. The second phase is present in the form of channels between the cuboidal nano-precipitates, has an ordered B2 crystal structure with the lattice parameter a2 = 330.4 ± 0.5 pm and is rich in Al, Ti and Zr. Both phases are coherent and have the same crystallographic orientation within the former grains. The formation of this modulated nano-phase structure is discussed in the framework of nucleation-and-growth and spinodal decomposition mechanisms. The yield strength of this refractory high entropy superalloy is superior to the yield strength of Ni-based superalloys in the temperature range of 20 °C to 1200 °C.

  2. Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

    2006-02-23

    In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life.

  3. Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

    2006-01-01

    In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life

  4. 76 FR 8773 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-1090 (Review)] Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Termination of five-year... revocation of the antidumping duty order on superalloy degassed chromium from Japan would be likely to lead...

  5. 75 FR 67100 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... Chromium From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of a five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on superalloy degassed chromium from Japan. SUMMARY... order on superalloy degassed chromium from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence...

  6. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  7. Maintenance welding technology in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Fukuhisa

    1999-01-01

    Welding technology used for a nuclear power plant greatly differs depending on either when the plant is being constructed or when the plant is in operation. Welding used in plant construction does not much differ, in method and technology, from that used in ordinary thermal power, chemical or other plants. On the other hand, repair welding technology for the reactor section of a nuclear power plant in operation greatly differs from that used for those plants. The recent requests for the prolongation of the life of nuclear power plants have remarkably improved welding technology for maintenance and repair in the nuclear field. Thus, the existing welding technology has been improved and new advanced welding technologies have been created one after another. Problems with the reactor section and welding technology for its maintenance and repair are presented. The temper bead method and the laser beam cladding and modification method for reactor pressure vessels, SCC and irradiation-assisted SCC measures for vessel structures, and SCC measures for heat-exchange tubes and the overall replacement of a steam generator are presented. (N.H.)

  8. Report Summarizing the Effort Required to Initiate Welding of Irradiated Materials within the Welding Cubicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, Greg [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Sutton, Benjamin J. [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Tatman, Jonathan K. [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Vance, Mark Christopher [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Allen W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Clark, Scarlett R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feng, Zhili [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, Roger G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chen, Jian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tang, Wei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hu, Xunxiang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gibson, Brian T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The advanced welding facility within a hot cell at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which has been jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and the Electric Power Research Institute, Long Term Operations Program and the Welding and Repair Technology Center, is in the final phase of development. Research and development activities in this facility will involve direct testing of advanced welding technologies on irradiated materials in order to address the primary technical challenge of helium induced cracking that can arise when conventional fusion welding techniques are utilized on neutron irradiated stainless steels and nickel-base alloys. This report details the effort that has been required since the beginning of fiscal year 2017 to initiate welding research and development activities on irradiated materials within the hot cell cubicle, which houses welding sub-systems that include laser beam welding (LBW) and friction stir welding (FSW) and provides material containment within the hot cell.

  9. Ship construction and welding

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Nisith R

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses various aspects of ship construction, from ship types and construction materials, to welding technologies and accuracy control. The contents of the book are logically organized and divided into twenty-one chapters. The book covers structural arrangement with longitudinal and transverse framing systems based on the service load, and explains basic structural elements like hatch side girders, hatch end beams, stringers, etc. along with structural subassemblies like floors, bulkheads, inner bottom, decks and shells. It presents in detail double bottom construction, wing tanks & duct keels, fore & aft end structures, etc., together with necessary illustrations. The midship sections of various ship types are introduced, together with structural continuity and alignment in ship structures. With regard to construction materials, the book discusses steel, aluminum alloys and fiber reinforced composites. Various methods of steel material preparation are discussed, and plate cutting and form...

  10. Coaxial monitoring of keyhole during Yb:YAG laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol-Hee; Ahn, Do-Chang

    2012-09-01

    In laser remote welding using a scanner, high-speed welding can be achieved by using a 6-axial robot and a galvanometric mirror. In this system, because the laser projection point changes depending on the mirror's position, coaxial monitoring is required to track welding phenomena. This paper presents coaxial monitoring of the keyhole generated by an Yb:YAG laser beam during laser lap welding of steel and Al sheets. A coaxial image camera and a coaxial illumination laser are integrated into the proposed monitoring system. The areas of the keyhole and the full penetration hole were calculated by image processing, and their behaviours were investigated under various welding conditions. The keyhole was monitored using various band-pass filters and a coaxial illumination laser. Adequate filters were suggested for steel and Al alloy welding.

  11. Development of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strain, R.V.; Leong, K.H.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    Laser welding is potentially advantageous because of its flexibility and the reduced amount of material affected by the weld. Lasers do not require a vacuum (as do electron beam welders) and the welds they produce high depth-to-width ratios. Scoping with a small pulsed 50 J YAG laser indicated that lasers could produce successful welds in vanadium alloy (V-5%Cr-5%Ti) sheet (1 mm thick) when the fusion zone was isolated from air. The pulsed laser required an isolating chamber filled with inert gas to produce welds that did not contain cracks and showed only minor hardness increases. Following the initial scoping tests, a series of tests were preformed with a 6 kW continuous CO{sub 2} laser. Successful bead-on-plate welds were made on V-4%Cr-4%Ti and V-5%Cr-5%Ti alloys to depths of about 4 mm with this laser.

  12. Pre-Industry-Optimisation of the Laser Welding Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Hui

    phenomena of the laser welding process including the behaviour of the keyhole and plume, and the correlation between the adjustable process parameters: laser power, welding speed, focal point position, gas parameters etc. and the characteristics describing the quality of the weld: seam depth and width......) is generated by the self-learning mechanism - the neural network. The optimisation procedure is completed with the welding process being carried out by adjusting the focus of the laser beam to the OFPP. The self-learning focus control system, employing the off-line trained neural network to generate the OFPPs......This dissertation documents the investigations into on-line monitoring the CO2 laser welding process and optimising the process parameters for achieving high quality welds. The requirements for realisation of an on-line control system are, first of all, a clear understanding of the dynamic...

  13. Laser welding of 6xxx series aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zervaki, A.D.; Haidenmenopoulos, G.N. [Thessaly Univ., Volos (Greece). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

    2000-07-01

    Considerable interest has emerged recently in applying laser welding to aluminum alloys especially in the aerospace, automotive and shipbuilding industries. in the present work experimental results regarding CO{sub 2} laser welding of aluminum alloys 6063, 6061 and 6013 of 1.8 mm thickness are being presented. CO{sub 2} lasers with 1.5, 3 and 5 kW output power were employed. The effect of laser power, beam travel speed, focal depth shielding gas, surface preparation on weld geometrical characteristics (depth of penetration and width of HAZ) as well as weld quality (microhardness and internal defects) is discussed. Optimum welding conditions were determined for the alloy 6063 where for certain values of heat input weld defects such as pores, hot cracking and partial penetration were eliminated. Modeling work is underway to predict the microstructural evolution and resulting hardness profiles in the HAZ. (orig.)

  14. Laser assisted arc welding for aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuerschbach, P.W.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effector to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (<1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  15. Automatic welding of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briola, J.

    1958-01-01

    The welding process depends on the type of fuel element, the can material and the number of cartridges to be welded: - inert-gas welding (used for G2 and the 1. set of EL3), - inert atmosphere arc welding (used for welding uranium and zirconium), - electronic welding (used for the 2. set of EL3 and the tank of Proserpine). (author) [fr

  16. Diffusion welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniault, J.; Gillet, R.

    1969-01-01

    After a brief recall of the principle, and of the advantages of the method, we give some examples of metallic bonding in a first part where we describe preliminary trials: Ta-Mo, Zr-Zr, Zr-Nb, Nb-stainless steel, Mo-stainless steel, aluminium-aluminium (A5-A5). The second part of the note is devoted to trials on construction elements: on tubular elements for bonding between Mo or Nb on one hand, and stainless steel on the other hand (We indicate in what conditions the bonding are tight and what are their mechanical strength and their resistance to thermic cycles). We indicate, in this chapter, a method to obtain radiation windows in Be welded on an element made of stainless steel. (authors) [fr

  17. Sensor-guided robotic laser welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, M.W.

    2007-01-01

    Robotic laserwelding is a promising joining technique for welding of continuous seams in 3D products. High quality joints can be realised provided that the manipulation of the laser beam and the product tolerances meet strict criteria. The requirements for the positioning accuracy of the laser

  18. Plasma Arc Augmented CO2 laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Andersen, Mikkel; Frederiksen, Niels

    2001-01-01

    In order to reduce the hardness of laser beam welded 2.13 mm medium strength steel CMn 250, a plasma arc has been used simultaneously with a 2.6 kW CO2 laser source. In a number of systematic laboratory tests, the plasma arc current, plasma gas flow and distance to the laser source were varied...

  19. A Weld Position Recognition Method Based on Directional and Structured Light Information Fusion in Multi-Layer/Multi-Pass Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jinle; Du, Dong; Wang, Li; Chang, Shuhe; Peng, Guodong; Wang, Wenzhu

    2018-01-01

    Multi-layer/multi-pass welding (MLMPW) technology is widely used in the energy industry to join thick components. During automatic welding using robots or other actuators, it is very important to recognize the actual weld pass position using visual methods, which can then be used not only to perform reasonable path planning for actuators, but also to correct any deviations between the welding torch and the weld pass position in real time. However, due to the small geometrical differences between adjacent weld passes, existing weld position recognition technologies such as structured light methods are not suitable for weld position detection in MLMPW. This paper proposes a novel method for weld position detection, which fuses various kinds of information in MLMPW. First, a synchronous acquisition method is developed to obtain various kinds of visual information when directional light and structured light sources are on, respectively. Then, interferences are eliminated by fusing adjacent images. Finally, the information from directional and structured light images is fused to obtain the 3D positions of the weld passes. Experiment results show that each process can be done in 30 ms and the deviation is less than 0.6 mm. The proposed method can be used for automatic path planning and seam tracking in the robotic MLMPW process as well as electron beam freeform fabrication process. PMID:29304026

  20. A Weld Position Recognition Method Based on Directional and Structured Light Information Fusion in Multi-Layer/Multi-Pass Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinle Zeng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-layer/multi-pass welding (MLMPW technology is widely used in the energy industry to join thick components. During automatic welding using robots or other actuators, it is very important to recognize the actual weld pass position using visual methods, which can then be used not only to perform reasonable path planning for actuators, but also to correct any deviations between the welding torch and the weld pass position in real time. However, due to the small geometrical differences between adjacent weld passes, existing weld position recognition technologies such as structured light methods are not suitable for weld position detection in MLMPW. This paper proposes a novel method for weld position detection, which fuses various kinds of information in MLMPW. First, a synchronous acquisition method is developed to obtain various kinds of visual information when directional light and structured light sources are on, respectively. Then, interferences are eliminated by fusing adjacent images. Finally, the information from directional and structured light images is fused to obtain the 3D positions of the weld passes. Experiment results show that each process can be done in 30 ms and the deviation is less than 0.6 mm. The proposed method can be used for automatic path planning and seam tracking in the robotic MLMPW process as well as electron beam freeform fabrication process.

  1. Laser Cladding of Ultra-Thin Nickel-Based Superalloy Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Tobias; Rommel, Daniel; Scherm, Florian; Gorywoda, Marek; Glatzel, Uwe

    2017-03-10

    Laser cladding is a well-established process to apply coatings on metals. However, on substrates considerably thinner than 1 mm it is only rarely described in the literature. In this work 200 µm thin sheets of nickel-based superalloy 718 are coated with a powder of a cobalt-based alloy, Co-28Cr-9W-1.5Si, by laser cladding. The process window is very narrow, therefore, a precisely controlled Yb fiber laser was used. To minimize the input of energy into the substrate, lines were deposited by setting single overlapping points. In a design of experiments (DoE) study, the process parameters of laser power, laser spot area, step size, exposure time, and solidification time were varied and optimized by examining the clad width, weld penetration, and alloying depth. The microstructure of the samples was investigated by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), combined with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Similarly to laser cladding of thicker substrates, the laser power shows the highest influence on the resulting clad. With a higher laser power, the clad width and alloying depth increase, and with a larger laser spot area the weld penetration decreases. If the process parameters are controlled precisely, laser cladding of such thin sheets is manageable.

  2. Laser Cladding of Ultra-Thin Nickel-Based Superalloy Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Gabriel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Laser cladding is a well-established process to apply coatings on metals. However, on substrates considerably thinner than 1 mm it is only rarely described in the literature. In this work 200 µm thin sheets of nickel-based superalloy 718 are coated with a powder of a cobalt-based alloy, Co–28Cr–9W–1.5Si, by laser cladding. The process window is very narrow, therefore, a precisely controlled Yb fiber laser was used. To minimize the input of energy into the substrate, lines were deposited by setting single overlapping points. In a design of experiments (DoE study, the process parameters of laser power, laser spot area, step size, exposure time, and solidification time were varied and optimized by examining the clad width, weld penetration, and alloying depth. The microstructure of the samples was investigated by optical microscope (OM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, combined with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. Similarly to laser cladding of thicker substrates, the laser power shows the highest influence on the resulting clad. With a higher laser power, the clad width and alloying depth increase, and with a larger laser spot area the weld penetration decreases. If the process parameters are controlled precisely, laser cladding of such thin sheets is manageable.

  3. Low-Cobalt Powder-Metallurgy Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harf, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    Highly-stressed jet-engine parts made with less cobalt. Udimet 700* (or equivalent) is common nickel-based superalloy used in hot sections of jet engines for many years. This alloy, while normally used in wrought condition, also gas-atomized into prealloyed powder-metallurgy (PM) product. Product can be consolidated by hot isostatically pressing (HIPPM condition) and formed into parts such as turbine disk. Such jet-engine disks "see" both high stresses and temperatures to 1,400 degrees F (760 degrees C).

  4. Experience of Application of EBW in Producing Welded VT41 Alloy Drums in the Design of an HPC in an Advanced Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, Yu. G.; Fomichev, E. O.; Kashapov, O. S.; Kyaramyan, K. A.

    2017-12-01

    The conditions of electron-beam welding (EBW) of ring samples made of a VT41 alloy are adjusted to produce large welded joints of this alloy for a high-pressure compressor (HPC) of an advanced engine. The problems of quality control of a welded joint, the level of residual stresses in the near-weld zone, the microstructure of the welded joint, and its properties are considered.

  5. Evaluating the Properties of Dissimilar Metal Welding Between Inconel 625 and 316L Stainless Steel by Applying Different Welding Methods and Consumables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourdani, Ahmad; Derakhshandeh-Haghighi, Reza

    2018-04-01

    The current work was carried out to characterize welding of Inconel 625 superalloy and 316L stainless steel. In the present study, shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) with two types of filler metals (ERNiCrMo-3 and ERSS316L) and an electrode (ENiCrMo-3) were utilized. This paper describes the selection of the proper welding method and welding consumables in dissimilar metal joining. During solidification of ERNiCrMo-3 filler metal, Nb and Mo leave dendritic cores and are rejected to inter-dendritic regions. However, ERSS316L filler metal has small amounts of elements with a high tendency for segregation. So, occurrence of constitutional super-cooling for changing the solidification mode from cellular to dendritic or equiaxed is less probable. Using GTAW with lower heat input results in higher cooling rate and finer microstructure and less Nb segregation. The interface between weld metal and base metal and also unmixed zones was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Microhardness measurements, tensile test, and Charpy impact test were performed to see the effect of these parameters on mechanical properties of the joints.

  6. Evaluating the Properties of Dissimilar Metal Welding Between Inconel 625 and 316L Stainless Steel by Applying Different Welding Methods and Consumables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourdani, Ahmad; Derakhshandeh-Haghighi, Reza

    2018-01-01

    The current work was carried out to characterize welding of Inconel 625 superalloy and 316L stainless steel. In the present study, shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) with two types of filler metals (ERNiCrMo-3 and ERSS316L) and an electrode (ENiCrMo-3) were utilized. This paper describes the selection of the proper welding method and welding consumables in dissimilar metal joining. During solidification of ERNiCrMo-3 filler metal, Nb and Mo leave dendritic cores and are rejected to inter-dendritic regions. However, ERSS316L filler metal has small amounts of elements with a high tendency for segregation. So, occurrence of constitutional super-cooling for changing the solidification mode from cellular to dendritic or equiaxed is less probable. Using GTAW with lower heat input results in higher cooling rate and finer microstructure and less Nb segregation. The interface between weld metal and base metal and also unmixed zones was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Microhardness measurements, tensile test, and Charpy impact test were performed to see the effect of these parameters on mechanical properties of the joints.

  7. Process stabilization by dual focus laser welding of aluminum alloys for car body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Kimihiro; Iwase, Takakuni; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Dausinger, Friedrich H.; Hohenberger, Bernd; Mueller, Matthias; Matsunawa, Akira; Seto, Naoki

    2003-09-01

    Aluminum alloys were welded using dual focus beams formed with two Nd:YAG lasers with the aim of obtaining a stable welding process. The relationship between the configuration of the spot beams and the quality of the weld beads was investigated using X-ray and high-speed camera observations. The number of pores was clearly related to the ratio of the keyhole depth to the keyhole opening. A larger keyhole opening and/or a shallower keyhole depth resulted in a smaller number of pores caused by instability of the weld pool. Based on the investigation, a car body component was welded with a dual focus beam system. The results show that aluminum car body panels can be welded stably at high speed with little distortion under optimum conditions.

  8. Handbook of Plastic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the information about the laser welding of plastic. Laser welding is a matured process nevertheless laser welding of micro dimensional plastic parts is still a big challenge. This report collects the latest information about the laser welding of plastic...... materials and provides an extensive knowhow on the industrial plastic welding process. The objectives of the report include: - Provide the general knowhow of laser welding for the beginners - Summarize the state-of-the-art information on the laser welding of plastics - Find the technological limits in terms...... of design, materials and process - Find the best technology, process and machines adaptive to Sonion’s components - Provide the skills to Sonion’s Design Engineers for successful design of the of the plastic components suitable for the laser welding The ultimate goal of this report is to serve...

  9. Numerical microstructural analysis of automotive-grade steels when joined with an array of welding processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, J.E.; Khurana, S.P.; Li, T.

    2004-01-01

    Weld strength, formability, and impact resistance for joints on automotive steels is dependent on the underlying microstructure. A martensitic weld area is often a precursor to reduced mechanical performance. In this paper, efforts are made to predict underlying joint microstructures for a range of processing approaches, steel types, and gauges. This was done first by calculating cooling rates for some typical automotive processes [resistance spot welding (RSW), resistance mash seam welding (RMSEW), laser beam welding (LBW), and gas metal arc welding (GMAW)]. Then, critical cooling rates for martensite formation were calculated for a range of automotive steels using an available thermodynamically based phase transformation model. These were then used to define combinations of process type, steel type, and gauge where welds could be formed avoiding martensite in the weld area microstructure

  10. Liquid phase and supercooled liquid phase welding of bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Recent progress on welding in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) has been reviewed. BMGs have been successfully welded to BMGs or crystalline metals by liquid phase welding using explosion, pulse-current and electron-beam methods, and by supercooled liquid phase welding using friction method. Successful welding of the liquid phase methods was due to the high glass-forming ability of the BMGs and the high concentration of welding energy in these methods. In contrast, the supercooled liquid phase welding was successful due to the thermally stable supercooled liquid state of the BMGs and the superplasticity and viscous flow of the supercooled liquid. The successful welding of BMGs to BMGs and crystalline materials is promising for the future development of BMGs as engineering materials

  11. Inline Repair of Blowouts During Laser Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K. S.; Olsen, F. O.; Kristiansen, M.; Madsen, O.

    In a current laser welding production process of components of stainless steel, a butt joint configuration may lead to failures in the form of blowouts, causing an unacceptable welding quality. A study to improve the laser welding process was performed with the aim of solving the problem by designing a suitable pattern of multiple small laser spots rather than a single spot in the process zone. The blowouts in the process are provoked by introducing small amounts of zinc powder in the butt joint. When the laser heats up the zinc, this rapidly evaporates and expands, leaving the melt pool to be blown away locally. Multiple spot pattern designs are tested. Spot patterns are produced by applying diffractive optics to a beam from a single mode fiber laser. Results from welding while applying spot patterns both with and without trailing spots are presented. Data showing the power ratio between a trailing spot and two main spots as a function of spot distance is also presented. The results of the study show that applying multiple spots in the welding process may improve the process stability when welding materials with small impurities in the form of zinc particles.

  12. Welding Course Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  13. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  14. Misfit in Inconel-Type Superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Strunz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An important parameter for the characterization of microstructural changes in nickel base superalloys is the misfit - the relative difference between lattice parameters of γ matrix and γ′ precipitates. The misfit in IN738LC superalloy was examined at POLDI time-of-flight (TOF neutron diffractometer both at room temperature and in situ at elevated temperatures using a high-temperature furnace. A careful out-of-furnace measurement yielded the lattice parameters of both γ and γ′ phase at room temperature (aγ=3.58611(10 Å, aγ′=3.58857(17 Å as well as the misfit (equal to 6.9(6×10-4. The in situ measurement at elevated temperatures provided the temperature dependence of the lattice parameters of γ (up to 1120°C and γ′ (up to 1000°C. Using these data, the evolution of the misfit with temperature was calculated. The misfit decreases with increasing temperature until it reaches zero value at a temperature around 800°C. Above 800°C, it becomes negative.

  15. Numerical estimation of temperature field in a laser welded butt joint made of dissimilar materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saternus Zbigniew

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper concerns numerical analysis of thermal phenomena occurring in the butt welding of two different materials by a laser beam welding. The temperature distribution for the welded butt-joint is obtained on the basis of numerical simulations performed in the ABAQUS program. Numerical analysis takes into account the thermophysical properties of welded plate made of two different materials. Temperature distribution in analysed joints is obtained on the basis of numerical simulation in Abaqus/Standard solver, which allowed the determination of the geometry of laser welded butt-joint.

  16. Investigation into the influence of post-weld heat treatment on the microstructure and hardness of Inconel X-750

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prachya Peasura

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a post-weld heat treatment for a precipitation-hardened nickel alloy. Inconel X-750 is a nickel-based superalloy for gas tungsten arc welding processes. The materials were heat-treated in two steps: solution and aging. The post-weld heat treatment variables examined in this study included post-weld heat treatment temperatures of 705°C, 775°C, and 845°C and post-weld heat treatment time of 2–24 h in 2-h increments. The resulting materials were examined using the full factorial design of experiments to determine the resulting material hardness and observed with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in the fusion zone and heat-affected zone. The results show that a longer post-weld heat treatment time corresponds to larger γ′ precipitates and a smaller amount of Cr23C6 at the grain boundaries, which can decrease the overall hardness. The post-weld heat treatment analysis indicates that an increase in the amount of γ′ results in better mechanical properties for particles with octagonal shapes and a small size. A factorial analysis, which was conducted on the relationship between the post-weld heat treatment temperature and time to the hardness of the fusion zone, had a 95% confidence level.

  17. Plug-welding of ODS cladding tube for BOR-60 irradiation. Welding condition setting. Device remodeling and welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Masayuki; Ishibashi, Fujio; Kono, Syusaku; Hirako, Kazuhito; Tsukada, Tatsuya

    2003-04-01

    Irradiation test in BOR-60 at RIAR to judge practical use prospect of ODS cladding tube at early stage is planned as Japan-Russia a joint research. RIAR does fuel design of fuel pin used for this joint research. JNC manufactures ODS cladding tube and bar materials (two steel kind of martensite and ferrite), upper endplug production. They are welded by pressurized resistance welding, and are inspected in JNC Tokai, transported to RIAR. And RIAR manufactures vibration packing fuel pin. On the upper endplug welding by pressurized resistance welding method, we worded on the problems such as decision of welding condition by changing the size and crystallization of cladding tube and the design of endplug, and the chucking device remodeling to correspond to the long scale cladding tube welding system (included handling) and of quality assurance method. Especially, use of long scale cladding tube caused problem that bending transformation occurred in cladding tube by welding pressure. However, we solved this problem by shortening the distance of cladding tube colette chuck and pressure receiving, and by putting the sleeve in an internal space of welding machine, losing the bending of cladding tube. Moreover, welding defects were occurred by the difference of an inside state, an inside defect and recrystallization of cladding tube. We solved the problem by inside grinding for the edge of tube, angle beam method by ultrasonic wave, and ultrasonic wave form confirmation. Manufacturing process with long scale cladding tube including heat-treatment to remove combustion return and remaining stress was established besides, Afterwards, welding of ODS cladding tube and upper endplug. As the quality assurance system, we constructed [Documented procedure (referred to JOYO)] based on [Document of the QA plan] by OEC. Welding and inspection were executed by the document procedure. It is thought that the quality assurance method become references for the irradiation test in JOYO in the

  18. Concurrent laser welding and annealing exploiting robotically manipulated optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Hussein A.; Siddiqui, Rafiq A.

    2002-12-01

    Present investigation reports on the effects of incorporating pre- and post-heating on the mechanical properties of laser-welded joints, in normal air condition. Two common types of steels, i.e. mild steel, and stainless steel were welded with Lumonic's MS 830 Nd 3+:YAG laser machine, with an output capacity of 400 W. Due to the low integrated energy input required for laser welded joints, the welded region are often cooled too rapidly via conduction to the surrounding material and atmosphere, which leads to hardness discontinuities in the fusion and heat affected zone. The effects of in-process laser annealing on the mechanical properties and microstructure of laser-welded joints are important in any manufacturing operation. To improve the poor weld characteristics, this work investigates the use of automated dual-beam delivery system to implement a pre- or post-heating technique, simultaneously with the welding process. The results show that proper selection of the control parameters for the pre- or post-heating can reduce the hardness of the weld significantly and improve the welded joints mechanical properties, such as higher tensile strength and better durability.

  19. Hybrid laser arc welding: State-of-art review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acherjee, Bappa

    2018-02-01

    Hybrid laser arc welding simultaneously utilizes the arc welding and the laser welding, in a common interaction zone. The synergic effects of laser beam and eclectic arc in the same weld pool results in an increase of welding speed and penetration depth along with the enhancement of gap bridging capability and process stability. This paper presents the current status of this hybrid technique in terms of research, developments and applications. Effort is made to present a comprehensive technical know-how about this process through a systematic review of research articles, industrial catalogues, technical notes, etc. In the introductory part of the review, an overview of the hybrid laser arc welding is presented, including operation principle, process requirements, historical developments, benefits and drawbacks of the process. This is followed by a detailed discussion on control parameters those govern the performance of hybrid laser arc welding process. Thereafter, a report of improvements of performance and weld qualities achieved by using hybrid welding process is presented based on review of several research papers. The succeeding sections furnish the examples of industrial applications and the concluding remarks.

  20. METHOD OF ELECTRON BEAM PROCESSING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    As a rule, electron beam welding takes place in a vacuum. However, this means that the workpieces in question have to be placed in a vacuum chamber and have to be removed therefrom after welding. This is time−consuming and a serious limitation of a process the greatest advantage of which is the o......As a rule, electron beam welding takes place in a vacuum. However, this means that the workpieces in question have to be placed in a vacuum chamber and have to be removed therefrom after welding. This is time−consuming and a serious limitation of a process the greatest advantage of which...... is the option of welding workpieces of large thicknesses. Therefore the idea is to guide the electron beam (2) to the workpiece via a hollow wire, said wire thereby acting as a prolongation of the vacuum chamber (4) down to workpiece. Thus, a workpiece need not be placed inside the vacuum chamber, thereby...... exploiting the potential of electron beam processing to a greater degree than previously possible, for example by means of electron beam welding...

  1. A high-throughput search for new ternary superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyshadham, Chandramouli; Hansen, Jacob; Oses, Corey; Curtarolo, Stefano; Hart, Gus

    In 2006 an unexpected new superalloy, Co3[Al,W], was discovered. This new alloy is cobalt-based, in contrast to conventional superalloys, which are nickel-based. Inspired by this new discovery, we performed first-principles calculations, searching through 2224 ternary metallic systems of the form A3[B0.5C0.5], where A = Ni/Co/Fe and [B, C] = all binary combinations of 40 different elements chosen from the periodic table. We found 175 new systems that are better than the Co3[Al, W] superalloy. 75 of these systems are brand new--they have never been reported in experimental literature. These 75 new potential superalloys are good candidates for further experiments. Our calculations are consistent with current experimental literature where data exists. Work supported under: ONR (MURI N00014-13-1-0635).

  2. Grinding of Inconel 713 superalloy for gas turbines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapek, J.; Kyncl, J.; Kolařík, K.; Beránek, L.; Pitrmuc, Z.; Medřický, Jan; Pala, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2016), s. 14-15 ISSN 1213-2489 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Casting defects * Gas turbine * Grinding * Nickel superalloy * Residual stresses Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials

  3. Proceedings of the Conference on Refractory Alloying Elements in Superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Some papers about the use of refractory metals in superalloys are presented. Mechanical properties, thermodynamics properties, use for nuclear fuels and corrosion resistance of those alloys are studied. (E.G.) [pt

  4. Modelling and simulation of superalloys. Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogal, Jutta; Hammerschmidt, Thomas; Drautz, Ralf (eds.)

    2014-07-01

    Superalloys are multi-component materials with complex microstructures that offer unique properties for high-temperature applications. The complexity of the superalloy materials makes it particularly challenging to obtain fundamental insight into their behaviour from the atomic structure to turbine blades. Recent advances in modelling and simulation of superalloys contribute to a better understanding and prediction of materials properties and therefore offer guidance for the development of new alloys. This workshop will give an overview of recent progress in modelling and simulation of materials for superalloys, with a focus on single crystal Ni-base and Co-base alloys. Topics will include electronic structure methods, atomistic simulations, microstructure modelling and modelling of microstructural evolution, solidification and process simulation as well as the modelling of phase stability and thermodynamics.

  5. Numerical modeling of heat-transfer and the influence of process parameters on tailoring the grain morphology of IN718 in electron beam additive manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghavan, Narendran; Dehoff, Ryan; Pannala, Sreekanth; Simunovic, Srdjan; Kirka, Michael; Turner, John; Carlson, Neil; Babu, Sudarsanam S.

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of 3-D parts from CAD models by additive manufacturing (AM) is a disruptive technology that is transforming the metal manufacturing industry. The correlation between solidification microstructure and mechanical properties has been well understood in the casting and welding processes over the years. This paper focuses on extending these principles to additive manufacturing to understand the transient phenomena of repeated melting and solidification during electron beam powder melting process to achieve site-specific microstructure control within a fabricated component. In this paper, we have developed a novel melt scan strategy for electron beam melting of nickel-base superalloy (Inconel 718) and also analyzed 3-D heat transfer conditions using a parallel numerical solidification code (Truchas) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spatial and temporal variations of temperature gradient (G) and growth velocity (R) at the liquid-solid interface of the melt pool were calculated as a function of electron beam parameters. By manipulating the relative number of voxels that lie in the columnar or equiaxed region, the crystallographic texture of the components can be controlled to an extent. The analysis of the parameters provided optimum processing conditions that will result in columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) during the solidification. The results from the numerical simulations were validated by experimental processing and characterization thereby proving the potential of additive manufacturing process to achieve site-specific crystallographic texture control within a fabricated component.

  6. Electron Gun for Computer-controlled Welding of Small Components

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dupák, Jan; Vlček, Ivan; Zobač, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 62, 2-3 (2001), s. 159-164 ISSN 0042-207X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS2065015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : Electron beam-welding machine * Electron gun * Computer- control led beam Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.541, year: 2001

  7. Welding technology for energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    Quest for efficiency leads to extremes of operating temperature both high and low, at which for reasons of safety there must be adequate strengths and ductilities of materials under transient as well as steady conditions. The demand for large unit plant sizes arises from the need to achieve economies of scale. It has the effect of progressively increasing the section sizes over which such material properties must be sustained, and also leads to a preference for welded joints which approach the homogeneity of parent materials. The economic pressure to use impure sources of fuels creates problems of erosion and corrosion. The approach to materials and joining must be interdisciplinary and must also have regard to the broad classification of components. This paper is concerned with the present development and future prospects of the newer welding processes such as electron beam, friction and diffusion bonding, in comparison with the range of arc fusion processes, together with the joint properties that are obtained. It also makes reference to particular problems such as site construction, repair, remote welding and heat treatment

  8. Deviation of longitudinal and shear waves in austenitic stainless steel weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Reimann, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    One of the difficulties associated with the ultrasonic inspection of stainless steel weld metal is the deviation of the ultrasonic beams. This can lead to errors in determining both the location and size of reflectors. The present paper compares experimental and theoretical data related to beam steering for longitudinal and shear waves in a sample of 308 SS weld metal. Agreement between predicted and measured beam deviations is generally good. Reasons for discrepancies are discussed

  9. Interdiffusion behavior between NiAlHf coating and Ni-based single crystal superalloy with different crystal orientations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ruili; Gong, Xueyuan; Peng, Hui; Ma, Yue; Guo, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The interdiffusion behavior between the NiAlHf coating and the superalloy substrate was influenced by the crystal orientation of the substrate alloy. • The structure of TCP phases formed in SRZ and IDZ was studied. • Studying the effect of orientation crystal of substrate on the formation of SRZ. - Abstract: NiAlHf coatings were deposited onto Ni-based single crystal (SC) superalloy with different crystal orientations by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). The effects of the crystal orientations of the superalloy substrate on inter-diffusion behavior between the substrate and the NiAlHf coating were investigated. Substrate diffusion zone (SDZ) containing needle-like μ phases and interdiffusion zone (IDZ) mainly consisting of the ellipsoidal and rod-like μ phases were formed in the SC alloy after heat-treatment 10 h at 1100 °C. The thickness of secondary reaction zone (SRZ) formed in the SC alloy with (0 1 1) crystal orientation is about 14 μm after 50 h heat-treatment at 1100 °C, which is relatively thicker than that in the SC alloy with (0 0 1) crystal orientation, whereas the IDZ revealed similar thickness

  10. Efficiency of the Inertia Friction Welding Process and Its Dependence on Process Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkov, O. N.; Mahaffey, D. W.; Tung, D. J.; Zhang, W.; Semiatin, S. L.

    2017-07-01

    It has been widely assumed, but never proven, that the efficiency of the inertia friction welding (IFW) process is independent of process parameters and is relatively high, i.e., 70 to 95 pct. In the present work, the effect of IFW parameters on process efficiency was established. For this purpose, a series of IFW trials was conducted for the solid-state joining of two dissimilar nickel-base superalloys (LSHR and Mar-M247) using various combinations of initial kinetic energy ( i.e., the total weld energy, E o), initial flywheel angular velocity ( ω o), flywheel moment of inertia ( I), and axial compression force ( P). The kinetics of the conversion of the welding energy to heating of the faying sample surfaces ( i.e., the sample energy) vs parasitic losses to the welding machine itself were determined by measuring the friction torque on the sample surfaces ( M S) and in the machine bearings ( M M). It was found that the rotating parts of the welding machine can consume a significant fraction of the total energy. Specifically, the parasitic losses ranged from 28 to 80 pct of the total weld energy. The losses increased (and the corresponding IFW process efficiency decreased) as P increased (at constant I and E o), I decreased (at constant P and E o), and E o (or ω o) increased (at constant P and I). The results of this work thus provide guidelines for selecting process parameters which minimize energy losses and increase process efficiency during IFW.

  11. Analysis and validation of laser spot weld-induced distortion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knorovsky, G.A.; Kanouff, M.P.; Maccallum, D.O.; Fuerschbach, P.W.

    1999-12-09

    Laser spot welding is an ideal process for joining small parts with tight tolerances on weld size, location, and distortion, particularly those with near-by heat sensitive features. It is also key to understanding the overlapping laser spot seam welding process. Rather than attempting to simulate the laser beam-to-part coupling (particularly if a keyhole occurs), it was measured by calorimetry. This data was then used to calculate the thermal and structural response of a laser spot welded SS304 disk using the finite element method. Five combinations of process parameter values were studied. Calculations were compared to experimental data for temperature and distortion profiles measured by thermocouples and surface profiling. Results are discussed in terms of experimental and modeling factors. The authors then suggest appropriate parameters for laser spot welding.

  12. Process and installation for welding nuclear fuel assembly grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vere, B.; Mathevon, P.

    1985-01-01

    The invention proposes a process to weld two sets of perpendicular plates of which the end parts are made integral with a belt piece; the grid is held in a support frame with access openings to the points to be welded on the two faces and on the grid sides; the frame is moved on a mobile table by means of an orientation system along the perpendicular direction of an electron beam welding equipment; each joint to be welded is presented, rotating the frame through 90 deg about an axis and repeating the operation, and rotating the frame about a perpendicular axis and repeating the operation until all the joints on each side of the grid have been welded [fr

  13. Welding of nickel free high nitrogen stainless steel: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffi Mohammed

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available High nitrogen stainless steel (HNS is a nickel free austenitic stainless steel that is used as a structural component in defence applications for manufacturing battle tanks as a replacement of the existing armour grade steel owing to its low cost, excellent mechanical properties and better corrosion resistance. Conventional fusion welding causes problems like nitrogen desorption, solidification cracking in weld zone, liquation cracking in heat affected zone, nitrogen induced porosity and poor mechanical properties. The above problems can be overcome by proper selection and procedure of joining process. In the present work, an attempt has been made to correlate the microstructural changes with mechanical properties of fusion and solid state welds of high nitrogen steel. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW, gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW, electron beam welding (EBW and friction stir welding (FSW processes were used in the present work. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction were used to characterize microstructural changes. Hardness, tensile and bend tests were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of welds. The results of the present investigation established that fully austenitic dendritic structure was found in welds of SMAW. Reverted austenite pools in the martensite matrix in weld zone and unmixed zones near the fusion boundary were observed in GTA welds. Discontinuous ferrite network in austenite matrix was observed in electron beam welds. Fine recrystallized austenite grain structure was observed in the nugget zone of friction stir welds. Improved mechanical properties are obtained in friction stir welds when compared to fusion welds. This is attributed to the refined microstructure consisting of equiaxed and homogenous austenite grains.

  14. Creep-fatigue of low cobalt superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Testing for the low cycle fatigue and creep fatigue resistance of superalloys containing reduced amounts of cobalt is described. The test matrix employed involves a single high temperature appropriate for each alloy. A single total strain range, again appropriate to each alloy, is used in conducting strain controlled, low cycle, creep fatigue tests. The total strain range is based upon the level of straining that results in about 10,000 cycles to failure in a high frequency (0.5 Hz) continuous strain-cycling fatigue test. No creep is expected to occur in such a test. To bracket the influence of creep on the cyclic strain resistance, strain hold time tests with ore minute hold periods are introduced. One test per composition is conducted with the hold period in tension only, one in compression only, and one in both tension and compression. The test temperatures, alloys, and their cobalt compositions that are under study are given.

  15. Microstructurally sensitive crack nucleation around inclusions in powder metallurgy nickel-based superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, J.; Yang, J.; Zhang, T.; Zou, J.; Wang, Y.; Dunne, F.P.E.; Britton, T.B.

    2016-01-01

    Nickel-based superalloys are used in high strength, high-value applications, such as gas turbine discs in aero engines. In these applications the integrity of the disc is critical and therefore understanding crack initiation mechanisms is of high importance. With an increasing trend towards powder metallurgy routes for discs, sometimes unwanted non-metallic inclusions are introduced during manufacture. These inclusions vary in size from ∼10 μm to 200 μm which is comparable to the grain size of the nickel-based superalloys. Cracks often initiate near these inclusions, and the precise size, shape, location and path of these cracks are microstructurally sensitive. In this study, we focus on crack initiation at the microstructural length scale using a controlled three-point bend test, with the inclusion deliberately located within the tensile fibre of the beam. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is combined with high spatial resolution digital image correlation (HR-DIC) to explore full field plastic strain distributions, together with finite element modelling, to understand the micro-crack nucleation mechanisms. This full field information and controlled sample geometry enable us to systematically test crack nucleation criteria. We find that a combined stored energy and dislocation density provide promising results. These findings potentially facilitate more reliable and accurate lifing prediction tools to be developed and applied to engineering components. - Highlights: • High resolution digital image correlation. • High resolution electron backscatter diffraction. • Crack nucleation. • Non-metallic inclusion.

  16. Micro stresses in welded high-strength stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukas, P.; Mikula, P.; Strunz, P.; Vrana, M.; Zaffagnini, M.; Janovec, J.; Macek, K.

    1995-01-01

    The dependence of residual stresses in martensitic-austenitic age-hardenable steels on a different technological treatment (welding by electron beam, postweld heat treatment) were investigated using neutron diffraction. Experiments were performed in NPI Rez on a high-resolution diffractometer equipped with cylindrically bent perfect crystals. The resolution of the instrument (Δd/d ∼ 10 -4 ; d-lattice spacing) enabled the authors to investigate plastic strains in weld joints

  17. Disk laser welding of metal alloys for aerospace

    OpenAIRE

    Alfieri, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    2011 - 2012 Laser welding is the logical processing solution to accomplish different needs. Improvements at the design stage are actually aimed to remove any mechanical fastening, thus moving towards a technology which would not increase the joint thickness; moreover, a number of benefits in comparison with conventional welding methods are provided when considering laser beams, since deep penetration is achieved and the energy is effectively used where needed, thus melting t...

  18. Application of YAG laser processing in underwater welding and cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohwaki, Katsura; Morita, Ichiro; Kojima, Toshio; Sato, Shuichi

    2002-01-01

    The high-power YAG laser is a new fabrication tool. The laser torch is easy to combine with complex with complex mechanics because of beam delivery through optical fiber. A direct underwater laser welding technology has been developed and applied to the preservation, maintenance and removal of nuclear power plants. For subdividing or removing operations for retirement of plants, the laser cutting properties were confirmed to allow a maximum cutting thickness of 80 mm. For repairing inner surface of stainless steel tanks, an underwater laser welding system using a remote-controlled robot was developed and the high quality of underwater laser welding was confirmed. (author)

  19. Cryogen spray cooling during laser tissue welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, N M; Walsh, J T

    2000-03-01

    Cryogen cooling during laser tissue welding was explored as a means of reducing lateral thermal damage near the tissue surface and shortening operative time. Two centimetre long full-thickness incisions were made on the epilated backs of guinea pigs, in vivo. India ink was applied to the incision edges then clamps were used to appose the edges. A 4 mm diameter beam of 16 W, continuous-wave, 1.06 microm, Nd:YAG laser radiation was scanned over the incisions, producing approximately 100 ms pulses. There was a delay of 2 s between scans. The total irradiation time was varied from 1-2 min. Cryogen was delivered to the weld site through a solenoid valve in spurt durations of 20, 60 and 100 ms. The time between spurts was either 2 or 4 s, corresponding to one spurt every one or two laser scans. Histology and tensile strength measurements were used to evaluate laser welds. Total irradiation times were reduced from 10 min without surface cooling to under 1 min with surface cooling. The thermal denaturation profile showed less denaturation in the papillary dermis than in the mid-dermis. Welds created using optimized irradiation and cooling parameters had significantly higher tensile strengths (1.7 +/- 0.4 kg cm(-2)) than measured in the control studies without cryogen cooling (1.0 +/- 0.2 kg cm(-2)) (p laser welding results in increased weld strengths while reducing thermal damage and operative times. Long-term studies will be necessary to determine weld strengths and the amount of scarring during wound healing.

  20. Residual stress characterization of welds using x-ray diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineault, J.A.; Brauss, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    Neglect of residual stresses created during processes lead to stress corrosion cracking, distortion, fatigue cracking, premature failures in components, and instances of over design. Automated residual stress mapping and truly portable equipment have now made the characterization of residual stresses using x-ray diffraction (XRI) practical. The nondestructive nature of the x-ray diffraction technique has made the tile residual stress characterization of welds a useful tool for process optimization and failure analysis, particularly since components can be measured before and after welding and post welding processes. This paper illustrates the importance of residual stress characterization in welds and presents examples where x-ray diffraction techniques were applied in the characterization of various kinds of welds. arc welds, TIG welds, resistance welds, laser welds and electron beam welds. Numerous techniques are available to help manage potentially harmfull residual stresses created during the welding process thus, the effects of a few example post weld processes such as grinding, heat treating and shot peening are also addressed

  1. Welding skate with computerized controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    New welding skate concept for automatic TIG welding of contoured or double-contoured parts combines lightweight welding apparatus with electrical circuitry which computes the desired torch angle and positions a torch and cold-wire guide angle manipulator.

  2. Impact testing of welded samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundeen, Calvin D.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate how welding practice and joint design affect the performance of the joint. Also demonstrated is the importance of weld inspection to ensure quality welds.

  3. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  4. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  5. Real time control of curved laser welding processes by cellular neural networks (CNN): first results

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolosi, L.; Tetzlaff, R.

    2010-01-01

    In the last decades the laser beam welding (LBW) has outclassed older welding techniques in the industrial scenario. Despite the improvement in welding technology, sophisticated methods of fault detection are not commonly used in commercially available equipments yet. A recent analysis of process images have revealed the possibility to build up a real time closed loop control system. By the use of image based quality features, a feedback signal can be provided to maintain th...

  6. Experimental Investigation on Micro-Welding of Thin Stainless Steel Sheet by Fiber Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd I.S. Ismail; Yasuhiro Okamoto; Akira Okada; Yoshiyuki Uno

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: The miniaturization of components plays an important role for manufacturing in electrical and electronic industries. Therefore, the joining technology of thin metal sheets has been strongly required. Laser welding with micro-beam and high-speed scanning is a promising solution in micro-welding, because it has high-potential advantages in welding heat sensitive components with precise control of heat input and minimal thermal distortion. Approach: In this study, the characte...

  7. Dual wire welding torch and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  8. Manual tube welding torch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, J.H.; Smith, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    In a welding torch which fits over a tube intermediate the ends thereof for welding the juncture between the tube and a boss on the back side of a tube plate, a split housing encloses a tungsten electrode, a filler wire duct and a fiber optic bundle arranged to observe the welding process. A shielding gas duct is provided in the housing. A screw is provided for setting electrode/work distance. Difficult remote tube welding operations can be performed with the apparatus. (author)

  9. Robot welding process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    This final report documents the development and installation of software and hardware for Robotic Welding Process Control. Primary emphasis is on serial communications between the CYRO 750 robotic welder, Heurikon minicomputer running Hunter & Ready VRTX, and an IBM PC/AT, for offline programming and control and closed-loop welding control. The requirements for completion of the implementation of the Rocketdyne weld tracking control are discussed. The procedure for downloading programs from the Intergraph, over the network, is discussed. Conclusions are made on the results of this task, and recommendations are made for efficient implementation of communications, weld process control development, and advanced process control procedures using the Heurikon.

  10. Electric arc welding gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  11. Numerical simulation of the laser welding process for the prediction of temperature distribution on welded aluminium aircraft components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirkas, S. A.

    2018-03-01

    The present investigation is focused to the modelling of the temperature field in aluminium aircraft components welded by a CO2 laser. A three-dimensional finite element model has been developed to simulate the laser welding process and predict the temperature distribution in T-joint laser welded plates with fillet material. The simulation of the laser beam welding process was performed using a nonlinear heat transfer analysis, based on a keyhole formation model analysis. The model employs the technique of element ;birth and death; in order to simulate the weld fillet. Various phenomena associated with welding like temperature dependent material properties and heat losses through convection and radiation were accounted for in the model. The materials considered were 6056-T78 and 6013-T4 aluminium alloys, commonly used for aircraft components. The temperature distribution during laser welding process has been calculated numerically and validated by experimental measurements on different locations of the welded structure. The numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  12. Fire resistance of slim floor beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fellinger, J.H.H.; Twilt, L.

    1996-01-01

    Slim floor beams support decks on a wide plate welded on the lower flange of an 1- shaped beam. The air gap between the plate and the lower flange increases the fire resistance of the beam. A Finite Element Method (FEM) model, validated with three fire tests, is used to set up simple calculation

  13. Laser welding, cutting and surface treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crafer, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Fourteen articles cover a wide range of laser applications in welding, cutting and surface treatment. Future trends are covered as well as specific applications in shipbuilding, the manufacture of heart pacemakers, in the electronics industry, in automobile production and in the aeroengine industry. Safety with industrial lasers and the measurement of laser beam parameters are also included. One article on 'Lasers in the Nuclear Industry' is indexed separately. (U.K.)

  14. Noburnium: Systems design of niobium superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Abhijeet

    2005-11-01

    A systems-based approach, integrating quantum mechanical calculations with efficient experimentation, was employed to design niobium-based superalloys. The microstructural concept of gamma-gamma' nickel-based superalloys was adopted, where, the coherent gamma ' aluminides act both as the strengthening phase and a source of aluminum for Al2O3 passivation. Building on previous research, the selected bcc-type ordered aluminide was L2 1 structured Pd2HfAl phase. Comprehensive phase relations were measured on Nb-Pd-Hf-Al prototype alloys, and key tie-tetrahedra were identified. Aluminide precipitation in a bcc matrix was demonstrated in designed Nb+Pd2HfAl alloys. Thermodynamic databases were developed by integrating first-principles calculations with measured phase relations. Atomic volume models were developed for the bcc matrix and the Pd2HfAl phase and matrix elements which would reduce lattice misfit were identified. An experimental 2-phase alloy demonstrated a misfit of 3%. A modified Wagner's model was used to predict the required transient properties to form external Al2O3. The principal oxidation design goal was to decrease the oxygen permeability ( NSOx DO ) divided by the aluminum diffusivity (DAl) by 5 orders of magnitude. A multicomponent mobility database was developed to predict the diffusivities. Guided by first-principles calculations the effect of alloying elements on the oxygen diffusivity in Nb was measured, and the mobility database was experimentally validated. Based on the mobility database, it was found that increasing Al solubility in the bcc matrix greatly increased Al diffusivity. Alloying elements were identified that would increase Al solubility in the bcc matrix. Prototype alloys were prepared and the best oxidation performance was exhibited by a bcc+Nb2Al Nb-Hf-Al alloy, which exhibited parabolic oxidation behavior at 1300°C. The alloy was shown to have achieved the required 5 orders of magnitude reduction in the design parameter. The

  15. Weld pool control in ND: YAG laser Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, S.

    2003-01-01

    During laser welding small parameter variations can result in defects and loss of quality in the weld. An important quality in Tailor Made Blanks is the weld depth. In this thesis a number of feedback control strategies are developed to control the weld depth on-line.

  16. Optimization of weld overlay dimensions for butt-welded pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chintapalli, A.; Ku, F.H.; Miessi, G.A., E-mail: achintapalli@structint.com, E-mail: fku@structint.com, E-mail: amiessi@structint.com [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc., San Jose, California (United States); Yee, R.K., E-mail: Raymond.Yee@sjsu.edu [San Jose State Univ., San Jose, California (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Weld overlay technique can be used on a welded pipe with a flaw in the butt weld to prevent it from cracking further. Due to the application of weld overlay on top of the weld, compressive stresses are developed in the pipe wall and the weld. These stresses counteract the effect of the residual stresses from the butt weld and tensile stresses produced in the pipe during normal operation. Existing guidelines in the nuclear industry specify minimum dimensions (length and thickness) of the weld overlay. However, there is no guideline regarding the optimum repair dimensions that should be used to obtain minimum residual stresses induced by the weld overlay technique. The optimum dimensions in this study refer to the minimum material that can be used for the weld overlay. This results in reduced cost, time and exposure to radiation. Hence a size sensitivity study is performed by varying three parameters, the width and thickness of the weld overlay, and the size of the pipe being repaired. The repaired pipe is assumed to be subjected to typical pressurizer water reactor (PWR) operating conditions. The weld overlay process is simulated using an axisymmetric finite element model. The axial and hoop stresses in the region of the butt weld after the weld overlay are compared. The results from this study will be analyzed to establish optimum dimensions of the weld overlay for various pipe sizes to mitigate axial and circumferential crack initiation at the butt weld. (author)

  17. Measuring weld heat to evaluate weld integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauder, V., E-mail: schauder@hks-prozesstechnik.de [HKS-Prozesstechnik GmbH, Halle (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Eddy current and ultrasonic testing are suitable for tube and pipe mills and have been used for weld seam flaw detection for decades, but a new process, thermography, is an alternative. By measuring the heat signature of the weld seam as it cools, it provides information about weld integrity at and below the surface. The thermal processes used to join metals, such as plasma, induction, laser, and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), have improved since they were developed, and they get better with each passing year. However, no industrial process is perfect, so companies that conduct research in flaw detection likewise continue to develop and improve the technologies used to verify weld integrity: ultrasonic testing (UT), eddy current testing (ET), hydrostatic, X-ray, magnetic particle, and liquid penetrant are among the most common. Two of these are used for verifying the integrity of the continuous welds such as those used on pipe and tube mills: UT and ET. Each uses a transmitter to send waves of ultrasonic energy or electrical current through the material and a receiver (probe) to detect disturbances in the flow. The two processes often are combined to capitalize on the strengths of each. While ET is good at detecting flaws at or near the surface, UT penetrates the material, detecting subsurface flaws. One drawback is that sound waves and electrical current waves have a specific direction of travel, or an alignment. A linear defect that runs parallel to the direction of travel of the ultrasonic sound wave or a flaw that is parallel to the coil winding direction of the ET probe can go undetected. A second drawback is that they don't detect cold welds. An alternative process, thermography, works in a different fashion: It monitors the heat of the material as the weld cools. Although it measures the heat at the surface, the heat signature provides clues about cooling activity deep in the material, resulting in a thorough assessment of the weld's integrity It

  18. Effects of tooling on the residual stress distribution in an inertia weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, J.W.L.; Preuss, M.; Withers, P.J.; Baxter, G.J.; Small, C.

    2003-01-01

    Neutron diffraction residual strain measurements have been made on a tubular structure formed by joining two nickel-based superalloy RR1000 parts by inertia welding. Residual strains in the radial, hoop and axial directions of the tube cross-section have been measured. The corresponding residual stress field has been calculated accounting for the stress-free lattice parameter variations in the region close to the weld line. Tensile residual stresses were observed near the inner diameter of the tube with magnitudes of the order of +500, +1100 and +1300 MPa in the radial, axial and hoop directions, respectively. By comparison near the outer diameter (OD) of the weld the corresponding stresses are of the order of -200, -1000 and 150 MPa. The final stress state reflects the influence of the gripping fixture tooling and thermal gradients during inertia welding. Additional X-ray (at the surface) and hole-drilling (at the near surface) measurements show a steep residual stress gradient in the near surface region. Tensile hoop and axial machining stresses at the surface indicate the potential for improving the inertia weld tooling and the machining parameters used when removing the flash

  19. Explosion metal welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popoff, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    Process parameters pertaining to welding similar and dissimilar metals using explosives are reviewed. The discussion centers on the interrelationship of physical parameters which play a part in achieving desirable metallurgical results. Present activities in explosion metal welding at LASL are presented and shown how they related to the interests of the ERDA community

  20. Advanced Welding Torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    In order to more easily join the huge sections of the Space Shuttle external tank, Marshall Space Flight Center initiated development of the existing concept of Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding. VPPA welding employs a variable current waveform that allows the system to operate for preset time increments in either of two polarity modes for effective joining of light alloys.

  1. DC arc weld starter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  2. Fusion Welding of AerMet 100 Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ENGLEHART, DAVID A.; MICHAEL, JOSEPH R.; NOVOTNY, PAUL M.; ROBINO, CHARLES V.

    1999-08-01

    A database of mechanical properties for weldment fusion and heat-affected zones was established for AerMet{reg_sign}100 alloy, and a study of the welding metallurgy of the alloy was conducted. The properties database was developed for a matrix of weld processes (electron beam and gas-tungsten arc) welding parameters (heat inputs) and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) conditions. In order to insure commercial utility and acceptance, the matrix was commensurate with commercial welding technology and practice. Second, the mechanical properties were correlated with fundamental understanding of microstructure and microstructural evolution in this alloy. Finally, assessments of optimal weld process/PWHT combinations for cotildent application of the alloy in probable service conditions were made. The database of weldment mechanical properties demonstrated that a wide range of properties can be obtained in welds in this alloy. In addition, it was demonstrated that acceptable welds, some with near base metal properties, could be produced from several different initial heat treatments. This capability provides a means for defining process parameters and PWHT's to achieve appropriate properties for different applications, and provides useful flexibility in design and manufacturing. The database also indicated that an important region in welds is the softened region which develops in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and analysis within the welding metallurgy studies indicated that the development of this region is governed by a complex interaction of precipitate overaging and austenite formation. Models and experimental data were therefore developed to describe overaging and austenite formation during thermal cycling. These models and experimental data can be applied to essentially any thermal cycle, and provide a basis for predicting the evolution of microstructure and properties during thermal processing.

  3. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  4. Mechanical characterization of superalloys for space reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchesne, J.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this work is the choice of materials usable between 600 and 900 0 C for nuclear space reactor structures. The main criterion of selection for these materials is their good creep behaviour. Consequently, macroscopic theories of creep and several extrapolation methods were described. Superalloys seem the best materials for the studied range of temperatures. Five of them, base nickel, ones unusual in nuclear industry were selected for their good mechanical properties. Three of them are industrial alloys: the first, HAYNES 230 is a recent one, HASTELLOY S and X are more standard materials. The last two, HASTELLOY XR and PYRAD 38 D are issued from special fabrications. Creep tests metallographic investigations, hardness and tensile tests were performed. A contraction of samples was observed during some creep tests under a low stress, 20MPa at 800 0 C, for HAYNES 230 and HASTELLOY X. This could be due to a structural evolution of these materials connected to a decrease of the cristalline parameter. In addition, correlations were observed between certain characteristics determined from slow tensile tests and short duration creep tests. These correlations present a large interest because, at the present time, creep tests cannot be executed on irradiated materials in our laboratories. Consequently creep behaviour of irradiated materials seem may be deduced. Further studies are needed to explain and confirm the behaviour of the most interesting materials under low stresses: HAYNES 230 and HASTELLOY XR to anticipate their behaviour in working conditions [fr

  5. Surface alloying of nickel based superalloys by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, G.P.; Garcia, I.; Damborenea, J.J. de

    1998-01-01

    Ni based superalloys present a high oxidation resistance at high temperature as well as good mechanical properties. But new technology developments force to research in this materials to improve their properties at high temperature. In this work, two Ni based superalloys (Nimonic 80A and Inconel 600) were surface alloyed with aluminium using a high power laser. SEM and EDX were used to study the microstructure of the obtained coatings. Alloyed specimens were tested at 1.273 K between 24 and 250 h. Results showed the generation of a protective and continuous coating of alumina on the laser treated specimens surface that can improve oxidation resistance. (Author) 8 refs

  6. Reduction method for residual stress of welded joint using random vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Shigeru; Nishimura, Tadashi; Hiroi, Tetsumaro

    2005-01-01

    Welded joints are used for construction of many structures. Residual stress is induced near the bead caused by locally given heat. Tensile residual stress on the surface may reduce fatigue strength. In this paper, a new method for reduction of residual stress using vibration during welding is proposed. As vibrational load, random vibration, white noise and filtered white noise are used. Two thin plates are butt-welded. Residual stress is measured with a paralleled beam X-ray diffractometer with scintillation counter after removing quenched scale chemically. It is concluded that tensile residual stress near the bead is reduced by using random vibration during welding

  7. Residual stress determination in an overlay dissimilar welded pipe by neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Wan Chuck [ORNL; Em, Vyacheslav [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute; Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL; Lee, Ho-Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute; Park, Kwang Soo [Doosan Heavy Industries & Construction

    2011-01-01

    Residual stresses were determined through the thickness of a dissimilar weld overlay pipe using neutron diffraction. The specimen has a complex joining structure consisting of a ferritic steel (SA508), austenitic steel (F316L), Ni-based consumable (Alloy 182), and overlay of Ni-base superalloy (Alloy 52M). It simulates pressurized nozzle components, which have been a critical issue under the severe crack condition of nuclear power reactors. Two neutron diffractometers with different spatial resolutions have been utilized on the identical specimen for comparison. The macroscopic 'stress-free' lattice spacing (d{sub o}) was also obtained from both using a 2-mm width comb-like coupon. The results show significant changes in residual stresses from tension (300-400 MPa) to compression (-600 MPa) through the thickness of the dissimilar weld overlay pipe specimen.

  8. Calibration Fixture For Welding Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holly, Krisztina J.

    1990-01-01

    Compact, lightweight device used in any position or orientation. Calibration fixture designed for use on robotic gas/tungsten-arc welding torch equipped with vision-based seam-tracking system. Through optics in hollow torch cylinder, video camera obtains image of weld, viewing along line of sight coaxial with welding electrode. Attaches to welding-torch cylinder in place of gas cup normally attached in use. By use of longer or shorter extension tube, fixture accommodates welding electrode of unusual length.

  9. Laser forming and welding processes

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Shuja, Shahzada Zaman

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces model studies and experimental results associated with laser forming and welding such as laser induced bending, welding of sheet metals, and related practical applications. The book provides insight into the physical processes involved with laser forming and welding. The analytical study covers the formulation of laser induced bending while the model study demonstrates the simulation of bending and welding processes using the finite element method. Analytical and numerical solutions for laser forming and welding problems are provided.

  10. Thermoplastic welding apparatus and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Geren, William Preston; Miller, Robert James

    2017-03-07

    A thermoplastic welding apparatus includes a thermoplastic welding tool, at least one tooling surface in the thermoplastic welding tool, a magnetic induction coil in the thermoplastic welding tool and generally encircling the at least one tooling surface and at least one smart susceptor in the thermoplastic welding tool at the at least one tooling surface. The magnetic induction coil is adapted to generate a magnetic flux field oriented generally parallel to a plane of the at least one smart susceptor.

  11. Welding method, and welding device for use therein, and method of analysis for evaluating welds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aendenroomer, A.J.; Den Ouden, G.; Xiao, Y.H.; Brabander, W.A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Described is a method of automatically welding pipes, comprising welding with a pulsation welding current and monitoring, by means of a sensor, the variations occurring in the arc voltage caused by weld pool oscillations. The occurrence of voltage variations with only frequency components below 100

  12. Angles of entry of ultraviolet radiation into welding helmets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenkate, T S; Collins, M J

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the angles of entry of ultraviolet (UV) radiation into welding helmets, a UV detector was placed in the eye socket of a head form that was then fitted with a range of welding helmets. The head form was exposed to a collimated beam of UV radiation from various orientations, and the amount of infiltration was measured. Radiation was found to be reflected from the filter plate and into the detector (eye) after entering through (1) an opening between the edge of the shield and the side of the face, and (2) an opening between the top edge of the shield and the top of the head. These results have significance for UV exposure when welding is performed in highly reflective and enclosed situations, and for the design of welding helmets.

  13. Neutron diffraction studies of laser welding residual stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Peter I.; Bokuchava, Gizo D.; Papushkin, Igor V.; Genchev, Gancho; Doynov, Nikolay; Michailov, Vesselin G.; Ormanova, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    The residual stress and microstrain distribution induced by laser beam welding of the low-alloyed C45 steel plate was investigated using high-resolution time-of-flight (TOF) neutron diffraction. The neutron diffraction experiments were performed on FSD diffractometer at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor in FLNP JINR (Dubna, Russia). The experiments have shown that the residual stress distribution across weld seam exhibit typical alternating sign character as it was observed in our previous studies. The residual stress level is varying in the range from -60 MPa to 450 MPa. At the same time, the microstrain level exhibits sharp maxima at weld seam position with maximal level of 4.8·10-3. The obtained experimental results are in good agreement with FEM calculations according to the STAAZ model. The provided numerical model validated with measured data enables to study the influence of different conditions and process parameters on the development of residual welding stresses.

  14. Diffusion welding of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susei, Shuzo; Matsui, Shigetomo; Yamada, Takeshi

    1978-01-01

    Recently, the materials with high heat resistance, corrosion resistance or strength have been developed, and some of them cannot be welded by ordinary method. Thereupon solid phase joining method is noticed, the mechanism of which is entirely different from conventional fusion welding. Among various solid phase joining methods, diffusion welding has many features. In case of joining same material, the joint can be made chemically and mechanically same as the parent material, and in case of joining different materials, joining can be made without forming any harmful compound, and the embrittlement of joints can be avoided. Kawasaki Heavy Industries Corp. has carried out a series of research on the diffusion welding of various metals, but in this paper, the characteristics of the joints of same material and different materials in titanium alloys are reported. The diffusion welding apparatus used adopts radiation heating using a tungsten heater and a hydraulic cylinder for pressing. The atmosphere of welded materials is kept in vacuum. The tested materials were industrial pure titanium TB 35 and Ti-6 Al-4 V alloy. The weldability of these materials by diffusion welding was studied, and it was confirmed that the joint efficiency of 100% was able to be obtained. However, for the practical application, more studies are required. (Kako, I.)

  15. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2003-01-01

    Deals with the main commercially significant and commonly used welding processes. This title takes the student or novice welder through the individual steps involved in each process in an easily understood way. It covers many of the requirements referred to in European Standards including EN719, EN 729, EN 729 and EN 287.$bWelding processes handbook is a concise, explanatory guide to the main commercially significant and commonly-used welding processes. It takes the novice welder or student through the individual steps involved in each process in a clear and easily understood way. It is intended to provide an up-to-date reference to the major applications of welding as they are used in industry. The contents have been arranged so that it can be used as a textbook for European welding courses in accordance with guidelines from the European Welding Federation. Welding processes and equipment necessary for each process are described so that they can be applied to all instruction levels required by the EWF and th...

  16. Design of welding parameters for laser welding of thin-walled stainless steel tubes using numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, M.; Behúlová, M.

    2017-11-01

    Nowadays, the laser technology is used in a wide spectrum of applications, especially in engineering, electronics, medicine, automotive, aeronautic or military industries. In the field of mechanical engineering, the laser technology reaches the biggest increase in the automotive industry, mainly due to the introduction of automation utilizing 5-axial movements. Modelling and numerical simulation of laser welding processes has been exploited with many advantages for the investigation of physical principles and complex phenomena connected with this joining technology. The paper is focused on the application of numerical simulation to the design of welding parameters for the circumferential laser welding of thin-walled exhaust pipes from theAISI 304 steel for automotive industry. Using the developed and experimentally verified simulation model for laser welding of tubes, the influence of welding parameters including the laser velocity from 30 mm.s-1 to 60 mm.s-1 and the laser power from 500 W to 1200 W on the temperature fields and dimensions of fusion zone was investigated using the program code ANSYS. Based on obtained results, the welding schedule for the laser beam welding of thin-walled tubes from the AISI 304 steel was suggested.

  17. Weld pool oscillation during gas tungsten arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, You Hong

    The oscillation behavior of Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) weld pools in mild steels Fe 360 and in austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 is considered. Special attention is given to the possibility of using the weld pool oscillation behavior as a sensor of weld pool geometry during welding, which is one of the objectives in adaptive control of the welding process. The topics discussed include the theoretical background of the oscillation phenomenon, the direct observation of weld pool oscillation, the experimental determination of the relation between the weld pool geometry and the oscillation frequency both under stationary arc conditions and under traveling arc conditions and the possibility of sensing the weld pool geometry, especially the weld pool penetration, by monitoring the oscillation frequency.

  18. Sizing and recognition of cracks and porosity in weld metals using acoustical holographic inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, F.; Nagashima, Y.; Tanaka, I.; Nakada, S.

    2000-01-01

    Non-destructive inspection of weld metals in carbon steel and stainless steel pipes become more important if high reliability of power plants are to be maintained. Flaws in the weld metals, i.e. porosity or cracks, may be produced by weld condition changes and then grow due to up by thermal stress repetitions. If non-destructive inspections of the flaw sizing and recognition in pipe welds are possible, reliability evaluations and residual life estimations of each pipe can be improved. Based on this background, the authors applied an acoustical holographic method to weld metal inspections. In the present work, flaw sizing and recognition capabilities of the acoustical holographic inspections were compared with those of conventional radiographic testing and the ultrasonic tip-echo method. Ultrasonic inspections with normal, 45 and 70 degree angled beams were made for flaws in weld metals of SGV410 steels and SUS316 stainless steel. The capabilities of the acoustical holographic method as determined by the above inspections are as follows. For porosity in 28 mm thick weld metals, the holographic method with a normal beam can detect and represent the flaws as spherical images, although sizing is overestimated, making it inferior to radiographic testing. For cracks in the weld metals, the sizing errors in the holographic method with 45 and 70 degree angled beams are confirmed to be superior to those of the tip-echo method. (author)

  19. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of AISI 304 to AISI 420 stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, José Roberto; de Rossi, Wagner; David Martins das Neves, Maurício; Alves de Almeida, Ivan; Dias Vieira Junior, Nilson

    2007-09-01

    The technique to weld AISI 304 stainless steel to AISI 420 stainless steel with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser has been investigated. The main objective of this study was to determine the influence of the laser beam position, with respect to the joint, on weld characteristics. Specimens were welded with the laser beam incident on the joint and moved 0.1 and 0.2 mm on either side of the joint. The joints were examined in an optical microscope for cracks, pores and to determine the weld geometry. The microstructure of the weld and the heat affected zones were observed in a scanning electron microscope. An energy dispersive spectrometer, coupled to the scanning electron microscope, was used to determine variations in (weight %) the main chemical elements across the fillet weld. Vickers microhardness testing and tensile testing were carried out to determine the mechanical properties of the weld. The results of the various tests and examinations enabled definition of the best position for the incident laser beam with respect to the joint, for welding together the two stainless steels.

  20. Thermal stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  1. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  2. Half bead welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canonico, D.A.; Holz, P.P.

    1978-05-01

    The ORNL has employed the Section XI half-bead procedure for six repair welds. Table 2 identifies the repairs and the components upon which they were accomplished. The weld repairs were performed to permit us to evaluate material properties, residual stresses, weld repair procedures, and structural behavior of repaired pressure vessels. As a consequence of our study we concluded that when the half bead procedure is correctly applied: (1) there is no metallurgical degradation of the base material, (2) residual stresses of yield point magnitude will be present, and (3) the structural integrity of the pressure vessel is not impaired at Charpy V-notch upper shelf temperatures

  3. APPARATUS FOR ARC WELDING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingafelter, J.W.

    1960-04-01

    An apparatus is described in which a welding arc created between an annular electrode and a workpiece moves under the influence of an electromagnetic field about the electrode in a closed or annular path. This mode of welding is specially suited to the enclosing of nuclear-fuel slugs in a protective casing. For example, a uranium slug is placed in an aluminum can, and an aluminum closure is welded to the open end of the can along a closed or annular path conforming to the periphery of the end closure.

  4. Mechanical properties of welded type AISI 316 L austenitic steel: synthesis of Charpy test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudig, W.; Mayer, H.G.; Stuttgart Univ.

    1990-01-01

    The Charpy U-notch impact strength values obtained from tests on base metal and vacuum electron beam weld specimens were found to be very high; none of the specimens broke at 550 0 C, 20 0 /C, and even -196 0 C. The impact strength values from non-vacuum electron beam weld specimens were high too: The data exceed the minimum value of 140 J/cm 2 specified for the base metal at 20 0 C, and some of the specimens did not break. In case of gas-metal arc, manual metal arc, and submerged arc welding, the Charpy performance was lower and all of the specimens broke. Lowest Charpy U-notch impact strength values were obtained in case of manual metal arc and submerged arc welding: At 20 0 C, the impact strength values were close to or even slightly below the minimum value of 70 J/cm 2 specified for manual metal arc weld. (author)

  5. Cobalt-free nickel-base superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Michio; Harada, Hiroshi

    1979-01-01

    Cobalt-free nickel-base cast superalloys have been developed. Cobalt is considered to be a beneficial element to strengthen the alloys but should be eliminated in alloys to be used for direct cycle helium turbine driven by helium gas from HTGR (high temp. gas reactor). The elimination of cobalt is required to avoid the formation of radioactive 60 Co from the debris or scales of the alloys. Cobalt-free alloys are also desirable from another viewpoint, i.e. recently the shortage of the element has become a serious problem in industry. Cobalt-free Mar-M200 type alloys modified by the additions of 0.15 - 0.2 wt% B and 1 - 1.5 wt% Hf were found to have a creep rupture strength superior or comparable to that of the original Mar-M200 alloy bearing cobalt. The ductility in tensile test at 800 0 C, as cast or after prolonged heating at 900 0 C (the tensile test was done without removing the surface layer affected by the heating), was also improved by the additions of 0.15 - 0.2% B and 1 - 1.5% Hf. The morphology of grain boundaries became intricated by the additions of 0.15 - 0.2% B and 1 - 1.5% Hf, to such a degree that one can hardly distinguish grain boundaries by microscopes. The change in the grain boundary morphology was considered, as suggested previously by one of the authors (M.Y.), to be the reason for the improvements in the creep rupture strength and tensile ductility. (author)

  6. Advanced alloy design technique: High temperature cobalt base superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Freche, J. C.; Sandrock, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced alloy design technique was developed for treating alloys that will have extended life in service at high temperature and intermediate temperatures. Process stabilizes microstructure of the alloy by designing it so that compound identified with embrittlement is eliminated or minimized. Design process is being used to develop both nickel and cobalt-base superalloys.

  7. Solidification behaviour of Ni-base superalloy CMSX-6

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, D.; Meyer Ter Vehn, M.; Busse, P.; Sahm, P.

    1993-01-01

    The solidification behaviour of the single crystal superalloy CMSX-6 has been investigated using directional solidification technique. The longitudinal sections of the quenched samples were taken to identify the solidification structure. The experimentally determined solidification diagram gives the relationship between solidification structure and process parameters. The analysis of the transverse sections yields the solidification sequence and the solid fraction against the temperature decr...

  8. Effect of structure on creep behaviour of superalloy single crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukáš, Petr; Kunz, Ludvík; Svoboda, Milan; Čadek, Josef

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 482, - (2005), s. 267-270 ISSN 0255-5476 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IBS2041001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904; CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Superalloys CMSX-4 and CM186LC Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.399, year: 2005

  9. Double minimum creep of single crystal Ni-base superalloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    WU, X.; Wollgramm, P.; Somsen, C.; Dlouhý, Antonín; Kostka, A.; Eggeler, G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 112, JUN (2016), s. 242-260 ISSN 1359-6454 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22834S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Single crystal Ni-base superalloys * Primary creep * Transmission electron microscopy * Dislocations * Stacking fault s Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 5.301, year: 2016

  10. Pore formation during C.W.Nd: YAG laser welding of aluminum alloys for automotive applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, M.; Zhao, H.; DebRoy, T.

    2000-01-01

    Pore formation is an important concern in laser welding of automotive aluminum alloys. This paper investigates the influence of the laser beam defocusing on pore formation during continuous wave Nd:YAG laser welding of aluminum automotive alloys 5182 and 5754. It was found that the instability of the keyhole during welding was a dominant cause of pore formation while hydrogen rejection played an insignificant role. The defocusing of the laser beam greatly affected the stability of the keyhole. Finally, the mechanism of the collapse of the keyhole and pore formation is proposed. (Author) 45 refs

  11. Twin-spot laser welding of advanced high-strength multiphase microstructure steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajcar, Adam; Morawiec, Mateusz; Różański, Maciej; Stano, Sebastian

    2017-07-01

    The study addresses the results concerning the laser welding of TRIP (TRansformation Induced Plasticity) steel using a beam focused at two spots (also referred to as twin-spot laser welding). The analysis involved the effect of variable welding thermal cycles on the properties and microstructure of welded joints. The tests were performed using a linear energy of 0.048 and 0.060 kJ/mm and the laser beam power distribution of 50%:50%, 60%:40% and 70%:30%. The tests also involved welding performed using a linear energy of 0.150 kJ/mm and the laser beam power distribution of 70%:30%. In addition, the research included observations of the microstructure of the fusion zone, heat affected zone and the transition zone using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The fusion zone was composed of blocky-lath martensite whereas the HAZ (heat-affected zone) was characterised by the lath microstructure containing martensite, bainite and retained austenite. The distribution of twin-spot laser beam power significantly affected the microstructure and hardness profiles of welded joints. The highest hardness (480-505 HV), regardless of welding variants used, was observed in the HAZ.

  12. Residual stress by repair welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Toyoda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Residual stress by repair welds is computed using the thermal elastic-plastic analysis with phase-transformation effect. Coupling phenomena of temperature, microstructure, and stress-strain fields are simulated in the finite-element analysis. Weld bond of a plate butt-welded joint is gouged and then deposited by weld metal in repair process. Heat source is synchronously moved with the deposition of the finite-element as the weld deposition. Microstructure is considered by using CCT diagram and the transformation behavior in the repair weld is also simulated. The effects of initial stress, heat input, and weld length on residual stress distribution are studied from the organic results of numerical analysis. Initial residual stress before repair weld has no influence on the residual stress after repair treatment near weld metal, because the initial stress near weld metal releases due to high temperature of repair weld and then stress by repair weld regenerates. Heat input has an effect for residual stress distribution, for not its magnitude but distribution zone. Weld length should be considered reducing the magnitude of residual stress in the edge of weld bead; short bead induces high tensile residual stress. (author)

  13. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle,; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy, A [Ammon, ID

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  14. Neutral polypropylene laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandolfino, Chiara; Lertora, Enrico; Gambaro, Carla

    2016-10-01

    The joining of polymeric materials is a technology used in many industrial applications, from transport to telecommunications and the medical sector. A new technology for the joining of polymers is the laser welding process. In particular, fibre laser welding is a flexible technology which allows high process speed and the realization of good quality joints. Despite its application becoming more widespread in the production of assemblies of high precision, the application of laser technology for the welding of polymers has not been the subject of many studies up to now. This study focused on the welding of neutral polypropylene. The window process parameter was identified, without the use of additives to increase radiation absorption, and a mechanical characterization was conducted in order to evaluate the quality of the joints realized.

  15. Welding of refractory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessmann, G.G.

    1984-01-01

    This review primarily summarizes welding evaluations supported by NASA-Lewis Research Center in the 1960s. A literature search run in preparation for this review indicates that more recent work is modest by comparison. Hence, this review restates these accomplishments briefly and addresses opportunities which have evolved in welding technology (such as lasers) in the intervening decade. Emphasis in this review is given to tantalum- and niobium-base alloys. Considerable work was also done to assure that a consistent comparison was made with tungsten. A wide variety of candidate alloys derived primarily from developments directed at aircraft propulsion applications were available. Early efforts by NASA were directed at screening studies to select promising structural alloys for the space power application. This objective required fine tuning of welding procedures, e.g., the demonstration of stringent standards for control of welding atmosphere to assure good corrosion resistance in liquid alkali metals. 16 figures, 6 tables

  16. Characterization the microstructure of pulsed Nd:YAG welding method in low frequencies; correlation with tensile and fracture behavior in laser-welded nitinol joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei Zoeram, Ali; Rahmani, Aida; Asghar Akbari Mousavi, Seyed Ali

    2017-05-01

    The precise controllability of heat input in pulsed Nd:YAG welding method provided by two additional parameters, frequency and pulse duration, has made this method very promising for welding of alloys sensitive to heat input. The poor weldability of Ti-rich nitinol as a result of the formation of Ti2Ni IMC has deprived us of the unique properties of this alloy. In this study, to intensify solidification rate during welding of Ti-rich nitinol, pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam in low frequency was employed in addition to the employment of a copper substrate. Specific microstructure produced in this condition was characterized and the effects of this microstructure on tensile and fracture behavior of samples welded by two different procedures, full penetration and double-sided method with halved penetration depth for each side were investigated. The investigations revealed although the combination of low frequencies, the use of a high thermal conductor substrate and double-sided method eliminated intergranular fracture and increased tensile strength, the particular microstructure, built in the pulsed welding method in low frequencies, results to the formation of the longitudinal cracks during the first stages of tensile test at weld centerline. This degrades tensile strength of welded samples compared to base metal. The results showed samples welded in double-sided method performed much better than samples welded in full penetration mode.

  17. A welding technology using RobotStudio

    OpenAIRE

    Cohal Viorel

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the results obtained in designing a welding workstation by using offline programming in RobotStudio. The developed model was used to simulate welding elements of a welded assembly. Welding routes are obtained offline. By using ArcWelding module and VirtualArc there were obtained parameters of welding technology, which are automatically in WPS.

  18. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Donald W.; Johnson, John A.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1987-01-01

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  19. Sensor development and integration for robotized laser welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, D.

    2009-01-01

    Laser welding requires fast and accurate positioning of the laser beam over the seam trajectory. The task of accurate positioning of the laser tools is performed by robotic systems. It is therefore necessary to teach the robot the path it has to follow. Seam teaching is implemented in several ways:

  20. Sintering and microstructure evolution of columnar nickel-based superalloy sheets prepared by EB-PVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.; Qu, S.J.; Liang, J.; Han, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → EB-PVD technology is commonly used to deposit thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and columnar structure is commonly seen in EB-PVD condensates. The unique columnar structure can provide outstanding resistance against thermal shock and mechanical strains for TBCs. However, a number of researchers have found that the columnar structure can affect the mechanical properties of EB-PVD alloy thin sheet significantly. As yet, works on how to reduce this kind of effects are seldom done. In the present article, we tried to reveal the sintering effects on microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of columnar Ni-based superalloy sheet. The results suggests that after sintering, the columnar structure degrades. Degradation depends on sintering temperature and time. Both the ultimate tensile strength and the elongation percentage are effectively improved after sintering. - Abstract: A ∼0.15 mm-thick columnar nickel-based superalloy sheet was obtained by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). The as-deposited alloy sheet was sintered at different conditions. The microstructure of the specimens before and after sintering was characterized by using scanning electron microscopy. An X'Pert texture facility was used to determine the crystallographic orientation of the as-deposited alloy sheet. The phase transformation was investigated by X-ray diffraction. Tensile tests were conducted at room temperature on as-deposited and sintered specimens. The results show that the as-deposited sheet is composed of typical columnar structures. After sintering, however, the columnar structure degrades. The degradation depends on sintering temperature and time. Both the ultimate tensile strength and the elongation percentage are effectively improved after sintering.

  1. Gamma Prime Morphology and Creep Properties of Nickel Based Superalloys With Platinum Group Metal Additions (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    Cobalt on the Tensile and Stress Rupture Properties of the Nickel-Base Superalloy MAR-M247,” Metallurgical Transactions A, 13 (A) (1982), 1767-1774.           10 ...AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2008-4320 GAMMA PRIME MORPHOLOGY AND CREEP PROPERTIES OF NICKEL BASED SUPERALLOYS WITH PLATINUM GROUP METAL ADDITIONS...AND SUBTITLE GAMMA PRIME MORPHOLOGY AND CREEP PROPERTIES OF NICKEL BASED SUPERALLOYS WITH PLATINUM GROUP METAL ADDITIONS (PREPRINT) 5a.

  2. Determination of Focal Laws for Ultrasonic Phased Array Testing of Dissimilar Metal Welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Ye; Kim, Hak Joon; Song, Sung Jin; Song, Myung Ho; Kang, Suk Chull; Kang, Sung Sik; Kim, Kyung Cho

    2008-01-01

    Inspection of dissimilar metal welds using phased array ultrasound is not easy at all, because crystalline structure of dissimilar metal welds cause deviation and splitting of the ultrasonic beams. Thus, in order to have focusing and/or steering phased array beams in dissimilar metal welds, proper time delays should be determined by ray tracing. In this paper, we proposed an effective approach to solve this difficult problem. Specifically, we modify the Oglivy's model parameters to describe the crystalline structure of real dissimilar metal welds in a fabricated specimen. And then, we calculate the proper time delay and incident angle of linear phased array transducer in the anisotropic and inhomogeneous material for focusing and/or steering phased array ultrasonic beams on the desired position

  3. Finite element analysis of spot laser of steel welding temperature history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibib Khalid S.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser welding process reduces the heat input to the work-piece which is the main goal in aerospace and electronics industries. A finite element model for axi-symmetric transient heat conduction has been used to predict temperature distribution through a steel cylinder subjected to CW laser beam of rectangular beam profile. Many numerical improvements had been used to reduce time of calculation and size of the program so as to achieve the task with minimum time required. An experimental determined absorptivity has been used to determine heat induced when laser interact with material. The heat affected zone and welding zone have been estimated to determine the effect of welding on material. The ratio of depth to width of the welding zone can be changed by proper selection of beam power to meet the specific production requirement. The temperature history obtained numerically has been compared with experimental data indicating good agreement.

  4. Automatic welding machine for piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Koyama, Takaichi; Iizuka, Tomio; Ito, Yoshitoshi; Takami, Katsumi.

    1978-01-01

    A remotely controlled automatic special welding machine for piping was developed. This machine is utilized for long distance pipe lines, chemical plants, thermal power generating plants and nuclear power plants effectively from the viewpoint of good quality control, reduction of labor and good controllability. The function of this welding machine is to inspect the shape and dimensions of edge preparation before welding work by the sense of touch, to detect the temperature of melt pool, inspect the bead form by the sense of touch, and check the welding state by ITV during welding work, and to grind the bead surface and inspect the weld metal by ultrasonic test automatically after welding work. The construction of this welding system, the main specification of the apparatus, the welding procedure in detail, the electrical source of this welding machine, the cooling system, the structure and handling of guide ring, the central control system and the operating characteristics are explained. The working procedure and the effect by using this welding machine, and the application to nuclear power plants and the other industrial field are outlined. The HIDIC 08 is used as the controlling computer. This welding machine is useful for welding SUS piping as well as carbon steel piping. (Nakai, Y.)

  5. Recent trends in superalloys research for critical aero-engine components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remy, Luc [Mine ParisTech, CNRS UMR 7633, 91 - Evry (France). Centre des Materiaux; Guedou, Jean-Yves [Snecma Safran Group, Moissy-Cramayel (France). Materials and Processes Dept.

    2010-07-01

    This paper is a brief survey of common research activity on superalloys for aero-engines between Snecma and Mines ParisTech Centre des Materiaux during recent years. First in disks applications, the development of new powder metallurgy superalloys is shown. Then grain boundary engineering is investigated in a wrought superalloy. Secondly, design oriented research on single crystals blades is shown: a damage model for low cycle fatigue is used for life prediction when cracks initiated at casting pores. The methodology developed for assessing coating life is illustrated for thermal barrier coating deposited on AMI single crystal superalloy. (orig.)

  6. METHOD OF OBTAINING AN IMPROVED WELD IN INERT ARC WELDING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1962-12-11

    A method is reported for inert arc welding. An a-c welding current is applied to the workpiece and welding electrode such that the positive portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode positive, has only sufficient energy to clean the surface of the workpiece and the negative portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode negative, contains the energy required to weld. (AEC)

  7. Characterization of the Ni–Mo–Cr superalloy subjected to simulated heat-affected zone thermal cycle treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yanming, E-mail: heyanming@zjut.edu.cn [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Yang, Jianguo, E-mail: yangjg@zjut.edu.cn [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Qin, Chunjie [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Chen, Shuangjian [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Gao, Zengliang [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The constitution of Ni–17Mo–7Cr alloy was convincingly ascertained by TEM analysis. • The Ni–17Mo–7Cr alloy was thermally cycled with a peak temperature up to 1350 °C. • The lamellar-like phases in the alloy were firstly determined by TEM and HRTEM. • The formation mechanism for the lamellar-like phases was unveiled rigorously. • Effect of lamellar-like phases on the alloy’s performances was evaluated in depth. - Abstract: A representative Ni–Mo–Cr superalloy with basic composition of Ni–17Mo–7Cr (wt.%) was fabricated in the work and the relationship between the microstructure and mechanical properties while it went through simulated heat-affected zone (HAZ) thermal cycle treatment was investigated. The results reveal that the Ni–Mo–Cr alloy mainly consisted of Ni matrix and MoC carbides. The critical peak temperature that a lamellar-like structure occurred in the alloy was found to be 1300 °C. These products were firstly characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) analysis, and they were essentially Ni matrix and carbides (MoC and chromium carbides) generated through local melting. The equivalent mechanical properties of the alloy relative to that of un-treated alloy were received owing to its unique architecture even the peak temperature during thermal cycle was up to 1350 °C. The results obtained suggests these lamellar-like products dispersed near the fusion line in a Ni–Mo–Cr welded joint will not influence the joint’s mechanical strength and stability while the peak temperature in the HAZ was adjusted below 1350 °C, providing valuable guideline in designing and applying the Ni–Mo–Cr system superalloys.

  8. Neutron Strain Scanning of Fibre and Diode Laser Welds in Stainless Steel and Ti6Al4 V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisey, K. T.; Folkes, J.; Srithorn, J.; Hughes, D. J.

    Fibre lasers provide an unprecedented combination of high beam quality, brightness and low cost. Fibre laser beams can provide an exceptionally high power density beam with a relatively large depth of focus. Compared to more established laser welding technologies such as diode laser welding, fibre laser welding produces exceptionally narrow weld beads. As with all types of welding, fibre laser welding produces residual stresses in the material forming and adjacent to the weld. The SALSA instrument at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL) has been used to make neutron diffraction measurements for both fibre and diode laser welded stainless steel 304 and Ti6Al4 V. Clear diffraction peaks are obtained from stainless steel 304 and residual stress distributions are obtained. Little variation in residual stress distribution with welding parameters is seen. Ti6Al4 V diffraction peaks are complicated by phase transformations on cooling. Transformed beta phase peaks in Ti6Al4 V allow the extent of the heat affected zone to be determined.

  9. Design of Laser Welding Parameters for Joining Ti Grade 2 and AW 5754 Aluminium Alloys Using Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Behúlová

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Joining of dissimilar Al-Ti alloys is very interesting from the point of view of weight reduction of components and structures in automotive or aerospace industries. In the dependence on cooling rate and chemical composition, rapid solidification of Al-Ti alloys during laser welding can lead to the formation of metastable phases and brittle intermetallic compounds that generally reduce the quality of produced weld joints. The paper deals with design and testing of welding parameters for preparation of weld joints of two sheets with different thicknesses from titanium Grade 2 and AW 5754 aluminium alloy. Temperature fields developed during the formation of Al-Ti butt joints were investigated by numerical simulation in ANSYS software. The influence of laser welding parameters including the laser power and laser beam offset on the temperature distribution and weld joint formation was studied. The results of numerical simulation were verified by experimental temperature measurement during laser beam welding applying the TruDisk 4002 disk laser. The microstructure of produced weld joints was assessed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. EDX analysis was applied to determine the change in chemical composition across weld joints. Mechanical properties of weld joints were evaluated using tensile tests and Vickers microhardness measurements.

  10. Alternate Welding Processes for In-Service Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-24

    Conducting weld repairs and attaching hot tap tees onto pressurized pipes has the advantage of avoiding loss of service and revenue. However, the risks involved with in-service welding need to be managed by ensuring that welding is performed in a rep...

  11. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  12. Resistance Spot Welding of dissimilar Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Kolařík

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the properties of resistance spot welds between low carbon steel and austenitic CrNi stainless steel. The thickness of the welded dissimilar materials was 2 mm. A DeltaSpot welding gun with a process tape was used for welding the dissimilar steels. Resistance spot welds were produced with various welding parameters (welding currents ranging from 7 to 8 kA. Light microscopy, microhardness measurements across the welded joints, and EDX analysis were used to evaluate the quality of the resistance spot welds. The results confirm the applicability of DeltaSpot welding for this combination of materials.

  13. The influence of shielding gas in hybrid LASER MIG welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Giovanni; Campana, Giampaolo; Fortunato, Alessandro; Ascari, Alessandro

    2007-07-01

    Hybrid LASER-GMAW welding technique has been recently studied and developed in order to meet the needs of modern welding industries. The two sources involved in this process play, in fact, a complementary role: fast welding speed, deep bead penetration and high energy concentration can be achieved through the LASER beam, while gap bridgeability and cost-effectiveness are typical of the GMAW process. Particularly interesting, in this context, is the CO 2 LASER-MIG welding which differs from the Nd:YAG LASER-MIG technique for the high powers that can be exploited and for the good power/cost ratio of the process. This paper is a part of a wide study on the hybrid CO 2 LASER-MIG welding and investigates the influence of the shielding gas both on the stability of the process and on the dimensional characteristics of the weld bead. Two different parameters have been taken into consideration in order to develop this analysis: the shielding gas composition and the shielding gas flow. The experiment, performed on AISI 304 stainless steel plates, has been planned exploiting design of experiment techniques. The results have been analyzed through a statistical approach in order to determine the real influence of each parameter on the overall process.

  14. Overview on the welding technologies of CLAM steel and the DFLL TBM fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyu Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dual Functional Lithium Lead (DFLL blanket was proposed for its advantages of high energy exchange efficiency and on-line tritium extraction, and it was selected as the candidate test blanket module (TBM for China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR and the blanket for Fusion Design Study (FDS series fusion reactors. Considering the influence of high energy fusion neutron irradiation and high heat flux thermal load on the blanket, China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM steel was selected as the structural material for DFLL blanket. The structure of the blanket and the cooling internal components were pretty complicated. Meanwhile, high precision and reliability were required in the blanket fabrication. Therefore, several welding techniques, such as hot isostatic pressing diffusion bonding, tungsten inner gas welding, electron beam welding and laser beam welding were developed for the fabrication of cooling internals and the assembly of the blanket. In this work, the weldability on CLAM steel by different welding methods and the properties of as-welded and post-weld heat-treated joints were investigated. Meanwhile, the welding schemes and the assembly strategy for TBM fabrication were raised. Many tests and research efforts on scheme feasibility, process standardization, component qualification and blanket assembly were reviewed.

  15. Process Parameter Optimization for Wobbling Laser Spot Welding of Ti6Al4V Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili-Farahani, F.; Lungershausen, J.; Wasmer, K.

    Laser beam welding (LBW) coupled with "wobble effect" (fast oscillation of the laser beam) is very promising for high precision micro-joining industry. For this process, similarly to the conventional LBW, the laser welding process parameters play a very significant role in determining the quality of a weld joint. Consequently, four process parameters (laser power, wobble frequency, number of rotations within a single laser pulse and focused position) and 5 responses (penetration, width, heat affected zone (HAZ), area of the fusion zone, area of HAZ and hardness) were investigated for spot welding of Ti6Al4V alloy (grade 5) using a design of experiments (DoE) approach. This paper presents experimental results showing the effects of variating the considered most important process parameters on the spot weld quality of Ti6Al4V alloy. Semi-empirical mathematical models were developed to correlate laser welding parameters to each of the measured weld responses. Adequacies of the models were then examined by various methods such as ANOVA. These models not only allows a better understanding of the wobble laser welding process and predict the process performance but also determines optimal process parameters. Therefore, optimal combination of process parameters was determined considering certain quality criteria set.

  16. Robotic Welding and Inspection System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. B. Smartt; D. P. Pace; E. D. Larsen; T. R. McJunkin; C. I. Nichol; D. E. Clark; K. L. Skinner; M. L. Clark; T. G. Kaser; C. R. Tolle

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a robotic system for GTA welding of lids on cylindrical vessels. The system consists of an articulated robot arm, a rotating positioner, end effectors for welding, grinding, ultrasonic and eddy current inspection. Features include weld viewing cameras, modular software, and text-based procedural files for process and motion trajectories.

  17. Welding. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of eight terminal objectives for a basic welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (2 hours daily) course developed to teach the fundamentals of welding shop work, to become familiar with the operation of the welding shop…

  18. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  19. Defocusing Techniques for Multi-pass Laser Welding of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhu, Miikka; Kujanpää, Veli

    This study introduces an experimental work carried out in multi-pass laser welding with cold filler wire and laser-arc hybrid welding of thick section austenitic stainless steel. As it has been demonstrated earlier, hybrid and cold wire welding with a keyhole-mode can offer very efficient way to produce multi-pass welds in narrow gap thick section joints. However, when multi-pass welding is applied to one pass per layer method without e.g. scanning or defocusing, the used groove width needs to be very narrow in order to ensure the proper melting of groove side walls and thus to avoid lack of fusion/cold-run defects. As a consequence of the narrow groove, particularly in thick section joints, the accessibility of an arc torch or a wire nozzle into the very bottom of a groove in root pass welding can be considerably restricted. In an alternative approach described in this paper, a power density of a laser beam spot was purposely dispersed by using a defocusing technique. In groove filling experiments, a power density of defocused laser beam was kept in the range, which led the welding process towards to conduction limited regime and thus enabled to achieve broader weld cross-sections. The object was to study the feasibility of defocusing as a way to fill and bridge wider groove geometries than what can be welded with focused keyhole-mode welding with filler addition. The paper covers the results of multi-pass welding of up to 60 mm thick joints with single side preparations.

  20. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Weld Strength for Aluminum Ultrasonic Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Bita; Hetrick, Elizabeth T.; Mozurkewich, George; Reatherford, Larry V.

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this work is to determine the feasibility of using an ultrasonic, non-destructive technique for post-process evaluation of aluminum ultrasonic spot welds. A focused immersion transducer was utilized to obtain a C-scan of the weld interface, from which a weighted ultrasonic contact area was estimated. Weldments were subsequently tested destructively to determine the weld strength. The square root of the weld contact area displayed a relatively good correlation with weld strength, r2=0.85.

  1. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  2. Microstructure evolution and fracture behaviour for electron beam ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of microstructural characteristics on fracture behaviour mechanism for electron beam welding of Ti–6Al–4V was investigated. The results indicated that the welded microstructure composed of coarse needle + phases presenting disordered and multidirectional short needle morphology to make fracture ...

  3. Microstructure evolution and fracture behaviour for electron beam ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. The effect of microstructural characteristics on fracture behaviour mechanism for electron beam welding of Ti–6Al–4V was investigated. The results indicated that the welded microstructure composed of coarse needle α + β phases presenting disordered and multidirectional short needle morphology to make frac-.

  4. Monitoring of high-power fiber laser welding based on principal component analysis of a molten pool configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiangdong, Gao; Qian, Wen

    2013-12-01

    There exists plenty of welding quality information on a molten pool during high-power fiber laser welding. An approach for monitoring the high-power fiber laser welding status based on the principal component analysis (PCA) of a molten pool configuration is investigated. An infrared-sensitive high-speed camera was used to capture the molten pool images during laser butt-joint welding of Type 304 austenitic stainless steel plates with a high-power (10 kW) continuous wave fiber laser. In order to study the relationship between the molten pool configuration and the welding status, a new method based on PCA is proposed to analyze the welding stability by comparing the situation when the laser beam spot moves along, and when it deviates from the weld seam. Image processing techniques were applied to process the molten pool images and extract five characteristic parameters. Moreover, the PCA method was used to extract a composite indicator which is the linear combination of the five original characteristics to analyze the different status during welding. Experimental results showed that the extracted composite indicator had a close relationship with the actual welding results and it could be used to evaluate the status of the high-power fiber laser welding, providing a theoretical basis for the monitoring of laser welding quality.

  5. Weldability of an iron meteorite by Friction Stir Spot Welding: A contribution to in-space manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, William Todd; Neely, Kelsay E.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Cook, George E.

    2017-11-01

    Friction Stir Welding has been proposed as an efficient and appropriate method for in space welding. It has the potential to serve as a viable option for assembling large scale space structures. These large structures will require the use of natural in space materials such as those available from iron meteorites. Impurities present in most iron meteorites limit its ability to be welded by other space welding techniques such as electron beam laser welding. This study investigates the ability to weld pieces of in situ Campo del Cielo meteorites by Friction Stir Spot Welding. Due to the rarity of the material, low carbon steel was used as a model material to determine welding parameters. Welded samples of low carbon steel, invar, and Campo del Cielo meteorite were compared and found to behave in similar ways. This study shows that meteorites can be Friction Stir Spot Welded and that they exhibit properties analogous to that of FSSW low carbon steel welds. Thus, iron meteorites can be regarded as another viable option for in-space or Martian construction.

  6. Low temperature heat treatments of AA5754-Ti6Al4V dissimilar laser welds: Microstructure evolution and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, P.; D'Ostuni, S.; Casalino, G.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the effects of the post welding heat treatments (PWHT) performed at 350 °C and 450 °C on the microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of AA5754 and Ti6Al4V dissimilar laser welds. The microstructure and tensile properties of the welds before and after low temperature treatment were analyzed. The off-set welding technique was applied to limit the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds during the welding process. The laser beam was directed onto the titanium side at a small distance from the aluminum edge. The keyhole formed and the full penetration was reached in the titanium side of the weld. Thereafter, the aluminum side melted as the heat that formed the keyhole transferred from the titanium fused zone. Two different energy lines (32 J/mm and 76 J/mm) were used. In this manner, a fused and a heat affected zones was revealed on both sides of the weld. Several intermetallic compounds formed in the intermetallic layer between the two metals. The thickness and the composition of the intermetallic layer depended on the welding parameters and the post welding heat treatment. The hardness and tensile properties of the welds before and after the post welding heat treatment were measured and analyzed.

  7. Microstructural Characterization and Modeling of SLM Superalloy 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tim M.; Sudbrack, Chantal K.; Bonacuse, Pete; Rogers, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Superalloy 718 is an excellent candidate for selective laser melting (SLM) fabrication due to a combination of excellent mechanical properties and workability. Predicting and validating the microstructure of SLM-fabricated Superalloy 718 after potential post heat-treatment paths is an important step towards producing components comparable to those made using conventional methods. At present, obtaining accurate volume fraction and size measurements of gamma-double-prime, gamma-prime and delta precipitates has been challenging due to their size, low volume fractions, and similar chemistries. A technique combining high resolution distortion corrected SEM imaging and with x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy has been developed to accurately and independently measure the size and volume fractions of the three precipitates. These results were further validated using x-ray diffraction and phase extraction methods and compared to the precipitation kinetics predicted by PANDAT and JMatPro. Discrepancies are discussed in context of materials properties, model assumptions, sampling, and experimental errors.

  8. Thermomechanically coupled conduction mode laser welding simulations using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haoyue; Eberhard, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Process simulations of conduction mode laser welding are performed using the meshless Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The solid phase is modeled based on the governing equations in thermoelasticity. For the liquid phase, surface tension effects are taken into account to simulate the melt flow in the weld pool, including the Marangoni force caused by a temperature-dependent surface tension gradient. A non-isothermal solid-liquid phase transition with the release or absorption of additional energy known as the latent heat of fusion is considered. The major heat transfer through conduction is modeled, whereas heat convection and radiation are neglected. The energy input from the laser beam is modeled as a Gaussian heat source acting on the initial material surface. The developed model is implemented in Pasimodo. Numerical results obtained with the model are presented for laser spot welding and seam welding of aluminum and iron. The change of process parameters like welding speed and laser power, and their effects on weld dimensions are investigated. Furthermore, simulations may be useful to obtain the threshold for deep penetration welding and to assess the overall welding quality. A scalability and performance analysis of the implemented SPH algorithm in Pasimodo is run in a shared memory environment. The analysis reveals the potential of large welding simulations on multi-core machines.

  9. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  10. High Temperature Oxidation of Superalloys and Intermetallic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-28

    7] The charpy impact energy is satisfactory at room temperature, and, depending on the grain size, the FeAI(40 at.%) offers a yielding point...alumina (Al203).[7] The charpy impact energy is satisfactory at room temperature, and, depending on the grain size, the FeAI(40 at.%) offers a yielding...IN 718) superalloy was investigated by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). The corrosion test temperatures used were salt melting points

  11. Surface modification, microstructure and mechanical properties of investment cast superalloy

    OpenAIRE

    M. Zielińska; K. Kubiak; J. Sieniawski

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to determine physical and chemical properties of cobalt aluminate (CoAl2O4) modifiers produced by different companies and the influence of different types of modifiers on the grain size, the microstructure and mechanical properties of high temperature creep resisting superalloy René 77.Design/methodology/approach: The first stage of the research work took over the investigations of physical and chemical properties of cobalt aluminate manufactured by three diff...

  12. Powder-metallurgy superalloy strengthened by a secondary gamma phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotval, P. S.

    1971-01-01

    Description of experiments in which prealloyed powders of superalloy compositions were consolidated by extrusion after the strengthening by precipitation of a body-centered tetragonal gamma secondary Ni3 Ta phase. Thin foil electron microscopy showed that the mechanical properties of the resultant powder-metallurgy product were correlated with its microstructure. The product exhibited high strength at 1200 F without loss of ductility, after thermomechanical treatment and aging.

  13. Milestones in welding technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolby, Richard E.

    2013-09-01

    Sir Alan's PhD thesis describes his research into cracking during arc welding of armour steels. Throughout his career, he had a strong interest in defects of all types, how they formed in metallic structures and how the larger ones could be detected and sized by non-destructive techniques. He was also vitally concerned with how defects impacted on the engineering integrity of welded structures, particularly the risk of fracture in nuclear plant. This study presents a view of some of the major milestones in global welding technology that took place over the 60 or more years of Sir Alan's career and highlights those where he had a personal and direct involvement.

  14. Influence of Main Characteristic Features of Spot Welding on Welded Connection/Joint Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Quran, Firas M. F.; Matarneh, M. I.; Belik, A. G.

    2014-03-01

    To provide the required quality of welded connection in spot welding, an investigation of the influence of characteristic features of welding conditions on the welded connection strength and choice of the best process parameters are carried out.

  15. Combining Welding Expert Systems With Welding Databases to Improve Shipbuilding Production (The National Shipbuilding Research Program)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vandetverldt, Hans H; Johnston, Sterling; Jones, Jerald E; White, Dawn; Cleveland, B

    1989-01-01

    .... The WELDEXCELL system is a WELDing EXpert manufacturing CELL that provides computerized technical support information, off-line weld planning, and an integrated welding robot/welding system/vision system controller...

  16. Interfacial dislocation motion and interactions in single-crystal superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Raabe, D. [Max Planck Inst. fur Eisenforshung. Dusseldorf (Germany); Roters, F. [Max Planck Inst. fur Eisenforshung. Dusseldorf (Germany); Arsenlis, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The early stage of high-temperature low-stress creep in single-crystal superalloys is characterized by the rapid development of interfacial dislocation networks. Although interfacial motion and dynamic recovery of these dislocation networks have long been expected to control the subsequent creep behavior, direct observation and hence in-depth understanding of such processes has not been achieved. Incorporating recent developments of discrete dislocation dynamics models, we simulate interfacial dislocation motion in the channel structures of single-crystal superalloys, and investigate how interfacial dislocation motion and dynamic recovery are affected by interfacial dislocation interactions and lattice misfit. Different types of dislocation interactions are considered: self, collinear, coplanar, Lomer junction, glissile junction, and Hirth junction. The simulation results show that strong dynamic recovery occurs due to the short-range reactions of collinear annihilation and Lomer junction formation. The misfit stress is found to induce and accelerate dynamic recovery of interfacial dislocation networks involving self-interaction and Hirth junction formation, but slow down the steady interfacial motion of coplanar and glissile junction forming dislocation networks. The insights gained from these simulations on high-temperature low-stress creep of single-crystal superalloys are also discussed.

  17. Comparison of Welding Residual Stresses of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding and Submerged Arc Welding in Offshore Steel Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    In the offshore industry, welding-induced distortion and tensile residual stresses have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of a welded structure. Particularly, the continuous increase in size of welded plates and joints needs special attention concerning welding induced...... are hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) and submerged arc welding (SAW). Both welding methods are applied for a full penetration butt-weld of 10 mm thick plates made of thermomechanically hot-rolled, low-carbon, fine-grain S355ML grade steel used in offshore steel structures. The welding residual stress state...

  18. Study on weld bead surface profile and angular distortion in 6 mm thick butt weld joints of SS304 using fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, P.; Paul, C. P.; Mundra, G.; Premsingh, C. H.; Mishra, S. K.; Nagpure, D.; Kumar, Atul; Kukreja, L. M.

    2014-02-01

    We deployed a 2 kW continuous wave fiber laser integrated with the 5-axis workstation to understand the effect of various processing parameters (laser power, welding speed, beam spot size and chamfer at welded edges) on depth of penetration, angular distortion and welded bead surface profile during autogenous laser welding of 6 mm thick austenitic stainless steel type 304 plates. Full penetration with reduced weld bead surface undulation (joints having chamfered edges of 0.8 mm. The microscopic studies revealed grossly defect-free fusion zone with a few porosities at isolated locations. The microstructure at the fusion zone was largely austenitic with few ferrites and the direction of growth was epitaxial towards the fusion line. The measured values of microhardness at base material and fusion zone were 208±4 HV0.1 and 235±10 HV0.1 respectively. The tensile testing of laser welded samples indicated the ultimate strength >605 MPa and these samples could be bent for an angle >170° without noticeable crack during bend test. The study opened the avenues for the deployment of fiber laser welding technology for applications demanding critical values of surface weld bead profile and distortion.

  19. Effect of Dynamic Reheating Induced by Weaving on the Microstructure of GTAW Weld Metal of 25% Cr Super Duplex Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Joon Sung

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the additional growth and/or transformation of the austenite phase that occurs in weld metals of super duplex stainless steel upon reheating is known. However, the effects have not been fully investigated, especially with respect to reheating induced by weaving during single-pass welding. In this work, bead-on-pipe gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW was conducted on super duplex stainless steel to understand the effect of weaving on the microstructure of weld metal. Microstructural analysis, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD, and focused ion beam transmission electron microscopy (FIB-TEM were carried out to investigate the relationship between weaving and microstructural change. The weaving of GTAW produced a dynamic reheated area just before the weld bead during welding. It was revealed that extensive reheated weld existed even after one welding pass, and that the content of the austenite phase in the reheated area was higher than that in the non-reheated area, indicating the existence of a large quantity of intragranular austenite phase. In addition, the Cr2N content in the reheated area was lower than that in the non-reheated area. This reduction of Cr2N was closely related to the reheating resulting from weaving. TEM analysis revealed that Cr2N in the non-reheated area was dispersed following heating and transformed to secondary austenite.

  20. Spot Welding of Honeycomb Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohal, V.

    2017-08-01

    Honeycomb structures are used to prepare meals water jet cutting machines for textile. These honeycomb structures are made of stainless steel sheet thickness of 0.1-0.2 mm. Corrugated sheet metal strips are between two gears with special tooth profile. Hexagonal cells for obtaining these strips are welded points between them. Spot welding device is three electrodes in the upper part, which carries three welding points across the width of the strip of corrugated sheet metal. Spot welding device filled with press and advance mechanisms. The paper presents the values of the regime for spot welding.

  1. Ternary gas plasma welding torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor); Waldron, Douglas J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A plasma arc welding torch is discussed. A first plasma gas is directed through the body of the welding torch and out of the body across the tip of a welding electrode disposed at the forward end of the body. A second plasma gas is disposed for flow through a longitudinal bore in the electrode. The second plasma gas enters one end of the electrode and exits the electrode at the tip thereof for co-acting with the electric welding arc to produce the desired weld. A shield gas is directed through the torch body and circulates around the head of the torch adjacent to the electrode tip.

  2. Mechanized hyperbaric welding by robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aust, E.; Santos, J.F. dos; Bohm, K.H.; Hensel, H.D.

    1988-01-01

    At the GKSS-Forschungszentrum investigations are carried out on mechanized welded test plates produced under working pressure between 10 to 110 bar in breathable TRIMIX-5-atmosphere. The welds are performed by a modified industrial robot, which was adapted in its components to withstand these severe conditions. Variations on the welding parameters were made to maintain a stable arc as well as to provide on indication of the effect of the variables on the mechanical properties of the welded joint. During all tests the robot showed a very good function. Good reliable welds were achieved meeting the requirements according API II04 or BS 4515-1984. (orig.) [de

  3. NASA/ORNL/AFRL Project Work on EBM LSHR: Additive Manufacturing of High-Temperature Gamma-Prime Strengthened Ni-Based Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudbrack, Chantal K.; Kirka, Michael M.; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Carter, Robert W.; Semiatin, Sheldon L.; Gabb, Timothy P.

    2016-01-01

    Powder-bed fabrication of aerospace alloys may revolutionize production by eliminating the need for extensive machining and expensive tooling. Heated-bed electron-beam melting (EBM) offers advantages over non-heated laser additive manufacturing (AM) methods, including lower residual stress, reduced risk of contamination, slower cooling rates, and faster build times. NASA Glenn Research Center has joint project work with Oak Ridge National Lab and the Air Force Research Laboratory to explore the feasibility of fabricating advanced Ni-based gamma-prime superalloys with EBM AM.

  4. Understanding Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2018-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum explains the friction stir welding process in terms of two basic concepts: the concentration of deformation in a shear surface enveloping the tool and the composition of the overall plastic flow field around the tool from simple flow field components. It is demonstrated how weld structure may be understood and torque, drag, and lateral tool forces may be estimated using these concepts. Some discrepancies between computations and accompanying empirical data are discussed in the text. This work is intended to be helpful to engineers in diagnosing problems and advancing technology.

  5. Development of special welding processes for in-core components in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setty, D.S.; Kalyanakrishnan, G.; Saibaba, N.

    2016-01-01

    India has designed its three-stage nuclear power program based on domestic limited resources of uranium and vast availability of thorium, where natural and enriched uranium-dioxide fuel is utilized in Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) respectively in the first stage. Plutonium based fuels are implemented for Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR) in the second stage and thorium based fuels are to be utilized using indigenously developed reactors in the third stage. Considering the harsh reactor operating conditions like high temperature and pressure and neutron flux, in-core components used in the above reactors are to be manufactured with different critical materials like Zirconium alloys, Special SS materials, ODS etc. Welding the best joining technique used for joining in-core components, and can perform satisfactorily in the reactors. The welding processes used in nuclear applications have to conform to stringent quality requirements to achieve zero failures rate. In view of the stringent weld quality requirements and amenable for automation various weld joint designs and welding processes were selected for fabrication of in-core components such as Resistance Welding, Tungsten Inert Gas welding and Electron Beam Welding. In this paper, overview is given for all the major welding processes used and its specific applications for fabrication of in-core components used in nuclear reactors. The welding process intricacies are explained and weld quality evaluation techniques are briefly brought out. The joint design modifications and improvements achieved with respect to welding operations over decades of reactor operating experiences are also explained, which helped in reducing fuel and in-core structural components failures for Indian nuclear reactors. (author)

  6. Welding method by remote handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashinokuchi, Minoru.

    1994-01-01

    Water is charged into a pit (or a water reservoir) and an article to be welded is placed on a support in the pit by remote handling. A steel plate is disposed so as to cover the article to be welded by remote handling. The welding device is positioned to the portion to be welded and fixed in a state where the article to be welded is shielded from radiation by water and the steel plate. Water in the pit is drained till the portion to be welded is exposed to the atmosphere. Then, welding is conducted. After completion of the welding, water is charged again to the pit and the welding device and fixing jigs are decomposed in a state where the article to be welded is shielded again from radiation by water and the steel plate. Subsequently, the steel plate is removed by remote handling. Then, the article to be welded is returned from the pit to a temporary placing pool by remote handling. This can reduce operator's exposure. Further, since the amount of the shielding materials can be minimized, the amount of radioactive wastes can be decreased. (I.N.)

  7. 75 FR 80457 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan: Final Results of Sunset Review and Revocation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ... the sunset review of the antidumping duty order on superalloy degassed chromium (SDC) ] from Japan... applicable deadline, the Department is revoking the antidumping duty order on SDC from Japan. DATES... antidumping duty order on SDC from Japan. See Antidumping Duty Order: Superalloy Degassed Chromium from Japan...

  8. The effect of temperature on the deformation structure of single crystal nickel based superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollar, M.; Bernstein, I. M.

    1988-01-01

    Results for the temperature dependence of the yield and flow stress were obtained for the superalloys PWA 1480 and CMSX-2. An extended Copley-Kear (1967) model is used to predict flow stresses from the dislocation densities measured at different strains and temperatures. Differences found between the two superalloys include the development of their dislocation structure, their ductility, and their work hardening characteristics.

  9. Visualization of Spot- welding Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Černý

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution devotes to monitoring of processes running during joining of steel sheets by incadescent so called point welding using non-destructive trial method – acoustic emission (AE. The joining process is detailed described within experimental measuring from the point of view of metallurgic effects runnig during weld creation (records obtained by means of AE method. It takes into consideration quality of joined steels within welding data of steel producer. Steel welding (determined by chemical composition during mechanical verification and firmness of welds consider results of measurement AE and fracture effect of point joints. The measurement also demonstrates conclusion about connection of metallurgic processes with material wave effects (AE measurement and their impact on firmness of joint at steel with guaranteed welding, difficult welding and at their potential combination.

  10. EB-welding of the copper canister for the nuclear waste disposal. Final report of the development programme 1994-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aalto, H.

    1998-10-01

    During 1994-1997 Posiva Oy and Outokumpu Poricopper Oy had a joint project Development of EB-welding method for massive copper canister manufacturing. The project was part of the national technology program 'Weld 2000' and it was supported financially by Technology Development Centre (TEKES). The spent fuel from Finnish nuclear reactors is planned to be encapsulated in thick-walled copper canisters and placed deep into the bedrock. The thick copper layer of the canister provides a long time corrosion resistance and prevents deposited nuclear fuel from contact with water. The quality requirements of the copper components are high because of the designed long lifetime of the canister. The EB-welding technology has proved to be applicable method for the production of the copper canisters and the EB-welding technique is needed at least when the lids of the copper canister will be closed. There are a number of parameters in EB-welding which affect weldability. However, the effect of the welding parameters and their optimization has not been extensively studied in welding of thick copper sections using conventional high vacuum EB-welding. One aim of this development work was to extensively study effect of welding parameters on weld quality. The final objective was to minimise welding defects in the main weld and optimize slope out procedure in thick copper EB-welding. Welding of 50 mm thick copper sections was optimized using vertical and horizontal EB-welding techniques. As a result two full scale copper lids were welded to a short cylinder successfully. The resulting weld quality with optimised welding parameters was reasonable good. The optimised welding parameters for horizontal and vertical beam can be applied to the longitudinal body welds of the canister. The optimal slope out procedure for the lid closure needs some additional development work. In addition of extensive EB-welding program ultrasonic inspection and creep strength of the weld were studied. According

  11. EB-welding of the copper canister for the nuclear waste disposal. Final report of the development programme 1994-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aalto, H. [Outokumpu Oy Poricopper, Pori (Finland)

    1998-10-01

    During 1994-1997 Posiva Oy and Outokumpu Poricopper Oy had a joint project Development of EB-welding method for massive copper canister manufacturing. The project was part of the national technology program `Weld 2000` and it was supported financially by Technology Development Centre (TEKES). The spent fuel from Finnish nuclear reactors is planned to be encapsulated in thick-walled copper canisters and placed deep into the bedrock. The thick copper layer of the canister provides a long time corrosion resistance and prevents deposited nuclear fuel from contact with water. The quality requirements of the copper components are high because of the designed long lifetime of the canister. The EB-welding technology has proved to be applicable method for the production of the copper canisters and the EB-welding technique is needed at least when the lids of the copper canister will be closed. There are a number of parameters in EB-welding which affect weldability. However, the effect of the welding parameters and their optimization has not been extensively studied in welding of thick copper sections using conventional high vacuum EB-welding. One aim of this development work was to extensively study effect of welding parameters on weld quality. The final objective was to minimise welding defects in the main weld and optimize slope out procedure in thick copper EB-welding. Welding of 50 mm thick copper sections was optimized using vertical and horizontal EB-welding techniques. As a result two full scale copper lids were welded to a short cylinder successfully. The resulting weld quality with optimised welding parameters was reasonable good. The optimised welding parameters for horizontal and vertical beam can be applied to the longitudinal body welds of the canister. The optimal slope out procedure for the lid closure needs some additional development work. In addition of extensive EB-welding program ultrasonic inspection and creep strength of the weld were studied. According

  12. 49 CFR 195.228 - Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welds and welding inspection: Standards of... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.228 Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability. (a) Each weld and welding must be inspected to insure compliance with...

  13. The Mechanical Properties of Candidate Superalloys for a Hybrid Turbine Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; MacKay, Rebecca A.; Draper, Susan L.; Sudbrack, Chantal K.; Nathal, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of several cast blade superalloys and one powder metallurgy disk superalloy were assessed for potential use in a dual alloy hybrid disk concept of joined dissimilar bore and web materials. Grain size was varied for each superalloy class. Tensile, creep, fatigue, and notch fatigue tests were performed at 704 to 815 degC. Typical microstructures and failure modes were determined. Preferred materials were then selected for future study as the bore and rim alloys in this hybrid disk concept. Powder metallurgy superalloy LSHR at 15 micron grain size and single crystal superalloy LDS-1101+Hf were selected for further study, and future work is recommended to develop the hybrid disk concept.

  14. High temperature oxidation and corrosion behavior of Ni-base superalloy in He environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gyoeng Geun; Park, Ji Yeon; Jung, Su jin

    2010-11-01

    Ni-base superalloy is considered as a IHX (Intermediate Heat Exchanger) material for VHTR (Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor). The helium environment in VHTR contains small amounts of impure gases, which cause oxidation, carburization, and decarburization. In this report, we conducted the literature survey about the high temperature behavior of Ni-base superalloys in air and He environments. The basic information of Ni-base superalloy and the basic metal-oxidation theory were briefly stated. The He effect on the corrosion of Ni-base superalloy was also summarized. This works would provide a brief suggestion for the next research topic for the application of Ni-base superalloy to VHTR

  15. Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1986-01-01

    Chromium-molybdenum steels exhibit a weakening after welding in an area adjacent to the weld. This invention is an improved method for welding to eliminate the weakness by subjecting normalized steel to a partial temper prior to welding and subsequently fully tempering the welded article for optimum strength and ductility.

  16. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.225 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding procedures...

  17. Tool For Robotic Resistive Roll Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilber, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    Roll-welding attachment for robot simple, inexpensive device incorporating modified commercial resistance-welding gun. Modified welding gun easily attaches to end effector of robot. Robot applies welding force and moves electrode wheel along prescribed path. Resistance-welding current starts and stops automatically according to force exerted against workpiece. Used to apply brazing foil to workpiece.

  18. Sensor integration for robotic laser welding processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, D.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Meijer, J.; Ostendorf, A; Hoult, A.; Lu, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The use of robotic laser welding is increasing among industrial applications, because of its ability to weld objects in three dimensions. Robotic laser welding involves three sub-processes: seam detection and tracking, welding process control, and weld seam inspection. Usually, for each sub-process,

  19. Integrated sensors for robotic laser welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, D.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Meijer, J.; Beyer, E.; Dausinger, F; Ostendorf, A; Otto, A.

    2005-01-01

    A welding head is under development with integrated sensory systems for robotic laser welding applications. Robotic laser welding requires sensory systems that are capable to accurately guide the welding head over a seam in three-dimensional space and provide information about the welding process as

  20. Disk Laser Welding of Car Body Zinc Coated Steel Sheets / Spawanie Laserem Dyskowym Blach Ze Stali Karoseryjnej Ocynkowanej

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiecki A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Autogenous laser welding of 0.8 mm thick butt joints of car body electro-galvanized steel sheet DC04 was investigated. The Yb:YAG disk laser TruDisk 3302 with the beam spot diameter of 200 μm was used. The effect of laser welding parameters and technological conditions on weld shape, penetration depth, process stability, microstructure and mechanical performance was determined. It was found that the laser beam spot focused on the top surface of a butt joint tends to pass through the gap, especially in the low range of heat input and high welding speed. All test welds were welded at a keyhole mode, and the weld metal was free of porosity. Thus, the keyhole laser welding of zinc coated steel sheets in butt configuration provides excellent conditions to escape for zinc vapours, with no risk of porosity. Microstructure, microhardness and mechanical performance of the butt joints depend on laser welding conditions thus cooling rate and cooling times. The shortest cooling time t8/5 was calculated for 0.29 s.

  1. Development of Temper Bead Welding Process for Weld Overlay of Dissimilar Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byeon, J. G.; Park, K. S.; Kim, Y. J. [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    In recent years, the dissimilar weld metal used to connect stainless steel piping and low alloy steel or carbon steel components have experienced cracking in nuclear reactor piping systems. The cracking has been observed in several Pressurized Water Reactors in overseas. In Several cases, the cracking was repaired using structural weld overlays, a repair technique that has been in use in the U.S. in Boiling Water Reactors for over twenty years. Although weld overlays have been used primarily as a repair for flawed piping, they can also be applied at locations that have not yet exhibited any cracking, but are considered susceptible to cracking. The purpose of this research is to develop the temper bead weld process for the weld overlay of the dissimilar weld pipe. We developed equipment for the overlay system, applied Procedure Qualification(PQ) for the temper bead welding process.

  2. Welding. Student Learning Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm Beach County Board of Public Instruction, West Palm Beach, FL.

    This student learning guide contains 30 modules for completing a course in welding. It is designed especially for use in secondary schools in Palm Beach County, Florida. Each module covers one task, and consists of a purpose, performance objective, enabling objectives, learning activities keyed to resources, information sheets, student self-check…

  3. Welding in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The 3rd international conference 'Welding in nuclear engineering', organized in 1978 by the Deutscher Verband fuer Schweisstechnik e.V., was, like the two foregoing conferences in 1970 and 1974, an absolute success. The noteworthy echo to this meeting in the international technical world - the number of 650 participants from 26 countries is self-evidence - and this fact, was for the Deutscher Verband fuer Schweisstechnik e.V. occasion and at the same time an obligation now to follow in the same way, the meeting that was started 12 years ago, by organizing the international conference 'Welding in nuclear engineering'. The conference this year offers in addition to the two plenary session lectures, 34 short reports and a further 28 single contributions in the form of two poster-sessions. Unfortunately, it was again not possible to accept all the papers submitted because the conference was limited to 2 days only. Nevertheless, the papers will offer a representative cross-section through the total range of welding engineering. In particular, the poster session, which take place for the first time within the scope of a meeting organized by the Working Group 'Welding in Nuclear Engineering', should contribute to the aim that this time again the discussions will form the main point of the conference. (orig./RW) [de

  4. Numerical simulation of welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær; Thorborg, Jesper

    Aim of project:To analyse and model the transient thermal field from arc welding (SMAW, V-shaped buttweld in 15mm plate) and to some extend the mechanical response due to the thermal field. - To implement this model in a general purpose finite element program such as ABAQUS.The simulation...

  5. Ultrasonic inspection of AA6013 laser welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Passini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Interest in laser beam welding for aerospace applications is continuously growing, mainly for aluminum alloys. The joints quality is usually assessed by non-destructive inspection (NDI. In this work, bead on plate laser welds on 1.6 mm thick AA6013 alloy sheets, using a 2 kW Yb-fiber laser were obtained and inspected by pulse/echo ultrasonic phased-array technique. Good and poor quality welds were inspected in order to verify the limits of inspection, comparing also to X-ray radiography and metallographic inspections. The results showed that ultrasonic phased array technique was able to identify the presence of grouped porosity, through the attenuation of the amplitude of the echo signal. This attenuation is attributed to the scattering of the waves caused by micro pores, with individual size below the resolution limit of the equipment, but when grouped, can cause a perceptive effect on the reflection spectra.

  6. Single Pass Laser Welding with Multiple Spots to Join Four Sheets in a Butt-joint Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, Morten; Hansen, Klaus Schütt; Langbak, Andreas; Johansen, Sebastian Blegebrønd; Krempin, Simon Borup; Hornum, Mattias Døssing

    Laser keyhole welding is widely used in industry due to its large welding depth and low heat input. For some industrial cases it is necessary to widen the beam to cover the joint configuration, which instead results in a lower intensity and surface conduction welds. The introduction of the high-power single mode fiber laser makes it possible to deal with this problem, because the beam can be shaped into a pre-defined pattern of multiple spots shaped to the actual joint configuration. The intensity of each spot is sufficient to make a keyhole. A case with four sheets in a butt-joint configuration is used to demonstrate the principle of how to design a spot pattern which ensures weld quality in case of a single pass laser weld.

  7. Acoustic emission monitoring during welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prine, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    Weld repair is a major cost item, particularly in the fabrication of heavy section weldments such as pressure vessels. A heavy section repair can frequently leave the weld with worse problems than the original flaw. These problems may include damage to weld microstructure as well as added residual stress. The removal of flaws through in-process repair can minimize these problems and certainly, the removal of one or two passes and their replacement with automatic welding procedure is considerably cheaper than a heavy section post weld repair. The major barrier to application of in-process repair is the lack of an effective in-process inspection procedure. In-process monitoring of Acoustic Emission shows great promise for providing this much needed tool. The successful application of acoustic emission to in-process weld monitoring requires that advanced signal processing and pattern recognition techniques be applied if the flaw related acoustic emission is to be separated from the overwhelming amount of background noise present in welding. GARD, INC. has studied the problem of applying in-process acoustic emission monitoring to weld inspection for over 9 years and has empirically developed AE signal processing techniques which allow typical weld flaws to be detected, located, and characterized. This paper discusses these techniques and describes a recent successful field test of a microcomputer based AE weld monitor in a nuclear fabrication plant. (author)

  8. Galvanic corrosion of beryllium welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.A.; Butt, D.P.; Lillard, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Beryllium is difficult to weld because it is highly susceptible to cracking. The most commonly used filler metal in beryllium welds is Al-12 wt.% Si. Beryllium has been successfully welded using Al-Si filler metal with more than 30 wt.% Al. This filler creates an aluminum-rich fusion zone with a low melting point that tends to backfill cracks. Drawbacks to adding a filler metal include a reduction in service temperature, a lowering of the tensile strength of the weld, and the possibility for galvanic corrosion to occur at the weld. To evaluate the degree of interaction between Be and Al-Si in an actual weld, sections from a mock beryllium weldment were exposed to 0.1 M Cl - solution. Results indicate that the galvanic couple between Be and the Al-Si weld material results in the cathodic protection of the weld and of the anodic dissolution of the bulk Be material. While the cathodic protection of Al is generally inefficient, the high anodic dissolution rate of the bulk Be during pitting corrosion combined with the insulating properties of the Be oxide afford some protection of the Al-Si weld material. Although dissolution of the Be precipitate in the weld material does occur, no corrosion of the Al-Si matrix was observed

  9. Cognition for robot scanner based remote welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombansen, U.; Ungers, Michael

    2014-02-01

    The effort for reduced cycle times in manufacturing has supported the development of remote welding systems which use a combination of scanners for beam delivery and robots for scanner positioning. Herein, close coupling of both motions requires a precise command of the robot trajectory and the scanner positioning to end up with a combined beam delivery. Especially the path precision of the robot plays a vital role in this kinematic chain. In this paper, a sensor system is being presented which allows tracking the motion of the laser beam against the work piece. It is based on a camera system which is coaxially connected to the scanner thus observing the relative motion of the laser beam relative to the work piece. The acquired images are processed with computer vision algorithms from the field of motion detection. The suitability of the algorithms is being demonstrated with a motion tracking tool which visualizes the homogeneity of the tracking result. The reported solution adds cognitive capabilities to manufacturing systems for robot scanner based materials processing. It allows evaluation of the relative motion between work piece and the laser beam. Moreover, the system can be used to adapt system programming during set-up of a manufacturing task or to evaluate the functionality of a manufacturing system during production. The presented sensor system will assist in optimizing manufacturing processes.

  10. Welding of the lid and the bottom of the disposal canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuronen, I.; Salonen, T.

    2010-10-01

    The seal welding of the lid and bottom of a copper disposal canister for spent nuclear fuel using ordinary electron beam welding (EBW) made in a vacuum and the results gained in the development work are presented in this report. As an alternative method, the friction stir welding (FSW) is also presented in an overview. Welding of copper is very challenging mainly due to the high thermal conductivity of the copper material. The EBW method is based on so-called deep penetration welding which does not use additional welding material. The convenience of the method is that the weld is the same material as the base material. When compared to other fusion welding methods, the material transitions in the material caused by EBW are slight. The EBW process typically has a high number of welding parameters but, in practice, only a few parameters are adjusted during copper welding to maintain weld quality and the stability of the process. The high vacuum required by the method prevents the material from oxidising but, on the other hand, it narrows the application of the method. The requirements presented for the weld and welding process can be divided in two classes. The first class contains the requirements intended to ensure the long-term safety of the canister. Corrosion resistance and adequate creep ductility are such requirements. The second class requirements correspond to welding process requirements for component manufacture, the components themselves and the other processes of the encapsulation plant. The welding process, including the personnel, equipment and process validation, shall also fulfil the special requirements concerning all nuclear plants in general. The quality assurance and control (QA/QC) for welding is presented as a separate section. The welding quality assurance contains the personnel, equipment and the welding process. For EBW process validation there are available norms and acceptation procedures. In these, the essential component is the

  11. Investigation on laser welding characteristics for appendage of bearing pads of nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. S.; Kim, W. K.; Park, C. H.; Ko, J. H.; Lee, J. W.; Yang, M. S.

    2001-01-01

    In CANDU nuclear fuel manufacturing the brazing technology has been adopted conventionally to attach the bearing pads of nuclear fuel elements. However, in order to meet good performance of nuclear fuel and improved working efficiency, we started developing the laser welding technology for attachments of the bearing pads. Since the YAG laser can be suitable for small parts and transmit the beam through the optical fiber, the process is corresponding to mass-production with working shops. Making the most of this feature, we have developed the laser welding for appendage of the bearing pads of nuclear fuel elements, and has studied on the laser welding characterisitcs of appendages for nuclear fuel element

  12. Improvements in and relating to welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, B.D.

    1979-01-01

    This invention concerns apparatus for use in welding, particularly welding which must be effected in a predetermined, for example, inert atmosphere, e.g. the welding of reactive materials such as zircaloy, titanium, magnesium, aluminium, etc. (U.K.)

  13. In-field Welding and Coating Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-12

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and Edison Welding Institute (EWI) created both laboratory and infield girth weld samples to evaluate the effects of weld geometry and hydrogen off-gassing on the performance of protective coatings. Laboratory made plat...

  14. Welding residual stress distributions for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Soo; Kim, Ju Hee; Bae, Hong Yeol; OH, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyungsoo [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Tae Kwang [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    In pressurized water nuclear reactors, dissimilar metal welds are susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking. To access this problem, accurate estimation of welding residual stresses is important. This paper provides general welding residual stress profiles in dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds using finite element analysis. By introducing a simplified shape for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds, changes in the welding residual stress distribution can be seen using a geometry variable. Based on the results, a welding residual stress profile for dissimilar metal nozzle butt welds is proposed that modifies the existing welding residual stress profile for austenitic pipe butt welds.

  15. Quantitative characterization and comparison of precipitate and grain shape in Nickel -base superalloys using moment invariants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Patrick Gregory

    A fundamental objective of materials science and engineering is to understand the structure-property-processing-performance relationship. We need to know the true 3-D microstructure of a material to understand certain geometric properties of a material, and thus fulfill this objective. Focused ion beam (FIB) serial sectioning allows us to find the true 3-D microstructure of Ni-base superalloys. Once the true 3-D microstructure is obtained, an accurate quantitative description and characterization of precipitate and/or grain shapes is needed to understand the microstructure and describe it in an unbiased way. In this thesis, second order moment invariants, the shape quotient Q, a convexity measure relating the volume of an object to the volume of its convex hull, V/Vconv, and Gaussian curvature have been used to compare an experimentally observed polycrystalline IN100 microstructure to three synthetic microstructures. The three synthetic microstructures used different shape classes to produce starting grain shapes. The three shape classes are ellipsoids, superellipsoids, and the shapes generated when truncating a cube with an octahedron. The microstructures are compared using a distance measure, the Hellinger distance. The Hellinger distance is used to compare distributions of shape descriptors for the grains in each microstructure. The synthetic microstructure that has the smallest Hellinger distance, and so best matched the experimentally observed microstructure is the microstructure that used superellipsoids as a starting grain shape. While it has the smallest Hellinger distance, and is approaching realistic grain morphologies, the superellipsoidal microstructure is still not realistic. Second order moment invariants, Q, and V/V conv have also been used to characterize the γ' precipitate shapes from four experimental Ru-containing Ni-base superalloys with differences in alloying additions. The superalloys are designated UM-F9, UM-F18, UM-F19, and UM-F22. The

  16. Corrosion Resistant Cladding by YAG Laser Welding in Underwater Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutomi Kochi; Toshio Kojima; Suemi Hirata; Ichiro Morita; Katsura Ohwaki

    2002-01-01

    It is known that stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) will occur in nickel-base alloys used in Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and Internals of nuclear power plants. A SCC sensitivity has been evaluated by IHI in each part of RPV and Internals. There are several water level instrumentation nozzles installed in domestic BWR RPV. In water level instrumentation nozzles, 182 type nickel-base alloys were used for the welding joint to RPV. It is estimated the SCC potential is high in this joint because of a higher residual stress than the yield strength (about 400 MPa). This report will describe a preventive maintenance method to these nozzles Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and welds by a corrosion resistant cladding (CRC) by YAG Laser in underwater environment (without draining a reactor water). There are many kinds of countermeasures for SCC, for example, Induction Heating Stress Improvement (IHSI), Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP) and so on. A YAG laser CRC is one of them. In this technology a laser beam is used for heat source and irradiated through an optical fiber to a base metal and SCC resistant material is used for welding wires. After cladding the HAZ and welds are coated by the corrosion resistant materials so their surfaces are improved. A CRC by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) in an air environment had been developed and already applied to a couple of operating plants (16 Nozzles). This method was of course good but it spent much time to perform because of an installation of some water-proof working boxes to make a TIG-weldability environment. CRC by YAG laser welding in underwater environment has superior features comparing to this conventional TIG method as follows. At the viewpoint of underwater environment, (1) an outage term reduction (no drainage water). (2) a radioactive exposure dose reduction for personnel. At that of YAG laser welding, (1) A narrower HAZ. (2) A smaller distortion. (3) A few cladding layers. A YAG laser CRC test in underwater

  17. Friction welding of bulk metallic glasses to different ones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Takuo; Kawamura, Yoshihito; Ohno, Yasuhide

    2004-01-01

    For application of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) as industrial materials, it is necessary to establish the metallurgical bonding technology. The BMGs exhibit high-strain-rate superplasticity in the supercooled liquid state. It has been reported that bulk metallic glasses were successfully welded together by friction, pulse-current, explosion and electron-beam methods. In this study, friction welding of the BMGs to different ones were tried for Pd 40 Ni 40 P 20 , Pd 40 Cu 30 P 20 Ni 10 , Zr 55 Cu 30 Al 10 Ni 5 and Zr 41 Be 23 Ti 14 Cu 12 Ni 10 BMGs. Successful welding was obtained in the combinations of the Pd 40 Ni 40 P 20 and Pd 40 Cu 30 P 20 Ni 10 BMGs, and the Zr 55 Cu 30 Al 10 Ni 5 and Zr 41 Be 23 Ti 14 Cu 12 Ni 10 ones. No crystallization was observed and no visible defect was recognized in the interface. The joining strength of the welded BMGs was the same as that of the parent BMG or more. BMGs seem to be successfully welded to the different ones with a difference below about 50 K in glass transition temperature

  18. Development of stress corrosion cracking resistant welds of 321 stainless steel by simple surface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankari, Kamal; Acharyya, Swati Ghosh

    2017-12-01

    We hereby report a simple surface engineering technique to make AISI grade 321 stainless steel (SS) welds resistant to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in chloride environment. Heat exchanger tubes of AISI 321 SS, welded either by (a) laser beam welding (LBW) or by (b) metal inert gas welding (MIG) were used for the study. The welds had high magnitude of tensile residual stresses and had undergone SCC in chloride environment while in service. The welds were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Subsequently, the welded surfaces were subjected to buffing operation followed by determination of residual stress distribution and surface roughness by XRD and surface profilometer measurements respectively. The susceptibility of the welds to SCC was tested in buffed and un-buffed condition as per ASTM G-36 in boiling MgCl2 for 5 h and 10 h, followed by microstructural characterization by using optical microscope and FESEM. The results showed that the buffed surfaces (both welds and base material) were resistant to SCC even after 10 h of exposure to boiling MgCl2 whereas the un-buffed surfaces underwent severe SCC for the same exposure time. Buffing imparted high magnitude of compressive stresses on the surface of stainless steel together with reduction in its surface roughness and reduction in plastic strain on the surface which made the welded surface, resistant to chloride assisted SCC. Buffing being a very simple, portable and economic technique can be easily adapted by the designers as the last step of component fabrication to make 321 stainless steel welds resistant to chloride assisted SCC.

  19. A new procedure for refurbishment of power plant Superalloy 617 by pulsed Nd:YAG laser process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Naser; Naffakh-Moosavy, Homam; Ghaini, Farshid Malek

    2017-06-01

    The present study has evaluated the surface rejuvenation of aged Inconel 617 superalloy by both GTAW and pulsed Nd:YAG laser techniques. The gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) by heat input per unit length [Q/V(J/mm)] of 280, 291.67, 309.74 and 225.48 (J/mm), and the pulse Nd:YAG laser process by the 15.71, 19.43 and 22.32 (J/mm), were employed. The Rosenthal equation was used for calculation of mushy zone (MZ) and partially-melted zone (PMZ). Size of MZ and PMZ in GTAW are more than 31 and 6 times than that of formed in pulsed Nd:YAG laser. According to the characterizations, solidification and liquation cracks were observed in these areas produced by GTAW whereas no cracks were identified in laser treated samples. Also, line scan EDS analyses demonstrated the interdendritic chromium and molybdenum segregation, which facilitated formation of hot cracks. With reduction in heat input per unit length, the hardness increased and the size of solidified metal microstructure reduced in pulse Nd:YAG laser. These comparative results showed that pulse Nd:YAG laser can easily be utilized as a new rejuvenation technique for aged Alloy 617 in comparison to the conventional processes due to extremely narrow MZ and HAZ and better surface soundness and mechanical properties.

  20. Fundamental Laser Welding Process Investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1998-01-01

    In a number of systematic laboratory investigations the fundamental behavior of the laser welding process was analyzed by the use of normal video (30 Hz), high speed video (100 and 400 Hz) and photo diodes. Sensors were positioned to monitor the welding process from both the top side and the rear...... side of the specimen.Special attention has been given to the dynamic nature of the laser welding process, especially during unstable welding conditions. In one series of experiments, the stability of the process has been varied by changing the gap distance in lap welding. In another series...... video pictures (400 Hz), a clear impact on the seam characteristics has been identified when a hump occurs.Finally, a clear correlation between the position of the focus point, the resultant process type and the corresponding signal intensity and signal variation has been found for sheets welded...