WorldWideScience

Sample records for beam size effects

  1. The effect of laser beam size in a zig-zag collimator on transverse cooling of a krypton atomic beam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vivek Singh; V B Tiwari; S Singh; S R Mishra; H S Rawat

    2014-07-01

    The effect of size of a cooling laser beam in a zig-zag atomic beam collimator on transverse cooling of a krypton atomic beam is investigated. The simulation results show that discreteness in the interaction between the cooling laser beam and atomic beam, arising due to finite size and incidence angle of the cooling laser beam, significantly reduces the value of transverse velocity capture range of the collimator. The experimental observations show the trend similar to that obtained from simulations. Our study can be particularly useful where a small zig-zag collimator is required.

  2. Duration of Load Effects on Different Sized Timber Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Lotte; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report submitted to EC in connection with a project on duration of load. The report contains the results of the experimental work on duration of load for beams and notched beams of LVL and of glulam. The report also contains experimental results from duration of load experiments...

  3. Size effect of glulam beams in tension perpendicular to grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas; Clorius, Christian Odin; Damkilde, Lars;

    2007-01-01

    The strength of wood is reduced when the stressed volume is increased. The phenomenon is termed size effect and is often explained as being stochastic in the sense that the probability of weak locations occurring in the wood increases with increased volume. This paper presents the hypothesis that...... the lower strength is caused by stress concentrations. The stress concentrations arise from the anisotropic structure of wood, and are therefore deterministic. The hypothesis is substantiated through extensive FEM-calculations and experiments. A reasonable agreement between ultimate stresses...

  4. Beam-beam effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zholents, A.

    1994-12-01

    The term beam-beam effects is usually used to designate different phenomena associated with interactions of counter-rotating beams in storage rings. Typically, the authors speak about beam-beam effects when such interactions lead to an increase of the beam core size or to a reduction of the beam lifetime or to a growth of particle`s population in the beam halo and a correspondent increase of the background. Although observations of beam-beam effects are very similar in most storage rings, it is very likely that every particular case is largely unique and machine-dependent. This constitutes one of the problems in studying the beam-beam effects, because the experimental results are often obtained without characterizing a machine at the time of the experiment. Such machine parameters as a dynamic aperture, tune dependencies on amplitude of particle oscillations and energy, betatron phase advance between the interaction points and some others are not well known, thus making later analysis uncertain. The authors begin their discussion with demonstrations that beam-beam effects are closely related to non linear resonances. Then, they will show that a non linearity of the space charge field is responsible for the excitation of these resonances. After that, they will consider how beam-beam effects could be intensified by machine imperfections. Then, they will discuss a leading mechanism for the formation of the beam halo and will describe a new technique for beam tails and lifetime simulations. They will finish with a brief discussion of the coherent beam-beam effects.

  5. Boundary effects in finite size plasmonic crystals: focusing and routing of plasmonic beams for optical communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetou, M. I.; Bouillard, J.-S.; Segovia, P.; Dickson, W.; Thomsen, B. C.; Bayvel, P.; Zayats, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Plasmonic crystals, which consist of periodic arrangements of surface features at a metal-dielectric interface, allow the manipulation of optical information in the form of surface plasmon polaritons. Here we investigate the excitation and propagation of plasmonic beams in and around finite size plasmonic crystals at telecom wavelengths, highlighting the effects of the crystal boundary shape and illumination conditions. Significant differences in broad plasmonic beam generation by crystals of different shapes are demonstrated, while for narrow beams, the propagation from a crystal onto the smooth metal film is less sensitive to the crystal boundary shape. We show that by controlling the boundary shape, the size and the excitation beam parameters, directional control of propagating plasmonic modes and their behaviour such as angular beam splitting, focusing power and beam width can be efficiently achieved. This provides a promising route for robust and alignment-independent integration of plasmonic crystals with optical communication components.

  6. Effects of Beam Size and Pulse Duration on the Laser Drilling Process

    CERN Document Server

    Afrin, Nazia; Chen, J K; Zhang, Yuwen

    2016-01-01

    A two-dimensional axisymmetric transient laser drilling model is used to analyze the effects of laser beam diameter and laser pulse duration on the laser drilling process. The model includes conduction and convection heat transfer, melting, solidification and vaporization, as well as material removal resulting from the vaporization and melt ejection. The validated model is applied to study the effects of laser beam size and pulse duration on the geometry of the drilled hole. It is found that the ablation effect decrease with the increasing beam diameter due to the effect of increased vaporization rate, and deeper hole is observed for the larger pulse width due to the higher thermal ablation efficiency.

  7. Beam-Beam Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Herr, W; Pieloni, T.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most severe limitations in high-intensity particle colliders is the beam-beam interaction, i.e. the perturbation of the beams as they cross the opposing beams. This introduction to beam-beam effects concentrates on a description of the phenomena that are present in modern colliding beam facilities.

  8. Beam-Beam Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Herr, W

    2014-01-01

    One of the most severe limitations in high-intensity particle colliders is the beam-beam interaction, i.e. the perturbation of the beams as they cross the opposing beams. This introduction to beam-beam effects concentrates on a description of the phenomena that are present in modern colliding beam facilities.

  9. The Effect of the Size of Radiotherapy Photon Beams on the Absorbed Dose to an Al2O3 Dosimeter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈少文; 张文澜; 范丽仙; 唐强; 刘小伟

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the size of radiotherapy photon beams on the absorbed dose to an Al2O3 dosimeter was investigated using the Monte Carlo method. The EGSnrc/DOSRZnrc program code was used to simulate the absorbed dose to the Al2O3 dosimeter, as well as the absorbed dose to water at the corresponding position in the absence of the dosimeter. The incident beams were 60Co γ and 6 MV with a different beam radius ranging from 0.1 cm to 2 cm. Results revealed that the absorbed dose ratio factor depends on the size of the incident photon beam. When the radius of the incident beam is smaller than that of the dosimeter, the absorbed dose ratio factor decreases as the incident beam size increases. The absorbed dose ratio factor reaches its minimum when the radius of the incident beam is almost the same as that of the dosimeter. When the radius of the incident beam is larger than that of the dosimeter, the absorbed dose ratio factor increases as the incident beam size increases. The maximum difference among these absorbed dose ratio factors can be up to 14% in 60Co γ beams and 23% in 6 MV beams. However, when the size of the incident beam is much larger than that of the dosimeter, the effect of the incident beam size on the absorbed dose ratio factor becomes quite small. The maximum discrepancy between the absorbed dose ratio factors and the average value is not more than 1%.

  10. Effect of Photon Beam Energy, Gold Nanoparticle Size and Concentration on the Dose Enhancement in Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahideh Gharehaghaji

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gold nanoparticles have been used as radiation dose enhancing materials in recent investigations. In the current study, dose enhancement effect of gold nanoparticles on tumor cells was evaluated using Monte Carlo (MC simulation. Methods: We used MCNPX code for MC modeling in the current study. A water phantom and a tumor region with a size of 1×1×1 cm3 loaded with gold nanoparticles were simulated. The macroscopic dose enhancement factor was calculated for gold nanoparticles with sizes of 30, 50, and 100 nm. Also, we simulated different photon beams including mono-energetic beams (50-120 keV, a Cobalt-60 beam, 6 & 18 MV photon beams of a conventional linear accelerator. Results: We found a dose enhancement factor (DEF of from 1.4 to 3.7 for monoenergetic kilovoltage beams, while the DEFs for megavoltage beams were negligible and less than 3% for all GNP sizes and concentrations. The optimum energy for higher DEF was found to be the 90 keV monoenergetic beam. The effect of GNP size was not considerable, but the GNP concentration had a substantial impact on achieved DEF in GNP-based radiation therapy. Conclusion: The results were in close agreement with some previous studies considering the effect of photon energy and GNP concentration on observed DEF. Application of GNP-based radiation therapy using kilovoltage beams is recommended.

  11. A study on size effect of carboxymethyl starch nanogel crosslinked by electron beam radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binh, Doan; Pham Thi Thu Hong; Nguyen Ngoc Duy; Nguyen Thanh Duoc; Nguyen Nguyet Dieu

    2012-07-01

    The formation of carboxymethyl starch (CMS) nanogel with 50 nm less particle size was carried out through a radiation crosslinked process on the electron beam (EB) linear accelerator. Changes of intrinsic viscosities and weight averaged molecular weight in the CMS concentration, which ranged from 3 to 10 mg ml-1 in absorbed doses were investigated. There were some new peaks in the 1H NMR spectra of CMS nanogel compared with those of CMS polymer. These results were anticipated that the predominant intramolecular crosslinking of dilute CMS aqueous solution occurred while being exposed to a short intense pulse of ionizing radiation. Hydrodynamic radius (often called particle size, Rh) and distribution of particle size were measured by a dynamic light scattering technique. The radiation yield of intermolecular crosslinking of CMS solution was calculated from the expression of Gx (Charlesby, 1960; Jung-Chul, 2010). The influence of the "size effect" was demonstrated by testing culture of Lactobacillus bacteria on MRS agar culture medium containing CMS nanogel and polymer. Results showed that the number of Lactobacillus bacteria growing on nanogel containing culture medium is about 170 cfu/ml and on polymer containing culture medium is only 6 cfu/ml.

  12. Effective source size, radial, angular and energy spread of therapeutic 11C positron emitter beams produced by 12C fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of positron emitter light ion beams in combination with PET (Positron Emission Tomography) and PET–CT (Computed Tomography) imaging could significantly improve treatment verification and dose delivery imaging during radiation therapy. The present study is dedicated to the analysis of the beam quality in terms of the effective source size, as well as radial, angular and energy spread of the 11C ion beam produced by projectile fragmentation of a primary point monodirectional and monoenergetic 12C ion beam in a dedicated range shifter of different materials. This study was performed combining analytical methods describing the transport of particles in matter and the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT+. A high brilliance and production yield of 11C fragments with a small effective source size and emittance is best achieved with a decelerator made of two media: a first liquid hydrogen section of about 20 cm followed by a hydrogen rich section of variable length. The calculated intensity of the produced 11C ion beam ranges from about 5% to 8% of the primary 12C beam intensity depending on the exit energy and the acceptance of the beam transport system. The angular spread is lower than 1 degree for all the materials studied, but the brilliance of the beam is the highest with the proposed mixed decelerator

  13. Vertical Beam Size Measurement by Streak Camera under Colliding and Single Beam Conditions in KEKB

    CERN Document Server

    Ikeda, Hitomi; Fukuma, Hitoshi; Funakoshi, Yoshihiro; Hiramatsu, Shigenori; Mitsuhashi, Toshiyuki; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Uehara, Sadaharu

    2005-01-01

    Beam behavior of KEKB was studied by measurement of the beam size using a streak camera. Effect of the electron-cloud and the parasitic collision on the vertical beam size was examined in beam collision. We intentionally injected a test bunch of positrons after 2 rf buckets of a bunch to enhance the electron cloud effect and changed electron beam conditions to see the beam-beam effect. The beam size was also measured with a single positron beam and compared with that during collision. The result of the measurement is reported in this paper.

  14. Beam-size-free optics determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method to measure the Twiss parameters in a beam transport line is presented. Usually these parameters are obtained based on the measured beam sizes. In the new method, in contrast, we determine them by finding quadrupole strengths that result in minimum beam sizes at a downstream measurement location. Therefore, systematic errors related to beam-size monitors do not propagate to the measured Twiss parameters. We describe the method together with a detailed estimation of statistical and systematic errors. It was examined with beam at the SwissFEL injector test facility at PSI, and these results are also presented

  15. The effect of voxel size on the measurement of mandibular thickness in cone-beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Hekmatian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT is a new imaging technology that has been widely used in implantology, oral and maxillofacial surgery and orthodontics. This method provides 3-D images that are composed of voxel, which is the smallest image unit, and determines image resolution. Smaller voxel is associated with the higher resolution and also greater radiation exposure. This study was aimed to find out the effect of voxel size on the measurement of mandibular thickness. Materials and Methods: Using voxel sizes of 0.30 mm and 0.15 mm, two CBCT protocols (protocol 1: Field of view (FOV of 15 cm, 85 kVp, 42 mAs, 0.15 mm voxel, 14 s scan time; protocol 2: FOV of 15 cm, 85 kVp, 10 mAs, 0.30 mm voxel, 14 s scan time were carried out on 16 dry human mandibles with permanent dentition. Mandibular thickness was measured at seven different sites (midline region, bilateral canine regions, bilateral mental foramen regions and bilateral molar regions. Analysis of variance was used for analysis of data using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA. P 0.05. Conclusion: Considering the insignificant differences of the mandibular thickness measurements using different voxel sizes, it would be more reasonable to use 0.30 mm voxel size instead of 0.15 mm voxel size to avoid unnecessary radiation exposure.

  16. Electric field generation by the electron beam filamentation instability: Filament size effects

    CERN Document Server

    Dieckmann, M E

    2009-01-01

    The filamentation instability (FI) of counter-propagating beams of electrons is modelled with a particle-in-cell simulation in one spatial dimension and with a high statistical plasma representation. The simulation direction is orthogonal to the beam velocity vector. Both electron beams have initially equal densities, temperatures and moduli of their nonrelativistic mean velocities. The FI is electromagnetic in this case. A previous study of a small filament demonstrated, that the magnetic pressure gradient force (MPGF) results in a nonlinearly driven electrostatic field. The probably small contribution of the thermal pressure gradient to the force balance implied, that the electrostatic field performed undamped oscillations around a background electric field. Here we consider larger filaments, which reach a stronger electrostatic potential when they saturate. The electron heating is enhanced and electrostatic electron phase space holes form. The competition of several smaller filaments, which grow simultaneo...

  17. The effects of field-of-view and patient size on CT numbers from cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seet, Katrina Y. T.; Barghi, Arvand; Yartsev, Slav; Van Dyk, Jake

    2009-10-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is used for patient alignment before treatment and is ideal for use in adaptive radiotherapy to account for tumor shrinkage, organ deformation and weight loss. However, CBCT images are prone to artifacts such as streaking and cupping effects, reducing image quality and CT number accuracy. Our goal was to determine the optimum combination of cone-beam imaging options to increase the accuracy of image CT numbers. Several phantoms with and without inserts of known relative electron densities were imaged using the Varian on-board imaging system. It was found that CT numbers are most influenced by the selection of field-of-view and are dependent on object size and filter type. Image acquisition in half-fan mode consistently produced more accurate CT numbers, regardless of phantom size. Values measured using full-fan mode can differ by up to 7% from planning CT values. No differences were found between CT numbers of all phantom images with low and standard dose modes.

  18. The effects of field-of-view and patient size on CT numbers from cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seet, Katrina Y T; Barghi, Arvand; Yartsev, Slav; Van Dyk, Jake [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: slav.yartsev@lhsc.on.ca

    2009-10-21

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is used for patient alignment before treatment and is ideal for use in adaptive radiotherapy to account for tumor shrinkage, organ deformation and weight loss. However, CBCT images are prone to artifacts such as streaking and cupping effects, reducing image quality and CT number accuracy. Our goal was to determine the optimum combination of cone-beam imaging options to increase the accuracy of image CT numbers. Several phantoms with and without inserts of known relative electron densities were imaged using the Varian on-board imaging system. It was found that CT numbers are most influenced by the selection of field-of-view and are dependent on object size and filter type. Image acquisition in half-fan mode consistently produced more accurate CT numbers, regardless of phantom size. Values measured using full-fan mode can differ by up to 7% from planning CT values. No differences were found between CT numbers of all phantom images with low and standard dose modes.

  19. Evaluation of size effect on shear strength of reinforced concrete deep beams using refined strut-and-tie model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Appa Rao; R Sundaresan

    2012-02-01

    This paper reports on development of size-dependent shear strength expression for reinforced concrete deep beams using refined strut-and-tie model. The generic form of the size effect law has been retained considering the merits of Siao’s model and modified Bazant’s size effect law using the large experimental data base reported in the literature. The proposed equation for predicting the shear strength of deep beams incorporates the compressive strength of concrete, ratios of the longitudinal and the web reinforcement, shear span-to-depth ratio and the effective depth.

  20. Beam test of wire scanner beam size monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beam size monitor for emittance measurement is required to have around 10μm resolution for injector linac, and to have a few tenth μm resolution for an extracted beam from a damping ring in Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). A wire scanner is a one of the candidate of a beam size monitor with a high resolution. The design and development study of the wire scanning stage has been done. The beam test using Tohoku 300MeV Linac was done and the emittance was measured by this wire scanner. A detection of beam size signal was done by a scintillator gamma detector placed at downstream of the wire stage. All of the measurements are taken by the computer. The beam test results are described. (author)

  1. Electron Beam Size Measurements in a Cooling Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Kroc, Thomas K; Burov, Alexey; Seletsky, Sergey; Shemyakin, Alexander V

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires a straight trajectory and constant beam size to provide effective cooling of the antiprotons in the Recycler. A measurement system was developed using movable appertures and steering bumps to measure the beam size in a 20 m long, nearly continuous, solenoid. This paper discusses the required beam parameters, the implimentation of the measurement system and results for our application.

  2. EFFECT OF PARTICLE SIZE AND PACKING RATIO OF PID ON VIBRATION AMPLITUDE OF BEAM

    OpenAIRE

    P.S. Kachare; Bimleshkumar

    2013-01-01

    Everything in the universe that has mass possesses stiffness and intrinsic damping. Owing to the stiffness property, mass will vibrate when excited and its intrinsic damping property will act to stop the vibration. The particle impact damper (PID) is a very interesting damper that affects impact and friction effects of particles by means of energy dissipation. PID is a means for achieving high structural damping by using a particle-filled enclosure attached to a structure. The particles absor...

  3. Effect of surface roughness and size of beam on squeeze-film damping—Molecular dynamics simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hojin; Strachan, Alejandro [School of Materials Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2015-11-28

    We use large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) to characterize fluid damping between a substrate and an approaching beam. We focus on the near contact regime where squeeze film (where fluid gap is comparable to the mean free path of the gas molecules) and many-body effects in the fluid become dominant. The MD simulations provide explicit description of many-body and non-equilibrium processes in the fluid as well as the surface topography. We study how surface roughness and beam width increases the damping coefficient due to their effect on fluid mobility. We find that the explicit simulations are in good agreement with prior direct simulation Monte Carlo results except at near-contact conditions where many-body effects in the compressed fluid lead the increased damping and weaker dependence on beam width. We also show that velocity distributions near the beam edges and for short gaps deviate from the Boltzmann distribution indicating a degree of local non-equilibrium. These results will be useful to parameterize compact models used for microsystem device-level simulations and provide insight into mesoscale simulations of near-contact damping.

  4. The SRI Beam Size Monitor Developed at NSRRC

    CERN Document Server

    Tseng, Tse-Chuan; Ho, H C; Jen Wang, Duan; Kuan, Chien-Kuang; Lin, Chia-Jui; Perng, Shen-Yaw; Wang, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    A beam size monitor based on the synchrotron radiation interferometer (SRI) was installed in the NSRRC TLS. This monitor consists of a simple diagnostic beamline with a water-cooled beryllium mirror inside and a detecting optical system for both vertical and horizontal beam size measurement. The beam sizes measured are 48 micron and 160 micron respectively and are more close to the theoretical values than the synchrotron image monitor. Comparing with other monitors, at least 1 micron beam size variation is detectable. To minimize the thermal effect, the mirror is located far away from the source point and closed to the detecting optical system. The thermal distortion of the mirror is quite small measured by a portable long trace profiler (LTP) and agrees with the simulating analysis. The detailed monitor system design and testing results are presented in this paper.

  5. Observations of ''effective'' transverse beam-size instabilities for a high current per bunch fill pattern in the APS storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The x-ray pinhole camera diagnostics on the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring have recorded an effective transverse beam size instability during operations with a sextuplet plus 22 singlets fill pattern. These instabilities were not observed with the sextuplet plus 25 triplets fill pattern that has been the standard fill pattern in FY'98. The instability threshold is at 82-85 mA with positrons. The features include an increased average (few seconds) transverse size both horizontally and vertically for stored currents above the threshold with a correlated effect on the beam lifetime. The horizontal transverse emittance is 25-30% larger at 100 mA than below the threshold. There is a related horizontal beam centroid motion as well, but this does not explain the vertical size change nor the lifetime effect. Complementary data were also taken with the diagnostic undulator, and a similar threshold effect on divergence was observed. The cross-comparison of the data and possible mechanisms is presented

  6. Phylogenetic effective sample size

    OpenAIRE

    Bartoszek, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    In this paper I address the question - how large is a phylogenetic sample I propose a definition of a phylogenetic effective sample size for Brownian motion and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes - the regression effective sample size. I discuss how mutual information can be used to define an effective sample size in the non-normal process case and compare these two definitions to an already present concept of effective sample size (the mean effective sample size). Through a simulation study I find...

  7. Enhancement of etch rate for preparation of nano-sized ion-track membranes of poly(vinylidene fluoride): Effect of pretreatment and high-LET beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated how pretreatment and high-LET beam irradiation affected the ion-track dissolution rate in poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) films by SEM observations and conductometric analysis in order to develop the preparation methodology of nano-sized ion-track membranes. PVDF thin films irradiated with four types of ion beams were exposed to a 9 mol/dm3 KOH aqueous solution after their storage in air at 120 deg. C. This heating treatment was found to enhance the etch rate in the latent track, both in the inner core and outer halo regions, without changing that in the bulk, probably due to the formation of parasitic oxidation products facilitating the introduction of the etching agent to improve the etchability. Additionally, the irradiation of heavier higher-LET ions, causing each track to more activated sites (like radicals), was preferable for achieving effective etching.

  8. Design of a Nanometer Beam Size Monitor for ATF2

    CERN Document Server

    Suehara, Taikan; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yoda, Hakutaro; Nakamura, Tomoya; Kamiya, Yoshio; Honda, Yosuke; Kume, Tatsuya; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Sanuki, Tomoyuki; Komamiya, Sachio

    2008-01-01

    We developed an electron beam size monitor for extremely small beam sizes. It uses a laser interference fringe for a scattering target with the electron beam. Our target performance is < 2 nm systematic error for 37 nm beam size and < 10% statistical error in a measurement using 90 electron bunches for 25 - 6000 nm beam size. A precise laser interference fringe control system using an active feedback function is incorporated to the monitor to achieve the target performance. We describe an overall design, implementations, and performance estimations of the monitor.

  9. The effect of voxel size on dose distribution in Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yani, Sitti, E-mail: sitti.yani@s.itb.ac.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Division, Physics Department, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Akademi Kebidanan Pelita Ibu, Kendari (Indonesia); Dirgayussa, I Gde E.; Haryanto, Freddy; Arif, Idam [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Division, Physics Department, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Rhani, Moh. Fadhillah [Tan Tock Seng Hospital (Singapore)

    2015-09-30

    Recently, Monte Carlo (MC) calculation method has reported as the most accurate method of predicting dose distributions in radiotherapy. The MC code system (especially DOSXYZnrc) has been used to investigate the different voxel (volume elements) sizes effect on the accuracy of dose distributions. To investigate this effect on dosimetry parameters, calculations were made with three different voxel sizes. The effects were investigated with dose distribution calculations for seven voxel sizes: 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 × 1 × 0.5 cm{sup 3}, and 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm{sup 3}. The 1 × 10{sup 9} histories were simulated in order to get statistical uncertainties of 2%. This simulation takes about 9-10 hours to complete. Measurements are made with field sizes 10 × 10 cm2 for the 6 MV photon beams with Gaussian intensity distribution FWHM 0.1 cm and SSD 100.1 cm. MC simulated and measured dose distributions in a water phantom. The output of this simulation i.e. the percent depth dose and dose profile in d{sub max} from the three sets of calculations are presented and comparisons are made with the experiment data from TTSH (Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore) in 0-5 cm depth. Dose that scored in voxels is a volume averaged estimate of the dose at the center of a voxel. The results in this study show that the difference between Monte Carlo simulation and experiment data depend on the voxel size both for percent depth dose (PDD) and profile dose. PDD scan on Z axis (depth) of water phantom, the big difference obtain in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm{sup 3} about 17%. In this study, the profile dose focused on high gradient dose area. Profile dose scan on Y axis and the big difference get in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm{sup 3} about 12%. This study demonstrated that the arrange voxel in Monte Carlo simulation becomes important.

  10. The effect of voxel size on dose distribution in Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, Monte Carlo (MC) calculation method has reported as the most accurate method of predicting dose distributions in radiotherapy. The MC code system (especially DOSXYZnrc) has been used to investigate the different voxel (volume elements) sizes effect on the accuracy of dose distributions. To investigate this effect on dosimetry parameters, calculations were made with three different voxel sizes. The effects were investigated with dose distribution calculations for seven voxel sizes: 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm3, 1 × 1 × 0.5 cm3, and 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm3. The 1 × 109 histories were simulated in order to get statistical uncertainties of 2%. This simulation takes about 9-10 hours to complete. Measurements are made with field sizes 10 × 10 cm2 for the 6 MV photon beams with Gaussian intensity distribution FWHM 0.1 cm and SSD 100.1 cm. MC simulated and measured dose distributions in a water phantom. The output of this simulation i.e. the percent depth dose and dose profile in dmax from the three sets of calculations are presented and comparisons are made with the experiment data from TTSH (Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore) in 0-5 cm depth. Dose that scored in voxels is a volume averaged estimate of the dose at the center of a voxel. The results in this study show that the difference between Monte Carlo simulation and experiment data depend on the voxel size both for percent depth dose (PDD) and profile dose. PDD scan on Z axis (depth) of water phantom, the big difference obtain in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm3 about 17%. In this study, the profile dose focused on high gradient dose area. Profile dose scan on Y axis and the big difference get in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm3 about 12%. This study demonstrated that the arrange voxel in Monte Carlo simulation becomes important

  11. The effect of voxel size on dose distribution in Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yani, Sitti; Dirgayussa, I. Gde E.; Rhani, Moh. Fadhillah; Haryanto, Freddy; Arif, Idam

    2015-09-01

    Recently, Monte Carlo (MC) calculation method has reported as the most accurate method of predicting dose distributions in radiotherapy. The MC code system (especially DOSXYZnrc) has been used to investigate the different voxel (volume elements) sizes effect on the accuracy of dose distributions. To investigate this effect on dosimetry parameters, calculations were made with three different voxel sizes. The effects were investigated with dose distribution calculations for seven voxel sizes: 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm3, 1 × 1 × 0.5 cm3, and 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm3. The 1 × 109 histories were simulated in order to get statistical uncertainties of 2%. This simulation takes about 9-10 hours to complete. Measurements are made with field sizes 10 × 10 cm2 for the 6 MV photon beams with Gaussian intensity distribution FWHM 0.1 cm and SSD 100.1 cm. MC simulated and measured dose distributions in a water phantom. The output of this simulation i.e. the percent depth dose and dose profile in dmax from the three sets of calculations are presented and comparisons are made with the experiment data from TTSH (Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore) in 0-5 cm depth. Dose that scored in voxels is a volume averaged estimate of the dose at the center of a voxel. The results in this study show that the difference between Monte Carlo simulation and experiment data depend on the voxel size both for percent depth dose (PDD) and profile dose. PDD scan on Z axis (depth) of water phantom, the big difference obtain in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm3 about 17%. In this study, the profile dose focused on high gradient dose area. Profile dose scan on Y axis and the big difference get in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm3 about 12%. This study demonstrated that the arrange voxel in Monte Carlo simulation becomes important.

  12. Evaluation of size dependent design shear strength of reinforced concrete beams without web reinforcement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Appa Rao; S S Injaganeri

    2011-06-01

    Analytical studies on the effect of depth of beam and several parameters on the shear strength of reinforced concrete beams are reported. A large data base available has been segregated and a nonlinear regression analysis (NLRA) has been performed for developing the refined design models for both, the cracking and the ultimate shear strengths of reinforced concrete (RC) beams without web reinforcement. The shear strength of RC beams is size dependent, which needs to be evaluated and incorporated in the appropriate size effect models. The proposed models are functions of compressive strength of concrete, percentage of flexural reinforcement and depth of beam. The structural brittleness of large size beams seems to be severe compared with highly ductile small size beams at a given quantity of flexural reinforcement. The proposed models have been validated with the existing popular models as well as with the design code provisions.

  13. Change of the size of vector Bessel beam rings under reflection

    OpenAIRE

    Novitsky, Andrey V.; Novitsky, Denis V.

    2008-01-01

    We theoretically predict the change of the size of Bessel beam rings under reflection. Considered electromagnetic Bessel beam is the superposition of phase shifted TE and TM polarized Bessel beams. Reflection from a semi-infinite medium and from a slab are studied. The sets of parameters maximizing the effect are discussed.

  14. Vertical beam size due to orbit and alignment errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The value of luminosity, synchrotron light source brightness, quantum lifetime, etc., for an electron storage ring is directly dependent upon the natural beam size and shape in the transverse phase space. These transverse beam parameters can be determined from the stationary particle distribution, psi, which depends upon (a) quantum excitations determined by the horizontal and vertical energy dispersion functions eta/sub x,y/ and eta'/sub x,y/ in the machine, (b) radiation damping provided by the rf acceleration, and (c) coupling between the transverse betatron motions caused by the skew quadrupole and solenoid magentic fields. A straightforward method to find psi is by solving the Fokker-Planck equation, which conveniently takes into account these factors. In this approach the quantum diffusion effects are described by three quantities, H/sub xx/, H/sub xy/, and H/sub yy/, which are integrals of the β- and eta-functions and their derivatives evaluated over the bending magnets in the machine; the radiation damping effects are characterized by the radiation damping constants α/sub x,y/ provided by an rf system. The coupling effects are represented by a coupling coefficient, Q, assuming smooth coupling between the betatron motions. Under these assumptions, psi can be found analytically and the expressions for transverse beam parameters in terms of Q, H/sub xx/, H/sub x,y/, H/sub yy/, α/sub x/, and α/sub y/ can be obtained. From these expressions, invariant conditions between some of the beam parameters can easily be shown. These results have been used to estimate the effects in PEP and SPEAR due to magnet alignment and vertical closed-orbit errors

  15. Apparent beam size definition of focused ion beams based on scanning electron microscopy images of nanodots

    OpenAIRE

    Vladov, Nikola; Segal, Joel; Ratchev, Svetan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the new term apparent beam size of Focused Ion Beam (FIB) is introduced and an original method of its evaluation is demonstrated. Traditional methods of measuring the beam size, like the knife edge method, provide information about the quality of the beam itself but practically they do not give information on the FIB sputtering resolution. To do this, it is necessary to take into account the material dependant interaction of the beam with the specimen and the gas precursor in th...

  16. Size effect in the strength of concrete structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B L Karihaloo; Q Z Xiao

    2002-08-01

    This paper reports on the range of applicability of the various size effect formulae available in the literature. In particular, the failure loads of three point bend (TPB) beams are analysed according to the size effect formulae of Ba$\\breve{z}$ant and of Karihaloo for notched beams and according to those of Ba$\\breve{z}$ant and of Carpinteri for unnotched beams, and the results of this analysis presented. Improvements to Karihaloo’s size effect formula are also proposed.

  17. Quenched effective population size

    CERN Document Server

    Sagitov, Serik; Vatutin, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    We study the genealogy of a geographically - or otherwise - structured version of the Wright-Fisher population model with fast migration. The new feature is that migration probabilities may change in a random fashion. Applying Takahashi's results on Markov chains with random transition matrices, we establish convergence to the Kingman coalescent, as the population size goes to infinity. This brings a novel formula for the coalescent effective population size (EPS). We call it a quenched EPS to emphasize the key feature of our model - random environment. The quenched EPS is compared with an annealed (mean-field) EPS which describes the case of constant migration probabilities obtained by averaging the random migration probabilities over possible environments.

  18. Focal spot size predictions for beam transport through a gas-filled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results from calculations of focal spot size for beam transport through a gas-filled reactor are summarized. In the converging beam mode, we find an enlargement of the focal spot due to multiple scattering and zeroth order self-field effects. This enlargement can be minimized by maintaining small reactors together with a careful choice of the gaseous medium. The self-focused mode, on the other hand, is relatively insensitive to the reactor environment, but is critically dependent upon initial beam quality. This requirement on beam quality can be significantly eased by the injection of an electron beam of modest current from the opposite wall

  19. Influence of the Spot Size of the Probe Beam on the Detected THz Power Using Electro-Optic Detection Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metbulut, Mukaddes Meliz; Güllü, Hasan Hüseyin; Altan, Hakan

    We compared the detected THz power through electro-optic detection for different spot sizes of a probe beam on the ZnTe crystal. We find that there is a proportional relationship between the detected THz power and spot size of the probe beam by theoretically analyzing its effect on the intensity profile of the terahertz beam.

  20. Duration of load behaviour of different sized straight timber beams subjected to bending in variable climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanhijärvi, A.; Galimard, P.; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    1998-01-01

    The paper is the second in a series which sums up the results of an extensive project to quantify the duration-of-load (DOL) effect on different sized timber beams in different climates. The paper deals with straight (unnotched) beams. The results of various DOL-tests of stepwise and constant ben...

  1. MLC mediated beam hardening effects in IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Beam hardening effects due to photons passing through the multi-leaf collimator (MLC) frequently exist in Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) fields. A fast online dose transmission verification system, MBMC (Measurement Based Monte Carlo), can verify IMRT delivery by using a fluence efficiency map to replace MLC geometry and movement simulation. This system, however, ignores beam hardening effects, and assumes that dose disturbances through the MLC are not significant for IMRT fields. This assumption has to be justified before it can be applied in the clinic. Methods: In this study, we simulated several field sizes (0.5 × 0.5, 1 × 1, 3 × 3, 5 × 5, and 10 × 10 cm2) to evaluate the dose influence of beam hardening effects under clinical conditions. In addition, a LATCH technique was used during simulation processes, which can record each particle interaction with specific gantry components, to distinguish between dose contribution from the total beam and MLC mediated beam. Results: The MLC indeed caused significant beam hardening effects, but the dose contribution fraction from the MLC was noticeable only for field sizes less than 1 × 1 cm2. Furthermore, in mixed fields containing both the total beam and MLC mediated beam, the maximum dose deviation due to the presence of the MLC is small even for the 0.5 × 0.5 cm2 field size (∼2%). Conclusions: The MLC causes noticeable beam hardening effects, but this effect results in only slight dose differences that are only noticeable for small field sizes in IMRT delivery. The use of a fluence efficiency map was feasible in our MBMC system.

  2. Focusing neutron beams to sub-millimeter size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focusing neutron guides are a well-established means to significantly increase the neutron flux for the investigation of small samples or samples subject to extreme conditions such as pressure or high magnetic fields. Parabolic and elliptic guides can focus the beam in a single point beyond the guide exit with well defined beam characteristics and a gain in intensity of over 30 compared to a non-focused beam. Focusing guides find applications in elastic and inelastic neutron scattering as well as in neutron imaging to increase the spatial resolution and for magnification. The aim of the Monte Carlo simulations using McStas was to produce focal spots with a diameter of the order of 0.1 mm using supermirrors with large angles of reflection. We will discuss the results of our simulations, i.e. the gains obtained, their variation with wavelength as well as the evolution of the beam size.

  3. Beam size measurement of the stored electron beam at the APS storage ring using pinhole optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam sizes of the stored electron beam at the APS storage ring were measured using pinhole optics and bending magnet x-rays in single-bunch and low-current mode. A pinhole of 25 μm and a fast x-ray imaging system were located 23.8 m and 35.4 m from the source, respectively. The x-ray imaging system consists of a CdWO4 scintillation crystal 60 μm thick, an optical imaging system, and a CCD detector. A measurement time of a few tenths of a second was obtained on a photon beam of E>30 keV produced in a bending magnet from a 7-GeV electron beam of 2mA current. The measured vertical and horizontal sizes of the electron beam were in reasonable agreement with the expected values

  4. Material-Independent and Size-Independent Tractor Beams for Dipole Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    A Bessel beam without an axial gradient can exert a pulling force on an object [A. Novitsky, C. W. Qiu, and H. Wang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107 203601 (2011)]. However, it cannot be called a “tractor beam” per se, as long as the light pulling effect is ultrasensitive to the object’s material and size......, a perturbation of which will make the optical traction go away. In this Letter, we investigate and report on the universality for a Bessel beam to be either a material-independent or size-independent optical tractor beam within the dipolar regime. Moreover, a general condition for a nonparaxial laser...... to be simultaneously a material- and size-independent tractor beam is proposed. These universal pulling effects and conditions are discussed in association with insight on modified far-field scattering, scattering resonances, and induced polarizabilities. Interestingly, we find that the acoustic pulling force exhibits...

  5. Control of the size of the coherence area in entangled twin beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtfrerich, M. W.; Marino, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    We study the effect of a change in size and spatial profile of the pump beam in an atomic-based four-wave mixing process on the size of the coherence area of the generated entangled twin beams. We perform experiments and develop a theoretical model to obtain a measure of the linear extent or "radius" of the coherence area from noise measurements of the twin beams as a function of transmission through a variable size slit. Our results show that an increase in the size of the pump reduces the size of the coherence area. More interestingly, we find that the use of a flat-top pump beam of the same size as a Gaussian pump beam leads to a reduction by a factor of more than 2 in the linear extent of the coherence area. This in turn leads to an increase by a factor of more than 4 in the number of spatial modes that make up the twin beams and a resolution enhancement of the entangled images that can be generated with the four-wave mixing process.

  6. Duration of load behaviour of different sized straight timber beams subjected to bending in variable climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanhijärvi, A.; Galimard, P.; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    1998-01-01

    The paper is the second in a series which sums up the results of an extensive project to quantify the duration-of-load (DOL) effect on different sized timber beams in different climates. The paper deals with straight (unnotched) beams. The results of various DOL-tests of stepwise and constant...... bending of LVL and glulam beams are reported and results of modelling outlined. It is concluded that in cyclically varying climate large cross-sections are less affected by the DOL-effect than smaller ones. The results do not show marked difference between LVL and glulam in susceptibility to the DOL-effect...

  7. Beam-beam effect seen through forced vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In electron accelerator, tune is measured by giving beam transverse forced vibration caused by RF frequency. It is well known that beam-beam parameter can be measured if beam-beam interaction exists. Generally, small value is chosen as the amplitude of forced vibration, and many researches were done in this case. In this report, we discuss effect of resonance caused by beam-beam interaction in case of amplitude of forced vibration being big. (author)

  8. Effect of Building Height on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Big-Sized Ti-6Al-4V Plate Fabricated by Electron Beam Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Pan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron beam melting (EBM is a layer by layer additive manufacturing technology, which has the capability of producing near-net shaped parts with complex geometries. It is also suitable for handling high melting point and reactive metallic materials, such as Ti alloy, which is widely used in the aerospace and biomedical applications. The present study focused on the relationship between the microstructure and mechanical properties of big-sized Ti-6Al-4V parts. A plate (6mm×180mm×372mm was additively manufactured by EBM. The microstructure evolution and variation of mechanical properties were investigated by using the x-ray diffraction, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and tensile test. The results revealed that with an increasing in the build height, there was a variation in the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the build plate. Although only α phase and a relatively small fraction of β phase were detected in both the bottom and top specimens of the build plate, yield strength and ultimate tensile strength decreased with an increase of build height. This was attributed to the increase of α lath width which was caused by the different thermal histories along the build height of the plate.

  9. Effective sizes for subdivided populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesser, R K; Rhodes, O E; Sugg, D W; Schnabel, A

    1993-12-01

    Many derivations of effective population sizes have been suggested in the literature; however, few account for the breeding structure and none can readily be expanded to subdivided populations. Breeding structures influence gene correlations through their effects on the number of breeding individuals of each sex, the mean number of progeny per female, and the variance in the number of progeny produced by males and females. Additionally, hierarchical structuring in a population is determined by the number of breeding groups and the migration rates of males and females among such groups. This study derives analytical solutions for effective sizes that can be applied to subdivided populations. Parameters that encapsulate breeding structure and subdivision are utilized to derive the traditional inbreeding and variance effective sizes. Also, it is shown that effective sizes can be determined for any hierarchical level of population structure for which gene correlations can accrue. Derivations of effective sizes for the accumulation of gene correlations within breeding groups (coancestral effective size) and among breeding groups (intergroup effective size) are given. The results converge to traditional, single population measures when similar assumptions are applied. In particular, inbreeding and intergroup effective sizes are shown to be special cases of the coancestral effective size, and intergroup and variance effective sizes will be equal if the population census remains constant. Instantaneous solutions for effective sizes, at any time after gene correlation begins to accrue, are given in terms of traditional F statistics or transition equations. All effective sizes are shown to converge upon a common asymptotic value when breeding tactics and migration rates are constant. The asymptotic effective size can be expressed in terms of the fixation indices and the number of breeding groups; however, the rate of approach to the asymptote is dependent upon dispersal

  10. Electron beam machining of nanometer-sized tips from multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik-Aktas, Ayten; Stubbins, James F.; Zuo, Jian-Min

    2007-07-01

    We report here that high energy electron irradiation of multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes can be used to form sharp, crystalline, conical tips, or to cut boron nitride nanotubes by controlling the electron beam size. Electron beam cutting is observed when a focused electron beam with a diameter much smaller than the tube diameter is used. The tip formation is observed when a shaped, disklike, electron beam is used to irradiate the tube; the diameter of the beam in this case is similar to the tube diameter. In situ electron microscopy observation shows that the tip formation effect is driven by layer peeling and the collapse of the inner walls of the nanotube. This is very different from the formation of nanoarches observed during cutting. The combination of shaping and cutting can be used to fabricate atomically sharp tips for field emitters, nanoimaging, and manipulations.

  11. Optimum field size and choice of isodose lines in electron beam treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A method is provided for the optimum field size and the choice of isodose line for the dose prescription in electron beam therapy. Methods and Materials: Electron beam dose uniformity was defined in terms of target coverage factor (TCF) which is an index of dose coverage of a given treatment volume. The TCF was studied with respect to the field size, the beam energy, and the isodose level for prescription from the measured data for various accelerators. The effect of the TCF on air gap between electron applicator/cone and the surface was investigated. Electron beams from scattering foil and scanned beam units were analyzed for the target coverage. Results: A mathematical method is provided to optimize a field size for target coverage by a given isodose line in terms of TCF which is strongly dependent on the type of accelerator and the design of the collimator. For a given type of collimating system, the TCF does not depend on the type of electron beam production (scattering foil or swept scanned beam). Selection of isodose line for dose prescription is very critical for the value of the TCF and the dose coverage. The TCF is inversely proportional to the isodose value selected for the treatment and nearly linear with field size and beam energy. Air gap between applicator and the surface reduces the dose uniformity. Tertiary collimator moderately improves the lateral coverage for high energy beams. Conclusions: To adequately cover the target volume in electron beam treatment, lateral and depth coverage should be considered. The coverage at depth is strongly dependent on the choice of isodose line or beam normalization. If the dose prescription is at dmax (i.e., the 100% isodose line is selected), the choice of beam energy is not critical for depth coverage since dmax is nearly independent of energy for smaller fields. The 100% isodose line should not be chosen for treatment because of the significant constriction of this isodose line and inadequate coverage

  12. Beam-beam effects under the influence of external noise

    OpenAIRE

    Ohmi, K.

    2014-01-01

    Fast external noise, which gives fluctuation into the beam orbit, is discussed in connection with beam-beam effects. Phase noise from crab cavities and detection devices (position monitor) and kicker noise from the bunch by bunch feedback system are the sources. Beam-beam collisions with fast orbit fluctuations with turn by turn or multi-turn correlations, cause emittance growth and luminosity degradation. We discuss the tolerance of the noise amplitude for LHC and HL-LHC.

  13. Effect Size in Clinical Phonology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierut, Judith A.; Morrisette, Michele L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to motivate the use of effect size (ES) for single-subject research in clinical phonology, with an eye towards meta-analyses of treatment effects for children with phonological disorders. Standard mean difference (SMD) is introduced and illustrated as one ES well suited to the multiple baseline (MBL) design and…

  14. Impact of Long Range Beam-Beam Effects on Intensity and Luminosity Lifetimes from the 2015 LHC Run

    CERN Document Server

    Crouch, Matthew; Banfi, Danilo; Barranco, Javier; Bruce, Roderik; Buffat, Xavier; Muratori, Bruno; Pieloni, Tatiana; Pojer, Mirko; Salvachua, Belen; Tambasco, Claudia; Trad, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Luminosity is one of the key parameters that determines the performance of colliding beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Luminosity can therefore be used to quantify the impact of beam-beam interactions on the beam lifetimes and emittances. The High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) project aims to reach higher luminosities, approximately a factor of 7 larger than the nominal LHC at peak luminosity without crab cavities. Higher luminosities are achieved by increasing the bunch populations and reducing the transverse beam sizes. This results in stronger beam-beam effects. Here the LHC luminosity and beam intensity decay rates are analysed as a function of reducing beam separation with the aim of characterising the impact of beam-beam effects on the luminosity and beam lifetime. The analysis and results are discussed with possible application to the HL-LHC upgrade.

  15. Luminosity, Beamstrahlung energy loss and beam-beam deflections for e+e- and e-e- collisions at the ILC with 500 GeV and varying transverse beam sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the interaction point of the International Linear Collider, beam-beam effects due to the strong electromagnetic fields that the bunches experience during collisions cause a mutual focusing, called pinch effect, which enhances the luminosity in the case of e+e- collisions. The opposite is true for e-e- collisions. In this case the luminosity is reduced by mutual defocusing, or anti-pinching. The resulting Beamstrahlung energy loss and beam-beam deflection angles as function of the vertical transverse offset are also different for both modes of operation. The dependence of these quantities with transverse beam sizes are presented for the case of e-e- collisions

  16. Effective Sizes for Subdivided Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Chesser, R. K.; Rhodes-Jr., O. E.; Sugg, D. W.; Schnabel, A.(Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin, D-10587, Germany)

    1993-01-01

    Many derivations of effective population sizes have been suggested in the literature; however, few account for the breeding structure and none can readily be expanded to subdivided populations. Breeding structures influence gene correlations through their effects on the number of breeding individuals of each sex, the mean number of progeny per female, and the variance in the number of progeny produced by males and females. Additionally, hierarchical structuring in a population is determined b...

  17. Beam Size Measurement by Optical Diffraction Radiation and Laser System for Compton Polarimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam diagnostics is an essential constituent of any accelerator, so that it is named as 'organs of sense' or 'eyes of the accelerator.' Beam diagnostics is a rich field. A great variety of physical effects or physical principles are made use of in this field. Some devices are based on electro-magnetic influence by moving charges, such as faraday cups, beam transformers, pick-ups; Some are related to Coulomb interaction of charged particles with matter, such as scintillators, viewing screens, ionization chambers; Nuclear or elementary particle physics interactions happen in some other devices, like beam loss monitors, polarimeters, luminosity monitors; Some measure photons emitted by moving charges, such as transition radiation, synchrotron radiation monitors and diffraction radiation-which is the topic of the first part of this thesis; Also, some make use of interaction of particles with photons, such as laser wire and Compton polarimeters-which is the second part of my thesis. Diagnostics let us perceive what properties a beam has and how it behaves in a machine, give us guideline for commissioning, controlling the machine and indispensable parameters vital to physics experiments. In the next two decades, the research highlight will be colliders (TESLA, CLIC, JLC) and fourth-generation light sources (TESLA FEL, LCLS, Spring 8 FEL) based on linear accelerator. These machines require a new generation of accelerator with smaller beam, better stability and greater efficiency. Compared with those existing linear accelerators, the performance of next generation linear accelerator will be doubled in all aspects, such as 10 times smaller horizontal beam size, more than 10 times smaller vertical beam size and a few or more times higher peak power. Furthermore, some special positions in the accelerator have even more stringent requirements, such as the interaction point of colliders and wigglor of free electron lasers. Higher performance of these accelerators increases the

  18. Beam Size Measurement by Optical Diffraction Radiation and Laser System for Compton Polarimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chuyu [Peking Univ., Beijing (China)

    2012-12-31

    Beam diagnostics is an essential constituent of any accelerator, so that it is named as "organs of sense" or "eyes of the accelerator." Beam diagnostics is a rich field. A great variety of physical effects or physical principles are made use of in this field. Some devices are based on electro-magnetic influence by moving charges, such as faraday cups, beam transformers, pick-ups; Some are related to Coulomb interaction of charged particles with matter, such as scintillators, viewing screens, ionization chambers; Nuclear or elementary particle physics interactions happen in some other devices, like beam loss monitors, polarimeters, luminosity monitors; Some measure photons emitted by moving charges, such as transition radiation, synchrotron radiation monitors and diffraction radiation-which is the topic of the first part of this thesis; Also, some make use of interaction of particles with photons, such as laser wire and Compton polarimeters-which is the second part of my thesis. Diagnostics let us perceive what properties a beam has and how it behaves in a machine, give us guideline for commissioning, controlling the machine and indispensable parameters vital to physics experiments. In the next two decades, the research highlight will be colliders (TESLA, CLIC, JLC) and fourth-generation light sources (TESLA FEL, LCLS, Spring 8 FEL) based on linear accelerator. These machines require a new generation of accelerator with smaller beam, better stability and greater efficiency. Compared with those existing linear accelerators, the performance of next generation linear accelerator will be doubled in all aspects, such as 10 times smaller horizontal beam size, more than 10 times smaller vertical beam size and a few or more times higher peak power. Furthermore, some special positions in the accelerator have even more stringent requirements, such as the interaction point of colliders and wigglor of free electron lasers. Higher performance of these accelerators increases the

  19. Beaming Effect in Fermi Blazars

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, J.H.; Yang, J. H.; Zhang, J Y; Hua, T. X.; Liu, Y.; Qin, Y. P.; Huang, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The \\gamma-ray loud blazars (flat spectrum radio quasars--FSRQs and BL Lacertae objects-BLs) are very bright in the \\gamma-ray bands, which is perhaps associated with a beaming effect. Therefore, one can expect that the \\gamma-ray luminosity is correlated with the beaming factor. In this paper, we investigated the relation between the radio Doppler factors and the gamma-ray luminosities. Our analysis suggests that the \\gamma-ray luminosity be strongly correlated with the factor of \\delta_R fo...

  20. Size effects in crystal plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Ulrik

    2007-01-01

    growth and interaction between neighboring voids, and on a comparison between the developed strain gradient crystal plasticity theory and a discrete dislocation plasticity theory. Furthermore, voids and rigid inclusions in isotropic materials have been studied using a strain gradient plasticity theory......Numerical analyses of plasticity size effects have been carried out for different problems using a developed strain gradient crystal plasticiy theory. The theory employs higher order stresses as work conjugates to slip gradients and uses higher order boundary conditions. Problems on localization...... of plastic flow in a single crystal, grain boundary effects in a bicrystal, and grain size effects in a polycrystal are studied. Single crystals containing micro-scale voids have also been analyzed at different loading conditions with focus on the stress and deformation fields around the voids, on void...

  1. Size effect on the static behavior of electrostatically actuated microbeams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yin; Qin Qian; Lin Wang

    2011-01-01

    We present a new analytical model for electrostatically actuated microbeams to explore the size effect by using the modified couple stress theory and the minimum total potential energy principle. A material length scale parameter is introduced to represent the size-dependent characteristics of microbeams. This model also accounts for the nonlinearities associated with the mid-plane stretching force and the electrostatical force. Numerical analysis for microbeams with clamped-clamped and cantilevered conditions has been performed. It is found that the intensity of size effect is closely associated with the thickness of the microbeam, and smaller beam thickness displays stronger size effect and hence yields smaller deflection and larger pull-in voltage. When the beam thickness is comparable to the material length scale parameter, the size effect is significant and the present theoretical model including the material length scale parameter is adequate for predicting the static behavior of microbeam-based MEMS.

  2. Theoretical study of the effect of the size of a high-energy proton beam of the Large Hadron Collider on the formation and propagation of shock waves in copper irradiated by 450-GeV proton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Ryazanov, A I; Vasilyev, Ya S; Ferrari, A

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of 450GeV protons with copper, which is the material of the collimators of the Large Hadron Collider, has been theoretically studied. A theoretical model for the formation and propagation of shock waves has been proposed on the basis of the anal ysis of the energy released by a proton beam in the electronic subsystem of the material owing to the deceleration of secondary particles appearing in nuclear reactions induced by this beam on the electronic subsy stem of the material. The subsequent transfer of the energy from the excited electronic subsystem to the crystal lattice through the electron–phonon interaction has been described within the thermal spike model [I.M. Lifshitz, M.I. Kaganov, and L.V. Tanatarov, Sov. Phys. JETP 4 , 173 (1957); I.M. Lifshitz, M.I. Kaganov, and L.V. Tanatarov, At. Energ. 6 , 391 (1959); K. Yasui, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. B 90 , 409 (1994)]. The model of the formation of shock waves involves energy exchange processes between excited electronic an...

  3. Wakefield effects in the SLC beam delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakefield effects occurring in the SLC after the LI28 emittance measurement station could be responsible for part of all of the observed discrepancy between the expected vertical spot sizes at the IP and the measured ones. The strongest wakefields are generated by the parts of the beam chamber which are the closest to the beam, like collimators. In this note we review the effect of the following wakefield sources: geometric wakefields from final focus fixed and movable collimators, geometric and resistive wakefields from linac collimators jaws, resistive wakefields from the beam pipe at the sextupole and final transformer locations. We mostly concentrate on the transverse dipole and quadrupole wakefield effects, although the longitudinal wakefields are briefly studied at the end. We limit ourselves to the vertical beam dynamics and to the lowest (mainly linear) order of the wakefield expansion with respect to the beam offset, which excludes the near wall effect on the beam. (author)

  4. Time-resolved momentum and beam size diagnostics for bunch trains with very large momentum spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olvegård, M., E-mail: maja.olvegard@physics.uu.se [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Box 516, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Barnes, M.J.; Ducimetière, L. [CERN, European Organization of Nuclear Research, 1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Ziemann, V. [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Box 516, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-10-11

    We propose a novel method to measure the time-resolved momentum distribution and size of beams with very large momentum spread. To demonstrate the principle we apply the method to the beam at the end of a Compact Linear Collider decelerator, where conventional diagnostic methods are hampered by the large energy spread of the drive beam after up to 90% of its kinetic energy is converted into microwave power. Our method is based on sweeping the beam in a circular pattern to determine the momentum distribution and recording the beam size on a screen using optical transition radiation. We present an algorithm to extract the time-resolved momentum distribution. Furthermore, the beam size along the bunch train can be extracted from the image left on a screen by sweeping the beam linearly. We introduce the analysis technique and show simulation results that allow us to estimate the applicability. In addition, we present a conceptual design of the technical realization.

  5. Time-resolved momentum and beam size diagnostics for bunch trains with very large momentum spread

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a novel method to measure the time-resolved momentum distribution and size of beams with very large momentum spread. To demonstrate the principle we apply the method to the beam at the end of a Compact Linear Collider decelerator, where conventional diagnostic methods are hampered by the large energy spread of the drive beam after up to 90% of its kinetic energy is converted into microwave power. Our method is based on sweeping the beam in a circular pattern to determine the momentum distribution and recording the beam size on a screen using optical transition radiation. We present an algorithm to extract the time-resolved momentum distribution. Furthermore, the beam size along the bunch train can be extracted from the image left on a screen by sweeping the beam linearly. We introduce the analysis technique and show simulation results that allow us to estimate the applicability. In addition, we present a conceptual design of the technical realization

  6. A study of beam-beam effects in hadron colliders with a large number of bunches

    CERN Document Server

    Pieloni, Tatiana; Bay, Aurelio; Rivkin, Leonid

    2008-01-01

    A particle beam is a collection of a large number of charges and represents an electromagnetic potential for other charges, therefore exerting forces on itself and other beams. The control of this so called Beam-Beam Interactions (BBIs) in particle colliders is fundamental to preserve beam stability and achieve the collider maximal luminosity. In the case of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, these forces are experienced as localized periodic distortions when the two beams cross each other in the four experimental areas. The forces are most important for high density beams, i.e. high intensity and small beam sizes. Each LHC beam is composed of 2808 bunches, each containing $10^{11}$ protons and with a transverse size of 16~$\\mu $m at the interaction points. These extreme parameters are the key to obtain high ``luminosity'', i. e. the number of collisions per second needed to study rare physics phenomena. The BBI is therefore often the limiting factor for the luminosity of colliders. Within all BB effect...

  7. Vibration Analysis of Nano-Beam with Consideration of Surface Effects and Damage Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fan; Chen, Chang Ping; Chen, De Liang

    2015-03-01

    On the basis of Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, surface elastic theory, the strain equivalent assumption and modiffed couple stress theory, the nonlinear governing equations of the nano-beam are derived. In addition, the Galerkin method and the Harmonic Balance Method are adopted so as to give a solution to the equations. In the example, the effects of nano-beam length, nano-beam thickness, damage factor and surface efect to curves of amplitude-frequency response of the nano-beam are discussed. The results show that damage effects should be taken into consideration and the frequency can be controlled by load and structure size of nano-beam.

  8. Fracture size effect: review of evidence for concrete structures

    OpenAIRE

    Bazant, Zdenek P; Ozbolt, Josko; Eligehausen, Rolf

    1994-01-01

    The paper reviews experimental evidence on the size effect caused by energy release due to fracture growth during brittle failures of concrete structures. The experimental evidence has by now become quite extensive. The size effect is verified for diagonal shear failure and torsional failure of longitudinally reinforced beams without stirrups, punching shear failure of slabs, pull-out failures of deformed bars and of headed anchors, failure of short and slender tied columns, double-punch comp...

  9. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND SIZE EFFECTS OF SINGLE CRYSTAL SILICON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Guangping; LIU Kai; WANG Xiuhong

    2006-01-01

    Six kinds of micro bridge-beam specimens with different sizes are fabricated using photolithography technology for bending test. Beam specimens with trapezoidal section could be representatives of those with rectangle and square section, which are usually applied in MEMS. Nano indentation method used in bending test can be applied to both elastic and plastic materials. Also, some mechanical properties parameters such as the modulus of elasticity, hardness and the bending strength are obtained. The average modulus of elasticity of SCS is 170.295 0±2.485 0 GPa, showing no size effects, but the bending strength ranges from 3.24 GPa to 10.15 GPa, displaying strong size effects,and the average hardness is 9.496 7± 1.753 3 GPa, in which no obvious size effects are observed.

  10. Size Control Technology of Silver Nanoparticles Using Electron Beam Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Suk; Kim, Byungnam; Kim, Hye Won; Koo, Yong Hwan; Lee, Byung Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Hyun [Univ. of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Hyung Bin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Changmoon [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The manufacturing of silver nanoparticles using an electron beam is easy, fast, and highly productive, and it is possible at room temperature with no chemical residuals. Its various advantages therefore make this an important method for manufacturing nanoparticles such as silver, copper, and platinum. In particular, despite the use of electron beam irradiation, the results show that this method makes it possible to produce silver nanoparticles at low cost since low beam energy and low doses are used. This means that middle and high-energy electron beam accelerators are very expensive, but a low-energy electron beam accelerator has a relatively low cost of around 4-5 times, and mass production for a flow reaction without the need for extra radiation shielding is possible. Silver nanoparticles are of great interest to many researchers owing to their ability to be used in many applications such as catalysis, nanoelectronics, optical filters, electromagnetic interference shielding, surface Raman scattering, medical supplies, fabrics, cosmetics, hygiene and kitchen supplies, and electric home appliances.

  11. Proposing a Laser Based Beam Size Monitor for the Future Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compton scattering techniques for the measurement of the transverse beam size of particle beams at future linear colliders (FLC) are proposed. At several locations of the beam delivery system (BDS) of the FLC, beam spot sizes ranging from several hundreds to a few micrometers have to be measured. This is necessary to verify beam optics, to obtain the transverse beam emittance, and to achieve the highest possible luminosity. The large demagnification of the beam in the BDS and the high beam power puts extreme conditions on any measuring device. With conventional techniques at their operational limit in FLC scenarios, new methods for the detection of the transverse beam size have to be developed. For this laser based techniques are proposed capable of measuring high power beams with sizes in the micrometer range. In this paper general aspects and critical issues of a generic device are outlined and specific solutions proposed. Plans to install a laser wire experiment at an accelerator test facility are presented

  12. Proposal of a nanometer beam size monitor for e+e- linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new simple method to measure the transverse beam spot size in the nanometer range is proposed for a beam diagnostic system at the collision point in future TeV region e+e- linear colliders. A high energy electron beam is injected at a right angle into a photon target of intense laser light, and generates high energy γ-rates by Compton scattering. Since the laser light is stored inside a cavity resonator and forms a standing wave, the γ-ray flux shows periodic variation with the period of the optical wavelength by scanning the electron beam trajectory along the laser beam axis. From this modulation depth, the transverse size of the electron beam can be easily determined by a simple relation. Using the Nd:YAG laser at wavelength 1.06 μm or 532 nm, we can measure the beam spot size of 60 nm in the FFTB experiment with sufficient accuracy. The required laser peak power is about 20 MW to generate 1000 γ-rays per bunch. If we employ a shorter wavelength laser, for example Ar2 excimer laser at the wavelength of 126 nm, it will be possible to measure the beam size down to 5 nm, which is almost close to the required beam size in future linear colliders in the TeV region. (orig.)

  13. Nano-meter beam size monitor by laser-Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spot size measurement system at nano-meter range using Compton scattering of laser beam has been proposed for a reliable diagnostic instrument of electron beam at interaction point in e+e- linear colliders. The high energy electron beam is injected into a standing wave of laser light, and generates high energy γ-rays by Compton scattering. We measure spatial modulation of γ-ray flux by scanning the electron beam trajectory along laser axis. From the modulation depth, the transverse electron beam size is determined. A system based on this scheme using Nd:YAG-laser of 1064 nm wavelength is under construction, and will be installed in FFTB beam line in SLAC, and tested with a fine beam of 1 μm by 60 nm in transverse dimensions. (author)

  14. The influence of Laval nozzle throat size on supersonic molecular beam injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinkui He; Xianfu Feng; Mingmin Zhong; Fujun Gou; Shuiquan Deng; Yong Zhao

    2014-01-01

    In this study, finite element analysis (FEA) has been used to investigate the effects of different Laval nozzle throat sizes on supersonic molecular beam. The simulations indicate the Mach numbers of the molecular stream peak at different positions along the center axis of the beam, which correspond to local minimums of the molecular densities. With the increase of the throat diam-eter, the first peak of the Mach number increases first and then decreases, while that of the molecular number density increases gradually. Moreover, both first peaks shift pro-gressively away from the throat. At the last part, we discuss the possible applications of our FEA approach to solve some crucial problems met in modern transportations.

  15. Beam size and position measurement based on logarithm processing algorithm in HLS II

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Chaocai; Sun, Baogen; Yang, Yongliang; Zhou, ZeRan; Lu, Ping; Wu, Fangfang; Wang, Jigang; Tang, Kai; Luo, Qing; Li, Hao; Zheng, Jiajun; Duan, Qingming

    2015-01-01

    A logarithm processing algorithm to measure beam transverse size and position is proposed and preliminary experimental results in Hefei Light Source II (HLS II) are given. The algorithm is based on only 4 successive channels of 16 anode channels of multianode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) R5900U-00-L16 which has typical rise time of 0.6 ns and effective area of 0.8x16 mm for a single anode channel. In the paper, we firstly elaborate the simulation results of the algorithm with and without chan...

  16. Helicopter engine exhaust rotor downwash effects on laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Markus; Sjöqvist, Lars; Seiffer, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    The hot exhaust gases from engines on helicopters are pushed down by the rotor in a turbulent flow. When the optical path of a laser beam or optical sensor passes through this region severe aberrations of the optical field may result. These perturbations will lead to beam wander and beam distortions that can limit the performance of optical countermeasure systems. To quantify these effects the Italian Air Force Flight Test Centre hosted a trial for the "Airborne platform effects on lasers and warning sensors" (ALWS) EDA-project. Laser beams were propagated from the airport control tower to a target screen in a slant path with the helicopter hovering over this path. Collimated laser beams at 1.55-, 2- and 4.6-μm wavelength were imaged with high speed cameras. Large increases in beam wander and beam divergence were found, with beam wander up to 200 μrad root-mean-square and increases in beam divergence up to 1 mrad. To allow scaling to other laser beam parameters and geometries formulas for propagation in atmospheric turbulence were used even though the turbulence may not follow Kolmogorov statistics. By assuming that the plume is short compared to the total propagation distance the integrated structure parameter through the plume could be calculated. Values in the range 10-10 to 10-8 m1/3 were found when the laser beams passed through the exhaust gases below the helicopter tail. The integrated structure parameter values calculated from beam wander were consistently lower than those calculated from long term spot size, indicating that the method is not perfect but provides information about order of magnitudes. The measured results show that the engine exhaust for worst case beam directions will dominate over atmospheric turbulence even for kilometer path lengths from a helicopter at low altitude. How severe the effect is on system performance will depend on beam and target parameters.

  17. Detector dose response in megavoltage small photon beams. II. Pencil beam perturbation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantify detector perturbation effects in megavoltage small photon fields and support the theoretical explanation on the nature of quality correction factors in these conditions. Methods: In this second paper, a modern approach to radiation dosimetry is defined for any detector and applied to small photon fields. Fano’s theorem is adapted in the form of a cavity theory and applied in the context of nonstandard beams to express four main effects in the form of perturbation factors. The pencil-beam decomposition method is detailed and adapted to the calculation of perturbation factors and quality correction factors. The approach defines a perturbation function which, for a given field size or beam modulation, entirely determines these dosimetric factors. Monte Carlo calculations are performed in different cavity sizes for different detection materials, electron densities, and extracameral components. Results: Perturbation effects are detailed with calculated perturbation functions, showing the relative magnitude of the effects as well as the geometrical extent to which collimating or modulating the beam impacts the dosimetric factors. The existence of a perturbation zone around the detector cavity is demonstrated and the approach is discussed and linked to previous approaches in the literature to determine critical field sizes. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulations are valuable to describe pencil beam perturbation effects and detail the nature of dosimetric factors in megavoltage small photon fields. In practice, it is shown that dosimetric factors could be avoided if the field size remains larger than the detector perturbation zone. However, given a detector and beam quality, a full account for the detector geometry is necessary to determine critical field sizes

  18. Detector dose response in megavoltage small photon beams. II. Pencil beam perturbation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchard, Hugo, E-mail: hugo.bouchard@npl.co.uk; Duane, Simon [Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Team, National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Kamio, Yuji [Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM), 1560 Sherbrooke Est, Montréal, Québec H2L 4M1 (Canada); Palmans, Hugo [Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Team, National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Medical Physics, EBG MedAustron GmbH, Wiener Neustadt A-2700 (Austria); Seuntjens, Jan [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montréal, Québec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To quantify detector perturbation effects in megavoltage small photon fields and support the theoretical explanation on the nature of quality correction factors in these conditions. Methods: In this second paper, a modern approach to radiation dosimetry is defined for any detector and applied to small photon fields. Fano’s theorem is adapted in the form of a cavity theory and applied in the context of nonstandard beams to express four main effects in the form of perturbation factors. The pencil-beam decomposition method is detailed and adapted to the calculation of perturbation factors and quality correction factors. The approach defines a perturbation function which, for a given field size or beam modulation, entirely determines these dosimetric factors. Monte Carlo calculations are performed in different cavity sizes for different detection materials, electron densities, and extracameral components. Results: Perturbation effects are detailed with calculated perturbation functions, showing the relative magnitude of the effects as well as the geometrical extent to which collimating or modulating the beam impacts the dosimetric factors. The existence of a perturbation zone around the detector cavity is demonstrated and the approach is discussed and linked to previous approaches in the literature to determine critical field sizes. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulations are valuable to describe pencil beam perturbation effects and detail the nature of dosimetric factors in megavoltage small photon fields. In practice, it is shown that dosimetric factors could be avoided if the field size remains larger than the detector perturbation zone. However, given a detector and beam quality, a full account for the detector geometry is necessary to determine critical field sizes.

  19. Detection of Ground Motion effects on the beam trajectory at ATF2

    CERN Document Server

    Renier, Y; Tomas, R; Schulte, D

    2012-01-01

    The ATF2 experiment is currently demonstrating the feasibility of the beam delivery system for the future linear collider. The orbit feedback is very critical to obtain the nanometer vertical beam size at the interaction point and in the case of CLIC, ground motion effects on the beam must be corrected. In this respect, as a proof of principle of a ground motion feed forward, the ground motion effects on the beam trajectory are extracted from the beam position monitor readings.

  20. Control of the kerf size and microstructure in Inconel 738 superalloy by femtosecond laser beam cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, J.; Ye, Y.; Sun, Z.; Liu, L.; Zou, G.

    2016-05-01

    Femtosecond laser beam cutting is becoming widely used to meet demands for increasing accuracy in micro-machining. In this paper, the effects of processing parameters in femtosecond laser beam cutting on the kerf size and microstructure in Inconel 738 have been investigated. The defocus, pulse width and scanning speed were selected to study the controllability of the cutting process. Adjusting and matching the processing parameters was a basic enhancement method to acquire well defined kerf size and the high-quality ablation of microstructures, which has contributed to the intensity clamping effect. The morphology and chemical compositions of these microstructures on the cut surface have been characterized by a scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Additionally, the material removal mechanism and oxidation mechanism on the Inconel 738 cut surface have also been discussed on the basis of the femtosecond laser induced normal vaporization or phase explosion, and trapping effect of the dangling bonds.

  1. Beam Size Estimation from Luminosity Scans at the LHC During 2015 Proton Physics Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Hostettler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    As a complementary method for measuring the beam size for high-intensity beams at 6.5 TeV flat-top energy, beam separation scans were done regularly at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during 2015 proton physics operation. The luminosities measured by the CMS experiment during the scans were used to derive the convoluted beam size and orbit offset bunch-by-bunch. This contribution will elaborate on the method used to derive plane-by-plane, bunch-by-bunch emittances from the scan data, including uncertainties and corrections. The measurements are then compared to beam size estimations from absolute luminosity, synchrotron light telescopes, and wire scanners. In particular, the evolution of the emittance over the course of several hours in collisions is studied and bunch-by-bunch differences are highlighted.

  2. High resolution electron imaging system for sub-micron sized metastable atom beams produced by Stern Gerlach interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosavljevic, A. R.; Bocvarski, V.; Jureta, J.; Marinkovic, B. P.; Karam, J.-C.; Grucker, J.; Perales, F.; Vassilev, G.; Reinhardt, J.; Robert, J.; Baudon, J.

    2005-10-01

    The method of modulating an atom beam profile by an immaterial magnetic mask generated in a Stern-Gerlach interferometer is recalled. A special magnetic configuration aimed at producing a single central bright interference fringe (atomic spot) was used. The effects of velocity spread, source coherence and source size on the limiting spot size at large values of the magnetic gradient are discussed. The observation of such small sizes requires a high spatial resolution of the position-sensitive detector. A new electron optical device is described, which images the secondary electron source generated by the impact of the atomic beam on a metallic electrode (detection in real time). Magnifications as high as 65 are accessible, leading to a better than 100 nm resolution of the atomic beam profile when a position-sensitive detector of a few µm resolution is used. Geometric and chromatic aberrations are discussed and, according to simulations, they do not significantly deteriorate the resolution.

  3. Simulating Transient Effects of Pulsed Beams on Beam Intercepting Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Herta; Noah Messomo, Etam

    2011-01-01

    The development in the physics community towards higher beam power through the possibilities of particle accelerators lead to challenges for the developers of elements which are exposed to effect of particle beams (beam intercepting devices = BIDs). For the design of BIDs, the increasing heat load onto these devices due to energetic and focused beams and - in most cases - their highly pulsed nature has to be taken into account. The physics requirements are sometimes opposed to the current state of the art. As one possibility of many in combining the different aspects for these ambitious demands, two highly developed computer programs, namely FLUKA and ANSYS AUTODYN, were joined for this dissertation. The former is a widely enhanced Monte-Carlo-code which specializes on the interaction of particles with static matter, while the latter is a versatile explicit code for the simulation of highly dynamic processes. Both computer programs were developed intensively over years and are still continuously enhanced in o...

  4. Size-effect of germanium nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Ou, Yiyu; Liu, Chuan;

    2011-01-01

    Different sizes of Ge nanocrystals embedded in a SiO2 matrix were formed by PECVD, and analyzed by TEM. Size effect of Ge nanocystals was demonstrated by Raman spectroscopy after excluding the thermal effect.......Different sizes of Ge nanocrystals embedded in a SiO2 matrix were formed by PECVD, and analyzed by TEM. Size effect of Ge nanocystals was demonstrated by Raman spectroscopy after excluding the thermal effect....

  5. Effect Sizes in Gifted Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Marcia; Peters, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent calls for reporting and interpreting effect sizes have been numerous, with the 5th edition of the "Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association" (2001) calling for the inclusion of effect sizes to interpret quantitative findings. Many top journals have required that effect sizes accompany claims of statistical significance.…

  6. Size effects in manufacturing of metallic components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollertsen, F; Biermann, D; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Jawahir, I.S.; Kuzman, K.

    2009-01-01

    In manufacturing of metallic components, the size of the part plays an important role for the process behaviour. This is due to so called size effects, which lead to changes in the process behaviour even if the relationship between the main geometrical features is kept constant. The aim of this...... paper is to give a systematic review on Such effects and their potential use or remedy. First, the typology of size effects will be explained, followed by a description of size effects on strength and tribology. The last three sections describe size effects on formability, forming processes and cutting...

  7. Beam size and position measurement based on logarithm processing algorithm in HLS II

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Chaocai; Yang, Yongliang; Zhou, Zeran; Lu, Ping; Wu, Fangfang; Wang, Jigang; Tang, Kai; Luo, Qing; Li, Hao; Zheng, Jiajun; Duan, Qingming

    2015-01-01

    A logarithm processing algorithm to measure beam transverse size and position is proposed and preliminary experimental results in Hefei Light Source II (HLS II) are given. The algorithm is based on only 4 successive channels of 16 anode channels of multianode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) R5900U-00-L16 which has typical rise time of 0.6 ns and effective area of 0.8x16 mm for a single anode channel. In the paper, we firstly elaborate the simulation results of the algorithm with and without channel inconsistency. Then we calibrate the channel inconsistency and verify the algorithm using general current signal processor Libera Photon in low-speed scheme. Finally we get turn-by-turn beam size and position and calculate the vertical tune in high-speed scheme. The experimental results show that measured values fit well with simulation results after channel differences are calibrated and the fractional part of the tune in vertical direction is 0.3628 which is very close to the nominal value 0.3621.

  8. Beam size and position measurement based on logarithm processing algorithm in HLS II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao-Cai, Cheng; Bao-Gen, Sun; Yong-Liang, Yang; Ze-Ran, Zhou; Ping, Lu; Fang-Fang, Wu; Ji-Gang, Wang; Kai, Tang; Qing, Luo; Hao, Li; Jia-Jun, Zheng; Qing-Ming, Duan

    2016-04-01

    A logarithm processing algorithm to measure beam transverse size and position is proposed and preliminary experimental results in Hefei Light Source II (HLS II) are given. The algorithm is based on only 4 successive channels of 16 anode channels of multianode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) R5900U-00-L16, which has typical rise time of 0.6 ns and effective area of 0.8×16 mm for a single anode channel. In the paper, we first elaborate the simulation results of the algorithm with and without channel inconsistency. Then we calibrate the channel inconsistency and verify the algorithm using a general current signal processor Libera Photon in a low-speed scheme. Finally we get turn-by-turn beam size and position and calculate the vertical tune in a high-speed scheme. The experimental results show that measured values fit well with simulation results after channel differences are calibrated, and the fractional part of the tune in vertical direction is 0.3628, which is very close to the nominal value 0.3621. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11005105, 11175173)

  9. Simulation of beam-induced plasma for the mitigation of beam-beam effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J.; Wang, G.; Samulyak, R.; Yu, K.; Litvinenko, V.

    2015-05-03

    One of the main challenges in the increase of luminosity of circular colliders is the control of the beam-beam effect. In the process of exploring beam-beam mitigation methods using plasma, we evaluated the possibility of plasma generation via ionization of neutral gas by proton beams, and performed highly resolved simulations of the beam-plasma interaction using SPACE, a 3D electromagnetic particle-in-cell code. The process of plasma generation is modelled using experimentally measured cross-section coefficients and a plasma recombination model that takes into account the presence of neutral gas and beam-induced electromagnetic fields. Numerically simulated plasma oscillations are consistent with theoretical analysis. In the beam-plasma interaction process, high-density neutral gas reduces the mean free path of plasma electrons and their acceleration. A numerical model for the drift speed as a limit of plasma electron velocity was developed. Simulations demonstrate a significant reduction of the beam electric field in the presence of plasma. Preliminary simulations using fully-ionized plasma have also been performed and compared with the case of beam-induced plasma.

  10. Long range beam-beam interaction and the effect on the beam and luminosity lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Crouch, Matthew; Barranco Garcia, Javier; Banfi, Danilo; Buffat, Xavier; Tambasco, Claudia; Alexahin, Yuri; Bruce, Roderik; Giachino, Rossano; Pojer, Mirko; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Solfaroli Camillocci, Matteo; Trad, Georges; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the minimum crossing angle achievable in the LHC is a key parameter to identify the collider luminosity reach. In this note, we summarise the observations collected during a dedicated experiment performed in 2015, where the strength of the long range beam-beam interaction is varied by reducing the crossing angle at IP1 and IP5. The crossing angle and the impact of the long range beam-beam interaction is analysed with respect to the beam and luminosity lifetimes. The effect of reducing Landau octupoles initially operating at 476 [A] and high chromaticity values (15 units) are also shown. The minimum crossing angle achievable with collisions is identified, together with the impact on beam and luminosity lifetimes

  11. Do class size effects differ across grades?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nandrup, Anne Brink

    size cap that creates exogenous variation in class sizes. Significant (albeit modest) negative effects of class size increases are found for children on primary school levels. The effects on math abilities are statistically different across primary and secondary school. Larger classes do not affect......This paper contributes to the class size literature by analyzing whether short-run class size effects are constant across grade levels in compulsory school. Results are based on administrative data on all pupils enroled in Danish public schools. Identification is based on a government-imposed class...

  12. Study on Size-Dependent Young’s Modulus of a Silicon Nano beam by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young’s modulus of a silicon nano beam with a rectangular cross-section is studied by molecular dynamics method. Dynamic simulations are performed for doubly clamped silicon nano beams with lengths ranging from 4.888 to 12.491 nm and cross-sections ranging from 1.22 nm ×1.22 nm to 3.39 nm × 3.39 nm. The results show that Young’s moduli of such small silicon nano beams are much higher than the value of Young’s modulus for bulk silicon. Moreover, the resonant frequency and Young’s modulus of the Si nano beam are strongly dependent not only on the size of the nano beam but also on surface effects. Young’s modulus increases significantly with the decreasing of the thickness of the silicon nano beam. This result qualitatively agrees with one of the conclusions based on a semi continuum model, in which the surface relaxation and the surface tension were taken into consideration. The impacts of the surface reconstruction with (2 ×1) dimmers on the resonant frequency and Young’s modulus are studied in this paper too. It is shown that the surface reconstruction makes the silicon nano beam stiffer than the one without the surface reconstruction, resulting in a higher resonant frequency and a larger Young’s modulus

  13. Effects, causing intensification of synchrotron radiaiton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possibility of intensification of synchrotron radiation beams in optical and ultraviolet spectrum range by shift of generation range of the output synchrotron radiation beams from circle sections of electron orbit to the magnetic field of gaps, separating sections of the accelerator electromagnets is discussed. The degree of manifestation of the considered effects in synchrotrons for 0.6 and 7.5 GeV energy is evaluated. The results of their experimental investigati.on in the optical beam of the 0.6 GeV synchrotron radiation are given. The results obtained show that beam intensity in the gap centre between the magnet sections increases 3.2 times. The structure of beam intensity distribution improves simultaneously and vertical direction of radiation increases approximately 2 times. A conclusion is made on applicability of the described method for beam intensification of synchrotron radiation

  14. Mangrove propagule size and oil contamination effects: Does size matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Gonasageran

    2016-09-15

    Three mangroves species with differential propagule size, Avicennia marina (2.5±0.3cm), Bruguiera gymnorrhiza (16±2cm) and Rhizophora mucronata (36±3cm), were subjected to oil contamination. In a series of glasshouse and field experiments, the sediment, propagules, leaves and stems were oiled and growth monitored. Oiling of the propagules, leaves, internodes or sediment reduced plant height, leaf number, leaf chlorophyll content index and induced growth abnormalities, leaf abscission and mortality, with effects being greatest in A. marina, intermediate in R. mucronata and least in B. gymnorrhiza. The results suggest that the greater susceptibility of A. marina to oil is due to early shedding of the protective pericarp and rapid root and shoot development after detachment from the parent tree and not to propagule size. After seedling emergence, micromorphological factors such as presence of trichomes, salt glands and thickness of protective barriers influence oil tolerance. PMID:27342901

  15. Tailoring of specific sizes of cluster ions for producing intense negative ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of producing an intense beam of monoatomic negative hydrogen ions from a beam of accelerated positive hydrogen cluster ions, the mean specific size of the cluster ions of 103 atoms/charge for an accelerating voltage of 1 MV is necessary for efficient formation of the negative ions. A fundamental investigation on the tailoring of specific sizes has been carried out by using nitrogen cluster ions with a mean specific size of 105 atoms/charge. The nitrogen cluster ions were accelerated at a voltage of up to 20 kV before entering the divider which reduced their specific sizes by multiple ionization. The order of magnitude of the mean reduced specific size is 103 - 104 atoms/charge for the ionizing electron current up to 140 mA. These values were crosschecked by different experimental methods, examined theoretically and concluded to be reasonable. (author)

  16. Size effects in thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Tellier, CR; Siddall, G

    1982-01-01

    A complete and comprehensive study of transport phenomena in thin continuous metal films, this book reviews work carried out on external-surface and grain-boundary electron scattering and proposes new theoretical equations for transport properties of these films. It presents a complete theoretical view of the field, and considers imperfection and impurity effects.

  17. Fracture energy and size effect studies for nuclear concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design, analysis and testing of large size nuclear concrete structures pose problems due to varying sizes of the test specimens, models and prototype structures and exhibit the structural size effect. In this paper the structural size effect law for such structures is revisited and is explained through nonlinear fracture mechanics description. The new experimental programme of material characterization for softening behavior of concrete in compression and tension are described. The fracture energy evaluation on notched/unnotched, plain and reinforced Three Point Bend (TPB) beam specimens using conventional instrumentation, acoustic b-value analysis and high resolution image processing systems is presented. Further, a few case studies are presented with numerical finite element cohesive crack and crack band models to illustrate the issues of mesh sensitivity as observed in the classical strength/strain based non-linear finite element theories

  18. Hazards of explosives dusts: Particle size effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashdollar, K L; Hertzberg, M; Green, G M

    1992-02-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the Bureau of Mines has investigated the hazards of military explosives dispersed as dust clouds in a 20-L test chamber. In this report, the effect of particle size for HMX, HNS, RDX, TATB, and TNT explosives dusts is studied in detail. The explosibility data for these dusts are also compared to those for pure fuel dusts. The data show that all of the sizes of the explosives dusts that were studied were capable of sustaining explosions as dust clouds dispersed in air. The finest sizes (<10 [mu]m) of explosives dusts were less reactive than the intermediate sizes (20 to 60 [mu]m); this is opposite to the particle size effect observed previously for the pure fuel dusts. At the largest sizes studied, the explosives dusts become somewhat less reactive as dispersed dust clouds. The six sizes of the HMX dust were also studied as dust clouds dispersed in nitrogen.

  19. Size-dependent crystalline fluctuation and growth mechanism of bismuth nanoparticles under electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sujuan; Jiang, Yi; Hu, Lijun; Sun, Jianguo; Wan, Piaopiao; Sun, Lidong

    2016-06-01

    Advanced nanofabrication requires accurate tailoring of various nanostructures with the assistance of electron or ion beam irradiation. However, evolution of the nanostructures under the beam irradiation significantly affects the fabrication process. It is thus of paramount importance to study the evolution behaviors and growth mechanism of the nanostructures. In this study, bismuth nanoparticles were selected to investigate crystalline fluctuation under electron beam irradiation via transmission electron microscopy. The results disclose size-dependent crystalline fluctuation of the nanoparticles. The particles exhibit crystalline and non-crystalline features for sizes of above 15 and below 4 nm, respectively, while a mixture of the two states is observed with sizes in between. The crystalline fluctuation facilitates the growth process of the particles when a crystalline particle is in contact with another non-crystalline one. This is promising for applications in nanofabrication where high quality interfaces are desired between two joining parts.Advanced nanofabrication requires accurate tailoring of various nanostructures with the assistance of electron or ion beam irradiation. However, evolution of the nanostructures under the beam irradiation significantly affects the fabrication process. It is thus of paramount importance to study the evolution behaviors and growth mechanism of the nanostructures. In this study, bismuth nanoparticles were selected to investigate crystalline fluctuation under electron beam irradiation via transmission electron microscopy. The results disclose size-dependent crystalline fluctuation of the nanoparticles. The particles exhibit crystalline and non-crystalline features for sizes of above 15 and below 4 nm, respectively, while a mixture of the two states is observed with sizes in between. The crystalline fluctuation facilitates the growth process of the particles when a crystalline particle is in contact with another non

  20. Effect size for dichotomous outcome measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanjia WANG; Naihua DUAN

    2011-01-01

    @@ Effect size for continuous outcome measures was discussed in our previous column[1].In this column we discuss several widely used effect size measures for dichotomous (Yes/No) outcome measures such as mortality,relapse,cure,discontinuation of treatment,and so forth.

  1. Free Vibration of Size-Dependent Functionally Graded Microbeams Based on the Strain Gradient Reddy Beam Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, R.; Gholami, R.; Sahmani, S.

    2014-09-01

    The microscale vibration characteristics of microbeams made of functionally graded materials (FGMs) are investigated based on the strain gradient Reddy beam theory capable of capturing the size effect. The non-classical governing differential equations, together with the corresponding boundary conditions, are obtained using Hamilton's principle. Then, the free vibration problem of simply supported FGM microbeams is solved using the Navier solution. The natural frequencies of FGM microbeams are calculated corresponding to a wide range of dimensionless length scale parameters, material property gradient indices, and aspect ratios to illustrate the influences of size effect on the vibrational response of FGM microbeams.

  2. Size effects on cavitation instabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2006-01-01

    growth is here analyzed for such cases. A finite strain generalization of a higher order strain gradient plasticity theory is applied for a power-law hardening material, and the numerical analyses are carried out for an axisymmetric unit cell containing a spherical void. In the range of high stress......In metal-ceramic systems the constraint on plastic flow leads to so high stress triaxialities that cavitation instabilities may occur. If the void radius is on the order of magnitude of a characteristic length for the metal, the rate of void growth is reduced, and the possibility of unstable cavity...... triaxiality, where cavitation instabilities are predicted by conventional plasticity theory, such instabilities are also found for the nonlocal theory, but the effects of gradient hardening delay the onset of the instability. Furthermore, in some cases the cavitation stress reaches a maximum and then decays...

  3. Machining with micro-size single crystalline diamond tools fabricated by a focused ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was carried out to understand the physics of micro-scale mechanical machining (henceforth referred to as 'micro-machining') with a micro-size tool using a five-axis ultra-precision machine. A micro-size single crystalline diamond (SCD) tool with sharp cutting edges fabricated by a focused ion beam (FIB) was employed to orthogonal-machine four materials (three polycrystalline metals with various grain sizes and one amorphous metal plating material). Since the wealth of knowledge of macro-machining cannot be successfully used in micro-machining, this study contributes to the understanding of the physics of mechanical machining with micro-size tools

  4. Diamond detector versus silicon diode and ion chamber in photon beams of different energy and field size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to test the suitability of a PTW diamond detector for nonreference condition dosimetry in photon beams of different energy (6 and 25 MV) and field size (from 2.6 cmx2.6 cm to 10 cmx10 cm). Diamond behavior was compared to that of a Scanditronix p-type silicon diode and a Scanditronix RK ionization chamber. Measurements included output factors (OF), percentage depth doses (PDD) and dose profiles. OFs measured with diamond detector agreed within 1% with those measured with diode and RK chamber. Only at 25 MV, for the smallest field size, RK chamber underestimated OFs due to averaging effects in a pointed shaped beam profile. Agreement was found between PDDs measured with diamond detector and RK chamber for both 6 MV and 25 MV photons and down to 5 cmx5 cm field size. For the 2.6 cmx2.6 cm field size, at 25 MV, RK chamber underestimated doses at shallow depth and the difference progressively went to zero in the distal region. PDD curves measured with silicon diode and diamond detector agreed well for the 25 MV beam at all the field sizes. Conversely, the nontissue equivalence of silicon led, for the 6 MV beam, to a slight overestimation of the diode doses in the distal region, at all the field sizes. Penumbra and field width measurements gave values in agreement for all the detectors but with a systematic overestimate by RK measurements. The results obtained confirm that ion chamber is not a suitable detector when high spatial resolution is required. On the other hand, the small differences in the studied parameters, between diamond and silicon systems, do not lead to a significant advantage in the use of diamond detector for routine clinical dosimetry

  5. Variations in cone beam CT numbers as a function of patient size: in vivo demonstration in bladder cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We determined Hounsfield numbers, using cone beam CT (CBCT), in the bladder of 27 muscle invasive bladder cancer patients treated with online adaptive radiotherapy using a Varian linear accelerator. The CBCT number of urine was found to increase by 130 from the thinnest to the largest patient (249 mm to 346 mm average diameter) demonstrating the effect of patient size on Hounsfield number in CBCT in vivo.

  6. Nanocoatings size effect in nanostructured films

    CERN Document Server

    Aliofkhazraei, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Size effect in structures has been taken into consideration over the last years. In comparison with coatings with micrometer-ranged thickness, nanostructured coatings usually enjoy better and appropriate properties, such as strength and resistance. These coatings enjoy unique magnetic properties and are used with the aim of producing surfaces resistant against erosion, lubricant system, cutting tools, manufacturing hardened sporadic alloys, being resistant against oxidation and corrosion. This book reviews researches on fabrication and classification of nanostructured coatings with focus on size effect in nanometric scale. Size effect on electrochemical, mechanical and physical properties of nanocoatings are presented.

  7. Size Effects on the Strength of Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xiaoxu

    2014-01-01

    The grain size effect and the specimen size effect on the strength of metals are briefly reviewed with respect to their history and current status of research. It is revealed that the fundamental strengthening mechanisms responsible for these two types of size effect are to increase the resistance...... to dislocation motion and to dislocation generation, respectively. It is shown that both strengthening mechanisms take place in some nanostructured metals, which leads to a suggestion to use these two mechanisms for optimizing the strength and ductility of nanostructured metals. This suggestion is...

  8. Simulating transient effects of pulsed beams on beam intercepting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development in the physics community towards higher beam power through the possibilities of particle accelerators lead to challenges for the developers of elements which are exposed to effect of particle beams (beam intercepting devices =BIDs). For the design of BIDs, the increasing heat load onto these devices due to energetic and focused beams and - in most cases - their highly pulsed nature has to be taken into account. The physics requirements are sometimes opposed to the current state of the art. As one possibility of many in combining the different aspects for these ambitious demands, two highly developed computer programs, namely FLUKA and ANSYS AUTODYN, were joined for this dissertation. The former is a widely enhanced Monte-Carlo-code which specializes on the interaction of particles with static matter, while the latter is a versatile explicit code for the simulation of highly dynamic processes. Both computer programs were developed intensively over years and are still continuously enhanced in order to achieve their best potential. As a consequence of their separate development histories, their combination requires a large amount of work - at the physics limits of their application as well as at the frontier of computing technology. The current work did not touch all different points needed for a full integration, but it is a first step towards their coupling within a feasible time frame. For the simulation of metallic targets irradiated with highly energetic uranium ions different material models have been combined and one parameter describing the damage of the material was varied. In the case of two copper targets, this procedure led to a qualitative agreement between simulations and experimental results. (author)

  9. Pencil-like mm-size electron beams produced with Linear Inductive Voltage Adders (LIVA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the design, analysis, and first results of the high brightness electron beam experiments currently under investigation at Sandia National Laboratories. The anticipated beam parameters are the following: energy 12 MeV, current 35-40 kA, rms radius 0.5 mm, and pulse duration 40 ns FWHM. The accelerator is SABRE, a pulsed LIVA modified to higher impedance, and the electron source is a magnetically immersed foilless electron diode. Twenty to thirty Tesla solenoidal magnets are required to insulate the diode and contain the beam to its extremely small sized (1 mm) envelope. These experiments are designed to push the technology to produce the highest possible electron current in a submillimeter radius beam. Design, numerical simulations, and first experimental results are presented. (author)

  10. Board Size Effects in Closely Held Corporations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Morten; Kongsted, H.C.; Meisner Nielsen, Kasper

    2004-01-01

    Previous work on board size effects in closely held corporationshas established a negative correlation between board size and firm performance.We argue that this work has been incomplete in analysing the causalrelationship due to lack of ownership information and weak identificationstrategies in ...

  11. Wavefront-sensor-induced beam size error: physical mechanism, sensitivity-analysis and correction method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, W.D.; Zwet, E.J. van

    2015-01-01

    When using a commonly-used quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometer wavefront sensor (QWLSI WFS) for beam size measurements on a high power CO2 laser, artefacts have been observed in the measured irradiance distribution. The grating in the QWLSI WFS not only generates the diffracted first orders

  12. SOLAR HARD X-RAY SOURCE SIZES IN A BEAM-HEATED AND IONIZED CHROMOSPHERE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar flare hard X-rays (HXRs) are produced as bremsstrahlung when an accelerated population of electrons interacts with the dense chromospheric plasma. HXR observations presented by Kontar et al. using the Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager have shown that HXR source sizes are three to six times more extended in height than those predicted by the standard collisional thick target model (CTTM). Several possible explanations have been put forward including the multi-threaded nature of flare loops, pitch-angle scattering, and magnetic mirroring. However, the nonuniform ionization (NUI) structure along the path of the electron beam has not been fully explored as a solution to this problem. Ionized plasma is known to be less effective at producing nonthermal bremsstrahlung HXRs when compared to neutral plasma. If the peak HXR emission was produced in a locally ionized region within the chromosphere, the intensity of emission will be preferentially reduced around this peak, resulting in a more extended source. Due to this effect, along with the associated density enhancement in the upper chromosphere, injection of a beam of electrons into a partially ionized plasma should result in an HXR source that is substantially more vertically extended relative to that for a neutral target. Here we present the results of a modification to the CTTM, which takes into account both a localized form of chromospheric NUI and an increased target density. We find 50 keV HXR source widths, with and without the inclusion of a locally ionized region, of ∼3 Mm and ∼0.7 Mm, respectively. This helps to provide a theoretical solution to the currently open question of overly extended HXR sources

  13. SOLAR HARD X-RAY SOURCE SIZES IN A BEAM-HEATED AND IONIZED CHROMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Flannagain, Aidan M.; Gallagher, Peter T. [Astrophysics Research Group, School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Brown, John C. [Astronomy and Astrophysics Group, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    Solar flare hard X-rays (HXRs) are produced as bremsstrahlung when an accelerated population of electrons interacts with the dense chromospheric plasma. HXR observations presented by Kontar et al. using the Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager have shown that HXR source sizes are three to six times more extended in height than those predicted by the standard collisional thick target model (CTTM). Several possible explanations have been put forward including the multi-threaded nature of flare loops, pitch-angle scattering, and magnetic mirroring. However, the nonuniform ionization (NUI) structure along the path of the electron beam has not been fully explored as a solution to this problem. Ionized plasma is known to be less effective at producing nonthermal bremsstrahlung HXRs when compared to neutral plasma. If the peak HXR emission was produced in a locally ionized region within the chromosphere, the intensity of emission will be preferentially reduced around this peak, resulting in a more extended source. Due to this effect, along with the associated density enhancement in the upper chromosphere, injection of a beam of electrons into a partially ionized plasma should result in an HXR source that is substantially more vertically extended relative to that for a neutral target. Here we present the results of a modification to the CTTM, which takes into account both a localized form of chromospheric NUI and an increased target density. We find 50 keV HXR source widths, with and without the inclusion of a locally ionized region, of ∼3 Mm and ∼0.7 Mm, respectively. This helps to provide a theoretical solution to the currently open question of overly extended HXR sources.

  14. Introducing the mean absolute deviation 'effect' size.

    OpenAIRE

    Gorard, S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme values. The paper then proposes the use of an easy to comprehend effect size based on the mean difference between treatment groups, divided by the mean...

  15. Long-term effects of class size

    OpenAIRE

    Fredriksson, Peter; Öckert, Björn; Oosterbeek, Hessel

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the long-term effects of class size in primary school. We use rich administrative data from Sweden and exploit variation in class size created by a maximum class size rule. Smaller classes in the last three years of primary school (age 10 to 13) are not only beneficial for cognitive test scores at age 13 but also for non-cognitive scores at that age, for cognitive test scores at ages 16 and 18, and for completed education and wages at age 27 to 42. The estimated effect on...

  16. Long-Term Effects of Class Size

    OpenAIRE

    Fredriksson, Peter; Öckert, Björn; Oosterbeek, Hessel

    2011-01-01

    This paper evaluates the long-term effects of class size in primary school. We use rich administrative data from Sweden and exploit variation in class size created by a maximum class size rule. Smaller classes in the last three years of primary school (age 10 to 13) are not only beneficial for cognitive test scores at age 13 but also for non-cognitive scores at that age, for cognitive test scores at ages 16 and 18, and for completed education and wages at age 27 to 42. The estimated effect on...

  17. Long-term effects of class size

    OpenAIRE

    Fredriksson, Peter; Öckert, Björn; Oosterbeek, Hessel

    2011-01-01

    This paper evaluates the long-term effects of class size in primary school. We use rich administrative data from Sweden and exploit variation in class size created by a maximum class size rule. Smaller classes in the last three years of primary school (age 10 to 13) are not only beneficial for cognitive test scores at age 13 but also for non-cognitive scores at that age, for cognitive test scores at ages 16 and 18, and for completed education and wages at age 27 to 42. The estimated effect on...

  18. Long-term effects of class size

    OpenAIRE

    Fredriksson, Peter; Öckert, Björn; Oosterbeek, Hessel

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the long-term effects of class size in primary school. We use rich data from Sweden and exploit variation in class size created by a maximum class size rule. Smaller classes in the last three years of primary school (age 10 to 13) are beneficial for cognitive and non-cognitive ability at age 13, and improve achievement at age 16. Most importantly, we find that smaller classes have positive effects on completed education, wages, and earnings at age 27 to 42. The estimated ...

  19. Influences of size and position of defects on the fatigue life of electron beam welded-aluminum alloy joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Li; ZHAO Haiyan; CAI Zhipeng; CUI Xiaofang

    2007-01-01

    Defects such as pores influence the fatigue life of electron beam-welded aluminum alloy joints. In this paper,the influences of pore size and position on the fatigue life of aluminum overlap joint are studied. A finite element model (FEM), combined with experimental data, is established to evaluate the fatigue life of overlap joints. By employing this FE model, the effects of pore size and position on fatigue lives of overlap joints are investigated and discussed. From the present study, when pore position is closer to the weld bead tip or the faying surface, the fatigue life decreases. Also, there is a critical size for the pore; when the pore size is larger than the critical value, the fatigue strength decreases sharply.

  20. Beam Collimation Using an Anisotropic Metamaterial Slab without Any Nanometer-sized Aperture

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shou; Cui, Yanxia; Zhang, Feng; He, Sailing; Hao, Yuying; Zhu, Furong

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic beam collimation effect has been thoroughly investigated based on the well-known nanometer-scale bull's eye structure formed by complex and high-cost fabrication processes. In this work, we report our effort for attaining beam collimation using an anisotropic metamaterial (AMM) slab that consists of a stack of alternating metal/dielectric layers and an integrated top metal grating. The results show that AMM slab allows creating the beam collimation effect similar to that of the bull's eye structure, an enabling technology for practical application due to its simple architecture and cost benefits. The excitation of surface plasmons at the AMM/air interface is derived. The structure of the AMM slab and its impact on beaming performance were analyzed using the effective medium theory and Finite Element Method.

  1. Application of lateral photovoltage towards contactless light beam induced current measurements and its dependence on the finite beam size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nature of the signal due to light beam induced current (LBIC) at the remote contacts is verified as a lateral photovoltage for non-uniformly illuminated planar p-n junction devices; simulation and experimental results are presented. The limitations imposed by the ohmic contacts are successfully overcome by the introduction of capacitively coupled remote contacts, which yield similar results without any significant loss in the estimated material and device parameters. It is observed that the LBIC measurements introduce artefacts such as shift in peak position with increasing laser power. Simulation of LBIC signal as a function of characteristic length Lc of photo-generated carriers and for different beam diameters has resulted in the observed peak shifts, thus attributed to the finite size of the beam. Further, the idea of capacitively coupled contacts has been extended to contactless measurements using pressure contacts with an oxidized aluminium electrodes. This technique avoids the contagious sample processing steps, which may introduce unintentional defects and contaminants into the material and devices under observation. Thus, we present here, the remote contact LBIC as a practically non-destructive tool in the evaluation of device parameters and welcome its use during fabrication steps

  2. Beam loss and radiation effects in the SSC lattice elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is designed to be an advanced machine with relatively low beam loss-induced radiation levels. However, a fraction of the beam lost in the lattice due to pp-collisions at the interaction points, beam-gas scattering, bearn-halo scraping, various instabilities and errors will result in the irradiation of conventional and superconducting components of the accelerator and experimental apparatus. The level of the beam loss and its distribution along the machine structure has impact on all of the three crucial radiation effects at the SSC: quenching of the superconducting magnets, survivability of the accelerator and detectors components in the near-beam regions, and influence to the environment. This paper, based on the full-scale Monte Carlo simulation, will explore all major sources of beam loss in the Collider and measures to reduce the irradiation of the accelerator components. Basic parameters of the Super Collider accepted throughout this report are as follows: Proton energy E0 = 20 TeV, injection energy is 2 TeV, number of protons circulating in each of the collider rings is N = 1.3 x 1014, circumference is 87.12 km, the transverse normalized emittance var-epsilon N(σ) = 1 π mm-mrad, for the regular lattice (β = 305 m) the beam R.M.S. sizes are σ = 0.12 mm at 20 TEV and σ = 0.38 mm at the injection energy. The dipole length is 15.815 m with the effective field length of 15.165 m. The magnetic field map for B0 = 6.5999 T has been calculated with the POISSON program by Greg Snitchler. The turn angle of each dipole is α = 1.50027 mrad. The dipole aperture is 50 mm. The two beam pipe diameters are studied 33 and 40 mm. The operating temperature is T0 = 4.35 K

  3. Measuring wage effects of plant size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albæk, Karsten; Arai, Mahmood; Asplund, Rita;

    1998-01-01

    There are large plant size–wage effects in the Nordic countries after taking into account individual and job characteristics as well as systematical sorting of the workers into various plant-sizes. The plant size–wage elasticities we obtain are, in contrast to other dimensions of the wage distrib......–wage elasticity. Our results indicate that using size–class midpoints yields essentially the same results as using exact measures of plant size...

  4. Spot size, depth-of-focus, and diffraction ring intensity formulas for truncated Gaussian beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urey, Hakan

    2004-01-20

    Simple polynomial formulas to calculate the FWHM and full width at 1/e2 intensity diffraction spot size and the depth of focus at a Strehl ratio of 0.8 and 0.5 as a function of a Gaussian beam truncation ratio and a system f-number are presented. Formulas are obtained by use of the numerical integration of a Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral and can be used to calculate the number of resolvable spots, the modulation transfer function, and the defocus tolerance of optical systems that employ laser beams. I also derived analytical formulas for the diffraction ring intensity as a function of the Gaussian beam truncation ratio and the system f-number. Such formulas can be used to estimate the diffraction-limited contrast of display and imaging systems. PMID:14765922

  5. Impact of beam-beam effects on precision luminosity measurements at the ILC

    CERN Document Server

    Rimbault, C; Mönig, K; Schulte, D

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the impact of beam-beam effects on the precision luminosity measurement at the International Linear Collider is investigated quantitatively for the first time. GUINEA-PIG, a beam-beam interaction simulation tool, is adapted to treat the space charge effects affecting the Bhabha events used in this measurement. The biases due to the resulting changes in kinematics are evaluated for different center-of-mass energies and beam parameters.

  6. Emittance reconstruction from measured beam sizes in ATF2 and perspectives for ILC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faus-Golfe, A.; Navarro, J.; Fuster Martinez, N.; Resta Lopez, J.; Giner Navarro, J.

    2016-05-01

    The projected emittance (2D) and the intrinsic emittance (4D) reconstruction method by using the beam size measurements at different locations is analyzed in order to study analytically the conditions of solvability of the systems of equations involved in this process. Some conditions are deduced and discussed, and general guidelines about the locations of the measurement stations have been obtained to avoid unphysical results. The special case of the multi-Optical Transition Radiation system (m-OTR), made of four measurement stations, in the Extraction Line (EXT) of Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) has been simulated in much detail and compared with measurements. Finally a feasibility study of a multi-station system for fast transverse beam size measurement, emittance reconstruction and coupling correction in the Ring to Main Linac (RTML) of International Linear Collider (ILC) Diagnostic sections of the RTML has been discussed in detail.

  7. Wavefront-sensor-induced beam size error: physical mechanism, sensitivity-analysis and correction method

    OpenAIRE

    Koek, W.D.; Zwet, E.J. van

    2015-01-01

    When using a commonly-used quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometer wavefront sensor (QWLSI WFS) for beam size measurements on a high power CO2 laser, artefacts have been observed in the measured irradiance distribution. The grating in the QWLSI WFS not only generates the diffracted first orders that are required for introducing the shear, but also diffracts significantly into higher orders. Consequently, in the few millimeters of free space propagation between the QWLSI WFS grating and it...

  8. Array size scaling of passive coherent beam combination in fiber laser array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuhao Xue; Bing He; Jun Zhou; Jinchong Xue; Zhen Li; Houkang Liu; Qihong Lou

    2012-01-01

    Array size scaling of passive coherent beam combination is explored theoretically.The Strehl ratio variation with wavelength is simulated in 4-,9-,16-,and 25-channel fiber arrays.The average Strehl ratio and phase error are calculated.The Strehl ratio is found to be near 100% for arrays with less than 5 fibers,but decreases significantly for larger arrays.These results are in good agreement with the recent experimental results.

  9. Assessment of the effect of beam modifiers on skin dose for external beam radiotherapy using Gafchromic EBT2 film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of different beam modifiers on the skin dose for 60Co and 15 MV photon beams. Skin doses were measured for solid water (PMMA) phantoms with Gafchromic films. It was observed that, skin dose for all the beam modifiers as well as that for the open beams increases as field size increases. At SSD of 80 cm, skin doses for 10 x 10 cm2 and 25 x 25 cm2 were, 36.9%, and 61.8% respectively for the 60Co unit. It was observed that, for a particular field size, skin dose for the 15 MV photon beam was much lower than that for 60Co beam, which gives an advantage of using the 15 MV photon beam over 60Co beam. As SSD increases skin dose reduces for both 60Co and 15 MV photon beams. For wedged fields (with 600 motorized wedge, it was found that there were very little effects on skin dose for smaller fields but significant effects for the larger fields (≥15 x 15 cm2) as compared with open beams for the 15 MV photon beam. Skin dose for bolus was higher compared with that of open beam and were 57.4% and 73.8% for 10 x 10 cm2 and 20 x 20 cm2 at 100 cm SSD respectively. For 60Co beam, the physical wedges and the 1.5 cm thickness compensator greatly reduced skin doses as compared to all the other beam modifiers. The skin doses for 10 × 10 cm2 field were 21.3%, 19.4%, 18.7%, 19.1% and 23.6% for 150, 300, 450, 600 and the 1.5 cm thickness compensators respectively, at SSD of 80 cm). These compared with 35.4% and 33.7% for the tray and open fields at the same SSD and field size as those for the wedges and compensator above. Skin doses reduced as the compensator thickness was increased. (au)

  10. The lensing effect of trapped particles in a dual-beam optical trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosser, Steffen; Fritsch, Anatol W; Kiessling, Tobias R; Stange, Roland; Käs, Josef A

    2015-02-23

    In dual-beam optical traps, two counterpropagating, divergent laser beams emitted from opposing laser fibers trap and manipulate dielectric particles. We investigate the lensing effect that trapped particles have on the beams. Our approach makes use of the intrinsic coupling of a beam to the opposing fiber after having passed the trapped particle. We present measurements of this coupling signal for PDMS particles, as well as a model for its dependence on size and refractive index of the trapped particle. As a more complex sample, the coupling of inhomogeneous biological cells is measured and discussed. We show that the lensing effect is well captured by the simple ray optics approximation. The measurements reveal intricate details, such as the thermal lens effect of the beam propagation in a dual-beam trap. For a particle of known size, the model further allows to infer its refractive index simply from the coupling signal. PMID:25836555

  11. Effective beam method for element concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method to evaluate chemical element concentrations in samples by generating an effective polychromatic beam using as initial input real monochromatic beam data is presented. There is a great diversity of research being conducted at synchrotron facilities around the world and a diverse set of beamlines to accommodate this research. Time is a precious commodity at synchrotron facilities; therefore, methods that can maximize the time spent collecting data are of value. At the same time the incident radiation spectrum, necessary for some research, may not be known on a given beamline. A preliminary presentation of a method applicable to X-ray fluorescence spectrocopic analyses that overcomes the lack of information about the incident beam spectrum that addresses both of these concerns is given here. The method is equally applicable for other X-ray sources so long as local conditions are considered. It relies on replacing the polychromatic spectrum in a standard fundamental parameters analysis with a set of effective monochromatic photon beams. A beam is associated with each element and can be described by an analytical function allowing extension to elements not included in the necessary calibration measurement(s)

  12. Effective beam method for element concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolhurst, Thomas; Barbi, Mauricio, E-mail: barbi@uregina.ca [University of Regina (Canada); Tokaryk, Tim [Royal Saskatchewan Museum (Canada)

    2015-01-29

    A method to evaluate chemical element concentrations in samples by generating an effective polychromatic beam using as initial input real monochromatic beam data is presented. There is a great diversity of research being conducted at synchrotron facilities around the world and a diverse set of beamlines to accommodate this research. Time is a precious commodity at synchrotron facilities; therefore, methods that can maximize the time spent collecting data are of value. At the same time the incident radiation spectrum, necessary for some research, may not be known on a given beamline. A preliminary presentation of a method applicable to X-ray fluorescence spectrocopic analyses that overcomes the lack of information about the incident beam spectrum that addresses both of these concerns is given here. The method is equally applicable for other X-ray sources so long as local conditions are considered. It relies on replacing the polychromatic spectrum in a standard fundamental parameters analysis with a set of effective monochromatic photon beams. A beam is associated with each element and can be described by an analytical function allowing extension to elements not included in the necessary calibration measurement(s)

  13. Experimental Studies of Compensation of Beam-Beam Effects with Tevatron Electron Lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab; Alexahin, Yu.; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.; Reva, V.; Solyak, N.; Wildman, D.; Zhang, X.-L.; Zimmermann, F.; /Fermilab /Los Alamos /Novosibirsk, IYF /CERN

    2008-02-01

    Applying the space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam can lead to a significant improvement of the beam-particle lifetime limit arising from the beam-beam interaction in a high-energy collider [1]. In this article we present the results of various beam experiments with 'electron lenses', novel instruments developed for the beam-beam compensation at the Tevatron, which collides 980-GeV proton and antiproton beams. We study the dependencies of the particle betatron tunes on the electron beam current, energy and position; we explore the effects of electron-beam imperfections and noises; and we quantify the improvements of the high-energy beam intensity and the collider luminosity lifetime obtained by the action of the Tevatron Electron Lenses.

  14. Finite size effects in isobaric ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Souza, S R

    2011-01-01

    The properties of isobaric ratios, between nuclei produced in the same reaction, are investigated using the canonical and grand-canonical statistical ensembles. Although the grand-canonical for- mulae furnish a means to correlate the ratios with the liquid drop parameters, finite size effects make it difficult to obtain their actual values from fitting nuclear collision data.

  15. Size Effect in Tension Perpendicular to Grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas; Clorius, Christian Odin; Hoffmeyer, Preben;

    2004-01-01

    The strength of wood is reduced when the stressed volume is increased. The phenomenon is termed size effect and is often explained as being stochastic in the sense that the probability of weak locations occurring in the wood increases with increased volume. This paper presents a hypothesis where ...

  16. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  17. SU-E-P-39: Characterization of Dose Impact On Different Beam Fields Size Attenuation for Elekta IGRT Couch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Quantification of the dosimetric impact of the Elekta IGRT treatment couch in different beam field sizes. Established the relationship of relative dose versus beam angle at different beam field sizes. Methods: Measurements of couch attenuation were performed at gantry angles from 180° to 120°, using a 0.125cc semiflex ionization chamber, isocentrically placed in the center of a homogeneous cylindric sliced RW3 phantom for 6 photon beams. Measurements were performed at six different field sizes (3×3, 5×5, 7×7,10×10, 12×12 and 15×15 cm2). The phantom were positioned at the center of the couche,100 MU were delivered at every gantry angle. The dose difference to the ion chamber was determined. Results: For oblique fields with 6 MV photons at the same gantry angle the attenuation coefficient value from the lagest to the smallest the order is field size 7 cm2,5 cm2,10 cm2,12 cm2,15 cm2 and 3 cm2. The biggest couch attenuation by up to 4.15% at the gantry angle of 140°for the field size of 7 cm2, while for the field size of 3 cm2 the couch attenuated value only 3.5%. The other field size couch attenuation values are between the couch attenuated value of field size of 7 cm2 and 3 cm2 Conclusion: The recommended treatment couch attenuation measured beam field size is 10×10 or 12×12 cm2. When measured using the beam field size 3×3 cm2 the tested value will be lower, while measuerd using the beam field size 7×7 cm2 the tested value will be higer than the recommended beam field size. This should be noted when modeling the treatment couch in the treatment planning system

  18. Investigations of initiation spot size effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, Steven A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Akinci, Adrian A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leichty, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schaffer, Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murphy, Michael J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Munger, Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thomas, Keith A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    As explosive components become smaller, a greater understanding of the effect of initiation spot size on detonation becomes increasingly critical. A series of tests of the effect of initiation spot size will be described. A series of DOI (direct optical initiation) detonators with initiation spots sizes from {approx}50 um to 1000um have been tested to determine laser parameters for threshold firing of low density PETN pressings. Results will be compared with theoretical predictions. Outputs of the initiation source (DOI ablation) have been characterized by a suite of diagnostics including PDV and schlieren imaging. Outputs of complete detonators have been characterized using PDV, streak, and/or schlieren imaging. At present, we have not found the expected change in the threshold energy to spot size relationship for DOI type detonators found in similar earlier for projectiles, slappers and EBWs. New detonators designs (Type C) are currently being tested that will allow the determination of the threshold for spot sizes from 250 um to 105um, where we hope to see change in the threshold vs. spot size relationship. Also, one test of an extremely small diameter spot size (50um) has resulted in preliminary NoGo only results even at energy densities as much as 8 times the energy density of the threshold results presented here. This gives preliminary evidence that 50um spot may be beyond the critical initiation diameter. The constant threshold energy to spot size relationship in the data to date does however still give some insight into the initiation mechanism of DOI detonators. If the DOI initiation mechanism were a 1D mechanism similar to a slapper or a flyer impact, the expected inflection point in the graph would have been between 300um and 500um diameter spot size, within the range of the data presented here. The lack of that inflection point indicates that the DOI initiation mechanism is more likely a 2D mechanism similar to a sphere or rod projectile. We expect to

  19. The effect of particle size on fracture properties and size effect of concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlangen, E.; Lim, H.S.; Weerheijm, J.

    2005-01-01

    In the study the effect of scaling the material structure on the fracture behaviour of concrete is investigated. Next to this the size effect of concrete fracture strength and fracture energy is studied. The fracture mechanism of concrete made with different size aggregates are tested numerically. A

  20. Biostimulative Effect Of Laser Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mester, E.

    1981-05-01

    We report on experiences gained in healing clinical cases treated with He-Ne and Argon-laser grouped according to etiology. In order to elucidate the action mechanism of the bioregulatory process, the following experiments were carried out: 1. Serial electron-microscopic and radioactivity studies of samples obtained from human ulcers; 2. Chemical transfer of stimulating substrate on human leukocyte population; 3. Enzyme histochemical studies in experiments on rats; 4. Study of vascularization with the "ear chamber" technique carried out on rabbit's ear; 5. The increase of tensile strength in rats; 6. Biochemical demonstration of the RNA, DNA, albumin synthesis on human fibrocyte-cultures; 7.a, 7.b, Immunological studies; 8. Prostaglandin producing effect. The discovery of laser opened up new prospects in the field of the biological research and medical use.

  1. Minimal interference beam size/profile measurement techniques applicable to the Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The imaging of synchrotron radiation (SR) has been suggested as a technique for providing a continuous, non-interfering monitor of the beam profile in the Collider rings at the Superconducting Super Collider. A closer examination has raised questions concerning the applicability of SR imaging in this case because of the diffraction broadening of the image, the requirements for axial space and location in the lattice, and the complexity of the system. We have surveyed the known, alternative, minimal interference techniques for measuring beam size and have evaluated them for possible Collider usage. We conclude that of the approaches that appear feasible, all require at least some development for our usage and that the development of an electron beam probe offers the best promise. We recommend that flying wires be used for cross-checking and calibrating the electron beam probe diagnostic and for luminosity measurements when the highest accuracy is required, but flying wires should not be used as the primary diagnostic because of their limited lifetime

  2. Minimal interference beam size/profile measurement techniques applicable to the Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nexsen, W.; Dutt, S.; Kauffmann, S.; Lebedev, V.; Maschke, A.; Mokhov, N.; Richardson, R.; Tsyganov, E.; Zinchenko, A.

    1993-05-01

    The imaging of synchrotron radiation (SR) has been suggested as a technique for providing a continuous, non-interfering monitor of the beam profile in the Collider rings at the Superconducting Super Collider. A closer examination has raised questions concerning the applicability of SR imaging in this case because of the diffraction broadening of the image, the requirements for axial space and location in the lattice, and the complexity of the system. We have surveyed the known, alternative, minimal interference techniques for measuring beam size and have evaluated them for possible Collider usage. We conclude that of the approaches that appear feasible, all require at least some development for our usage and that the development of an electron beam probe offers the best promise. We recommend that flying wires be used for cross-checking and calibrating the electron beam probe diagnostic and for luminosity measurements when the highest accuracy is required, but flying wires should not be used as the primary diagnostic because of their limited lifetime.

  3. Novel probe for determining the size and position of a relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to determine the size and position of a relativistic electron beam inside the wiggler magnetic field of a Free Electron Laser (FEL), we have developed a new probe which intercepts the electron beam on a high Z target and monitors the resulting bremsstrahlung radiation. The probe is designed to move along the entire three meters of the wiggler. This FEL is designed to operate in the microwave region (2 to 8 mm) and the interaction region is an oversized waveguide with a cross section 3 cm x 9.8 cm. The axial probe moves inside this waveguide. The probe stops the electron beam on a Tantalum target and the resulting x-rays are scattered in the forward direction. A scintillator behind the beam stop reacts to the x-rays and emits visible light in the region where the x-rays strike. An array of fiber optics behind the scintillator transmits the visible light to a Reticon camera system which images the visible pattern from the scintillator. Processing the optical image is done by digitizing and storing the image and/or recording the image on video tape. Resolution and performance of this probe will be discussed

  4. The effect of object shape and laser beam shape on lidar system resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hongchang; Wang, Jingyi; Ke, Jun

    2016-06-01

    In a LIDAR system, a pulsed laser beam is propagated to a scene, and then reflected back by objects. Ideally if the beam diameter and the pulse width are close to zero, then the reflected beam in time domain is similar to a delta function, which can accurately locate an object's position. However, in a practical system, the beam has finite size. Therefore, even if the pulse width is small, an object shape will make the reflected beam stretched along the time axis, then affect system resolution. In this paper, we assume the beam with Gaussian shape. The beam can be formulated as a delta function convolved with a shape function, such as a rectangular function, in time domain. Then the reflected beam can be defined as a system response function convolved with the shape function. We use symmetric objects to analyze the reflected beam. Corn, sphere, and cylinder objects are used to find a LIDAR system's response function. The case for large beam size is discussed. We assume the beam shape is similar to a plane wave. With this assumption, we get the simplified LIDAR system response functions for the three kinds of objects. Then we use tiny spheres to emulate an arbitrary object, and study its effect to the returned beam.

  5. Automatic calibration method of voxel size for cone-beam 3D-CT scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a cone-beam three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scanning system, voxel size is an important indicator to guarantee the accuracy of data analysis and feature measurement based on 3D-CT images. Meanwhile, the voxel size changes with the movement of the rotary stage along X-ray direction. In order to realize the automatic calibration of the voxel size, a new and easily-implemented method is proposed. According to this method, several projections of a spherical phantom are captured at different imaging positions and the corresponding voxel size values are calculated by non-linear least-square fitting. Through these interpolation values, a linear equation is obtained that reflects the relationship between the voxel size and the rotary stage translation distance from its nominal zero position. Finally, the linear equation is imported into the calibration module of the 3D-CT scanning system. When the rotary stage is moving along X-ray direction, the accurate value of the voxel size is dynamically exported. The experimental results prove that this method meets the requirements of the actual CT scanning system, and has virtues of easy implementation and high accuracy. (authors)

  6. Automatic Calibration Method of Voxel Size for Cone-beam 3D-CT Scanning System

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Min; Liu, Yipeng; Men, Fanyong; Li, Xingdong; Liu, Wenli; Wei, Dongbo

    2013-01-01

    For cone-beam three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scanning system, voxel size is an important indicator to guarantee the accuracy of data analysis and feature measurement based on 3D-CT images. Meanwhile, the voxel size changes with the movement of the rotary table along X-ray direction. In order to realize the automatic calibration of the voxel size, a new easily-implemented method is proposed. According to this method, several projections of a spherical phantom are captured at different imaging positions and the corresponding voxel size values are calculated by non-linear least square fitting. Through these interpolation values, a linear equation is obtained, which reflects the relationship between the rotary table displacement distance from its nominal zero position and the voxel size. Finally, the linear equation is imported into the calibration module of the 3D-CT scanning system, and when the rotary table is moving along X-ray direction, the accurate value of the voxel size is dynamically expo...

  7. In-beam evaluation of a medium-size Resistive-Plate WELL gaseous particle detector

    CERN Document Server

    Moleri, L; Arazi, L; Azevedo, C D R; Breskin, A; Coimbra, A E C; Oliveri, E; Pereira, F A; Renous, D Shaked; Schaarschmidt, J; Santos, J M F dos; Veloso, J F C A; Bressler, S

    2016-01-01

    In-beam evaluation of a fully-equipped medium-size 30$\\times$30 cm$^2$ Resistive Plate WELL (RPWELL) detector is presented. It consists here of a single element gas-avalanche multiplier with Semitron ESD225 resistive plate, 1 cm$^2$ readout pads and APV25/SRS electronics. Similarly to previous results with small detector prototypes, stable operation at high detection efficiency (>98%) and low average pad multiplicity (~1.2) were recorded with 150 GeV muon and high-rate pion beams, in Ne/(5%CH$_4$), Ar/(5%CH$_4$) and Ar/(7%CO$_2$). This is an important step towards the realization of robust detectors suitable for applications requiring large-area coverage; among them Digital Hadron Calorimetry.

  8. The effects of magnetic fringe fields on beam dynamics in a beam transport line of a terahertz FEL source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Han [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China); Xiong, Yongqian, E-mail: yqxiong@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China); Pei, Yuanji [National Synchrotron Radiation laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029, Anhui (China)

    2014-11-11

    The transport line used in a terahertz FEL device has to transport electron beam through the entire system efficiently and meet the requirements of the beam parameters at the undulator entrance. Due to space limitations, the size of the magnets (five quadrupoles and two bending magnets) employed in the transport line was limited, and some devices were densely packed. In this paper, analyses of the effect of fringe fields and magnetic interference of magnets are presented. 3D models of these magnets are built and their linear optical properties are compared with those obtained by hard edge models. The results indicated that the effects of these factors are significant and they would cause a mismatch of the beam at the exit of the transport line under the preliminary lattice design. To solve this problem, the beam was re-matched using the particle swarm optimization algorithm.

  9. Beam profile effects on NPB [neutral particle beam] performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of neutral particle beam brightness for various neutral beam profiles indicates that the widely used assumption of a Gaussian profile may be misleading for collisional neutralizers. An analysis of available experimental evidence shows that lower peaks and higher tails, compared to a Gaussian beam profile, are observed out of collisional neutralizers, which implies that peak brightness is over estimated, and for a given NPB platform-to-target range, the beam current (power), dwell time or some combination of such engagement parameters would have to be altered to maintain a fixed dose on target. Based on the present analysis, this factor is nominally about 2.4 but may actually be as low as 1.8 or as high as 8. This is an important consideration in estimating NPB constellation performance in SDI engagement contexts. 2 refs., 6 figs

  10. The influence of detector size relative to field size in small-field photon-beam dosimetry using synthetic diamond crystals as sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The choice of a detector for small-field dosimetry remains a challenge due to the size/volume effect of detectors in small fields. Aimed at selecting a suitable crystal type and detector size for small-field dosimetry, this study investigates the relationship between detector and field size by analysing output factors (OFs) measured with a Diode E (reference detector), a Farmer chamber and synthetic diamond detectors of various types and sizes in the dosimetry of a 6 MV photon beam with small fields between 0.3×0.3 cm2 and 10×10 cm2. The examined diamond sensors included two HPHT samples (HP1 and HP2) and six polycrystalline CVD specimens of optical grade (OG) and detector grade (DG) qualities with sizes between 0.3 and 1.0 cm. Each diamond was encapsulated in a tissue-equivalent probe housing which can hold crystals of various dimensions up to 1.0×1.0×0.1 cm3 and has different exposure geometries (‘edge-on’ and ‘flat-on’) for impinging radiation. The HPHT samples were found to show an overall better performance compared to the CVD crystals with the ‘edge-on’ orientation being a preferred geometry for OF measurement especially for very small fields. For instance, down to a 0.4×0.4 cm2 field a maximum deviation of 1.9% was observed between the OFs measured with Diode E and HP2 in the ‘edge-on’ orientation compared to a 4.6% deviation in the ‘flat-on’ geometry. It was observed that for fields below 4×4 cm2, the dose deviation between the OFs measured with the detectors and Diode E increase with increasing detector size. It was estimated from an established relationship between the dose deviation and the ratio of detector size to field size for the detectors that the dose deviation probably due to the volume averaging effect would be >3% when the detector size is >3/4 of the field size. A sensitivity value of 223 nC Gy−1 mm−3 was determined in a 0.5×0.5 cm2 field with HP2 compared to a value of 159.2 nC Gy−1 mm−3 obtained with the

  11. Size dependent bandgap of molecular beam epitaxy grown InN quantum dots measured by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    InN quantum dots (QDs) were grown on Si (111) by epitaxial Stranski-Krastanow growth mode using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Single-crystalline wurtzite structure of InN QDs was verified by the x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Scanning tunneling microscopy has been used to probe the structural aspects of QDs. A surface bandgap of InN QDs was estimated from scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) I-V curves and found that it is strongly dependent on the size of QDs. The observed size-dependent STS bandgap energy shifts with diameter and height were theoretical explained based on an effective mass approximation with finite-depth square-well potential model.

  12. The size effect in metal cutting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Milton C Shaw

    2003-10-01

    When metal is removed by machining there is substantial increase in the specific energy required with decrease in chip size. It is generally believed this is due to the fact that all metals contain defects (grain boundaries, missing and impurity atoms, etc.), and when the size of the material removed decreases, the probability of encountering a stress-reducing defect decreases. Since the shear stress and strain in metal cutting is unusually high, discontinuous microcracks usually form on the metal-cutting shear plane. If the material being cut is very brittle, or the compressive stress on the shear plane is relatively low, microcracks grow into gross cracks giving rise to discontinuous chip formation. When discontinuous microcracks form on the shear plane they weld and reform as strain proceeds, thus joining the transport of dislocations in accounting for the total slip of the shear plane. In the presence of a contaminant, such as CCl4 vapour at a low cutting speed, the rewelding of microcracks decreases, resulting in decrease in the cutting force required for chip formation. A number of special experiments are described in the paper that support the transport of microcracks across the shear plane, and the important role compressive stress plays on the shear plane. Relatively recently, an alternative explanation for the size effect in cutting was provided based on the premise that shear stress increases with increase in strain rate. When an attempt is made to apply this to metal cutting by Dinesh et al (2001) it is assumed in the analysis that the von Mises criterion pertains to the shear plane. This is inconsistent with the experimental findings of Merchant. Until this difficulty is taken care of, together with the promised experimental verification of the strain rate approach, it should be assumed that the strain rate effect may be responsible for some notion of the size effect in metal cutting. However, based on the many experiments discussed here, it is

  13. Poly(methyl methacrylate) Composites with Size-selected Silver Nanoparticles Fabricated Using Cluster Beam Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanif, Muhammad; Juluri, Raghavendra R.; Chirumamilla, Manohar;

    2016-01-01

    based on cluster beam technique allowing the formation of monocrystalline size-selected silver nanoparticles with a +/- 5-7% precision of diameter and controllable embedment into poly (methyl methacrylate). It is shown that the soft-landed silver clusters preserve almost spherical shape with a slight......An embedment of metal nanoparticles of well-defined sizes in thin polymer films is of significant interest for a number of practical applications, in particular, for preparing materials with tunable plasmonic properties. In this article, we present a fabrication route for metal-polymer composites...... tendency to flattening upon impact. By controlling the polymer hardness (from viscous to soft state) prior the cluster deposition and annealing conditions after the deposition the degree of immersion of the nanoparticles into polymer can be tuned, thus, making it possible to create composites with either...

  14. Plasticity size effects in voided crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussein, M.I.; Borg, Ulrik; Niordson, Christian Frithiof;

    2008-01-01

    The shear and equi-biaxial straining responses of periodic voided single crystals are analysed using discrete dislocation plasticity and a continuum strain gradient crystal plasticity theory. In the discrete dislocation formulation, the dislocations are all of edge character and are modelled...... and strain gradient plasticity formulations predict a negligible size effect under shear loading. By contrast, under equi-biaxial loading both plasticity formulations predict a strong size dependence with the flow strength approximately scaling inversely with the void spacing. Excellent agreement is obtained...... between predictions of the two formulations for all crystal types and void volume fractions considered when the material length scale in the non-local plasticity model is chosen to be 0.325 mu m (about 10 times the slip plane spacing in the discrete dislocation models)....

  15. Plasticity size effects in voided crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussein, M. I.; Borg, Ulrik; Niordson, Christian Frithiof;

    The shear and equi-biaxial straining responses of periodic voided single crystals are analysed using discrete dislocation plasticity and a continuum strain gradient crystal plasticity theory. In the discrete dislocation formulation the dislocations are all of edge character and are modelled as line...... gradient plasticity formulations predict a negligible size effect under shear loading. By contrast, under equi-biaxial loading both plasticity formulations predict a strong size dependence with the flow strength scaling approximately inversely with the void-spacing. Excellent agreement is obtained between...... predictions of the two formulations for all crystal types and void volume fractions considered when the material length scale in the non-local plasticity model chosen to be $0.325\\mu m$ (around ten times the slip plane spacing in the discrete dislocation models)....

  16. The Relationship between Sample Sizes and Effect Sizes in Systematic Reviews in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Robert; Smith, Dewi

    2009-01-01

    Research in fields other than education has found that studies with small sample sizes tend to have larger effect sizes than those with large samples. This article examines the relationship between sample size and effect size in education. It analyzes data from 185 studies of elementary and secondary mathematics programs that met the standards of…

  17. Dissipative effects in the beam-beam interaction of intersecting storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This proposal seeks continuing support for an ongoing research investigation of various dynamical instabilities which arise in high energy intersecting storage rings due to the beam-beam interaction. Although the dissipative effect of radiation in beam-beam machines is anticipated to be a dominant feature affecting stability in the dynamics of colliding beams of heavy particles, almost nothing is known regarding the stability problem in many-dimensional dissipative systems. The work proposed here will extend the earlier computations on weak instabilities in many-dimensional beam-beam models to include the effect of dissipation. The object of this research is to obtain conditions for global beam stability over long time scales as a function of the machine parameters

  18. Relativistic Beaming Effect in Fermi Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. H. Fan; D. Bastieri; J. H. Yang; Y. Liu; D. X. Wu; S. H. Li

    2014-09-01

    The most identified sources observed by Fermi/LAT are blazars, based on which we can investigate the emission mechanisms and beaming effect in the -ray bands for blazars. Here, we used the compiled around 450 Fermi blazars with the available X-ray observations to estimate their Doppler factors and compared them with the integral -ray luminosity in the range of 1–100 GeV. It is interesting that the integral -ray luminosity is closely correlated with the estimated Doppler factor, log = (2.95 ± 0.09) log + 43.59 ± 0.08 for the whole sample. When the dependence of the correlation between them and the X-ray luminosity is removed, the correlation is still strong, which suggests that the -ray emissions are strongly beamed.

  19. Effects on focused ion beam irradiation on MOS transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of irradiation from a focused ion beam (FIB) system on MOS transistors are reported systematically for the first time. Three MOS transistor technologies, with 0.5, 1, and 3 μm minimum feature sizes and with gate oxide thicknesses ranging from 11 to 50 nm, were analyzed. Significant shifts in transistor parameters (such as threshold voltage, transconductance, and mobility) were observed following irradiation with a 30 keV Ga+ focused ion beam with ion doses varying by over 5 orders of magnitude. The apparent damage mechanism (which involved the creation of interface traps, oxide trapped charge, or both) and extent of damage were different for each of the three technologies investigated

  20. Effects on focused ion beam irradiation on MOS transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, A.N.; Peterson, K.A.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Soden, J.M.

    1997-04-01

    The effects of irradiation from a focused ion beam (FIB) system on MOS transistors are reported systematically for the first time. Three MOS transistor technologies, with 0.5, 1, and 3 {mu}m minimum feature sizes and with gate oxide thicknesses ranging from 11 to 50 nm, were analyzed. Significant shifts in transistor parameters (such as threshold voltage, transconductance, and mobility) were observed following irradiation with a 30 keV Ga{sup +} focused ion beam with ion doses varying by over 5 orders of magnitude. The apparent damage mechanism (which involved the creation of interface traps, oxide trapped charge, or both) and extent of damage were different for each of the three technologies investigated.

  1. Size effects in lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu-Rong, Yao; Ya-Xia, Yin; Yu-Gao, Guo

    2016-01-01

    Size-related properties of novel lithium battery materials, arising from kinetics, thermodynamics, and newly discovered lithium storage mechanisms, are reviewed. Complementary experimental and computational investigations of the use of the size effects to modify electrodes and electrolytes for lithium ion batteries are enumerated and discussed together. Size differences in the materials in lithium ion batteries lead to a variety of exciting phenomena. Smaller-particle materials with highly connective interfaces and reduced diffusion paths exhibit higher rate performance than the corresponding bulk materials. The thermodynamics is also changed by the higher surface energy of smaller particles, affecting, for example, secondary surface reactions, lattice parameter, voltage, and the phase transformation mechanism. Newly discovered lithium storage mechanisms that result in superior storage capacity are also briefly highlighted. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51225204 and 21303222), the Shandong Taishan Scholarship, China, the Ministry of Science and Technology, China (Grant No. 2012CB932900), and the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDA09010000).

  2. Size-effects in porous metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2007-01-01

    The intrinsic size-effect for porous metals is investigated. The analyses are carried out numerically using a finite strain generalization of a higher order strain gradient plasticity model. Results for plane strain growth of cylindrical voids are presented in terms of response curves and curves of...... material. For porous materials with small void volume fractions under highly triaxial tension, void growth is analysed through cavitation instabilities using a finite element Rayleigh–Ritz procedure. Cavitation instabilities are found to be delayed for small voids, so that higher stress levels are needed...

  3. Finite sample size effects in transformation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of finite sample size on the kinetic law of phase transformations is considered. The case where the second phase develops by a nucleation and growth mechanism is treated under the assumption of isothermal conditions and constant and uniform nucleation rate. It is demonstrated that for spherical particle growth, a thin sample transformation formula given previously is an approximate version of a more general transformation law. The thin sample approximation is shown to be reliable when a certain dimensionless thickness is small. The latter quantity, rather than the actual sample thickness, determines when the usual law of transformation kinetics valid for bulk (large dimension) samples must be modified.

  4. Scrape-off layer-induced beam density fluctuations and their effect on beam emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, D.; Marandet, Y.; Tamain, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2015-07-01

    A statistical model is presented to calculate the magnitude of beam density fluctuations generated by a turbulent scrape-off layer (SOL). It is shown that the SOL can induce neutral beam density fluctuations of a similar magnitude to the plasma density fluctuations in the core, potentially corrupting beam emission spectroscopy measurements. The degree of corruption is quantified by combining simulations of beam and plasma density fluctuations inside a simulated measurement window. A change in pitch angle from the separatrix to the measurement window is found to reduce the effect of beam fluctuations, whose largest effect is to significantly reduce the measured correlation time.

  5. Effective dose range for dental cone beam computed tomography scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To estimate the absorbed organ dose and effective dose for a wide range of cone beam computed tomography scanners, using different exposure protocols and geometries. Materials and methods: Two Alderson Radiation Therapy anthropomorphic phantoms were loaded with LiF detectors (TLD-100 and TLD-100H) which were evenly distributed throughout the head and neck, covering all radiosensitive organs. Measurements were performed on 14 CBCT devices: 3D Accuitomo 170, Galileos Comfort, i-CAT Next Generation, Iluma Elite, Kodak 9000 3D, Kodak 9500, NewTom VG, NewTom VGi, Pax-Uni3D, Picasso Trio, ProMax 3D, Scanora 3D, SkyView, Veraviewepocs 3D. Effective dose was calculated using the ICRP 103 (2007) tissue weighting factors. Results: Effective dose ranged between 19 and 368 μSv. The largest contributions to the effective dose were from the remainder tissues (37%), salivary glands (24%), and thyroid gland (21%). For all organs, there was a wide range of measured values apparent, due to differences in exposure factors, diameter and height of the primary beam, and positioning of the beam relative to the radiosensitive organs. Conclusions: The effective dose for different CBCT devices showed a 20-fold range. The results show that a distinction is needed between small-, medium-, and large-field CBCT scanners and protocols, as they are applied to different indication groups, the dose received being strongly related to field size. Furthermore, the dose should always be considered relative to technical and diagnostic image quality, seeing that image quality requirements also differ for patient groups. The results from the current study indicate that the optimisation of dose should be performed by an appropriate selection of exposure parameters and field size, depending on the diagnostic requirements.

  6. Effective beam method for element concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolhurst, Thomas; Barbi, Mauricio; Tokaryk, Tim

    2015-03-01

    There is a great diversity of research being conducted at synchrotron facilities around the world and a diverse set of beamlines to accommodate this research. Time is a precious commodity at synchrotron facilities; therefore, methods that can maximize the time spent collecting data are of value. At the same time the incident radiation spectrum, necessary for some research, may not be known on a given beamline. A preliminary presentation of a method applicable to X-ray fluorescence spectrocopic analyses that overcomes the lack of information about the incident beam spectrum that addresses both of these concerns is given here. The method is equally applicable for other X-ray sources so long as local conditions are considered. It relies on replacing the polychromatic spectrum in a standard fundamental parameters analysis with a set of effective monochromatic photon beams. A beam is associated with each element and can be described by an analytical function allowing extension to elements not included in the necessary calibration measurement(s). PMID:25723941

  7. The compressive buckling and size effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yuzhou, E-mail: yuzhousun@126.com; Zhu, Yanzhi; Li, Dongxia [Department of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Zhongyuan University of Technology, Zhengzhou (China)

    2015-03-10

    A higher-order Bernoulli-Euler beam model is developed to investigate the compressive buckling and size effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes by using a higher-order continuum relationship that has been previously proposed by the present authors. The second-order deformation gradients with respect to the axial direction are also considered, and the beam parameters are obtained by calculating the constitutive response around the circumference. The critical compressive force is analytically provided, and the size effect is studied by estimating the contribution of the higher-order terms.

  8. The effect of beam intensity on the estimation bias of beam position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the signals of the beam position monitor (BPM), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is directly related to the beam intensity. Low beam intensity results in poor SNR. The random noise has a modulation effect on both the amplitude and phase of the BPM signals. Therefore, the beam position measurement has a certain random error. In the currently used BPM, time-averaging and waveform clipping are used to improve the measurement. The nonlinear signal processing results in a biased estimate of beam position. A statistical analysis was made to examine the effect of the SNR, which is determined by the beam intensity, on the estimation bias. The results of the analysis suggest that the estimation bias has a dependence not only on the beam position but also on beam intensity. Specifically, the dependence gets strong as the beam intensity decreases. This property has set a lower limit of the beam intensity range which the BPM's can handle. When the beam intensity is below that limit the estimation bias starts to vary dramatically, resulting in the BPMs failure. According to the analysis, the lowest beam intensity is that at which the SNR of the generated BPM signal is about 15 dB. The limit for NSEP BPM, for instance, is about 6Ell. The analysis may provide the BPM designers with some idea about the potential of the current BPM'S

  9. Effects of electron beam irradiation on tin dioxide gas sensors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zheng Jiao; Xiaojuan Wan; Bing Zhao; Huijiao Guo; Tiebing Liu; Minghong Wu

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam irradiation on the gas sensing performance of tin dioxide thin films toward H2 are studied. The tin dioxide thin films were prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The results show that the sensitivity increased after electron beam irradiation. The electron beam irradiation effects on tin dioxide thin films were simulated and the mechanism was discussed.

  10. Influence of the molecular structure on indentation size effect in polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Size dependent deformation of polymers has been observed by various researchers in various experimental settings including micro beam bending, foams and indentation testing. Here in this article the indentation size effect in polymers is examined which manifests itself in increased hardness at decreasing indentation depths. Based on previously suggested rationale of size dependent deformation and depth dependent hardness model the depth dependent hardness of various polymers are analyzed. It is found that polymers containing aromatic rings in their molecular structure exhibit depth dependent hardness above the micron length scale. For polymers not containing aromatic rings polymers the indentation size effect starts at smaller indentation depths if they are present at all.

  11. Report on single beam stability - coherent effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Group 1A was concerned with single beam stability, coherent effects. Theory is available. Most of the material for this work was drawn from F.J. Sacherer theory which has been left in reasonably good shape in the sense that given any coupling impedance, its effect on the beam can be estimated. The EBI computer program was extensively used in this respect. We still lack thorough knowledge of the SPS coupling impedance. Accordingly our results rest on a model. This model should be too unrealistic since it originates from various data of the SPS and other machines. Nevertheless any complementary information about the SPS impedance would be welcome. Broad-band impedance and parasitic effects on transverse and longitudinal motions will be reviewed. We shall mainly focus on the 270 GeV case with six equidistant bunches and 1011 particles per bunch. For other schemes results can be obtained in a similar fashion. Some relevant figures will be given for the situation at injection. (orig.)

  12. Effective plasmonic mode-size converter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Ryeong; Park, Jong-Moon; Kim, Min-su; Ju, Jung Jin; Son, Jung-Han; Lee, Myung-Hyun

    2011-10-24

    Plasmonic mode-size converters (PMSCs) for long-range surface plasmon polaritons (LR-SPPs) at the wavelength of 1.55 μm are presented. The PMSC is composed of an insulator-metal-insulator waveguide (IMI-W), a laterally tapered insulator-metal-insulator-metal-insulator waveguide (LT-IMIMI-W), and an IMIMI-W in series. The mode-intensity sizes of the LR-SPPs for the IMI-W and the IMIMI-W were not only calculated using a finite element method but were also experimentally measured. The propagation losses of the IMI-W and the IMIMI-W as well as the coupling losses between them were analyzed by the cut-back method to investigate the effect of LT-IMIMI-Ws. By using the PMSC with a ~27 ° angled LT-IMIMI-W, the coupling loss between a polarization-maintaining fiber and a 3 μm-wide IMIMI-W was reduced by ~3.4 dB. Moreover, the resulting mode-intensity in the output of the PMSC was squeezed to ~35% of the mode-intensity in the input IMI-W. The PMSC may be potentially useful for bridging micro- to nano-plasmonic integrated circuits. PMID:22109009

  13. Internal Transport Barrier in Edge Plasma of Small Size Divertor Tokamak Using Neutral Beam Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekheit, A. H.

    2013-08-01

    We model the internal transport barrier "ITB" in edge plasma of small size divertor tokamak with B2SOLPS0.5.2D fluid transport code. The simulation results demonstrated the following: (1) we control the internal transport barrier by altering the edge particle transport through changes the edge toroidal rotation which agree with the result of Burrell et al. (Edge Pedestal control in quiescent H-mode discharges in DIII-D using co-plus counter-neutral beam injection, Nucl Fusion, 49, 085024 (9pp) in 2009). (2) The radial electric field has neoclassical nature near separatrix with discharge by co-injection NBI. (3) The toroidal plasma viscosity has strong influence on the toroidal velocity.

  14. Impact of cone-beam computed tomography on implant planning and on prediction of implant size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim was to investigate the impact of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) on implant planning and on prediction of final implant size. Consecutive patients referred for implant treatment were submitted to clinical examination, panoramic (PAN) radiography and a CBCT exam. Initial planning of implant length and width was assessed based on clinical and PAN exams, and final planning, on CBCT exam to complement diagnosis. The actual dimensions of the implants placed during surgery were compared with those obtained during initial and final planning, using the McNemmar test (p 0.05). It was concluded that CBCT improves the ability of predicting the actual implant length and reduces inaccuracy in surgical dental implant planning. (author)

  15. Beam Energy and System Size Dependence of Dynamical Net Charge Fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAR Coll

    2008-07-21

    We present measurements of net charge fluctuations in Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 19.6, 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV, Cu + Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4, 200 GeV, and p + p collisions at {radical}s = 200 GeV using the dynamical net charge fluctuations measure {nu}{sub {+-},dyn}. We observe that the dynamical fluctuations are non-zero at all energies and exhibit a modest dependence on beam energy. A weak system size dependence is also observed. We examine the collision centrality dependence of the net charge fluctuations and find that dynamical net charge fluctuations violate 1/N{sub ch} scaling, but display approximate 1/N{sub part} scaling. We also study the azimuthal and rapidity dependence of the net charge correlation strength and observe strong dependence on the azimuthal angular range and pseudorapidity widths integrated to measure the correlation.

  16. Beam-energy and system-size dependence of dynamical net charge fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moira, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Dictel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X.-H.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, J.; Wu, Y.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zuo, J. X.

    2009-02-01

    We present measurements of net charge fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at sNN=19.6, 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV, Cu+Cu collisions at sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV, and p+p collisions at s=200 GeV using the dynamical net charge fluctuations measure ν+-,dyn. We observe that the dynamical fluctuations are nonzero at all energies and exhibit a modest dependence on beam energy. A weak system size dependence is also observed. We examine the collision centrality dependence of the net charge fluctuations and find that dynamical net charge fluctuations violate 1/Nch scaling but display approximate 1/Npart scaling. We also study the azimuthal and rapidity dependence of the net charge correlation strength and observe strong dependence on the azimuthal angular range and pseudorapidity widths integrated to measure the correlation.

  17. Operation of the CESR-TA vertical beam size monitor at $E_{\\rm b}$=4 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, J P; Edwards, E; Flanagan, J W; Fontes, E; Heltsley, B K; Lyndaker, A; Peterson, D P; Rider, N T; Rubin, D L; Seeley, R; Shanks, J

    2015-01-01

    We describe operation of the CESR-TA vertical beam size monitor (xBSM) with $e^\\pm$ beams with $E_{\\rm b}$=4 GeV. The xBSM measures vertical beam size by imaging synchrotron radiation x-rays through an optical element onto a detector array of 32 InGaAs photodiodes with 50 $\\mu$m pitch. The device has previously been successfully used to measure vertical beam sizes of 10-100 $\\mu$m on a bunch-by-bunch, turn-by-turn basis at $e^\\pm$ beam energies of $\\sim$2 GeV and source magnetic fields below 2.8 kG, for which the detector required calibration for incident x-rays of 1-5 keV. At $E_{\\rm b}=4.0$ GeV and $B$=4.5 kG, however, the incident synchrotron radiation spectrum extends to $\\sim$20 keV, requiring calibration of detector response in that regime. Such a calibration is described and then used to analyze data taken with several different thicknesses of filters in front of the detector. We obtain a relative precision of better than 4% on beam size measurement from 15-100 $\\mu$m over several different ranges of x...

  18. Biofuel Manufacturing from Woody Biomass: Effects of Sieve Size Used in Biomass Size Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Meng Zhang; Xiaoxu Song; Deines, T. W.; Pei, Z. J.; Donghai Wang

    2012-01-01

    Size reduction is the first step for manufacturing biofuels from woody biomass. It is usually performed using milling machines and the particle size is controlled by the size of the sieve installed on a milling machine. There are reported studies about the effects of sieve size on energy consumption in milling of woody biomass. These studies show that energy consumption increased dramatically as sieve size became smaller. However, in these studies, the sugar yield (proportional to biofuel yie...

  19. Effect of beam emittance on self-modulation of long beams in plasma wakefield accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Lotov, K V

    2015-01-01

    The initial beam emittance determines the maximum wakefield amplitude that can be reached as a result of beam self-modulation in the plasma. The wakefield excited by the fully self-modulated beam decreases linearly with the increase of the beam emittance. There is a value of initial emittance beyond which the self-modulation does not develop even if the instability is initiated by a strong seed perturbation. The emittance scale at which the wakefield is twice suppressed with respect to the zero-emittance case (the so called critical emittance) is determined by inability of the excited wave to confine beam particles radially and is related to beam and plasma parameters by a simple formula. The effect of beam emittance can be observed in several discussed self-modulation experiments.

  20. Particle size analysis by transmission fluctuation spectrometry in the two-Phase flow irradiated by a rectangular narrow beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory of transmission fluctuation spectrometry (TFS) has been developed as a new method of particle analysis in the two-phase flow. In our earlier publications, a circular beam is used whose intensity is uniform or of a Gaussian profile. In this work, the TFS theory is studied for the case of a rectangular narrow beam. The signal process of the transmission fluctuations is performed in the time and frequency domains and the corresponding analytical expression expressed in terms of the expectancy of the transmission square (ETS) is obtained. In addition, the correlation of the fluctuating transmission signals is studied, expressed in terms of the expectancy of the transmission product (ETP). Numerical calculation shows that the transition function of the transmission fluctuation spectrum is sensitive to both the ratio of beam size to particle size and the shape of the beam cross section.

  1. A Simplified Analysis of the Brazier Effect in Composite Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkilde, Lars; Lund, B.

    2009-01-01

    In the design of windturbine blades composite beams are often used as the load bearing element. The beam is primarily subjected to bending moments, and the deformations are relatively large. The large displacements result in a kind of ovalization of the beam section, the so-called Brazier effect...

  2. Relativistic beaming and orientation effects in core-dominated quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we investigate the relativistic beaming effects in a well-defined sample of core- dominated quasars using the correlation between the relative prominence of the core with respect to the extended emission (defined as the ratio of the core- to the lobe- flux density measured in the rest frame of the source) and the projected linear size as an indicator of relativistic beaming and source orientation. Based on the orientation-dependent relativistic beaming and unification paradigm for high luminosity sources in which the Fanaroff-Riley class-ll radio galaxies form the unbeamed parent population of both the lobe- and core-dominated quasars which are expected to lie at successively smaller angles to the line of sight, we find that the flows in the cores of these core-dominated quasars are highly relativistic, with optimum bulk Lorentz factor, γopt ∼6-16, and also highly anisotropic, with an average viewing angle, ∼ 9 deg. - 16 deg. Furthermore, the largest boosting occurs within a critical cone angle of ∼ 4 deg. - 10 deg. The results suggest that relativistic bulk flow appears to extend to kilo-parsec scales in these sources. (author)

  3. Disruption effects from the collision of quasi-flat beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The disruption effects from the collision of round beams and flat beams in linear colliders have been studied in the past, and has by now been well understood. In practice, however, in the current SLC running condition and in several designs of the next generation linear colliders, the quasi-flat beam geometries are expected. Namely, the beam aspect ratio R ≡ σx/σy > 1, but not infinitely large. In this regime the disruption effects in both x and y dimensions should be carefully included in order to properly describe the beam-beam interaction phenomena. In this paper the author investigates two major disruption effects for the the quasi-flat beam regime: The luminosity enhancement factor and the effective beamstrahlung. Computer simulations are employed and simple scaling laws are deduced

  4. Strong crystal size effect on deformation twinning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Qian; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Li, Ju;

    2010-01-01

    find that the stress required for deformation twinning increases drastically with decreasing sample size of a titanium alloy single crystal7, 8, until the sample size is reduced to one micrometre, below which the deformation twinning is entirely replaced by less correlated, ordinary dislocation...... plasticity. Accompanying the transition in deformation mechanism, the maximum flow stress of the submicrometre-sized pillars was observed to saturate at a value close to titanium’s ideal strength9, 10. We develop a ‘stimulated slip’ model to explain the strong size dependence of deformation twinning. The...

  5. A Note on the Sagnac Effect for Matter Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2014-01-01

    We study the Sagnac effect for matter beams, in order to estimate the kinematic corrections to the basic formula, deriving from the position and the extension of the interferometer, and discuss the analogy with the Aharonov-Bohm effect. We show that the formula for the Sagnac time delay is the same for matter and light beams in arbitrary stationary space-times, provided that a suitable condition on the speed of the beams is fulfilled. Hence, the same results obtained for light beams apply to matter beams.

  6. Accurate determination of electronic transport properties of silicon wafers by nonlinear photocarrier radiometry with multiple pump beam sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qian [Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 350, Shuangliu, Chengdu 610209 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Li, Bincheng, E-mail: bcli@uestc.ac.cn [Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 350, Shuangliu, Chengdu 610209 (China); School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2015-12-07

    In this paper, photocarrier radiometry (PCR) technique with multiple pump beam sizes is employed to determine simultaneously the electronic transport parameters (the carrier lifetime, the carrier diffusion coefficient, and the front surface recombination velocity) of silicon wafers. By employing the multiple pump beam sizes, the influence of instrumental frequency response on the multi-parameter estimation is totally eliminated. A nonlinear PCR model is developed to interpret the PCR signal. Theoretical simulations are performed to investigate the uncertainties of the estimated parameter values by investigating the dependence of a mean square variance on the corresponding transport parameters and compared to that obtained by the conventional frequency-scan method, in which only the frequency dependences of the PCR amplitude and phase are recorded at single pump beam size. Simulation results show that the proposed multiple-pump-beam-size method can improve significantly the accuracy of the determination of the electronic transport parameters. Comparative experiments with a p-type silicon wafer with resistivity 0.1–0.2 Ω·cm are performed, and the electronic transport properties are determined simultaneously. The estimated uncertainties of the carrier lifetime, diffusion coefficient, and front surface recombination velocity are approximately ±10.7%, ±8.6%, and ±35.4% by the proposed multiple-pump-beam-size method, which is much improved than ±15.9%, ±29.1%, and >±50% by the conventional frequency-scan method. The transport parameters determined by the proposed multiple-pump-beam-size PCR method are in good agreement with that obtained by a steady-state PCR imaging technique.

  7. Performance study of four mirror laser resonator for 6 μm minimum beam size using green laser oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) was constructed at KEK to study low emittance beam physics and to develop the technologies associated with it. In ATF damping ring, electron beam size is measured with laser wire system based on Compton scattering. A new four mirror laser wire system is developed for this purpose. This system has many advantages over two mirror laser wire system. Four mirror resonator reduces the sensitivity towards misalignment as compare to two mirror resonator. Measured Finesse of resonator is more than 4000. Optical cavity has enhancement factor of 1900. Inside ATF damping ring, electron beam has very small size of 10 μm in vertical direction. To measure electron beam profile, very thin laser beam size is needed. Laser waist size, around 6 μm in sagittal plane is achieved in between two concave mirrors. Special type of mirror alignment scheme is used to make a compact four mirror optical cavity. Laser resonator is designed to work in vacuum environment with a complex mirror holder design. We report the performance studies of such four mirror resonator using 532 nm CW laser oscillator in this research. (author)

  8. Stern-Gerlach Effect for Electron Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conflict between Bohr close-quote s assertion that the magnetic moment of the electron cannot be measured with experiments based on the concept of classical trajectories, and the measurement of the magnetic moment of electrons in a modified Penning trap by Dehmelt et al.has led us to reevaluate other implications of Bohr close-quote s assertion. We show that, contrary to the analysis of Bohr and Pauli, the assumption of classical trajectories in a Stern-Gerlach endash like device can result in a high degree of spin separation for an electron beam. This effect may persist within a fully quantum-mechanical analysis. The magnetic fields considered are such that a tabletop Stern-Gerlach electron spin filter is feasible. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  9. Research on biological effects of radioactive ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential importance of radioactive ion beams such as 9C, 8B and 8Li, representing double radiation sources coming from the external beams themselves and the delayed particles emitted internally, in medical use, cell radiobiological experiments using radioactive 8B beam and corresponding comparable 10B-ion beam were carried out in the secondary beam line (SBL) at Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). In these radiobiological experiments, biological endpoints such as survival fraction, micronucleus frequency and γ-H2AX focus induction at different penetration depths around the Bragg peaks along these beams were measured. Because human salivary gland (HSG) cancer cells were used in the experiments, it is hard to evaluate the biological effectiveness of the radioactive 8B beam exactly based on the results obtained in the radiobiological experiments. Therefore, normal cell line is expected to be employed in future experiments. In addition, a primary 10B beam of 100 MeV/u was used to produce radioactive 8Li beam under the conditions of 6 mm thick Beryllium target and 3.5 mm thick Aluminum degrader in the SBL at HIMAC. The lateral fluence distributions of the produced beam were measured at different penetration depths along the beam direction. To keep the uniformity of the irradiation field suitable for radiobiological experiments using the produced 8Li beam, a narrow momentum width has to be applied so that the beam intensity decreases. (author)

  10. Minimization effects on scintillations of sinusoidal Gaussian beams in strong turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minimization effects on the on-axis scintillation index of cos Gaussian (cG) and cosh Gaussian (chG) beams are studied in strong turbulence. In our formulation, the unified solution of the Rytov method, which imposes spatial filtering to extend the solution to the strong turbulence regime, is applied. Our solution correctly reduces to the weak turbulence sinusoidal beam scintillations and the strong turbulence Gaussian beam scintillations. The conditions to minimize the scintillations are found to be focused chG beams. Small scale scintillations mainly determine the overall scintillations of cG and chG beams in strong turbulence. In strong turbulence, increase in the source size decreases the scintillations of collimated cG beams but does not change the scintillations of focused cG beams. Collimated cG beams having larger displacement parameters and large focal lengths show smaller scintillations in the strong regime. Change in the displacement parameters for collimated and focused chG beams and the focal length of focused chG beams do not considerably vary their scintillations in strong turbulence

  11. Simulation of fluid-structure interaction in a microchannel using the lattice Boltzmann method and size-dependent beam element on a graphics processing unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems in microchannels play a prominent role in many engineering applications. The present study is an effort toward the simulation of flow in microchannel considering FSI. The bottom boundary of the microchannel is simulated by size-dependent beam elements for the finite element method (FEM) based on a modified couple stress theory. The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) using the D2Q13 LB model is coupled to the FEM in order to solve the fluid part of the FSI problem. Because of the fact that the LBM generally needs only nearest neighbor information, the algorithm is an ideal candidate for parallel computing. The simulations are carried out on graphics processing units (GPUs) using computed unified device architecture (CUDA). In the present study, the governing equations are non-dimensionalized and the set of dimensionless groups is exhibited to show their effects on micro-beam displacement. The numerical results show that the displacements of the micro-beam predicted by the size-dependent beam element are smaller than those by the classical beam element. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  12. Wavelength, beam size and type dependences of cerebral low-level light therapy: A Monte Carlo study on visible Chinese human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Zhao, Yue; Duan, Meixue; Sun, Yunlong; Li, Kai

    2014-02-01

    Low level light therapy (LLLT) has been clinically utilized for many indications in medicine requiring protection from cell/tissue death, stimulation of healing and repair of injuries, pain reduction, swelling and inflammation. Presently, use of LLLT to treat stroke, traumatic brain injury, and cognitive dysfunction is attracting growing interest. Near-infrared light can penetrate into the brain tissue, allowing noninvasive treatment to be carried out with few treatment-related adverse events. Optimization of LLLT treatment effect is one key issue of the field; however, only a few experimental tests on mice for wavelength selection have been reported. We addressed this issue by low-cost, straightforward and quantitative comparisons on light dosage distribution in Visible Chinese human head with Monte Carlo modeling of light propagation. Optimized selection in wavelength, beam type and size were given based on comparisons among frequently-used setups (i.e., wavelengths: 660 nm, 810 nm, 980 nm; beam type: Gaussian and flat beam; beam diameter: 2 cm, 4 cm, 6cm).This study provided an efficient way to guide optimization of LLLT setup and selection on wavelength, beam type and size for clinical brain LLLT.

  13. Finite size effect of harmonic measure estimation in a DLA model: Variable size of probe particles

    OpenAIRE

    Menshutin, Anton Yu.; Shchur, Lev N.; Vinokour, Valery M.

    2008-01-01

    A finite size effect in the probing of the harmonic measure in simulation of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) growth is investigated. We introduce a variable size of probe particles, to estimate harmonic measure and extract the fractal dimension of DLA clusters taking two limits, of vanishingly small probe particle size and of infinitely large size of a DLA cluster. We generate 1000 DLA clusters consisting of 50 million particles each, using an off-lattice killing-free algorithm developed ...

  14. When Effect Sizes Disagree: The Case of "r" and "d"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Robert E.; Meyer, Gregory J.

    2006-01-01

    The increased use of effect sizes in single studies and meta-analyses raises new questions about statistical inference. Choice of an effect-size index can have a substantial impact on the interpretation of findings. The authors demonstrate the issue by focusing on two popular effect-size measures, the correlation coefficient and the…

  15. How to Estimate and Interpret Various Effect Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacha-Haase, Tammi; Thompson, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    The present article presents a tutorial on how to estimate and interpret various effect sizes. The 5th edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (2001) described the failure to report effect sizes as a "defect" (p. 5), and 23 journals have published author guidelines requiring effect size reporting. Although…

  16. Size Effect on Magnesium Alloy Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenming; Wang, Qigui; Luo, Alan A.; Zhang, Peng; Peng, Liming

    2016-06-01

    The effect of grain size on tensile and fatigue properties has been investigated in cast Mg alloys of Mg-2.98Nd-0.19Zn (1530 μm) and Mg-2.99Nd-0.2Zn-0.51Zr (41 μm). The difference between RB and push-pull fatigue testing was also evaluated in both alloys. The NZ30K05-T6 alloy shows much better tensile strengths (increased by 246 pct in YS and 159 pct in UTS) and fatigue strength (improved by ~80 pct) in comparison with NZ30-T6 alloy. RB fatigue testing results in higher fatigue strength compared with push-pull fatigue testing, mainly due to the stress/strain gradient in the RB specimen cross section. The material with coarse grains could be hardened more in the cyclic loading condition than in the monotonic loading condition, corresponding to the lower σ f and the higher σ f/ σ b or σ f/ σ 0.2 ratio compared to the materials with fine grains. The fatigue crack initiation sites and failure mechanism are mainly determined by the applied stress/strain amplitude. In LCF, fatigue failure mainly originates from the PSBs within the surface or subsurface grains of the samples. In HCF, cyclic deformation and damage irreversibly caused by environment-assisted cyclic slip is the crucial factor to influence the fatigue crack. The Coffin-Manson law and Basquin equation, and the developed MSF models and fatigue strength models can be used to predict fatigue lives and fatigue strengths of cast magnesium alloys.

  17. Scaling of TNSA-accelerated proton beams with laser energy and focal spot size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obst, Lieselotte; Metzkes, Josefine; Schramm, Ulrich [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Zeil, Karl; Kraft, Stephan [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the acceleration of high energy proton pulses generated by relativistic laser-plasma interaction. The scope of this work was the systematic investigation of the scaling of the laser proton acceleration process in the ultra-short pulse regime in order to identify feasible routes towards the potential medical application of this accelerator technology for the development of compact proton sources for radiation therapy. We present an experimental study of the proton beam properties under variation of the laser intensity irradiating thin foil targets. This was achieved by employing different parabolic mirrors with various focal lengths. Hence, in contrast to moving the target in and out of focus, the target was always irradiated with an optimized focal spot. By observing the back reflected light of the laser beam from the target front side, pre-plasma effects on the laser absorption could be investigated. The study was performed at the 150 TW Draco Laser facility of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf with ultrashort (30 fs) laser pulses of intensities of about 8 . 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}.

  18. Effect of particle size on the thermo-optic properties of gold nanofluids - A thermal lens study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B. Rajesh; Basheer, N. Shemeena; Kurian, Achamma; George, Sajan D.

    2014-01-01

    Spherical gold nanoparticles having particle size in the range 30 to 50 nm are prepared using citrate reduction of gold chloride trihydrate in water. The influence of particle size on the thermal diffusivity value of gold nanofluid is measured using dual beam thermal lens technique. The present study shows that the particle size influences the effective thermal diffusivity value of the nanofluid substantially and the value decreases with decrease in particle size for the investigated samples.

  19. Effect of particle size on the thermo-optic properties of gold nanofluids – A thermal lens study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, B. Rajesh; Basheer, N. Shemeena; Kurian, Achamma [Photonics Lab, Department of Physics, Catholicate College, Pathanamthitta (India); George, Sajan D., E-mail: sajan.george@manipal.edu [Centre for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)

    2014-01-28

    Spherical gold nanoparticles having particle size in the range 30 to 50 nm are prepared using citrate reduction of gold chloride trihydrate in water. The influence of particle size on the thermal diffusivity value of gold nanofluid is measured using dual beam thermal lens technique. The present study shows that the particle size influences the effective thermal diffusivity value of the nanofluid substantially and the value decreases with decrease in particle size for the investigated samples.

  20. Impact of cone-beam computed tomography on implant planning and on prediction of implant size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedroso, Ludmila Assuncao de Mello; Silva, Maria Alves Garcia Santos, E-mail: ludmilapedroso@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia; Garcia, Robson Rodrigues [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Medicina Oral; Leles, Jose Luiz Rodrigues [Universidade Paulista (UNIP), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Cirurgia; Leles, Claudio Rodrigues [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Prevencao e Reabilitacao Oral

    2013-11-15

    The aim was to investigate the impact of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) on implant planning and on prediction of final implant size. Consecutive patients referred for implant treatment were submitted to clinical examination, panoramic (PAN) radiography and a CBCT exam. Initial planning of implant length and width was assessed based on clinical and PAN exams, and final planning, on CBCT exam to complement diagnosis. The actual dimensions of the implants placed during surgery were compared with those obtained during initial and final planning, using the McNemmar test (p < 0.05). The final sample comprised 95 implants in 27 patients, distributed over the maxilla and mandible. Agreement in implant length was 50.5% between initial and final planning, and correct prediction of the actual implant length was 40.0% and 69.5%, using PAN and CBCT exams, respectively. Agreement in implant width assessment ranged from 69.5% to 73.7%. A paired comparison of the frequency of changes between initial or final planning and implant placement (McNemmar test) showed greater frequency of changes in initial planning for implant length (p < 0.001), but not for implant width (p = 0.850). The frequency of changes was not influenced by implant location at any stage of implant planning (chi-square test, p > 0.05). It was concluded that CBCT improves the ability of predicting the actual implant length and reduces inaccuracy in surgical dental implant planning. (author)

  1. Size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) for a prototype orthopedic cone-beam CT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Samuel; Packard, Nathan; Yorkston, John

    2014-03-01

    Patient specific dose evaluation and reporting is becoming increasingly important for x-ray imaging systems. Even imaging systems with lower patient dose such as CBCT scanners for extremities can benefit from accurate and size-specific dose assessment and reporting. This paper presents CTDI dose measurements performed on a prototype CBCT extremity imaging system across a range of body part sizes (5, 10, 16, and 20 cm effective diameter) and kVp (70, 80, and 90 kVp - with 0.1 mm Cu added filtration). The ratio of the CTDI measurements for the 5, 10, and 20 cm phantoms to the CTDI measurements for the 16 cm phantom were calculated and results were compared to size-specific dose estimates conversion factors (AAPM Report 204), which were evaluated on a conventional CT scanner. Due to the short scan nature of the system (220 degree acquisition angle), the dependence of CTDI values on the initial angular orientation of the phantom with respect to the imager was also evaluated. The study demonstrated that for a 220 degree acquisition sequence, the initial angular position of the conventional CTDI phantom with respect to the scanner does not significantly affect CTDI measurements (varying by less than 2% overall across the range of possible initial angular positions). The size-specific conversion factor was found to be comparable to the Report 204 factors for the large phantom size (20 cm) but lower, by up to 12%, for the 5 cm phantom (i.e., 1.35 for CBCT vs 1.54 for CT). The factors dependence on kVp was minimal, but dependence on kVp was most significant for smaller diameters. These results indicate that specific conversion factors need to be used for CBCT systems with short scans in order to provide more accurate dose reporting across the range of body sizes found in extremity scanners.

  2. The causal effect of board size in the performance of small and medium-sized firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Morten; Kongsted, Hans Christian; Meisner Nielsen, Kasper

    2008-01-01

    Empirical studies of large publicly traded firms have shown a robust negative relationship between board size and firm performance. The evidence on small and medium-sized firms is less clear; we show that existing work has been incomplete in analyzing the causal relationship due to weak...... identification strategies. Using a rich data set of almost 7000 closely held corporations we provide a causal analysis of board size effects on firm performance: We use a novel instrument given by the number of children of the chief executive officer (CEO) of the firms. First, we find a strong positive...... correlation between family size and board size and show this correlation to be driven by firms where the CEO's relatives serve on the board. Second, we find empirical evidence of a small adverse board size effect driven by the minority of small and medium-sized firms that are characterized by having...

  3. Palm-top size X-ray microanalyzer using a pyroelectric focused electron beam with 100-micro-meter diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a palm-top size EPMA (electron probe X-ray microanalyzer), operated by 3 V electric battery except for a rotary vacuum pump. The electron beam was generated by a pyroelectric single crystal, LiTaO3. A needle was used to make a focused electron beam. The smallest beam size was 100 μm on the sample surface. The X-ray spectra were measured through a Kapton window by a Si-PIN detector for a model specimen containing TiO2 and MnO2 particles, which was an aerosol model specimen, where TiO2 and MnO2 particles of size about 100-200 μm were separated by a few hundreds micrometers. By moving the sample stage manually, the X-ray spectra were measured for 300 s each by 300 μm e-beam, and the measured X-ray intensities were strong enough for identification of the major element in individual 100-200 μm size aerosol particles.

  4. Characterization of resonances using finite size effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We develop methods to extract resonance widths from finite volume spectra of (1+1)-dimensional quantum field theories. Our two methods are based on Luscher's description of finite size corrections, and are dubbed the Breit-Wigner and the improved ''mini-Hamiltonian'' method, respectively. We establish a consistent framework for the finite volume description of sufficiently narrow resonances that takes into account the finite size corrections and mass shifts properly. Using predictions from form factor perturbation theory, we test the two methods against finite size data from truncated conformal space approach, and find excellent agreement which confirms both the theoretical framework and the numerical validity of the methods. Although our investigation is carried out in 1+1 dimensions, the extension to physical 3+1 space-time dimensions appears straightforward, given sufficiently accurate finite volume spectra

  5. Causality in Statistical Power: Isomorphic Properties of Measurement, Research Design, Effect Size, and Sample Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidel, R Eric

    2016-01-01

    Statistical power is the ability to detect a significant effect, given that the effect actually exists in a population. Like most statistical concepts, statistical power tends to induce cognitive dissonance in hepatology researchers. However, planning for statistical power by an a priori sample size calculation is of paramount importance when designing a research study. There are five specific empirical components that make up an a priori sample size calculation: the scale of measurement of the outcome, the research design, the magnitude of the effect size, the variance of the effect size, and the sample size. A framework grounded in the phenomenon of isomorphism, or interdependencies amongst different constructs with similar forms, will be presented to understand the isomorphic effects of decisions made on each of the five aforementioned components of statistical power. PMID:27073717

  6. Interpreting and Reporting Effect Sizes in Research Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Martha; Marsh, George E., II

    Since 1994, the American Psychological Association (APA) has advocated the inclusion of effect size indices in reporting research to elucidate the statistical significance of studies based on sample size. In 2001, the fifth edition of the APA "Publication Manual" stressed the importance of including an index of effect size to clarify research…

  7. SU-E-T-321: The Effects of a Dynamic Collimation System On Proton Pencil Beams to Improve Lateral Tissue Sparing in Spot Scanned Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the lateral beam penumbra in pencil beam scanning proton therapy delivered using a dynamic collimator device capable of trimming a portion of the primary beam in close proximity to the patient. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of pencil beams were performed using MCNPX. Each simulation transported a 125 MeV proton pencil beam through a range shifter, past acollimator, and into a water phantom. Two parameters were varied among the simulations, the source beam size (sigma in air from 3 to 9 mm), and the position of the edge of the collimator (placed from 0 to 30 mm from the central axis of the beam). Proton flux was tallied at the phantom surface to determine the effective beam sizefor all combinations of source beam size and collimator edge position. Results: Quantifying beam size at the phantom surface provides a useful measure tocompare performance among varying source beam sizes and collimation conditions. For arelatively large source beam size (9 mm) entering the range shifter, sigma at thesurface was found to be 10 mm without collimation versus 4 mm with collimation. Additionally, sigma at the surface achievable with collimation was found to be smallerthan for any uncollimated beam, even for very small source beam sizes. Finally, thelateral penumbra achievable with collimation was determined to be largely independentof the source beam size. Conclusion: Collimation can significantly reduce proton pencil beam lateral penumbra.Given the known dosimetric disadvantages resulting from large beam spot sizes,employing a dynamic collimation system can significantly improve lateral tissuesparing in spot-scanned dose distributions

  8. Unprecedented grain size effect on stacking fault width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hunter

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Using an atomistic-phase field dislocation dynamics model, we isolate and investigate grain size and stress effects on the stacking fault width created by partial dislocation emission from a boundary. We show that the nucleation stress for a Shockley partial is governed by size of the boundary defect and insensitive to grain size. We reveal a grain size regime in which the maximum value the stacking fault width attains increases with grain size.

  9. The dependency of wedge factors on field size and depth in megavoltage beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avadhani, J.S. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Tata Memorial Hospital, Bombay (India); Pradhan, A.S. [Radiologocal Physics Div., Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India); Sankar, A. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Tata Memorial Hospital, Bombay (India); Viswanathan, P.S. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Tata Memorial Hospital, Bombay (India)

    1996-11-01

    Aim: To investigate the variation of wedge factors on field size, depth on 2 types of telecobalt units and 3 types of medical linear accelerators and to make a simplified approach for day to day calculation procedure. Materials and Methods: A 0.125 cm{sup 3} ion chamber was used to determine the wedge factors which is connected to the computer controlled radiation field analyser. The wedge factors were determined for field sizes varying from 5x5 cm to the maximum square field size available for each wedge angles and at multiple depths upto 25 cm of respective teletherapy units. The results obtained are fitted to a second degree polynomial function. Results: There is no significant variation of wedge factor on field size for all the 3 linear accelerators. The wedge factors are found to vary mainly at larger depths and wedge angles. The variation of wedge factors for 2 types of cobalt units were similar and increase of 3%, 4% and 5.5% is observed for wedge angles 30 , 45 and 60 respectively with respect of depth of maximum build-up. The trend was similar for linear accelerators with maximum increase in wedge factor up to 7.5% for 60 wedge angle at 25 cm depth for 6 MV photon beams. Discussion and Conclusions: The determination of wedge factors at various field sizes and depths is essential to ensure accurate dose delivery. With experimental wedge data fitted with second degree polynomial function is a simplified and alternative method which can be adopted for routine dosimetric calculations. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Untersuchung der Variation von Keilfilterfaktoren in Abhaengigkeit von Feldgroesse und Dosierungstiefe bei zwei unterschiedlichen Telekobaltgeraeten und drei unterschiedlichen Linearbeschleunigern, um ein einfaches Naeherungsverfahren fuer taegliche Routineberechnungen zu erhalten. Material und Methode: Die Keilfilterfaktoren wurden mit einem computergesteuerten Messsystem mit einer 0,125-cm{sup 3}-Ionisationskammer bestimmt fuer Feldgroessen, beginnend

  10. Size modulated transition in the fluid-structure interaction losses in nano mechanical beam resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, S. D.; Pandey, A. K.; Parpia, J. M.; Verbridge, S. S.; Craighead, H. G.; Pratap, R.

    2016-05-01

    An understanding of the dominant dissipative mechanisms is crucial for the design of a high-Q doubly clamped nanobeam resonator to be operated in air. We focus on quantifying analytically the viscous losses—the squeeze film damping and drag force damping—that limit the net quality factor of a beam resonator, vibrating in its flexural fundamental mode with the surrounding fluid as air at atmospheric pressure. Specifically, drag force damping dominates at smaller beam widths and squeeze film losses dominate at larger beam widths, with no significant contribution from structural losses and acoustic radiation losses. The combined viscous losses agree well with the experimentally measured Q of the resonator over a large range of beam widths, within the limits of thin beam theory. We propose an empirical relation between the maximum quality factor and the ratio of maximum beam width to the squeeze film air gap thickness.

  11. Biological effect of penetration controlled irradiation with ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Shimizu, Takashi; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Yamashita, Takao

    1997-03-01

    To investigate the effect of local irradiation with ion beams on biological systems, technique for penetration controlled irradiation has been established. The range in a target was controlled by changing the distance from beam window in the atmosphere, and could be controlled linearly up to about 31 {mu}m in biological material. In addition, the effects of the penetration controlled irradiations with 1.5 MeV/u C and He ions were examined using tobacco pollen. The increased frequency of leaky pollen produced by ion beams suggests that the efficient pollen envelope damages would be induced at the range-end of ion beams. (author)

  12. The effect of family size on processing Serbian nouns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đerić Snežana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In two lexical decision experiments the effect of family size was investigated for Serbian nouns. In the first experiment there were 15 nouns of low and 15 nouns of high family size, while in the second experiment 50 nouns that cover the whole range of family size spectrum were presented. In both experiments family size accounts for significant proportion of explained variance of response latencies. In multiple regression the effect of family size is significant over and above word frequency and word length, while frequency and word length do not account for significant proportion of variance over and above family size.

  13. Effect size estimates: current use, calculations, and interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Catherine O; Morris, Peter E; Richler, Jennifer J

    2012-02-01

    The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (American Psychological Association, 2001, American Psychological Association, 2010) calls for the reporting of effect sizes and their confidence intervals. Estimates of effect size are useful for determining the practical or theoretical importance of an effect, the relative contributions of factors, and the power of an analysis. We surveyed articles published in 2009 and 2010 in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, noting the statistical analyses reported and the associated reporting of effect size estimates. Effect sizes were reported for fewer than half of the analyses; no article reported a confidence interval for an effect size. The most often reported analysis was analysis of variance, and almost half of these reports were not accompanied by effect sizes. Partial η2 was the most commonly reported effect size estimate for analysis of variance. For t tests, 2/3 of the articles did not report an associated effect size estimate; Cohen's d was the most often reported. We provide a straightforward guide to understanding, selecting, calculating, and interpreting effect sizes for many types of data and to methods for calculating effect size confidence intervals and power analysis. PMID:21823805

  14. Sector and size effects on effective corporate taxation

    OpenAIRE

    Nicodeme, Gaetan

    2002-01-01

    The current debate in corporate taxation is focussing on leveling the tax playing field within the European Union in order to allow companies incorporated in different countries to face the same competitive conditions. However, various elements of corporate tax rules may discriminate against companies registered in the same country but having different sizes or operating in different sectors. Using the micro backward-looking approach to compute effective tax rates for eleven European countrie...

  15. Beam orbit storage effect in the isochronous cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BOS-effect is useful to apply in many isochronous cyclotron operated for today. Some general advantages are pointed out below: 1) the storage orbits effect may be utilized in order to increasing the internal space charge in a given extraction zone (for instance medical isotope production and other applications on internal beam); 2) returning of the unextracted beam to the space of quasi stable acceleration region (n ≥ 0), will caused decreasing activity of construction elements of cyclotron. This is very important problem by exploitation on high intensity internal beams; 3) because of avoiding the internal beam losses on constructions elements, as well longitudinal extension of the beam and also change of the angle in radial emittance during the second accelerations process it is to expect a magnifying of the extracted beam. (author). 7 refs, 21 figs

  16. Effect of Subelement Size, Strand Size and RRR on Stability of RRP Nb3Sn Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzi, Emanuela; Moio, Simone; Zlobin, Alexander; Superconductor R&D Team

    2013-03-01

    Using ample statistics gathered from state-of-the-art Nb3Sn strands of different designs and sizes developed by Oxford Superconductor Technology (OST), the effects on the strand current density of subelement size, Residual Resistivity Ratio (RRR) of the copper matrix, and strand size were measured, analyzed and compared with the predictions of a stability model. The data confirmed a strong dependence of the instability current density on the subelement size, but also hinted at effects of non-uniform current distribution in the wire. The data also show that the instability current relates so weakly to RRR that it is possible to cleanly identify a common instability behavior as a function of subelement size and of strand size despite an ample range of RRR. This analysis was performed both at 4.2 K and 1.9 K.

  17. Effect size as a supplement to statistical significance testing

    OpenAIRE

    Gašper Cankar; Boštjan Bajec

    2003-01-01

    Researchers in the field of psychology often face the situation that the statistical significance depends largely on the sample size and its statistical power. Effect size is a statistical measure that can offer some solutions for constructive research, since it can overcome the problems that are connected to the sample size. This article presents statistical significance testing we meet in psychology and the usage of smaller group of the effect size measures – measures of the standardi...

  18. Using narrow beam profiles to quantify focal spot size, for accurate Monte Carlo simulations of SRS/SRT systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairn, T.; Crowe, S. B.; Charles, P. H.; Trapp, J. V.

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates the variation of photon field penumbra shape with initial electron beam diameter, for very narrow beams. A Varian Millenium MLC (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, USA) and a Brainlab m3 microMLC (Brainlab AB. Feldkirchen, Germany) were used, with one Varian iX linear accelerator, to produce fields that were (nominally) 0.20 cm across. Dose profiles for these fields were measured using radiochromic film and compared with the results of simulations completed using BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc, where the initial electron beam was set to FWHM = 0.02, 0.10, 0.12, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.50 cm. Increasing the electron-beam FWHM produced increasing occlusion of the photon source by the closely spaced collimator leaves and resulted in blurring of the simulated profile widths from 0.24 to 0.58 cm, for the MLC, from 0.11 to 0.40 cm, for the microMLC. Comparison with measurement data suggested that the electron spot size in the clinical linear accelerator was between FWHM = 0.10 and 0.15 cm, encompassing the result of our previous output-factor based work, which identified a FWHM of 0.12 cm. Investigation of narrow-beam penumbra variation has been found to be a useful procedure, with results varying noticeably with linear accelerator spot size and allowing FWHM estimates obtained using other methods to be verified.

  19. Effect of beamlet step-size on IMRT plan quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the degree to which beamlet step-size impacts the quality of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans. Treatment planning for IMRT begins with the application of a grid that divides each beam's-eye-view of the target into a number of smaller beamlets (pencil beams) of radiation. The total dose is computed as a weighted sum of the dose delivered by the individual beamlets. The width of each beamlet is set to match the width of the corresponding leaf of the multileaf collimator (MLC). The length of each beamlet (beamlet step-size) is parallel to the direction of leaf travel. The beamlet step-size represents the minimum stepping distance of the leaves of the MLC and is typically predetermined by the treatment planning system. This selection imposes an artificial constraint because the leaves of the MLC and the jaws can both move continuously. Removing the constraint can potentially improve the IMRT plan quality. In this study, the optimized results were achieved using an aperture-based inverse planning technique called direct aperture optimization (DAO). We have tested the relationship between pencil beam step-size and plan quality using the American College of Radiology's IMRT test case. For this case, a series of IMRT treatment plans were produced using beamlet step-sizes of 1, 2, 5, and 10 mm. Continuous improvements were seen with each reduction in beamlet step size. The maximum dose to the planning target volume (PTV) was reduced from 134.7% to 121.5% and the mean dose to the organ at risk (OAR) was reduced from 38.5% to 28.2% as the beamlet step-size was reduced from 10 to 1 mm. The smaller pencil beam sizes also led to steeper dose gradients at the junction between the target and the critical structure with gradients of 6.0, 7.6, 8.7, and 9.1 dose%/mm achieved for beamlet step sizes of 10, 5, 2, and 1 mm, respectively

  20. Size effects in superfluid 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The superfluid density and transition temperature of 3He filling the pores of packed alumina powder have been measured by fourth sound. The measurements were performed simultaneously for three separate fourth sound resonators, each packed with a different nominal grain size of 1.0 μm. 0.3 μm and 0.05 μm. The bulk 3He superfluid transition temperature, which was determined independently, was compared to the transition temperature of each resonator. We observed a systematic depression for both the superfluid density and transition temperature as the powder size was decreased. The depressions in the transition temperature were compared with theoretical estimates of size dependent transition temperatures for the ideal geometry of an infinite cylinder. In the analysis the cylinder radius was replaced by defining an average radius of the pore structure which was empirically determined by nitrogen gas sorption and mercury intrusion techniques. The pressure dependence of the transition temperature depression is found to be consistent with theoretical estimates of the superfluid coherence length. The experimentally determined magnitude of the coherence length based on the pore structure analysis is in agreement with theoretical estimates, confirming that the coherence length of superfluid 3He is about two orders of magnitude larger than that of He II

  1. Effect of skin-core debonding on the dynamic behaviour of GFRP composite beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayatilake, Indunil; Karunasena, Karu; Lokuge, Weena

    2013-08-01

    Composites are materials made by combining two individual materials where one material forms the matrix while the other provides the reinforcement. A novel composite sandwich made up of glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) face sheets and modified phenolic core has been developed recently. Although perfect bond between the skin and the core is a common assumption, an important issue that needs to be considered in using a composite beam is the development of debonding between the skin and the core. Debonding may arise during fabrication or under service conditions, which causes changes to the dynamic behaviour in addition to the strength degradation. This paper focuses on the effect of debonding on dynamic characteristics of sandwich beams of different debonding sizes and end conditions. Strand7 software is used for 3D finite element simulation. Free vibration behaviour reported in the literature for composite beams will first be used to compare the analytical results with the fully bonded and debonded beams. Study is extended to depict the effect of debonding on free vibration behaviour of novel composite beams. It is revealed that the decrease in natural frequency with the increase in the extent of debonding is more dependent on the width of debonding across the beam than the length along the beam. It is also perceived that full width debonding leads to increased participation of twisting modes in comparison to half-width debonding in clamped-clamped end condition. End conditions of the beam are a governing factor dictating which modes are more affected.

  2. Analytical treatment of the nonlinear electron cloud effect and the combined effects with beam-beam and space charge nonlinear forces in storage rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jie

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we treat first some nonlinear beam dynamics problems in storage rings, such as beam dynamic apertures due to magnetic multipoles, wiggles, beam-beam effects, nonlinear space charge effect, and then nonlinear electron cloud effect combined with beam-beam and space charge effects, analytically. This analytical treatment is applied to BEPC Ⅱ. The corresponding analytical expressions developed in this paper are useful both in understanding the physics behind these problems and also in making practical quick hand estimations.

  3. Hall-Petch effect: Another manifestation of size effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Dunstan, David; Bushby, Andy

    In the 1950s, Hall and Petch first established a quantitative relationship, expressed by the famous Hall-Petch equation: σd =σ0 +kHP/√{ d} There is a very large body of experimental data in the literature reinforcing this dependence in a very wide range of metals. Recently, we presented some of the classic data sets which have been considered to confirm the Hall-Petch equation and showed they are equally well consistent with the equation ɛel (d) =ɛ0 +kln/(d) d Eq. 2 is based on critical thickness theory. Fitting to Eq.1 with the exponent 0.5 replaced by the free fitting parameter x, the confidence interval for the exponent is 0.5 size of each study. The normalised kHP are widely scattered. However, the lower bound of the scatter shows a clear dependence on grain size. The Hall-Petch dependence of the strength on grain size, if it obeys Eq.2, is another manifestation of the size effect.

  4. Sample Size Calculations for Precise Interval Estimation of the Eta-Squared Effect Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of variance is one of the most frequently used statistical analyses in the behavioral, educational, and social sciences, and special attention has been paid to the selection and use of an appropriate effect size measure of association in analysis of variance. This article presents the sample size procedures for precise interval estimation…

  5. Super-size me: Portion size effects on young children's eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large portions of energy-dense foods are believed to favor obesity-promoting eating behaviors in young children. The following review presents evidence on food portion size effects on children's eating behavior and eating regulation, with comparison of findings to adult studies of portion size. Indi...

  6. Effect of specimen size on the tensile strength of WC-Co hard metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluensner, T., E-mail: thomas.kluensner@mcl.at [Materials Center Leoben Forschung GmbH, Roseggerstrasse 12, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Jahnstrasse 12, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Wurster, S. [Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Jahnstrasse 12, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Supancic, P. [Institut fuer Struktur- und Funktionskeramik, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Peter Tunner Strasse 5, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Ebner, R. [Materials Center Leoben Forschung GmbH, Roseggerstrasse 12, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Jenko, M. [Institute of Metals and Technology, Lepi pot 11, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Glaetzle, J.; Pueschel, A. [Ceratizit Austria GmbH, Metallwerk-Plansee-Strasse 71, 6600 Reutte (Austria); Pippan, R. [Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Jahnstrasse 12, 8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2011-06-15

    The fracture behaviour of an ultrafine grained WC-Co hard metal was investigated in tensile and bending tests using different specimen sizes and test arrangements in order to study the size effect on the tensile strength, by varying the effectively tested volume over a range of roughly 10 orders of magnitude. Mechanical testing of centimetre sized specimens was performed by means of tensile tests using an hour glass shaped specimen. Millimetre sized specimens were tested in four point and three point bending test set-ups. Micrometre sized specimens, rectangular beams produced via focused ion beam milling, were loaded in situ in a scanning electron microscope utilizing a piezo-electrically controlled cube corner micro-indenter. The resulting fracture surfaces were examined in order to identify crack origins. The main result of the present work is that strength values are found to increase from about 2500 to about 6000 MPa when the size of the effectively loaded volume is varied from about 100 to about 10{sup -8} mm{sup 3}. This kind of behaviour is typical for brittle materials in which strength is defect controlled and can be explained by a size effect according to Weibull theory. In the case of the micrometre sized specimens no defects were found on the fracture surfaces. Estimations of critical defect sizes in these specimens based on linear elastic fracture mechanics give values in the order of magnitude of the submicron sized tungsten carbide particles. It is therefore expected that the high strength values found in these specimens are close to the inherent material strength.

  7. Variation of Effective SSD According to Electron Energies and Irradiated Field Sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that fixed source to skin distance (SSD) cannot be used when the treatment field is sloped or larger than the size of second collimator in electron beam irradiation and inverse square law using effective ssd should be adopted. Effective SSDs were measured in different field sizes in each 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 MeV electron energy by suing NELAC 1018D linear accelerator of Kosin Medical Center. We found important parameters of effective SSD. 1. Minimum effective SSD was 58.8 cm in small field size of 6x6 cm and maximum effective SSD was 94.9 cm in large field size of 25x25 cm, with 6 MeV energy. It difference was 36.1 cm. The dose rate at measuring point was quite different even with a small difference of SSD in small field (6x6 cm) and low energy (6 MeV). 2. Effective SSD increased with field size in same electron energy. 3. Effective SSDs gradually increased with the electron energies and reached maximum at 12 or 15 MeV electron energy and decreased again at 18 MeV electron energy in each identical field size. And so the effective SSD should be measured in each energy and field size for practical radiotherapy

  8. Preparation of a beam quality indicator for effective energy determinations of continuum beams: establishment of traceability

    CERN Document Server

    Matsubayashi, M; Kobayashi, H

    1999-01-01

    A new beam quality indicator (BQI) was designed and fabricated to determine effective energies of beams extracted from neutron radiography facilities. Performances of the five new BQIs were compared with the original BQI which was recently proposed and tested by various beams. Non-filtered thermal neutrons, filtered thermal neutrons, and cold neutrons from a guide tube were used in the performance test program. The new BQIs were also examined by four different detection systems using a combination of a Gd converter and a X-ray film, a neutron imaging plate, a cooled charge coupled device camera, and a silicon intensified target tube camera.

  9. Application of size effect to compressive strength of concrete members

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jin-Keun Kim; Seong-Tae Yi

    2002-08-01

    It is important to consider the effect of size when estimating the ultimate strength of a concrete member under various loading conditions. Well known as the size effect, the strength of a member tends to decrease when its size increases. Therefore, in view of recent increased interest in the size effect of concrete this research focuses on the size effect of two main classes of compressive strength of concrete: pure axial compressive strength and flexural compressive strength. First, fracture mechanics type size effect on the compressive strength of cylindrical concrete specimens was studied, with the diameter, and the height/diameter ratio considered as the main parameters. Theoretical and statistical analyses were conducted, and a size effect equation was proposed to predict the compressive strength specimens. The proposed equation showed good agreement with the existing test results for concrete cylinders. Second, the size, length, and depth variations of a flexural compressive member have been studied experimentally. A series of -shaped specimens subjected to axial compressive load and bending moment were tested. The shape of specimens and the test procedures used were similar to those by Hognestad and others. The test results are curve-fitted using Levenberg-Marquardt’s least squares method (LSM) to obtain parameters for the modified size effect law (MSEL) by Kim and co workers. The results of the analysis show that the effect of specimen size, length, and depth on ultimate strength is significant. Finally, more general parameters for MSEL are suggested.

  10. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, Strahinja

    2013-01-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at CLIC at 3 TeV CM energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations: -> Correction of the angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation (ISR) effects, based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. -> Deconvolution of the luminosity spectrum distortion due to the ISR emission. -> Correction of the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution. All procedures were tested by simulation. Bhabha events were generated using BHLUMI, and used in Guinea-PIG to simulate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. Residual uncertainties after correction are listed in a table in the conclusions. The beam-beam related systematic counting uncertainty in the luminosity peak can be reduced to the order of permille.

  11. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, Strahinja

    2013-01-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at CLIC at 3 TeV CM energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations: - Correction of the angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation (ISR) effects, based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. - Deconvolution of the luminosity spectrum distortion due to the ISR emission. - Correction of the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution. All procedures were tested by simulation. Bhabha events were generated using BHLUMI, and used in Guinea-PIG to simulate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. Residual uncertainties after correction are listed in a table in the conclusions. The beam-beam related systematic counting uncertainty in the luminosity peak can be reduced to the order of permille.

  12. Effect of rf structure on cumulative beam breakup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We treat the effect of rf structure of a linac beam on cumulative beam breakup in the presence of external focusing. Starting with the difference equations of Helm and Loew, we derive two forms of an exact analytic solution for coasting beams: as a sum of products of Gegenbauer polynomials involving external focusing and rf structure, and as an integral involving these same parameters. The continuous-beam limit of Neil, Hall, and Cooper is obtained as the bunch separation goes to zero. An explicit solution is presented for the steady state, including modulation of the incoming displacement, showing both stable and unstable behavior with distance. Asymptotic amplitude expressions are derived for the transient solution, which can lead to even larger beam displacements. Approximate solutions also are obtained for accelerated and decelerated beams. Comparison with numerical simulations are presented

  13. Focused ion beam irradiation effects on nanoscale freestanding thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The focused ion beam (FIB) technique is a versatile tool for nanoscale manipulation, deposition and etching. However, degradation mechanisms which lead to residual stresses in materials exposed to high-energy ion beams are not well understood. In this study, we examine the evolution of residual stresses in 100 nm thick freestanding aluminum films subjected to typical ion beam exposures within a commercial FIB tool. Experimental results show that the magnitude of the residual stresses increase with cumulative ion beam exposure and that upper limits are attainable. Further investigation demonstrates that a decrease in ion beam current at constant acceleration-voltage augments the upper limits, which manifests itself in greater residual stresses. The stress gradients in thin films develop from surface modifications in the form of amorphous top layers, which are modeled as bilayer approximations. Experimental observations and analysis indicate that ion beam exposure effects on the mechanical properties of nanoscale thin films and nanostructures cannot be ignored

  14. Two Effective Heuristics for Beam Angle Optimization in Radiation Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Yarmand, Hamed

    2013-01-01

    In radiation therapy, mathematical methods have been used for optimizing treatment planning for delivery of sufficient dose to the cancerous cells while keeping the dose to critical surrounding structures minimal. This optimization problem can be modeled using mixed integer programming (MIP) whose solution gives the optimal beam orientation as well as optimal beam intensity. The challenge, however, is the computation time for this large scale MIP. We propose and investigate two novel heuristic approaches to reduce the computation time considerably while attaining high-quality solutions. We introduce a family of heuristic cuts based on the concept of 'adjacent beams' and a beam elimination scheme based on the contribution of each beam to deliver the dose to the tumor in the ideal plan in which all potential beams can be used simultaneously. We show the effectiveness of these heuristics for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) on a clinical liver case.

  15. Size effect in tension perpendicular to the grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Clorius, Christian Odin; Damkilde, Lars;

    1999-01-01

    material under stress is increased. This paper presents a small experimental investigation on specimens with well defined structural orientation of the material. The experiments exhibit a larger size effect than expected and furthermore the data and the nature of the failures encountered suggest that the...... size effect can be explained on a deterministic basis. Arguments for such a simple deterministic explanation of size effect is found in finite element modelling using the orthotropic stiffness characteristics in the transverse plane of wood....

  16. Effect of electron beam on in vitro cultured orchid organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiations have been effective mutagen sources to overcome the limitation of the useful genetic resources in natural environment. The study was conducted to investigate an effect of electron beam on organogenesis, growth patterns and genetic variation in the irradiated orchid organs. The in utero cultured rhizomes of orchids were irradiated with the electron beam in the dose range of 15Gy to 2240Gy under the condition of various beam energy and beam current. Significant decreases in survival, growth and organogenesis were observed by increase of intensity of electron beam irradiation. The irradiation intensity of lethal dose 50 of the in utero cultured orchid was estimated as approximately 500Gy to 1000Gy under 10MeV/n, and 1000Gy was optimal for growth and organogenesis of the cultures under 10MeV/n with 0.05mA treatment, and 15Gy ∼ 48Gy under 2MeV/n and 0.5mA electron beam condition. RAPD and ISSR analyses for the electron beam irradiated organs were performed to analyze genetic variation under the electron beam condition. Both of RAPD and ISSR analyses showed higher polymorphic rate in the electron-beam irradiated C. gangrene and C. Kaner

  17. Beam-beam effects in different luminosity levelling scenarios for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Buffat, X; Coombs, G R; Herr, W; Pieloni, T

    2014-01-01

    Adjusting luminosity and optimizing the luminous region in each interaction point of the LHC according to the experiments needs has become a requirement to maximize the efficiency of the different detectors. Several techniques are envisaged, most importantly by varying β∗ or a transverse offset at the interaction point. Coherent and incoherent stability in the presence of beam-beam effects will be discussed in realistic luminosity levelling scenarios for the LHC.

  18. Simple and cost-effective fabrication of size-tunable zinc oxide architectures by multiple size reduction technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeong-Ho Park, Xin Zhang, Seon-Yong Hwang, Sang Hyun Jung, Semin Kang, Hyun-Beom Shin, Ho Kwan Kang, Hyung-Ho Park, Ross H Hill and Chul Ki Ko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple size reduction technique for fabricating 400 nm zinc oxide (ZnO architectures using a silicon master containing only microscale architectures. In this approach, the overall fabrication, from the master to the molds and the final ZnO architectures, features cost-effective UV photolithography, instead of electron beam lithography or deep-UV photolithography. A photosensitive Zn-containing sol–gel precursor was used to imprint architectures by direct UV-assisted nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL. The resulting Zn-containing architectures were then converted to ZnO architectures with reduced feature sizes by thermal annealing at 400 °C for 1 h. The imprinted and annealed ZnO architectures were also used as new masters for the size reduction technique. ZnO pillars of 400 nm diameter were obtained from a silicon master with pillars of 1000 nm diameter by simply repeating the size reduction technique. The photosensitivity and contrast of the Zn-containing precursor were measured as 6.5 J cm−2 and 16.5, respectively. Interesting complex ZnO patterns, with both microscale pillars and nanoscale holes, were demonstrated by the combination of dose-controlled UV exposure and a two-step UV-NIL.

  19. Size effect on compressive strength of reactive powder concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Ming-zhe; ZHANG Li-jun; YI Quan-xin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the coefficient and law of the size effect of RPC were studied through experiments and theoretical analysis. The size-effect coefficients for the compressive strength of RPC are deduced through experiments. They indicate that RPC without fiber behaves quite the same as normal or high strength concrete. The size effect on compressive strength is more prominent in RPC containing fiber. Bazant's size effect formula of compressive strength applies to RPC. A formula is given to predict the compressive strength of cubic RPC specimens 100 mm on a side where the fiber dosage ranges from 0-2%.

  20. Causality in Statistical Power: Isomorphic Properties of Measurement, Research Design, Effect Size, and Sample Size

    OpenAIRE

    R. Eric Heidel

    2016-01-01

    Statistical power is the ability to detect a significant effect, given that the effect actually exists in a population. Like most statistical concepts, statistical power tends to induce cognitive dissonance in hepatology researchers. However, planning for statistical power by an a priori sample size calculation is of paramount importance when designing a research study. There are five specific empirical components that make up an a priori sample size calculation: the scale of measurement of t...

  1. On Beaming Effects in Afterglow Light Curves

    OpenAIRE

    Moderski, R.; Sikora, M.; Bulik, T.

    1999-01-01

    The most luminous GRBs can be explained in terms of models involving stellar mass central engines only if the ejecta are beamed. As was pointed out by Rhoads, the dynamics of the blast wave, formed by the beamed ejecta sweeping the external gas, can be significantly modified by the sideways expansion. This is because in this case the surface of the blast wave increases faster than just due to the radial divergence and so the blast wave deceleration rate increases faster. According to analytic...

  2. Country and size effects in financial ratios: a European perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Serrano Cinca, C.; Mar Molinero, C.; Gallizo Larraz, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    Harmonised aggregate financial statements are published by the European Commission in the BACH database. This information is organised by country, size of firm, and year. Financial ratios obtained from this database are analysed using multivariate statistical techniques in order to explore country and size effects. The data relates to three size groups, eleven countries, fourteen years, and fifteen financial ratios. It is found that financial ratios reflect the size of the firm, but that the ...

  3. Investigating size effects of complex nanostructures through Young-Laplace equation and finite element analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Dingjie; Xie, Yi Min; Huang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Shiwei, E-mail: shiwei.zhou@rmit.edu.au [Centre for Innovative Structures and Materials, School of Civil, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne 3001 (Australia); Li, Qing [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2015-11-28

    Analytical studies on the size effects of a simply-shaped beam fixed at both ends have successfully explained the sudden changes of effective Young's modulus as its diameter decreases below 100 nm. Yet they are invalid for complex nanostructures ubiquitously existing in nature. In accordance with a generalized Young-Laplace equation, one of the representative size effects is transferred to non-uniformly distributed pressure against an external surface due to the imbalance of inward and outward loads. Because the magnitude of pressure depends on the principal curvatures, iterative steps have to be adopted to gradually stabilize the structure in finite element analysis. Computational results are in good agreement with both experiment data and theoretical prediction. Furthermore, the investigation on strengthened and softened Young's modulus for two complex nanostructures demonstrates that the proposed computational method provides a general and effective approach to analyze the size effects for nanostructures in arbitrary shape.

  4. Investigating size effects of complex nanostructures through Young-Laplace equation and finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical studies on the size effects of a simply-shaped beam fixed at both ends have successfully explained the sudden changes of effective Young's modulus as its diameter decreases below 100 nm. Yet they are invalid for complex nanostructures ubiquitously existing in nature. In accordance with a generalized Young-Laplace equation, one of the representative size effects is transferred to non-uniformly distributed pressure against an external surface due to the imbalance of inward and outward loads. Because the magnitude of pressure depends on the principal curvatures, iterative steps have to be adopted to gradually stabilize the structure in finite element analysis. Computational results are in good agreement with both experiment data and theoretical prediction. Furthermore, the investigation on strengthened and softened Young's modulus for two complex nanostructures demonstrates that the proposed computational method provides a general and effective approach to analyze the size effects for nanostructures in arbitrary shape

  5. SIZE EFFECT ON THE BENDING AND TENSILE STRENGTH OF MICROMACHINED POLYSILICON FILMS FOR MEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DingJianning; YangJichang; WenShizhu

    2004-01-01

    The bending strength of microfabricated polysilicon beams was measured by beam bending using a nanoindenter. Also, the tensile strength of microfabricated polysilicon thin films was measured by tensile testing with a new microtensile test device. It was found that the bending strength and tensile strength of polysilicon microstructures exerts size effect on the size of the specimens. In such cases, the size effect can be traced back to the ratio of surface area to volume as the governing parameter. A statistical analysis of the bending strength for various specimen sizes shows that the average bending strength of polysilicon microcantilever beams is 2.885±0.408 GPa. The measured average value of Young's modulus, 164±1.2 GPa, falls within the theoretical bounds. The average fracture tensile strength is 1.36 GPa with a standard deviation of 0.14 GPa, and the Weibull modulus is 10.4-11.7, respectively. The tensile testing of 40 specimens on failure results in a recommendation for design that the nominal strain be maintained below 0.0057.

  6. Beam size reduction of a several hundred-keV compact ion microbeam system by improving the extraction condition in an ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A several hundred-keV compact ion microbeam system with a three-stage acceleration lens has been developed to form an ion beam of several micrometers in diameter. In a previous study of the Ohkubo et al. (2013) and Ishii et al. (2014), a hydrogen beam of 143 keV having 17 μm diameter was experimentally formed using such a microbeam system. It was demonstrated that a three-stage acceleration lens functioned as a focusing lens and indicated that the beam diameter (hereinafter referred to as the “beam size”) depended on the extraction voltage to generate the ion beam and the vacuum pressure in the extraction space in a plasma-type ion source. In this study, the hydrogen beam sizes were experimentally measured at 130 keV as functions of the extraction voltage and vacuum pressure to form the beam size with several micrometers in diameter. These two relationships showed that beam sizes were reduced in the extraction voltage range of 400–500 V and when the vacuum pressure was lowered to a minimum value of 5.33 × 10−5 Pa. In addition, the result showed that the beam size was dominantly influenced by the vacuum pressure. Consequently, a hydrogen beam 5.8 μm in diameter was formed experimentally—the smallest beam yet obtained

  7. Electron beam effects on gelatin polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main field of electron-beam radiation processing applications is the modification of polymeric material. Polymer development includes new pathways to produce natural polymers with better mechanical and barrier properties and thermal stability. The aim of this paper was to investigate the behavior of a gelatin/acrylamide polymer treated by electron-beam radiation. Gelatin is a heterogeneous mixture of water-soluble proteins of high average molecular mass derived by hydrolytic action from animal collagen, a fibrous insoluble protein, which is widely found in nature as the major constituent of skin, bones and connective tissue. Hydrolyzed collagen is composed of a unique sequence of amino acids, characterized particularly by the high content of glycine, proline and hydroxyproline. Among biomaterials, gelatin is an interesting material because is a partially crystalline polymer and has a relatively low melting point. Samples of gelatin together with glycerin as plasticizer and acrylamide as copolymer were irradiated with doses of 10 kGy and 40 kGy, using an electron beam accelerator, dose rate 22.41kGy/s, at room temperature in presence of air. After irradiation, some preliminary analyses were done like viscometry, texture analyses and colorimetry. The results of the diverse tests showed changes that can be ascribed to radiation-induced crosslinking. The electron-beam processed acrylamide-gelatin polymer using glycerin as plasticizer must be first extensively characterized before to be used for general applications. (author)

  8. Development of neural basis for chinese orthographic neighborhood size effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Li, Qing-Lin; Ding, Guo-Sheng; Bi, Hong-Yan

    2016-02-01

    The brain activity of orthographic neighborhood size (N size) effect in Chinese character naming has been studied in adults, meanwhile behavioral studies have revealed a developmental trend of Chinese N-size effect in developing readers. However, it is unclear whether and how the neural mechanism of N-size effect changes in Chinese children along with development. Here we address this issue using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Forty-four students from the 3(rd) , 5(th) , and 7(th) grades were scanned during silent naming of Chinese characters. After scanning, all participants took part in an overt naming test outside the scanner, and results of the naming task showed that the 3(rd) graders named characters from large neighborhoods faster than those from small neighborhoods, revealing a facilitatory N-size effect; the 5(th) graders showed null N-size effect while the 7(th) graders showed an inhibitory N-size effect. Neuroimaging results revealed that only the 3(rd) graders exhibited a significant N-size effect in the left middle occipital activity, with greater activation for large N-size characters. Results of 5(th) and 7(th) graders showed significant N-size effects in the left middle frontal gyrus, in which 5(th) graders induced greater activation in large N-size condition than in small N-size condition, while 7(th) graders exhibited an opposite effect which was similar to the adult pattern reported in a previous study. The current findings suggested the transition from broadly tuned to finely tuned orthographic representation with reading development, and the inhibition from neighbors' phonology for higher graders. Hum Brain Mapp 37:632-647, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26777875

  9. Portion size and intended consumption. Evidence for a pre-consumption portion size effect in males?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Eric; te Raa, Wesselien; Hardman, Charlotte A

    2015-08-01

    Larger portions increase energy intake (the 'portion size effect'); however, the mechanisms behind this effect are unclear. Although pre-meal intentions are thought to be an important determinant of energy intake, little research has examined how much of a meal individuals intend to eat when served standard versus larger portion sizes. Three studies examined the effect of manipulating portion size on intended food consumption. In Studies 1 (spaghetti bolognese) and 2 (curry and rice) male participants were shown an image of either a standard or a larger meal and indicated how much of the meal they intended to consume. In Study 3 male and female participants were served either a standard or a larger portion of ice cream for dessert, they indicated how much they intended to consume and then ate as much of the ice cream as they desired. Regardless of being shown standard or large portion sizes, in Studies 1 and 2 participants reported that they intended to eat the majority of the meal, equating to a large difference in intended energy consumption between portion size conditions (a 'pre-consumption portion size effect'). This finding was replicated in male participants in Study 3, although females intended to eat a smaller proportion of the larger portion of ice cream, compared to the standard portion. Both male and female participants tended to eat in accordance with their pre-meal intentions and a portion size effect on actual consumption was subsequently observed in males, but not in females. The portion size effect may be observed when measuring pre-meal intended consumption in males. PMID:25865660

  10. GPU-based finite-size pencil beam algorithm with 3D-density correction for radiotherapy dose calculation

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Xuejun; Jelen, Urszula; Li, Jinsheng; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2011-01-01

    Targeting at the development of an accurate and efficient dose calculation engine for online adaptive radiotherapy, we have implemented a finite size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm with a 3D-density correction method on GPU. This new GPU-based dose engine is built on our previously published ultrafast FSPB computational framework. Dosimetric evaluations against Monte Carlo dose calculations are conducted on 10 IMRT treatment plans (5 head-and-neck cases and 5 lung cases). For all cases, there i...

  11. Azimuthal multiple-beam interference effects with combinations of vortex beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Ignacio; Davis, Jeffrey A; Womble-Dahl, Taylor; Cottrell, Don M

    2015-05-15

    We create a series of vortex beams consisting of positive and negative topological charges and develop a geometry where they interfere creating azimuthal multiple-beam interference effects. Usually the combination of two beams with opposite charges creates an azimuthal two-beam interference effect where the intensity varies sinusoidally with azimuthal angle. We combine several of these beams to create patterns where the interference becomes more sharply defined in the azimuthal direction and where destructive interference eliminates some of the intensity peaks. The process is complicated by the fact that the radii of the different vortex beams depend on the topological charge and the focal length of the Fourier lens. We generate a series of patterns where the different charges are focused with different focal lengths such that their radii agree. However to encode these, we encode patterns from the lower charges that have been Fresnel diffracted to the plane of the highest charge. These complicated patterns are encoded onto a liquid crystal display (LCD). Experimental results agree well with theory. PMID:26393734

  12. Size Effect for Normal Strength Concrete in Uniaxial Tension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李庆斌; 尹玉先

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a new size effect model for normal strength concrete subjected to uniaxial tension. The model is based on two extremes, sand cement paste in uniaxial tension and a sand-cement-paste/rock interface in uniaxial tension. Uniaxial tension tests with normal strength concrete measuring the tensile strength of normal strength concrete specimens with different geometrical shapes and different ratios of the aggregate size to the characteristic dimension of the concrete specimen show a significant size effect. The theoretical size effect law prediction agrees well with the experimental data.

  13. Some Finite Size Effects in Simulations of Glass Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Horbach, J.; Kob, W; Binder, K.; Angell, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    We present the results of a molecular dynamics computer simulation in which we investigate the dynamics of silica. By considering different system sizes, we show that in simulations of the dynamics of this strong glass former surprisingly large finite size effects are present. In particular we demonstrate that the relaxation times of the incoherent intermediate scattering function and the time dependence of the mean squared displacement are affected by such finite size effects. By compressing...

  14. Effect Sizes for 2×2 Contingency Tables

    OpenAIRE

    OLIVIER, JAKE; Bell, Melanie L

    2013-01-01

    Sample size calculations are an important part of research to balance the use of resources and to avoid undue harm to participants. Effect sizes are an integral part of these calculations and meaningful values are often unknown to the researcher. General recommendations for effect sizes have been proposed for several commonly used statistical procedures. For the analysis of tables, recommendations have been given for the correlation coefficient for binary data; however, it is well known that ...

  15. Finite size effect of harmonic measure estimation in a DLA model: Variable size of probe particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menshutin, Anton Yu.; Shchur, Lev N.; Vinokour, Valery M.

    2008-11-01

    A finite size effect in the probing of the harmonic measure in simulation of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) growth is investigated. We introduce a variable size of probe particles, to estimate harmonic measure and extract the fractal dimension of DLA clusters taking two limits, of vanishingly small probe particle size and of infinitely large size of a DLA cluster. We generate 1000 DLA clusters consisting of 50 million particles each, using an off-lattice killing-free algorithm developed in the early work. The introduced method leads to unprecedented accuracy in the estimation of the fractal dimension. We discuss the variation of the probability distribution function with the size of probing particles.

  16. Size effect in nuclide leachability of plastic solidified bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In medium to low level radioactive solid wastes from nuclear power plants, the experiment on nuclide leachability has been usually made by solid size of about 100 cm3. The results are taken as the nuclide leachability for the solids of actual size (about 200 liters). It has been studied how the leachability of nuclides varies with the size of solids. Therefore, diffusion coefficient was measured for the plastic solids of different sizes from 5 cm3 to 235 cm3 in order to examine the size effect. In the range of size measured, the effect of solid size upon the diffusion coefficient was little observed; the values were about 10-5 cm2/day in all cases. The thermosetting resin used for plastic solidification was unsaturated polyester plus sodium sulfate (40/60). About 0.2 μCi of 137Cs per 10 g of solid was contained in each plastic solid. (Mori, K.)

  17. Size-effects on yield surfaces for micro reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Reza; Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2011-01-01

    . The center of the yield surface is tracked under uniaxial loading both in the transverse and longitudinal directions and an anisotropic Bauschinger effect is shown to depend on the size of the fibers. Results are compared to conventional predictions, and size-effects on the kinematic hardening...

  18. Matrix effects in biological SIMS using cluster ion beams of different chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnajeebi, Afnan M; Vickerman, John C; Lockyer, Nicholas P

    2016-06-01

    The influence of the matrix effect on secondary ion yield presents a very significant challenge in quantitative secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis, for example, in determining the relative concentrations of metabolites that characterize normal biological activities or disease progression. Not only the sample itself but also the choice of primary ion beam may influence the extent of ionization suppression/enhancement due to the local chemical environment. In this study, an assessment of ionization matrix effects was carried out on model systems using C60 (+), Arn (+), and (H2O)n (+) cluster ion beams. The analytes are pure and binary mixtures of amino acids arginine and histidine biological standards. Ion beams of 20 keV were compared with a range of cluster sizes n = 1000-10 000. The component secondary ion yields were assessed for matrix effects using different primary ion beams and sample composition. The presence of water in the cluster beam is associated with a reduction in the observed matrix effects, suggesting that chemically reactive ion beams may provide a route to more quantitative SIMS analysis of complex biological systems. PMID:26825287

  19. Effect of Processing and Aging on Particle Size of Explosives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒远杰; 刘世俊; 董海山; 郝莹; 詹春红; 陈捷

    2003-01-01

    Influence of such processes as molding powder production, pel-lets pressing and aging under different condit/ons on particle size of TATB ( 1,3,S-trlamino-2,4,6-trinltrobenzene ) and HMX (cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine) was experimentally studied. The results showed that parflele size of these explosives was greatly changed before and airier moldinu powder produc-tion, but for different size grade of explosive this change was not the same; pressing process had also great effect on explosive particle size, but before and after ageing process explosive par-tide size did not change seriously.

  20. Incoherent beam-beam effect---The relationship between tune-shift, bunch length and dynamic aperture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulation studies of the influence of long bunches on the beam-beam effect in particle colliders suggest that, despite the risk from synchro-betatron resonances, the attainable luminosity may be greater than that obtained for short bunches

  1. Size-effects on cavitation instabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2005-01-01

    growth is here analyzed for such cases. A finite strain generalization of a higher order strain gradient plasticity theory is applied for a power-law hardening material, and the numerical analyses are carried out for an axisymmetric unit cell containing a spherical void. In the range of high stress......In metal-ceramic systems the constraint on plastic flow leads to so high stress triaxialities that cavitation instabilities may occur. If the void radius is on the order of magnitude of a characteristic length for the metal, the rate of void growth is reduced, and the possibility of unstable cavity...... triaxiality, where cavitation instabilities are predicted by conventional plasticity theory, such instabilities are also found for the nonlocal theory, but the effects of gradient hardening delay the onset of the instability. Furthermore, in some cases the cavitation stress reaches a maximum and then decays...

  2. Repeated Habitat Disturbances by Fire Decrease Local Effective Population Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrey, Aaron W; Ragsdale, Alexandria K; McCoy, Earl D; Mushinsky, Henry R

    2016-07-01

    Effective population size is a fundamental parameter in population genetics, and factors that alter effective population size will shape the genetic characteristics of populations. Habitat disturbance may have a large effect on genetic characteristics of populations by influencing immigration and gene flow, particularly in fragmented habitats. We used the Florida Sand Skink (Plestiodon reynoldsi) to investigate the effect of fire-based habitat disturbances on the effective population size in the highly threatened, severely fragmented, and fire dependent Florida scrub habitat. We screened 7 microsatellite loci in 604 individuals collected from 12 locations at Archbold Biological Station. Archbold Biological Station has an active fire management plan and detailed records of fires dating to 1967. Our objective was to determine how the timing, number, and intervals between fires affect effective population size, focusing on multiple fires in the same location. Effective population size was higher in areas that had not been burned for more than 10 years and decreased with number of fires and shorter time between fires. A similar pattern was observed in abundance: increasing abundance with time-since-fire and decreasing abundance with number of fires. The ratio of effective population size to census size was higher at sites with more recent fires and tended to decrease with time-since-last-fire. These results suggest that habitat disturbances, such as fire, may have a large effect in the genetic characteristics of local populations and that Florida Sand Skinks are well adapted to the natural fire dynamics required to maintain Florida scrub. PMID:26976940

  3. The System of Nanosecond 280-keV-Hesize="-1">+ Pulsed Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Junphong, Pimporn; Lekprasert, Banyat; Suwannakachorn, Dusadee; Thongnopparat, N; Vilaithong, Thiraphat; Wiedemann, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    At Fast Neutron Research Facility,the 150 kV-pulseds neutron generator is being upgraded to produce a 280-keV-pulsed-He beam for time-of-flight Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. It involves replacing the existing beam line elements by a multicusp ion source, a 400-kV accelerating tube, 45o-double focusing dipole magnet and quadrupole lens. The Multicusp ion source is a compact filament-driven of 2.6 cm in diameter and 8 cm in length. The current extracted is 20.4 μA with 13 kV of extraction voltage and 8.8 kV of Einzel lens voltage. The beam emittance has been found to vary between 6-12 mm mrad. The beam transport system has to be redesigned based on the new elements. The important part of a good pulsed beam depends on the pulsing system. The two main parts are the chopper and buncher. An optimized geometry for the 280 keV pulsed helium ion beam will be presented and discussed. The PARMELA code has been used to optimize the space charge effect, resulting in pulse width of less than 2 ns at a t...

  4. Effect of electron beam irradiation on pollen mother cells of gladiolus 'chaoji'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to test the effects of various doses of electron beam on M1 generation pollen mother cells (PMC), the corm of gladiolus 'chaoji' was irradiated by electron beam with 3 MeV energy. Some abnormalities of meiosis of pollen mother cells were studied and the bands of protein subunit were analyzed by SDS-PAGE for the irradiated corm. The genetic damage at meiosis of gladiolus is observed, and the types of chromosomal aberrations are laggard chromosomes, chromosomal bridge, chromosome outside nucleus, unequal separation of chromosome, micronuclei and so on. Some trispores and paraspores are viewed at tetraspore period. The shape and size of the microspores vary in some treated materials, and most of microspores display little volume. The statistic of aberrance types and frequencies in PMCs show that aberrance types are chromosome outside nucleus and micronuclei mostly. The SDS-PAGE result shows that protein expression of M1 generation pollen is obviously changed by electron beam irradiation. Low dose of electron beam has obvious effects, and some special proteins subunit bands are found among varieties of irradiation dosage respectively. The protein bands are absent at the dose more than 160 Gy compared to low dose of electron beam. The results indicate that electron beam irradiation is an effective way for gladiolus breeding. (authors)

  5. SU-E-T-586: Field Size Dependence of Output Factor for Uniform Scanning Proton Beams: A Comparison of TPS Calculation, Measurement and Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Output dependence on field size for uniform scanning beams, and the accuracy of treatment planning system (TPS) calculation are not well studied. The purpose of this work is to investigate the dependence of output on field size for uniform scanning beams and compare it among TPS calculation, measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Field size dependence was studied using various field sizes between 2.5 cm diameter to 10 cm diameter. The field size factor was studied for a number of proton range and modulation combinations based on output at the center of spread out Bragg peak normalized to a 10 cm diameter field. Three methods were used and compared in this study: 1) TPS calculation, 2) ionization chamber measurement, and 3) Monte Carlos simulation. The XiO TPS (Electa, St. Louis) was used to calculate the output factor using a pencil beam algorithm; a pinpoint ionization chamber was used for measurements; and the Fluka code was used for Monte Carlo simulations. Results: The field size factor varied with proton beam parameters, such as range, modulation, and calibration depth, and could decrease over 10% from a 10 cm to 3 cm diameter field for a large range proton beam. The XiO TPS predicted the field size factor relatively well at large field size, but could differ from measurements by 5% or more for small field and large range beams. Monte Carlo simulations predicted the field size factor within 1.5% of measurements. Conclusion: Output factor can vary largely with field size, and needs to be accounted for accurate proton beam delivery. This is especially important for small field beams such as in stereotactic proton therapy, where the field size dependence is large and TPS calculation is inaccurate. Measurements or Monte Carlo simulations are recommended for output determination for such cases

  6. Determination of the size distribution of carbon and trace elements in suspended particulate matter by ion beam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The size distribution of carbon and trace elements in suspended particulate matter (SPM) collected by a low pressure impactor has been investigated. Sampling was carried out at Setagaya, a typical residential area located southwest of Tokyo, Japan. The low pressure impactor has a cascade design with 12-stage collection plates, allowing the collection of size-fractionated SPM. It operates at a flow rate of 20 l/min. Elemental composition was determined by ion beam analysis, particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS). PIXE provided data for elements from Al to U while RBS supplied information on elements lighter than Al such as C and O. The analysis is fast, non-destructive and requires no sample preparation. It is very suitable for determination of elements in SPM. In this paper we discuss size distribution and element concentrations in SPM together with their weekly and seasonal variations

  7. Simulating Electron Cloud Effects in Heavy-Ion Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stray electrons can be introduced in heavy ion fusion accelerators as a result of ionization of ambient gas or gas released from walls due to halo-ion impact, or as a result of secondary-electron emission. We summarize here results from several studies of electron-cloud accumulation and effects: (1) Calculation of the electron cloud produced by electron desorption from computed beam ion loss; the importance of ion scattering is shown; (2) Simulation of the effect of specified electron cloud distributions on ion beam dynamics. We find electron cloud variations that are resonant with the breathing mode of the beam have the biggest impact on the beam (larger than other resonant and random variations), and that the ion beam is surprisingly robust, with an electron density several percent of the beam density required to produce significant beam degradation in a 200-quadrupole system. We identify a possible instability associated with desorption and resonance with the breathing mode. (3) Preliminary investigations of a long-timestep algorithm for electron dynamics in arbitrary magnetic fields

  8. Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Aggregate Size on Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Junko Okuda-Shimazaki; Saiko Takaku; Koki Kanehira; Shuji Sonezaki; Akiyohshi Taniguchi

    2010-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (titania) nanoparticle aggregation is an important factor in understanding cytotoxicity. However, the effect of the aggregate size of nanoparticles on cells is unclear. We prepared two sizes of titania aggregate particles and investigated their biological activity by analyzing biomarker expression based on mRNA expression analysis. The aggregate particle sizes of small and large aggregated titania were 166 nm (PDI = 0.291) and 596 nm (PDI = 0.417), respectively. These two siz...

  9. Reduction of effective terahertz focal spot size by means of nested concentric parabolic reflectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Neumann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An ongoing limitation of terahertz spectroscopy is that the technique is generally limited to the study of relatively large samples of order 4 mm across due to the generally large size of the focal beam spot. We present a nested concentric parabolic reflector design which can reduce the terahertz focal spot size. This parabolic reflector design takes advantage of the feature that reflected rays experience a relative time delay which is the same for all paths. The increase in effective optical path for reflected light is equivalent to the aperture diameter itself. We have shown that the light throughput of an aperture of 2 mm can be increased by a factor 15 as compared to a regular aperture of the same size at low frequencies. This technique can potentially be used to reduce the focal spot size in terahertz spectroscopy and enable the study of smaller samples.

  10. Reduction of effective terahertz focal spot size by means of nested concentric parabolic reflectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, V. A., E-mail: v.a.neumann@student.utwente.nl [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, 21218 (United States); Faculty of Science & Technology, University of Twente, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Laurita, N. J.; Pan, LiDong; Armitage, N. P., E-mail: npa@pha.jhu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, 21218 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    An ongoing limitation of terahertz spectroscopy is that the technique is generally limited to the study of relatively large samples of order 4 mm across due to the generally large size of the focal beam spot. We present a nested concentric parabolic reflector design which can reduce the terahertz focal spot size. This parabolic reflector design takes advantage of the feature that reflected rays experience a relative time delay which is the same for all paths. The increase in effective optical path for reflected light is equivalent to the aperture diameter itself. We have shown that the light throughput of an aperture of 2 mm can be increased by a factor 15 as compared to a regular aperture of the same size at low frequencies. This technique can potentially be used to reduce the focal spot size in terahertz spectroscopy and enable the study of smaller samples.

  11. Reduction of effective terahertz focal spot size by means of nested concentric parabolic reflectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ongoing limitation of terahertz spectroscopy is that the technique is generally limited to the study of relatively large samples of order 4 mm across due to the generally large size of the focal beam spot. We present a nested concentric parabolic reflector design which can reduce the terahertz focal spot size. This parabolic reflector design takes advantage of the feature that reflected rays experience a relative time delay which is the same for all paths. The increase in effective optical path for reflected light is equivalent to the aperture diameter itself. We have shown that the light throughput of an aperture of 2 mm can be increased by a factor 15 as compared to a regular aperture of the same size at low frequencies. This technique can potentially be used to reduce the focal spot size in terahertz spectroscopy and enable the study of smaller samples

  12. Effect sizes for research univariate and multivariate applications

    CERN Document Server

    Grissom, Robert J

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this book is to inform a broad readership about a variety of measures and estimators of effect sizes for research, their proper applications and interpretations, and their limitations. Its focus is on analyzing post-research results. The book provides an evenhanded account of controversial issues in the field, such as the role of significance testing. Consistent with the trend toward greater use of robust statistical methods, the book pays much attention to the statistical assumptions of the methods and to robust measures of effect size.Effect Sizes for Research

  13. Effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated Miscanthus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particle size reduction is a crucial factor in transportation logistics as well as cellulosic conversion. The effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated Miscanthus x giganteus was determined. Miscanthus was ground using a hammer mill equipped with screens having 0.08, 2.0 or 6.0...

  14. Shaped E-beam nanopatterning with proximity effect correction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urbánek, Michal; Kolařík, Vladimír; Matějka, Milan; Matějka, František; Bok, Jan; Mikšík, P.; Vašina, J.

    Ostrava: TANGER Ltd, 2012, s. 717-722. ISBN 978-80-87294-32-1. [NANOCON 2012. International Conference /4./. Brno (CZ), 23.10.2012-25.10.2012] R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/576; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA TA ČR TE01020233 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : e-beam writer * shaped beam * proximity effect correction Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  15. Beam-beam effects in the high-pile-up tests of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Trad, G

    2014-01-01

    Investigating the beam-beam limit in the LHC is of great importance, since identifying its source is crucial for the luminosity optimization scenario. Several experiments were carried out to search for this limit and check whether it is dominated by the head-on (HO) or the long-range (LR) interactions. In this paper only the HO collision effects will be considered, tracking the evolution of the maximum tune shift achieved during the dedicated machine developments and the special high pile-up fills.

  16. Beam-beam effects in the high-pile-up tests of the LHC

    OpenAIRE

    Trad, G.

    2014-01-01

    Investigating the beam-beam limit in the LHC is of great importance, since identifying its source is crucial for the luminosity optimization scenario. Several experiments were carried out to search for this limit and check whether it is dominated by the head-on (HO) or the long-range (LR) interactions. In this paper only the HO collision effects will be considered, tracking the evolution of the maximum tune shift achieved during the dedicated machine developments and the special high pile-up ...

  17. A novel method for sub-micrometer transverse electron beam size measurements using optical transition radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Aryshev, A.; Boogert, S. T.; Howell, D.; Karataev, P.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.

    2010-01-01

    Optical Transition Radiation (OTR) appearing when a charged particle crosses a boundary between two media with different dielectric properties has widely been used as a tool for transverse profile measurements of charged particle beams in various facilities worldwide. The resolution of the monitor is defined by so-called Point Spread Function (PSF), source distribution generated by a single electron and projected by an optical system onto a screen. In this paper we represent the development o...

  18. Beam divergence effects on high power optical parametric oscillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hui-Qing; Geng Ai-Cong; Bo Yong; Wu Ling-An; Cui Da-Fu; Xu Zu-Yan

    2005-01-01

    The beam divergence effects of the input pump laser on a high power nanosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) have been numerically simulated. The OPO conversion efficiency is affected due to the angular deviation of real laser beams from ideal phase matching conditions. Our theoretical model is based on the decomposition of the Gaussian beam and assumes each component has a single deviation angle and thus a Particular wave vector mismatch. We take into account the variable intensity profile in the spatial and temporal domains of the Gaussian beam, the pump depletion effects for large-signal processes as well as the oscillatory effects of the three waves. Two nonlinear crystals β-BaB2O4 (BBO) and LiB3O5 (LBO) have been investigated in detail. The results indicate that the degree of beam divergence strongly influences the maximum pump intensity, optimum crystal length and OPO conversion efficiency.The impact of beam divergence is much more severe in the case of critical phase-matching for BBO than in the case of non-critical phase-matching for LBO. The results provide a way to choose the optimum parameters for a high power ns OPO such as the nonlinear material, the crystal length and the pump intensity, etc. Good agreement is obtained with our experimental results.

  19. Effects of beam velocity and density on an ion-beam pulse moving in magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xiao-ying; Zhao, Yong-tao; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The wakefield and stopping power of an ion-beam pulse moving in magnetized plasmas are investigated by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The effects of beam velocity and density on the wake and stopping power are discussed. In the presence of magnetic field, it is found that beside the longitudinal conversed V-shaped wakes, the strong whistler wave are observed when low-density and low-velocity pulses moving in plasmas. The corresponding stopping powers are enhanced due to the drag of these whistler waves. As beam velocities increase, the whistler waves disappear, and only are conversed V-shape wakes observed. The corresponding stopping powers are reduced compared with these in isotropic plasmas. When high-density pulses transport in the magnetized plasmas, the whistler waves are greatly inhibited for low-velocity pulses and disappear for high-velocity pulses. Additionally, the magnetic field reduces the stopping powers for all high-density cases.

  20. Orbital properties of micron-size dust determined using the Arecibo 430 MHz dual-beam radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janches, Diego; Meisel, David D.; Nolan, Michael C.; Bartlett, Brent D.; Mathews, John D.; Zhou, Qihou H.; Moser, Danielle E.

    Orbital results derived from radar observations of micron-size dust entering the earth's atmosphere are presented and discussed. These observations are performed using the 430 MHz Arecibo Observatory (AO) dual-beam radar system in Puerto Rico - a unique ground-base tool for the study of dust. The AO radar daily daily thousands of decelerating particles in the size range 0.5-100 microns for which precise altitude; instantaneous Doppler velocity and (linear) deceleration are obtained. These results help bridge the gap between spacecraft dust measurements and traditional meteor radar capabilities. During 2002, monthly micrometeor radar observations were performed. Each month, a minimum of one, 14 hour interval of observations (18:00-08:00 hrs LT) were carried out. During this year-long observing campaign, the antenna line feed was pointing vertically while the Gregorian feed was pointed at a zenith angle of 15 degrees. The off-vertical radar beam was initially placed pointing north and every 30 minutes was rotated 180 degrees. Preliminary results show an assymetry on the orbital properties of dust at 1 AU and indicate that the traditional idea of sporadic meteor sources may be too simplistic to describe the sporadic micrometeor complex, at least for the particle sizes detected by AO.

  1. Size effect on efficiency droop of blue light emitting diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Y.B.; Chen, Z.Z. [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructures and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Photonics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NW (United Kingdom); Wang, S.Y.; Zhang, G.Y. [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructures and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Gong, Z.; Xie, E.Y.; Chen, Y.J.; Zhang, Y.F.; McKendry, J.; Massoubre, D.; Gu, E.D. [Institute of Photonics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NW (United Kingdom); Rae, B.R.; Henderson, R.K. [Institute for Integrated Micro and Nano Systems, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JL (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    In this paper, the size effects on the efficiency droop (ED) in blue InGaN/GaN quantum well light emitting diode are investigated. The smaller size LEDs can work well under much higher power density, especially when the size is reduced to under 40 micro-meters. It shows a weaker ED in these small LEDs. Time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) measurements show a longer electroluminescence lifetime for smaller size LEDs, which implicates the nonradiative recombination is reduced. It is likely due to Auger recombination reduction by quantum well (QW) band flattened with the device size decreasing. Cathodoluminescence results indicates that the strain in QWs is relaxed both in the whole pillar and along radial direction of the pillar. The better performance of the smaller size LED is likely attributed to strain relaxation (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. EFFECTS OF ULTRASOUND ON THE MORPHOLOGY, PARTICLE SIZE, CRYSTALLINITY, AND CRYSTALLITE SIZE OF CELLULOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUMARI SUMARI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to optimize ultrasound treatment to produce fragment of cellulose that is low in particles size, crystallite size, and crystallinity. Slurry of 1 % (w/v the cellulose was sonicated at different time periods and temperatures. An ultrasonic reactor was operated at 300 Watts and 28 kHz to cut down the polymer into smaller particles. We proved that ultrasound damages and fragments the cellulose particles into shorter fibers. The fiber lengths were reduced from in the range of 80-120 µm to 30-50 µm due to an hour ultrasonication and became 20-30 µm after 5 hours. It was also found some signs of erosion on the surface and stringy. The acoustic cavitation also generated a decrease in particle size, crystallinity, and crystallite size of the cellulose along with increasing sonication time but it did not change d-spacing. However, the highest reduction of particle size, crystallite size, and crystallinity of the cellulose occurred within the first hour of ultrasonication, after which the efficiency was decreased. The particle diameter, crystallite size, and crystallinity were decreased from 19.88 µm to 15.96 µm, 5.81 Å to 2.98 Å, and 77.7% to 73.9% respectively due to an hour ultrasound treatment at 40 °C. The treatment that was conducted at 40 °C or 60 °C did not give a different effect significantly. Cellulose with a smaller particle and crystallite size as well as a more amorphous shape is preferred for further study.

  3. The effect of asymmetric beams on polarized spectral indices

    CERN Document Server

    Wehus, Ingunn Kathrine; Eriksen, Hans Kristian

    2012-01-01

    We study four particularly bright polarized compact objects (Tau A, Virgo A, 3C273 and Fornax A) in the 7-year WMAP sky maps, with the goal of understanding potential systematics involved in estimation of foreground spectral indices. We estimate the spectral index, the polarization angle, the polarization fraction and apparent size and shape of these objects when smoothed to a nominal resolution of 1 degree FWHM. Second, we compute the spectral index as a function of polarization orientation, alpha. Because these objects are approximately point sources with constant polarization angle, this function should be constant in the absence of systematics. However, computing it for the K- and Ka-band WMAP data we find strong index variations for all four sources. For Tau A, we find a spectral index beta=-2.59+-0.03 for alpha=30 degrees, and beta=-2.03+-0.01 for alpha=50 degrees. On the other hand, the spectral index between Ka and Q band is found to be stable. The most likely cause of this effect is beam asymmetries,...

  4. Economic Effects of Increased Control Zone Sizes in Conflict Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Koushik

    1998-01-01

    A methodology for estimating the economic effects of different control zone sizes used in conflict resolutions between aircraft is presented in this paper. The methodology is based on estimating the difference in flight times of aircraft with and without the control zone, and converting the difference into a direct operating cost. Using this methodology the effects of increased lateral and vertical control zone sizes are evaluated.

  5. Cohesive stresses and size effect in quasi-brittle materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V E Saouma; D Natekar

    2002-08-01

    A novel approach to the derivation of Ba$\\breve{z}$ant’s size effect law is presented. Contrarily to the original Lagrangian derivation which hinged on energetic consideration, a Newtonian approach based on local stress intensity factors is presented. Through this approach, it is shown that Ba$\\breve{z}$ant’s size effect law is the first (and dominant) term in a series expansion for the nominal stress. Furthermore, analytical expressions for are derived for selected specimen geometries.

  6. A GPU-based finite-size pencil beam algorithm with 3D-density correction for radiotherapy dose calculation

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Xuejun; Jelen, Urszula; Li, Jinsheng; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2011-01-01

    Targeting at the development of an accurate and efficient dose calculation engine for online adaptive radiotherapy, we have implemented a finite size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm with a 3D-density correction method on GPU. This new GPU-based dose engine is built on our previously published ultrafast FSPB computational framework [Gu et al. Phys. Med. Biol. 54 6287-97, 2009]. Dosimetric evaluations against Monte Carlo dose calculations are conducted on 10 IMRT treatment plans (5 head-and-neck c...

  7. Biological Effects on Fruit Fly by N+ ion Beam Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Mutation induced by low energy ion beam implantation has beenapplied widely both in plants and microbes. However, due to the vacuum limitation, such ion implantation into animals was never studied except for silkworm. In this study, Pupae of fruit fly were irradiated with different dosage N+ ions at energy 20 KeV to study the biological effect of ion beam on animal. The results showed a saddle-like curve exists between incubate rate and dosage. Damage of pupae by ion beam implantation was observed using scanning electron microscope. Some individuals with incomplete wing were obtained after implantation but no similar character was observed in their offspring. Furthermore, about 5.47% mutants with wide variation appeared in M1 generation. Therefore, ion beam implantation could be widely used for mutation breeding.

  8. Different effects of laser contrast on proton emission from normal large foils and transverse-size-reduced targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yuan; Ge, Xulei; Yang, Su; Wei, Wenqing; Yu, Tongpu; Liu, Feng; Chen, Min; Liu, Jingquan; Yuan, Xiaohui; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    We report experimental results on the effects of laser contrast on beam divergence and energy spectrum of protons emitted from ultrashort intense laser interactions with normal large foils and transverse-size-reduced targets. Correlations between beam divergence and spectral shape are found. Large divergence and near-plateau shape energy spectrum are observed for both types of targets when the laser pulse contrast is low. With high contrast laser irradiation, proton beam divergence is remarkably reduced and the energy spectral shape is changed to exponential for large foil targets. In comparison, a similar large divergence and the near-plateau spectral shape remain for transverse-size-reduced targets. The results could be explained by the preplasma formation and target deformation at different laser contrasts and modified accelerating sheath field evolution in transverse-size-reduced target, which were supported by the 2D hydrodynamic and PIC simulations.

  9. Finite size effects in the intermittency analysis of the fragment-size correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An influence of the finite size effect on the fragment-size correlations in the nuclear multifragmentation is studied using the method of scaled factorial moments for a 1 - dim percolation model and for a statistical model of the fragmentation process, which for a certain value of a tuning parameter yields the power-law behaviour of the fragment-size distribution. It is shown that the statistical models of this type contain only repulsive correlations due to the conservation laws. The comparison of the results with those obtained in the non-critical 1 - dim percolation and in the 3 - dim percolation at around the critical point is presented. Correlations in the 1 - dim percolation model are analysed analytically and the mechanism of the attractive correlations in 1 - dim and 3 - dim is identified. (author) 30 refs., 7 figs

  10. Single beam collective effects in FCC-ee due to beam coupling impedance

    CERN Document Server

    Belli, Eleonora; Persichelli, Serena; Zobov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    The Future Circular Collider study, hosted by CERN to design post-LHC particle accelerator options in a worldwide context, is focused on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-luminosity frontier machines. This new accelerator complex represents a great challenge under several aspects, which involve R&D on beam dynamics and new technologies. One very critical point in this context is represented by collective effects, generated by the interaction of the beam with self-induced electromagnetic fields, called wake fields, which could produce beam instabilities, thus reducing the machines performance and limiting the maximum stored current. It is therefore very important to be able to predict these effects and to study in detail potential solutions to counteract them. In this paper the resistive wall and some other important geometrical sources of impedance for the FCC electron-positron accelera- tor are identified and evaluated, and their impact on the beam dynamics, which in some cases could l...

  11. Single beam collective effects in FCC-ee due to beam coupling impedance

    CERN Document Server

    Belli, Eleonora; Persichelli, Serena; Zobov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    The Future Circular Collider study, hosted by CERN to design post-LHC particle accelerator options in a worldwide context, is focused on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-luminosity frontier machines. This new accelerator complex represents a great challenge under several aspects, which involve R&D on beam dynamics and new technologies. One very critical point in this context is represented by collective effects, generated by the interaction of the beam with self-induced electromagnetic fields, called wake fields, which could produce beam instabilities, thus reducing the machines performance and limiting the maximum stored current. It is therefore very important to be able to predict these effects and to study in detail potential solutions to counteract them. In this paper the resistive wall and some other important geometrical sources of impedance for the FCC electron-positron accelerator are identified and evaluated, and their impact on the beam dynamics, which in some cases could lea...

  12. Magnetic heating effect of nanoparticles with different sizes and size distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a comparative study of dynamic and quasistatic magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles. The samples are prepared by different wet chemical precipitation methods resulting in different sizes and size distributions. The structural characterization was performed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The heating effect in an ac field in the range 0-30 kA/m at 210 kHz was measured calorimetrically. In addition, a vibrating sample magnetometer was used for hysteresis and remanence curve measurements. - Highlights: ► Preparation of 4 different types of magnetic nanoparticles with mean sizes from 10–20 nm. ► Basic characterization by X-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometry. ► Determination of sizes and size distributions from X-ray and TEM data. ► Calorimetric measurements of the specific heating power in an ac field of 210 kHz and field amplitudes up to 30 kA/m.

  13. Ionization chamber gradient effects in nonstandard beam configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: For the purpose of nonstandard beam reference dosimetry, the current concept of reporting absorbed dose at a point in water located at a representative position in the chamber volume is investigated in detail. As new nonstandard beam reference dosimetry protocols are under development, an evaluation of the role played by the definition of point of measurement could lead to conceptual improvements prior to establishing measurement procedures. Methods: The present study uses the current definition of reporting absorbed dose to calculate ionization chamber perturbation factors for two cylindrical chamber models (Exradin A12 and A14) using the Monte Carlo method. The EGSnrc based user-code EGS lowbar chamber is used to calculate chamber dose responses of 14 IMRT beams chosen to cause considerable dose gradients over the chamber volume as previously used by Bouchard and Seuntjens [''Ionization chamber-based reference dosimetry of intensity modulated radiation beams,'' Med. Phys. 31(9), 2454-5465 (2004)]. Results: The study shows conclusively the relative importance of each physical effect involved in the nonstandard beam correction factors of 14 IMRT beams. Of all correction factors involved in the dosimetry of the beams studied, the gradient perturbation correction factor has the highest magnitude, on average, 11% higher compared to reference conditions for the Exradin A12 chamber and about 5% higher for the Extradin A14 chamber. Other perturbation correction factors (i.e., Pwall, Pstem, and Pcel) are, on average, less than 0.8% different from reference conditions for the chambers and beams studied. The current approach of reporting measured absorbed dose at a point in water coinciding with the location of the centroid of the chamber is the main factor responsible for large correction factors in nonstandard beam deliveries (e.g., intensity modulated radiation therapy) reported in literature. Conclusions: To reduce or eliminate the magnitude of perturbation

  14. Design of the 'half-size' ITER neutral beam source for the test facility ELISE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Postfach 1533, D-85740 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: bernd.heinemann@ipp.mpg.de; Falter, H.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Froeschle, M.; Gutser, R.; Kraus, W.; Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.; Speth, E.; Staebler, A.; Wuenderlich, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Postfach 1533, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Agostinetti, P. [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Jiang, T. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, ChengDu (China)

    2009-06-15

    In 2007 the radio frequency driven negative hydrogen ion source developed at IPP in Garching was chosen by the ITER board as the new reference source for the ITER neutral beam system. In order to support the design and the commissioning and operating phases of the ITER test facilities ISTF and NBTF in Padua, IPP is presently constructing a new test facility ELISE (Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment). ELISE will be operated with the so-called 'half-size ITER source' which is an intermediate step between the present small IPP RF sources (1/8 ITER size) and the full size ITER source. The source will have approximately the width but only half the height of the ITER source. The modular concept with 4 drivers will allow an easy extrapolation to the full ITER size with 8 drivers. Pulsed beam extraction and acceleration up to 60 kV (corresponding to pre-acceleration voltage of SINGAP) is foreseen. The aim of the design of the ELISE source and extraction system was to be as close as possible to the ITER design; it has however some modifications allowing a better diagnostic access as well as more flexibility for exploring open questions. Therefore one major difference compared to the source of ITER, NBTF or ISTF is the possible operation in air. Specific requirements for RF sources as found on IPP test facilities BATMAN and MANITU are implemented [A. Staebler, et al., Development of a RF-driven ion source for the ITER NBI system, SOFT Conference 2008, Fusion Engineering and Design, 84 (2009) 265-268].

  15. Finite Size Effects on the QCD Spectrum Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, C; DeTar, C E; Gottlieb, S; Krasnitz, A; Sugar, L; Toussaint, D; Gottlieb, Steven

    1992-01-01

    We have continued our study of finite size effects in the QCD spectrum on lattices ranging in size from $8^3\\times 24$ to $16^3\\times24$. We have increased our statistics for quark mass $am_q=0.025$ for the smallest lattice size. In addition, we have studied quark mass 0.0125 for lattice sizes $12^3\\times24$ and $16^3\\times24$. These lattice sizes correspond to a box 1.8--3.6 fm on a side when the rho mass at zero quark mass is used to set the scale. We discuss the nucleon to rho mass ratio at a smaller value of $m_\\pi/m_\\rho$ than previously studied with two dynamical flavors.

  16. Multi-beam raindrop size distribution retrievals on the Doppler spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unal, C.M.H.

    2012-01-01

    Acquiring the raindrop size distribution from radar data is still a challenge. Generally this distribution is retrieved using the reflectivity, Z, and the differential reflectivity, Zdr, at S-band. The specific differential phase, Kdp, provides a third radar observable in the case of heavy precipita

  17. Confidence Intervals for Standardized Effect Sizes: Theory, Application, and Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Kelley

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The behavioral, educational, and social sciences are undergoing a paradigmatic shift in methodology, from disciplines that focus on the dichotomous outcome of null hypothesis significance tests to disciplines that report and interpret effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals. Due to the arbitrariness of many measurement instruments used in the behavioral, educational, and social sciences, some of the most widely reported effect sizes are standardized. Although forming confidence intervals for standardized effect sizes can be very beneficial, such confidence interval procedures are generally difficult to implement because they depend on noncentral t, F, and x2 distributions. At present, no main-stream statistical package provides exact confidence intervals for standardized effects without the use of specialized programming scripts. Methods for the Behavioral, Educational, and Social Sciences (MBESS is an R package that has routines for calculating confidence intervals for noncentral t, F, and x2 distributions, which are then used in the calculation of exact confidence intervals for standardized effect sizes by using the confidence interval transformation and inversion principles. The present article discusses the way in which confidence intervals are formed for standardized effect sizes and illustrates how such confidence intervals can be easily formed using MBESS in R.

  18. Long-Term Effects of School Size on Students' Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humlum, Maria Knoth; Smith, Nina

    school size and alternative measures of long-term success in the educational system and the labor market. The positive impact of school size seems mainly to be driven by boys, students from families with a low educational level and students attending schools in urban areas.......We estimate the effect of school size on students' long-term outcomes such as high school completion, being out of the labor market, and earnings at the age of 30. We use rich register data on the entire population of Danish children attending grade 9 in the period 1986-2004. This allows us to...... compare the results of different fixed effect and instrumental variables estimators. We use the natural population variation in the residentail catchment areas and school openings and closures to instrument for actual school size. We find a robust positive but numerically fairly small relationship between...

  19. Testing samples size effect on notch toughness of structural steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Strnadel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In the paper notch toughness assessment of full scale testing samples (FS form the upper bound toughness of sub-sized (SS samples of structural carbon-manganese steels. The relations proposed by Schindler (2000 are in good agreement with experimental data. Empirical proportionality constant q* = 0,54 between notch toughness of full scale and sub-sized samples of studied structural steels agrees well with theoretically estimated constant q* = 0,50–0,54. More precise knowledge of the size effect of testing samples on temperature dependence of notch toughness requires an analysis of scatter in experimental data.

  20. Size and shape effects on Curie temperature of ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A simplified model was developed to describe the Curie temperature suppression of ferromagnetic nanoparticles. Based on a size and shape dependent model of cohesive energy, the critical temperature variations of ferromagnetic nanoparticles were deduced. It is predicted that the Curie temperature of nanoparticles depends on both size and shape conditions, among which the temperature suppression is strongly influenced by the particle size and the shape effect is comparably minor. The calculation values for freestanding nanoparticles are in good agreement with other theoretical model and the experimental results. The model is also potential for predictions for the nanoparticles embedded in different substrates.

  1. Microfocusing of the FERMI@Elettra FEL beam with a K–B active optics system: Spot size predictions by application of the WISE code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FERMI@Elettra, the first seeded EUV-SXR free electron laser (FEL) facility located at Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste has been conceived to provide very short (10–100 fs) pulses with ultrahigh peak brightness and wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm. A section fully dedicated to the photon transport and analysis diagnostics, named PADReS, has already been installed and commissioned. Three of the beamlines, EIS-TIMEX, DiProI and LDM, installed after the PADReS section, are in advanced commissioning state and will accept the first users in December 2012. These beam lines employ active X-ray optics in order to focus the FEL beam as well as to perform a controlled beam-shaping at focus. Starting from mirror surface metrology characterization, it is difficult to predict the focal spot shape applying only methods based on geometrical optics such as the ray tracing. Within the geometrical optics approach one cannot take into account the diffraction effect from the optics edges, i.e. the aperture diffraction, and the impact of different surface spatial wavelengths to the spot size degradation. Both these effects are strongly dependent on the photon beam energy and mirror incident angles. We employed a method based on physical optics, which applies the Huygens–Fresnel principle to reflection (on which the WISE code is based). In this work we report the results of the first measurements of the focal spot in the DiProI beamline end-station and compare them to the predictions computed with Shadow code and WISE code, starting from the mirror surface profile characterization

  2. The implicit identity effect: identity primes, group size, and helping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Mark; Cassidy, Clare; Jentzsch, Ines

    2010-12-01

    Three studies consider the implicit bystander effect in the light of recent advances in social identity approaches to helping. Drawing on the social identity model of deindividuation effects we argue that the implicit bystander effect is shaped not by the number of others imagined, but by who those others are imagined to be. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrate that, when group membership is primed, increasing group size can facilitate helping in line with the norms and values of the group. Study 3 explores mediation processes in group level helping. As group size increases, female participants react faster to words associated with communalism when others are imagined as women rather than strangers. The paper demonstrates that group size and helping behaviour is qualified by an implicit identity effect. PMID:20122306

  3. Portfolio effects and firm size distribution : carbonated soft drinks

    OpenAIRE

    Whelan, Ciara; Patrick P. Walsh

    2002-01-01

    PUBLISHED We use rich brand level retail data to demonstrate that the firm size distribution in Carbonated Soft Drinks is mainly an outcome of the degree to which firms own a portfolio of brands across segments of the market, and not from performance within segments. In addition, while the number of firms in each segment is limited by segment size relative to sunk cost and competition in a segment, idiosyncratic firm effects make some firms more likely to participate in any given segment. ...

  4. Effects of Container Size on Overconsumption of Carbonated Soft Drinks

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Xiaoyong; Zhen, Chen; Wohlgenant, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    We take a structural approach to examine the effects of larger container size on consumption of carbonated soft drinks---using Nielsen Company's Homescan data on household purchases for the years 2004 through 2006. Our results show that by removing the price discount implicit in packages with larger container size, the average unit price the two households pay for CSD products increase and hence both households (both the low income and the high income) reduce their annual consumption of soft ...

  5. Size-Dependent Antimicrobial Effects of Novel Palladium Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Clara P.; Walker, Katherine A.; Obare, Sherine O.; Docherty, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Investigating the interactions between nanoscale materials and microorganisms is crucial to provide a comprehensive, proactive understanding of nanomaterial toxicity and explore the potential for novel applications. It is well known that nanomaterial behavior is governed by the size and composition of the particles, though the effects of small differences in size toward biological cells have not been well investigated. Palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) have gained significant interest as catal...

  6. The possible advantages of the mean absolute deviation 'effect' size.

    OpenAIRE

    Gorard, S.

    2013-01-01

    A range of ‘effect’ sizes already exists, for presenting a relatively easy to interpret estimate of a difference or change between two sets of observations. All are based on use of the standard deviation of the observations, involving squaring and then square-rooting, which makes results hard to interpret, hard to teach and may distort extreme scores. An effect size based on the simpler mean absolute deviation overcomes these issues to some extent, while being at least as efficient and...

  7. Volume Phase Transition of Polyelectrolyte Gels: Effects of Ionic Size

    OpenAIRE

    Qu, Li-Jian; Zhang, Xinghua; Tang, Jiuzhou; Yan, Dadong

    2013-01-01

    Although the volume transition of the polyelectrolyte gel has been studied for decades, little research on the effects of size of the mobile ions has been conducted. In the present paper, Tanaka classical theory of polyelectrolyte gel is extended to the cases of mobile ions of finite volume. In the salt free limit, the theoretical results show that the discontinuous volume transition of the polyelectrolyte gel will become a continuous one with an increase of the counter-ionic size. An increas...

  8. Specimen size effect of explosive sensitivity under low velocity impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low velocity impact may ignite the solid high explosives and cause undesired explosion incidents. The safety of high explosives under low velocity impact is one of the most important issues in handling, manufacture, storage, and transportation procedures. Various evaluation tests have been developed for low velocity impact scenarios, including, but not limited to the drop hammer test, the Susan test, the Spigot test, and the Steven test, with a charge mass varying from tens of milligrams to several kilograms. The effects of specimen size on explosive sensitivity were found in some impact tests such as drop hammer test and Steven tests, including the threshold velocity/height and reaction violence. To analyse the specimen size effects on explosive sensitivity under low velocity impacts, we collected the impact sensitivity data of several PBX explosives in the drop hammer test, the Steven test, the Susan test and the Spigot test. The effective volume of explosive charge and the critical specific mechanical energy were introduced to investigate the size-effect on the explosive reaction thresholds. The effective volumes of explosive charge in Steven test and Spigot test were obtained by numerical simulation, due to the deformation localization of the impact loading. The critical specific mechanical energy is closely related to the effective volume of explosive charge. The results show that, with the increase of effective volume, the critical mechanical energy needed for explosive ignition decreases and tends to reach a constant value. The mechanisms of size effects on explosive sensitivity are also discussed.

  9. Moessbauer Effect applications using intense radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Moessbauer Effect is reviewed as a promising tool for a number of new solid state studies when used in combination with radioactive beam/implantation facilities. The usual Moessbauer Effect involves long-lived radioactive parents (days to years) that populate low-lying nuclear excited states that subsequently decay to the ground state. Resonant emission/absorption of recoil-free gamma rays from these states provide information on a number of properties of the host materials. Radioactive ion beams (RIB) produced on-line allow new Moessbauer nuclei to be studied where there is no suitable parent. The technique allows useful sources to be made having extremely low local concentrations. The ability to separate the beams in both Z and A should provide high specific activity ''conventional'' sources, a feature important in some applications such as Moessbauer studies in diamond anvil high pressure cells. Exotic chemistry is proposed using RIB and certain Krypton and Xenon Moessbauer isotopes

  10. Processing the acoustic effect of size in speech sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kriegstein, K; Warren, J D; Ives, D T; Patterson, R D; Griffiths, T D

    2006-08-01

    The length of a vocal tract is reflected in the sound it is producing. The length of the vocal tract is correlated with body size and humans are very good at making size judgments based on the acoustic effect of vocal tract length only. Here we investigate the underlying mechanism for processing this main auditory cue to size information in the human brain. Sensory encoding of the acoustic effect of vocal tract length (VTL) depends on a time-stabilized spectral scaling mechanism that is independent of glottal pulse rate (GPR, or voice pitch); we provide evidence that a potential neural correlate for such a mechanism exists in the medial geniculate body (MGB). The perception of the acoustic effect of speaker size is influenced by GPR suggesting an interaction between VTL and GPR processing; such an interaction occurs only at the level of non-primary auditory cortex in planum temporale and anterior superior temporal gyrus. Our findings support a two-stage model for the processing of size information in speech based on an initial stage of sensory analysis as early as MGB, and a neural correlate of the perception of source size in non-primary auditory cortex. PMID:16644240

  11. Selection dramatically reduces effective population size in HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittler John E

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In HIV-1 evolution, a 100–100,000 fold discrepancy between census size and effective population size (Ne has been noted. Although it is well known that selection can reduce Ne, high in vivo mutation and recombination rates complicate attempts to quantify the effects of selection on HIV-1 effective size. Results We use the inbreeding coefficient and the variance in allele frequency at a linked neutral locus to estimate the reduction in Ne due to selection in the presence of mutation and recombination. With biologically realistic mutation rates, the reduction in Ne due to selection is determined by the strength of selection, i.e., the stronger the selection, the greater the reduction. However, the dependence of Ne on selection can break down if recombination rates are very high (e.g., r ≥ 0.1. With biologically likely recombination rates, our model suggests that recurrent selective sweeps similar to those observed in vivo can reduce within-host HIV-1 effective population sizes by a factor of 300 or more. Conclusion Although other factors, such as unequal viral reproduction rates and limited migration between tissue compartments contribute to reductions in Ne, our model suggests that recurrent selection plays a significant role in reducing HIV-1 effective population sizes in vivo.

  12. A multiscale gradient-dependent plasticity model for size effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Hao; Taheri-Nassaj, Nasrin; Zbib, Hussein M.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical behaviour of polycrystalline material is closely correlated to grain size. In this study, we investigate the size-dependent phenomenon in multi-phase steels using a continuum dislocation dynamic model coupled with viscoplastic self-consistent model. We developed a dislocation-based strain gradient plasticity model and a stress gradient plasticity model, as well as a combined model, resulting in a theory that can predict size effect over a wide range of length scales. Results show that strain gradient plasticity and stress gradient plasticity are complementary rather than competing theories. The stress gradient model is dominant at the initial strain stage, and is much more effective for predicting yield strength than the strain gradient model. For larger deformations, the strain gradient model is dominant and more effective for predicting size-dependent hardening. The numerical results are compared with experimental data and it is found that they have the same trend for the yield stress. Furthermore, the effect of dislocation density at different strain stages is investigated, and the findings show that the Hall-Petch relation holds for the initial strain stage and breaks down for higher strain levels. Finally, a power law to describe the size effect and the transition zone between the strain gradient and stress gradient dominated regions is developed.

  13. Measurements of effective total macroscopic cross sections and effective energy of continuum beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Hisao [Rikkyo Univ., Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan). Inst. for Atomic Energy

    1998-03-01

    Two practically useful quantities are introduced in this study to characterize a continuum neutron beam and to describe transmission phenomena of the beam in field of quantitative neutron radiography: an effective energy instead of a peak energy or a mean energy of the spectrum and an effective total macroscopic (ETM) cross section instead of a total macroscopic (TM) cross section defined at the monochromatic energy. The effective energy was evaluated by means of energy dependence of ETM cross section. To realize the method a beam quality indicator (BQI) has been proposed recently. Several effective energies were measured for non-filtered, filtered neutron beams, and outputs of neutron guide tubes in world by the BQI. A thermal neutron beam and three beams modulated by Pb filters with different thicknesses are studied to measure ETM cross sections for various materials and summarized in a table. Validity of the effective energy determined by the BQI is discussed relating with ETM cross sections of materials. (author)

  14. Internal target effects in ion storage rings with beam cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accurate description of internal target effects is important for the prediction of operation conditions which are required for experiments in the planned storage rings of the FAIR facility. The BETACOOL code developed by the Dubna group has been used to evaluate beam dynamics in ion storage rings, where electron cooling in combination with an internal target is applied. Systematic benchmarking experiments of this code were carried out at the ESR storage ring at GSI. A mode with vanishing dispersion in the target position was applied to evaluate the influence of the dispersion function on the parameters when the target is heating the beam. The influence of the internal target on the beam parameters is demonstrated in the present work. A comparison of experimental results with simple models describing the energy loss of the beam particles in the target as well as with more sophisticated simulations with the BETACOOL code is given. In order to study the conditions which can be achieved in the proposed experiments the simulation results were quantitatively compared with experimental results and simulations for the ESR. The results of this comparison are discussed in the present thesis. BETACOOL simulations of target effects were performed for the NESR and the HESR of the future FAIR facility in order to predict the beam parameters for the planned experiments. (orig.)

  15. Internal target effects in ion storage rings with beam cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gostishchev, Vitaly

    2008-06-15

    The accurate description of internal target effects is important for the prediction of operation conditions which are required for experiments in the planned storage rings of the FAIR facility. The BETACOOL code developed by the Dubna group has been used to evaluate beam dynamics in ion storage rings, where electron cooling in combination with an internal target is applied. Systematic benchmarking experiments of this code were carried out at the ESR storage ring at GSI. A mode with vanishing dispersion in the target position was applied to evaluate the influence of the dispersion function on the parameters when the target is heating the beam. The influence of the internal target on the beam parameters is demonstrated in the present work. A comparison of experimental results with simple models describing the energy loss of the beam particles in the target as well as with more sophisticated simulations with the BETACOOL code is given. In order to study the conditions which can be achieved in the proposed experiments the simulation results were quantitatively compared with experimental results and simulations for the ESR. The results of this comparison are discussed in the present thesis. BETACOOL simulations of target effects were performed for the NESR and the HESR of the future FAIR facility in order to predict the beam parameters for the planned experiments. (orig.)

  16. Beam-beam interaction in P-P colliding accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One model for beam growth due to the beam-beam interaction in P-P colliding accelerators is that it is due to the presence of non-linear forces generated by the fields produced by the beam plus some radomizing effect like noise, or a tune modulation. According to this model, to limit beam-beam effects, one should try to limit the size of the non-linear forces and the sources of noise or tune modulation. This model can also be used to compare the severity of beam-beam effects in two situations by comparing the size of the non-linear forces. In this paper, this approach will be used to study three problems: to compare the effects of beam-beam non-linear resonances in the ISR with those in ISABELLE; to estimate the strength of a spectrometer magnet that may be placed at one of the beam crossing points, without appreciably increasing the beam-beam effects; and to compare the beam-beam interaction for colliding beam accelerators with different crossing-angles and different ν/sub x/ and ν/sub y/ at the crossing points

  17. Adaptive beamlet-based finite-size pencil beam dose calculation for independent verification of IMRT and VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Justin C.; Li, Jonathan G.; Arhjoul, Lahcen; Yan, Guanghua; Lu, Bo; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, Chihray, E-mail: liucr@ufl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0385 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The use of sophisticated dose calculation procedure in modern radiation therapy treatment planning is inevitable in order to account for complex treatment fields created by multileaf collimators (MLCs). As a consequence, independent volumetric dose verification is time consuming, which affects the efficiency of clinical workflow. In this study, the authors present an efficient adaptive beamlet-based finite-size pencil beam (AB-FSPB) dose calculation algorithm that minimizes the computational procedure while preserving the accuracy. Methods: The computational time of finite-size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm is proportional to the number of infinitesimal and identical beamlets that constitute an arbitrary field shape. In AB-FSPB, dose distribution from each beamlet is mathematically modeled such that the sizes of beamlets to represent an arbitrary field shape no longer need to be infinitesimal nor identical. As a result, it is possible to represent an arbitrary field shape with combinations of different sized and minimal number of beamlets. In addition, the authors included the model parameters to consider MLC for its rounded edge and transmission. Results: Root mean square error (RMSE) between treatment planning system and conventional FSPB on a 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} square field using 10 × 10, 2.5 × 2.5, and 0.5 × 0.5 cm{sup 2} beamlet sizes were 4.90%, 3.19%, and 2.87%, respectively, compared with RMSE of 1.10%, 1.11%, and 1.14% for AB-FSPB. This finding holds true for a larger square field size of 25 × 25 cm{sup 2}, where RMSE for 25 × 25, 2.5 × 2.5, and 0.5 × 0.5 cm{sup 2} beamlet sizes were 5.41%, 4.76%, and 3.54% in FSPB, respectively, compared with RMSE of 0.86%, 0.83%, and 0.88% for AB-FSPB. It was found that AB-FSPB could successfully account for the MLC transmissions without major discrepancy. The algorithm was also graphical processing unit (GPU) compatible to maximize its computational speed. For an intensity modulated radiation therapy (

  18. Simulation of Toroidal Rotation Effect on Heat Flux Transport in the Edge Plasma of Small Size Divertor Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekheit, A. H.

    2010-08-01

    The effect of toroidal rotation on heat flux transport in the edge plasma of small size divertor was simulated by B2SOLP0.5.2D transport code. The main results of simulation shows that, the following: (1) the radial heat flux is strongly influenced by toroidal rotation. (2) The amplification of conduction part of radial heat flux imposes nonresilient profile of ion temperature, under which the effect of toroidal rotation on ion temperature profile is strong. (3) The ion distribution and its gradients are lower for counter-injection neutral beam than for co-injection neutral beam. (4) Reversal of toroidal rotation during using neutral beam injection result in reverses of radial electric field and E × B drift velocity. (5) The toroidal rotation strong influence on the ion temperature scale length of the ion temperature gradient (ITG). (6) Switch on and off all drifts leads to higher change in the ion density distribution in edge plasma of small size divertor tokamak when the unbalance neutral beam injection are considered (7) the comparison between radial heat flux at different momentum input shows that, the radial ion heat flux with larger ion temperature scale length in the case of co-injection neutral beam is larger than the ion heat flux with smaller ion temperature scale length in the case of counter-injection neutral beam.

  19. Experimental Effects on IR Reflectance Spectra: Particle Size and Morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiswenger, Toya N.; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Ertel, Alyssa B.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Szecsody, James E.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Smith, Milton; Lanker, Cory

    2016-05-23

    For geologic and extraterrestrial samples it is known that both particle size and morphology can have strong effects on the species’ infrared reflectance spectra. Due to such effects, the reflectance spectra cannot be predicted from the absorption coefficients alone. This is because reflectance is both a surface as well as a bulk phenomenon, incorporating both dispersion as well as absorption effects. The same spectral features can even be observed as either a maximum or minimum. The complex effects depend on particle size and preparation, as well as the relative amplitudes of the optical constants n and k, i.e. the real and imaginary components of the complex refractive index. While somewhat oversimplified, upward-going amplitude in the reflectance spectrum usually result from surface scattering, i.e. rays that have been reflected from the surface without penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. While the effects are well known, we report seminal measurements of reflectance along with quantified particle size of the samples, the sizing obtained from optical microscopy measurements. The size measurements are correlated with the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to understand the effects on the spectral features as a function of the mean grain size of the sample. We report results for both sodium sulfate Na2SO4 as well as ammonium sulfate (NH4)2SO4; the optical constants have been measured for (NH4)2SO4. To go a step further from the field to the laboratory we explore our understanding of particle size effects on reflectance spectra in the field using standoff detection. This has helped identify weaknesses and strengths in detection using standoff distances of up 160 meters away from the Target. The studies have

  20. The Size Effects on Process Design of Micro Deep Drawing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper suggested to reformulate cylindrical deep drawing parameters with dimensionless form. A diagram, in which a feasible zone is drawn to bound both the maximal allowable tension and compression stress during the deep drawing process, was established. Since it is presented in a dimensionless form, it may be applied for both conventional and micro deep drawing. Cylindrical cup deep drawing was taken as an example to show the dimensionless process design method. In addition, the size effects should be taken into account. Two kinds of size effects on micro deep drawing were investigated, which can be explained by surface layer model and strain gradient model. Numerical simulations were carried out to compare the strain distribution with or without consideration of size effect.

  1. Understanding size effects on the strength of single crystals through high-temperature micropillar compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compression tests of 〈1 1 1〉-oriented LiF single-crystal micropillars 1–5 μm in diameter were carried out from 25 °C to 250 °C. While the flow stress at ambient temperature was independent of the micropillar diameter, a strong size effect developed with elevated temperature. This behavior was explained by rigorously accounting for the different contributions to the flow stress of the micropillars as a function of temperature and pillar diameter: the lattice resistance, the forest hardening; and the size-dependent contribution as a result of the operation of single-arm dislocation sources. This was possible because the micropillars were obtained by chemically etching away the surrounding matrix in directionally solidified LiF–NaCl and LiF–KCl eutectics, avoiding any use of focused ion beam methods, yielding micropillars with a controlled dislocation density, independent of the sample preparation technique. In particular, the role of the lattice resistance on the size effect of micrometer-size single crystals was demonstrated unambiguously for the first time. This result rationalizes the different values of power-law exponent for the size effect found in the literature for face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic metals as well as for covalent and ionic solids

  2. E-Beam Effects on CMOS Active Pixel Sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three different CMOS active pixel structures manufactured in a deep submicron process have been evaluated with electron beam. The devices were exposed to 1 MeV electron beam up to 5kGy. Dark current increased after E-beam irradiation differently at each pixel structure. Dark current change is dependent on CMOS pixel structures. CMOS image sensors are now good candidates in demanding applications such as medical image sensor, particle detection and space remote sensing. In these situations, CISs are exposed to high doses of radiation. In fact radiation is known to generate trapped charge in CMOS oxides. It can lead to threshold voltage shifts and current leakages in MOSFETs and dark current increase in photodiodes. We studied ionizing effects in three types of CMOS APSs fabricated by 0.25 CMOS process. The devices were irradiated by a Co60 source up to 50kGy. All irradiation took place at room temperature. The dark current in the three different pixels exhibits increase with electron beam exposure. From the above figure, the change of dark current is dependent on the pixel structure. Double junction structure has shown relatively small increase of dark current after electron beam irradiation. The dark current in the three different pixels exhibits increase with electron beam exposure. The contribution of the total ionizing dose to the dark current increase is small here, since the devices were left unbiased during the electron beam irradiation. Radiation hardness in dependent on the pixel structures. Pixel2 is relatively vulnerable to radiation exposure. Pixel3 has radiation hardened structure

  3. Effects of ion beam irradiation on semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nashiyama, Isamu; Hirao, Toshio; Itoh, Hisayoshi; Ohshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Energetic heavy-ion irradiation apparatus has been developed for single-event effects (SEE) testing. We have applied three irradiation methods such as a scattered-ion irradiation method, a recoiled-atom irradiation method, and a direct-beam irradiation method to perform SEE testing efficiently. (author)

  4. LTRACK: Beam-transport calculation including wakefield effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LTRACK is a first-order beam-transport code that includes wakefield effects up to quadrupole modes. This paper will introduce the readers to this computer code by describing the history, the method of calculations, and a brief summary of the input/output information. Future plans for the code will also be described

  5. Finite size effect on classical ideal gas revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S.; Mitra, J.; Bera, N.

    2015-09-01

    Finite size effects on classical ideal gas are revisited. The micro-canonical partition function for a collection of ideal particles confined in a box is evaluated using Euler-Maclaurin’s as well as Poisson's summation formula. In Poisson's summation formula there are some exponential terms which are absent in Euler-Maclaurin’s formula. In the thermodynamic limit the exponential correction is negligibly small but in the macro/nano dimensions and at low temperatures they may have a great significance. The consequences of finite size effects have been illustrated by redoing the calculations in one and three dimensions keeping the exponential corrections. Global and local thermodynamic properties, diffusion driven by the finite size effect, and effect on speed of sound have been discussed. Thermo-size effects, similar to thermoelectric effects, have been described in detail and may be a theoretical basis with which to design nano-scaled devices. This paper can also be very helpful for undergraduate and graduate students in physics and chemistry as an instructive exercise for a good course in statistical mechanics.

  6. Non-local finite size effects in the dimer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two-dimensional dimer model exhibits peculiar finite-size effects. In particular the finite-size correction terms for the free energy depend in a crucial way on the parity of the horizontal and vertical lengths of the grid on which it is defined. After reviewing these effects, we show that this unusual dependence can be fully explained in a conformal field theoretic description, by noting that a change of parity of one of the lengths of the grid induces a change of boundary condition. (author)

  7. Size effect of welded thin-walled tubular joints

    OpenAIRE

    Mashiri, Fidelis Rutendo; Zhao, Xiao-Ling; Hirt, Manfred A.; NUSSBAUMER, Alain

    2007-01-01

    This paper clarifies the terminologies used to describe the size effect on fatigue behaviour of welded joints. It summarizes the existing research on size effect in the perspective of newly defined terminologies. It identifies knowledge gaps in designing tubular joints using the hot spot stress method, i.e. thin-walled tubular joints with wall thickness less than 4 mm and thick-walled tubular joints with wall thickness larger than 50 mm or diameter to thickness ratio less than 24. It is the t...

  8. Effect of beam-pointing errors on bistatic SAR imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The purpose is to conduct a research in the energy variation of echo wave and the imaging effect caused by the aero bistatic SAR pointing errors.Based on the moving geometry configuration of aero bistatic SAR,a model of beam pointing errors is built.Based on this,the azimuth Doppler frequency center estimation caused by these errors and the limitation to the beam pointing synchronization error are studied,and then the imaging result of different errors are analyzed.The computer's simulations are provided to prove the validity of the above analysis.

  9. Investigation of effect of electron beam on various polyethylene blends

    CERN Document Server

    Morshedian, J

    2003-01-01

    With regards to the expanding usage of electron beams irradiation in polymer industries such as sterilization of polymeric disposable medical products; cable manufacturing; pipes, heat shrinkable materials, etc. In this project the effect of electron beam on polyethylene used in manufacturing of pipe and heat shrinkable products was studied. Results showed that by increasing the applied dose on samples; the crosslink density would increase and polymers with tertiary carbon atoms in their backbone structure tend to crosslink more readily. The melting temperature and crystallinity percent decreased and degradation temperature increased. Density in low doses decreased and in high doses increased.

  10. Beam-beam interaction and pacman effects in the SSC with momentum oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to find the combined effects of beam-beam interaction (head-on and long-range) and random nonlinear multipoles in dipole magnets, the transverse oscillations of ''regular'' as well as ''pacman'' particles are traced for 256 synchrotron oscillation periods (corresponding to 135K revolutions) in the proposed SSC. Results obtained in this study do not show any obvious reduction of dynamic or linear apertures for pacman particles when compared with regular particles for (Δp/p) = 0. There are some indications of possible sudden or gradual increases in the oscillation amplitude, for pacman as well as regular particles, when the amplitude of momentum oscillation is as large as 3σ. 4 refs., 7 figs

  11. Analysis of the variation of the attenuation curve in function of the radiation field size for k Vp X-ray beams using the MCNP-5C code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Marco A.R., E-mail: marco@cetea.com.b, E-mail: marfernandes@fmb.unesp.b [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FMB/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina; Ribeiro, Victor A.B. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (IBB/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias; Viana, Rodrigo S.S.; Coelho, Talita S. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The paper illustrates the use of the Monte Carlo method, MCNP-5C code, to analyze the attenuation curve behavior of the 50 kVp radiation beam from superficial radiotherapy equipment as Dermopan2 model. The simulations seek to verify the MCNP-5C code performance to study the variation of the attenuation curve - percentage depth dose (PDD) curve - in function of the radiation field dimension used at radiotherapy of skin tumors with 50 kVp X-ray beams. The PDD curve was calculated for six different radiation field sizes with circular geometry of 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0 cm in diameter. The radiation source was modeled considering a tungsten target with inclination 30 deg, focal point of 6.5 mm in diameter and energy beam of 50 kVp; the X-ray spectrum was calculated with the MCNP-5C code adopting total filtration (beryllium window of 1 mm and aluminum additional filter of 1 mm). The PDD showed decreasing behavior with the attenuation depth similar what is presented on the literature. There was not significant variation at the PDD values for the radiation field between 1.0 and 4.0 cm in diameter. The differences increased for fields of 5.0 and 6.0 cm and at attenuation depth higher than 1.0 cm. When it is compared the PDD values for fields of 3.0 and 6.0 cm in diameter, it verifies the greater difference (12.6 %) at depth of 5.7 cm, proving the scattered radiation effect. The MCNP-5C code showed as an appropriate procedure to analyze the attenuation curves of the superficial radiotherapy beams. (author)

  12. Interactions, particle size and surface effects in magnetic nanoparticle systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Mantecon, M

    2000-02-01

    This work has involved the study of the magnetic behaviour of small magnetic nanoparticle systems. Due to the reduced size of magnetic nanoparticles they present distinctive properties, such as size and surface effects, that have been analysed in this work, as well as the effect of interactions in such systems. The samples chosen for the study were magnetite particles in the form of a ferrofluid and Co nanoclusters in a nonmagnetic matrix of Cu. Both systems present very narrow particle size distributions, which facilitates the interpretation of the data. The samples have been subjected to basic characterisation, which includes the determination of the distribution of magnetic particle sizes using the magnetisation curves at room temperatures, TEM microscopy and X-ray diffraction, in the case of the ferrofluid samples. For the nanoclusters, a time of flight spectrometer has been used to obtain the number of atoms per cluster. Many of the measurements have been performed at low temperatures, where thermal effects are minimised. For such measurements the samples have been frozen in a zero applied field, so that they have a random distribution of magnetic moments prior to the measurement. The energy barrier distributions have been calculated via the temperature decay of remanence (TDR). From this study, an effective anisotropy constant has been calculated. For the study of the interactions, surface and size effects, magnetisation, susceptibility (ZFC), remanence and delta-M curves, as well as the time dependence of magnetisation have been studied. The attempt frequency of the different particle size systems has been calculated using different techniques. The basic magnetic behaviour can be explained on the basis of the Neel blocking model. It has been found that the systems with the smaller particles have significant surface effects, which are enhanced at lower temperatures. Interactions, which are weak due to the low concentration of magnetic material in the samples

  13. Effect of electron beam irradiation on seed germination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of electron beam irradiation on seed germination was investigated in this research. Electron beam of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 kGy was irradiated to the seeds of lettuce, green onion and cucumber, and the irradiated seeds were incubated at 25 .deg. Cn Nitsch medium solidified with 0.2% Phytagel. Germination percentage and the length of the sprouts were determined after 72 hours. Germination percentage of lettuce seeds was greatly reduced by the irradiation, and that of the green onion and cucumber were moderately reduced or unchanged by the irradiation. Although average length of the lettuce sprouts was reduced severely, that of the green onion and cucumber was unchanged or moderately reduced. Conclusively, electron beam irradiation might be a useful way of disinfecting some plant seeds including green onion and cucumber

  14. Effect of electron beam irradiation on seed germination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seunghee; Bae, Youngmin [Changwon Univ., Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Effect of electron beam irradiation on seed germination was investigated in this research. Electron beam of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 kGy was irradiated to the seeds of lettuce, green onion and cucumber, and the irradiated seeds were incubated at 25 .deg. Cn Nitsch medium solidified with 0.2% Phytagel. Germination percentage and the length of the sprouts were determined after 72 hours. Germination percentage of lettuce seeds was greatly reduced by the irradiation, and that of the green onion and cucumber were moderately reduced or unchanged by the irradiation. Although average length of the lettuce sprouts was reduced severely, that of the green onion and cucumber was unchanged or moderately reduced. Conclusively, electron beam irradiation might be a useful way of disinfecting some plant seeds including green onion and cucumber.

  15. Review of Surface Roughness Effect on Beam Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Alesini, D.

    2003-12-01

    In recent years a strong attention arose around the problem of the e.m. interaction of an ultra-relativistic beam with the residual roughness inside a beam tube, in particular in the framework of future 4th generation coherent light sources. The main concern was the effect of the wake-fields on the relative energy spread of the beam which has to be of the order of 10-4, as for example in the LCLS and TESLA case. Although the real roughness has a stochastic feature, most studies dealt with periodic structure, or dielectric-equivalent layer which are considered to be conservative with respect the stochastic case. In this paper we will review the main theoretical models, and the most significant measurements trying to provide to the reader a complete picture of the present status of understanding.

  16. Effect of electron-beam irradiation on graphene field effect devices

    OpenAIRE

    Childres, I.; Jauregui, L A; Foxe, M.; Tian, J. F.; R. Jalilian; Jovanovic, I; Chen, Y P

    2010-01-01

    Electron beam exposure is a commonly used tool for fabricating and imaging graphene-based devices. Here, we present a study of the effects of electron-beam irradiation on the electronic transport properties of graphene and the operation of graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs). Exposure to a 30 keV electron-beam caused negative shifts in the charge-neutral point (CNP) of the GFET, interpreted as due to n-dopin...

  17. Electron beam irradiation effects on aromatic polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron irradiation effects on aromatic polymers having various molecular structures were studied to elucidate the following subjects; (1) relation between radiation stability and molecular structure of repeating units, (2) mechanism of deterioration and (3) adaptability to matrix resin for radiation resistant FRP. Results are summarized as follows: (1) An order of radiation stability of units is; imide ring > diphenyl ether, diphenyl ketone > aromatic amide >> bis-phenol A > diphenyl sulphone. (2) Poly (ether-ether-ketone) and most polyimide are crosslinkable but polysulphones and polyarylate are chain degradation type polymers. (3) Newly developed thermoplastic polyimides have possibilities for use as matrix materials in radiation resistant FRP. (author)

  18. MODE II FRACTURE PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS SIZES OF BEAMS IN PLAIN CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darsigunta Seshaiah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Blended aggregate in concrete and arriving at the structural properties of blended aggregate concrete is a thrust area. Pumice is very light and porous igneous rock that is formed during volcanic eruptions.Cinder is a waste material obtained from steel manufacturing units. Shear strength is a property of major significance for wide range of civil engineering materials and structures. Shear and punching shear failures particularly in deep beams, in corbels and in concrete flat slabs are considered to be more critical and catastrophic than other types of failures. This area has received greater attention in recent years. For investigating shear type of failures, from the literature it is found that double central notched (DCN specimen geometry proposed by Prakash Desai and V.Bhaskar Desai is supposed the best suited geometry. In this present experimental investigation an attempt is made to study the Mode-II fracture property of light weight blended aggregate cement concrete combining both the pumice and cinder in different proportions, and making use of DCN test specimen geometry . By blending the pumice and cinder in different percentages of 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 by volumeof concrete, a blended light weight aggregate concrete is prepared. By using this the property such as in plane shear strength is studied. Finally an analysis is carried out regarding Mode-II fracture properties of blended concrete. It is concluded that the Ultimate load in Mode-II is found to decrease continuously with the percentage increase in Pumice aggregate content. It is also observed that the ultimate stress in Mode II is found to increase continuously with percentage increase in cinder aggregate content.

  19. Effect of coherence and polarization on the polychromatic partially coherent dark hollow beam generated from axicon-lens system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study is carried out to investigate the effect of coherence and polarization on the polychromatic partially coherent dark hollow beam (PCDHB). The experimental results show that the spatial coherence and source polarization affect the dark region of the generated hollow beam. The study shows that by varying the source degree of polarization (DOP), we get a tunable dark region. We find that the longer the spatial coherence length of the input beam, the larger the central dark size of the resultant PCDHB. Further, it is shown that polychromatic PCDHB with low spatial coherence travel a longer distance without being distorted than a beam with a high spatial coherence. These kinds of polychromatic beams may find potential application in the field of polychromatic light based free-space optical (FSO) communications. (papers)

  20. Multi-beam raindrop size distributions retrievals on the Doppler spectra: Influence of averaging and mean horizontal wind correction

    OpenAIRE

    Unal, C.M.H.

    2012-01-01

    Acquiring the raindrop size distribution (DSD) from radar data is still a challenge. For profiling radar, this distribution can be estimated from the Doppler spectra. However the Doppler spectrum is not a direct measure of the DSD. The radial component of the wind shifts the Doppler spectrum related to the raindrop size distribution along the Doppler velocity interval. Furthermore, the Doppler spectrum may be broadened by turbulence effect. The Doppler spectra of rain are modelled using Rayle...

  1. Core size effects on safety performances of LMRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Byung Chan; Hahn, Do Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    An oxide fuel small size core (1200 MWt) was analyzed in comparison with a large size core (3600 MWt) in order to evaluate the size effects on transient safety performances of liquid-metal reactors (LMRs). In the first part of the study, main static safety parameters (i.e., Doppler coefficient, sodium void effect, etc.) of the two cores were characterized, and the second part of the study was focused on the dynamic behavior of the cores in two representative transient events: the unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF) and the unprotected transient overpower (UTOP). Margins to fuel melting and sodium boiling have been evaluated for these representative transients. Results show that the small core has a generally better or equivalent level of safety performances during these events. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  2. Size quantization effects in thin film Casimir interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the role of size quantization in the vacuum force between metallic films of nanometric thickness. The force is calculated by the Lifshitz formula with the film dielectric tensor derived from the one-electron energies and wavefunctions under the assumption of a constant potential inside the film and a uniform distribution of the positive ion charge. The results show that quantization effects tend to reduce the force with respect to the continuum plasma model. The reduction is more significant at low electron densities and for film size of the order of few nanometers and persists for separation distances up to 10-50 nm. Comparison with previous work indicates that the softening of the boundary potential is important in determining the amount of the reduction. The calculations are extended to treat Drude intraband absorption. It is shown that the inclusion of relaxation time enhances the size quantization effects in the force calculations.

  3. Fundamental edge broadening effects during focused electron beam induced nanosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Roland Schmied; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Robert Winkler; Rack, Phillip D; Harald Plank

    2015-01-01

    The present study explores lateral broadening effects of 3D structures fabricated through focused electron beam induced deposition using MeCpPt(IV)Me3 precursor. In particular, the scaling behavior of proximity effects as a function of the primary electron energy and the deposit height is investigated through experiments and validated through simulations. Correlated Kelvin force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy measurements identified conductive and non-conductive proximity r...

  4. A GPU-based finite-size pencil beam algorithm with 3D-density correction for radiotherapy dose calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Xuejun; Li, Jinsheng; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2011-01-01

    Targeting at developing an accurate and efficient dose calculation engine for online adaptive radiotherapy, we have implemented a finite size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm with a 3D-density correction method on GPU. This new GPU-based dose engine is built on our previously published ultrafast FSPB computational framework [Gu et al. Phys. Med. Biol. 54 6287-97, 2009]. Dosimetric evaluations against MCSIM Monte Carlo dose calculations are conducted on 10 IMRT treatment plans with heterogeneous treatment regions (5 head-and-neck cases and 5 lung cases). For head and neck cases, when cavities exist near the target, the improvement with the 3D-density correction over the conventional FSPB algorithm is significant. However, when there are high-density dental filling materials in beam paths, the improvement is small and the accuracy of the new algorithm is still unsatisfactory. On the other hand, significant improvement of dose calculation accuracy is observed in all lung cases. Especially when the target is in the m...

  5. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at ILC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, S

    2015-01-01

    Three methods for handling beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at ILC are tested and evaluated in this work. The first method represents an optimization of the LEPtype asymmetric selection cuts that reduce the counting biases. The second method uses the experimentally reconstructed shape of the √ s ′ spectrum to determine the Beamstrahlung component of the bias. The last, recently proposed, collision-frame method relies on the reconstruction of the collision-frame velocity to define the selection function in the collision frame both in experiment and in theory. Thus the luminosity expression is insensitive to the difference between the CM frame of the collision and the lab frame. The collision-frame method is independent of the knowledge of the beam parameters, and it allows an accurate reconstruction of the luminosity spectrum above 80% of the nominal CM energy. However, it gives no precise infromation about luminosity below 80% of the nominal CM energy. The compatibility of diverse selection cut...

  6. Size-effects in plane strain sheet-necking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Redanz, Pia

    2004-01-01

    A finite strain generalization of the strain gradient plasticity theory by Fleck and Hutchinson (J. Mech. Phys. Solids 49 (2001a) 2245) is proposed and used to study size effects in plane strain necking of thin sheets using the finite element method. Both sheets with rigid grips at the ends and...

  7. Size-effects in plane strain sheet-necking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Redanz, Pia

    2003-01-01

    A finite strain generalization of the strain gradient plasticity theory by Fleck and Hutchinson (2001) is proposed and used to study size effects in plane strain necking of thin sheets using the finite element method. Both sheets with rigid grips at the ends and specimens with shear free ends are...

  8. Size effect on dielectric properties of synthetic diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batsanov, Stepan S.; Dan’kin, Dmitry A.

    2016-07-01

    Reducing sizes of diamond crystals in the micrometer range progressively increases their dielectric permittivity. This effect is due to the surface shells of solids where under-coordinated atoms diminish the energy of chemical bonding on a surface that reduces the frequency of atomic vibration but also create a distortion in atomic order causing spontaneous polarization.

  9. Adaptive evolution and effective population size in wild house mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Phifer-Rixey, M.; Bonhomme, F.; Boursot, P.; Churchill, G. A.; Piálek, Jaroslav; Tucker, P.; Nachman, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 10 (2012), s. 2949-2955. ISSN 0737-4038 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/08/0640 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : substitution * adaptation * evolution * effective population size * house mouse Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 10.353, year: 2012

  10. Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes: Applying Bootstrap Resampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjanovic, Erin S.; Osborne, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    Confidence intervals for effect sizes (CIES) provide readers with an estimate of the strength of a reported statistic as well as the relative precision of the point estimate. These statistics offer more information and context than null hypothesis statistic testing. Although confidence intervals have been recommended by scholars for many years,…

  11. Effect size, confidence intervals and statistical power in psychological research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Téllez A.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative psychological research is focused on detecting the occurrence of certain population phenomena by analyzing data from a sample, and statistics is a particularly helpful mathematical tool that is used by researchers to evaluate hypotheses and make decisions to accept or reject such hypotheses. In this paper, the various statistical tools in psychological research are reviewed. The limitations of null hypothesis significance testing (NHST and the advantages of using effect size and its respective confidence intervals are explained, as the latter two measurements can provide important information about the results of a study. These measurements also can facilitate data interpretation and easily detect trivial effects, enabling researchers to make decisions in a more clinically relevant fashion. Moreover, it is recommended to establish an appropriate sample size by calculating the optimum statistical power at the moment that the research is designed. Psychological journal editors are encouraged to follow APA recommendations strictly and ask authors of original research studies to report the effect size, its confidence intervals, statistical power and, when required, any measure of clinical significance. Additionally, we must account for the teaching of statistics at the graduate level. At that level, students do not receive sufficient information concerning the importance of using different types of effect sizes and their confidence intervals according to the different types of research designs; instead, most of the information is focused on the various tools of NHST.

  12. An Introductory Summary of Various Effect Size Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, Susan

    This paper provides a tutorial summary of some of the many effect size choices so that members of the Southwest Educational Research Association would be better able to follow the recommendations of the American Psychological Association (APA) publication manual, the APA Task Force on Statistical Inference, and the publication requirements of some…

  13. Modeling of astigmatic-elliptical beam shaping during fs-laser waveguide writing including beam truncation and diffraction effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz De la Cruz, A.; Ferrer, A.; del Hoyo, J.; Siegel, J.; Solis, J.

    2011-08-01

    In this work, we report a model for accurately calculating the focal volumes corresponding to astigmatic elliptical beams used in fs-laser waveguide writing. The model is based on the use of the ABCD matrix formalism for the propagation of a Gaussian beam. The code includes the effects of propagation on the astigmatic elliptical beam, and the effects of beam truncation and diffraction at the entrance pupil of the focusing objective due to beam clipping when overfilling the pupil. The results predict that for a given astigmatism value and propagation distance it is possible to efficiently suppress the astigmatic focus closer to the surface. This explains previous experimental results where single structure waveguides with controllable aspect-ratio were fabricated using astigmatic-elliptical beams. Furthermore, we investigate the respective roles of astigmatism and beam propagation, as well as the strong impact of truncation and diffraction effects caused by clipping the beam at the pupil of the focusing optics. Finally, based on the results from our model, we present some practical considerations in terms of beam propagation and phase wrapping constraints.

  14. Magnitude and effects of X-ray scatter of a cone-beam micro-CT for small animal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Y.C. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China); Jan, M.L. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China); Chen, K.W. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Y.D. [Department of Nuclear Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Chuang, K.S. [Department of Nuclear Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Fu, Y.K. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: fufrank@iner.gov.tw

    2006-12-20

    We have developed a micro-CT system to provide high-resolution and anatomic information to combine with a microPET'' (registered) R4 system. This study was to evaluate the magnitude and effects of scatter for low kVp X-ray in this cone-beam micro-CT system. Slit collimators were used to simulate fan-beam micro-CT for comparison. The magnitudes of X-ray scatter were measured using the beam-stop method and were estimated by polynomial-fitting extrapolation to 0 mm size of stoppers. The scatter-to-primary ratio at center of the cone-beam system were 45% and 20% for rat and mouse phantoms, respectively, and were reduced to 5.86% and 4.2% in fan-beam geometric setup. The effects of X-ray scatter on image uniformity and contrast ratio were evaluated also. The uniformity response was examined by the profile of the reconstructed image. The degrees of 'cupping' in the fan-beam and cone-beam conditions were 1.75% and 3.81%, respectively, in rat phantom. A contrast phantom consisting of four inserts with physical densities similar to that of acrylic was used for measuring the effect of X-ray scatter on image contrast. Contrast ratios of the inserts and acrylic in cone-beam setup degraded 36.9% in average compared with fan-beam setup. A tumor-bearing mouse was scanned by the micro-CT system. The tumor-to-background contrast ratios were measured to be 0.331 and 0.249, respectively, with fan-beam and cone-beam setups.

  15. Quality Management in China: Effects of Company Ownership and Size

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Jingxin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this dissertation is to discover the effect of company ownership and size on Chinese company’s QM development and their choices of QM initiatives, the effect of ISO 9000 series on other QM practices and the attitudes of the workers towards these initiatives. Design/methodology/approach – The research is entirely based on case studies in six Chinese manufacturing companies, covering all types of companies. Interviews are done with both the managers and workers in e...

  16. Biological effect of carbon beams on cultured human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to determine the biological effect of carbon beams on 13 human tumor cells, in comparison with 200 KVp X-rays. Carbon beams were generated by the Riken Ring Cyclotron. The RBE (relative biological effectiveness) values were distributed from 1.46 to 2.20 for LET of 20 keV/μm, and 2.29-3.54 for 80 keV/μm. The RBEs were increased in all cell lines as the LET of carbon beams was increased from 20 to 80 keV/μm. There was no significant difference in radiosensitivity between cells from adenocarcinoma and those from squamous cell carcinoma. The relationship between the radiosensitivity of cells to X-rays and RBE was analyzed, but no significant correlation was suggested. Several survival curves of 20-40 keV/μm carbon beam irradiation showed the initial shoulders and the recovery ratios between two split doses were determined. Recovery was observed for LET of 2O keV/μm but not for that of 40 keV/μm. Furthermore, recovery ratios were 1.0-1.8, smaller than those for X-rays (1.5-2.4). (author)

  17. Source size and time dependence of multifragmentation induced by GeV {sup 3}He beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, G.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Bracken, D.S.; Renshaw Foxford, E.; Hsi, W.; Morley, K.B.; Viola, V.E.; Yoder, N.R. [Departments of Chemistry and Physics and IUCF, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States); Volant, C.; Legrain, R.; Pollacco, E.C. [DAPNIA/SPhN, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Korteling, R.G. [Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, (Canada) V5A 156; Friedman, W.A. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Botvina, A. [INFN and Department of Physics, University of Bologna, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Brzychczyk, J. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Breuer, H. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States)

    1999-07-01

    To investigate the source size and time dependence of multifragmentation reactions, small- and large-angle relative velocity correlations between coincident complex fragments have been measured for the 1.8{endash}4.8 GeV {sup 3}He+{sup nat}Ag, {sup 197}Au systems. The results support an evolutionary scenario for the fragment emission process in which lighter IMFs (Z{approx_lt}6) are emitted from a hot, more dense source prior to breakup of an expanded residue. For the most highly excited residues, for which there is a significant yield of fragments with very soft energy spectra (E/A{le}3 MeV), comparisons with an {ital N}-body simulation suggest a breakup time of {tau}{approximately}50 fm/c for the expanded residue. Comparison of these data with both the evolutionary expanding emitting source model and the Copenhagen statistical multifragmentation model shows good agreement for heavier IMF{close_quote}s formed in the final breakup stage, but only the evolutionary model is successful in accounting for the lighter IMFs. thinsp {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Source size and time dependence of multifragmentation induced by GeV 3He beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the source size and time dependence of multifragmentation reactions, small- and large-angle relative velocity correlations between coincident complex fragments have been measured for the 1.8 - 4.8 GeV 3He+natAg, 197Au systems. The results support an evolutionary scenario for the fragment emission process in which lighter IMFs (Z approx-lt 6) are emitted from a hot, more dense source prior to breakup of an expanded residue. For the most highly excited residues, for which there is a significant yield of fragments with very soft energy spectra (E/A≤3 MeV), comparisons with an N-body simulation suggest a breakup time of τ∼50 fm/c for the expanded residue. Comparison of these data with both the evolutionary expanding emitting source model and the Copenhagen statistical multifragmentation model shows good agreement for heavier IMF close-quote s formed in the final breakup stage, but only the evolutionary model is successful in accounting for the lighter IMFs. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  19. Source size and time dependence of multifragmentation induced by GeV [sup 3]He beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, G.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Bracken, D.S.; Renshaw Foxford, E.; Hsi, W.; Morley, K.B.; Viola, V.E.; Yoder, N.R. (Departments of Chemistry and Physics and IUCF, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States)); Volant, C.; Legrain, R.; Pollacco, E.C. (DAPNIA/SPhN, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Korteling, R.G. (Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, (Canada) V5A 156); Friedman, W.A. (Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)); Botvina, A. (INFN and Department of Physics, University of Bologna, 40126 Bologna (Italy)); Brzychczyk, J. (Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland)); Breuer, H. (Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States))

    1999-07-01

    To investigate the source size and time dependence of multifragmentation reactions, small- and large-angle relative velocity correlations between coincident complex fragments have been measured for the 1.8[endash]4.8 GeV [sup 3]He+[sup nat]Ag, [sup 197]Au systems. The results support an evolutionary scenario for the fragment emission process in which lighter IMFs (Z[approx lt]6) are emitted from a hot, more dense source prior to breakup of an expanded residue. For the most highly excited residues, for which there is a significant yield of fragments with very soft energy spectra (E/A[le]3 MeV), comparisons with an [ital N]-body simulation suggest a breakup time of [tau][approximately]50 fm/c for the expanded residue. Comparison of these data with both the evolutionary expanding emitting source model and the Copenhagen statistical multifragmentation model shows good agreement for heavier IMF[close quote]s formed in the final breakup stage, but only the evolutionary model is successful in accounting for the lighter IMFs. thinsp [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

  20. Relativistic Beaming and Orientation Effects in BL Lacertae Objects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F. C. Odo; A. A. Ubachukwu; A. E. Chukwude

    2012-09-01

    We use the correlation between the core-to-lobe radio luminosity ratio () and the linear size () of a sample of BL Lacertae objects to investigate the relativistic beaming and radio source orientation paradigm for high peaked and low-peaked BL Lacs (X-ray and radio selected BL Lacs respectively) and to constrain relativistic beaming model for this extreme class of active galactic nuclei. We show that the - distributions of the BL Lac populations contradict blazar orientation sequence, with the X-ray selected BL Lacs (XBLs) being more consistent with the beaming and orientation model. On the premise that Fanaroff-Riley Type I radio galaxies are the unbeamed parent population of these objects, we derive the bulk Lorentz factor of the jets, ∼ 7-20 corresponding to a critical cone angle for optimum boosting, c of ∼ 1° - 4°, while on average, these objects are inclined at 5° - 12° to the line-of-sight. The implications of these results for the blazar unification sequence are discussed.

  1. Size-dependent antimicrobial effects of novel palladium nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Clara P; Walker, Katherine A; Obare, Sherine O; Docherty, Kathryn M

    2014-01-01

    Investigating the interactions between nanoscale materials and microorganisms is crucial to provide a comprehensive, proactive understanding of nanomaterial toxicity and explore the potential for novel applications. It is well known that nanomaterial behavior is governed by the size and composition of the particles, though the effects of small differences in size toward biological cells have not been well investigated. Palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) have gained significant interest as catalysts for important carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom reactions and are increasingly used in the chemical industry, however, few other applications of Pd NPs have been investigated. In the present study, we examined the antimicrobial capacity of Pd NPs, which provides both an indication of their usefulness as target antimicrobial compounds, as well as their potency as potential environmental pollutants. We synthesized Pd NPs of three different well-constrained sizes, 2.0 ± 0.1 nm, 2.5 ± 0.2 nm and 3.1 ± 0.2 nm. We examined the inhibitory effects of the Pd NPs and Pd(2+) ions toward gram negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) and gram positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacterial cultures throughout a 24 hour period. Inhibitory growth effects of six concentrations of Pd NPs and Pd(2+) ions (2.5 × 10(-4), 10(-5), 10(-6), 10(-7), 10(-8), and 10(-9) M) were examined. Our results indicate that Pd NPs are generally much more inhibitory toward S. aureus than toward E. coli, though all sizes are toxic at ≥ 10(-5) M to both organisms. We observed a significant difference in size-dependence of antimicrobial activity, which differed based on the microorganism tested. Our work shows that Pd NPs are highly antimicrobial, and that fine-scale (<1 nm) differences in size can alter antimicrobial activity. PMID:24465824

  2. Infrared reflectance spectra: Effects of particle size, provenance and preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Yin-Fong; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Forland, Brenda M.; Szecsody, James E.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-09-22

    We have recently developed methods for making more accurate infrared total and diffuse directional - hemispherical reflectance measurements using an integrating sphere. We have found that reflectance spectra of solids, especially powders, are influenced by a number of factors including the sample preparation method, the particle size and morphology, as well as the sample origin. On a quantitative basis we have investigated some of these parameters and the effects they have on reflectance spectra, particularly in the longwave infrared. In the IR the spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: In general, upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from strong surface scattering, i.e. rays that are reflected from the surface without bulk penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signals reflected from solids usually encompass all such effects, but with strong dependencies on particle size and preparation. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to observe the effects on the spectral features: Bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions between 5 and 500 microns. The median particle size is demonstrated to have large effects on the reflectance spectra. For certain minerals we also observe significant spectral change depending on the geologic origin of the sample. All three such effects (particle size, preparation and provenance) result in substantial change in the reflectance spectra for solid materials; successful identification algorithms will require sufficient flexibility to account for these parameters.

  3. Effect of Proton Beam on Cancer Progressive and Metastatic Enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of proton beam on enzymes for promotion/progression of carcinogenesis and metastasis of malignant tumor cells to clarify proton beam-specific biological effects. The changes of cancer chemopreventive enzymes in human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells irradiated with proton beams were tested by measuring the activities of quinine reductase (QR), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), glutathione (GSH) levels, and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). We also examined the effect of proton beam on the ODC activity and expression of COX-2 in human breast cancer cell. We then assessed the metastatic capabilities of HT-29 and MDA-MB-231 cells irradiated with proton beam by measuring the invasiveness of cells through Matrigel-coated membrane and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced MMP activity in MDA-MB-231 and HT-29 cells. QR activity of irradiated HT-29 cells was slightly increased. Proton irradiation at dose of 32 Gy in HT-29 cells increased GST activity by 1.23-fold. In addition GSH levels in HT-29 cells was significantly increased 1.23- (p<0.05), 1.32- (p<0.01) and 1.34-fold (p<0.01) with the proton irradiation at doses of 8, 16 and 32 Gy, respectively. These results suggest that colon cancer chemopreventive activity was increased with the proton irradiation by increasing QR and GST activities and GSH levels and inhibiting ODC activity. Proton ion irradiation decreased the invasiveness of TPA-treated HT-29 cells and MDA-MB-231 cells through Matrigel-coated membrane. Proton ion irradiation pretreatment decreased TPA-induced MMP activity in MDA-MB-231 and HT-29 cells. Further studies are necessary to investigate if these findings could be translated to in vivo situations

  4. The effect of size and size distribution on the oxidation kinetics and plasmonics of nanoscale Ag particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We employed a simple and effective electroless (EL) plating approach to produce silver nanoparticles (NPs) on bare silicon, on dielectric ZnO nanowires (NWs) and on Si NWs, respectively. The surface stability of the homogeneous Ag NPs formed on the ZnO NW surfaces was investigated by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), which show that the attachment of thiol to the Ag surface can slow down the oxidation process, and the SERS signal remains strong for more than ten days. To further examine the Ag NP oxidation process in air, the oxygen content in the silicon nanowire core/Ag sheath composites was monitored by the energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) method. The amount of oxygen in the system increases with time, indicating the silver NPs were continuously oxidized, and it is not clear if saturation is reached in this time period. To investigate the influence of the Ag NPs size distribution on the oxidation process, the oxygen amount in the NPs formed by EL deposition and e-beam (EB) evaporation on a bare silicon surface was compared. Results indicate a faster oxidation process in the EL formed Ag NPs than those produced by EB evaporation. We attribute this observation to the small diameter of the EL produced silver particles, which results in a higher surface energy.

  5. The effect of size and size distribution on the oxidation kinetics and plasmonics of nanoscale Ag particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hua; Alexson, Dimitri; Glembocki, Orest; Prokes, S. M.

    2010-05-01

    We employed a simple and effective electroless (EL) plating approach to produce silver nanoparticles (NPs) on bare silicon, on dielectric ZnO nanowires (NWs) and on Si NWs, respectively. The surface stability of the homogeneous Ag NPs formed on the ZnO NW surfaces was investigated by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), which show that the attachment of thiol to the Ag surface can slow down the oxidation process, and the SERS signal remains strong for more than ten days. To further examine the Ag NP oxidation process in air, the oxygen content in the silicon nanowire core/Ag sheath composites was monitored by the energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) method. The amount of oxygen in the system increases with time, indicating the silver NPs were continuously oxidized, and it is not clear if saturation is reached in this time period. To investigate the influence of the Ag NPs size distribution on the oxidation process, the oxygen amount in the NPs formed by EL deposition and e-beam (EB) evaporation on a bare silicon surface was compared. Results indicate a faster oxidation process in the EL formed Ag NPs than those produced by EB evaporation. We attribute this observation to the small diameter of the EL produced silver particles, which results in a higher surface energy.

  6. The effect of size and size distribution on the oxidation kinetics and plasmonics of nanoscale Ag particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi Hua; Alexson, Dimitri; Glembocki, Orest; Prokes, S M, E-mail: huaqi@ccs.nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: Prokes@estd.nrl.navy.mil [Electronics Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2010-05-28

    We employed a simple and effective electroless (EL) plating approach to produce silver nanoparticles (NPs) on bare silicon, on dielectric ZnO nanowires (NWs) and on Si NWs, respectively. The surface stability of the homogeneous Ag NPs formed on the ZnO NW surfaces was investigated by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), which show that the attachment of thiol to the Ag surface can slow down the oxidation process, and the SERS signal remains strong for more than ten days. To further examine the Ag NP oxidation process in air, the oxygen content in the silicon nanowire core/Ag sheath composites was monitored by the energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) method. The amount of oxygen in the system increases with time, indicating the silver NPs were continuously oxidized, and it is not clear if saturation is reached in this time period. To investigate the influence of the Ag NPs size distribution on the oxidation process, the oxygen amount in the NPs formed by EL deposition and e-beam (EB) evaporation on a bare silicon surface was compared. Results indicate a faster oxidation process in the EL formed Ag NPs than those produced by EB evaporation. We attribute this observation to the small diameter of the EL produced silver particles, which results in a higher surface energy.

  7. Effects of laser beam propagation in a multilevel photoionization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the intense laser pulse propagates in the atomic vapor over a long distance, the laser pulse shape, the carrier frequency and the propagating velocity are greatly modified during the propagation by the resonant and/or the near-resonant interactions with atoms. We have been investigating these effects on the laser beam propagation experimentally and analytically. The simulation code named CEALIS-P has been developed, which employs the coupled three- level Bloch-Maxwell equations to study the atomic excitation and laser beam propagation simultaneously. Several features of the resonant and near-resonant effects based on the the self-induced transparency, the self-phase modulation and the nonlinear group velocity dispersion are described and the influences of such effects on the photoionization efficiency are analyzed.

  8. Focused Ion Beam Induced Effects on MOS Transistor Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramo, Marsha T.; Antoniou, Nicholas; Campbell, Ann N.; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Hembree, Charles E.; Jessing, Jeffrey R.; Soden, Jerry M.; Swanson, Scot E.; Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Vanderlinde, William E.

    1999-07-28

    We report on recent studies of the effects of 50 keV focused ion beam (FIB) exposure on MOS transistors. We demonstrate that the changes in value of transistor parameters (such as threshold voltage, V{sub t}) are essentially the same for exposure to a Ga+ ion beam at 30 and 50 keV under the same exposure conditions. We characterize the effects of FIB exposure on test transistors fabricated in both 0.5 {micro}m and 0.225 {micro}m technologies from two different vendors. We report on the effectiveness of overlying metal layers in screening MOS transistors from FIB-induced damage and examine the importance of ion dose rate and the physical dimensions of the exposed area.

  9. Origin of size effect on efficiency of organic photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manor, Assaf; Katz, Eugene A.; Tromholt, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    It is widely accepted that efficiency of organic solar cells could be limited by their size. However, the published data on this effect are very limited and none of them includes analysis of light intensity dependence of the key cell parameters. We report such analysis for bulk heterojunction solar...... voltage dependence of photocurrent and dark current is the key to understanding size limitation of the organic photovoltaics (OPV) efficiency. Practical methods to overcome this limitation as well as the possibility of producing concentrator OPV cells operating under sunlight concentrations higher than 10...

  10. Effect of Ammonium Nitrate on Nanoparticle Size Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyana C. Pingali

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate was added to the spraying solution as a foaming agent to reduce the particle size of nanoparticles synthesized in the spray-pyrolysis process. Ammonium nitrate was effective in breaking the aerosol droplet size and generating nanoparticles that were of approximately one order-of-magnitude (from 200 to 20 nm smaller diameter than those created in the absence of ammonium nitrate in the feed solution. This technique makes it possible to control the particle diameter of metallic nanoparticles below 20 nm.

  11. Size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics: an integrated computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H [Graduate School of Engineering, Chiba University, Chiba, 263-8522 (Japan); Aono, H [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI48109 (United States)], E-mail: hliu@faculty.chiba-u.jp, E-mail: aonoh@umich.edu

    2009-03-01

    Hovering is a miracle of insects that is observed for all sizes of flying insects. Sizing effect in insect hovering on flapping-wing aerodynamics is of interest to both the micro-air-vehicle (MAV) community and also of importance to comparative morphologists. In this study, we present an integrated computational study of such size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics, which is performed using a biology-inspired dynamic flight simulator that integrates the modelling of realistic wing-body morphology, the modelling of flapping-wing and body kinematics and an in-house Navier-Stokes solver. Results of four typical insect hovering flights including a hawkmoth, a honeybee, a fruit fly and a thrips, over a wide range of Reynolds numbers from O(10{sup 4}) to O(10{sup 1}) are presented, which demonstrate the feasibility of the present integrated computational methods in quantitatively modelling and evaluating the unsteady aerodynamics in insect flapping flight. Our results based on realistically modelling of insect hovering therefore offer an integrated understanding of the near-field vortex dynamics, the far-field wake and downwash structures, and their correlation with the force production in terms of sizing and Reynolds number as well as wing kinematics. Our results not only give an integrated interpretation on the similarity and discrepancy of the near- and far-field vortex structures in insect hovering but also demonstrate that our methods can be an effective tool in the MAVs design.

  12. Size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics: an integrated computational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovering is a miracle of insects that is observed for all sizes of flying insects. Sizing effect in insect hovering on flapping-wing aerodynamics is of interest to both the micro-air-vehicle (MAV) community and also of importance to comparative morphologists. In this study, we present an integrated computational study of such size effects on insect hovering aerodynamics, which is performed using a biology-inspired dynamic flight simulator that integrates the modelling of realistic wing-body morphology, the modelling of flapping-wing and body kinematics and an in-house Navier-Stokes solver. Results of four typical insect hovering flights including a hawkmoth, a honeybee, a fruit fly and a thrips, over a wide range of Reynolds numbers from O(104) to O(101) are presented, which demonstrate the feasibility of the present integrated computational methods in quantitatively modelling and evaluating the unsteady aerodynamics in insect flapping flight. Our results based on realistically modelling of insect hovering therefore offer an integrated understanding of the near-field vortex dynamics, the far-field wake and downwash structures, and their correlation with the force production in terms of sizing and Reynolds number as well as wing kinematics. Our results not only give an integrated interpretation on the similarity and discrepancy of the near- and far-field vortex structures in insect hovering but also demonstrate that our methods can be an effective tool in the MAVs design

  13. Influence of orientation on the size effect in bcc pillars with different critical temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Crystallographic orientation has no effect on the stress-strain behavior of bcc micro-and nanopillars. → Size dependence of bcc pillars correlates with the material specific critical temperature. → Dependence on critical temperature shows importance of screw dislocation mobility. → Contribution of screw dislocations is verified by the loading rate dependence of the yield stress and calculated activation volumes. - Abstract: The size effect in body-centered cubic metals is comprehensively investigated through micro/nano-compression tests performed on focused ion beam machined tungsten (W), molybdenum (Mo) and niobium (Nb) pillars, with single slip [2 3 5] and multiple slip [0 0 1] orientations. The results demonstrate that the stress-strain response is unaffected by the number of activated slip systems, indicating that dislocation-dislocation interaction is not a dominant mechanism for the observed diameter dependent yield strength and strain hardening. Furthermore, the limited mobility of screw dislocations, which is different for each material at ambient temperature, acts as an additional strengthening mechanism leading to a material dependent size effect. Nominal values and diameter dependence of the flow stress significantly deviate from studies on face-centered cubic metals. This is demonstrated by the correlation of size dependence with the material specific critical temperature. Activation volumes were found to decrease with decreasing pillar diameter further indicating that the influence of the screw dislocations decreases with smaller pillar diameter.

  14. Thermal effects in high power cavities for photoneutralization of D- beams in future neutral beam injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, Donatella; Feng, Jiatai; Pichot, Mikhaël; Chaibi, Walid

    2015-04-01

    Photoneutralization may represent a key issue in the neutral beam injectors for future fusion reactors. In fact, photodetachment based neutralization combined with an energy recovery system increase the injector overall efficiency up to 60%. This is the SIPHORE injector concept in which photoneutralization is realized in a refolded cavity [1]. However, about 1 W of the several megaWatts intracavity power is absorbed by the mirrors coatings and gives rise to important thermoelastic distortions. This is expected to change the optical behavior of the mirrors and reduce the enhancement factor of the cavity. In this paper, we estimate these effects and we propose a thermal system to compensate it.

  15. Physics-Based Reactive Burn Model: Grain Size Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, X.; Hamate, Y.; Horie, Y.

    2007-12-01

    We have been developing a physics-based reactive burn (PBRB) model, which was formulated based on the concept of a statistical hot spot cell. In the model, essential thermomechanics and physiochemical features are explicitly modeled. In this paper, we have extended the statistical hot spot model to explicitly describe the ignition and growth of hot spots. In particular, grain size effects are explicitly delineated through introduction of grain size-dependent, thickness of the hot-region, energy deposition criterion, and specific surface area. Besides the linear relationships between the run distance to detonation and the critical diameter with respect to the reciprocal specific surface area of heterogeneous explosives (HE), which is based on the original model and discussed in a parallel paper of this meeting, parametric studies have shown that the extended PBRB model can predict a non-monotonic variation of shock sensitivity with grain size, as observed by Moulard et al.

  16. Low energy Ar+ ion beam irradiation effects on Si ripple pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlovy, Shahjada A; Yanagimoto, Kazuma; Miyamoto, Iwao

    2011-02-01

    Etching of surfaces by ion beam sputtering is widely used to pattern surfaces. Recent studies using the high-spatial-resolution capability of the scanning tunneling microscope, atomic force microscope and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) disclose in fact that ion bombardment creates repetitive structures at micro-nanometre scale, waves (ripples), checkerboards or pyramids. The phenomenon is related to the interaction between ion erosion and diffusion of adatoms (vacancies), which causes surface re-organization. In this paper we investigated the ripple pattern formation on Si substrates by low energy Ar+ ion bombardment and the dose effect on ripple size. We also briefly discussed the irradiation effects (at normal incidence) on ripple pattern for different irradiation time. Finally, based on Bradley and Harper (BH) theory we proposed a model to understand the mechanism of ripple pattern change due to Ar+ ion beam irradiation. PMID:21456140

  17. The Effect of Size and Ecology on Extinction Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, C.; Yuan, A.; Heim, N.; Payne, J.

    2015-12-01

    Although life on Earth first emerged as prokaryotic organisms, it eventually evolved into billions of different species. However, extinctions on Earth, especially the five mass extinctions, have decimated species. So what leads to a species survival or demise during a mass extinction? Are certain species more susceptible to extinctions based on their size and ecology? For this project, we focused on the data of marine animals. To examine the impact of size and ecology on a species's likelihood of survival, we compared the sizes and ecologies of the survivors and victims of the five mass extinctions. The ecology, or life mode, of a genus consists of the combination of tiering, motility, and feeding mechanism. Tiering refers to the animal's typical location in the water column and sediments, motility refers to its ability to move, and feeding mechanism describes the way the organism eats; together, they describe the animal's behavior. We analyzed the effect of ecology on survival using logistic regression, which compares life mode to the success or failure of a genus during each mass extinction interval. For organism size, we found the extinct organisms' mean size (both volume and length) and compared it with the average size of survivors on a graph. Our results show that while surviving genera of mass extinctions tended to be slightly larger than those that went extinct, there was no significant difference. Even though the Permian (Changhsingian) and Triassic (Rhaetian) extinctions had larger surviving species, likewise the difference was small. Ecology had a more obvious impact on the likelihood of survival; fast-moving, predatory pelagic organisms were the most likely to go extinct, while sedentary, infaunal suspension feeders had the greatest chances of survival. Overall, ecology played a greater role than size in determining the survival of a species. With this information, we can use ecology to predict which species would survive future extinctions.

  18. Finite-size effects from general covariance and Weyl anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By exploiting the diffeomorphism invariance we relate the finite-size effects of massless theories to their Weyl anomaly. We show that the universal contributions to the finite-size effects are determined by certain coefficient functions in the heat kernel expansion of the related wave operators. For massless scalars confined in a four-dimensional curved space-time with boundary, the relevant coefficients are given confirming the results of Moss and Dowker and also of Branson and Gilkey. We apply the general results to theories on bounded regions in two- and four-dimensional flat space-times and determine the change of the effective action under arbitrary conformal deformations of the regions. (orig.)

  19. Grain size effects on He bubbles distribution and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Gao, X.; Gao, N. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Z.G., E-mail: zhgwang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Cui, M.H.; Wei, K.F.; Yao, C.F.; Sun, J.R.; Li, B.S.; Zhu, Y.B.; Pang, L.L. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, Y.F. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, D. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xie, E.Q. [School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • SMAT treated T91 and conventional T91 were implanted by 200 keV He{sup 2+} to 1 × 10{sup 21} He m{sup −2} at room temperature and annealed at 450 °C for 3.5 h. • He bubbles in nanometer-size-grained T91 are smaller in as-implanted case. • The bubbles in the matrix of nanograins were hard to detect and those along the nanograin boundaries coalesced and filled with the grain boundaries after annealing. • Brownian motion and coalescence and Ostwald ripening process might lead to bubbles morphology presented in the nanometer-size-grained T91 after annealing. - Abstract: Grain boundary and grain size effects on He bubble distribution and evolution were investigated by He implantation into nanometer-size-grained T91 obtained by Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment (SMAT) and the conventional coarse-grained T91. It was found that bubbles in the nanometer-size-grained T91 were smaller than those in the conventional coarse-grained T91 in as-implanted case, and bubbles in the matrix of nanograins were undetectable while those at nanograin boundaries (GBs) coalesced and filled in GBs after heat treatment. These results suggested that the grain size of structural material should be larger than the mean free path of bubble’s Brownian motion and/or denuded zone around GBs in order to prevent bubbles accumulation at GBs, and multiple instead of one type of defects should be introduced into structural materials to effectively reduce the susceptibility of materials to He embrittlement and improve the irradiation tolerance of structural materials.

  20. Size effects of latex nanomaterials on lung inflammation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of nano-sized materials (nanomaterials) on sensitive population have not been well elucidated. This study examined the effects of pulmonary exposure to (latex) nanomaterials on lung inflammation related to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or allergen in mice, especially in terms of their size-dependency. In protocol 1, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received a single exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (250 μg/animal) with three sizes (25, 50, and 100 nm), LPS (75 μg/animal), or LPS plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 2, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received repeated exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (100 μg/animal), allergen (ovalbumin: OVA; 1 μg/animal), or allergen plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 1, latex nanomaterials with all sizes exacerbated lung inflammation elicited by LPS, showing an overall trend of amplified lung expressions of proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, LPS plus nanomaterials, especially with size less than 50 nm, significantly elevated circulatory levels of fibrinogen, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1, and keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant, and von Willebrand factor as compared with LPS alone. The enhancement tended overall to be greater with the smaller nanomaterials than with the larger ones. In protocol 2, latex nanomaterials with all sizes did not significantly enhance the pathophysiology of allergic asthma, characterized by eosinophilic lung inflammation and Igs production, although latex nanomaterials with less than 50 nm significantly induced/enhanced neutrophilic lung inflammation. These results suggest that latex nanomaterials differentially affect two types of (innate and adaptive immunity-dominant) lung inflammation

  1. Effect of Pour Size on Concrete Placing Productivity in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaoluwa Olatunde

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Pour size as one of the site factors affecting concreting was examined to determine its effects on concreting productivity. A total of 167 separate concrete pours were observed on 25 building construction sites in Lagos, Nigeria,comprising 35 pours placed by crane and skip; 26 pours placed by dumper; 58 pours placed by wheelbarrow; 37 pours placed by head pan; and 11 pours placed jointly by pump, wheelbarrow and head pan. Data collected from the daily concrete pours were analyzed to determine operational productivity rates. The relationship between concreting productivity and pour size was examined using regression analyses to develop a model relating productivity to pour size. The results showed that irrespective of placing method, productivity generally increased by 1.1 m3/h for every 10 m3 increase in pour size. It was recommended that the obtained index of productivity increase per pour size be standardised for use in improving on-site productivity in the Nigerian construction industry.

  2. Preliminary study on the size effect of composite materials subjected to bending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusof M.Z.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effect of size or dimension changes of reinforced concrete structures, in terms of structural performance and serviceability limit states. A theoretical and design study was carried out to evaluate the structural performance and serviceability of reinforced concrete structures using the European Code of Practice (EC2 and British Code of Practice (BS8110. The analysis required nine different sizes of reinforced concrete beams, with dimension between 150mm × 250mm and 350mm × 250mm. The study showed that dimension changes significantly affected the load-carrying capacity and deflection of reinforced concrete members; regardless of their depth/width ratio. The analysis results also produced an equation (presented here to assess the performance of reinforced concrete members, based on the codes of practice.

  3. Electron beam welding in the fabrication of thick-walled large-size pipes of C-Mn steels. Final report; Elektronenstrahlschweissen bei der Fertigung von dickwandigen Grossrohren aus C-Mn-Staehlen. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woeste, K.

    2001-11-01

    This research project investigates electron beam welding as a method of fabrication of large-size pipes with longitudinal welds. The effects of the welding speed on the mechanical and technological properties of the weld are investigated. From the economic view, electron beam welding is much more favourable than submerged-arc welding. [German] Dieses Forschungsprojekt soll dazu beitragen, das Elektronenstrahlschweissen als Fertigungsverfahren fuer laengsnahtgeschweisste Grossrohre zu qualifizieren. Dabei wird der Einfluss der Schweissgeschwindigkeit auf die mechanisch-technologischen Eigenschaften der Schweissung untersucht. Im Wirtschaftlichkeitsvergleich schneidet Elektronenstrahlschweissverfahren gegenueber dem Unterpulverschweissverfahren eindeutig besser ab.

  4. Creep of intermetallic composites: Effect of grain size versus reinforcements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creep deformation behavior of molybdenum disilicide, nickel aluminide, and titanium aluminide and their composites was examined as a function of temperature and strain rate. The addition of reinforcements invariably reduced the grain size for all the three materials by inhibiting grain growth during their processing. Reducing grain size of a material contributed to higher creep rates while increasing volume fraction of the reinforcement contributed to lower rates. The net effect depended on the grain size, the volume fraction and the distribution of reinforcements. To account for the composite strengthening, a modified shear lag theory was proposed for predicting the effects of grain size and the reinforcements. Based on this model, it was shown that there was a critical volume fraction beyond which the strengthening from reinforcements exceeded any weakening contribution from grain refinement. The critical volume fraction decreased with increasing aspect ratio. The experimental results agreed qualitatively with these theoretical predictions. Application of these concepts for the development of creep resistant composites is presented

  5. Beam loading effect on rf system in proton synchrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the stability of an rf system in the presence of beam loading. The analysis is based on the transfer function method given in F. Pedersen (IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. NS-22, 1906 (1975)). First, the Routh-Hurwitz criterion is applied to the analysis of the stability of the rf system with a wideband cavity. Then the simplified model in which the loading effect is treated as a reduction in gain of the phase loop is developed. Secondly, the critical damping criteria of the phase loop in the rf system are derived. These criteria give a stability limit appreciably smaller than that given by the Routh-Hurwitz criterion. Finally, we discussed the technique by which the beam loading effect will be compensated. (author)

  6. Kinetic modelling of quantum effects in laser-beam interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Nerush, Evgeny

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of kinetic modelling of quantum effects in laser-beam interaction. In the developed numerical model, electron-positron pair production by hard photons, hard photon emission and the electromagnetic fields generated by the created charged particles are taken into account. Interaction of a relativistic electron beam with a strong laser pulse is analyzed. It is shown that the quantum effects can be important even for moderately intense laser pulses when the number of emitted photons by single electron is not large. Electron-positron pair plasma production in extremely-intense laser field via development of electromagnetic cascades is also studied. The simulation results confirm the prediction of strong laser field absorption in the self-generated electron-positron plasma. It is shown that the self-generated electron-positron plasma can be an efficient source of energetic gamma-quanta.

  7. Development and Clinical Implementation of a Universal Bolus to Maintain Spot Size During Delivery of Base of Skull Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Both, Stefan, E-mail: Stefan.Both@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Shen, Jiajian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Kirk, Maura; Lin, Liyong; Tang, Shikui; Alonso-Basanta, Michelle; Lustig, Robert; Lin, Haibo; Deville, Curtiland; Hill-Kayser, Christine; Tochner, Zelig; McDonough, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To report on a universal bolus (UB) designed to replace the range shifter (RS); the UB allows the treatment of shallow tumors while keeping the pencil beam scanning (PBS) spot size small. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with brain cancers treated from 2010 to 2011 were planned using the PBS technique with bolus and the RS. In-air spot sizes of the pencil beam were measured and compared for 4 conditions (open field, with RS, and with UB at 2- and 8-cm air gap) in isocentric geometry. The UB was applied in our clinic to treat brain tumors, and the plans with UB were compared with the plans with RS. Results: A UB of 5.5 cm water equivalent thickness was found to meet the needs of the majority of patients. By using the UB, the PBS spot sizes are similar with the open beam (P>.1). The heterogeneity index was found to be approximately 10% lower for the UB plans than for the RS plans. The coverage for plans with UB is more conformal than for plans with RS; the largest increase in sparing is usually for peripheral organs at risk. Conclusions: The integrity of the physical properties of the PBS beam can be maintained using a UB that allows for highly conformal PBS treatment design, even in a simple geometry of the fixed beam line when noncoplanar beams are used.

  8. Development and Clinical Implementation of a Universal Bolus to Maintain Spot Size During Delivery of Base of Skull Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report on a universal bolus (UB) designed to replace the range shifter (RS); the UB allows the treatment of shallow tumors while keeping the pencil beam scanning (PBS) spot size small. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with brain cancers treated from 2010 to 2011 were planned using the PBS technique with bolus and the RS. In-air spot sizes of the pencil beam were measured and compared for 4 conditions (open field, with RS, and with UB at 2- and 8-cm air gap) in isocentric geometry. The UB was applied in our clinic to treat brain tumors, and the plans with UB were compared with the plans with RS. Results: A UB of 5.5 cm water equivalent thickness was found to meet the needs of the majority of patients. By using the UB, the PBS spot sizes are similar with the open beam (P>.1). The heterogeneity index was found to be approximately 10% lower for the UB plans than for the RS plans. The coverage for plans with UB is more conformal than for plans with RS; the largest increase in sparing is usually for peripheral organs at risk. Conclusions: The integrity of the physical properties of the PBS beam can be maintained using a UB that allows for highly conformal PBS treatment design, even in a simple geometry of the fixed beam line when noncoplanar beams are used

  9. Limiting of the spot size of intense relativistic electronic beams in a solenoidal field%螺线管场下强流相对论电子束焦斑尺寸的限制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石金水; 林郁正; 丁伯南

    2001-01-01

    分析了螺线管场下影响强流相对论电子束聚焦的主要因素,并给出了各影响因素所限制的最小焦斑。计算结果表明,当发射度和能散度的值分别控制在0.397mm*rad和1%以内, 单个螺线管磁轴的偏心不大于0.54mrad;初始注入束偏心不大于1mrad时,对于20MeV、3kA的电子束和15MeV、2.5kA的电子束,最终打靶束焦斑均可小于1.5mm。%High-resolution X-ray photographing needs to focus intense relativistic electron beams of several thousand amperes on the bremsstrahlung converter target, thereon forming a small and stable spot. In the ideal case, electron beams cn be focused to a point. However, due to the influence of such factrs as the space charge effect, the beam emittance, the spherical aberration of the lens, and the chromatic aberration, the minimization of the spot size of electron beams is limited. Furthermore, the corkscrew oscillation of the beam centroid not only leads to the increase of the spot size but also to the distortion of the spot shape.The effects of solenoidal field on the spot size of intense relativistic electronic beams are analyzed and the minimal spot sizes limited by various factors are given. The results of the numerical calculation show that if the emittance ≤0.397mm*rad and the energy sweep ≤1%,the ultimate minimal spot size for 20MeV, 3kA and 15MeV, 3kA intense beams is less than 1.5mm when the tilt of each solenoid ≤1mrad and the injection tilt of beams ≤1mrad.

  10. The Rashba and quantum size effects in ultrathin Bi films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We studied the electronic and spin structure of ultrathin Bi films with spin and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. • We found that the surface states are clearly spin-split, but the spin-polarization is lost when the bands start to overlap with the bulk-band projection. • This is explained as a change in the origin of the band splitting from the Rashba effect to the quantum-size effect. • It means that band splitting due to different-symmetry breakings can be jointed smoothly. - Abstract: Precise characterization of physical properties in nanometer-scale materials is interesting not only in terms of low-dimensional physics but also in application to devices. Due to the reduced dimensionality and symmetry, these systems possess various interesting properties that cannot be found in the bulk. In this article, focusing on epitaxial ultrathin bismuth films formed on a silicon substrate, we introduce an intriguing interplay of the quantum size and Rashba effects in reciprocal space. Utilizing spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we observed clear Rashba-split nature of the surface-state bands in these Bi films. However, the band dispersion did not follow the simple Rashba picture and the spin-splitting was lost where they overlapped with the bulk projection. From first-principles calculations, this is explained as a change in the nature of the band-splitting into an even-odd splitting induced by the quantum size effect

  11. Finite size effects in neutron star and nuclear matter simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giménez Molinelli, P.A., E-mail: pagm@df.uba.ar; Dorso, C.O.

    2015-01-15

    single structure per cell while the cubic and truncated octahedron show consistent results, with more than one structure per cell. For systems of the size studied in this work these effects are still noticeable, but we find evidence to support that the dependence of the results on the cell geometry becomes smaller as the system size is increased. When the Coulomb interaction is present, the competition between opposing interactions of different range results in a proper, physically meaningful length scale that is independent of the system size and periodic cell of choice. Only under these conditions “finite size effects” will vanish for large enough systems (i.e. cells much larger than this characteristic length). Larger simulations are in order, but our computational capabilities forbid it for the time being.

  12. Effect of electron beam irradiation on surgical rubber gloves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlines the effects of electron beam irradiation on surgical rubber gloves. The tensile strength, elongation at break and modulus were evaluated as function of dose range 20-100 kGy minimum dose, dose uniformity ratio, 3.1, and both, accelerated and normal aging, were used to study the stability of the irradiated gloves after irradiation. The surgical gloves were found to be useful up to the highest dose tested. (orig.)

  13. Effect of electron beam irradiation on surgical rubber gloves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevy Ratnam, Chantara; Zaman, Khairul

    1998-04-01

    This paper outlines the effects of electron beam irradiation on surgical rubber gloves. The tensile strength, elongation at break and modulus were evaluated as function of dose range 20-100 kGy minimum dose, dose uniformity ratio, 3.1, and both, accelerated and normal aging, were used to study the stability of the irradiated gloves after irradiation. The surgical gloves were found to be useful up to the highest dose tested.

  14. Nanodosimetric cluster size distributions of a 250 MeV therapeutic proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nanodosimetry enables the energy deposition of ionizing radiation on a DNA scale to be determined. The purpose of this research is to conduct nanodosimetric measurements of proton radiation fields at the proton accelerator of Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) in an attempt to verify a Monte Carlo simulation system. To achieve this, these measurements will be compared to the output from a Monte Carlo simulation system that is being developed to simulate the nanodosimetric spectra of the LLUMC beamline. Once verified, this Monte Carlo system will provide a very powerful tool with which to measure the effect of radiation fields on a nanoscopic level without submitting humans or expensive electronics to such a potentially damaging environment. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Physics

  15. Effects of anisotropic turbulence on average polarizability of Gaussian Schell-model quantized beams through ocean link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Yixin; Zhu, Yun; Chen, Minyu

    2016-07-01

    Based on the spatial power spectrum of the refractive index of anisotropic turbulence, the average polarizability of the Gaussian Schell-model quantized beams and lateral coherence length of the spherical wave propagating through the ocean water channel are derived. Numerical results show that, in strong temperature fluctuation, the depolarization effects of anisotropic turbulence are inferior to isotropic turbulence, as the other parameters of two links are the same. The depolarization effects of salinity fluctuation are less than the effects of the temperature fluctuation; the average polarizability of beams increases when increasing the inner scale of turbulence and the source's transverse size; and the larger rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid enhances the average polarizability of beams. The region of the receiving radius is smaller than the characteristic radius and the average polarizability of beams in isotropy turbulence is smaller than that of beams in anisotropy turbulence. However, the receiving radius region is larger than a characteristic radius and the average polarizability of beams in isotropy turbulence is larger than that of beams in anisotropy turbulence. PMID:27409215

  16. Individual increase in inbreeding allows estimating effective sizes from pedigrees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valera Mercedes

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present here a simple approach to obtain reliable estimates of the effective population size in real world populations via the computation of the increase in inbreeding for each individual (delta Fi in a given population. The values of delta Fi are computed as t-root of 1 - (1 - Fi where Fi is the inbreeding coefficient and t is the equivalent complete generations for each individual. The values of delta F computed for a pre-defined reference subset can be averaged and used to estimate effective size. A standard error of this estimate of Ne can be further computed from the standard deviation of the individual increase in inbreeding. The methodology is demonstrated by applying it to several simulated examples and to a real pedigree in which other methodologies fail when considering reference subpopulations. The main characteristics of the approach and its possible use are discussed both for predictive purposes and for analyzing genealogies.

  17. Aperture Size Effect on Extracted Negative Ion Current Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Esch, H. P. L.; Svensson, L.; Riz, D.

    2009-03-01

    This paper discusses experimental results obtained at the 1 MV testbed at CEA Cadarache that appear to show a higher extracted D- current density from small apertures. Plasma grids with different shapes have been installed and tested. All grids had one single aperture. The tests were done in volume operation and in caesium operation. We tested four grids, two with O/14 mm, one with O/11 mm and one with O/8 mm apertures. No aperture size effect was observed in volume operation. In caesiated operation the extracted current density for the O/8 mm aperture appears to be significantly higher (˜50%) than for the O/14 mm aperture. Simulations with a 3D Monte Carlo Trajectory Following Code have shown an aperture size effect of about 20%. Finally, as byproducts of the experiments, data on backstreaming positive ions and the temperature of the plasma grid have been obtained.

  18. Modeling size effects on fracture toughness by dislocation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of grain size and of crack-tip blunting radius on the fracture toughness of tungsten polycrystals are studied by using a combined dislocation dynamics/cohesive zone model (CZM). Two-dimensional dislocation dynamics are employed to analyze crack-tip plasticity and crack propagation is characterized by a CZM. The geometry of the crack and the corresponding boundary conditions are described by means of a boundary element method with dislocation dipoles as fundamental solution. Grain boundaries are introduced as obstacles for dislocation motion. Numerical experiments reveal that the fracture toughness decreases with grain size, because grain boundaries confine the plastic zone. This effect is particularly pronounced at small loading rates, where the unconfined plastic zone is large. Our results also show that fracture toughness scales with the tip radius as the stress concentration at the crack tip is reduced and the plastic zone is enlarged.

  19. Modeling size effects on fracture toughness by dislocation dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, X.H. [Interdisciplinary Centre for Advanced Materials Simulation, Ruhr-University Bochum, Stiepeler Str. 129 (UHW), 44801 Bochum (Germany); Hartmaier, A., E-mail: Alexander.Hartmaier@ruhr-uni-bochum.de [Interdisciplinary Centre for Advanced Materials Simulation, Ruhr-University Bochum, Stiepeler Str. 129 (UHW), 44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    The effects of grain size and of crack-tip blunting radius on the fracture toughness of tungsten polycrystals are studied by using a combined dislocation dynamics/cohesive zone model (CZM). Two-dimensional dislocation dynamics are employed to analyze crack-tip plasticity and crack propagation is characterized by a CZM. The geometry of the crack and the corresponding boundary conditions are described by means of a boundary element method with dislocation dipoles as fundamental solution. Grain boundaries are introduced as obstacles for dislocation motion. Numerical experiments reveal that the fracture toughness decreases with grain size, because grain boundaries confine the plastic zone. This effect is particularly pronounced at small loading rates, where the unconfined plastic zone is large. Our results also show that fracture toughness scales with the tip radius as the stress concentration at the crack tip is reduced and the plastic zone is enlarged.

  20. Size effect of the surface energy density of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yin; Wei, Yaochi; Chen, Shaohua

    2015-06-01

    The surface energy density of nanoparticles exhibits an obviously size-dependent behavior. However, how the surface energy density changes with the diameter of nanoparticles is still ambiguous. Based on a recently developed continuum theory considering the size effect in nanomaterials, theoretical analysis is carried out for various fcc metallic nanoparticles. Surface lattice contractions of nanoparticles are predicted and compared with the existing experimental data. As a result, the surface energy density decreases with the increase of nanoparticle diameter. Such a variation trend of surface energy density is contrary to the prediction of existing theoretical models but well consistent with the previously atomistic simulations and density functional calculations. The results in this paper provide a further understanding of the surface effect of nanoparticles, which should be helpful for the design of nanoscale devices or nanomaterials related to nanoparticles, such as NEMs and nanoparticle-reinforced composites.

  1. Individual increase in inbreeding allows estimating effective sizes from pedigrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo; Cervantes, Isabel; Molina, Antonio; Valera, Mercedes; Goyache, Félix

    2008-01-01

    We present here a simple approach to obtain reliable estimates of the effective population size in real world populations via the computation of the increase in inbreeding for each individual (delta Fi) in a given population. The values of delta Fi are computed as t-root of 1 - (1 - Fi) where Fi is the inbreeding coefficient and t is the equivalent complete generations for each individual. The values of delta F computed for a pre-defined reference subset can be averaged and used to estimate effective size. A standard error of this estimate of Ne can be further computed from the standard deviation of the individual increase in inbreeding. The methodology is demonstrated by applying it to several simulated examples and to a real pedigree in which other methodologies fail when considering reference subpopulations. The main characteristics of the approach and its possible use are discussed both for predictive purposes and for analyzing genealogies. PMID:18558071

  2. Influence of bulk pre-straining on the size effect in nickel compression pillars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, A.S., E-mail: Andreas.schneider@inm-gmbh.de [INM-Leibniz Institute for New Materials, Campus D2 2, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Kiener, D. [University of Leoben, Department of Materials Physics, Jahnstr. 12, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Yakacki, C.M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado Denver, Denver 80217 (United States); Maier, H.J. [University of Paderborn, Lehrstuhl fuer Werkstoffkunde (Materials Science), 33098 Paderborn (Germany); Gruber, P.A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Tamura, N.; Kunz, M. [Advanced Light Source (ALS), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Minor, A.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, and National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Frick, C.P. [University of Wyoming, Mechanical Engineering Department, 1000 East University Avenue, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Micro-compression tests were performed on pre-strained nickel (Ni) single crystals in order to investigate the influence of the initial dislocation arrangement on the size dependence of small-scale metal structures. A bulk Ni sample was grown using the Czochralski method and sectioned into four compression samples, which were then pre-strained to nominal strains of 5, 10, 15 and 20%. Bulk samples were then characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), micro-Laue diffraction, and electron backscatter diffraction. TEM results show that a dislocation cell structure was present for all deformed samples, and Laue diffraction demonstrated that the internal strain increased with increased amount of pre-straining. Small-scale pillars with diameters from 200 nm to 5 {mu}m were focused ion beam (FIB) machined from each of the four deformed bulk samples and further compressed via a nanoindenter equipped with a flat diamond punch. Results demonstrate that bulk pre-straining inhibits the sample size effect. For heavily pre-strained bulk samples, the deformation history does not affect the stress-strain behavior, as the pillars demonstrated elevated strength and rather low strain hardening over the whole investigated size range. In situ TEM and micro-Laue diffraction measurements of pillars confirmed little change in dislocation density during pillar compression. Thus, the dislocation cell walls created by heavy bulk pre-straining become the relevant internal material structure controlling the mechanical properties, dominating the sample size effect observed in the low dislocation density regime.

  3. Effective number of breeders, effective population size and their relationship with census size in an iteroparous species, Salvelinus fontinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzzante, Daniel E; McCracken, Gregory R; Parmelee, Samantha; Hill, Kristen; Corrigan, Amelia; MacMillan, John; Walde, Sandra J

    2016-01-27

    The relationship between the effective number of breeders (Nb) and the generational effective size (Ne) has rarely been examined empirically in species with overlapping generations and iteroparity. Based on a suite of 11 microsatellite markers, we examine the relationship between Nb, Ne and census population size (Nc) in 14 brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) populations inhabiting 12 small streams in Nova Scotia and sampled at least twice between 2009 and 2015. Unbiased estimates of Nb obtained with individuals of a single cohort, adjusted on the basis of age at first maturation (α) and adult lifespan (AL), were from 1.66 to 0.24 times the average estimates of Ne obtained with random samples of individuals of mixed ages (i.e. [Formula: see text]). In turn, these differences led to adjusted Ne estimates that were from nearly five to 0.7 times the estimates derived from mixed-aged individuals. These differences translate into the same range of variation in the ratio of effective to census population size [Formula: see text] within populations. Adopting [Formula: see text] as the more precise and unbiased estimates, we found that these brook trout populations differ markedly in their effective to census population sizes (range approx. 0.3 to approx. 0.01). Using AgeNe, we then showed that the variance in reproductive success or reproductive skew varied among populations by a factor of 40, from Vk/k ≈ 5 to 200. These results suggest wide differences in population dynamics, probably resulting from differences in productivity affecting the intensity of competition for access to mates or redds, and thus reproductive skew. Understanding the relationship between Ne, Nb and Nc, and how these relate to population dynamics and fluctuations in population size, are important for the design of robust conservation strategies in small populations with overlapping generations and iteroparity. PMID:26817773

  4. Radiation effects of electron-beam metal depositions on IGFET's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron-beam radiation effects on n-channel IGFET parameters were studied. This paper summarizes the resulting surface- and dielectric-radiation effects obtained with a series of experiments incorporating e-gun metal deposition on MOS, MNOS, and SNOS structures. The results are compared with those using resistance-heated metal deposition for various thin-film compositions between the metal and silicon surfaces. A comparison is also made with the effects of controlled direct e-beam irradiation of the structures. The efficiency of quartz and aluminum thin films over MNOS structures, in reducing e-gun radiation effects, is evaluated for double-level metallurgy structures. The effect of different thermal-annealing conditions for offsetting the radiation effects is determined. It is concluded that e-gun metallization causes large negative voltage shifts in MOS, MNOS, and SNOS devices. While MOS threshold shifts are fully ''annealable'', residual MNOS and SNOS V/sub T/ shifts are observed after an anneal of 3500/4500C. Thin films of quartz and aluminum over MOS and MNOS structures effectively reduce radiation effects. Other IGFET parameters are not substantially affected by e-gun radiation

  5. Effects of Kurozu concentrated liquid on adipocyte size in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura Kumi; Kondo Yoshie; Udono Miyako; Tanaka Yasutake; Baba Sanae; Kawamura Sayaka; Katakura Yoshinori; Tong Li-Tao; Imaizumi Katsumi; Sato Masao

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Kurozu concentrated liquid (KCL) is used as a health-promoting supplement for the treatment of disorders such as cancer, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension in Japan. We investigated the possible anti-obesity effects of KCL in rats. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed American Institute of Nutrition 76 formula diet and were orally administrated KCL or acetic acid at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight or deionized water for 4 weeks. Adipocyte size, DNA content in subcutaneo...

  6. Landscape Heterogeneity-Biodiversity Relationship: Effect of Range Size

    OpenAIRE

    Katayama, Naoki; Amano, Tatsuya; Naoe, Shoji; YAMAKITA Takehisa; Komatsu, Isamu; Takagawa, Shin-ichi; Sato, Naoto; Ueta, Mutsuyuki; Miyashita, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    The importance of landscape heterogeneity to biodiversity may depend on the size of the geographic range of species, which in turn can reflect species traits (such as habitat generalization) and the effects of historical and contemporary land covers. We used nationwide bird survey data from Japan, where heterogeneous landscapes predominate, to test the hypothesis that wide-ranging species are positively associated with landscape heterogeneity in terms of species richness and abundance, wherea...

  7. Response to recurrent selection under small effective population size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Jr. Cláudio Lopes de

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A formula was derived for the prediction of the response to recurrent selection when the effective population size (Ne is small. Usually, responses to selection have been estimated by Rs = icsigma²A/sigmaPh, where i, c, sigma²A, and sigmaPh stand for standardized selection differential, parental control, additive variance, and phenotypic standard deviation, respectively. This expression, however, was derived under the assumption of infinite population size. By introducing the effects of finite population size, the expression derived was Rs = [ic(sigma²A + deltaFD1/sigmaPh] - DFID, where deltaF, ID and D1 are the changes in the inbreeding coefficient, the inbreeding depression, and the covariance of additive and homozygous dominance effects, respectively. Thus, the predicted responses to selection based on these expressions will be smaller than those based on the standard procedures for traits with a high level of dominance such as yield. Responses to five cycles of half-sib selection were predicted for maize by both expressions, considering that 100 progenies were evaluated and 10 S1 progenies were recombined, which corresponds to Ne = 10 for each cycle. The accumulated response to selection estimated with the new expression was about 47 and 28% smaller than that based on the standard expression for yield and plant height, respectively. Thus, the expression usually used overestimates the responses to selection, which is in agreement with reported results, because it does not take into account the effective population size that is generally small in recurrent selection programs

  8. Effect of eating rate on binge size in Bulimia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Kissileff, Harry R.; Zimmerli, Ellen J.; Torres, Migdalia I; Devlin, Michael J.; Walsh, B. Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Effect of eating rate on binge size in bulimia nervosa. Bulimia Nervosa (BN) is an eating disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of binge eating. During binge eating episodes, patients often describe the rapid consumption of food, and laboratory studies have shown that during binges patients with BN eat faster than normal controls (NC), but the hypothesis that a rapid rate of eating contributes to the excessive intake of binge meals has not yet been experimentally tested. The aim of thi...

  9. Finite size effects on thermal denaturation of globular proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Mai Suan; Klimov, D. K.; Thirumalai, D.

    2004-01-01

    Finite size effects on the cooperative thermal denaturation of proteins are considered. A dimensionless measure of cooperativity, Omega, scales as N^zeta, where N is the number of amino acids. Surprisingly, we find that zeta is universal with zeta = 1 + gamma, where the exponent gamma characterizes the divergence of the susceptibility for a self-avoiding walk. Our lattice model simulations and experimental data are consistent with the theory. Our finding rationalizes the marginal stability of...

  10. Effect of Pour Size on Concrete Placing Productivity in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Olaoluwa Olatunde; Ojo Stephen Okunlola; Adesanya David Abiodun

    2012-01-01

    Pour size as one of the site factors affecting concreting was examined to determine its effects on concreting productivity. A total of 167 separate concrete pours were observed on 25 building construction sites in Lagos, Nigeria,comprising 35 pours placed by crane and skip; 26 pours placed by dumper; 58 pours placed by wheelbarrow; 37 pours placed by head pan; and 11 pours placed jointly by pump, wheelbarrow and head pan. Data collected from the daily concrete pours were analyzed to determine...

  11. Influence of Size Effect on Evaporation of Aerosol Nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Levdansky, V.V.; Smolík, Jiří; Ždímal, Vladimír

    Praha : Czech Aerosol Society , 2013 - (Zíková, N.), s. 23-24 ISBN 978-80-86186-52-8. [Výroční konference České aerosolové společnosti /14./. Nový Smokovec, High Tatras (SK), 23.10.2013-25.10.2013] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200760905 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : nanoparticles * size effect * evaporation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  12. Effect of rouleaux size of erythrocyte on blood viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the rouleaux size dependence of viscosity in concentrated red blood cell suspension is derived analytically, by using reversible kinetic equation of coagulation, to reveal the effect of erythrocyte aggregation on the blood viscosity. In the limit of dilute concentration and low shear rate, the result does not reduce to Casson's equation. In the end we argue Murata's result on the shear rate dependence of viscosity. (author). 8 refs, 5 figs

  13. The dose delivery effect of the different Beam ON interval in FFF SBRT: TrueBEAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawonwong, T.; Suriyapee, S.; Oonsiri, S.; Sanghangthum, T.; Oonsiri, P.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the dose delivery effect of the different Beam ON interval in Flattening Filter Free Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (FFF-SBRT). The three 10MV-FFF SBRT plans (2 half rotating Rapid Arc, 9 to10 Gray/Fraction) were selected and irradiated in three different intervals (100%, 50% and 25%) using the RPM gating system. The plan verification was performed by the ArcCHECK for gamma analysis and the ionization chamber for point dose measurement. The dose delivery time of each interval were observed. For gamma analysis (2%&2mm criteria), the average percent pass of all plans for 100%, 50% and 25% intervals were 86.1±3.3%, 86.0±3.0% and 86.1±3.3%, respectively. For point dose measurement, the average ratios of each interval to the treatment planning were 1.012±0.015, 1.011±0.014 and 1.011±0.013 for 100%, 50% and 25% interval, respectively. The average dose delivery time was increasing from 74.3±5.0 second for 100% interval to 154.3±12.6 and 347.9±20.3 second for 50% and 25% interval, respectively. The same quality of the dose delivery from different Beam ON intervals in FFF-SBRT by TrueBEAM was illustrated. While the 100% interval represents the breath-hold treatment technique, the differences for the free-breathing using RPM gating system can be treated confidently.

  14. An accurate description of quantum size effects in InP nanocrystallites over a wide range of sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We obtain an effective parametrization of the bulk electronic structure of InP within the tight-binding scheme. Using these parameters, we calculate the electronic structure of InP clusters with the size ranging up to 7.5 nm. The calculated variations in the electronic structure as a function of the cluster size is found to be in excellent agreement with experimental results over the entire range of sizes, establishing the effectiveness and transferability of the obtained parameter strengths

  15. Effects of sample size on KERNEL home range estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, D.E.; Millspaugh, J.J.; Kernohan, Brian J.; Brundige, Gary C.; Raedeke, Kenneth J.; Gitzen, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Kernel methods for estimating home range are being used increasingly in wildlife research, but the effect of sample size on their accuracy is not known. We used computer simulations of 10-200 points/home range and compared accuracy of home range estimates produced by fixed and adaptive kernels with the reference (REF) and least-squares cross-validation (LSCV) methods for determining the amount of smoothing. Simulated home ranges varied from simple to complex shapes created by mixing bivariate normal distributions. We used the size of the 95% home range area and the relative mean squared error of the surface fit to assess the accuracy of the kernel home range estimates. For both measures, the bias and variance approached an asymptote at about 50 observations/home range. The fixed kernel with smoothing selected by LSCV provided the least-biased estimates of the 95% home range area. All kernel methods produced similar surface fit for most simulations, but the fixed kernel with LSCV had the lowest frequency and magnitude of very poor estimates. We reviewed 101 papers published in The Journal of Wildlife Management (JWM) between 1980 and 1997 that estimated animal home ranges. A minority of these papers used nonparametric utilization distribution (UD) estimators, and most did not adequately report sample sizes. We recommend that home range studies using kernel estimates use LSCV to determine the amount of smoothing, obtain a minimum of 30 observations per animal (but preferably a?Y50), and report sample sizes in published results.

  16. Effect of Electron beam on Prepared HAP-Gel Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naima A. El Gendy*,Tawfik M. S.**, and Asma M. Nour

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polyvinyl alcohol liquid PVAl was used as the organic carrier for Hydroxylapatite-gel (Hap-gel composite. PVAl has the ability to form a nano- hydroxylapatite polyvinyl alcohol composite gel which has a wide range of uses in different environmental and medical applications. Prepared Hap-gel is known to have a very similar composition to human bone and is used as a substitute for bones in compound fractures and artificial dentures. Matreia and Methods: In this work prepared HAP- gel was exposed to a high ionizing radiation electron beam (5 kilo Gray and an aqueous solution containing aluminum ions (Al+. Some investigations were done to illustrate the effect of radiation exposure and aluminum contamination on prepared Hap-gel. Results: Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDx showed that the electron beam used caused an obvious increase in the calcium ions (Ca++ content of the prepared Hap-gel from 60% to 65.69 % with a prominent decrease in phosphorus ions (P + content from 40 % to 34.31 % in addition to an increase in the Ca/P ratio from 1.5 to 1.91. Exposure of the pre-irradiated Hap-gel samples to aluminium ions (Al+ resulted in a noticeable decrease in Ca++ content from 65.69 atomic % to 32.14 % atomic % and a further noticeable decrease in P+ content from 34.31 % atomic % to 13 atomic % as well as an increase in the Ca/P ratio from 1.91 to 2.47. The levels for the original prepared Hap-gel were Ca++; 60 atomic % and P+; 40 atomic %. It was deduced that exposure of the Hap-gel to Al+ had a further damaging effect on the pre-irradiated Hap-gel composition in addition to the damaging effect that the electron beam used induced on the samples. Conclusions: it could be concluded that electron beams and Al+ have an injurious effect on human bone tissue taking into consideration the similarity in composition between Hap-gel and bones. Therefore, this study could be beneficial in the field of osteoporosis research and assist the

  17. Infrared Polarization and Beaming Effect for BL Lac Objects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEI Dong-Cheng; XIE Guang-Zhong

    2001-01-01

    With the idea of the beaming models, we derive a relation between the observed polarization and Dopplercorrected magnitude; that is, the observed polarization is in anti-correlation with the Doppler-corrected magnitude. Making use of the infrared data observed simultaneously by Impey et al. [Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc.200 (1982) 19; 209 (1984) 245] and Holmes et al. [ibid. 210 (1984) 961] we found that: (1) there is a significant correlation between the observed maximum polarization and Doppler-corrected magnitude but the polarization is not in anti-correlation with the Doppler-corrected magnitude; (2) the maximum infrared polarization is strongly correlated with the maximum optical polarization. Our conclusion is that the infrared polarization depends only on the degree of ordering of the magnetic field in the synchrotron emission regions and not on the beaming effect.Both infrared and optical emissions originate from the synchrotron radiation.

  18. Beam-Shape Effects in Nonlinear Compton and Thomson Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Heinzl, T; Kämpfer, B

    2009-01-01

    We discuss intensity effects in collisions between beams of optical photons from a high-power laser and relativistic electrons. Our main focus are the modifications of the emission spectra due to realistic finite-beam geometries. By carefully analyzing the classical limit we precisely quantify the distinction between strong-field QED Compton scattering and classical Thomson scattering. A purely classical, but fully covariant, calculation of the bremsstrahlung emitted by an electron in a plane wave laser field yields radiation into harmonics, as expected. This result is generalized to pulses of finite duration and explains the appearance of line broadening and harmonic substructure as an interference phenomenon. The ensuing numerical treatment confirms that strong focussing of the laser leads to a broad continuum while higher harmonics become visible only at moderate focussing, hence lower intensity. We present a scaling law for the backscattered photon spectral density which facilitates averaging over electro...

  19. Effects of modulated electron beams and cavities on reditrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, T. J. T.; Davis, H. A.; Fulton, R. D.; Sherwood, E. G.

    The virtual cathode, when formed in a cavity, can generate microwaves at different cavity modes depending on the geometry of the cavity. We found that the formation and the oscillation frequency of the virtual cathode in a reditron can be significantly influenced by cavity designs. The length of a cavity can play a role in frequency and mode selection. Our simulations showed that TM sub 012 and TM sub 033 were excited for cavity lengths of 15.0 cm and 22.5 cm, respectively. In addition to the cavity effects on reditrons, we discovered that highly modulated electron beams can be produced in reditrons. Full modulation (100 percent) of the transmitted electron beam current has been confirmed in our simulations. We further showed that incorporation of an inverse diode configuration can achieve microwave production efficiency of 26 percent.

  20. Effects of modulated electron beams and cavities on reditrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Davis, H.A.; Fulton, R.D.; Sherwood, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    The virtual cathode, when formed in a cavity, can generate microwaves at different cavity modes depending on the geometry of the cavity. We found that the formation and the oscillation frequency of the virtual cathode in a reditron can be significantly influenced by cavity designs. The length of a cavity can play a role in frequency and mode selection. Our simulations showed that TM/sub 012/ and TM/sub 033/ were excited for cavity lengths of 15.0 cm and 22.5 cm, respectively. In addition to the cavity effects on reditrons, we discovered that highly modulated electron beams can be produced in reditrons. Full modulation (100/percent/) of the transmitted electron beam current has been confirmed in our simulations. We further showed that incorporation of an inverse diode configuration can achieve microwave production efficiency of 26/percent/. 11 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Limits to the resolution of beam size measurement from fluorescent screens due to the thickness of the phosphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the use of fluorescent screens for the measurement of beam profiles on non-circulating particle beams. An expression for the intensity of the beam profile as a function of phosphor thickness is given. 3 refs., 8 figs

  2. Stiction of a Nano-Beam with Surface Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-Lin; XIA Re; ZHOU Yue-Ting

    2011-01-01

    Nanowire stiction is a cruciai bottleneck for the development of M/NEMS devices. We present a model of a nano-beam stuck to te substrate in consideration of both surface elasticity and residual surface stress. The critical detachment length can be derived from the transversality condition using the variational method. The effects of the surface parameters on the adhesion of the nano-beam are discussed in detail. These analyses provide some suggestions for engineers in the design and fabrication of more accurate M/NEMS instruments.%Nanowire stiction is a crucial bottleneck for the development of M/NEMS devices.We present a model of a nano-beam stuck to the substrate in consideration of both surface elasticity and residual surface stress.The critical detachment length can be derived from the transversality condition using the variational method.The effects of the surface parameters on the adhesion of the nano-beam are discussed in detail.These analyses provide some suggestions for engineers in the design and fabrication of more accurate M/NEMS instruments.In the bottom-up approach,nanowires and nanobelts are widely used as the building blocks of micro/nano devices,such as micro-sensors,resonators,probes,transistors and actuators in micro/nanoelectro-mechanical systems (M/NMES).[1-3] Unfortunately,the stiction failure caused by spontaneous adhesion between M/NEMS structures has become a major limitation to push better application of these novel devices and this problem has been highlighted as a hot topic in the past decades.[4,5] The main reason of stiction is that in the small spacings,slender structures with high compliance are easily brought into contact with a substrate with strong surface energy.

  3. Effect of Construction Joints on Performance of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zena Waleed Abass

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction joints are stopping places in the process of placing concrete, and they are required because in many structures it is impractical to place concrete in one continuous operation. The amount of concrete that can be placed at one time is governed by the batching and mixing capacity and by the strength of the formwork. A good construction joint should provide adequate flexural and shear continuity through the interface.In this study, the effect of location of construction joints on the performance of reinforced concrete structural elements is experimentally investigated. Nineteen beam specimens with dimensions of 200×200×950 mm were tested. The variables investigated are the location of the construction joints (at midspan or at third point of the specimens, type of construction joints (vertical, inclined, and key construction joints, and presence of stirrups at these joints. The specimens were tested using 1000 kN computer controlled versatile electronic testing machine. The specimens were positioned in the machine so that the deflection at center andor at the location of construction joint was measured at each load step.The results of the experimental program indicated that the best location of the construction joint is at the point of minimum shear. It was found that the use of vertical construction joint has little effect on the overall behavior of beam specimens (the percentage of reduction in ultimate load capacity is in the range of 0% - 5%. While inclined construction joints results in a noticeable reduction in strength of beams relative to the strength of beam without construction joint the percentage of reduction in ultimate load capacity is in range of 8% - 20%.The presence of stirrups at the construction joints is an important variable, which affect the type of failure and load carrying capacity. It is found that adding of stirrups across the joint results in an increase in capacity in the range of (7%- 15% and a decrease in

  4. Effects of tidal forces on the beam energy in LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The e+e- collider LEP is used to investigate the Z particle and to measure its energy and width. This requires energy calibrations with ∼20 ppm precision achieved by measuring the frequency of a resonance which destroys the transverse beam polarization established by synchrotron radiation. To make this calibration valid over a longer period all effects causing an energy change have to be corrected for. Among those are the terrestrial tides due to the Moon and Sun. They move the Earth surface up and down by as much as ∼0.25 m which represents a relative local change of the Earth radius of 0.04 ppm. This motion has also lateral components resulting in a change of the LEP circumference (Cc=26.7 km) by a similar relative amount. Since the length of the beam orbit is fixed by the constant RF-frequency the change of the machine circumference will force the beam to go off-center through the quadrupoles and receive an extra deflection leading to an energy change given by ΔCc/Cc ∼ -αc ΔE/E. With the momentum compaction αc = 1.85 · 10-4 for the present LEP optics this gives tide-driven p.t.p. energy excursion up to about 220 ppm, corresponding to ∼18.5 MeV for the Z energy. A beam energy measurement carried out over a 24 hour period perfectly confirmed the effects expected from a more detailed calculation of the tides. A corresponding correction can be applied to energy calibrations

  5. Effects of beam and pulse trawling on the benthic ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Teal, L.R.; Depestele, J.; O'Neill, B; Craeymeersch, J.A.M.; Denderen, van, A.C.; Parker, R.; Perdon, K.J.; H. POLET; Rasenberg, M.M.M.; Vanelslander, B.; Rijnsdorp, A.D.

    2014-01-01

    Here we study the effects of fishing trawl gear on the seabed and benthic organisms. A BACI-design experiment was used to examine the effects of a traditional beam trawl gear and the pulse trawl gear. The pulse trawl gear is gaining popularity amongst Dutch fishers in recent years due to reduced fuel costs and good sole catches.The research was carried out in the northern part of the Dutch Voordelta (southern North Sea coastal zone area, 15 – 22m deep, sandy habitat) in June 2013. In this exp...

  6. Finite size effects in simulations of protein aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Pawar

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that the soluble protofibrillar species that proceed amyloid fibril formation are associated with a range of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson diseases. Computer simulations of the processes that lead to the formation of these oligomeric species are starting to make significant contributions to our understanding of the determinants of protein aggregation. We simulate different systems at constant concentration but with a different number of peptides and we study the how the finite number of proteins affects the underlying free energy of the system and therefore the relative stability of the species involved in the process. If not taken into account, this finite size effect can undermine the validity of theoretical predictions regarding the relative stability of the species involved and the rates of conversion from one to the other. We discuss the reasons that give rise to this finite size effect form both a probabilistic and energy fluctuations point of view and also how this problem can be dealt by a finite size scaling analysis.

  7. An analytical solution for quantum size effects on Seebeck coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabetoglu, S.; Sisman, A.; Ozturk, Z. F.

    2016-03-01

    There are numerous experimental and numerical studies about quantum size effects on Seebeck coefficient. In contrast, in this study, we obtain analytical expressions for Seebeck coefficient under quantum size effects. Seebeck coefficient of a Fermi gas confined in a rectangular domain is considered. Analytical expressions, which represent the size dependency of Seebeck coefficient explicitly, are derived in terms of confinement parameters. A fundamental form of Seebeck coefficient based on infinite summations is used under relaxation time approximation. To obtain analytical results, summations are calculated using the first two terms of Poisson summation formula. It is shown that they are in good agreement with the exact results based on direct calculation of summations as long as confinement parameters are less than unity. The analytical results are also in good agreement with experimental and numerical ones in literature. Maximum relative errors of analytical expressions are less than 3% and 4% for 2D and 1D cases, respectively. Dimensional transitions of Seebeck coefficient are also examined. Furthermore, a detailed physical explanation for the oscillations in Seebeck coefficient is proposed by considering the relative standard deviation of total variance of particle number in Fermi shell.

  8. Effect of particle size on degree of inversion in ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrites with the spinel structure are important materials because of their structural, magnetic and electrical properties. The suitability of these materials depends on both the intrinsic behavior of the material and the effects of the grain size. Moessbauer spectroscopy was employed to investigate the cation distribution and degree of inversion in bulk and nano sized particles of CuFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/, MnFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ and NiFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ ferrites. The Moessbauer spectra of all bulk ferrites showed complete magnetic behavior, whereas nanoparticle ferrites showed combination of ferromagnetic and superparamagnetic components. Moreover, the cation distribution in nanoparticle materials was also found to be different to that of their bulk counterparts indicating the particle size dependency. The inversion of Cu and Ni ions in bulk sample was greater than that of nanoparticles; whereas the inversion of Mn ions was less in bulk material as compared to the nanoparticles. Hence the degree of inversion decreased in CuFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ and NiFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ samples whereas, it increased in MnFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ as the particle size decreased and thus showed the anomalous behavior in this case. The nanoparticle samples also showed paramagnetic behaviour due to superparamagnetism and this effect is more prominent in MnFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/. Moessbauer spectra of bulk and nanoparticles CuFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ is shown. (Orig./A.B.)

  9. Size-effect features on the magnetothermopower of bismuth nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In this work we have studied the magnetic field dependence of the thermopower (TEP) and resistance of glass-coated Bi wires with diameter (d) from 100 nm to at 1.5 μm below 80 K. Nanowires have anomalously large values of the thermopower (+100 μV K.1) and relatively high effective resistivities, but their frequencies of SdH oscillations remain those of bulk Bi. The TEP stays positive in longitudinal magnetic fields up to 15 T, where the surface scattering of charge carriers is negligible. Our analysis shows that the anomalous thermopower has a diffusion origin and is a consequence of the microstructure rather than the result of the strong scattering of electrons by the wire walls. The intensities of field at which the size-effect features appear on the magnetothermopower curves correspond to a value at which the diameter of the hole cyclotron orbit equals d. Size-effect features were observed only for set of nanowires with d = 100-350 nm, where diffusion TEP is dominant. The contribution of the phonon-drag effect was observed in a wire with diameter larger than 400 nm and becomes dominant at diameter of 1 μm. (authors)

  10. A GPU-based finite-size pencil beam algorithm with 3D-density correction for radiotherapy dose calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xuejun; Jelen, Urszula; Li, Jinsheng; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2011-06-01

    Targeting at the development of an accurate and efficient dose calculation engine for online adaptive radiotherapy, we have implemented a finite-size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm with a 3D-density correction method on graphics processing unit (GPU). This new GPU-based dose engine is built on our previously published ultrafast FSPB computational framework (Gu et al 2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 6287-97). Dosimetric evaluations against Monte Carlo dose calculations are conducted on ten IMRT treatment plans (five head-and-neck cases and five lung cases). For all cases, there is improvement with the 3D-density correction over the conventional FSPB algorithm and for most cases the improvement is significant. Regarding the efficiency, because of the appropriate arrangement of memory access and the usage of GPU intrinsic functions, the dose calculation for an IMRT plan can be accomplished well within 1 s (except for one case) with this new GPU-based FSPB algorithm. Compared to the previous GPU-based FSPB algorithm without 3D-density correction, this new algorithm, though slightly sacrificing the computational efficiency (~5-15% lower), has significantly improved the dose calculation accuracy, making it more suitable for online IMRT replanning.

  11. Modelling beam transport and biological effectiveness to develop treatment planning for ion beam radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Grzanka, Leszek

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy with carbon ions is a novel technique of cancer radiotherapy, applicable in particular to treating radioresistant tumours at difficult localisations. Therapy planning, where the medical physicist, following the medical prescription, finds the optimum distribution of cancer cells to be inactivated by their irradiation over the tumour volume, is a basic procedure of cancer radiotherapy. The main difficulty encountered in therapy planning for ion radiotherapy is to correctly account for the enhanced radiobiological effectiveness of ions in the Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP) region over the tumour volume. In this case, unlike in conventional radiotherapy with photon beams, achieving a uniform dose distribution over the tumour volume does not imply achieving uniform cancer cell inactivation. In this thesis, an algorithm of the basic element (kernel) of a treatment planning system (TPS) for carbon ion therapy is developed. The algorithm consists of a radiobiological part which suitably corrects for ...

  12. Lens effect of unipolar electrostatic steerers on low-energy ion beams and its effective reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The JAEA-Tokai tandem accelerator has two ion injectors, one is the negative ion injector placed on the ground and the other is the positive ion injector in the high voltage terminal. The electrostatic steerers in the high voltage terminal are used for ion beams from the both injectors. Because the beams from the negative ion injector gain high energy at the 20MV terminal, the electrodes of the electrostatic steerers are designed to be supplied several ten kV. The high voltages are supplied by two unipolar DC power supplies and they are controlled as the sum of the voltages keeps constant. The high electric potential between the electrodes affects the beam trajectory as an electrostatic lens. The potential must be too high for the low energy ion beams from the positive ion injector on the 100kV deck. We simulated the beam trajectory by calculation and evaluated the strength of the lens effects. The results showed that the focal distances were too short to control the beam form positive ion injector using optical devices in the downstream. If we reduce the voltages to one tenth in simulation, then the focusing effects were much less significant. We installed a multiplying factor circuit to make the voltages variable and much lower. The results of beam-handling tests using the circuit actually showed significant increase of the ion beam current. (author)

  13. Beam-shape effects in nonlinear Compton and Thomson scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss intensity effects in collisions between beams of optical photons from a high-power laser and relativistic electrons. Our main focus is on the modifications of the emission spectra due to realistic finite-beam geometries. By carefully analyzing the classical limit we precisely quantify the distinction between strong-field QED Compton scattering and classical Thomson scattering. A purely classical, but fully covariant, calculation of the bremsstrahlung emitted by an electron in a plane-wave laser field yields radiation into harmonics, as expected. This result is generalized to pulses of finite duration and explains the appearance of line broadening and harmonic substructure as an interference phenomenon. The ensuing numerical treatment confirms that strong focusing of the laser leads to a broad continuum while higher harmonics become visible only at moderate focusing, and hence lower intensity. We present a scaling law for the backscattered photon spectral density which facilitates averaging over electron beam phase space. Finally, we propose a set of realistic parameters such that the observation of intensity-induced spectral red shift, higher harmonics, and their substructure becomes feasible.

  14. SU-D-213-02: Characterization of the Effect of a New Commercial Transmission Detector On Radiotherapy Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of a new commercial transmission detector on radiotherapy beams of various energies. Methods: A transmission detector designed for online treatment monitoring was characterized on a TrueBeam STx linear accelerator with 6MV, 6FFF, 10MV, and 10FFF beams. Measurements of beam characteristics including percentage depth doses (PDDs), inplane and crossplane off-axis profiles at different depths, transmission factors, and skin dose were acquired at field sizes of 3×3cm, 5×5m, 10×10cm, and 20×20cm at 100cm and 80cm source-to-surface distance (SSD). All measurements were taken with and without the transmission detector in the path of the beam. A CC04 chamber was used for all profile and transmission factor measurements. Skin dose was assessed at 100cm, 90cm, and 80cm SSD and using a variety of detectors (Roos and Markus parallel-plate chambers, and OSLD). Results: The PDDs showed small differences between the unperturbed and perturbed beams for both 100cm and 80cm SSD (≤4mm dmax difference and <1.2% average profile difference). The differences were larger for the flattened beams and at larger field sizes. The off-axis profiles showed similar trends. The penumbras looked similar with and without the transmission detector. Comparisons in the central 80% of the profile showed a maximum average (maximum) profile difference between all field sizes of 0.756% (1.535%) and 0.739% (3.682%) for 100cm and 80cm SSD, respectively. The average measured skin dose at 100cm (80cm) SSD for 10×10cm field size was <4% (<35%) dose increase for all energies. For 20×20cm field size, this value increased to <10% (≤45%). Conclusion: The transmission detector has minimal effect on the clinically relevant radiotherapy beams for IMRT and VMAT (field sizes 10×10cm and less). For larger field sizes, some perturbations are observable which would need to be assessed for clinical impact. The authors of this publication has research support from IBA Dosimetry

  15. Effect of flexural crack on plain concrete beam failure mechanism A numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoullah Namdar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The flexural failure of plain concrete beam occurs along with development of flexural crack on beam. In this paper by using ABAQUS, mechanism failure of plain concrete beam under three steps have been simulated. The cracking moment has been analytically calculated and applied on the both sides of the fixed beam, and flexural crack has been simulated on beam. Displacement, von Mises, load reaction, displacementcrack length, von Mises-crack length and von Mises-displacement of beams have been graphical depicted. Results indicated that, the flexural crack governs beam mechanism failure and its effects on beam resistance failure. It has been found that the flexural crack in initial stage it developed slowly and changes to be fast at the final stage of collapsing beam due to reduction of the flexural resistance of beam. Increasing mechanical properties of concrete, collapse displacement is reduced.

  16. Electron beam irradiation effects on some packaged dried food items

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For radical sports practitioners, small nutritious snack foods are needed. At the same time, food preparation must guarantee long shelf life and be compact or lightweight for easiness of carrying. Commercial individually packaged foods can be used either for sports practitioners like adventure racing or eventually as military rations. Irradiation processing of foods is an important preservation technology. High-voltage electron beams generated from linear accelerators are an alternative to radioisotope generators as they require much shorter exposure times (seconds vs. hours for γ irradiation) to be effective and are currently used to pasteurize meat products among others food items. This work describes the application of electron beam irradiation on some food items used in sport training diets: fiber rich cookies, fruit cereal bars, instant dehydrated asparagus soup and instant Brazilian corn pudding. Each kind of sample contained 3 groups of 15 units each. Irradiation was performed with an electron beam accelerator Dynamitron (Radiation Dynamics Inc.) model JOB 188, with doses of 5 and 10 kGy. For the evaluation of irradiated samples a methodology based on the Analytical Norms of the Instituto Adolfo Lutz, one of the South America Reference Laboratories was employed. The microbiological and sensory analyses of the diverse irradiated samples are presented. Electron beam irradiation resulted in significant reduction of the fungus and yeast load but caused dose dependent differences of some sensory characteristics. A careful dose choice and special irradiation conditions must be used in order to achieve sensory requirements needed for the commercialization of these irradiated food items. (author)

  17. Reduction of metal artifacts: beam hardening and photon starvation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadava, Girijesh K.; Pal, Debashish; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    The presence of metal-artifacts in CT imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and interfere with disease diagnosis. The cause and occurrence of metal-artifacts are primarily due to beam hardening, scatter, partial volume and photon starvation; however, the contribution to the artifacts from each of them depends on the type of hardware. A comparison of CT images obtained with different metallic hardware in various applications, along with acquisition and reconstruction parameters, helps understand methods for reducing or overcoming such artifacts. In this work, a metal beam hardening correction (BHC) and a projection-completion based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms were developed, and applied on phantom and clinical CT scans with various metallic implants. Stainless-steel and Titanium were used to model and correct for metal beam hardening effect. In the MAR algorithm, the corrupted projection samples are replaced by the combination of original projections and in-painted data obtained by forward projecting a prior image. The data included spine fixation screws, hip-implants, dental-filling, and body extremity fixations, covering range of clinically used metal implants. Comparison of BHC and MAR on different metallic implants was used to characterize dominant source of the artifacts, and conceivable methods to overcome those. Results of the study indicate that beam hardening could be a dominant source of artifact in many spine and extremity fixations, whereas dental and hip implants could be dominant source of photon starvation. The BHC algorithm could significantly improve image quality in CT scans with metallic screws, whereas MAR algorithm could alleviate artifacts in hip-implants and dentalfillings.

  18. Effect of heavy ion beams on intratumoral radioresistant tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the radiobiological effect of heavy ion beams on radioresistant and radiosensitive human tumor cells. Tumors of human origin, an ependymoblastoma (EB) with wild-type (wt) p53, a primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) with wt p53, and a glioblastoma (GB) with mutant-type (mt) p53, were transplanted to nude mice, and the mice were irradiated with carbon ion beams (290 MeV/u) or 200 kV X-rays. Tumors were excised 4, 6, or 24 hours after 2 Gy irradiation. A part of each tumor was fixed in formalin and embedded in paraffin. Thin sections were stained with H.E., GFAP or TUNEL for microscopic study. Total RNA was extracted for cDNA microarray analysis. In wt-p53 tumors, apoptosis increased 4 or 6 hours after irradiation. The tumors with wt-p53 showed significant changes in gene expression following 2 Gy irradiation. Pathway analysis of up- and down-regulated genes demonstrated that apoptosis, p53 signaling pathway, and cell cycle are involved significantly. There was little difference between the gene expression profiles induced by carbon ion beams and those by X-rays. In contrast, the tumor with mt-p53 showed much less change in gene expression after 2 Gy irradiation. But, the tumor showed significant changes 4, 6, or 24 hours after 8 Gy or 16 Gy irradiation, and the gene expression profiles induced by carbon ion beams were different from those by X-rays. p53, caspases, Fas, and TRAIL were not involved in the pathways, but NF-kB and IAP were suggested to be involved. (author)

  19. The flexoelectric effect associated size dependent pyroelectricity in solid dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Gang, E-mail: baigang@njupt.edu.cn [Jiangsu Provincial Engineering Laboratory for RF Integration and Micropackaging and College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210023 (China); Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liu, Zhiguo [Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xie, Qiyun; Guo, Yanyan; Li, Wei [Jiangsu Provincial Engineering Laboratory for RF Integration and Micropackaging and College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210023 (China); Yan, Xiaobing [College of Electronic and information Engineering, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China)

    2015-09-15

    A phenomenological thermodynamic theory is used to investigate the effect of strain gradient on the pyroelectric effect in centrosymmetric dielectric solids. Direct pyroelectricity can exist as external mechanical stress is applied to non-pyroelectric dielectrics with shapes such as truncated pyramids, due to elastic strain gradient induced flexoelectric polarization. Effective pyroelectric coefficient was analyzed in truncated pyramids. It is found to be controlled by size, ambient temperature, stress, and aspect ratio and depends mainly on temperature sensitivity of flexoelectric coefficient (TSFC) and strain gradient of the truncated pyramids dielectric solids. These results show that the pyroelectric property of Ba{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}TiO{sub 3} above T{sub c} similar to PZT and other lead-based ferroelectrics can be obtained. This feature might widely broaden the selection of materials for infrared detectors with preferable properties.

  20. The flexoelectric effect associated size dependent pyroelectricity in solid dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A phenomenological thermodynamic theory is used to investigate the effect of strain gradient on the pyroelectric effect in centrosymmetric dielectric solids. Direct pyroelectricity can exist as external mechanical stress is applied to non-pyroelectric dielectrics with shapes such as truncated pyramids, due to elastic strain gradient induced flexoelectric polarization. Effective pyroelectric coefficient was analyzed in truncated pyramids. It is found to be controlled by size, ambient temperature, stress, and aspect ratio and depends mainly on temperature sensitivity of flexoelectric coefficient (TSFC) and strain gradient of the truncated pyramids dielectric solids. These results show that the pyroelectric property of Ba0.67Sr0.33TiO3 above Tc similar to PZT and other lead-based ferroelectrics can be obtained. This feature might widely broaden the selection of materials for infrared detectors with preferable properties

  1. The effect of nanocrystalline magnetite size on arsenic removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.T. Mayo et al

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher environmental standards have made the removal of arsenic from water an important problem for environmental engineering. Iron oxide is a particularly interesting sorbent to consider for this application. Its magnetic properties allow relatively routine dispersal and recovery of the adsorbent into and from groundwater or industrial processing facilities; in addition, iron oxide has strong and specific interactions with both As(III and As(V. Finally, this material can be produced with nanoscale dimensions, which enhance both its capacity and removal. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential arsenic adsorption by nanoscale iron oxides, specifically magnetite (Fe3O4 nanoparticles. We focus on the effect of Fe3O4 particle size on the adsorption and desorption behavior of As(III and As(V. The results show that the nanoparticle size has a dramatic effect on the adsorption and desorption of arsenic. As particle size is decreased from 300 to 12 nm the adsorption capacities for both As(III and As(V increase nearly 200 times. Interestingly, such an increase is more than expected from simple considerations of surface area and suggests that nanoscale iron oxide materials sorb arsenic through different means than bulk systems. The desorption process, however, exhibits some hysteresis with the effect becoming more pronounced with small nanoparticles. This hysteresis most likely results from a higher arsenic affinity for Fe3O4 nanoparticles. This work suggests that Fe3O4 nanocrystals and magnetic separations offer a promising method for arsenic removal.

  2. Neutralized ion beam modification of cellulose membranes for study of ion charge effect on ion-beam-induced DNA transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakrajang, K., E-mail: k.prakrajang@gmail.com [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sangwijit, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S. [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Wanichapichart, P. [Membrane Science and Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkla 90110 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.th [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2012-02-01

    Low-energy ion beam biotechnology (IBBT) has recently been rapidly developed worldwide. Ion-beam-induced DNA transfer is one of the important applications of IBBT. However, mechanisms involved in this application are not yet well understood. In this study plasma-neutralized ion beam was applied to investigate ion charge effect on induction of DNA transfer. Argon ion beam at 7.5 keV was neutralized by RF-driven plasma in the beam path and then bombarded cellulose membranes which were used as the mimetic plant cell envelope. Electrical properties such as impedance and capacitance of the membranes were measured after the bombardment. An in vitro experiment on plasmid DNA transfer through the cellulose membrane was followed up. The results showed that the ion charge input played an important role in the impedance and capacitance changes which would affect DNA transfer. Generally speaking, neutral particle beam bombardment of biologic cells was more effective in inducing DNA transfer than charged ion beam bombardment.

  3. Finite-size effects in amorphous indium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sreemanta; Tewari, Girish C.; Mahalu, Diana; Shahar, Dan

    2016-04-01

    We study the low-temperature magnetotransport properties of several highly disordered amorphous indium oxide (a:InO) samples. Simultaneously fabricated devices comprising a two-dimensional (2D) film and 10 -μ m -long wires of different widths were measured to investigate the effect of size as we approach the 1D limit, which is around 4 times the correlation length, and happens to be around 100 nm for a:InO. The film and the wires showed magnetic field (B )-induced superconductor to insulator transition (SIT). In the superconducting side, the resistance increased with decrease in wire width, whereas an opposite trend is observed in the insulating side. We find that this effect can be explained in light of charge-vortex duality picture of the SIT. Resistance of the 2D film follows an activated behavior over the temperature (T ), whereas, the wires show a crossover from the high-T -activated to a T -independent behavior. At high-temperature regime the wires' resistance follow the film's until they deviate and became independent of T . We find that the temperature at which this deviation occurs evolves with the magnetic field and the width of the wire, which show the effect of finite size on the transport.

  4. Establishment of dosimetric references for high energy X-ray beams of very small field sizes (≤ 1 cm2) used in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The French primary standard dosimetry laboratory 'Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel' is in charge of the establishment of dosimetric standards for ionizing radiation beams. Absolute dose measurements are thus available for X-Ray beams used in radiotherapy for field sizes between 10 and 2 cm. Since the miniaturization of absolute dosimeters is not possible for smaller field sizes, a dose area product (DAP) has been suggested as a substitute to the absorbed dose at a point.In order to measure a DAP with dosimeters which sensitive surface is larger than the beam, a graphite calorimeter with a sensitive surface of 3 cm diameter was designed, built and tested. An ionization chamber with the same diameter was realized and tested to transfer the dosimetric references to the end users. Its calibration factor in terms of DAP was determined in circular beams of 2, 1 and 0.75 cm diameter with an uncertainty smaller than 0.7 %. The two-Dimension relative dose distribution was measured thanks to a diamond dosimeter, a PinPoint ionization chamber and gafchromic films, using a specific protocol. Both approaches, respectively based on a PDS and an absorbed dose to water at a point, were in good agreement in the 2 cm beam. Correction factors determined from Monte Carlo simulations and measured dose distributions were needed for this comparison. The calibration factor of the large ionization chamber in the 1 and 0.75 cm diameter beams were in good agreement within the uncertainties but a gap of -2.6 % was found with the one established in the 2 cm diameter beam. As a result, the DAP can be used if the sensitive surface is much larger than the beam section. (author)

  5. Effect Sizes for Research Univariate and Multivariate Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Grissom, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Noted for its comprehensive coverage, this greatly expanded new edition now covers the use of univariate and multivariate effect sizes. Many measures and estimators are reviewed along with their application, interpretation, and limitations. Noted for its practical approach, the book features numerous examples using real data for a variety of variables and designs, to help readers apply the material to their own data. Tips on the use of SPSS, SAS, R, and S-Plus are provided. The book's broad disciplinary appeal results from its inclusion of a variety of examples from psychology, medicine, educa

  6. Application of fractal theory to size effect of disordered materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    For disordered materials it is impossible to measure constantmaterial properties using the Euclidian geometrical dimension of the test specimens. Based on the theory of fractal geometry, the fractal dimension of the damaged microstructure is applied to measure the strength and fracture toughness of imitation marbles, which turn out to be scale-invariant material constants. In this paper, the experimental data are treated and interpreted by the theory of fractal geometry. Reasonable results are obtained and the size effects on strength and fracture energy are observed.

  7. Effects on doppler profiles in beam-heated plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze various effects that can influence ion temperature measurements based on Doppler broadening of impurity lines. Macroscopic effects such as inhomogeneities, plasma rotation and temporal modulations are distinguished from microscopic ones leading to species-dependent temperatures and anisotropy in the impurity distribution functions. There are turbulent effects related to the latter that can also cause deviations from thermodynamic equilibrium among light and heavy impurities. It is found that under neutral-beam-heated JET conditions, all effects should be small and influence the measured ion temperature by less than ∼ 10%. Larger influences could be expected from strongly peaked rotation profiles - for which, however, no indications are found - and high-level turbulence, which appears rather unrealistic, too. (author)

  8. The effect of heavy-ion beams for tumor metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to clarify the effect of carbon-ion beams (C-ions) for metastatic potential of malignant melanomas. B16/BL6 cells, a mouse malignant melanoma cell line having highly metastatic potential, were exposed to heavy-ion beams (C-ions) or photon beams (X-rays or γ-rays) in vitro or in vivo conditions. Survival curves showed higher cytotoxic effects of C-ions than X-rays. The abilities of migration, invasion and adhesion were significantly suppressed by C-ions with increment of dose and linear energy transfer (LET) values, however a part of those abilities enhanced by X-rays at low dose range (0.5-1.0 Gy) compared with controls. Interestingly, the enhancement ratios for the metastatic potentials, migration, invasion and adhesion were higher than those for cell killing. Local tumors implanted into right leg of mice (7.5±0.5 mm) were irradiated with C-ions (290 MeV/u, 6 cm spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP)) or γ-rays (137Cs). Lung metastatic nodules arise from local tumors was counted as metastasis after irradiation. The metastasis was suppressed by radiations depending on the physical dose, and the effect of C-ions was significant. Additionally, the surviving fraction of each cell in a tumor was obtained by in vivo-in vitro assay, and biological equivalent dose were estimated. C-ions also significantly suppressed metastatic fraction compared with γ-rays when the metastasis was re-analyzed using the equivalent dose. It might suggest that C-ion inhibit metastasis at radiotherapy compared with low-LET photons. (author)

  9. Influence of nuclear quantum effects on frozen phonon simulations of electron vortex beam HAADF-STEM images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, André; Zeiger, Paul; Kocevski, Vancho; Rusz, Ján

    2016-05-01

    We have evaluated atomic resolution high-angle annular dark field images with ordinary beams and electron vortex beams for thin crystals of bcc iron, explicitly considering the atomic vibrations using molecular dynamics. The shape of the image representing an atomic column depends on the orbital angular momentum, sample thickness and temperature. For electron vortex beams we observe characteristic doughnut-shaped images of atomic columns. It is shown how the thermal diffuse scattering reduces the depth of their central minima, which get further smeared by finite source size effects. In addition, it is shown that in calculations of HAADF-STEM images at low temperatures one has to explicitly consider the nuclear quantum effects (zero point vibrations), otherwise the effect of atomic vibrations is strongly underestimated. PMID:26852870

  10. Numerical analysis of the effects of non-conventional laser beam geometries during laser melting of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser melting is an important industrial activity encountered in a variety of laser manufacturing processes, e.g. selective laser melting, welding, brazing, soldering, glazing, surface alloying, cladding etc. The majority of these processes are carried out by using either circular or rectangular beams. At present, the melt pool characteristics such as melt pool geometry, thermal gradients and cooling rate are controlled by the variation of laser power, spot size or scanning speed. However, the variations in these parameters are often limited by other processing conditions. Although different laser beam modes and intensity distributions have been studied to improve the process, no other laser beam geometries have been investigated. The effect of laser beam geometry on the laser melting process has received very little attention. This paper presents an investigation of the effects of different beam geometries including circular, rectangular and diamond shapes on laser melting of metallic materials. The finite volume method has been used to simulate the transient effects of a moving beam for laser melting of mild steel (EN-43A) taking into account Marangoni and buoyancy convection. The temperature distribution, melt pool geometry, fluid flow velocities and heating/cooling rates have been calculated. Some of the results have been compared with the experimental data

  11. Effects of 70 MeV proton beam on a murine tumor and skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological effectiveness of 70 MeV proton beam generated from the NIRS cyclotron was studied. Seventh generation of a squamous cell carcinoma which arose spontaneously in a C3H/f female mouse was monodispersed by trypsin, and 1.2 x 105 cells were transplanted s.c. into right hind legs of syngeneic male mice. Five days after transplantation, legs with tumors were irradiated under nembutal anaesthesia. Tumor sizes were measured periodically up to 60 days. Time required for a tumor to grow 12.0 mm in diameter was obtained from culculations by use of computer, and termed as TG (tumor growth) time. TGD (Tumor growth deley) time, a difference of TG time between experimental and control groups, was used as an endpoint for tumor. For measurement of skin reaction, hair on right hind legs were depilated by depilatory 7 days before irradiation. Skin reaction was scored every other day up to 35 days, and mean skin reactions were employed as another endpoint. 30 mm spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) in water was used in proton irradiation, and its dose rate was about 90 Gy/min. The reference beam used here was 200 kVp X-ray with dose rate of 2.4 Gy/min. In the first experiment, biological effect of modulated proton beam was examined as a function of penetration depth. Depth was varied by applying various thickness of lucite plates. Tumor and skin effects were found to be very similar to the physical depth-dose distribution. Secondly, we examined relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of proton beam in the spread out Bragg peak, being at 15 mm depth in Lucite. RBEs were 0.82 for skin and 0.79 for tumor. Thereby, therapeutic gain factor (TGF) of 0.96 was obtained in our system. (author)

  12. Electron beam radiation effects on recycled polyamide-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to study the ionizing radiation effects on recycled polyamide-6. This polymer was irradiated with a 1.5 MeV electron beam at different doses. The glass transition of the samples was determined by dynamic mechanical analyses (DMA) measurements and the crystallinity was observed through the X-ray diffraction diagrams. It was observed that crosslinking may have occurred in the irradiated samples of virgin and recycled polyamide-6 and the crystallinity has not changed. (author)

  13. Proximity effect simulation for variable shape e-beam writer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolařík, Vladimír; Matějka, Milan; Urbánek, Michal; Král, Stanislav; Krátký, Stanislav; Mikšík, P.; Vašina, J.

    Brno: Institute of Scientific Instruments AS CR, v.v.i, 2012 - (Mika, F.), s. 75-76 ISBN 978-80-87441-07-7. [International Seminar on Recent Trends in Charged Particle Optics and Surface Physics Instrumentation /13./. Skalský dvůr (CZ), 25.06.2012-29.06.2012] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MPO FR-TI1/576 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : electron scattering effects * e-beam writer * computer simulation Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  14. Coherent beam-beam effects observation and mitigation at the RHIC collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White S.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.

    2012-05-20

    In polarized proton operation in RHIC coherent beam-beam modes are routinely observed with beam transfer function measurements in the vertical plane. With the existence of coherent modes a larger space is required in the tune diagram than without them and stable conditions can be compromised for operation with high intensity beams as foreseen for future luminosity upgrades. We report on experiments and simulations carried out to understand the existence of coherent modes in the vertical plane and their absence in the horizontal plane, and investigate possible mitigation strategies.

  15. Modeling the light-travel-time effect on the far-infrared size of IRC +10216

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Edward L.; Baganoff, Frederick K.

    1995-01-01

    Models of the far-infrared emission from the large circumstellar dust envelope surrounding the carbon star IRC +10216 are used to assess the importance of the light-travel-time effect (LTTE) on the observed size of the source. The central star is a long-period variable with an average period of 644 +/- 17 days and a peak-to-peak amplitude of two magnituds, so a large light-travel-time effect is seen at 1 min radius. An attempt is made to use the LTTE to reconcile the discrepancy between the observations of Fazio et al. and Lester et al. regarding the far-infrared source size. This discrepancy is reviewed in light of recent, high-spatial-resolution observations at 11 microns by Danchi et al. We conclude that IRC +10216 has been resolved on the arcminute scale by Fazio et al. Convolution of the model intensity profile at 61 microns with the 60 sec x 90 sec Gaussian beam of Fazio et al. yields an observed source size full width at half maximum (FWHM) that ranges from approximately 67 sec to 75 sec depending on the phase of the star and the assumed distance to the source. Using a simple r(exp -2) dust distribution and the 106 deg phase of the Fazio et al. observations, the LTTE model reaches a peak size of 74.3 sec at a distance of 300 pc. This agrees favorably with the 78 sec x 6 sec size measured by Fazio et al. Finally, a method is outlined for using the LTTE as a distance indicator to IRC +10216 and other stars with extended mass outflows.

  16. Size-effects on time-dependent concrete fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A realistic description of the behavior of concrete specimens (laboratory-sized) and concrete structures (e.g. concrete dams) requires a nonlinear theory able to predict the well-known phenomenon of size-effects. One of these theories was first proposed by Hillerborg and co-workers (fictitious crack model) and is based on earlier works by Barenblatt and Dugdale for metals (cohesive crack model). It is based on the existence of a fracture process zone (FPZ), where the material undergoes strain-softening while the material outside this zone is linear and elastic. The FPZ, whose existence is borne out by experimental evidence, especially in materials characterized by a heterogeneous microstructure, makes it possible to avoid the stress singularity at the crack tip. This paper analyses the interaction between strain-softening and time-dependent behavior in the case of quasi-static fracture of concrete, with emphasis on size-effects on failure lifetime. A micromechanical model for the fracture process zone, proposed by Santhikumar and Karihaloo, is coupled with a viscous element based on a fractional order rate law (Barpi and Valente). This approach makes it possible to include a whole range of dissipative mechanisms in a single rheological element. The crack propagation rate is slow enough to neglect inertial forces and large enough to ensure that the time-dependent behavior of the process zone remains dominant compared to the behavior of the undamaged and viscoelastic zone. Creep fracture in modeI I conditions is analyzed through the finite element method and the cohesive crack model in the case of laboratory tests where rupture can be achieved by keeping the load constant before peak value. The results obtained with the proposed method in terms of size-effects on failure lifetime are compared with the experimental results reported by Bazant and Xiang. A discussion about the advantages of an object-oriented programming language (like C++ or Java) in the development of

  17. Transport, retention, and size perturbation of graphene oxide in saturated porous media: Effects of input concentration and grain size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurately predicting the fate and transport of graphene oxide (GO) in porous media is critical to assess its environmental impact. In this work, sand column experiments were conducted to determine the effect of input concentration and grain size on transport, retention, and size perturbation of GO ...

  18. Effects of Kurozu concentrated liquid on adipocyte size in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura Kumi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kurozu concentrated liquid (KCL is used as a health-promoting supplement for the treatment of disorders such as cancer, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension in Japan. We investigated the possible anti-obesity effects of KCL in rats. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed American Institute of Nutrition 76 formula diet and were orally administrated KCL or acetic acid at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight or deionized water for 4 weeks. Adipocyte size, DNA content in subcutaneous adipose tissue, lipid levels in the serum and liver, and the rate of fatty acid excretion were determined. Effects of KCL on pancreatic lipase activity and 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation were investigated in vitro. Results In the KCL group, the average adipocyte size in subcutaneous and perirenal adipose tissues was significantly reduced. The KCL-administered rats displayed greater numbers of small adipocytes in the subcutaneous, perirenal and mesenteric adipose tissues than did rats from the other groups. In the KCL group, the DNA content in subcutaneous adipose tissue was significantly increased. The rate of fatty acid excretion was significantly increased in the KCL group. Furthermore, KCL significantly inhibited pancreatic lipase activity in vitro, and also significantly inhibited fat accumulation and mRNA expression of fatty acid binding protein 2 (aP2 and peroxisome proliferator-activated γ (PPARγ in 3T3-L1 preadipocyte. The levels of serum and liver lipids, the concentration of serum glucose, and the levels of adiponectin were similar among the 3 groups. Conclusion Oral administration of KCL decreases the adipocyte size via inhibition of dietary fat absorption and reductions of PPARγ and aP2 mRNA expression levels in adipocytes.

  19. Size effects in MgO cube dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Stefan O; Schneider, Johannes; Sternig, Andreas; Thomele, Daniel; Stankic, Slavica; Berger, Thomas; Grönbeck, Henrik; Diwald, Oliver

    2015-03-10

    Stability parameters and dissolution behavior of engineered nanomaterials in aqueous systems are critical to assess their functionality and fate under environmental conditions. Using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction, we investigated the stability of cubic MgO particles in water. MgO dissolution proceeding via water dissociation at the oxide surface, disintegration of Mg(2+)-O(2-) surface elements, and their subsequent solvation ultimately leads to precipitation of Mg(OH)2 nanosheets. At a pH ≥ 10, MgO nanocubes with a size distribution below 10 nm quantitatively dissolve within few minutes and convert into Mg(OH)2 nanosheets. This effect is different from MgO cubes originating from magnesium combustion in air. With a size distribution in the range 10 nm ≤ d ≤ 1000 nm they dissolve with a significantly smaller dissolution rate in water. On these particles water induced etching generates (110) faces which, above a certain face area, dissolve at a rate equal to that of (100) planes.1 The delayed solubility of microcrystalline MgO is attributed to surface hydroxide induced self-inhibition effects occurring at the (100) and (110) microplanes. The present work underlines the importance of morphology evolution and surface faceting of engineered nanomaterials particles during their dissolution. PMID:25668706

  20. Substructure location and size effects on decentralized model updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xinjun; Zhu, Dapeng; Wang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    To improve the simulation accuracy of the finite-element (FE) model of an as-built structure, measurement data from the actual structure can be utilized for updating the model parameters, which is termed as FE model updating. During the past few decades, most efforts on FE model updating intend to update the entire structure model altogether, while using measurement data from sensors installed throughout the structure. When applied on large and complex structural models, the typical model updating approaches may fail due to computational challenges and convergence issues. In order to reduce the computational difficulty, this paper studies a decentralized FE model updating approach that intends to update one substructure at a time. The approach divides the entire structure into a substructure (currently being instrumented and updated) and the residual structure. The Craig-Bampton transform is adopted to condense the overall structural model. The optimization objective is formulated to minimize the modal dynamic residuals from the eigenvalue equations in structural dynamics involving natural frequencies and mode shapes. This paper investigates the effects of different substructure locations and sizes on updating performance. A space frame example, which is based on an actual pedestrian bridge on Georgia Tech campus, is used to study the substructure location and size effects. Keywords: substructure

  1. Quantum Size Effect in Organometal Halide Perovskite Nanoplatelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichert, Jasmina A; Tong, Yu; Mutz, Niklas; Vollmer, Mathias; Fischer, Stefan; Milowska, Karolina Z; García Cortadella, Ramon; Nickel, Bert; Cardenas-Daw, Carlos; Stolarczyk, Jacek K; Urban, Alexander S; Feldmann, Jochen

    2015-10-14

    Organometal halide perovskites have recently emerged displaying a huge potential for not only photovoltaic, but also light emitting applications. Exploiting the optical properties of specifically tailored perovskite nanocrystals could greatly enhance the efficiency and functionality of applications based on this material. In this study, we investigate the quantum size effect in colloidal organometal halide perovskite nanoplatelets. By tuning the ratio of the organic cations used, we can control the thickness and consequently the photoluminescence emission of the platelets. Quantum mechanical calculations match well with the experimental values. We find that not only do the properties of the perovskite, but also those of the organic ligands play an important role. Stacking of nanoplatelets leads to the formation of minibands, further shifting the bandgap energies. In addition, we find a large exciton binding energy of up to several hundreds of meV for nanoplatelets thinner than three unit cells, partially counteracting the blueshift induced by quantum confinement. Understanding of the quantum size effects in perovskite nanoplatelets and the ability to tune them provide an additional method with which to manipulate the optical properties of organometal halide perovskites. PMID:26327242

  2. Cost-effective unilateral climate policy design: Size Matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehringer, Christoph; Fischer, Carolyn; Rosendahl, Knut Einar

    2011-07-01

    Given the bleak prospects for a global agreement on mitigating climate change, pressure for unilateral abatement is increasing. A major challenge is emissions leakage. Border carbon adjustments and output-based allocation of emissions allowances can increase effectiveness of unilateral action but introduce distortions of their own. We assess antileakage measures as a function of abatement coalition size. We first develop a partial equilibrium analytical framework to see how these instruments affect emissions within and outside the coalition. We then employ a computable general equilibrium model of international trade and energy use to assess the strategies as the coalition grows. We find that full border adjustments rank first in global cost-effectiveness, followed by import tariffs and output-based rebates. The differences across measures and their overall appeal decline as the abatement coalition grows. In terms of cost, the coalition countries prefer border carbon adjustments; countries outside the coalition prefer output-based rebates.(Author)

  3. A symplectic coherent beam-beam model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider a simple one-dimensional model to study the effects of the beam-beam force on the coherent dynamics of colliding beams. The key ingredient is a linearized beam-beam kick. We study only the quadrupole modes, with the dynamical variables being the 2nd-order moments of the canonical variables q, p. Our model is self-consistent in the sense that no higher order moments are generated by the linearized beam-beam kicks, and that the only source of violation of symplecticity is the radiation. We discuss the round beam case only, in which vertical and horizontal quantities are assumed to be equal (though they may be different in the two beams). Depending on the values of the tune and beam intensity, we observe steady states in which otherwise identical bunches have sizes that are equal, or unequal, or periodic, or behave chaotically from turn to turn. Possible implications of luminosity saturation with increasing beam intensity are discussed. Finally, we present some preliminary applications to an asymmetric collider. 8 refs., 8 figs

  4. Effect of precipitation procedure and detection technique on particle size distribution of CaCO 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos, C.; Coto, B.; Peña, J. L.; Rodríguez, R.; Merino-Garcia, D.; Pastor, G.

    2010-09-01

    The deposition of inorganic salts ("scales") such as calcium carbonate is an important flow assurance problem during crude oil production. The knowledge of the features of the precipitated solids, mainly the particle size and morphology, is crucial to understand the nature of the solids and to avoid or reduce the effect of their deposition. For instance, the use of additives is one of the most usual procedures to mitigate this problem. Additives interact with scale-forming substances either by increasing the induction time, or by inhibiting crystal growth, changing the morphology of solids. In this work, CaCO 3 was precipitated by two different experimental methods: by mixing sodium carbonate and calcium chloride at 25 °C (method 1), and by changing the pH (method 2). Precipitated solids were analyzed by means of the following techniques: laser diffraction (LD), focused-beam reflectance measurement (FBRM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), in order to select a method for the determination of particle size of solids similar to scales, in order to study these deposits at the beginning of their formation and to evaluate the effect of additives in the scales particle size. Results were compared to those of scale deposits extracted from crude oil pipelines. SEM and XRD characterization showed that both the precipitation methods lead to calcium carbonate as a mixture of calcite, aragonite and vaterite, with rhombohedral morphology for method 1 and spherical for method 2. The effects of temperature, kinetics and Mg 2+ presence in the morphology of CaCO 3 were evaluated. Thus, the solids obtained by static bottle test and real scales are mainly formed by long needle-shaped aragonite. The comparison of the several particle size characterization methods determinates that an LD is a fast and sensitive technique for spherical and non-spherical solids, and it is a convenient technique for the analysis of scales extracted from oil pipelines.

  5. Effect of a spectrometer magnet on the beam-beam interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornacchia, M; Parzen, G

    1981-01-01

    The presence of experimental apparatus in the interaction regions of an intersecting beam accelerator changes the configuration of the crossing beams. This changes the space-charge forces with respect to the standard, magnet-free crossing. The question is: what is the maximum allowable perturbation caused by the spectrometer magnet that can be tolerated from the point of view of the beam dynamics. This paper is limited to the perturbations that the curved trajectories cause the beam-beam space charge nonlinearities. The question has arisen of how one defines the strength of the perturbation. The only solution is to compute the strength of the most important nonlinear resources. In what follows, the computational method used in calculating these resonances is described, and compared with those induced by random orbit errors.

  6. Chemical effects of heavy ion beams on organic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, Hitoshi E-mail: koizumih@eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Namba, Hideki

    2003-05-01

    Effects of ion beam irradiation on {alpha}-alanine, adipic acid and polydimethylsiloxane were examined. Stable radicals were generated in the radiolysis of solids of {alpha}-alanine and adipic acid by {gamma}-ray, 220 MeV C ions, 350 MeV Ne ions and 175 MeV Ar ions. The G-value decreases in this order. The G-value for adipic acid decreases more than that for {alpha}-alanine. The decreases in the G-value are ascribed to high local dose in the ion tracks. Effective G-value of the radicals for {gamma}-irradiations decreases at high doses. The local dose in the ion tracks exceeds those doses, and the G-values for the ion irradiation are hence smaller than the G-value for {gamma}-irradiations. The difference in the dependence of the G-values for {alpha}-alanine and adipic acid on the ion beams is due to difference in the dose-yield relationship for radical formation. The high local dose in the ion tracks exceeds the gelation dose of some of polymers. Formation of gel strings of polydimethylsiloxanes generated in heavy ion tracks was observed by atomic force microscopy.

  7. A preliminary study of material homogeneity for size effect investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The forged material 20 MnMoNi 55, material number 1.6310 (heat number 69906) with a heat treatment of 900 oC, water quenched, 730 oC, air cooled, was subjected to an intensive quality control consisting of chemical analysis, metallography, hardness tests, tensile tests, and impact tests. Six plates of the material were investigated, and all specimens were taken from a diagonal of each plate in three positions, outer margins and the centre of the plates. The quality control exhibits the following results: 1) The material fulfill the material specification in all respects. 2) This material is a fine grained homogeneous ferritic material of bainitic structure; neither from the chemical analysis, metallography, nor from hardness tests influences from the position of the specimens taken from the plates could be derived. 3) The tensile tests clearly revealed position dependent material properties. With the exception of one plate, one of the selected positions exhibits no natural yield strength, higher rupture strength, and lower elongation to fracture compared with the other two positions at 293 K and 573 K. 4) Many of the data obtained from the impact tests at room temperature were larger than the capacity of the impact machine, i.e. 225 Joule; the experimental condition was changed from tests at 573 K to tests at 253 K to obtain data from the transition region. The main conclusions drawn for the size effect experiments where that all the tensile test results for different specimen sizes have to be discussed with respect of the specimen positions within the plates, and that for all bend bar as well as impact experiments with different specimen sizes the notch depth to specimen width ratio a/w has to be changed from a/w = 0.2 to a/w = 0.3 to get reasonable results within the frame of the available test equipment. (author)

  8. Study of Effect of Ion Source Energy Spread on RFQ Beam Dynamics at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, M A

    2013-01-01

    With an upgrade to the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at REX under consideration a study was launched in order to understand the effect of an increased energy spread from the ion source on the beam dynamics of the RFQ. Due to the increased electron beam potential needed to achieve the upgrade’s charge breeding specification it is expected that the energy spread of the beam will increase from today’s estimated value of approximately +-0.1%. It is shown through beam dynamics simulations that the energy spread can be increased to +-1% without significant degradation of the beam quality output by the RFQ.

  9. Nonlinear Interaction of Elliptical Laser Beam with Collisional Plasma: Effect of Linear Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshav, Walia; Sarabjit, Kaur

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, nonlinear interaction of elliptical laser beam with collisional plasma is studied by using paraxial ray approximation. Nonlinear differential equations for the beam width parameters of semi-major axis and semi-minor axis of elliptical laser beam have been set up and solved numerically to study the variation of beam width parameters with normalized distance of propagation. Effects of variation in absorption coefficient and plasma density on the beam width parameters are also analyzed. It is observed from the analysis that extent of self-focusing of beam increases with increase/decrease in plasma density/absorption coefficient.

  10. The dependence of the gravity effect in elliptic neutron guides on the source size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliptic neutron guides are expected to be widely used for construction of long neutron beamlines at the future European Spallation Source and other facilities due to their superiour transmission properties compared to conventional straight guides. At the same time, neutrons traveling long distances are subject to the action of gravity that can significantly modify their flight paths. In this work, the influence of gravity on a neutron beam propagating through elliptic guides is studied for the first time in a systematic way with Monte-Carlo simulations. It is shown that gravity leads to significant distortions of the phase space during propagation through long elliptic guides, but this effect can be recovered by a sufficiently large source size. The results of this analysis should be taken into account during design of long neutron instruments at the ESS and other facilities.

  11. Particle size, porosity and temperature effects on char conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Effect of particle size, porosity and temperature on char conversion is investigated. → Kinetic parameters have been obtained using a chemically controlled experiment. → Transport equation inside the char particle was solved using finite element method. → Large Damkohler number resulted in steep gasifying agent concentration profiles. → Small Damkohler number resulted in constant gasifying agent concentration profile. -- Abstract: The effect of particle size, porosity and reactor temperature/reaction rate constant on the progress of a char particle conversion has been investigated numerically by solving the transport equation inside a reacting char particle. Numerical simulations have been conducted for three cases that include two extreme cases and one general case. The two extreme cases correspond to a very large Damkohler number (3.2607 x 103) and a very small Damkohler number (0.0042). The third case corresponds to an intermediate value of Damkohler number. For the very large Damkohler number case, concentration profiles of the gasifying agent showed a steep gradient across the particle and the reaction occurred mostly in outer layer of the particle. This behavior corresponds to a diffusion controlled process. For the very small Damkohler number case, gasifying agent concentration was a straight line parallel to the x-axis, with a y-axis value of the surrounding concentration. The reaction occurred homogeneously across the particle and the degree of conversion was only a function in time. This behavior corresponds to a chemically controlled process. The total conversion of the char particle as a function of time has also been calculated for different particle sizes, initial porosity and reaction rate constant. Variation in conversion profiles as a function of time due to variation in initial porosity and reaction rate constant were limited to a certain extent. Very high initial porosity values tend to shift the process towards a

  12. Nosewitness Identification: Effects of Lineup Size and Retention Interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, Laura; Soares, Sandra C.; Costa, Liliana P.; Pinto, Elisa; Ferreira, Jacqueline H. T.; Sorjonen, Kimmo; Silva, Carlos F.; Olsson, Mats J.

    2016-01-01

    Although canine identification of body odor (BO) has been widely used as forensic evidence, the concept of nosewitness identification by human observers was only recently put to the test. The results indicated that BOs associated with male characters in authentic crime videos could later be identified in BO lineup tests well above chance. To further evaluate nosewitness memory, we assessed the effects of lineup size (Experiment 1) and retention interval (Experiment 2), using a forced-choice memory test. The results showed that nosewitness identification works for all lineup sizes (3, 5, and 8 BOs), but that larger lineups compromise identification performance in similarity to observations from eye- and earwitness studies. Also in line with previous eye- and earwitness studies, but in disagreement with some studies on odor memory, Experiment 2 showed significant forgetting between shorter retention intervals (15 min) and longer retention intervals (1-week) using lineups of five BOs. Altogether this study shows that identification of BO in a forensic setting is possible and has limits and characteristics in line with witness identification through other sensory modalities. PMID:27303317

  13. Community Size Effects on Epidemic Spreading in Multiplex Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Li, Ping; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical process of epidemic spreading has drawn much attention of the complex network community. In the network paradigm, diseases spread from one person to another through the social ties amongst the population. There are a variety of factors that govern the processes of disease spreading on the networks. A common but not negligible factor is people’s reaction to the outbreak of epidemics. Such reaction can be related information dissemination or self-protection. In this work, we explore the interactions between disease spreading and population response in terms of information diffusion and individuals’ alertness. We model the system by mapping multiplex networks into two-layer networks and incorporating individuals’ risk awareness, on the assumption that their response to the disease spreading depends on the size of the community they belong to. By comparing the final incidence of diseases in multiplex networks, we find that there is considerable mitigation of diseases spreading for full phase of spreading speed when individuals’ protection responses are introduced. Interestingly, the degree of community overlap between the two layers is found to be critical factor that affects the final incidence. We also analyze the consequences of the epidemic incidence in communities with different sizes and the impacts of community overlap between two layers. Specifically, as the diseases information makes individuals alert and take measures to prevent the diseases, the effective protection is more striking in small community. These phenomena can be explained by the multiplexity of the networked system and the competition between two spreading processes. PMID:27007112

  14. Atomic size effects studied by transport in single silicide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccoli, I.; Edler, F.; Pfnür, H.; Appelfeller, S.; Dähne, M.; Holtgrewe, K.; Sanna, S.; Schmidt, W. G.; Tegenkamp, C.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrathin metallic silicide nanowires with extremely high aspect ratios can be easily grown, e.g., by deposition of rare earth elements on semiconducting surfaces. These wires play a pivotal role in fundamental research and open intriguing perspectives for CMOS applications. However, the electronic properties of these one-dimensional systems are extremely sensitive to atomic-sized defects, which easily alter the transport characteristics. In this study, we characterized comprehensively TbSi2 wires grown on Si(100) and correlated details of the atomic structure with their electrical resistivities. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as well as all transport experiments were performed in situ using a four-tip STM system. The measurements are complemented by local spectroscopy and density functional theory revealing that the silicide wires are electronically decoupled from the Si template. On the basis of a quasiclassical transport model, the size effect found for the resistivity is quantitatively explained in terms of bulk and surface transport channels considering details of atomic-scale roughness. Regarding future applications the full wealth of these robust nanostructures will emerge only if wires with truly atomically sharp interfaces can be reliably grown.

  15. Effect of blocking mass on characteristics of beam lateral vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lateral vibration equation is established by setting up two separate co-coordinate systems of the mass-beam system, and the non-dimensional coefficients implying the position and mass radio of the mass in the system are presented in the paper. The effect on the vibration frequencies of changing the position and the mass radio in the system is numerically discussed, and the modes of the system with different mass radio and position are considered. The result shows that the frequencies decrease as increasing the mass radio, but the frequencies fluctuate with position changing, and there exists some positions that the frequencies do not vary after the mass radio increases except the first frequency, also that the effects on the vibration characteristic as increasing the mass radio can be decreased by modulating the position of the mass. (authors)

  16. Effective mutagenesis of Arabidopsis by heavy ion beam-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Arabidopsis researches frequently include the genetic approach, so efficient, convenient, and safe methods for mutagenesis are required. Currently, the most popular method for in house mutagenesis is application of EMS. Although this method is very effective, its base substitution-type mutations often gives leaky mutants with residual gene functions, leading some difficulty in understanding the corresponding gene functions. Heavy ion beam generated by accelerators gives highest energy transfer rates among known radiation-based mutagenesis methods including X ray, gamma ray, fast neutron, electron and proton irradiation. This feature is thought to give high frequency of the double strand break of genomic DNA and resultant short deletions, resulting frame shift-type mutations. At RIKEN Accelerator Research Facility (RARF, http://www.rarf.riken.go.jp/index-e.html), we have optimized conditions for effective mutagenesis of Arabidopsis regarding to ion species and irradiation dose, and achieved comparable mutation rates to the method with EMS. (author)

  17. Aerodynamic Ground Effect in Fruitfly Sized Insect Takeoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Maeda, Masateru; Engels, Thomas; Liu, Hao; Schneider, Kai; Nave, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Aerodynamic ground effect in flapping-wing insect flight is of importance to comparative morphologies and of interest to the micro-air-vehicle (MAV) community. Recent studies, however, show apparently contradictory results of either some significant extra lift or power savings, or zero ground effect. Here we present a numerical study of fruitfly sized insect takeoff with a specific focus on the significance of leg thrust and wing kinematics. Flapping-wing takeoff is studied using numerical modelling and high performance computing. The aerodynamic forces are calculated using a three-dimensional Navier–Stokes solver based on a pseudo-spectral method with volume penalization. It is coupled with a flight dynamics solver that accounts for the body weight, inertia and the leg thrust, while only having two degrees of freedom: the vertical and the longitudinal horizontal displacement. The natural voluntary takeoff of a fruitfly is considered as reference. The parameters of the model are then varied to explore possible effects of interaction between the flapping-wing model and the ground plane. These modified takeoffs include cases with decreased leg thrust parameter, and/or with periodic wing kinematics, constant body pitch angle. The results show that the ground effect during natural voluntary takeoff is negligible. In the modified takeoffs, when the rate of climb is slow, the difference in the aerodynamic forces due to the interaction with the ground is up to 6%. Surprisingly, depending on the kinematics, the difference is either positive or negative, in contrast to the intuition based on the helicopter theory, which suggests positive excess lift. This effect is attributed to unsteady wing-wake interactions. A similar effect is found during hovering. PMID:27019208

  18. Indentation size effect and the plastic compressibility of glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxide glasses exhibit significant densification under an applied isostatic pressure at the glass transition temperature. The glass compressibility is correlated with the chemical composition and atomic packing density, e.g., borate glasses with planar triangular BO3 units are more disposed for densification than silicate glasses with tetrahedral units. We here show that there is a direct relation between the plastic compressibility following hot isostatic compression and the extent of the indentation size effect (ISE), which is the decrease of hardness with indentation load exhibited by most materials. This could suggest that the ISE is correlated with indentation-induced shear bands, which should form in greater density when the glass network is more adaptable to volume changes through structural and topological rearrangements under an applied pressure.

  19. Finite population-size effects in projection Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Projection (Green's function and diffusion) Monte Carlo techniques sample a wave function by a stochastic iterative procedure. It is shown that these methods converge to a stationary distribution which is unexpectedly biased, i.e., differs from the exact ground state wave function, and that this bias occurs because of the introduction of a replication procedure. It is demonstrated that these biased Monte Carlo algorithms lead to a modified effective mass which is equal to the desired mass only in the limit of an infinite population of walkers. In general, the bias scales as 1/N for a population of walkers of size N. Various strategies to reduce this bias are considered. (authors). 29 refs., 3 figs

  20. Effects of dust size distribution in ultracold quantum dusty plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Xue-Hong; Duan Wen-Shan; Chen Jian-Min; Wang Shan-Jin

    2011-01-01

    The effect of dust size distribution in ultracold quantum dusty plasmas are investigated in this paper. How the dispersion relation and the propagation velocity for the quantum dusty plasma vary with the system parameters and the different dust distribution are studied. It is found that as the Fermi temperature of the dust grains increases the frequency of the wave increases for large wave number dust acoustic wave. The quantum parameter of Hd also increases the frequency of the large wave number dust acoustic wave. It is also found that the frequency ω0 and the propagation velocity v0 of quantum dust acoustic waves all increase as the total number density increases. They are greater for unusual dusty plasmas than those of the usual dusty plasma.

  1. Finite-size effects on current correlation functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shunda; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Jiao; Zhao, Hong

    2014-02-01

    We study why the calculation of current correlation functions (CCFs) still suffers from finite-size effects even when the periodic boundary condition is taken. Two important one-dimensional, momentum-conserving systems are investigated as examples. Intriguingly, it is found that the state of a system recurs in the sense of microcanonical ensemble average, and such recurrence may result in oscillations in CCFs. Meanwhile, we find that the sound mode collisions induce an extra time decay in a current so that its correlation function decays faster (slower) in a smaller (larger) system. Based on these two unveiled mechanisms, a procedure for correctly evaluating the decay rate of a CCF is proposed, with which our analysis suggests that the global energy CCF decays as ∼ t(-2/3) in the diatomic hard-core gas model and in a manner close to ∼ t(-1/2) in the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-β model. PMID:25353426

  2. Thinking outside the box: fluctuations and finite size effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isothermal compressibility of an interacting or non-interacting system may be extracted from the fluctuations of the number of particles in a well-chosen control volume. Finite size effects are prevalent and should be accounted for to obtain a meaningful, thermodynamic compressibility. In the traditional computational setup, where a given simulation box is replicated with periodic boundary conditions, we study particle number fluctuations outside the box (i.e. when the control volume exceeds the box itself), which bear relevant thermodynamic information. We also investigate the related problem of extracting the compressibility from the structure factor in the small wave-vector limit (k → 0). The calculation should be restricted to the discrete set of wave-vectors k that are compatible with the periodicity of the system, and we assess the consequences of considering other k values, a widespread error among beginners. (paper)

  3. Thinking outside the box: fluctuations and finite size effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamaina, Dario; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    The isothermal compressibility of an interacting or non-interacting system may be extracted from the fluctuations of the number of particles in a well-chosen control volume. Finite size effects are prevalent and should be accounted for to obtain a meaningful, thermodynamic compressibility. In the traditional computational setup, where a given simulation box is replicated with periodic boundary conditions, we study particle number fluctuations outside the box (i.e. when the control volume exceeds the box itself), which bear relevant thermodynamic information. We also investigate the related problem of extracting the compressibility from the structure factor in the small wave-vector limit (k → 0). The calculation should be restricted to the discrete set of wave-vectors k that are compatible with the periodicity of the system, and we assess the consequences of considering other k values, a widespread error among beginners.

  4. Effect of tube size on electromagnetic tube bulging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The commercial finite code ANSYS was employed for the simulation of the electromagnetic tube bulging process. The finite element model and boundary conditions were thoroughly discussed. ANSYS/EMAG was used to model the time varying electromagnetic field in order to obtain the radial and axial magnetic pressure acting on the tube. The magnetic pressure was then used as boundary conditions to model the high velocity deformation of various length tube with ANSYS/LSDYNA. The time space distribution of magnetic pressure on various length tubes was presented. Effect of tube size on the distribution of radial magnetic pressure and axial magnetic pressure and high velocity deformation were discussed. According to the radial magnetic pressure ratio of tube end to tube center and corresponding dimensionless length ratio of tube to coil, the free electromagnetic tube bulging was studied in classification. The calculated results show good agreements with practice.

  5. Non-local damage rheology and size effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyakhovsky, V.

    2011-12-01

    We study scaling relations controlling the onset of transiently-accelerating fracturing and transition to dynamic rupture propagation in a non-local damage rheology model. The size effect is caused principally by growth of a fracture process zone, involving stress redistribution and energy release associated with a large fracture. This implies that rupture nucleation and transition to dynamic propagation are inherently scale-dependent processes. Linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and local damage mechanics are formulated in terms of dimensionless strain components and thus do not allow introducing any space scaling, except linear relations between fracture length and displacements. Generalization of Weibull theory provides scaling relations between stress and crack length at the onset of failure. A powerful extension of the LEFM formulation is the displacement-weakening model which postulates that yielding is complete when the crack wall displacement exceeds some critical value or slip-weakening distance Dc at which a transition to kinetic friction is complete. Scaling relations controlling the transition to dynamic rupture propagation in slip-weakening formulation are widely accepted in earthquake physics. Strong micro-crack interaction in a process zone may be accounted for by adopting either integral or gradient type non-local damage models. We formulate a gradient-type model with free energy depending on the scalar damage parameter and its spatial derivative. The damage-gradient term leads to structural stresses in the constitutive stress-strain relations and a damage diffusion term in the kinetic equation for damage evolution. The damage diffusion eliminates the singular localization predicted by local models. The finite width of the localization zone provides a fundamental length scale that allows numerical simulations with the model to achieve the continuum limit. A diffusive term in the damage evolution gives rise to additional damage diffusive time

  6. The damaging effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on upland cotton ( Gossypium hirsutum L.) pollen grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanjie; Wu, Lijun; Wu, Yuejin; Wang, Qingya; Tang, Canming

    2008-09-01

    With the aim to study the effects of an ion beam on plant cells, upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivar "Sumian 22" pollen grains were irradiated in vacuum (7.8 × 10-3 Pa) by low-energy nitrogen ions with an energy of 20 keV at various fluences ranging from 0.26 × 1016 to 0.78 × 1016 N+/cm2. The irradiation effects on pollen grains were tested, considering the ultrastructural changes in the exine and interior walls of pollen grains, their germination rate, the growth speed of the pollen tubes in the style, fertilization and boll development after the pistils were pollinated by the pollen grains which had been implanted with nitrogen ions. Nitrogen ions entered the pollen grains by etching and penetrating the exine and interior walls and destroying cell structures. A greater percentage of the pollen grains were destroyed as the fluence of N+ ions increased. Obviously, the nitrogen ion beam penetrated the exine and interior walls of the pollen grains and produced holes of different sizes. As the ion fluence increased, the amount and the density of pollen grain inclusions decreased and the size of the lacuna and starch granules increased. Pollen grain germination rates decreased with increasing ion fluence. The number of pollen tubes in the style declined with increased ion implantation into pollen grains, but the growth speed of the tubes did not change. All of the pollen tubes reached the end of the style at 13 h after pollination. This result was consistent with that of the control. Also, the weight and the diameter of the ovary decreased and shortened with increased ion beam implantation fluence. No evident change in the fecundation time of the ovule was observed. These results indicate that nitrogen ions can enter pollen grains and cause a series of biological changes in pollen grains of upland cotton.

  7. The damaging effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) pollen grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aim to study the effects of an ion beam on plant cells, upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivar 'Sumian 22' pollen grains were irradiated in vacuum (7.8 x 10-3 Pa) by low-energy nitrogen ions with an energy of 20 keV at various fluences ranging from 0.26 x 1016 to 0.78 x 1016 N+/cm2. The irradiation effects on pollen grains were tested, considering the ultrastructural changes in the exine and interior walls of pollen grains, their germination rate, the growth speed of the pollen tubes in the style, fertilization and boll development after the pistils were pollinated by the pollen grains which had been implanted with nitrogen ions. Nitrogen ions entered the pollen grains by etching and penetrating the exine and interior walls and destroying cell structures. A greater percentage of the pollen grains were destroyed as the fluence of N+ ions increased. Obviously, the nitrogen ion beam penetrated the exine and interior walls of the pollen grains and produced holes of different sizes. As the ion fluence increased, the amount and the density of pollen grain inclusions decreased and the size of the lacuna and starch granules increased. Pollen grain germination rates decreased with increasing ion fluence. The number of pollen tubes in the style declined with increased ion implantation into pollen grains, but the growth speed of the tubes did not change. All of the pollen tubes reached the end of the style at 13 h after pollination. This result was consistent with that of the control. Also, the weight and the diameter of the ovary decreased and shortened with increased ion beam implantation fluence. No evident change in the fecundation time of the ovule was observed. These results indicate that nitrogen ions can enter pollen grains and cause a series of biological changes in pollen grains of upland cotton

  8. The damaging effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) pollen grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Yanjie [College of Agronomy, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing Jiangsu 210095 (China); Wu Lijun; Wu Yuejin [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Wang Qingya [College of Life Science, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210095 (China); Tang Canming [College of Agronomy, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing Jiangsu 210095 (China)], E-mail: tang20@jlonline.com

    2008-09-15

    With the aim to study the effects of an ion beam on plant cells, upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivar 'Sumian 22' pollen grains were irradiated in vacuum (7.8 x 10{sup -3} Pa) by low-energy nitrogen ions with an energy of 20 keV at various fluences ranging from 0.26 x 10{sup 16} to 0.78 x 10{sup 16} N{sup +}/cm{sup 2}. The irradiation effects on pollen grains were tested, considering the ultrastructural changes in the exine and interior walls of pollen grains, their germination rate, the growth speed of the pollen tubes in the style, fertilization and boll development after the pistils were pollinated by the pollen grains which had been implanted with nitrogen ions. Nitrogen ions entered the pollen grains by etching and penetrating the exine and interior walls and destroying cell structures. A greater percentage of the pollen grains were destroyed as the fluence of N{sup +} ions increased. Obviously, the nitrogen ion beam penetrated the exine and interior walls of the pollen grains and produced holes of different sizes. As the ion fluence increased, the amount and the density of pollen grain inclusions decreased and the size of the lacuna and starch granules increased. Pollen grain germination rates decreased with increasing ion fluence. The number of pollen tubes in the style declined with increased ion implantation into pollen grains, but the growth speed of the tubes did not change. All of the pollen tubes reached the end of the style at 13 h after pollination. This result was consistent with that of the control. Also, the weight and the diameter of the ovary decreased and shortened with increased ion beam implantation fluence. No evident change in the fecundation time of the ovule was observed. These results indicate that nitrogen ions can enter pollen grains and cause a series of biological changes in pollen grains of upland cotton.

  9. On the Relativistic Beaming and Orientation Effects in Core-Dominated Quasars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. A. Ubachukwu; A. E. Chukwude

    2002-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the relativistic beaming effects in a well-defined sample of core-dominated quasars using the correlation between the relative prominence of the core with respect to the extended emission (defined as the ratio of core- to lobe- flux density measured in the rest frame of the source) and the projected linear size as an indicator of relativistic beaming and source orientation. Based on the orientation-dependent relativistic beaming and unification paradigm for high luminosity sources in which the Fanaroff-Riley class-II radio galaxies form the unbeamed parent population of both the lobe- and core-dominated quasars which are expected to lie at successively smaller angles to the line of sight, we find that the flows in the cores of these core-dominated quasars are highly relativistic, with optimum bulk Lorentz factor, opt ∼ 6—16, and also highly anisotropic, with an average viewing angle, ∼ 9°-16°. Furthermore, the largest boosting occurs within a critical cone angle of ≈ 4°-10°.

  10. Multivariate methods and small sample size: combining with small effect size

    OpenAIRE

    Budaev, Dr. Sergey V.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript is the author's response to: "Dochtermann, N.A. & Jenkins, S.H. Multivariate methods and small sample sizes, Ethology, 117, 95-101." and accompanies this paper: "Budaev, S. Using principal components and factor analysis in animal behaviour research: Caveats and guidelines. Ethology, 116, 472-480"

  11. Artificial fish schools : Collective effects of school size, body size, and body form

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, H.; Hemelrijk, C.K.

    2003-01-01

    Individual-based models of schooling in fish have demonstrated that, via processes of self-organization. artificial fish may school in the absence of a leader or external stimuli, using local information only. We study for the first time how body size and body form of artificial fish affect school f

  12. Effect of electron beam irradiation on fully aromatic polyimide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was clarified that the carbon fiber-reinforced plastics using polyether-ether-ketone as the matrix resin showed high radiation resistance, and the high temperature characteristics were improved by irradiation. The glass transition temperature of PEEK is about 150degC, and for the use in space and aviation fields, the matrix resin with higher heat resistance and thermoplastic property has been demanded. The thermoplastic polyimide, the development of which is advanced by Mitsui Toatsu at present, shows high glass transition temperature, and seems suitable to the use like this. In this study, the effect that electron beam irradiation exerted on the high temperature characteristics of the new thermoplastic polyimide and the change of the molecular mobility by irradiation were measured, and the applicability as a heat resistant and radiation resistant matrix was evaluated. The tensile test and the measurement of dynamic viscoelasticity were carried out. This polyimide maintained the value of 50% - 70% of the value measured at 23 degC even in the temperature zone of 150 - 200 degC, and has the excellent high temperature characteristics. Its strength and Young's modulus hardly changed by electron beam irradiation up to 120 MGy. (K.I.)

  13. Third-order moment effect of beam position measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Third-order moments of beam charge distribution cause unwanted errors in beam positions measured by a beam position monitor with two or four electrodes. These errors can be reduced or corrected by adding or subtracting third-order moment terms in difference equations of signal voltages output from electrodes. In the case of a six-electrode beam position monitor with circular cross-section which is used in SPring-8 linear accelerator errors calculated with and without correction are 24 μm and 360 μm at a simulated beam position of x = 3 mm, y = 3 mm apart form a duct center. (author)

  14. Beam manipulation techniques, nonlinear beam dynamics, and space charge effect in high energy high power accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. Y.

    2014-04-07

    We had carried out a design of an ultimate storage ring with beam emittance less than 10 picometer for the feasibility of coherent light source at X-ray wavelength. The accelerator has an inherent small dynamic aperture. We study method to improve the dynamic aperture and collective instability for an ultimate storage ring. Beam measurement and accelerator modeling are an integral part of accelerator physics. We develop the independent component analysis (ICA) and the orbit response matrix method for improving accelerator reliability and performance. In collaboration with scientists in National Laboratories, we also carry out experimental and theoretical studies on beam dynamics. Our proposed research topics are relevant to nuclear and particle physics using high brightness particle and photon beams.

  15. Effect of beam oscillation on borated stainless steel electron beam welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borated stainless steels are used in nuclear power plants to control neutron criticality in reactors as control rods, shielding material, spent fuel storage racks and transportation casks. In this study, bead on plate welds were made using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and electron beam welding (EBW) processes. Electron beam welds made using beam oscillation technique exhibited higher tensile strength values compared to that of GTA welds. Electron beam welds were found to show fine dendritic microstructure while GTA welds exhibited larger dendrites. While both processes produced defect free welds, GTA welds are marked by partially melted zone (PMZ) where the hardness is low. EBW obviate the PMZ failure due to low heat input and in case of high heat input GTA welding process failure occurs in the PMZ.

  16. Optimal beam focusing through turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnotskii, Mikhail

    2015-11-01

    Beam spread and beam wandering are the most perceptible effects of atmospheric turbulence on propagating laser beams. The width of the mean irradiance profile is typically used to characterize the beam spread. This so-called long-term (LT) statistic allows for a relatively simple theoretical description. However, the LT beam size is not a very practical measure of the beam spread because its measurements are sensitive to the movements of the source and detector, and to the large-scale variations of the refractive index that are not associated with turbulence. The short-term (ST) beam spread is measured relative to the instantaneous position of the beam center and is free of these drawbacks, but has not been studied as thoroughly as the LT spread. We present a theoretical model for the ST beam irradiance that is based on the parabolic equation for the beam wave propagation in random media, and the Markov approximation for calculation of the statistics of the optical field, and discuss an approximation that allows introduction of the isoplanatic ST point spread function (PSF). Unlike the LT PSF, the ST PSF depends on the overall beam geometry. This allows optimization of the initial beam field in terms of minimizing the ST beam size at the observation plane. Calculations supporting this conjecture are presented for the simple case of the coherent Gaussian beam, and Kolmogorov turbulence. PMID:26560908

  17. Flexo-chemo effect in nanoferroics as a source of critical size disappearance at size-induced phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozovska, Anna N.; Glinchuk, Maya D.

    2016-03-01

    Based on Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire approach, we explore the critical size disappearance at size induced phase transitions and reentrant phase occurrence in nanoferroics. Our calculations have shown that the physical mechanism of the exciting phenomenon can be the flexo-chemo effect, being the synergy of the spontaneous flexoelectric stresses and the chemical pressure induced by ion vacancies via Vegard effect. The flexo-chemo effect can lead to the remarkable changes of the nanoferroics phase diagrams, such as non-monotonic increase of the transition temperature and long-range order enhancement appearing under the size decrease and fulfilment of definite conditions. Since the flexo-chemo effect should exist in any nanostructured ferroics, obtained analytical results can be predictive for many of them. As a concrete example of the primary ferroics, we consider ferroelectric nanoparticles and have shown that a commonly expected transition from the ferroelectric to paraelectric phase at some small critical size is absent, so that the critical size loses its sense. Contrarily, the stabilization of the ferroelectric phase manifests itself by the enhancement of the transition temperature and polarization with the particle size decrease (ferroelectric phase reentrance), which was observed earlier in the tetragonal BaTiO3 nanospheres of radii 5-50 nm and stayed unexplained up to now.

  18. Effects of nonlinear left-hand circularly polarized waves supported by a proton beam on linear beam-plasma instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper studies the effect of nonlinear left-hand polarized waves supported by a proton beam on the linear circularly polarized instabilities driven by the same beam. It shows that the nonlinear wave can either stabilize or destabilize the linear instabilities. The effects depend on the amplitude of the nonlinear wave and on the temperature of the system. It also shows that purely electrostatic ion-acoustic-like waves, can be destabilized by the large amplitude wave. The latter instabilities do not occur in the absence of the nonlinear waves

  19. SIZE EFFECT AND GEOMETRICAL EFFECT OF SOLIDS IN MICRO-INDENTATION TEST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏悦广; 王学峥; 赵满洪; 郑哲敏; 白以龙

    2003-01-01

    Micro-indentation tests at scales of the order of sub-micron show that the measured hardness increases strongly with decreasing indent depth or indent size, which is frequently referred to as the size effect. At the same time, at micron or sub-micron scale, another effect, which is referred to as the geometrical size effects such as crystal grain size effect, thin film thickness effect, etc., also influences the measured material hardness. However, the trends are at odds with the size-independence implied by the conventional elastic-plastic theory. In the present research, the strain gradient plasticity theory (Fleck and Hutchinson) is used to model the composition effects (size effect and geometrical effect) for polycrystal material and metal thin film/ceramic substrate systems when materials undergo micro-indenting. The phenomena of the "pile-up" and "sink-in" appeared in the indentation test for the polycrystal materials are also discussed. Meanwhile, the micro-indentation experiments for the polycrystal A1 and for the Ti/Si3N4 thin film/substrate system are carried out. By comparing the theoretical predictions with experimental measurements, the values and the variation trends of the micro-scale parameter included in the strain gradient plasticity theory are predicted.

  20. The Effect of Pretreatment by using Electron Beam Irradiation on Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kristiani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB is a potential type of lignocellulosic biomass for second-generation bioethanol production. The pretreatment process is an important process in the series of processes to produce bioethanol. This research aims to study the effects of pretreatment process by using electron beam irradiation to OPEFB’s characterization as raw materials for the hydrolysis reaction to produce monomer sugars which will be fermented into ethanol. The untreated and treated OPEFB are characterized in terms of their physical and chemical properties. Analysis results of the compositional analysis by using NREL/TP-510-42618 method show that after pretreatment by using electron beam irradiation, OPEFB's total lignin content is changed little while its cellulose and hemicellulose contents tend to decrease with increasing irradiation dose. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis shows that there is a decrease of crystallinity compared to untreated OPEFB, except for 200-kGy irradiated OPEFB. The highest decrease of crystallinity was shown by 300-kGy irradiated OPEFB. Further, crystallite sizes of treated OPEFBs are not significantly different from the untreated, except for the 200-kGy irradiated OPEFB. Irradiation pretreatment also increases specific surface area, pore volume, and pore size. The IR spectra analysis show the absorption of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin.