WorldWideScience

Sample records for beam scattering experiments

  1. Intra-beam Scattering Theory and RHIC Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, J.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Malitsky, N.; Parzen, G.; Qiang, J.

    2005-01-01

    Intra-beam scattering is the leading mechanism limiting the luminosity in heavy-ion storage rings like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The multiple Coulomb scattering among the charged particles causes transverse emittance growth and longitudinal beam de-bunching and beam loss, compromising machine performance during collision. Theoretically, the original theories developed by Piwinski, Bjorken, and Mtingwa only describe the rms beam size growth of an unbounded Gaussian distribution. Equations based on the Fokker-Planck approach are developed to further describe the beam density profile evolution and beam loss. During the 2004 RHIC heavy-ion operation, dedicated IBS experiments were performed to bench-mark the rms beam size growth, beam loss, and profile evolution both for a Gaussian-like and a longitudinal hollow beam. This paper summarizes the IBS theory and discusses the experimental bench-marking results

  2. Molecular-beam scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N 2 from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl → NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2 2 P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3 2 P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included

  3. Internal Energy Dependence of Molecular Condensation Coefficients Determined from Molecular Beam Surface Scattering Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibener, S. J.; Lee, Y. T.

    1978-05-01

    An experiment was performed which confirms the existence of an internal mode dependence of molecular sticking probabilities for collisions of molecules with a cold surface. The scattering of a velocity selected effusive beam of CCl{sub 4} from a 90 K CC1{sub 4} ice surface has been studied at five translational velocities and for two different internal temperatures. At a surface temperature of 90 K (approx. 99% sticking probability) a four fold increase in reflected intensity was observed for the internally excited (560 K) CC1{sub 4} relative to the room temperature (298 K) CC1{sub 4} at a translational velocity of 2.5 X 10{sup 4} cm/sec. For a surface temperature of 90 K all angular distributions were found to peak 15{sup 0} superspecularly independent of incident velocity.

  4. Dynamics of chemical reactions of multiply-charged cations: Information from beam scattering experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herman, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 378, FEB 2015 (2015), s. 113-126 ISSN 1387-3806 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Multiply-charged ions * Dynamics of chemical reactions * Beam scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2015

  5. Proposal to perform a high - statisics neutrino scattering experiment using a fine - grained detector in the NuMI Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morfin, J.G.; /Fermilab; McFarland, K.; /Rochester U.

    2003-12-01

    The NuMI facility at Fermilab will provide an extremely intense beam of neutrinos for the MINOS neutrino-oscillation experiment. The spacious and fully-outfitted MINOS near detector hall will be the ideal venue for a high-statistics, high-resolution {nu} and {bar {nu}}-nucleon/nucleus scattering experiment. The experiment described here will measure neutrino cross-sections and probe nuclear effects essential to present and future neutrino-oscillation experiments. Moreover, with the high NuMI beam intensity, the experiment will either initially address or significantly improve our knowledge of a wide variety of neutrino physics topics of interest and importance to the elementary-particle and nuclear-physics communities.

  6. Imaging characterization of the rapid adiabatic passage in a source-rotatable, crossed-beam scattering experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huilin; Mondal, Sohidul; Yang, Chung-Hsin; Liu, Kopin

    2017-07-01

    In order to achieve a more efficient preparation of a specific ro-vibrationally excited reactant state for reactive scattering experiments, we implemented the rapid adiabatic passage (RAP) scheme to our pulsed crossed-beam machine, using a single-mode, continuous-wave mid-infrared laser. The challenge for this source-rotatable apparatus lies in the non-orthogonal geometry between the molecular beam and the laser propagation directions. As such, the velocity spread of the supersonic beam results in a significantly broader Doppler distribution that needs to be activated for RAP to occur than the conventional orthogonal configuration. In this report, we detail our approach to shifting, locking, and stabilizing the absolute mid-infrared frequency. We exploited the imaging detection technique to characterize the RAP process and to quantify the excitation efficiency. We showed that with appropriate focusing of the IR laser, a nearly complete population transfer can still be achieved in favorable cases. Compared to our previous setup—a pulsed optical parametric oscillator/amplifier in combination with a multipass ring reflector for saturated absorption, the present RAP scheme with a single-pass, continuous-wave laser yields noticeably higher population-transfer efficiency.

  7. Virtual neutron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Julie Hougaard; Bruun, Jesper; May, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering....... In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus...

  8. Virtual neutron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Julie Hougaard; Bruun, Jesper; May, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering....... In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus...

  9. Three-beam double stimulated Raman scatterings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Minhaeng

    2018-01-01

    Two-beam stimulated Raman scattering with pump and Stokes beams is manifest in both the Raman loss of the pump beam and the Raman gain of the Stokes beam, and it has been used in various label-free bioimaging applications. Here, a three-beam stimulated Raman scattering that involves pump, Stokes, and depletion beams is considered, where two stimulated Raman gain-loss processes are deliberately made to compete with each other. It is shown that the three-beam Raman scattering process can be described by coupled differential equations for the increased numbers of Stokes and depletion beam photons. From approximate solutions of the coupled differential equations and numerical calculation results, it is shown that a highly efficient suppression of the Stokes Raman gain is possible by using an intense depletion beam whose frequency difference from that of the pump beam is identical to another acceptor Raman mode frequency. I anticipate that the present work will provide a theoretical framework for super-resolution stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

  10. Magnetic scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vettier, C.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the relative use of neutrons and X-rays as scattering tools to probe the magnetic properties of materials. Neutron diffraction experiments continue to be the most appropriate tool to determine the magnetic structure of bulk solids. Synchrotron X-ray experiments are and will be used to investigate selectively the magnetic behaviour of different chemical species and/or electronic shells in magnetic systems. There exist some grey areas where the two probes can be used depending on the scientific problem under investigation. In particular, neutrons allow very accurate measurements of magnetic form factors, but X-rays provide a separation of the orbital momentum contribution to magnetisation. Comparisons between X-rays and neutrons studies of magnetism at surfaces are presented. Finally, one can anticipate that only inelastic neutron scattering experiments will allow the observation of magnetic excitations across the whole Brillouin zone

  11. Scatter corrections for cone beam optical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olding, Tim; Holmes, Oliver [Department of Physics, Queen' s University (United Kingdom); Schreiner, L John [Medical Physics Department, Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: Tim.Olding@krcc.on.ca

    2009-05-01

    Cone beam optical computed tomography (OptCT) employing the VISTA scanner (Modus Medical, London, ON) has been shown to have significant promise for fast, three dimensional imaging of polymer gel dosimeters. One distinct challenge with this approach arises from the combination of the cone beam geometry, a diffuse light source, and the scattering polymer gel media, which all contribute scatter signal that perturbs the accuracy of the scanner. Beam stop array (BSA), beam pass array (BPA) and anti-scatter polarizer correction methodologies have been employed to remove scatter signal from OptCT data. These approaches are investigated through the use of well-characterized phantom scattering solutions and irradiated polymer gel dosimeters. BSA corrected scatter solutions show good agreement in attenuation coefficient with the optically absorbing dye solutions, with considerable reduction of scatter-induced cupping artifact at high scattering concentrations. The application of BSA scatter corrections to a polymer gel dosimeter lead to an overall improvement in the number of pixel satisfying the (3%, 3mm) gamma value criteria from 7.8% to 0.15%.

  12. Molecular beam scattering experiments on the abstraction and exchange reactions of deuterium atoms with the hydrogen halides HCl, HBr, and HI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, W.; Rusin, L.Y.; Toennies, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    Molecular beam scattering experiments have been carried out on the abstraction and exchange reactions of deuterium atoms (T=2600 K) with the hydrogen halides HX(T=300 K) in the range of scattering angles: 0 0 0 (theta/sub cm/=0 0 is the direction of the incident D-atom beam). The apparatus employed a very sensitive electron bombardment detector with a sufficiently low H 2 background to make possible the measurement of differential cross sections of about 0.1 A 2 /sr for reactively scattered HD and H and nonreactively scattered D-atoms. The measured HD signal can be largely attributed to various background sources and only serves to establish a rough upper limit on the abstraction cross section in the angular range investigated. The H-atom signal was more intense. The observed angular distribution was forward peaked, and is attributed to the exchange reaction. The nonreactively scattered D-atom signal was used in conjunction with a recently reported effective spherically symmetric potential to provide an absolute calibration of the detector sensitivity. The measured integral cross sections for the exchange reactions are 2.3 A 2 (D+HCl), 1.3 A 2 (D+HBr) and 1.6 A 2 (D+HI) with an estimated error of about +- 30%. The absolute cross sections and the H-atom angular distributions are consistent with the DX distributions measured by McDonald and Herschbach. Both experimental angular distributions are considerably narrower than those predicted by the recent classical trajectory calculations of Raff, Suzukawa, and Thompson. The implications of the new data for the activation energies for the exchange reactions are discussed

  13. Scattering of ion beams from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiland, W.; Taglauer, E.

    1978-01-01

    A review is presented of the scattering of ion beams from surfaces and the physical phenomena which are probably most important for the formation of the final state (charge and excitation) of the secondary particles. The subject is treated under the headings: ion scattering, desorption by ion impact, and neutralization. (U.K.)

  14. Crossed beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolder, K.T.

    1976-01-01

    Many natural phenomena can only be properly understood if one has a detailed knowledge of interactions involving atoms, molecules, ions, electrons or photons. In the laboratory these processes are often studied by preparing beams of two types of particle and observing the reactions which occur when the beams intersect. Some of the more interesting of these crossed beam experiments and their results are discussed. Proposals to extend colliding beam techniques to high energy particle physics are also outlined. (author)

  15. Experimental study of the molecular beam destruction by beam-beam and beam-background scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossel, U.; Dettleff, G.

    1974-01-01

    The extraction of flow properties related to the molecular motion normal to stream lines of an expanding gas jet from observed intensity profiles of supersonic beams is critically assessed. The perturbation of the profile curves by various effects is studied for a helium beam. Exponential laws appear to describe scattering effects to a satisfactory degree

  16. Molecular beam scattering experiments with polar molecules. 1. Differential elastic scattering of H2+NH3 and H2+H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Scoles, G.; Smith, K.M.

    1974-01-01

    Differential elastic scattering cross sections with well resolved quantum oscillations have been measuremed for the systems H 2 +NH 3 and H 2 +H 2 O. Assuming a spherically symmetric interaction the data show that a simple spherical potential (i.e. Lennard-Jones) does not properly describe the scattering

  17. Beam-charge azimuthal asymmetry and deeply virtual Compton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Amarian, M.; Andrus, A.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Augustyniak, W.; Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A.; Avetissian, E.; Bailey, P.; Balin, D.; Beckmann, M.; Belostotski, S.; Bianchi, N.; Blok, H. P.; Böttcher, H.; Borissov, A.; Borysenko, A.; Bouwhuis, M.; Brüll, A.; Bryzgalov, V.; Capiluppi, M.; Capitani, G. P.; Chen, T.; Ciullo, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; Dalpiaz, P. F.; Deconinck, W.; de Leo, R.; Demey, M.; de Nardo, L.; de Sanctis, E.; Devitsin, E.; di Nezza, P.; Dreschler, J.; Düren, M.; Ehrenfried, M.; Elalaoui-Moulay, A.; Elbakian, G.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elschenbroich, U.; Fabbri, R.; Fantoni, A.; Felawka, L.; Frullani, S.; Funel, A.; Gapienko, G.; Gapienko, V.; Garibaldi, F.; Garrow, K.; Gaskell, D.; Gavrilov, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Grebeniouk, O.; Gregor, I. M.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hafidi, K.; Hartig, M.; Hasch, D.; Hesselink, W. H. A.; Hillenbrand, A.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Hommez, B.; Hristova, I.; Iarygin, G.; Ivanilov, A.; Izotov, A.; Jackson, H. E.; Jgoun, A.; Kaiser, R.; Kinney, E.; Kisselev, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kopytin, M.; Korotkov, V.; Kozlov, V.; Krauss, B.; Krivokhijine, V. G.; Lagamba, L.; Lapikás, L.; Laziev, A.; Lenisa, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden-Levy, L. A.; Lorenzon, W.; Lu, H.; Lu, J.; Lu, S.; Ma, B.-Q.; Maiheu, B.; Makins, N. C. R.; Mao, Y.; Marianski, B.; Marukyan, H.; Masoli, F.; Mexner, V.; Meyners, N.; Michler, T.; Mikloukho, O.; Miller, C. A.; Miyachi, Y.; Muccifora, V.; Murray, M.; Nagaitsev, A.; Nappi, E.; Naryshkin, Y.; Negodaev, M.; Nowak, W.-D.; Oganessyan, K.; Ohsuga, H.; Osborne, A.; Pickert, N.; Potterveld, D. H.; Raithel, M.; Reggiani, D.; Reimer, P. E.; Reischl, A.; Reolon, A. R.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, A.; Rubacek, L.; Rubin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Sanjiev, I.; Savin, I.; Schäfer, A.; Schnell, G.; Schüler, K. P.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seitz, B.; Shanidze, R.; Shearer, C.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shutov, V.; Sinram, K.; Sommer, W.; Stancari, M.; Statera, M.; Steffens, E.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, J.; Stinzing, F.; Tait, P.; Tanaka, H.; Taroian, S.; Tchuiko, B.; Terkulov, A.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Vandenbroucke, A.; van der Nat, P. B.; van der Steenhoven, G.; van Haarlem, Y.; Vikhrov, V.; Vincter, M. G.; Vogel, C.; Volmer, J.; Wang, S.; Wendland, J.; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yen, S.; Zihlmann, B.; Zupranski, P.

    2007-01-01

    The first observation of an azimuthal cross section asymmetry with respect to the charge of the incoming lepton beam is reported from a study of hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons. The data have been accumulated by the HERMES experiment at DESY, in which the HERA 27.6 GeV electron or positron beam scattered off an unpolarized hydrogen gas target. The observed asymmetry is attributed to the interference between the Bethe-Heitler process and the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) process. The interference term is sensitive to DVCS amplitudes, which provide the most direct access to generalized parton distributions.

  18. Neutron scattering. Experiment manuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The thermal triple axis spectrometer PUMA, the high-resolution powder diffractometer SPODI, the hot single-crystal diffractometer HEiDi for structure analysis with neutrons, the backscattering spectrometer SPHERES, neutron polarization analysis with tht time-of-flight spectrometer DNS, the neutron spin-echo spectrometer J-NSE, small-angle neutron scattering with the KWS-1 and KWS-2 diffractometers, the very-small-angle neutron scattering diffractrometer with focusing mirror KWS-3, the resonance spin-echo spectrometer RESEDA, the reflectometer TREFF, the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF. (HSI)

  19. Neutron scattering. Experiment manuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner

    2014-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The thermal triple-axis spectrometer PUMA, the high-resolution powder diffractometer SPODI, the hot-single-crystal diffractometer HEiDi, the three-axis spectrometer PANDA, the backscattering spectrometer SPHERES, the DNS neutron-polarization analysis, the neutron spin-echo spectrometer J-NSE, small-angle neutron scattering at KWS-1 and KWS-2, a very-small-angle neutron scattering diffractometer with focusing mirror, the reflectometer TREFF, the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF. (HSI)

  20. Neutron scattering. Experiment manuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner

    2010-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The thermal triple axis spectrometer PUMA, the high-resolution powder diffractometer SPODI, the hot single-crystal diffractometer HEiDi for structure analysis with neutrons, the backscattering spectrometer SPHERES, neutron polarization analysis with tht time-of-flight spectrometer DNS, the neutron spin-echo spectrometer J-NSE, small-angle neutron scattering with the KWS-1 and KWS-2 diffractometers, the very-small-angle neutron scattering diffractrometer with focusing mirror KWS-3, the resonance spin-echo spectrometer RESEDA, the reflectometer TREFF, the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF. (HSI)

  1. Neutron scattering. Experiment manuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2014-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The thermal triple-axis spectrometer PUMA, the high-resolution powder diffractometer SPODI, the hot-single-crystal diffractometer HEiDi, the three-axis spectrometer PANDA, the backscattering spectrometer SPHERES, the DNS neutron-polarization analysis, the neutron spin-echo spectrometer J-NSE, small-angle neutron scattering at KWS-1 and KWS-2, a very-small-angle neutron scattering diffractometer with focusing mirror, the reflectometer TREFF, the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF. (HSI)

  2. Charge-transfer energy in the water-hydrogen molecular aggregate revealed by molecular-beam scattering experiments, charge displacement analysis, and ab initio calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belpassi, Leonardo; Reca, Michael L; Tarantelli, Francesco; Roncaratti, Luiz F; Pirani, Fernando; Cappelletti, David; Faure, Alexandre; Scribano, Yohann

    2010-09-22

    Integral cross-section measurements for the system water-H(2) in molecular-beam scattering experiments are reported. Their analysis demonstrates that the average attractive component of the water-H(2) intermolecular potential in the well region is about 30% stronger than dispersion and induction forces would imply. An extensive and detailed theoretical analysis of the electron charge displacement accompanying the interaction, over several crucial sections of the potential energy surface (PES), shows that water-H(2) interaction is accompanied by charge transfer (CT) and that the observed stabilization energy correlates quantitatively with CT magnitude at all distances. Based on the experimentally determined potential and the calculated CT, a general theoretical model is devised which reproduces very accurately PES sections obtained at the CCSD(T) level with large basis sets. The energy stabilization associated with CT is calculated to be 2.5 eV per electron transferred. Thus, CT is shown to be a significant, strongly stereospecific component of the interaction, with water functioning as electron donor or acceptor in different orientations. The general relevance of these findings for water's chemistry is discussed.

  3. Scattering of thermal photons by a 46 GeV positron beam at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bini, C.; De Zorzi, G.; Diambrini-Palazzi, G.; Di Cosimo, G.; Di Domenico, A.; Gauzzi, P.; Zanello, D.

    1991-01-01

    The scattering of thermal photons present in the vacuum pipe of LEP against the high energy positron beam has been detected. The spectrum of the back-scattered photons is presented for a positron beam energy of 46.1 GeV. Measurements have been performed in the interaction region 1 with the LEP-5 experiment calorimeter. (orig.)

  4. Simulation of ion beam scattering in a gas stripper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxeiner, Sascha; Suter, Martin; Christl, Marcus; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2015-10-01

    Ion beam scattering in the gas stripper of an accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) enlarges the beam phase space and broadens its energy distribution. As the size of the injected beam depends on the acceleration voltage through phase space compression, the stripper becomes a limiting factor of the overall system transmission especially for low energy AMS system in the sub MV region. The spatial beam broadening and collisions with the accelerator tube walls are a possible source for machine background and energy loss fluctuations influence the mass resolution and thus isotope separation. To investigate the physical processes responsible for these effects, a computer simulation approach was chosen. Monte Carlo simulation methods are applied to simulate elastic two body scattering processes in screened Coulomb potentials in a (gas) stripper and formulas are derived to correctly determine random collision parameters and free path lengths for arbitrary (and non-homogeneous) gas densities. A simple parametric form for the underlying scattering cross sections is discussed which features important scaling behaviors. An implementation of the simulation was able to correctly model the data gained with the TANDY AMS system at ETH Zurich. The experiment covered transmission measurements of uranium ions in helium and beam profile measurements after the ion beam passed through the He-stripper. Beam profiles measured up to very high stripper densities could be understood in full system simulations including the relevant ion optics. The presented model therefore simulates the fundamental physics of the interaction between an ion beam and a gas stripper reliably. It provides a powerful and flexible tool for optimizing existing AMS stripper geometries and for designing new, state of the art low energy AMS systems.

  5. Hyperon Beam Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiment WA89 uses the upgraded Omega facility together with a hyperon beam installed at the end of the H1 beamline. The beam can deliver 2~10$ ^{5} \\% Sigma ^- $ per machine burst at 330 GeV/c with a background of 5 10$ ^{5} \\% \\pi ^- $. \\\\ \\\\ The goals of the experiment are: observation of charmed particles, mainly the charmed-strange baryons and measurements of their production in the kinematical range x$ _{F} $~$>$~0.2, and their decay properties, a search for exotic states such as U(3100) observed in the previous CERN hyperon beam experiment WA62, measurements of hyperon polarization and production properties. \\\\ \\\\ A vertex detector consisting of 24 silicon microstrip planes with 25~$\\mu$m pitch and 6~planes with 50~$\\mu$m pitch provides track measurements of sufficient accuracy to identify the decays of short living charmed particles and measure their lifetimes. A RICH detector provides good $\\pi$/K separation for momenta up to 100~GeV/c and $\\pi$/p separation up to 150~GeV/c. Photons are detecte...

  6. Beam experiment at TARN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, A.; Chida, K.; Hattori, T.

    1984-01-01

    TARN is a storage ring of low energy ions (T sub(N) -- 10 MeV/u) constructed in 1979 to verify the feasibility of intensity multiplication proposed at NUMATRON project. The mean radius and maximum magnetic rigidity of the ring are 5.06 m and 11.8 kG.m, respectively. Magnet system based on a strong focusing FODO lattice is composed of 8 dipole and 16 quadrupole magnets. Additional 12 sextupole magnets are also installed for chromaticity control. Intensity increase by the multi-turn injection is 20 times with the dilution factor of 2.0 in horizontal transverse phase space. Injected beams are RF captured with the frequency around 8 MHz and moved inner side of the ring by RF deceleration as large as -- 5 % in Δp/p. Beam intensity increases linearly up to around 20 stackings with the capture efficiency of 80 % and 30 Hz repetition rate. Dilution factor of the longitudinal phase space is measured at 1.8. Thus about 300 times total intensity increase has been attained. The e-folding beam life time of 7 MeV proton is measured at 400 s for the vacuum pressure of 1 x 10 -10 Torr. Stochastic momentum cooling experiment of 7 MeV proton has been performed. A feed-back system based on the 'Notch-Filter' method has been adopted for its simplicity and characteristics suitable for lower beam intensity. Cooling time for the 7 MeV proton beam with the intensity of 10 8 is estimated at 19 s for optimum cooling rate with the system gain of 105 dB, while the system gain as large as 111 dB has been achieved without self-oscillation of the electronics system. From the beam experiment, the cooling time of 10 8 proton beam with fractional momentum spread of 1.4 x 10 -2 is measured at --20 sec with the system gain of 97 db. (author)

  7. Stimulated Brillouin scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, D.C.; Berger, R.L.; Busch, G.; Kinzer, C.M.; Mayer, F.J.; Powers, L.V.; Tanner, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes two experiments in which SBS would be expected to play an important role. In the first experiment, we find a clear signature of the Brillouin backscatter of a short (100 psec) pulse from a long (approx. 50 μm) gradient length gas target plasma. The second experiment used much longer (approx. 1 nsec) pulses on spherical glass shell targets. These experiments were done with both narrow ( 30A) bandwidth laser light. Using one-dimensional, spherically symmetric fluid simulations, we have attempted to model many of the laser-plasma interaction processes which combine to determine the amount of absorbed energy in the long-pulse experiments. These simulations indicate that modest laser bandwidths are successful in reducing the level of SBS at the irradiances ( 15 W/cm 2 ) used in these experiments

  8. Semi-analytical solution to arbitrarily shaped beam scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Huayong; Sun, Yufa

    2017-07-01

    Based on the field expansions in terms of appropriate spherical vector wave functions and the method of moments scheme, an exact semi-analytical solution to the scattering of an arbitrarily shaped beam is given. For incidence of a Gaussian beam, zero-order Bessel beam and Hertzian electric dipole radiation, numerical results of the normalized differential scattering cross section are presented to a spheroid and a circular cylinder of finite length, and the scattering properties are analyzed concisely.

  9. Choice of theoretical model for beam scattering at accelerator output foil for particle energy determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balagyra, V.S.; Ryabka, P.M.

    1999-01-01

    For measuring the charged particle energy calculations of mean square angles of electron beam multiple Coulomb scattering at output combined accelerator target were undertaken according to seven theoretical models. Mollier method showed the best agreement with experiments

  10. Molecular beam photoionization and gas-surface scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceyer, S.T.

    1979-09-01

    The energetics of the ethylene ion-molecule reactions was investigated in more detail than previously possible in two body collision experiments by photoionization of the neutral van der Waals ethylene dimer. The stability of the (C 2 H 4 ) + C 2 H 4 ion-molecule collision complex has been determined to be 18.2 +- 0.5 kcal. The highest potential barriers along the reaction coordinate for decomposition of this collision complex into C 4 H 7 + + H and C 3 H 5 + + CH 3 have been determined to be 0 +- 1.5 and 8.7 +- 1.5 kcal. In a similar manner, the energetics of the solvated ethylene dimer ion was investigated by the photoionization of the ethylene trimer. The absolute proton affinity of NH 3 (203.6 +- 1.3 kcal/mole) and the proton solvation energies by more than one NH 3 have been determined by molecular beam photoionization. In addition, the NH 3 + -NH 3 interaction energy (0.79 +- 0.05 eV) was measured by photoionization of the neutral van der Waals dimer. These experiments have shown that photoionization of van der Waals clusters is a very powerful method of determining the energetics of gas phase proton solvation. The scattering of helium atomic beams from a high Miller index platinum surface that exhibits ordered, periodic steps on the atomic scale to probe the effect of atomic steps on the scattering distribution is explored. Rainbow scattering is observed when the step edges are perpendicular to the incident helium atoms. The design, construction and operation of a beam-surface scattering apparatus are described. The first data obtained in this apparatus are presented and the interesting dynamical aspects of the oxidation of D, D 2 and CO are discussed. 75 references

  11. Elastic scattering and (p,n) reactions with secondary beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orr, N.A.

    1998-01-01

    To study nuclear mass distribution in 6 He we carried out elastic scattering measurements on the p( 6 He, 6 He)p reaction and on the exchange reaction p( 6 He, 6 Li)n. This experiment was one of the first measurements of a direct reaction induced by a secondary beam produced by fragmentation. At the same time the elastic reaction of 10 Be was measured. The results o these reactions show that the utilized method SISSI for producing secondary beam and SPEG as energy-loss-spectrometer is a very powerful technology, namely, providing a very high energy and angular resolution for reaction products. Data from this experiment were analyzed while their interpretation resulting from the comparison with calculations is underway

  12. Scattering of linearly polarized Bessel beams by dielectric spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoorian, Hamed

    2017-09-01

    The scattering of a Linearly Polarized Bessel Beam (LPBB) by an isotropic and homogenous dielectric sphere is investigated. Using analytical relation between the cylindrical and the spherical vector wave functions, all the closed- form analytical expressions, in terms of spherical wave-functions expansions, are derived for the scattered field. It is shown that in the case of conical angle of incident Bessel beam is equal to zero, the Linearly Polarized Bessel Beam becomes a plane wave and its scattering coefficients become the same as the expansion coefficients of plane wave in Mie theory. The transverse Cartesian and spherical components of the electric field, scattered by a sphere are shown in the z-plane for different cases, moreover the intensity of the incident Bessel beam and the effects of its conical angle on the scattered field and the field inside the sphere are investigated. To quantitatively study the scattering phenomenon and the variations of the fields inside and outside of the sphere, the scattering and absorption efficiencies are obtained for the scattering of the linearly-polarized Bessel beam, and are compared with those of the plane wave scattering.

  13. Neutrino-electron scattering at LAMPF: Large Cherenkov detector experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    An experiment to measure neutrino-electron scattering is described. The neutrinos are generated in a beam stop from 800 MeV protons at LAMPF. The expected precision on sin 2 θ/sub w/ is 1%. The experiment also gives stringent hints on neutrino oscillations and is sensitive to neutrinos from supernova collapse. 5 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Scattered X-ray beam nondestructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, G.; Kosanetzky, J.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray scatter interactions generally dominate the linear attenuation coefficient at the photon energies typical of medical and industrial radiography. Specific advantages of X-ray scatter imaging, including a flexible choice of measurement geometry, direct 3D-imaging capability (tomography) and improved information for material characterization, are illustrated with results from Compton and coherent scatter devices. Applications of a Compton backscatter scanner (ComScan) in the aerospace industry and coherent scatter imaging in security screening are briefly considered [pt

  15. Recent tendency to neutron beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Yoshikazu

    1979-01-01

    The application of neutron beam experiment to the study of reactor materials is described in this paper. In Japan, neutron beam experiments have been developed, using reactors JRR-2, JRR-3 and KUR-1. Most of experimental apparatuses in Japan are neutron diffraction systems and three-axis neutron spectrometers, similarly to those in U.S.A. and Canada. In Europe, cold neutron experiments have been developed. The most interesting experiment at present is the small angle scattering experiment. This technique can be applied to the other field than solid state physics. Nondestructive measurements for large samples can be made. Measurement while controlling outside conditions, and measurement for radioactive substances of considerable intensity are possible. Statistical mean values for larger volumes can be obtained as compared with electron microscope observation. Effects of multiple scattering are negligible. A non-destructive test of the properties of turbine blades was made at the GALILEO research reactor. The results were useful for the estimation of the residual life of the blades. Anomaly in the welded parts of pressure vessels for reactors can be detected by the small angle scattering method. The voids in irradiated samples were also observed by this technique. (Kato, T.)

  16. Dual scattering foil design for poly-energetic electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainz, K K; Antolak, J A; Almond, P R; Bloch, C D; Hogstrom, K R

    2005-03-07

    The laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) mechanism can accelerate electrons to energies within the 6-20 MeV range desired for therapy application. However, the energy spectrum of LWFA-generated electrons is broad, on the order of tens of MeV. Using existing laser technology, the therapeutic beam might require a significant energy spread to achieve clinically acceptable dose rates. The purpose of this work was to test the assumption that a scattering foil system designed for a mono-energetic beam would be suitable for a poly-energetic beam with a significant energy spread. Dual scattering foil systems were designed for mono-energetic beams using an existing analytical formalism based on Gaussian multiple-Coulomb scattering theory. The design criterion was to create a flat beam that would be suitable for fields up to 25 x 25 cm2 at 100 cm from the primary scattering foil. Radial planar fluence profiles for poly-energetic beams with energy spreads ranging from 0.5 MeV to 6.5 MeV were calculated using two methods: (a) analytically by summing beam profiles for a range of mono-energetic beams through the scattering foil system, and (b) by Monte Carlo using the EGS/BEAM code. The analytic calculations facilitated fine adjustments to the foil design, and the Monte Carlo calculations enabled us to verify the results of the analytic calculation and to determine the phase-space characteristics of the broadened beam. Results showed that the flatness of the scattered beam is fairly insensitive to the width of the input energy spectrum. Also, results showed that dose calculated by the analytical and Monte Carlo methods agreed very well in the central portion of the beam. Outside the useable field area, the differences between the analytical and Monte Carlo results were small but significant, possibly due to the small angle approximation. However, these did not affect the conclusion that a scattering foil system designed for a mono-energetic beam will be suitable for a poly

  17. Elastic scattering and charge exchange reactions with exotic beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Cortina-Gil, M.D.; Mittig, W.; Alamanos, N.; Auger, F.; Fekou-Youmbi, V.; Barrette, J.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Frascaria, N.; Al-Khalili, J.

    1996-01-01

    The elastic scattering of 6 He, 10,11 Be secondary beams on a (CH 2 ) 3 target and the charge exchange reaction p( 6 He, 6 Li)n have been measured. Very good agreement was found for the 6 He+ 12 C data with a four-body eikonal scattering model. A microscopic optical potential was used to reproduce the proton-nucleus elastic scattering data. (author)

  18. Crossed-molecular-beams reactive scattering of oxygen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baseman, R.J.

    1982-11-01

    The reactions of O(/sup 3/P) with six prototypical unsaturated hydrocarbons, and the reaction of O(/sup 1/D) with HD, have been studied in high-resolution crossed-molecular-beams scattering experiments with mass-spectrometric detection. The observed laboratory-product angular and velocity distributions unambiguously identify parent-daughter ion pairs, distinguish different neutral sources of the same ion, and have been used to identify the primary products of the reactions. The derived center-of-mass product angular and translational energy distributions have been used to elucidate the detailed reaction dynamics. These results demonstrate that O(/sup 3/P)-unsaturated hydrocarbon chemistry is dominated by single bond cleavages, leading to radical products exclusively.

  19. Crossed-molecular-beams reactive scattering of oxygen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baseman, R.J.

    1982-11-01

    The reactions of O( 3 P) with six prototypical unsaturated hydrocarbons, and the reaction of O( 1 D) with HD, have been studied in high-resolution crossed-molecular-beams scattering experiments with mass-spectrometric detection. The observed laboratory-product angular and velocity distributions unambiguously identify parent-daughter ion pairs, distinguish different neutral sources of the same ion, and have been used to identify the primary products of the reactions. The derived center-of-mass product angular and translational energy distributions have been used to elucidate the detailed reaction dynamics. These results demonstrate that O( 3 P)-unsaturated hydrocarbon chemistry is dominated by single bond cleavages, leading to radical products exclusively

  20. Modeling transmission and scatter for photon beam attenuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnesjö, A; Weber, L; Nilsson, P

    1995-11-01

    The development of treatment planning methods in radiation therapy requires dose calculation methods that are both accurate and general enough to provide a dose per unit monitor setting for a broad variety of fields and beam modifiers. The purpose of this work was to develop models for calculation of scatter and transmission for photon beam attenuators such as compensating filters, wedges, and block trays. The attenuation of the beam is calculated using a spectrum of the beam, and a correction factor based on attenuation measurements. Small angle coherent scatter and electron binding effects on scattering cross sections are considered by use of a correction factor. Quality changes in beam penetrability and energy fluence to dose conversion are modeled by use of the calculated primary beam spectrum after passage through the attenuator. The beam spectra are derived by the depth dose effective method, i.e., by minimizing the difference between measured and calculated depth dose distributions, where the calculated distributions are derived by superposing data from a database for monoenergetic photons. The attenuator scatter is integrated over the area viewed from the calculation point of view using first scatter theory. Calculations are simplified by replacing the energy and angular-dependent cross-section formulas with the forward scatter constant r2(0) and a set of parametrized correction functions. The set of corrections include functions for the Compton energy loss, scatter attenuation, and secondary bremsstrahlung production. The effect of charged particle contamination is bypassed by avoiding use of dmax for absolute dose calibrations. The results of the model are compared with scatter measurements in air for copper and lead filters and with dose to a water phantom for lead filters for 4 and 18 MV. For attenuated beams, downstream of the buildup region, the calculated results agree with measurements on the 1.5% level. The accuracy was slightly less in situations

  1. Three-beam double stimulated Raman scatterings: Cascading configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B. Jayachander; Cho, Minhaeng

    2018-03-01

    Two-beam stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) has been used in diverse label-free spectroscopy and imaging applications of live cells, biological tissues, and functional materials. Recently, we developed a theoretical framework for the three-beam double SRS processes that involve pump, Stokes, and depletion beams, where the pump-Stokes and pump-depletion SRS processes compete with each other. It was shown that the net Stokes gain signal can be suppressed by increasing the depletion beam intensity. The theoretical prediction has been experimentally confirmed recently. In the previous scheme for a selective suppression of one SRS by making it compete with another SRS, the two SRS processes occur in a parallel manner. However, there is another possibility of three-beam double SRS scheme that can be of use to suppress either Raman gain of the Stokes beam or Raman loss of the pump beam by depleting the Stokes photons with yet another SRS process induced by the pair of Stokes and another (second) Stokes beam. This three-beam double SRS process resembles a cascading energy transfer process from the pump beam to the first Stokes beam (SRS-1) and subsequently from the first Stokes beam to the second Stokes beam (SRS-2). Here, the two stimulated Raman gain-loss processes are associated with two different Raman-active vibrational modes of solute molecule. In the present theory, both the radiation and the molecules are treated quantum mechanically. We then show that the cascading-type three-beam double SRS can be described by coupled differential equations for the photon numbers of the pump and Stokes beams. From the approximate solutions as well as exact numerical calculation results for the coupled differential equations, a possibility of efficiently suppressing the stimulated Raman loss of the pump beam by increasing the second Stokes beam intensity is shown and discussed. To further prove a potential use of this scheme for developing a super-resolution SRS microscopy, we

  2. Scattering of Gaussian Beams by Disordered Particulate Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.

    2016-01-01

    A frequently observed characteristic of electromagnetic scattering by a disordered particulate medium is the absence of pronounced speckles in angular patterns of the scattered light. It is known that such diffuse speckle-free scattering patterns can be caused by averaging over randomly changing particle positions and/or over a finite spectral range. To get further insight into the possible physical causes of the absence of speckles, we use the numerically exact superposition T-matrix solver of the Maxwell equations and analyze the scattering of plane-wave and Gaussian beams by representative multi-sphere groups. We show that phase and amplitude variations across an incident Gaussian beam do not serve to extinguish the pronounced speckle pattern typical of plane-wave illumination of a fixed multi-particle group. Averaging over random particle positions and/or over a finite spectral range is still required to generate the classical diffuse speckle-free regime.

  3. Extending backward polygon beam tracing to glossy scattering surfaces

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duvenhage, B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available -8659.2011.01903.x COMPUTER GRAPHICS forum Volume 0 (2011), number 0 pp. 1?12 Extending Backward Polygon Beam Tracing to Glossy Scattering Surfaces B. Duvenhage,1 K. Bouatouch2 and D. G. Kourie1 1University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa dkourie... of magnitude for rendering caustics from glossy and specular surfaces. Keywords: backward beam tracing, caustics, glossy scattering, lumped transport model ACM CCS: I.3.7 [Computer Graphics]: Three Dimensional Graphics and Realism?Color, shading, shadowing...

  4. Quantum entanglement and neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, R A

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that quantum entanglement in condensed matter can be observed with scattering experiments if the energy resolution of the experiments enables a clear separation between the elastic scattering and the scattering from the excitations in the system. These conditions are not satisfied in recent deep inelastic neutron scattering experiments from hydrogen-containing systems that have been interpreted as showing the existence of quantum entanglement for short times in, for example, water at room temperature. It is shown that the theory put forward to explain these experiments is inconsistent with the first-moment sum rule for the Van Hove scattering function and we suggest that the theory is incorrect. The experiments were performed using the unique EVS spectrometer at ISIS and suggestions are made about how the data and their interpretation should be re-examined

  5. Small angle scatter imaging from wide beam diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, Steven J; Rogers, Keith D; Hall, Chris J; Round, Adam R

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we report on the extension of the technique of mapping small angle x-ray scatter (SAXS) across a soft material specimen several millimetres square. In the conventional SAXS mapping technique a pencil beam of x-rays is raster scanned over the specimen with the scatter pattern recorded from each point in the raster. In our technique a wide, parallel beam is used, speeding up the data collection time considerably. An image processing algorithm is used to separate the scatter pattern features from individual points along the line of the beam. To test the efficacy of the technique a phantom was constructed using gelatin and rat tail tendon collagen. Collagen fibres in the phantom were arranged in quarters horizontally, diagonally and vertically leaving one quarter with just gelatin. The phantom was used to collect both raster scanned sets of SAXS patterns spaced at 0.25 mm horizontally and vertically and also a wide beam data set. The width of the beam in this case was approximately 7 mm. Using the third-order diffraction of rat tail tendon intensity data were gathered from each SAXS pattern and used to construct a map. Data from the raster scan image and that from the wide beam are compared. Finally using a phantom made from dehydrated rat tail tendon and paraffin wax a tomographic slice constructed using data from SAXS patterns is shown

  6. Beam shape coefficients of the most general focused Gaussian laser beam for light scattering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lock, James A.

    2013-01-01

    The vector wave equation for electromagnetic waves, when subject to a number of constraints corresponding to propagation of a monochromatic beam, reduces to a pair of inhomogeneous differential equations describing the transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarized beam components. These differential equations are solved analytically to obtain the most general focused Gaussian beam to order s 4 , where s is the beam confinement parameter, and various properties of the most general Gaussian beam are then discussed. The radial fields of the most general Gaussian beam are integrated to obtain the on-axis beam shape coefficients of the generalized Lorenz–Mie theory formalism of light scattering. The beam shape coefficients are then compared with those of the localized Gaussian beam model and the Davis–Barton fifth-order symmetrized beam. -- Highlights: ► Derive the differential equation for the most general Gaussian beam. ► Solve the differential equation for the most general Gaussian beam. ► Determine the properties of the most general Gaussian beam. ► Determine the beam shape coefficients of the most general Gaussian beam

  7. Scattered radiation from applicators in clinical electron beams.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battum, L.J. van; Zee, W. van der; Huizenga, H.

    2003-01-01

    In radiotherapy with high-energy (4-25 MeV) electron beams, scattered radiation from the electron applicator influences the dose distribution in the patient. In most currently available treatment planning systems for radiotherapy this component is not explicitly included and handled only by a slight

  8. Scattering of Gaussian beams by disordered particulate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.

    2016-01-01

    A frequently observed characteristic of electromagnetic scattering by a disordered particulate medium is the absence of pronounced speckles in angular patterns of the scattered light. It is known that such diffuse speckle-free scattering patterns can be caused by averaging over randomly changing particle positions and/or over a finite spectral range. To get further insight into the possible physical causes of the absence of speckles, we use the numerically exact superposition T-matrix solver of the Maxwell equations and analyze the scattering of plane-wave and Gaussian beams by representative multi-sphere groups. We show that phase and amplitude variations across an incident Gaussian beam do not serve to extinguish the pronounced speckle pattern typical of plane-wave illumination of a fixed multi-particle group. Averaging over random particle positions and/or over a finite spectral range is still required to generate the classical diffuse speckle-free regime. - Highlights: • Electromagnetic scattering by a disordered particulate medium is studied. • The superposition T-matrix solver of the Maxwell equations is used. • Finite width of an incident Gaussian beam does not extinguish interference speckles. • Ensemble or spectral averaging is required to generate diffuse speckle-free patterns.

  9. Scatter Reduction and Correction for Dual-Source Cone-Beam CT Using Prepatient Grids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lei; Chen, Yingxuan; Zhang, You; Giles, William; Jin, Jianyue; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2016-06-01

    Scatter significantly limits the application of the dual-source cone-beam computed tomography by inducing scatter artifacts and degrading contrast-to-noise ratio, Hounsfield-unit accuracy, and image uniformity. Although our previously developed interleaved acquisition mode addressed the cross scatter between the 2 X-ray sources, it doubles the scanning time and doesn't address the forward scatter issue. This study aims to develop a prepatient grid system to address both forward scatter and cross scatter in the dual-source cone-beam computed tomography. Grids attached to both X-ray sources provide physical scatter reduction during the image acquisition. Image data were measured in the unblocked region, while both forward scatter and cross scatter were measured in the blocked region of the projection for postscan scatter correction. Complementary projections were acquired with grids at complementary locations and were merged to form complete projections for reconstruction. Experiments were conducted with different phantom sizes, grid blocking ratios, image acquisition modes, and reconstruction algorithms to investigate their effects on the scatter reduction and correction. The image quality improvement by the prepatient grids was evaluated both qualitatively through the artifact reduction and quantitatively through contrast-to-noise ratio, Hounsfield-unit accuracy, and uniformity using a CATphan 504 phantom. Scatter artifacts were reduced by scatter reduction and were removed by scatter correction method. Contrast-to-noise ratio, Hounsfield-unit accuracy, and image uniformity were improved substantially. The simultaneous acquisition mode achieved comparable contrast-to-noise ratio as the interleaved and sequential modes after scatter reduction and correction. Higher grid blocking ratio and smaller phantom size led to higher contrast-to-noise ratio for the simultaneous mode. The iterative reconstruction with total variation regularization was more effective than the

  10. Crossed beam reactive scattering of oxygen atoms and surface scattering studies of gaseous condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibener, S.J.

    1979-09-01

    A high pressure, radio frequency discharge nozzle beam source was developed for the production of very intense (greater than or equal to 10 18 atoms sr -1 sec -1 ) supersonic beams of oxygen atoms. This source is capable of producing seeded beams of ground state O( 3 P/sub J/) atoms when dilute oxygen-argon mixtures are used, with molecular dissociation levels exceeding 80% being realized for operation at pressures up to 350 torr. When dilute oxygen-helium mixtures are employed both ground state O( 3 P/sub J/) and excited state O( 1 D 2 ) atoms are present in the terminal beam, with molecular dissociation levels typically exceeding 60% being achieved for operation at pressures up to 200 torr. Atomic oxygen mean translational energies from 0.14 to 0.50 eV were obtained using the seeded beams technique, with Mach numbers as high as 10 (FWHM Δ v/v approx. = 20%) being realized. The IC1, CF 3 I, C 6 H 6 , and C 6 D 6 reactions are discussed in detail. The IC1 and CF 3 I studies have enabled us to determine an improved value for the bond energy of the IO radical: D/sub o/(IO) = 55 +- 2 kcal/mole. The IO product angular and velocity distributions have been used to generate center-of-mass flux contour maps, which indicate that these two reactions proceed via relatively long-lived collision complexes whose mean lifetimes are slightly shorter than their respective rotational periods. The O( 3 P/sub J/) + C 6 H 6 and C 6 D 6 reactions were studied in order to elucidate the reaction mechanism, and, in particular, to identify the primary reaction products produced in these reactions. Finally, a series of beam-surface scattering experiments are described which examined the internal and translational energy dependence of molecular condensation probabilities for collisions involving either CC1 4 or SF 6 and their respective condensed phases. 117 references

  11. Thomson scattering of polarized photons in an intense laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byung Yunn

    2006-02-21

    We present a theoretical analysis of the Thomson scattering of linearly and circularly polarized photons from a pulsed laser by electrons. The analytical expression for the photon distribution functions presented in this paper should be useful to designers of Thomson scattering experiments.

  12. Numerical investigation of beam halo from beam gas scattering in KEK-ATF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R.; Bambade, P.; Kubo, K.; Okugi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Zhou, D.

    2017-07-01

    To demonstrate the final focus schemes of the Future Linear Collider (FLC), the Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) at KEK is devoted to focus the beam to a RMS size of a few tens of nanometers (nm) vertically and to provide stability at the nm level at the virtual Interaction Point (IP). However, the loss of halo particles upstream will introduce background to the diagnostic instrument measuring the ultra-small beam, using a laser interferometer monitor. To help the realization of the above goals and beam operation, understanding and mitigation of beam halo are crucial. In this paper, we present the systematical simulation of beam halo formation from beam gas Coulomb scattering (BGS) in the ATF damping ring. The behavior of beam halo with various machine parameters is also discussed.

  13. Experimental study of intensive electron beam scattering in melting channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balagura, V.S.; Kurilko, V.I.; Safronov, B.G.

    1988-01-01

    Multiple scattering of an intensive electron beam at 28 keV energy passing through a melting channel in iron targets is experimentally studied. The dependence of scattering on the melting current value is established. The material density in the channel on the basis of the binary collision method is evaluated. It is shown that these density values are of three orders less than the estimations made on the basis of the data on energy losses of electrons in the channel. 6 refs.; 4 figs

  14. High pressure cell for neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinde, A.B.; Krishna, P.S.R.; Paranjpe, S.K.; Vaidya, S.N.

    1997-01-01

    We report here the design and fabrication of a high pressure clamped cell using EN45 steel for neutron scattering experiments up to 15 kbar. The pressure cell geometry allows detection of scattered neutrons in a plane over an angular range of 90 deg. The cell can be used for both elastic and inelastic scattering measurements on polycrystalline materials and disordered materials. The volume of the sample region is about 400 mm 3 . Preliminary results obtained from neutron diffraction of ND 4 I and KNO 3 are presented. (author)

  15. Elastic scattering and reactions of light exotic beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, N.; Alamanos, N.; Kemper, K. W.; Rusek, K.

    2009-10-01

    The present work provides a literature survey of elastic scattering of exotic nuclei from 6He to 17F. It presents a set of definitions that allow different analyses to be put into a common language. A calculational approach is proposed that yields consistent results across different beams and targets so that conclusions concerning the influence of virtual and real breakup as well as transfer couplings on the elastic scattering may be drawn. Calculations of elastic scattering around the Coulomb barrier are emphasised, employing a Pb target whose large Z allows the interplay between nuclear and Coulomb forces to be exploited to maximise possible effects arising from proton or neutron haloes or skins. A series of test calculations is performed and where possible compared to data, demonstrating that there are instances where coupling to transfer channels can have a large effect on the elastic scattering angular distributions. By careful choice of target/beam combination, different aspects of the coupling effects may be emphasised.

  16. Beam-helicity asymmetry arising from deeply virtual Compton scattering measured with kinematically complete event reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Lab. of Physics; Akopov, N. [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); Akopov, Z. [DESY, Hamburg (DE)] (and others)

    2012-06-15

    The beam-helicity asymmetry in exclusive electroproduction of real photons by the longitudinally polarized HERA positron beam scattering off an unpolarized hydrogen target is measured at HERMES. The asymmetry arises from deeply virtual Compton scattering and its interference with the Bethe-Heitler process. Azimuthal amplitudes of the beam-helicity asymmetry are extracted from a data sample consisting of ep{yields}ep{gamma} events with detection of all particles in the final state including the recoiling proton. The installation of a recoil detector, while reducing the acceptance of the experiment, allows the elimination of resonant background that was estimated to contribute an average of about 12% to the signal in previous HERMES publications. The removal of the resonant background from the present data sample is shown to increase the magnitude of the leading asymmetry amplitude by 0.054{+-}0.016 to -0.328{+-}0.027(stat.){+-}0.045(syst.).

  17. Analysis of beam plasma instability effects on incoherent scatter spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Diaz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Naturally Enhanced Ion Acoustic Lines (NEIALs detected with Incoherent Scatter Radars (ISRs can be produced by a Langmuir decay mechanism, triggered by a bump on tail instability. A recent model of the beam-plasma instability suggests that weak-warm beams, such those associated with NEIAL events, might produce Langmuir harmonics which could be detected by a properly configured ISR. The analysis performed in this work shows that such a beam-driven wave may be simultaneously detected with NEIALs within the baseband signal of a single ISR. The analysis shows that simultaneous detection of NEIALs and the first Langmuir harmonic is more likely than simultaneous detection of NEIALs and enhanced plasma line. This detection not only would help to discriminate between current NEIAL models, but could also aid in the parameter estimation of soft precipitating electrons.

  18. MEASUREMENTS OF INTRA-BEAM SCATTERING GROWTH TIMES WITH GOLD BEAM BELOW TRANSITION IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FISCHER, W.; BAI, M.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, J.M.; CAMERON, P.; CONNOLLY, R.; LEHRACH, A.; PARZEN, G.; TEPIKIAN, S.; ZENO, K.; VAN ZEIJTS, J.

    2001-01-01

    While RHIC is filled with beam, bunches are stored for up to several minutes at the injection energy before acceleration starts. In gold operation, the RHIC injection energy is below transition. A bunch length increase, and correspondingly an increase in the longitudinal emittance, can lead to particle loss during transition crossing and rebucketing into the storage buckets. The longitudinal growth of gold beams in RHIC at injection is dominated by intra-beam scattering. Measurements of longitudinal growth times are presented and compared with computations

  19. Progress on Thomson scattering in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlossberg, D. J.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Schoenbeck, N. L.; Winz, G. R.

    2013-11-01

    A novel Thomson scattering system has been implemented on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment where typical densities of 1019 m-3 and electron temperatures of 10 to 500 eV are expected. The system leverages technological advances in high-energy pulsed lasers, volume phase holographic (VPH) diffraction gratings, and gated image intensified (ICCD) cameras to provide a relatively low-maintenance, economical, robust diagnostic system. Scattering is induced by a frequency-doubled, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (2 J at 532 nm, 7 ns FWHM pulse) directed to the plasma over a 7.7 m long beam path, and focused to VPH transmission gratings (eff. > 80%) and fast-gated ICCDs (gate > 2 ns, Gen III intensifier) with high-throughput (F/1.8), achromatic lensing. A stray light mitigation facility has been implemented, consisting of a multi-aperture optical baffle system and a simple beam dump. Successful stray light reduction has enabled detection of scattered signal, and Rayleigh scattering has been used to provide a relative calibration. Initial temperature measurements have been made and data analysis algorithms are under development.

  20. Trapping induced nonlinear behavior of backward stimulated Raman scattering in multi-speckled laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Rose, H. A.; Bowers, K. J.; Bergen, B.; Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Hinkel, D. E.; Langdon, A. B.; Michel, P.

    2012-01-01

    In inertial confinement fusion experiments, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) occurs when electron density fluctuations are amplified resonantly by the incident laser beams and scattered light. These beams comprise several thousands of individual laser speckles. We have found in single-speckle studies that electron trapping lowers the threshold intensity for SRS onset to a value below that from linear theory and enhances scattering. The trapping-induced plasma-wave frequency shift leads to wave-front bowing and filamentation processes that saturate SRS and limit scattering within a speckle. With large-scale simulations, we have now examined how laser speckles interact with one another through three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of two interacting speckles and 2D PIC simulations of ensembles of laser speckles (hundreds of speckles). Our work shows that kinetic trapping physics also governs the onset and saturation of SRS in ensembles of speckles. Speckles interact in a manner that is nonlinear and nonlocal: An intense speckle can destabilize its neighbors through transport of hot electrons and SRS waves, resulting in enhanced emission of particles and waves that, in turn, act upon the original speckle. In this manner, speckles below threshold when in isolation can be above the threshold in multi-speckled beams under conditions for laser-driven fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and ensembles of speckles are thus found to collectively lower the SRS onset threshold. Simulations of the hohlraum interior where laser beams overlap show that multi-speckled laser beams at low average intensity (a few times 10 14 W/cm 2 ) have correspondingly lower thresholds for enhanced SRS and that the sub-ps bursts of SRS saturate through trapping induced nonlinearities. Because of electron trapping effects, SRS reflectivity grows slowly with average laser intensity. While SRS reflectivity saturates under NIF conditions, SRS hot electron

  1. Precision Beam Parameter Monitoring in a Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moeller Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, M.S.

    2005-04-11

    A precision measurement of the parity nonconserving left-right asymmetry, A{sub LR}, in Moeller scattering (e{sup -}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}e{sup -}) is currently in progress at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). This experiment, labeled SLAC-E158, scatters longitudinally polarized electrons off atomic electrons in an unpolarized hydrogen target at a Q{sup 2} of 0.03 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The asymmetry, which is the fractional difference in the scattering cross-sections, measures the effective pseudo-scalar weak neutral current coupling, g{sub ee}, governing Moeller scattering. This quantity is in turn proportional to (1/4 - sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w}), where {theta}{sub w} is the electroweak mixing angle. The goal is to measure the asymmetry to a precision of 1 x 10{sup -8} which corresponds to {delta}(sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w}) {approx} 0.0007. Since A{sub LR} is a function of the cross-sections, and the cross-sections depend on the beam parameters, the desired precision of A{sub LR} places stringent requirements on the beam parameters. This paper investigates the requirements on the beam parameters and discusses the means by which they are monitored and accounted for.

  2. Measurement of the primary and scatter dose in high energy photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Linden, P.M. [Catharina Ziekenhuis, Eindhoven (Netherlands). Radiotherapy Dept.; Tiourina, T.B.; Dries, W.

    1995-12-01

    A method is presented to measure the primary and scatter components separately in a water tank using a small cylindrical absorber. Results from this experiment are compared with Monte Carlo calculations. The measurement setup consists of a small cylindrical absorber placed on a central axis of the beam a few centimetres above the radiation detector. Both absorber and detector move along the central axis while absorbed dose is registered. As the primary radiation is fully blocked, only scatter component is measured when a cylindrical absorber is used. Measurements in open fields result in the total absorbed dose being the sum of primary and scatter components. The primary dose component can be derived by substraction. Absorbers with different diameters are used. With decreasing dimensions the relative contribution of the dose due to scatter radiation increases. A steep increase is observed when the range of laterally scattered electrons becomes comparable with the radius of the absorber. Two different Monte Carlo simulations have been performed: with and without secondary electron transport. The data obtained for the former case perfectly agrees with the experiment. The situation where the secondary electron is assumed zero (i.e. local energy deposition) simulates the Cunningham model. Our results show that the Cunningham model predicts lower scatter component under the block edge which can be important for these applications.

  3. Elastic scattering of light neutron rich exotic beams on a proton target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortina-Gil, M.D.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Mittig, W.; Casandjian, J.M.; Chartier, M.; Alamanos, N.; Auger, F.; Fekou-Youmbi, V.; Barrette, J.; Blumenfeld, Y.; and others.

    1996-01-01

    The elastic scattering of 6 He, 10,11 Be secondary beams on a (CH 2 ) 3 target has been measured. A microscopic optical potential was used to reproduce the proton-nucleus elastic scattering data. (author)

  4. Resonance proton scattering use for the beam parameters control of the electrostatic accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Soroka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses peculiarities of the resonance proton scattering use for the beam parameters control of the electrostatic accelerators. The expediency of the use has been confirmed by experiment. Peculiarities are caused because elastic resonance scattering through the stage of compound nucleus is always accompanied by potential and Coulomb scattering. These three components interfere and for that reason the resonance form de-pends on a scattering angle and total angular moment of a compound nucleus level. However, possessing neces-sary information in the given field of nuclear spectroscopy enables the selection of resonance with the character-istics suitable for the calibration purpose. Considerable increase of the scattering cross section in the resonance region saves the time and simplifies the experiment technical maintenance. The experiments were performed at the 10 MeV tandem accelerator of the Institute for Nuclear Research, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv, after its modernization. Silicon and oxygen were used as the targets. Silicon targets were of two types of thickness: 1 the target of complete absorption, 2 the target with the thickness in which the loss of protons ener-gy exceeded the width of the selected resonance. The elastic and non elastic scattering from silicon were used in region of the 3,100 MeV proton energy resonance. Oxygen target, as component of the surface oxidizing layer on beryllium had the thickness which in terms of the loss of proton energy was less than the width of the selected elastic narrow resonance at 3,470 MeV proton energy. As result of the measurement the corrections concerning the energy scale of the accelerator and protons energy spread in the beam were proposed.

  5. Beam Extinction Monitoring in the Mu2e Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prebys, Eric [Fermilab; Bartoszek, Larry [Technicare; Gaponenko, Andrei [Fermilab; Kasper, Peter [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    The Mu2e Experiment at Fermilab will search for the conversion of a muon to an electron in the field of an atomic nucleus with unprecedented sensitivity. The experiment requires a beam consisting of proton bunches approximately 200ns FW long, separated by 1.7 microseconds, with no out-of-time protons at the 10⁻¹⁰ fractional level. The verification of this level of extinction is very challenging. The proposed technique uses a special purpose spectrometer which will observe particles scattered from the production target of the experiment. The acceptance will be limited such that there will be no saturation effects from the in-time beam. The precise level and profile of the out-of-time beam can then be built up statistically, by integrating over many bunches.

  6. Small-angle neutron-scattering experiment, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimura, Nobuo; Kaji, Harumi.

    1983-01-01

    Elementary explanation is given to the experiment on the small angle scattering using neutrons having long wave-length (3-12A), continued from the previous report. Two types of the apparatus for small angle neutron scattering experiment are described. The first is angle dispersion type, which uses the neutron beam from research reactors, and the second is wavelength dispersion type, which uses pulsed cold neutron sources. The principles of these experiments are explained. Especially the wavelength dispersion is described in detail. The apparatus in the booster facility at the Institute for High Energy Physics is shown as an example for the latter type. The two-dimensional position sensitive detector, which is essential for angle dispersion type, is also used for the wavelength dispersion type, and its data processing is also described. In the small angle neutron scattering experiment for the studies on the structure of living body substances, the techniques that should be taken into account in common are discussed; the proportion of D 2 O-H 2 O in solvent, the measurable range of Q, the size of specimens, the correction of incident neutron spectra, and the analysis of measured data. (Asami, T.)

  7. Beam loss due to the aperture limitation resulting from intrabeam scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Diffusion equation is used to evaluate the beam loss in the presence of aperture limitation resulting from the intrabeam scattering. We discuss the effect of different boundary conditions. Satisfactory beam intensity can be maintained within the proposed RHIC operation time

  8. Measurement of the SMC muon beam polarisation using the asymmetry in the elastic scattering off polarised electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D.; Adeva, B.; Akdogan, T.; Arik, E.; Arvidson, A.; Badelek, B; Bardin, G.; Baum, G.; Berglund, P.; Betev, L.; Birsa, R.; Bjoerkholm, P.; Bonner, B.E.; Botton, N. de E-mail: nico.de.botton@cern.ch; Boutemeur, M.; Bradamante, F.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Bueltmann, S.; Burtin, E.; Cavata, C.; Clocchiatti, M.; Crabb, D.; Cranshaw, J.; Cuhadar, T.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dantzig, R. van; Derro, B.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Dulya, C.; Dyring, A.; Eichblatt, S.; Faivre, J.C.; Fasching, D.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandez, C.; Forthmann, S.; Frois, B.; Gallas, A.; Garzon, J.A.; Gatignon, L.; Gaussiran, T.; Gilly, H.; Giorgi, M.; Goeler, E. von; Goertz, S.; Golutvin, I.A.; Gracia, G.; Groot, N. de; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Haft, K.; Harrach, D. von; Hasegawa, T.; Hautle, P.; Hayashi, N.; Heusch, C.A.; Horikawa, N.; Hughes, V.W.; Igo, G.; Ishimoto, S.; Iwata, T.; Kabuss, E.M.; Kageya, T.; Karev, A.; Kessler, H.J.; Ketel, T.J.; Kiryluk, J.; Kiryushin, I.; Kishi, A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klostermann, L.; Kraemer, D.; Krivokhijine, V.; Kroeger, W.; Kukhtin, V.; Kurek, K.; Kyynaeraeinen, J.; Lamanna, M.; Landgraf, U.; Le Goff, J.M.; Lehar, F.; Lesquen, A. de; Lichtenstadt, J.; Lindqvist, T.; Litmaath, M.; Lowe, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Marie, F.; Martin, A.; Martino, J.; Matsuda, T.; Mayes, B.; McCarthy, J.S.; Medved, K.; Meyer, W.; Middelkoop, G. van; Miller, D.; Miyachi, Y.; Mori, K.; Moromisato, J.; Nagaitsev, A.; Nassalski, J.; Naumann, L.; Niinikoski, T.O.; Oberski, J.E.J.; Ogawa, A.; Ozben, C.; Pereira, H.; Perrot-Kunne, F.; Peshekhonov, D.; Piegaia, R.; Pinsky, L.; Platchkov, S.; Plo, M.; Pose, D.; Postma, H.; Pretz, J.; Pussieux, T.; Raedel, G.; Rijllart, A.; Reicherz, G.; Roberts, J.B.; Rock, S.; Rodriguez, M.; Rondio, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Sabo, I.; Saborido, J.; Sandacz, A; Savin, I.; Schiavon, P.; Schiller, A.; Schueler, K.P.; Seitz, R.; Semertzidis, Y.; Sergeev, S.; Shanahan, P.; Sichtermann, E.P.; Simeoni, F.; Smirnov, G.I.; Staude, A.; Steinmetz, A. [and others

    2000-03-21

    A muon beam polarimeter was built for the SMC experiment at the CERN SPS, for beam energies of 100 and 190 GeV. The beam polarisation is determined from the asymmetry in the elastic scattering off the polarised electrons of a ferromagnetic target whose magnetisation is periodically reversed. At muon energies of 100 and 190 GeV the measured polarisation is P{sub {mu}}=-0.80{+-}0.03 (stat.){+-}0.02 (syst.) and P{sub {mu}}=-0.797{+-}0.011 (stat.){+-}0.012 (syst.), respectively. These results agree with measurements of the beam polarisation using a shape analysis of the decay positron energy spectrum.

  9. Neutron–Proton Scattering Experiments at ANKE–COSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathmann F.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The nucleon–nucleon interaction (NN is fundamental for the whole of nuclear physics and hence to the composition of matter as we know it. It has been demonstrated that stored, polarised beams and polarised internal targets are experimental tools of choice to probe spin effects in NN–scattering experiments. While the EDDA experiment has dramatically improved the proton–proton date base, information on spin observables in neutron–proton scattering is very incomplete above 800 MeV, resulting in large uncertainties in isoscalar n p phase shifts. Experiments at COSY, using a polarised deuteron beam or target, can lead to significant improvements in the situation through the study of quasi–free reactions on the neutron in the deuteron. Such a measurements has already been started at ANKE by using polarised deuterons on an unpolarised target to study the dp → {pp}n deuteron charge–exchange reaction and the full program with a polarised storage cell target just has been conducted. At low excitation energies of the final pp system, the spin observables are directly related to the spin– dependent parts of the neutron–proton charge–exchange amplitudes. Our measurement of the deuteron–proton spin correlations will allow us to determine the relative phases of these amplitudes in addition to their overall magnitudes.

  10. Zeno: Critical Fluid Light Scattering Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, Robert W.; Shaumeyer, J. N.; Briggs, Matthew E.; Boukari, Hacene; Gent, David A.; Wilkinson, R. Allen

    1996-01-01

    The Zeno (Critical Fluid Light Scattering) experiment is the culmination of a long history of critical fluid light scattering in liquid-vapor systems. The major limitation to making accurate measurements closer to the critical point was the density stratification which occurs in these extremely compressible fluids. Zeno was to determine the critical density fluctuation decay rates at a pair of supplementary angles in the temperature range 100 mK to 100 (mu)K from T(sub c) in a sample of xenon accurately loaded to the critical density. This paper gives some highlights from operating the instrument on two flights March, 1994 on STS-62 and February, 1996 on STS-75. More detail of the experiment Science Requirements, the personnel, apparatus, and results are displayed on the Web homepage at http://www.zeno.umd.edu.

  11. Specimen environments in thermal neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebula, D.J.

    1980-11-01

    This report is an attempt to collect into one place outline information concerning the techniques used and basic design of sample environment apparatus employed in neutron scattering experiments. Preliminary recommendations for the specimen environment programme of the SNS are presented. The general conclusion reached is that effort should be devoted towards improving reliability and efficiency of operation of specimen environment apparatus and developing systems which are robust and easy to use, rather than achieving performance at the limits of technology. (author)

  12. Comparison between beam-stop and beam-hole array scatter correction techniques for industrial X-ray cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoerner, K., E-mail: karsten.schoerner.ext@siemens.co [Corporate Technology, Siemens AG, 81739 Muenchen (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Goldammer, M.; Stephan, J. [Corporate Technology, Siemens AG, 81739 Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-02-01

    Research highlights: {yields} We propose a scatter correction method employing a beam-hole array. {yields} Beam-hole and beam-stop array techniques are compared in respect of geometric and scattering properties. {yields} The beam-hole array method reduces overall scattering compared to a beam-stop array. {yields} Application of the beam-hole array method is successfully demonstrated for a CT of ceramic specimen. -- Abstract: In industrial X-ray cone-beam computed tomography, the inspection of large-scale samples is important because of increasing demands on their quality and long-term mechanical resilience. Large-scale samples, for example made of aluminum or iron, are strongly scattering X-rays. Scattered radiation leads to artifacts such as cupping, streaks, and a reduction in contrast in the reconstructed CT-volume. We propose a scatter correction method based on sampling primary signals by employing a beam-hole array (BHA). In this indirect method, a scatter estimate is calculated by subtraction of the sampled primary signal from the total signal, the latter taken from an image where the BHA is absent. This technique is considered complementary to the better known beam-stop array (BSA) method. The two scatter estimation methods are compared here with respect to geometric effects, scatter-to-total ratio and practicability. Scatter estimation with the BHA method yields more accurate scatter estimates in off-centered regions, and a lower scatter-to-total ratio in critical image regions where the primary signal is very low. Scatter correction with the proposed BHA method is then applied to a ceramic specimen from power generation technologies. In the reconstructed CT volume, cupping almost completely vanishes and contrast is enhanced significantly.

  13. Experimental considerations concerning the velocity measurement of the relativistic electron beam in a gyrotron by means of Thomson scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegrist, M.R.; Soumagne, G.; Tran, M.Q.

    1992-11-01

    The feasibility of Thomson scattering to determine the beam velocity in a gyrotron has been analyzed and preliminary experiments to implement such a system on our 100 GHz quasi-optical gyrotron are reported. Although the project had to be abandoned due to technical problems, the conclusions are that for the 90 o scattering arrangement discussed it should be possible to determine at least one velocity component with an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio. (author) 11 figs., 10 refs

  14. Suite of experiments in beam H3

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The H3 beam runs from bottom to top, in the middle of the photo. On its left preparation is going on for WA10 in beam H5, on its right, behind the concrete wall, the S3 beam runs to BEBC. The H3 beam first meets the IKAR target of the experiment WA9 (right, bottom corner) then crosses the polarized hydrogen target of experiment WA6 sitting inside the large green magnet (centre, also visible the yellow support of the recoil chamber telescope). Finally the beam reaches WA11 and the Goliath magnet (under the white passerelle). The WA9 (left) and the WA5/11 (right) huts stand on top of the photo, the WA6 stands at the right, centre. The three experiments were running in alternance.

  15. Diagnostics for the ATA beam propagation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessenden, T.J.; Atchison, W.L.; Barletta, W.A.

    1981-11-01

    This report contains a discussion of the diagnostics required for the beam propagation experiment to be done with the ATA accelerator. Included are a list of the diagnostics needed; a description of the ATA experimental environment; the status of beam diagnostics available at Livermore including recent developments, and a prioritized list of accelerator and propagation diagnostics under consideration or in various stages of development

  16. Nuclear astrophysics experiments with radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leleux, P.

    2000-01-01

    In Nuclear Astrophysics, experiments with radioactive beams present particular problems (e.g. low beam intensity, large background) to which specific solutions (i.e. non-standard detection setup) can be brought. Selected reactions measured in Louvain-la-Neuve are treated as practical examples. (author)

  17. Diagnostics for the ATA beam propagation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fessenden, T.J.; Atchison, W.L.; Barletta, W.A.

    1981-11-01

    This report contains a discussion of the diagnostics required for the beam propagation experiment to be done with the ATA accelerator. Included are a list of the diagnostics needed; a description of the ATA experimental environment; the status of beam diagnostics available at Livermore including recent developments, and a prioritized list of accelerator and propagation diagnostics under consideration or in various stages of development.

  18. Elastic and inelastic atomic beam scattering from Ni(115)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aten, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    Scattered angular intensities of the elastic diffraction of nearly monoenergetic helium beam from a Ni(115) crystalline surface in the [552] direction at a variety of incident energies and polar angles was measured. A method is developed of mapping the corrugation parameters from the hard-wall diffraction model, which fit the experimental data, to the corrugation parameters in the soft wall (Morse potential) model. The experimental data was fit by the soft wall model with only minor adjustments of the mapped corrugation parameters for well depth of 8.0 MeV and a steepness parameter of 2.2 reciprocal angstroms. The inelastic scattering of argon at an incident angle of 30 0 for a variety of incident energies and surface temperatures was measured both as a function of reflected angle and as a function of time for narrow incident pulse shapes at the angle corresponding to the backscattered rainbow maximum in the [552] direction, and at the specular angle in the [110] direction. The angular scans show the intensity is peaked at a backscattered rainbow angle in the [552] direction, and is peaked at the specular angle in the [110] direction. The time-of-flight measurements show that a linear relationship between the reflected energy and the incident energy and between the reflected energy and the surface temperature is obeyed

  19. Effect of the selective adsorption on the reactive scattering process of molecular beams from stepped surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, N.

    1977-01-01

    An indicative proposal which may explain the diffusion of incident atomic beams scattered by a crystal surface is made in terms of the selective adsorption mechanism. In this sense, the stepped metallic surfaces present characteristics which enhance the displacements and the lifetimes of the beams on the surface. This may be important for increasing the exchange reactive scattering of molecules from crystal surfaces

  20. Beam Diagnostics for Laser Undulator Based on Compton Backward Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroda, R

    2005-01-01

    A compact soft X-ray source is required in various research fields such as material and biological science. The laser undulator based on Compton backward scattering has been developed as a compact soft X-ray source for the biological observation at Waseda University. It is performed in a water window region (250eV - 500 eV) using the interaction between 1047 nm Nd:YLF laser (10ps FWHM) and about 5 MeV high quality electron beam (10ps FWHM) generated from rf gun system. The range of X-ray energy in the water window region has K-shell absorption edges of Oxygen, Carbon and Nitrogen, which mainly constitute of living body. Since the absorption coefficient of water is much smaller than the protein's coefficient in this range, a dehydration of the specimens is not necessary. To generate the soft X-ray pulse stably, the electron beam diagnostics have been developed such as the emittance measurement using double slit scan technique, the bunch length measurement using two frequency analysis technique. In this confere...

  1. Beam and experiments summary [neutrino studies

    CERN Document Server

    Blondel, A; Campanelli, M; Cervera-Villanueva, Anselmo; Cline, David B; Collot, J; De Jong, M; Donini, Andrea; Dydak, Friedrich; Edgecock, R; Gavela-Legazpi, Maria Belen; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; González-Garciá, M Concepción; Gruber, P; Harris, D A; Hernández, Pilar; Kuno, Y; Litchfield, P J; McFarland, K; Mena, O; Migliozzi, P; Palladino, Vittorio; Panman, J; Papadopoulos, I M; Para, A; Peña-Garay, C; Pérez, P; Rigolin, Stefano; Romanino, Andrea; Rubbia, André; Strolin, P; Wojcicki, S G

    2000-01-01

    The discovery of neutrino oscillations marks a major milestone in the history of neutrino physics, and opens a new window to the still mysterious origin of masses and flavour mixing. Many current and forthcoming experiments will. Answer open questions; however, a major step forward, up to and possibly including CP violation in the neutrino-mixing matrix, requires the neutrino beams from a neutrino factory. The neutrino factory is a new concept for producing neutrino beams of unprecedented quality in terms of intensity, flavour composition, and precision of the beam parameters. Most importantly, the neutrino factory is the only known way to generate a high- intensity beam of electron neutrinos of high energy. The neutrino beam from a neutrino factory, in particular the electron-neutrino beam, enables the exploration of otherwise inaccessible domains in neutrino oscillation physics by exploiting baselines of planetary dimensions. Suitable detectors pose formidable challenges but seem within reach with only mode...

  2. Cryogen free cryostat for neutron scattering experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichek, O.; Down, R. B. E.; Manuel, P.; Keeping, J.; Bowden, Z. A.

    2014-12-01

    Most very low temperature (below 1K) experiments at advanced neutron facilities are based on dilution and 3He refrigerator inserts used with Orange cryostats, or similar systems. However recent increases in the cost of liquid helium caused by global helium supply problems, has raised significant concern about the affordability of such cryostats. Here we present the design and test results of a cryogen free top-loading cryostat with a standard KelvinoxVT® dilution refrigerator insert which provides sample environment for neutron scattering experiments in the temperature range 35 mK - 300 K. The dilution refrigerator insert operates in a continuous regime. The cooling time of the insert is similar to one operated in the Orange cryostat. The main performance criteria such as base temperature, cooling power, and circulation rate are compatible with the technical specification of a standard dilution refrigerator. In fact the system offers operating parameters very similar to those of an Orange cryostat, but without the complication of cryogens. The first scientific results obtained in ultra-low temperature neutron scattering experiment with this system are also going to be discussed.

  3. Crystalline beams: Theory, experiments, and proposals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1995-12-31

    Crystalline Beams are an ordered state of an ensemble of ions, circulating in a storage ring, with very small velocity fluctuations. They can be obtained from ordinary warm ion beams with the application of intense cooling techniques (stochastic, electron, laser). A phase transition occurs when sufficiently small velocity spreads are reached, freezing the particle-to-particle spacing in strings, Zigzags, and helices ... The properties and the feasibility of Crystalline Beams depend on the choice of the lattice of the Storage Ring. There are three issues closely related to the design of the Storage Ring; namely: the determination of Equilibrium Configurations, Confinement Conditions, and Stability Conditions. Of particular concern is the effect of the trajectory curvature and of the beam momentum spread, since they set the requirements on the amount of momentum cooling, on the focussing, and on the distribution of bending in the lattice of the storage ring. The practical demonstration of Crystalline Beams may create the basis for an advanced technology for particle accelerators, where the limitations due to Coulomb intrabeam scattering and space-charge forces would finally be brought under control, so that beams of ions, more dense than normal, can be achieved for a variety of new applications.

  4. Crystalline beams: Theory, experiments, and proposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1995-01-01

    Crystalline Beams are an ordered state of an ensemble of ions, circulating in a storage ring, with very small velocity fluctuations. They can be obtained from ordinary warm ion beams with the application of intense cooling techniques (stochastic, electron, laser). A phase transition occurs when sufficiently small velocity spreads are reached, freezing the particle-to-particle spacing in strings, Zigzags, and helices ... The properties and the feasibility of Crystalline Beams depend on the choice of the lattice of the Storage Ring. There are three issues closely related to the design of the Storage Ring; namely: the determination of Equilibrium Configurations, Confinement Conditions, and Stability Conditions. Of particular concern is the effect of the trajectory curvature and of the beam momentum spread, since they set the requirements on the amount of momentum cooling, on the focussing, and on the distribution of bending in the lattice of the storage ring. The practical demonstration of Crystalline Beams may create the basis for an advanced technology for particle accelerators, where the limitations due to Coulomb intrabeam scattering and space-charge forces would finally be brought under control, so that beams of ions, more dense than normal, can be achieved for a variety of new applications

  5. Probing the phase of the elastic pp scattering amplitude with vortex proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, I. P. [IFPA, Universite de Liege, Allee du 6 Aout 17, batiment B5a, 4000 Liege, Belgium Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Koptyug avenue 4, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15

    We show that colliding vortex proton beams instead of (approximate) plane waves can lead to a direct measurement of how the overall phase of the scattering amplitude changes with the scattering angle. In elastic pp scattering, this will open a novel way to measure the parameter {rho}(t) and probe the real part of the Pomeron.

  6. Summary -- Experiments with Radioactive Beams Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, D.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wiescher, M. [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States)

    1992-12-31

    During the course of the workshop, a wide range of futuristic radioactive-beam experiments were discussed. These extended from the study of electroweak interactions in nuclei to materials science, nuclear astrophysics, and a host of nuclear physics investigations. Emphasis was placed on illustrating how these prototypical experiments could be done, discussing what types of detection systems would be needed, exploring the new problems which would be confronting the radioactive beam experimenter, and better defining the beam requirements. Contained herein is a summary of these discussions.

  7. Operational experience with SLAC's beam containment electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constant, T.N.; Crook, K.; Heggie, D.

    1977-03-01

    Considerable operating experience was accumulated at SLAC with an extensive electronic system for the containment of high power accelerated beams. Average beam power at SLAC can approach 900 kilowatts with the potential for burning through beam stoppers, protection collimators, and other power absorbers within a few seconds. Fast, reliable, and redundant electronic monitoring circuits have been employed to provide some of the safeguards necessary for minimizing the risk to personnel. The electronic systems are described, and the design philosophy and operating experience are discussed

  8. Studies on ion scattering and sputtering processes relevant to ion beam sputter deposition of multicomponent thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auciello, O.; Ameen, M.S.; Kingon, A.I.

    1989-01-01

    Results from computer simulation and experiments on ion scattering and sputtering processes in ion beam sputter deposition of high Tc superconducting and ferroelectric thin films are presented. It is demonstrated that scattering of neutralized ions from the targets can result in undesirable erosion of, and inert gas incorporation in, the growing films, depending on the ion/target atom ass ratio and ion beam angle of incidence/target/substrate geometry. The studies indicate that sputtering Kr + or Xe + ions is preferable to the most commonly used Ar + ions, since the undesirable phenomena mentioned above are minimized for the first two ions. These results are used to determine optimum sputter deposition geometry and ion beam parameters for growing multicomponent oxide thin films by ion beam sputter-deposition. 10 refs., 5 figs

  9. Determination of electron beam parameters by means of laser-Compton scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Chouffani

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Laser-Compton scattering (LCS experiments were carried out at the Idaho Accelerator Center using the 5 ns (FWHM and 22 MeV electron beam. The electron beam was brought to an approximate head-on collision with a 29 MW, 7 ns (FWHM, 10 Hz Nd:YAG laser. Clear and narrow x-ray peaks resulting from the interaction of relativistic electrons with the Nd:YAG laser second harmonic line at 532 nm were observed. We have developed a relatively new method of using LCS as a nonintercepting electron beam monitor. Our method focused on the variation of the shape of the LCS spectrum rather than the LCS intensity as a function of the observation angle in order to extract the electron beam parameters at the interaction region. The electron beam parameters were determined by making simultaneous fits to spectra taken across the LCS x-ray cone. This scan method allowed us also to determine the variation of LCS x-ray peak energies and spectral widths as a function of the detector angles. Experimental data show that in addition to being viewed as a potential bright, tunable, and quasimonochromatic x-ray source, LCS can provide important information on the electron beam pulse length, direction, energy, angular and energy spread. Since the quality of LCS x-ray peaks, such as degree of monochromaticity, peak energy and flux, depends strongly on the electron beam parameters, LCS can therefore be viewed as an important nondestructive tool for electron beam diagnostics.

  10. Enhanced Thomson scattering theory applied to eight experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, A.; Short, R.W.; Seka, W.; Goldman, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    The onset of an instability, such as the 2ω/sub p/ at the n/sub c//4 surface, usually leads to wave breaking and the emission of hot electron pulses which can profoundly influence instability thresholds and scattering behavior elsewhere in the plasma. In particular, enhanced Thomson scattering (via the plasma line) can occur, and this has been used to explain the observation of the SRS instability well below the theoretical threshold. A simple model of the hot electron pulses based on measured values of the hot and cold electron temperatures, T/sub h/ and T/sub c/, has yielded good agreement with experimental observation of the Raman spectral frequency bands. The agreement has continued, even for experiments which are clearly above the SRS threshold, with the enhanced noise likely acting as a ''seed'' for the SRS growth. We will show details of the successful comparison of this theory with six experiments carried out on SHIVA, ARGUS, NOVETTE(2), and GDL(2), and also with an upscattering feature seen at Garching. In addition, a recent experiment using 6 beams of OMEGA (at 0.35μ) will be discussed, and compared with the theory. The report is comprised of viewgraphs of the talks

  11. Transverse Beam Spin Asymmetries in Forward-Angle Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Armstrong; Francois Arvieux; Razmik Asaturyan; Todd Averett; Stephanie Bailey; Guillaume Batigne; Douglas Beck; Elizabeth Beise; Jay Benesch; Louis Bimbot; James Birchall; Angela Biselli; Peter Bosted; Elodie Boukobza; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; Robert Carr; Nicholas Chant; Yu-Chiu Chao; Swapan Chattopadhyay; Russell Clark; Silviu Covrig; Anthony Cowley; Daniel Dale; Charles Davis; Willie Falk; John Finn; Tony Forest; Gregg Franklin; Christophe Furget; David Gaskell; Joseph Grames; Keith Griffioen; Klaus Grimm; Benoit Guillon; Hayko Guler; Lars Hannelius; Richard HASTY; Alice Hawthorne Allen; Tanja Horn; Kathleen Johnston; Mark Jones; Peter Kammel; Reza Kazimi; Paul King; Ameya Kolarkar; Elie Korkmaz; Wolfgang Korsch; Serge Kox; Joachim Kuhn; Jeff Lachniet; Lawrence Lee; Jason Lenoble; Eric Liatard; Jianglai Liu; Berenice Loupias; Allison Lung; Dominique Marchand; Jeffery Martin; Kenneth McFarlane; David McKee; Robert McKeown; Fernand Merchez; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Bryan Moffit; M. Morlet; Itaru Nakagawa; Kazutaka Nakahara; Retief Neveling; Silvia Niccolai; S. Ong; Shelley Page; Vassilios Papavassiliou; Stephen Pate; Sarah Phillips; Mark Pitt; Benard Poelker; Tracy Porcelli; Gilles Quemener; Brian Quinn; William Ramsay; Aamer Rauf; Jean-Sebastien Real; Julie Roche; Philip Roos; Gary Rutledge; Jeffery Secrest; Neven Simicevic; Gregory Smith; Damon Spayde; Samuel Stepanyan; Marcy Stutzman; Vince Sulkosky; Vincent Sulkosky; Vince Sulkosky; Vincent Sulkosky; Vardan Tadevosyan; Raphael Tieulent; Jacques Van de Wiele; Willem van Oers; Eric Voutier; William Vulcan; Glen Warren; Steven Wells; Steven Williamson; Stephen Wood; Chen Yan; Junho Yun; Valdis Zeps

    2007-08-01

    We have measured the beam-normal single-spin asymmetry in elastic scattering of transversely-polarized 3 GeV electrons from unpolarized protons at Q^2 values of 0.15 and 0.25 (GeV/c)^2 with results of A_n = -4.06 +- 0.99(stat) +- 0.63(syst) and A_n = -4.82 +- 1.87(stat) +- 0.98(syst) ppm. These results are inconsistent with calculations solely using the elastic nucleon intermediate state, and generally agree with calculations with significant inelastic hadronic intermediate state contributions. A_n provides a direct probe of the imaginary component of the two-photon exchange amplitude, the complete description of which is important in the interpretation of data from precision electron-scattering experiments.

  12. Narrow-band photon beam via laser Compton scattering in an energy recovery linac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Akagi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Narrow-bandwidth photon beams in the x-ray and γ-ray energy ranges are expected to be applied in various fields. An energy recovery linac (ERL-based laser Compton scattering (LCS source employing a laser enhancement cavity can produce a high-flux and narrow-bandwidth photon beam. We conducted the first experiment of an ERL-based LCS source in combination with a laser enhancement cavity. We obtained LCS photons with an energy of 6.95±0.01  keV by colliding an electron beam of 20 MeV with a laser of 1064 nm wavelength. The photon flux at the interaction point was evaluated to be (2.6±0.1×10^{7}  photons/s with an average beam current of 58  μA and an average laser power of 10 kW. The energy bandwidth was evaluated to be 0.4% (rms with an opening angle of 0.14 mrad. The technologies demonstrated in this experiment are applicable for future ERL-based LCS sources.

  13. A novel technique for determining luminosity in electron-scattering/positron-scattering experiments from multi-interaction events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; O'Connor, C.; Bernauer, J. C.; Milner, R.

    2018-01-01

    The OLYMPUS experiment measured the cross-section ratio of positron-proton elastic scattering relative to electron-proton elastic scattering to look for evidence of hard two-photon exchange. To make this measurement, the experiment alternated between electron beam and positron beam running modes, with the relative integrated luminosities of the two running modes providing the crucial normalization. For this reason, OLYMPUS had several redundant luminosity monitoring systems, including a pair of electromagnetic calorimeters positioned downstream from the target to detect symmetric Møller and Bhabha scattering from atomic electrons in the hydrogen gas target. Though this system was designed to monitor the rate of events with single Møller/Bhabha interactions, we found that a more accurate determination of relative luminosity could be made by additionally considering the rate of events with both a Møller/Bhabha interaction and a concurrent elastic ep interaction. This method was improved by small corrections for the variance of the current within bunches in the storage ring and for the probability of three interactions occurring within a bunch. After accounting for systematic effects, we estimate that the method is accurate in determining the relative luminosity to within 0.36%. This precise technique can be employed in future electron-proton and positron-proton scattering experiments to monitor relative luminosity between different running modes.

  14. Angular scattering of an Airy beam light sheet by a concentric sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhaolou; Zhai, Chunjie

    2017-11-01

    Angular distribution of scattered light by a particle reveals information of its topology and refractive index, which has been proved to be an effective method to identify and characterize the particle. In this paper, numerical study on angular scattering of a polarized one-dimensional Airy beam light sheet by concentric spheres is presented. Plane-wave spectrum method is adopted to simplify the problem into classic Mie scattering problem, which significantly improves computational efficiency. The effects of size parameters, refractive index and position of concentric spheres and Airy beam radius on the angular distribution of scattered light are investigated. This paper provides theoretical results for light scattering measurement where Airy beam light sheet is employed for reducing effects of multiple scattering.

  15. Scattering by two spheres: Theory and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnø, Irina; Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1998-01-01

    of suspended sediments. The scattering properties of single regular-shaped particles have been studied in depth by several authors in the past. However, single particle scattering cannot explain all features of scattering by suspended sediment. When the concentration of particles exceeds a certain limit......, multiple particle scattering becomes important. As a first step in the investigation of mutual interactions between several particles, the acoustical scattering by two spheres has been studied theoretically and experimentally and the results are reported in this paper. The study has mainly been focused...... on three issues: (1) to develop a simplified theory for scattering by two elastical spheres; (2) to measure the scattering by two spheres in a water tank, and (3) to compare the theoretical/numerical results with the measured data. A number of factors influencing multiple scattering, including...

  16. Optical vortex beam transmission with different OAM in scattering beads and brain tissue media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W. B.; Shi, Lingyan; Lindwasser, Lukas; Marque, Paulo; Lavery, M. P. J.; Alfano, R. R.

    2016-03-01

    Light transmission of Laguerre Gaussian (LG) vortex beams with different orbital angular momentum (OAM) values (L) in scattering beads and mouse brain tissue media were experimentally investigated for the first time in comparison with Gaussian (G) beams. The LG beams with different OAM were generated using a spatial light modulator (SLM) in reflection mode. The scattering beads media consist of various sizes and concentrations of latex beads in water solutions. The transmissions of LG and G beams through scattering beads and brain tissue media were measured with different ratios of sample thicknesses (z) to scattering mean free path (ls) of the turbid media, z/ls. The results indicate that within the ballistic region where z/ls is small, the LG and G beams show no significant difference, while in the diffusive region where z/ls is higher, the vortex beams show higher transmission than G beams. In the diffusive region, the LG beams with higher L values show higher transmission than the beams with lower L values due to the eigen channels in the media. The transition points from the ballistic to diffusive regions for different scattering beads and brain tissue media were studied.

  17. Multipole expansion of Bessel and Gaussian beams for Mie scattering calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J M; Love, G D

    2009-02-01

    Multipole expansions of Bessel and Gaussian beams, suitable for use in Mie scattering calculations, are derived. These results allow Mie scattering calculations to be carried out considerably faster than existing methods, something that is of particular interest for time evolution simulations where large numbers of scattering calculations must be performed. An analytic result is derived for the Bessel beam that improves on a previously published expression requiring the evaluation of an integral. An analogous expression containing a single integral, similar to existing results quoted, but not derived, in literature, is derived for a Gaussian beam, valid from the paraxial limit all the way to arbitrarily high numerical apertures.

  18. Spectrometer magnet for experiment NA4 (deep inelastic muon scattering)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    This is one section of the toroidal-field spectrometer magnet of experiment NA4 (deep inelastic muon scattering), shown here during the installation period and later located in the North Area of the SPS. To see all 4 sections, select 7709201. Igor Savin from Dubna looks at what his lab had provided: the huge iron disks were machined at and provided by Dubna. Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers were installed in the gaps between the packs of 4 disks. When the beam from the SPS struck the target (to the right in this picture), the iron would quickly stop the hadronic shower, whilst the muons would go on, performing oscillations in the toroidal field. NA4 was a CERN-Dubna-Munich-Saclay (later also Bologna) collaboration, spokesman: Carlo Rubbia.

  19. Beam-plasma coupling physics in support of active experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakymenko, K.; Delzanno, G. L.; Roytershteyn, V.

    2017-12-01

    The recent development of compact relativistic accelerators might open up a new era of active experiments in space, driven by important scientific and national security applications. Examples include using electron beams to trace magnetic field lines and establish causality between physical processes occurring in the magnetosphere and those in the ionosphere. Another example is the use of electron beams to trigger waves in the near-Earth environment. Waves could induce pitch-angle scattering and precipitation of energetic electrons, acting as an effective radiation belt remediation scheme. In this work, we revisit the coupling between an electron beam and a magnetized plasma in the framework of linear cold-plasma theory. We show that coupling can occur through two different regimes. In the first, a non-relativistic beam radiates through whistler waves. This is well known, and was in fact the focus of many rockets and space-shuttle campaigns aimed at demonstrating whistler emissions in the eighties. In the second regime, the beam radiates through extraordinary (R-X) modes. Nonlinear simulations with a highly-accurate Vlasov code support the theoretical results qualitatively and demonstrate that the radiated power through R-X modes can be much larger than in the whistler regime. Test-particle simulations in the wave electromagnetic field will also be presented to assess the efficiency of these waves in inducing pitch-angle scattering via wave-particle interactions. Finally, the implications of these results for a rocket active experiment in the ionosphere and for a radiation belt remediation scheme will be discussed.

  20. Quantum Interference of Multiple Beams Induced by Multiple Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Mortensen, N. Asger; Lodahl, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We report on quantum interference induced by the transmission of quantized light through a multiple-scattering medium. We show that entangled states can be created by multiple-scattering and that quantum interference survives disorder averaging.......We report on quantum interference induced by the transmission of quantized light through a multiple-scattering medium. We show that entangled states can be created by multiple-scattering and that quantum interference survives disorder averaging....

  1. Characterisation of the polarised neutron beam at the small angle scattering instrument SANS-I with a polarised proton target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aswal, V.K.; Brandt, B. van den; Hautle, P.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Konter, J.A.; Michels, A.; Piegsa, F.M.; Stahn, J.; Petegem, S. van; Zimmer, O.

    2008-01-01

    A transmission neutron polariser (Fe/Si supermirror) has been successfully implemented in the small angle neutron scattering instrument SANS-I at the SINQ neutron source. The polariser is needed for investigations of magnetic nanostructures as well as for spin contrast variation techniques relying on the spin-dependent neutron scattering length of polarised nuclei. The V-shaped polariser is installed in the first section of the collimator system of the SANS instrument and its performance is optimised for neutrons with a wavelength between 0.5 and 1.0 nm. For a precise polarisation analysis of a beam with selectable incident divergence, such as in SANS experiments, an opaque spin filter is ideal. We used a solid polarised proton target exploiting the strong spin-dependent neutron scattering cross-section of hydrogen and determined the neutron beam polarisation to a precision of δp/p∼0.5% for different collimations in a broad wavelength band

  2. Characterisation of the polarised neutron beam at the small angle scattering instrument SANS-I with a polarised proton target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswal, V. K.; van den Brandt, B.; Hautle, P.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Konter, J. A.; Michels, A.; Piegsa, F. M.; Stahn, J.; Van Petegem, S.; Zimmer, O.

    2008-02-01

    A transmission neutron polariser (Fe/Si supermirror) has been successfully implemented in the small angle neutron scattering instrument SANS-I at the SINQ neutron source. The polariser is needed for investigations of magnetic nanostructures as well as for spin contrast variation techniques relying on the spin-dependent neutron scattering length of polarised nuclei. The V-shaped polariser is installed in the first section of the collimator system of the SANS instrument and its performance is optimised for neutrons with a wavelength between 0.5 and 1.0 nm. For a precise polarisation analysis of a beam with selectable incident divergence, such as in SANS experiments, an opaque spin filter is ideal. We used a solid polarised proton target exploiting the strong spin-dependent neutron scattering cross-section of hydrogen and determined the neutron beam polarisation to a precision of δp/p˜0.5% for different collimations in a broad wavelength band.

  3. Multi-GeV electron-positron beam generation from laser-electron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranic, Marija; Klimo, Ondrej; Korn, Georg; Weber, Stefan

    2018-03-16

    The new generation of laser facilities is expected to deliver short (10 fs-100 fs) laser pulses with 10-100 PW of peak power. This opens an opportunity to study matter at extreme intensities in the laboratory and provides access to new physics. Here we propose to scatter GeV-class electron beams from laser-plasma accelerators with a multi-PW laser at normal incidence. In this configuration, one can both create and accelerate electron-positron pairs. The new particles are generated in the laser focus and gain relativistic momentum in the direction of laser propagation. Short focal length is an advantage, as it allows the particles to be ejected from the focal region with a net energy gain in vacuum. Electron-positron beams obtained in this setup have a low divergence, are quasi-neutral and spatially separated from the initial electron beam. The pairs attain multi-GeV energies which are not limited by the maximum energy of the initial electron beam. We present an analytical model for the expected energy cutoff, supported by 2D and 3D particle-in-cell simulations. The experimental implications, such as the sensitivity to temporal synchronisation and laser duration is assessed to provide guidance for the future experiments.

  4. Self-scattering cross-section of molecules in a beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, Y.S.

    1974-01-01

    Molecular collision cross-section has always been measured by the beam scattering method, or by the measurements of thermal conductivity and/or viscosity coefficient, etc. The cross-section thus obtained has been found to be different, qualitatively, from that of the self-scattering of the molecules moving within a molecular beam. By perturbing the zeroth order solution of the Boltzmann equation with a B-G-K kinetic model for the gas upstream to the orifice, and performing particle scattering calculation for molecules within the beam downstream to the orifice, such self-scattering collision cross-section can be determined from the experimental data of velocity distribution functions of molecules in the beam

  5. A 3% Measurement of the Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry in Forward Angle Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering using the Qweak Setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waidyawansa, Dinayadura Buddhini [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States)

    2013-08-01

    The beam normal single spin asymmetry generated in the scattering of transversely polarized electrons from unpolarized nucleons is an observable of the imaginary part of the two-photon exchange process. Moreover, it is a potential source of false asymmetry in parity violating electron scattering experiments. The Q{sub weak} experiment uses parity violating electron scattering to make a direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton. The targeted 4% measurement of the weak charge of the proton probes for parity violating new physics beyond the Standard Model. The beam normal single spin asymmetry at Q{sub weak} kinematics is at least three orders of magnitude larger than 5 ppb precision of the parity violating asymmetry. To better understand this parity conserving background, the Q{sub weak} Collaboration has performed elastic scattering measurements with fully transversely polarized electron beam on the proton and aluminum. This dissertation presents the analysis of the 3% measurement (1.3% statistical and 2.6% systematic) of beam normal single spin asymmetry in electronproton scattering at a Q2 of 0.025 (GeV/c)2. It is the most precise existing measurement of beam normal single spin asymmetry available at the time. A measurement of this precision helps to improve the theoretical models on beam normal single spin asymmetry and thereby our understanding of the doubly virtual Compton scattering process.

  6. A general framework and review of scatter correction methods in cone beam CT. Part 2: Scatter estimation approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruehrnschopf and, Ernst-Peter; Klingenbeck, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    The main components of scatter correction procedures are scatter estimation and a scatter compensation algorithm. This paper completes a previous paper where a general framework for scatter compensation was presented under the prerequisite that a scatter estimation method is already available. In the current paper, the authors give a systematic review of the variety of scatter estimation approaches. Scatter estimation methods are based on measurements, mathematical-physical models, or combinations of both. For completeness they present an overview of measurement-based methods, but the main topic is the theoretically more demanding models, as analytical, Monte-Carlo, and hybrid models. Further classifications are 3D image-based and 2D projection-based approaches. The authors present a system-theoretic framework, which allows to proceed top-down from a general 3D formulation, by successive approximations, to efficient 2D approaches. A widely useful method is the beam-scatter-kernel superposition approach. Together with the review of standard methods, the authors discuss their limitations and how to take into account the issues of object dependency, spatial variance, deformation of scatter kernels, external and internal absorbers. Open questions for further investigations are indicated. Finally, the authors refer on some special issues and applications, such as bow-tie filter, offset detector, truncated data, and dual-source CT.

  7. Spatial modifications of three-dimensional elliptic Gaussian beam scattered by two-dimensional periodic array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gribovsky

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The diffraction problem of a three-dimensional elliptic p- polarized Gaussian beam on an aperture array of rectangular holes is solved. The new algorithm for the solution of three-dimensional scattering problems of linearly polarized wave beams on two-dimensional periodic structures is offered. The given algorithm allows exploring of wave beams with any allocation of a field on cross section. The case of oblique incidence of linearly polarized elliptic Gaussian wave beam on two-dimensional periodic structure is viewed. As structure the rectangular waveguides phased antenna array is chosen. The elliptic shape of a beam cross section gives the chance to proportion energy of an incident field in a plane of an antenna array in the chosen direction. The frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient intensity for the Gaussian beam is calculated. For the analysis of patterns of the reflected and transmitted beams in a far zone the frequencies on which the strongest interaction between next waveguides channels is observed have been chosen. Dynamics of patterns transformation of the reflected and transmitted beams depending on the form of cross-section and a polarization direction of an incident beam on different frequencies is investigated. It is determined that shape of the pattern of reflected and transmitted beams (symmetry, asymmetry, bifurcation, amplitude, width depends on chosen spatial orientation of the ellipse axes of the cross section in the incident beam. Frequency ranges, in which the form of the reflected and transmitted beams is not Gaussian, are defined. The nature of transformation of the patterns of scattered beams was examined. Narrowing effect of the pattern of transmitted beam and deformation of the pattern of reflected beam is detected. A physical explanation of these effects is given. The results are presented in the form of two- and three-dimensional patterns of the scattered field of beams in the far field.

  8. A small target neutrino deep-inelastic scattering experiment at the first muon collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.A.; McFarland, K.S.

    1998-04-01

    Several different scenarios for neutrino scattering experiments using a neutrino beam from the muon collider complex are discussed. The physics reach of a neutrino experiment at the front end of a muon collider is shown to extend far beyond that of current neutrino experiments, since the high intensity neutrino beams one would see at the muon collider allow for a large flexibility in choosing neutrino targets. Measurements of quark spin, A-dependence of the structure function xF 3 and neutral current chiral couplings to quarks are outlined

  9. Experiments with neutron-rich isomeric beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rykaczewski, K.; Lewitowicz, M.; Pfuetzner, M.

    1998-01-01

    A review of experimental results obtained on microsecond-isomeric states in neutron-rich nuclei produced in fragmentation reactions and studied with SISSI-Alpha-LISE3 spectrometer system at GANIL Caen is given. The perspectives of experiments based on secondary reactions with isomeric beams are presented

  10. The neutrino factory beam and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Blondel, A; Campanelli, M; Cervera-Villanueva, Anselmo; Cline, David B; Collot, J; De Jong, M; Donini, Andrea; Dydak, Friedrich; Edgecock, R; Gavela-Legazpi, Maria Belen; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; González-Garciá, M Concepción; Gruber, P M; Harris, D A; Hernández, Pilar; Kuno, Y; Litchfield, P J; McFarland, K; Mena, O; Migliozzi, P; Palladino, Vittorio; Panman, J; Papadopoulos, I M; Para, A; Peña-Garay, C; Pérez, P; Rigolin, Stefano; Romanino, Andrea; Rubbia, André; Strolin, P; Wojcicki, S G

    2000-01-01

    The discovery of neutrino oscillations marks a major milestone in the history of neutrino physics, and opens a new window to the still mysterious origin of masses and flavour-mixing. Many current and forthcoming experiments will answer open questions; however, a major step forward, up to and possibly including CP violation in the neutrino-mixing matrix, requires the neutrino beams from a \

  11. Electron beam sounding rocket experiments for probing the distant magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemzek, R. J.; Winckler, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Electron accelerators on sounding rockets have injected 8-40-keV electrons on closed magnetospheric tail field lines near 250 km altitude in the northern auroral zone. These beams mirrored at the southern conjugate point ad returned as 'echoes' which were detected on the rocket system. The 20 percent of the beam that returned was sufficient to measure field line lengths and verify magnetospheric magnetic models, to measure fluctuating electric fields, and electron pitch angle scattering (6-10) R(E) distant, and to identify 10-100 V field-aligned potentials above the rocket. The experiment gives new insight into the motion of natural electrons in the outer Van Allen radiation belt.

  12. Crossed-beam experiment for the scattering of low- and intermediate-energy electrons from BF{sub 3}: A comparative study with XF{sub 3} (X = C, N, and CH) molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, M., E-mail: masami-h@sophia.ac.jp; Suga, A.; Kato, H.; Tanaka, H. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Limão-Vieira, P. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Ferreira da Silva, F. [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); García, G. [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-07-14

    Absolute differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron interaction with BF{sub 3} molecules have been measured in the impact energy range of 1.5–200 eV and recorded over a scattering angle range of 15°–150°. These angular distributions have been normalized by reference to the elastic DCSs of the He atom and integrated by employing a modified phase shift analysis procedure to generate integral cross sections (ICSs) and momentum transfer cross sections (MTCSs). The calculations of DCSs and ICSs have been carried out using an independent atom model under the screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR). The present elastic DCSs have been found to agree well with the results of IAM-SCAR calculation above 20 eV, and also with a recent Schwinger multichannel calculation below 30 eV. Furthermore, in the comparison with the XF{sub 3} (X = B, C, N, and CH) molecules, the elastic DCSs reveal a similar angular distribution which are approximately equal in magnitude from 30 to 200 eV. This feature suggests that the elastic scattering is dominated virtually by the 3-outer fluorine atoms surrounding the XF{sub 3} molecules. The vibrational DCSs have also been obtained in the energy range of 1.5–15 eV and vibrational analysis based on the angular correlation theory has been carried out to explain the nature of the shape resonances. Limited experiments on vibrational inelastic scattering confirmed the existence of a shape resonance with a peak at 3.8 eV, which is also observed in the vibrational ICS. Finally, the estimated elastic ICSs, MTCSs, as well as total cross sections are compared with the previous cross section data available.

  13. Beam dump experiments at the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soukas, A.; Bregman, M.; Galik, R.

    1978-01-01

    Searches for the prompt production of weak or semi-strongly interacting particles in a neutrino beam dump and their subsequent interaction or decay were performed at the AGS. The experiment is detailed using the totally active liquid scintillator detector, and mention the results of the spark chamber detector. An exposure of a copper beam dump to two orders of magnitude more protons than in previous searches at 28 GeV has yielded 104 neutrino-like events in the detector. The events from the beam dump are compared directly with those from π and K decay neutrinos produced concurrently in the normal long neutrino decay path following a 15 cm brass target. The characteristics of the events are similar. However, when compared to the rate of events predicted by scaling the 15 cm target yields, the beam dump data show an excess of 45 +- 16 events. The excess events from the beam dump appear to deposit energies greater than or equal to 1 GeV. Their source remains puzzling. Future experiments at the AGS could verify the existence of the effect, decrease the uncertainty in the predicted number of events from 30 to 10% by directly measuring the pion absorption length with a variable density target, search for threshold effects, and measure the sign of the charge of the existing muons. 22 references

  14. The role of off-focus radiation in scatter correction for dedicated cone beam breast CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Linxi; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew; Zhu, Lei

    2018-01-01

    Dedicated cone beam breast CT (CBBCT) suffers from x-ray scatter contamination. We aim to identify the source of the significant difference between the scatter distributions estimated by two recent methods proposed by our group and to investigate its effect on CBBCT image quality. We recently proposed two novel methods of scatter correction for CBBCT, using a library based (LB) technique and a forward projection (FP) model. Despite similar enhancement on CBBCT image qualities, these two methods obtain very different scatter distributions. We hypothesize that the off-focus radiation (OFR) is the contributor and results in nontrivial signals in x-ray projections, which is ignored in the scatter estimation via the LB method. Experiments using a thin wire test tool are designed to study the effect of OFR on CBBCT spatial resolution by measuring the point spread function (PSF) and the modulation transfer function (MTF). A narrow collimator setting is used to suppress the OFR-induced signals. In addition, "PSFs" and "MTFs" are measured on clinical CBBCT images obtained by the LB and FP methods using small calcifications as point sources. The improvement of spatial resolution achieved by suppressing OFR in the wire experiment as well as in the clinical study is quantified by the improvement ratios of PSFs and spatial frequencies at different MTF values. Our hypothesis that OFR causes the imaging difference between the FP and LB methods is verified if these ratios obtained from experimental and clinical data are consistent. In the wire experiment, the results show that suppression of OFR increases the maximum signal of the PSF by about 14% and reduces the full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) by about 12.0%. Similar improvement on spatial resolution is achieved by the FP method compared with the LB method in the patient study. The improvement ratios of spatial frequencies at different MTF values without OFR match very well in both studies at a level of around 16%, with an

  15. Inverse Compton Scattering as a Diagnostic Tool for the Measurement of Electron Beam Energies in Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, A. D. J.

    2003-10-01

    The main emphasis of the diode research project at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) UK is to produce small diameter radiographic spot sizes at high dose to improve the resolution of the transmission radiographs taken during hydrodynamic experiments. Experimental measurements of conditions within the diodes of Pulsed Power driven flash x-ray machines are vital to provide a benchmark for electromagnetic PIC codes such as LSP which are used to develop new diode designs. The potential use of inverse Compton scattering (ICS) as a diagnostic technique in the determination of electron energies within the diode has been investigated. The interaction of a laser beam with a beam of high-energy electrons will create an ICS spectrum of photons. Theoretically, one should be able to glean information on the energies and positions of the electrons from the energy spectrum and differential cross section of the scattered photons. The feasibility of fielding this technique on various diode designs has been explored, and an experimental setup with the greatest likelihood of success is proposed.

  16. Geometry Survey of the Time-of-Flight Neutron-Elastic Scattering (Antonella) Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshinowo, Babatunde O. [Fermilab; Izraelevitch, Federico [Buenos Aires U.

    2016-10-17

    The Antonella experiment is a measurement of the ionization efficiency of nuclear recoils in silicon at low energies [1]. It is a neutron elastic scattering experiment motivated by the search for dark matter particles. In this experiment, a proton beam hits a lithium target and neutrons are produced. The neutron shower passes through a collimator that produces a neutron beam. The beam illuminates a silicon detector. With a certain probability, a neutron interacts with a silicon nucleus of the detector producing elastic scattering. After the interaction, a fraction of the neutron energy is transferred to the silicon nucleus which acquires kinetic energy and recoils. This kinetic energy is then dissipated in the detector producing ionization and thermal energy. The ionization produced is measured with the silicon detector electronics. On the other hand, the neutron is scattered out of the beam. A neutron-detector array (made of scintillator bars) registers the neutron arrival time and the scattering angle to reconstruct the kinematics of the neutron-nucleus interaction with the time-of-flight technique [2]. In the reconstruction equations, the energy of the nuclear recoil is a function of the scattering angle with respect to the beam direction, the time-of-flight of the neutron and the geometric distances between components of the setup (neutron-production target, silicon detector, scintillator bars). This paper summarizes the survey of the different components of the experiment that made possible the off-line analysis of the collected data. Measurements were made with the API Radian Laser Tracker and I-360 Probe Wireless. The survey was completed at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, USA in February 2015.

  17. Scattering of flexural waves in Euler-Bernoulli beams by short-range potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Iermakova, Sofia V.; Gaididei, Yuri B.

    2018-01-01

    Time-harmonic flexural waves on a beam and on two elastically coupled beams with short-range localized imperfections in the mass distribution and in the position dependant coupling are considered. Thus scattering of an incident wave solution to the Euler-Bernoulli equation by a Dirac delta function...

  18. Angular scattering in electron capture and loss D- beam formation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggiola, M.J.; Hodges, R.V.; Huestis, D.L.; Peterson, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The development of high energy (> 150 keV) neutral beams for heating and fueling magnetic fusion devices depends on the ability to produce well-collimated negative ion beams. The double capture charge-exchange technique is a known, scalable method. In order to maximize the overall efficiency of the process and to achieve the desired beam characteristics, it is necessary to examine the optical qualities of the beams as well as the total efficiency of beam production. A combined modeling and experimental study of the angular scattering effects in negative ion formation and loss processes has therefore been undertaken

  19. Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry in Forward Angle Inelastic Electron-Proton Scattering using the Q-Weak Apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ., Nuruzzaman [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The Q-weak experiment in Hall-C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has made the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton through the precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at low momentum transfer. There is also a parity conserving Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry or transverse asymmetry (B_n) on H_2 with a sin(phi)-like dependence due to two-photon exchange. If the size of elastic B_n is a few ppm, then a few percent residual transverse polarization in the beam, combined with small broken azimuthal symmetries in the detector, would require a few ppb correction to the Q-weak data. As part of a program of B_n background studies, we made the first measurement of B_n in the N-to-Delta(1232) transition using the Q-weak apparatus. The final transverse asymmetry, corrected for backgrounds and beam polarization, was found to be B_n = 42.82 ± 2.45 (stat) ± 16.07 (sys) ppm at beam energy E_beam = 1.155 GeV, scattering angle theta = 8.3 deg, and missing mass W = 1.2 GeV. B_n from electron-nucleon scattering is a unique tool to study the gamma^* Delta Delta form factors, and this measurement will help to improve the theoretical models on beam normal single spin asymmetry and thereby our understanding of the doubly virtual Compton scattering process. To help correct false asymmetries from beam noise, a beam modulation system was implemented to induce small position, angle, and energy changes at the target to characterize detector response to the beam jitter. Two air-core dipoles separated by ~10 m were pulsed at a time to produce position and angle changes at the target, for virtually any tune of the beamline. The beam energy was modulated using an SRF cavity. The hardware and associated control instrumentation will be described in this dissertation. Preliminary detector sensitivities were extracted which helped to reduce the width of the measured asymmetry. The beam modulation system

  20. Small angle neutron scattering experiment and raw data reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Guohai; Li Tianfu; Zhang Li; Wang Yu; Wang Hongli; Liu Xiangfeng

    2010-01-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique is a powerful tool for nanometer structural analysis of materials. The process of SANS measurement, and the raw data reduction, is relatively complicated. In order to obtain the absolute SANS intensity, one needs to measure intensities of the incident and scattered beams, the sample transmission, the background, the scattering and transmission of the empty cell etc. If a wide scattering vector range is needed, one has to measure the same sample under different instrument configurations. Also, a large number of data treatments are needed before one obtains the SANS data for further analysis. In this paper, after a short introduction to the SANS basic theory and the experimental system, we focus on the raw data reduction method, in which the averaging and the combination of the isotropically scattered data are discussed in detail. (authors)

  1. Future experiments with super neutrino beams

    CERN Document Server

    Nakaya, T

    2003-01-01

    The recent status of future neutrino experiments with super neutrino beams is summarized in this paper. Physics motivations of the neutrino experiments are the discovery of nu /sub mu / to nu /sub e/ oscillation and the measurement of the mixing angle theta /sub 13/, the precise measurement of neutrino oscillation parameters, theta /sub 23/ and Delta m/sub 23//sup 2/, the determination of the sign of Delta m/sub 23//sup 2/, and the search for CP violation in neutrino oscillation as an ultimate goal. In order to achieve the physics goals, several neutrino experiments with super neutrino beams are proposed all over the world; the JHF-Kamioka project in Japan, several experiments in the United States, and the CERN SPL and the CERN SPL+ beta beam projects in Europe. The physics sensitivity of these experiments are typically theta /sub 13/ ~ 0.001, the precision of theta /sub 23/ at 1% level, the precision of Delta m/sub 23//sup 2 / at 1 * 10/sup -4/ eV/sup 2/, and the sensitivity of the CP violation phase, delta ...

  2. Closed form formula for Mie scattering of nonparaxial analogues of Gaussian beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Nicole J; Alonso, Miguel A

    2008-04-14

    A closed form formula is found for the Mie scattering coefficients of incident complex focus beams (which are a nonparaxial generalization of Gaussian beams) with any numerical aperture. This formula takes the compact form of multipoles evaluated at a single complex point. Included are the cases of incident scalar fields as well as electromagnetic fields with many polarizations, such as linear, circular, azimuthal and radial. Examples of incident radially and azimuthally polarized beams are presented.

  3. Measurement of the SMC muon beam polarisation using the asymmetry in the elastic scattering off polarised electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, D; Adeva, B; Akdogan, T; Arik, E; Arvidson, A; Badelek, B; Bardin, G; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; Birsa, R; Björkholm, P; Bonner, B E; De Botton, N R; Boutemeur, M; Bradamante, Franco; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Bültmann, S; Burtin, E; Cavata, C; Clocchiatti, M; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dalla Torre, S; Van Dantzig, R; Derro, B R; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Dulya, C M; Dyring, A; Eichblatt, S; Faivre, Jean-Claude; Fasching, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Forthmann, S; Frois, Bernard; Gallas, A; Garzón, J A; Gatignon, L; Gaussiran, T; Gilly, H; Giorgi, M A; von Goeler, E; Görtz, S; Golutvin, I A; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Haft, K; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kabuss, E M; Kageya, T; Karev, A G; Kessler, H J; Ketel, T; Kiryluk, J; Kiryushin, Yu T; Kishi, A; Kiselev, Yu F; Klostermann, L; Krämer, Dietrich; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kröger, W; Kukhtin, V V; Kurek, K; Kyynäräinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Le Goff, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Lindqvist, T; Litmaath, M; Loewe, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Marie, F; Martin, A; Martino, J; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B W; McCarthy, J S; Medved, K S; Meyer, W T; Van Middelkoop, G; Miller, D; Miyachi, Y; Mori, K; Moromisato, J H; Nagaitsev, A P; Nassalski, J P; Naumann, Lutz; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J; Ogawa, A; Ozben, C; Pereira, H; Perrot-Kunne, F; Peshekhonov, V D; Piegaia, R; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S K; Pló, M; Pose, D; Postma, H; Pretz, J; Pussieux, T; Rädel, G; Rijllart, A; Reicherz, G; Roberts, J B; Rock, S E; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, Ewa; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sabo, I; Saborido, J; Sandacz, A; Savin, I A; Schiavon, R P; Schiller, A; Schüler, K P; Seitz, R; Semertzidis, Y K; Sergeev, S; Shanahan, P; Sichtermann, E P; Simeoni, F; Smirnov, G I; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Stiegler, U; Stuhrmann, H B; Szleper, M; Tessarotto, F; Thers, D; Tlaczala, W; Tripet, A; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, Rüdiger; Whitten, C; Windmolders, R; Willumeit, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Ylöstalo, J; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K; Zamiatin, N I; Zhao, J

    2000-01-01

    A muon beam polarimeter was built for the SMC experiment at the CERN SPS, for beam energies of 100 and 190 GeV. The beam polarisation is determined from the asymmetry in the elastic scattering off the polarised electrons of a ferromagnetic target whose magnetisation is periodically reversed. At muon energies of 100 and 190~GeV the measured polarisation is $P_{\\mu}=-0.80 \\pm 0.03 (stat.)\\pm 0.02 (syst.)$ and $P_{\\mu}=-0.797 \\pm 0.011 (stat.)\\pm 0.012 (syst.)$, respectively. These results agree with measurements of the beam polarisation using a shape analysis of the decay positron energy spectrum.

  4. Arbitrary scattering of an acoustical Bessel beam by a rigid spheroid with large aspect-ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhixiong; Li, Wei; Mitri, Farid G.; Chai, Yingbin; Zhao, Yao

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the T-matrix (null-field) method is applied to investigate the acoustic scattering by a large-aspect-ratio rigid spheroid immersed in a non-viscous fluid under the illumination of an unbounded zeroth-order Bessel beam with arbitrary orientation. Based on the proposed method, a MATLAB software package is constructed accordingly, and then verified and validated to compute the acoustic scattering by a rigid oblate or prolate spheroid in the Bessel beam. Several numerical examples are carried out to investigate the novel phenomenon of acoustic scattering by spheroids in Bessel beams with arbitrary incidence, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e. the ratio of the polar radius over the equatorial radius of the spheroid), the half-cone angle of Bessel beam, the dimensionless frequency, as well as the angle of incidence. The quasi-periodic oscillations are observed in the plots of the far-field backscattering form function modulus versus the dimensionless frequency, owing to the interference between the specular reflection and the Franz wave circumnavigating the spheroid in the surrounding fluid. Furthermore, the 3D far-field scattering directivity patterns at end-on incidence and 2D polar plots at arbitrary angles of incidence are exhibited, which could provide new insights into the physical mechanisms of Bessel beam scattering by flat or elongated spheroid. This research work may provide an impetus for the application of acoustic Bessel beam in engineering practices.

  5. Small-angle neutron-scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, A.D.; Thomas, M.W.; Rouse, K.D.

    1981-04-01

    A brief introduction to the technique of small-angle neutron scattering is given. The layout and operation of the small-angle scattering spectrometer, mounted on the AERE PLUTO reactor, is also described. Results obtained using the spectrometer are presented for three materials (doped uranium dioxide, Magnox cladding and nitrided steel) of interest to Springfields Nuclear Power Development Laboratories. The results obtained are discussed in relation to other known data for these materials. (author)

  6. An analytical formalism to calculate phantom scatter factors for flattening filter free (FFF) mode photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Heeteak; Prado, Karl L; Yi, Byong Yong

    2014-01-01

    Phantom Scatter Factors, Sp in the Khan formalism (Khan et al 1980 J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 6 745–51) describe medium-induced changes in photon-beam intensity as a function of size of the beam. According to the British Journal of Radiology, Supplement 25, megavoltage phantom scatter factors are invariant as a function of photon-beam energy. However, during the commissioning of an accelerator with flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams (Varian TrueBeam TM  6-MV FFF and 10-MV FFF), differences were noted in phantom scatter between the filtered beams and FFF-mode beams. The purpose of this work was to evaluate this difference and provide an analytical formalism to explain the phantom scatter differences between FFF-mode and the filtered mode. An analytical formalism was devised to demonstrate the source of phantom scatter differences between the filtered and the FFF-mode beams. The reason for the differences in the phantom scatter factors between the filtered and the FFF-mode beams is hypothesized to be the non-uniform beam profiles of the FFF-mode beams. The analytical formalism proposed here is based on this idea, taking the product of the filtered phantom scatter factors and the ratio of the off-axis ratio between the FFF-mode and the filtered beams. All measurements were performed using a Varian TrueBeam TM  linear accelerator with photon energies of 6-MV and 10-MV in both filtered and FFF-modes. For all measurements, a PTW Farmer type chamber and a Scanditronix CC04 cylindrical ionization were used. The in-water measurements were made at depth dose maximum and 100 cm source-to-axis distance. The in-air measurements were done at 100 cm source-to-axis distance with appropriate build-up cap. From these measurements, the phantom scatter factors were derived for the filtered beams and the FFF-mode beams for both energies to be evaluated against the phantoms scatter factors calculated using the proposed algorithm. For 6-MV, the difference between the

  7. Nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries in deeply virtual Compton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Amarian, M.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Augustyniak, W.; Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A.; Avetisyan, E.; Ball, B.; Belostotski, S.; Bianchi, N.; Blok, H. P.; Böttcher, H.; Borissov, A.; Bowles, J.; Bryzgalov, V.; Burns, J.; Capiluppi, M.; Capitani, G. P.; Cisbani, E.; Ciullo, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; Dalpiaz, P. F.; Deconinck, W.; Leo, R. De; Nardo, L. De; Sanctis, E. De; Diefenthaler, M.; Nezza, P. Di; Düren, M.; Ehrenfried, M.; Elbakian, G.; Ellinghaus, F.; Fabbri, R.; Fantoni, A.; Felawka, L.; Frullani, S.; Gabbert, D.; Gapienko, G.; Gapienko, V.; Garibaldi, F.; Gavrilov, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Giordano, F.; Gliske, S.; Guler, H.; Guzey, V.; Haan, S.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hartig, M.; Hasch, D.; Hill, G.; Hillenbrand, A.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Hristova, I.; Imazu, Y.; Ivanilov, A.; Jackson, H. E.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Kaiser, R.; Karyan, G.; Keri, T.; Kinney, E.; Kisselev, A.; Korotkov, V.; Kozlov, V.; Kravchenko, P.; Lagamba, L.; Lamb, R.; Lapikás, L.; Lehmann, I.; Lenisa, P.; López Ruiz, A.; Lorenzon, W.; Lu, X.-G.; Lu, X.-R.; Ma, B.-Q.; Mahon, D.; Makins, N. C. R.; Manaenkov, S. I.; Manfré, L.; Mao, Y.; Marianski, B.; de La Ossa, A. Martinez; Marukyan, H.; Miller, C. A.; Miyachi, Y.; Movsisyan, A.; Muccifora, V.; Murray, M.; Mussgiller, A.; Nappi, E.; Naryshkin, Y.; Nass, A.; Negodaev, M.; Nowak, W.-D.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Perez-Benito, R.; Raithel, M.; Reimer, P. E.; Reolon, A. R.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, A.; Rubin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Schäfer, A.; Schnell, G.; Schüler, K. P.; Shanidze, R.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shutov, V.; Stancari, M.; Statera, M.; Steffens, E.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stewart, J.; Stinzing, F.; Taroian, S.; Terkulov, A.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Vandenbroucke, A.; Haarlem, Y. Van; Hulse, C. Van; Varanda, M.; Veretennikov, D.; Vikhrov, V.; Vilardi, I.; Wang, S.; Yaschenko, S.; Ye, H.; Ye, Z.; Yu, W.; Zeiler, D.; Zihlmann, B.; Zupranski, P.; sHERMES Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    The nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal cross-section asymmetries with respect to charge and longitudinal polarization of the lepton beam is studied for hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons. The observed beam-charge and beam-helicity asymmetries are attributed to the interference between the Bethe-Heitler and the deeply virtual Compton scattering processes. For various nuclei, the asymmetries are extracted for both coherent and incoherent-enriched regions, which involve different (combinations of) generalized parton distributions. For both regions, the asymmetries are compared to those for a free proton, and no nuclear-mass dependence is found.

  8. Nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries in deeply virtual Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Lab. of Physics; Akopov, N. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); Akopov, Z. [DESY, Hamburg (DE)] (and others)

    2009-11-15

    The nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal cross section asymmetries with respect to charge and longitudinal polarization of the lepton beam is studied for hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons. The observed beam-charge and beam-helicity asymmetries are attributed to the interference between the Bethe-Heitler and deeply virtual Compton scattering processes. For various nuclei, the asymmetries are extracted for both coherent and incoherent-enriched regions, which involve different (combinations of) generalized parton distributions. For both regions, the asymmetries are compared to those for a free proton, and no nuclear-mass dependence is found. (orig.)

  9. Scattering of flexural waves in Euler-Bernoulli beams by short-range potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Peter L.; Iermakova, Sofia V.; Gaididei, Yuri B.; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2018-03-01

    Time-harmonic flexural waves on a beam and on two elastically coupled beams with short-range localized imperfections in the mass distribution and in the position dependant coupling are considered. Thus scattering of an incident wave solution to the Euler-Bernoulli equation by a Dirac delta function and its derivative up to order three is studied, and the possible physical interpretations are outlined. Reflected, transmitted and evanescent waves exist, and their scattering data are determined. For δ (x) and δ' (x) , the scattering problem is solved by standard integration. For δ'' (x) and δ''' (x) , the standard integration procedure does not work and solutions are obtained by regularization. In the latter case the scatterer is in general nontransparent and only partially penetrable at discrete resonances. The first few of these as well as their scattering data are determined numerically.

  10. Transfer line scattering model of therapeutic hadron beams and applications to nozzle and gantry optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Palm

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of hadron therapy is growing rapidly with several facilities currently being planned, under construction or in commissioning worldwide. In the “active scanning” irradiation technique, the target is irradiated using a narrow pencil beam that is scanned transversally over the target while the penetration depth is altered with the beam energy. Together, the target dose can thereby be conformed in all three dimensions to the shape of the tumor. For applications where a sharp lateral beam penumbra is required in order to spare critical organs from unwanted dose, beam size blowup due to scattering in on-line beam diagnostic monitors, air gaps and passive elements like the ripple filter must be minimized. This paper presents a model for transverse scattering of therapeutic hadron beams along arbitrary multislab geometries. The conventional scattering formulation, which is only applicable to a drift space, is extended to not only take beam optics into account, but also non-Gaussian transverse beam profiles which are typically obtained from the slow resonant extraction from a synchrotron. This work has been carried out during the design phase of the beam delivery system for MedAustron, an Austrian hadron therapy facility with first patient treatment planned for the end of 2015. Irradiation will be performed using active scanning with proton and carbon ion beams. As a direct application of the scattering model, design choices for the MedAustron proton gantry and treatment nozzles are evaluated with respect to the transverse beam profile at the focal point; in air and at the Bragg peak.

  11. The Thomson scattering experiment pulsed by CO2 laser in FT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartolini, L.; Fornetti, G.; Nardi, M.; Occhionero, G.; Ferri de Collibus, M.

    1987-01-01

    An experiment carried out to measure the plasma ion temperature Tsub(i) in the tokamak FT in Frascati by Collective Thomson Scattering. A tandem laser system generates two single mode beams (10.6μ) one of which is pulsed and amplified up to levels of 5 MW, 1μs and actively frequency locked to a second continuous wave low pressure CO 2 laser. The pulse beam crosses the plasma and the forward scattered light is collected at angles between 1 degrees centigrade and 1.6 degrees centigrade. An heterodyne technique in which the c.w. beam is the local oscillator is used to measure the Doppler enlarged spectral density of the signal. The experimental apparatus is described and the results are reported and discussed

  12. Infrared photodissociation of van der Waals complexes selectively prepared by molecular beam scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, U.; Huisken, Friedrich; Lauenstein, Ch.; Pertsch, Thomas; Sroka, R.

    1988-02-01

    Infrared photodissociation experiments were carried out on (C2H4)n-clusters, which were prepared according to their size by scattering them from a helium beam. The ethylene clusters were dissociated upon absorption of a CO2-laser photon by exciting the nu-7 mode of the monomer. Since an appreciable amount of energy is transferred to the cluster during the collision, the laser photons interact with internally cold or hot clusters depending on whether the interaction is before or after the collision center. The frequency and fluence dependences of the photodissociation cross sections were measured for cold and hot clusters from n=2 to n=6. The spectra of the cold clusters show the same shape and line width for all cluster sizes investigated, while those of the hot clusters are characterized by large variations in shape and line width. The very structured dimer spectrum is explained by the excitation of hot bands.

  13. Light scattering of a Bessel beam by a nucleated biological cell: An eccentric sphere model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia Jie; Han, Yi Ping; Chang, Jiao Yong; Chen, Zhu Yang

    2018-02-01

    Within the framework of generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT), an eccentrically stratified dielectric sphere model illuminated by an arbitrarily incident Bessel beam is applied to investigate the scattering characteristics of a single nucleated biological cell. The Bessel beam propagating in an arbitrary direction is expanded in terms of vector spherical wave functions (VSWFs), where the beam shape coefficients (BSCs) are calculated rigorously in a closed analytical form. The effects of the half-cone angle of Bessel beam, the location of the particle in the beam, the size ratio of nucleus to cell, and the location of the nucleus inside the cell on the scattering properties of a nucleated cell are analyzed. The results provide useful references for optical diagnostic and imaging of particle having nucleated structure.

  14. ISX-B neutral beams and the beam target experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, S.C.; Edmonds, P.H.; Kim, J.; Bush, C.E.; Massengill, L.A.; Overbey, D.R.; Pearce, J.W.

    1980-10-01

    This report describes the hardware and operation of the ISX neutral beamlines as well as an experiment done to verify estimates of the neutral power injected into the tokamak. Tangential coinjection of megawatt levels of 30 to 40-keV neutrals into the tokamak has made the study of high-beta plasmas in ISX possible. These power levels were achieved with high reliability (over 90%) by two neutral beamlines with design power ratings of 900 kW of H/sup 0/ (upgraded to 1.5 MW) each. The neutral beamlines consist of a duoPIGatron plasma generator, acceleration grids, a gas neutralization cell, an ion deflection magnet, beam calorimetry, high-speed helium cryocondensation vacuum pumps, and associated electrical and control systems. The beamlines and their operation are described briefly with an emphasis on their relation to injection into a plasma. Neutral injection geometry with respect to the tokamak is given.

  15. A simple, direct method for x-ray scatter estimation and correction in digital radiography and cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siewerdsen, J.H.; Daly, M.J.; Bakhtiar, B.

    2006-01-01

    X-ray scatter poses a significant limitation to image quality in cone-beam CT (CBCT), resulting in contrast reduction, image artifacts, and lack of CT number accuracy. We report the performance of a simple scatter correction method in which scatter fluence is estimated directly in each projection from pixel values near the edge of the detector behind the collimator leaves. The algorithm operates on the simple assumption that signal in the collimator shadow is attributable to x-ray scatter, and the 2D scatter fluence is estimated by interpolating between pixel values measured along the top and bottom edges of the detector behind the collimator leaves. The resulting scatter fluence estimate is subtracted from each projection to yield an estimate of the primary-only images for CBCT reconstruction. Performance was investigated in phantom experiments on an experimental CBCT benchtop, and the effect on image quality was demonstrated in patient images (head, abdomen, and pelvis sites) obtained on a preclinical system for CBCT-guided radiation therapy. The algorithm provides significant reduction in scatter artifacts without compromise in contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). For example, in a head phantom, cupping artifact was essentially eliminated, CT number accuracy was restored to within 3%, and CNR (breast-to-water) was improved by up to 50%. Similarly in a body phantom, cupping artifact was reduced by at least a factor of 2 without loss in CNR. Patient images demonstrate significantly increased uniformity, accuracy, and contrast, with an overall improvement in image quality in all sites investigated. Qualitative evaluation illustrates that soft-tissue structures that are otherwise undetectable are clearly delineated in scatter-corrected reconstructions. Since scatter is estimated directly in each projection, the algorithm is robust with respect to system geometry, patient size and heterogeneity, patient motion, etc. Operating without prior information, analytical modeling

  16. Investigation of the clinical potential of scattering foil free electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldib, Ahmed; Jin, Lihui; Li, Jinsheng; Ma, C-M Charlie

    2014-02-21

    Electron beam therapy has been an important radiation therapy modality for many decades. Studies have been conducted recently for more efficient and advanced delivery of electron beam radiation therapy. X-ray contamination is a common problem that exists with all of the advanced electron beam therapy techniques such as Bolus Electron conformal therapy, segmented electron conformal therapy, and modulated electron arc therapy. X-ray contamination could add some limitations to the advancement and clinical utility of those electron modalities. It was previously shown in the literature that the scattering foil is one of the major accelerator parts contributing to the generation of bremsstrahlung photons. Thus, in this work we investigate the dosimetric characteristics of scattering foil free (SFF) electron beams and the feasibility of using those beams for breast cancer boosts. The SFF electron beams were modeled and simulated using the Monte Carlo method. CT scans of six previously treated breast patients were used for the treatment plan generation utilizing our in-house Monte Carlo-based treatment planning system. Electron boost plans with conventional beams and the SFF beams were generated, respectively, for all patients. A significant reduction of the photon component was observed with the removal of the primary scattering foil for beam energies higher than 12 MeV. Flatness was greatly affected but the difference in flatness between conventional and SFF beams was much reduced for small cone sizes, which were often used clinically for breast boosts. It was found that the SFF electron beams could deliver high-quality dose distributions as conventional electron beams for boost treatments of the breast with an added advantage of a further reduced dose to the lung and the heart.

  17. Compensators for dose and scatter management in cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, S. A.; Moseley, D. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    The ability of compensators (e.g., bow-tie filters) designed for kV cone-beam computed tomography (CT) to reduce both scatter reaching the detector and dose to the patient is investigated. Scattered x rays reaching the detector are widely recognized as one of the most significant challenges to cone-beam CT imaging performance. With cone-beam CT gaining popularity as a method of guiding treatments in radiation therapy, any methods that have the potential to reduce the dose to patients and/or improve image quality should be investigated. Simple compensators with a design that could realistically be implemented on a cone-beam CT imaging system have been constructed to determine the magnitude of reduction of scatter and/or dose for various cone-beam CT imaging conditions. Depending on the situation, the compensators were shown to reduce x-ray scatter at the detector and dose to the patient by more than a factor of 2. Further optimization of the compensators is a possibility to achieve greater reductions in both scatter and dose

  18. Impact of Various Beam Parameters on Lateral Scattering in Proton and Carbon-ion Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi Loushab, M; Mowlavi, A A; Hadizadeh, M H; Izadi, R; Jia, S B

    2015-12-01

    In radiation therapy with ion beams, lateral distributions of absorbed dose in the tissue are important. Heavy ion therapy, such as carbon-ion therapy, is a novel technique of high-precision external radiotherapy which has advantages over proton therapy in terms of dose locality and biological effectiveness. In this study, we used Monte Carlo method-based Geant4 toolkit to simulate and calculate the effects of energy, shape and type of ion beams incident upon water on multiple scattering processes. Nuclear reactions have been taken into account in our calculation. A verification of this approach by comparing experimental data and Monte Carlo methods will be presented in an upcoming paper. Increasing particle energies, the width of the Bragg curve becomes larger but with increasing mass of particles, the width of the Bragg curve decreases. This is one of the advantages of carbon-ion therapy to treat with proton. The transverse scattering of dose distribution is increased with energy at the end of heavy ion beam range. It can also be seen that the amount of the dose scattering for carbon-ion beam is less than that of proton beam, up to about 160mm depth in water. The distortion of Bragg peak profiles, due to lateral scattering of carbon-ion, is less than proton. Although carbon-ions are primarily scattered less than protons, the corresponding dose distributions, especially the lateral dose, are not much less.

  19. Examining resonant inelastic spontaneous scattering of classical Laguerre-Gauss beams from molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rury, Aaron S.

    2013-04-01

    This paper treats theoretically the spontaneous resonant inelastic scattering of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beams from the vibrations of complex polyatomic molecules within the semiclassical framework. We develop an interaction Hamiltonian that accounts for the position of the molecule within the excitation beam to derive the effective differential scattering cross section of a classical LG beam from a molecule using the frequency-domain third-order nonlinear optical response function. To gain physical insight, we utilize a model vibronic molecule to study the changes to this scattering process. For specific molecular parameters including vibrational frequency and relative displacement of the involved electronic states, this investigation shows that an incident LG beam asymmetrically enhances one of two participating excitation transitions causing modulation of the interference present in the scattering process. This modulation allows a pathway to coherent control of resonant inelastic scattering from complex, polyatomic molecules. We discuss the possible application of this control to the resonant x-ray inelastic scattering (RIXS) of small polyatomic molecules central to applications ranging from single-molecule electronics to solar energy science.

  20. The electron beam dynamics simulation in the laser-electron storage ring involving compton and intrabeam scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladkikh, P.I.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Karnaukhov, I.M.

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the development of intense X-ray sources based on Compton scattering in laser-electron storage rings is discussed. The results of the electron beam dynamics simulation involving Compton and intrabeam scattering are presented

  1. The electron beam dynamics simulation in the laser-electron storage ring involving compton and intrabeam scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Gladkikh, P I; Karnaukhov, I M

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of the development of intense X-ray sources based on Compton scattering in laser-electron storage rings is discussed. The results of the electron beam dynamics simulation involving Compton and intrabeam scattering are presented.

  2. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off a deuterium target at the HERMES experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movsisyan, Aram

    2011-05-01

    Deeply virtual Compton scattering is studied in this report, using all data collected at the HERMES experiment from 1996 to 2005. Azimuthal asymmetries with respect to beam-helicity, beam-charge and target polarization alone and also to their different combinations for hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons in deep-inelastic scattering from a both unpolarized and longitudinally polarized deuterium targets are measured. The asymmetries are attributed to the interference between the deeply virtual Compton scattering and Bethe-Heitler processes. The asymmetries are observed in the exclusive region -(1.5) 2 GeV 2 2 X 2 GeV 2 of the squared missing mass. The dependences of these asymmetries on -t, x N , or Q 2 are investigated. The results include the coherent process ed→edγ and the incoherent process ed→epnγ where in addition a nucleon may be excited to a resonance. For an unpolarized deuterium target, the leading Fourier amplitude of the beam-helicity asymmetry that is sensitive to the interference term is found to be substantial, but no significant t dependence is observed. The leading amplitude of the beam-charge asymmetry is substantial at large -t, but becomes small at small values of -t. The amplitudes of the beam-helicity asymmetry that are sensitive to the squared DVCS term are found to be consistent with zero. The deuteron Compton form factor H 1 appears to have a similar behavior as H of the proton. (orig.)

  3. Neutron detectors for scattering experiments at HANARO

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing various kinds of PSDs to improve the instrument performance and to develop new scattering instruments. Our development work is initiated with 1-D PSD for residual stress analysis spectrometer and finally the technology is extended to development of ...

  4. Interleaved acquisition for cross scatter avoidance in dual cone-beam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, William; Bowsher, James; Li, Hao; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2012-12-01

    Cone-beam x-ray imaging with flat panel detectors is used for target localization in image guided radiation therapy. This imaging includes cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and planar imaging. Use of two orthogonal x-ray systems could reduce imaging time for CBCT, provide simultaneous orthogonal views in planar imaging, facilitate dual-energy methods, and be useful in alleviating cone-beam artifacts by providing two axially offset focal-spot trajectories. However, the potential advantages of a second cone-beam system come at the cost of cross scatter, i.e., scatter of photons originating from one tube into the noncorresponding detector. Herein, cross scatter is characterized for dual cone-beam imaging, and a method for avoiding cross scatter is proposed and evaluated. A prototype dual-source CBCT system has been developed that models the geometry of a gantry-mounted kV imaging device used in radiation therapy. Cross scatter was characterized from 70 to 145 kVp in projections and reconstructed images using this system and three cylindrical phantoms (15, 20, and 30 cm) with a common Catphan core. A novel strategy for avoiding cross scatter in dual CBCT was developed that utilized interleaved data acquisition on each imaging chain. Interleaving, while maintaining similar angular sampling, can be achieved by either doubling the data acquisition rate or, as presented herein, halving the rotation speed. The ratio of cross scatter to the total detected signal was found to be as high as 0.59 in a 30 cm diameter phantom. The measured scatter-to-primary ratio in some cases exceeded 4. In the 30 cm phantom, reconstructed contrast was reduced across all ROIs by an average of 48.7% when cross scatter was present. These cross-scatter degradations were almost entirely avoided by the method of interleaved exposures. Cross scatter is substantial in dual cone-beam imaging, but its effects can be largely removed by interleaved acquisition, which can be achieved at the same angular

  5. Collective Thomson scattering of a high power electron cyclotron resonance heating beam in LHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubo, S.; Nishiura, M.; Tanaka, K.

    2010-01-01

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) system has been constructed at LHD making use of the high power ECRH system in LHD. The necessary features for CTS, high power probing beams and receiving beams, both with well defined Gaussian profile and with the fine controllability, are endowed in the ECRH...... system. The 32 channel radiometer with sharp notch filter at the front end is attached to the ECRH system transmission line as a CTS receiver. The validation of the CTS signal is performed by scanning the scattering volume. A new method to separate the CTS signal from background ECE is developed...

  6. Atomic scattering from an adsorbed monolayer solid with a helium beam that penetrates to the substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Bruch, L.W.; Dammann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Diffraction and one-phonon inelastic scattering of a thermal energy helium atomic beam are evaluated in the situation that the target monolayer lattice is so dilated that the atomic beam penetrates to the interlayer region between the monolayer and the substrate. The scattering is simulated...... by propagating a wavepacket and including the effect of a feedback of the inelastic wave onto the diffracted wave, which represents a coherent re-absorption of the created phonons. Parameters are chosen to be representative of an observed p(1 × 1) commensurate monolayer solid of H2/NaCl(001) and a conjectured p...

  7. The electromagnetic calorimeter in JLab Real Compton Scattering Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert Shahinyan; Eugene Chudakov; A. Danagoulian; P. Degtyarenko; K. Egiyan; V. Gorbenko; J. Hines; E. Hovhannisyan; Ch. Hyde; C.W. de Jager; A. Ketikyan; V. Mamyan; R. Michaels; A.M. Nathan; V. Nelyubin; I. Rachek; M. Roedelbrom; A. Petrosyan; R. Pomatsalyuk; V. Popov; J. Segal; Yu. Shestakov; J. Templon; H. Voskanyan; B. Wojtsekhowski

    2007-04-16

    A hodoscope calorimeter comprising of 704 lead-glass blocks is described. The calorimeter was constructed for use in the JLab Real Compton Scattering experiment. The detector provides a measurement of the coordinates and the energy of scattered photons in the GeV energy range with resolutions of 5 mm and 6\\%/$\\sqrt{E_\\gamma \\, [GeV]}$, respectively. Design features and performance parameters during the experiment are presented.

  8. Constraints on ion beam handling for intersecting beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruse, T.

    1981-01-01

    The intense synchrotron radiation beams from the NSLS uv or x-ray storage rings still do not compare in monochromatized photon flux with a laser beam, a fact which becomes apparent in considering reaction rates for interaction of photon and ion beams. There are two prototypical interaction geometries, parallel and perpendicular. Calculations should properly be done in the rest frame of the ion beam; however, expected beta values are small, so the lab frame will be employed and aberration and Doppler shift effects neglected

  9. Preparation and characterisation of magnetic nanostructured samples for inelastic neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreuzpaintner, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in thin-film structuring techniques have generated significant interest in the dynamics of spin waves in magnetic nanostructures and the possible use of inelastic neutron scattering (INS) for their investigation. This thesis describes the design and implementation, at GKSS Research Centre, of equipment for preparation of large and laterally submicron and nanometre structured magnetic samples for such future INS experiments. After a brief resume on spin waves in nanostructures, the development work on new purpose-designed equipment, including high vacuum (HV) argon ion beam milling and ultra high vacuum (UHV) e-beam evaporation setups, is described. Ni nanodot as well as Ni and novel Gd nanowire samples were prepared using combinations of sputter deposition, laser interference lithography, argon ion beam milling, e-beam evaporation and self organisation techniques. With reference to sample preparation, epitaxial growth studies for Ni on Si(100) substrate were performed, resulting in the development of a new deposition process, which by thermal tuning allows for the direct epitaxial growth of Ni on Si with unprecedented crystalline quality. The results of various characterisation experiments on the prepared nanostructured samples, including Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), microprobe analysis, Atomic and Magnetic Force Microscopy (AFM/MFM), Vibrating Sample Magnetometry (VSM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Reflectivity (XRR), unpolarised and Polarised Neutron Scattering (PNR) and off-specular scattering by X-rays and neutrons using rocking scans and Time-Of-Flight Grazing Incidence Small Angle Neutron Scattering (TOF-GISANS), together with various analysis procedures such as Distorted-Wave Born Approximation (DWBA), are reported. The analysis of a Gd nanowire sample by TOF-GISANS led to a novel evaluation technique which in comparison with single wavelength methods allows portions of reciprocal space to be scanned without changing the angle of

  10. Preparation and characterisation of magnetic nanostructured samples for inelastic neutron scattering experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuzpaintner, Wolfgang

    2010-06-22

    Recent advances in thin-film structuring techniques have generated significant interest in the dynamics of spin waves in magnetic nanostructures and the possible use of inelastic neutron scattering (INS) for their investigation. This thesis describes the design and implementation, at GKSS Research Centre, of equipment for preparation of large and laterally submicron and nanometre structured magnetic samples for such future INS experiments. After a brief resume on spin waves in nanostructures, the development work on new purpose-designed equipment, including high vacuum (HV) argon ion beam milling and ultra high vacuum (UHV) e-beam evaporation setups, is described. Ni nanodot as well as Ni and novel Gd nanowire samples were prepared using combinations of sputter deposition, laser interference lithography, argon ion beam milling, e-beam evaporation and self organisation techniques. With reference to sample preparation, epitaxial growth studies for Ni on Si(100) substrate were performed, resulting in the development of a new deposition process, which by thermal tuning allows for the direct epitaxial growth of Ni on Si with unprecedented crystalline quality. The results of various characterisation experiments on the prepared nanostructured samples, including Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), microprobe analysis, Atomic and Magnetic Force Microscopy (AFM/MFM), Vibrating Sample Magnetometry (VSM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Reflectivity (XRR), unpolarised and Polarised Neutron Scattering (PNR) and off-specular scattering by X-rays and neutrons using rocking scans and Time-Of-Flight Grazing Incidence Small Angle Neutron Scattering (TOF-GISANS), together with various analysis procedures such as Distorted-Wave Born Approximation (DWBA), are reported. The analysis of a Gd nanowire sample by TOF-GISANS led to a novel evaluation technique which in comparison with single wavelength methods allows portions of reciprocal space to be scanned without changing the angle of

  11. Simulation of integrated beam experiment designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grote, D.P.; Sharp, W.M.

    2004-01-01

    Simulation of designs of an Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) class accelerator have been carried out. These simulations are an important tool for validating such designs. Issues such as envelope mismatch and emittance growth can be examined in a self-consistent manner, including the details of injection, accelerator transitions, long-term transport, and longitudinal compression. The simulations are three-dimensional and time-dependent, and begin at the source. They continue up through the end of the acceleration region, at which point the data is passed on to a separate simulation of the drift compression. Results are be presented

  12. Monte Carlo calculation of scattered radiation from applicators in low energy clinical electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabbari, N.; Hashemi-Malayeri, B.; Farajollahi, A. R.; Kazemnejad, A.

    2007-01-01

    In radiotherapy with electron beams, scattered radiation from an electron applicator influences the dose distribution in the patient. The contribution of this radiation to the patient dose is significant, even in modern accelerators. In most of radiotherapy treatment planning systems, this component is not explicitly included. In addition, the scattered radiation produced by applicators varies based on the applicator design as well as the field size and distance from the applicators. The aim of this study was to calculate the amount of scattered dose contribution from applicators. We also tried to provide an extensive set of calculated data that could be used as input or benchmark data for advanced treatment planning systems that use Monte Carlo algorithms for dose distribution calculations. Electron beams produced by a NEPTUN 10PC medical linac were modeled using the BEAMnrc system. Central axis depth dose curves of the electron beams were measured and calculated, with and without the applicators in place, for different field sizes and energies. The scattered radiation from the applicators was determined by subtracting the central axis depth dose curves obtained without the applicators from that with the applicator. The results of this study indicated that the scattered radiation from the electron applicators of the NEPTUN 10PC is significant and cannot be neglected in advanced treatment planning systems. Furthermore, our results showed that the scattered radiation depends on the field size and decreases almost linearly with depth. (author)

  13. Stimulated Raman scattering by an intense relativistic electron beam subjected to a rippled electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekefi, G.; Shefer, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    Generation of submillimeter radiation by stimulated Raman scattering in an intense relativistic electron beam subjected to a spatially periodic transverse electric field is examined. The requisite electric field modulation can be obtained by rippling the wall of the conducting drift tube. When the electron beam is subjected to a periodic longitudinal electric field, short-wavelength plasmons, rather than photons, are generated. The growth rate and other parameters related to this instability are discussed

  14. Precise measurement in elastic electron scattering: HAPPEX and E-158 experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacheret, A.

    2004-12-01

    Parity Violation asymmetry measurements in elastic electron scattering are in one hand an interesting way of retrieving new informations about the sea quarks of the nucleon and in the other hand a powerful test of the Standard Model electroweak sector at low energy. This thesis describes the HAPPEX experiment at JLab and the E-158 experiment at SLAC (USA) which measure de parity violation asymmetries in elastic scattering of polarized electron on nuclei like Hydrogen or Helium and on atomic electrons. With the measurements on hadronic targets one can extract the strange quarks contribution to the charge and current density of the nucleon. With the electron-electron scattering one can test the standard model at the loop level and far from the Z pole by extracting sin 2 θ W . In this thesis we describe the formalism associated with the electroweak probe. We present in detail the experimental methods used to make such precise measurements of parity violation asymmetry. Then, we describe the experimental set-up of each experiment and in particular the electron detector and the feedback loop on the beam current for the HAPPEX experiment and the analysis of E-158 run III with a dedicated systematic study on the beam sub-pulse fluctuations. We present the preliminary results for each experiment with a comparison with the other existing results and the future experiments. (author)

  15. Simulation of a complete inelastic neutron scattering experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, H.; Lefmann, K.; Lake, B.

    2002-01-01

    A simulation of an inelastic neutron scattering experiment on the high-temperature superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4 is presented. The complete experiment, including sample, is simulated using an interface between the experiment control program and the simulation software package (McStas) and is compared...

  16. Scattering and propagation of a Laguerre-Gaussian vortex beam by uniaxial anisotropic bispheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Tan; Wu, Zhensen; Shang, Qingchao; Li, Zhengjun; Wu, Jiaji; Li, Haiying

    2018-04-01

    Within the framework of the generalized multi-particle Mie (GMM) theory, analytical solution to electromagnetic scattering of two interacting homogeneous uniaxial anisotropic spheres by a Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) vortex beam is investigated. The particles with different size and dielectric parameter tensor elements are arbitrarily configured. Based on the continuous boundary conditions at each sphere surface, the interactive scattering coefficients are derived. The internal and near-surface field is investigated to describe the propagation of LG vortex beam through the NaCl crystal. In addition, the far fields of some typical anisotropic medium such as LiNbO3, TiO2 bispheres illuminated by an LG vortex beam are numerically presented in detail to analyze the influence of the anisotropic parameters, sphere positions, separation distance and topological charge etc. The results show that LG vortex beam has a better recovery after interacting with a spherical particle compared with Gaussian beam. The study in the paper are useful for the further research on the scattering and propagation characteristics of arbitrary vortex beam in anisotropic chains and periodic structure.

  17. Plasmonic resonance scattering from silver nanowire illuminated by tightly focused singular beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normatov, Alexander; Spektor, Boris; Leviatan, Yehuda; Shamir, Joseph

    2010-08-15

    We investigate scattering features of tightly focused singular beams by placing a cylindrical nanowire in the vicinity of a line phase singularity. Applying an illumination wavelength corresponding to silver cylinder plasmonic resonance, we compare the scattering response with that of a perfect conductor. The rigorous modeling employs a 2D version of the Richards-Wolf focusing method and the source model technique. It is found that a cylinder with a plasmonic resonance produces a strong scattering response by deflecting the power flow toward the optical singularity region, where otherwise the power approaches zero.

  18. Experiments with radioactive nuclear beams II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilera R, E.F.; Martinez Q, E.; Gomez C, A.; Lizcano C, D.; Garcia M, H.; Rosales M, P.

    2001-12-01

    The studies of nuclear reactions with heavy ions have been carried out for years for the group of heavy ions of the laboratory of the Accelerator of the ININ. Especially in the last years the group has intruded in the studies of nuclear reactions with radioactive beams, frontier theme at world level. Presently Technical Report is presented in detailed form the experimental methods and the analysis procedures of the research activities carried out by the group. The chpater II is dedicated to the procedures used in the analysis of the last two experiments with radioactive beams carried out by the group. In the chapter III is presented the procedure followed to carrying out an extended analysis with the CCDEF code, to consider the transfer channel of nucleons in the description of the fusion excitation functions of a good number of previously measured systems by the group. Finally, in the chapter IV the more important steps to continue in the study of the reaction 12 C + 12 C experiment drifted to be carried out using the available resources of the Tandem Accelerator Laboratory of the ININ are described. At the end of each chapter some of the more representative results obtained in the analysis are presented and emphasis on the scientific production generated by the group for each case is made. (Author)

  19. Electron Beam Final Focus System For Thomson Scattering At Elbe

    CERN Document Server

    Krämer, J.M.; Bødkera, F.; Irman, A.; Jochmann, A.; Kristensena, J.P.; Lehnert, U.; Michel, P.; Schramm, U.; 10.1016/j.nima.2015.10.067

    2016-01-01

    The design of an electron beam final focus system (FFS) aiming for high-flux laser-Thomson backscattering X-ray sources at ELBE is presented. A telescope system consisting of four permanent magnet based quadrupoles was found to have significantly less chromatic aberrations than a quadrupole doublet or triplet as commonly used. Focusing properties like the position of the focal plane and the spot size are retained for electron beam energies between 20 and 30 MeV by adjusting the position of the quadrupoles individually on a motorized stage. The desired ultra-short electron bunches require an increased relative energy spread up to a few percent and, thus, second order chromatic effects must be taken into account. We also present the design and test results of the permanent magnet quadrupoles. Adjustable shunts allow for correction of the field strength and compensation of deviations in the permanent magnet material. For a beam emittance of 13 mm mrad, we predict focal spot sizes of about 40 μm (rms) and diverg...

  20. Electron beam final focus system for Thomson scattering at ELBE

    CERN Document Server

    Krämer, J.M.; Bødker, F.; Irman, A.; .Jochmann A.; Kristensen, J.P.; Lehnert U., HZDR; Michel, P.; Schrammb, U.; 10.1016/j.nima.2015.10.067

    2016-01-01

    The design of an electron beam final focus system (FFS) aiming for high-flux laser-Thomson backscattering X-ray sources at ELBE is presented. A telescope system consisting of four permanent magnet based quadrupoles was found to have significantly less chromatic aberrations than a quadrupole doublet or triplet as commonly used. Focusing properties like the position of the focal plane and the spot size are retained for electron beam energies between 20 and 30 MeV by adjusting the position of the quadrupoles individually on a motorized stage. The desired ultra-short electron bunches require an increased relative energy spread up to a few percent and, thus, second order chromatic effects must be taken into account. We also present the design and test results of the permanent magnet quadrupoles. Adjustable shunts allow for correction of the field strength and compensation of deviations in the permanent magnet material. For a beam emittance of 13 mm mrad, we predict focal spot sizes of about 40 μm (rms) and diverg...

  1. Multiple scattering and attenuation corrections in Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawidowski, J; Blostein, J J; Granada, J R

    2006-01-01

    Multiple scattering and attenuation corrections in Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering experiments are analyzed. The theoretical basis of the method is stated, and a Monte Carlo procedure to perform the calculation is presented. The results are compared with experimental data. The importance of the accuracy in the description of the experimental parameters is tested, and the implications of the present results on the data analysis procedures is examined

  2. Dose contributions from large-angle scattered particles in therapeutic carbon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, Yohsuke; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kase, Yuki; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Komori, Masataka; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Ito, Atsushi; Uchida, Hirohisa

    2007-01-01

    In carbon therapy, doses at center of spread-out Bragg peaks depend on field size. For a small field of 5x5 cm 2 , the central dose reduces to 96% of the central dose for the open field in case of 400 MeV/n carbon beam. Assuming the broad beam injected to the water phantom is made up of many pencil beams, the transverse dose distribution can be reconstructed by summing the dose distribution of the pencil beams. We estimated dose profiles of this pencil beam through measurements of dose distributions of broad uniform beams blocked half of the irradiation fields. The dose at a distance of a few cm from the edge of the irradiation field reaches up to a few percent of the central dose. From radiation quality measurements of this penumbra, the large-angle scattered particles were found to be secondary fragments which have lower LET than primary carbon beams. Carbon ions break up in beam modifying devices or in water phantom through nuclear interaction with target nuclei. The angular distributions of these fragmented nuclei are much broader than those of primary carbon particles. The transverse dose distribution of the pencil beam can be approximated by a function of the three-Gaussian form. For a simplest case of mono-energetic beam, contributions of the Gaussian components which have large mean deviations become larger as the depth in the water phantom increases

  3. Scattering of an ion beam by charged fine particles with Coulomb force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amemiya, H.; Nakamura, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Fine particles satisfying critical limits act as Coulomb forces and scatter charged particles like beams due to the long-range force. Otherwise, fine particles behave as tiny probes. The energy loss and broadening rates of an ion beam by particles having Coulomb fields are investigated where the Coulomb logarithm is taken as a variable. Dependence of the energy loss and broadening on the plasma density, dust charge and beam energy is obtained. A method for measuring the dust surface charge is also given

  4. Beam energy spread in FERMI(at)elettra gun and linac induced by intrabeam scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zholents, Alexander A; Zholents, Alexander A; Zolotorev, Max S.; Penco, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Intrabeam scattering (IBS) of electrons in the pre-cathode area in the electron guns know in the literature as Boersh effect is responsible for a growth of the electron beam energy spread there. Albeit most visible within the electron gun where the electron beam density is large and the energy spread is small, the IBS acts all along the entire electron beam pass through the Linac. In this report we calculate the energy spread induced by IBS in the FERMI(at)elettra electron gun

  5. Quasielastic nucleon scattering using polarized beams and targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusser, O.

    1990-07-01

    Inelastic scattering of polarized intermediate energy nucleons to continuum nuclear states is discussed with emphasis on recent results. Spin momentum correlations of protons in polarized targets of 3 He were observed for the first time. Complete spin observables in (p,p') show effects of the nuclear spin-isospin response and of an NN interaction modified by the nuclear medium. A comparison of Gamow Teller and isovector M1 giant resonance strengths in the sd shell provides evidence for large meson exchange current effects in the M1. (Author) (37 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.)

  6. A novel method for megavoltage scatter correction in cone-beam CT acquired concurrent with rotational irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herk, Marcel; Ploeger, Lennert; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Acquisition of cone-beam CT (CBCT) concurrent with VMAT results in scatter of the megavoltage (MV) beam onto the kilovoltage (kV) detector deteriorating CBCT image quality. The aim of this paper is to develop a method to estimate and correct for MV scatter reaching the kV panel. The correction

  7. Measurement of the polarisation of a muon beam of 190 GeV by scattering on a target of polarised electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtin, Etienne

    1996-01-01

    This research thesis reports the development of a muon-based polarimeter which implements elastic scattering of muons on a target of polarised electrons. In its first part, it describes the deeply inelastic scattering process, and presents the theoretical framework for the interpretation of experimental results. The author describes the experimental installation, and the measurement of the beam polarisation by elastic scattering on a target of polarised electrons. He reports the analysis of data obtained with a 190 GeV beam, the discussion and assessment of error sources, the comparison of these results with other measurements using the muon in-flight disintegration, and with the prediction obtained by the beam line simulation. He finally reports the results of the SMC experiment obtained for the proton and the deuteron, and demonstrates the verification of the Bjorken sum rule

  8. Scatter and leakage contributions to the out-of-field absorbed dose distribution in water phantom around the medical LINAC radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordy, J.M.; Bessiere, I.; Ostrowsky, A.; Poumarede, B.; Sorel, S.; Vermesse, D.

    2013-01-01

    This work is carried out within the framework of EURADOS Working Group 9 (WG9) whose general objective is 'to assess non-target organ doses in radiotherapy and the related risks of second cancers, with the emphasis on dosimetry'. The objective of the present work is to provide reference values (i) to evaluate the current methods of deriving three-dimensional dose distributions in and around the target volume using passive dosimeters, (ii) to derive the leakage dose from the head of the medical linear accelerator (LINAC) and the doses due to scattered radiation from the collimator edges and the body (phantom) itself. Radiation qualities of 6, 12 and 20 MV are used with standard calibration conditions described in IAEA TRS 398 and nonstandard conditions at a reference facility at the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (CEA LIST/LNE LNHB). An ionisation chamber is used to measure profile and depth dose in especially design water phantom built to enable investigation of doses up to 60 cm from the beam axis. A first set of experiments is carried out with the beam passing through the tank. From this first experiment, penumbra and out-of-field dose profiles including water and collimator scatter and leakage are found over three orders of magnitude. Two further sets of experiments using the same experimental arrangement with the beam outside the tank, to avoid water scatter, are designed to measure collimator scatter and leakage by closing the jaws of the collimator. It is shown that the ratios between water scatter, collimator scatter and leakage depend on the photon energy. Depending on the energy, typical leakage and collimator scatter represents 10-40% and 30-50% of the total out-of-field doses respectively. Water scatter decreases with energy while leakage increases with energy, and collimator scatter varies only slowly with energy. (authors)

  9. Determination of scatter factor parameters and electron disequilibrium for monoenergetic photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, J; Bloch, P; Bjärngard, B E

    1999-02-01

    The tissue-phantom-ratio (TPR) is expressed as the product of the phantom scatter factor (SF), an electron disequilibrium factor, and an attenuation factor, equal to the zero-area TPR. The scatter factor, as a function of depth d and field size s, has been described by two parameters a and w, SF(d,s) = 1 + asd/(ws + d). We have determined the parameters a and w for 20 monoenergetic photon beams between 1 and 20 MeV. Pencil-beam energy-deposition kernels were obtained using Monte Carlo simulations. The kernels were used to calculate broad-beam depth-dose data, which were converted to TPR and fitted to the equation above using an iterative search over a-w space. The parameter a is nearly equal to the attenuation coefficient for all energies while the parameter w increases with energy. The resulting a and w compare favorably to values determined for clinical photon beams, as a function of the measured attenuation coefficient. With the scatter factor determined, we isolated the electron disequilibrium factor for each monoenergetic beam. It can be characterized as a quadratic function of the depth. The coefficients of the quadratic function can be related to the range of the most energetic secondary electron produced.

  10. Ultrafast cone-beam CT scatter correction with GPU-based Monte Carlo simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Xu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Scatter artifacts severely degrade image quality of cone-beam CT (CBCT. We present an ultrafast scatter correction framework by using GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC simulation and prior patient CT image, aiming at automatically finish the whole process including both scatter correction and reconstruction within 30 seconds.Methods: The method consists of six steps: 1 FDK reconstruction using raw projection data; 2 Rigid Registration of planning CT to the FDK results; 3 MC scatter calculation at sparse view angles using the planning CT; 4 Interpolation of the calculated scatter signals to other angles; 5 Removal of scatter from the raw projections; 6 FDK reconstruction using the scatter-corrected projections. In addition to using GPU to accelerate MC photon simulations, we also use a small number of photons and a down-sampled CT image in simulation to further reduce computation time. A novel denoising algorithm is used to eliminate MC noise from the simulated scatter images caused by low photon numbers. The method is validated on one simulated head-and-neck case with 364 projection angles.Results: We have examined variation of the scatter signal among projection angles using Fourier analysis. It is found that scatter images at 31 angles are sufficient to restore those at all angles with < 0.1% error. For the simulated patient case with a resolution of 512 × 512 × 100, we simulated 5 × 106 photons per angle. The total computation time is 20.52 seconds on a Nvidia GTX Titan GPU, and the time at each step is 2.53, 0.64, 14.78, 0.13, 0.19, and 2.25 seconds, respectively. The scatter-induced shading/cupping artifacts are substantially reduced, and the average HU error of a region-of-interest is reduced from 75.9 to 19.0 HU.Conclusion: A practical ultrafast MC-based CBCT scatter correction scheme is developed. It accomplished the whole procedure of scatter correction and reconstruction within 30 seconds.----------------------------Cite this

  11. Impact of beam ions on α-particle measurements by collective Thomson scattering in ITER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egedal, J.; Bindslev, H.; Budny, R.V.

    2005-01-01

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) has been proposed as a viable diagnostic for characterizing fusion born a-distributions in ITER. However, the velocities of the planned 1 MeV deuterium heating beam ions in 1TER are similar to that of fusion born a-particles and may therefore mask the measureme......Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) has been proposed as a viable diagnostic for characterizing fusion born a-distributions in ITER. However, the velocities of the planned 1 MeV deuterium heating beam ions in 1TER are similar to that of fusion born a-particles and may therefore mask...... and the alpha-particles are calculated. Our investigations show that the CTS measurements of alpha-particles will not be masked by the presence of the beam ions in H-mode plasmas. In lower density reversed shear plasmas, only a part of the CTS alpha-particle spectrum will be perturbed....

  12. Pitch Angle Scattering of Upgoing Electron Beams in Jupiter's Polar Regions by Whistler Mode Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, S. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Clark, G.; Mauk, B. H.; Bolton, S. J.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Levin, S. M.

    2018-02-01

    The Juno spacecraft's Jupiter Energetic-particle Detector Instrument has observed field-aligned, unidirectional (upgoing) electron beams throughout most of Jupiter's entire polar cap region. The Waves instrument detected intense broadband whistler mode emissions occurring in the same region. In this paper, we investigate the pitch angle scattering of the upgoing electron beams due to interactions with the whistler mode waves. Profiles of intensity versus pitch angle for electron beams ranging from 2.53 to 7.22 Jovian radii show inconsistencies with the expected adiabatic invariant motion of the electrons. It is believed that the observed whistler mode waves perturb the electron motion and scatter them away from the magnetic field line. The diffusion equation has been solved by using diffusion coefficients which depend on the magnetic intensity of the whistler mode waves.

  13. Elastic scattering of protons at the TOTEM experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080719; Csanád, Máté; Niewiadomski, Hubert

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC at CERN is optimized to measure elastic and diffractive scattering at the LHC and measures the total proton-proton cross-section with\tthe luminosity-independent method. The TOTEM experiment uses the special technique of movable beam pipe insertions -- called Roman Pots -- to detect very forward protons. The reconstruction of the forward proton kinematics requires the precise understanding of the LHC beam optics. A new method of LHC optics determination is reported, which exploits kinematical distributions of elastically scattered proton-proton data measured by the Roman Pots of the TOTEM experiment. The method has been successfully applied to data samples recorded since 2010. The interpretation of the proton-proton elastic differential cross-section is a challenging task. The geometrical model of proton-proton elastic scattering of Bialas and Bzdak is fitted to ISR data and to data measured by the TOTEM experiment at LHC energy of $\\sqrt{s}=7$~TeV. The Bialas-Bzdak model is g...

  14. Effect of laser beam filamentation on plasma wave localization and stimulated Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purohit, Gunjan; Sharma, R. P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the effect of laser beam filamentation on the localization of electron plasma wave (EPW) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in unmagnitized plasma when both relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities are operative. The filamentary dynamics of laser beam is studied and the splitted profile of the laser beam is obtained due to uneven focusing of the off-axial rays. The localization of electron plasma wave takes place due to nonlinear coupling between the laser beam and EPW. Stimulated Raman scattering of this EPW is studied and backreflectivity has been calculated. The localization of EPW also affects the eigenfrequency and damping of plasma wave; consequently, mismatch and modified enhanced Landau damping lead to the disruption of SRS process and a substantial reduction in the backreflectivity. The new enhanced damping of the plasma wave has been calculated and it is found that the SRS process gets suppressed due to the localization of plasma wave in laser beam filamentary structures. For typical laser beam and plasma parameters with wavelength λ (=1064 nm), power flux (=10 16 W/cm 2 ) and plasma density (n/n cr ) = 0.2; the SRS back reflectivity is found to be suppressed by a factor of around 5%. (author)

  15. SU-E-T-523: On the Radiobiological Impact of Lateral Scatter in Proton Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuvel, F Van den; Deruysscher, D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In proton therapy, justified concern has been voiced with respect to an increased efficiency in cell kill at the distal end of the Bragg peak. This coupled with range uncertainty is a counter indication to use the Bragg peak to define the border of a treated volume with a critical organ. An alternative is to use the lateral edge of the proton beam, obtaining more robust plans. We investigate the spectral and biological effects of the lateral scatter . Methods: A general purpose Monte Carlo simulation engine (MCNPX 2.7c) installed on a Scientific Linux cluster, calculated the dose deposition spectrum of protons, knock on electrons and generated neutrons for a proton beam with maximal kinetic energy of 200MeV. Around the beam at different positions in the beam direction the spectrum is calculated in concentric rings of thickness 1cm. The deposited dose is converted to a double strand break map using an analytical expression.based on micro dosimetric calculations using a phenomenological Monte Carlo code (MCDS). A strict version of RBE is defined as the ratio of generation of double strand breaks in the different modalities. To generate the reference a Varian linac was modelled in MCNPX and the generated electron dose deposition spectrum was used . Results: On a pristine point source 200MeV beam the RBE before the Bragg peak was of the order of 1.1, increasing to 1.7 right behind the Bragg peak. When using a physically more realistic beam of 10cm diameter the effect was smaller. Both the lateral dose and RBE increased with increasing beam depth, generating a dose deposition with mixed biological effect. Conclusions: The dose deposition in proton beams need to be carefully examined because the biological effect will be different depending on the treatment geometry. Deeply penetrating proton beams generate more biologically effective lateral scatter

  16. Magnetized and Flat Beam Experiment at FAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, A. [Fermilab; Hyun, J. [Sokendai, Tsukuba; Mihalcea, D. [NIU, DeKalb; Piot, P. [NICADD, DeKalb; Sen, T. [Fermilab; Thangaraj, C. [Fermilab

    2017-05-22

    A photocathode, immersed in solenoidal magnetic field, can produce canonical-angular-momentum (CAM) dominated or “magnetized” electron beams. Such beams have an application in electron cooling of hadron beams and can also be uncoupled to yield asymmetric-emittance (“flat”) beams. In the present paper we explore the possibilities of the flat beam generation at Fermilab’s Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. We present optimization of the beam flatness and four-dimensional transverse emittance and investigate the mapping and its limitations of the produced eigen-emittances to conventional emittances using a skew-quadrupole channel. Possible application of flat beams at the FAST facility are also discussed.

  17. A holder to rotate sample cells to avoid sedimentation in small-angle neutron scattering and ultra small-angle neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Anders; Hellsing, Maja S; Rennie, Adrian R

    2013-01-01

    Sedimentation, or creaming, of samples can significantly alter the amount of material in the beam during small-angle scattering experiments. Simple rotating mounts that ameliorate this effect are described and the design criteria are carefully discussed. A modular design permits simple adaptation to various instruments and different sample cells. Temperature control in the range 10 °C below ambient to about +40 °C has been implemented using air flow and a Peltier device. Example ultra small-angle neutron scattering data are shown that exploit the simplicity of the mounts and the capability to position several samples close together on a translation stage. (paper)

  18. Coherent Forward Stimulated-Brillouin Scattering of a Spatially Incoherent Laser Beam in a Plasma and Its Effect on Beam Spray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grech, M.; Riazuelo, G.; Pesme, D.; Weber, S.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2009-01-01

    A statistical model for forward stimulated-Brillouin scattering is developed for a spatially incoherent, monochromatic, laser beam propagating in a plasma. The threshold above which the laser beam spatial incoherence cannot prevent the coherent growth of forward stimulated-Brillouin scattering is computed. It is found to be well below the threshold for self-focusing. Three-dimensional simulations confirm its existence and reveal the onset of beam spray above it. From these results, we propose a new figure of merit for the control of propagation through a plasma of a spatially incoherent laser beam

  19. R & D of a Gas-Filled RF Beam Profile Monitor for Intense Neutrino Beam Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonehara, K. [Fermilab; Backfish, M. [Fermilab; Moretti, A. [Fermilab; Tollestrup, A. V. [Fermilab; Watts, A. [Fermilab; Zwaska, R. M. [Fermilab; Abrams, R. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Cummings, M. A.; Dudas, A. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Johnson, R. P. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Kazakevich, G. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Neubauer, M. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Liu, Q. [Case Western Reserve U.

    2017-05-01

    We report the R&D of a novel radiation-robust hadron beam profile monitor based on a gas-filled RF cavity for intense neutrino beam experiments. An equivalent RF circuit model was made and simulated to optimize the RF parameter in a wide beam intensity range. As a result, the maximum acceptable beam intensity in the monitor is significantly increased by using a low-quality factor RF cavity. The plan for the demonstration test is set up to prepare for future neutrino beam experiments.

  20. Acoustic scattering of a Bessel vortex beam by a rigid fixed spheroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-12-01

    Partial-wave series representation of the acoustic scattering field of high-order Bessel vortex beams by rigid oblate and prolate spheroids using the modal matching method is developed. The method, which is applicable to slightly elongated objects at low-to-moderate frequencies, requires solving a system of linear equations which depends on the partial-wave index n and the order of the Bessel vortex beam m using truncated partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs), and satisfying the Neumann boundary condition for a rigid immovable surface in the least-squares sense. This original semi-analytical approach developed for Bessel vortex beams is demonstrated for finite oblate and prolate spheroids, where the mathematical functions describing the spheroidal geometry are written in a form involving single angular (polar) integrals that are numerically computed. The transverse (θ = π / 2) and 3D scattering directivity patterns are evaluated in the far-field for both prolate and oblate spheroids, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid) not exceeding 3:1, the half-cone angle β and order m of the Bessel vortex beam, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kr0. Periodic oscillations in the magnitude plots of the far-field scattering form function are observed, which result from the interference of the reflected waves with the circumferential (Franz') waves circumnavigating the surface of the spheroid in the surrounding fluid. Moreover, the 3D directivity patterns illustrate the far-field scattering from the spheroid, that vanishes in the forward (θ = 0) and backward (θ = π) directions. Particular applications in underwater acoustics and scattering, acoustic levitation and the detection of submerged elongated objects using Bessel vortex waves to name a few, would benefit from the results of the present investigation.

  1. Studies of isotopic defined hydrogen beams scattering from Pd single-crystal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlam, Mihai; Steflea, Dumitru

    2001-01-01

    An experimental investigation of hydrogen isotopes interaction with Pd single-crystal surface has been carried out using molecular beam technique. The energy dependence of the sticking probability and its relation with the trapping probability into the precursor state is studied by integrating the scattered angular distribution of hydrogen Isotopic defined beams from Pd (111) surface in the 40-400 K surface temperature range. The dependence has been evaluated by defining hydrogen molecular beams with different isotopic concentration - from the natural one to the 5% D/(D+H) ratio - and for different incident energies. The beam was directed onto a single-crystal Pd (111) surface. In the paper, we report the experimental results and some considerations related to it. (authors)

  2. Analysis of Neutron Production in Passively Scattered Ion-Beam Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Seunguk; Yoo, Seunghoon; Song, Yongkeun; Kim, Eunho; Shin, Jaeik; Han, Soorim; Jung, Wongyun; Nam, Sanghee; Lee, Rena; Lee, Kitae; Cho, Sungho

    2017-07-01

    A new treatment facility for heavy ion therapy since 2010 was constructed. In the broad beam, a range shifter, ridge filter and multi leaf collimator (MLC) for the generation of the spread-out Bragg peak is used. In this case, secondary neutrons produced by the interactions of the ion field with beam-modifying devices (e.g. double-scattering system, beam shaping collimators and range compensators) are very important for patient safety. Therefore, these components must be carefully examined in the context of secondary neutron yield and associated secondary cancer risk. In this article, Monte Carlo simulation has been carried out with the FLUktuierende KAskade particle transport code, the fluence and distribution of neutron generation and the neutron dose equivalent from the broad beam components are compared using carbon and proton beams. As a result, it is confirmed that the yield of neutron production using a carbon beam from all components of the broad beam was higher than using a proton beam. The ambient dose by neutrons per heavy ion and proton ion from the MLC surface was 0.12-0.18 and 0.0067-0.0087 pSv, respectively, which shows that heavy ions generate more neutrons than protons. However, ambient dose per treatment 2 Gy, which means physical dose during treatment by ion beam, is higher than carbon beam because proton therapy needs more beam flux to make 2-Gy prescription dose. Therefore, the neutron production from the MLC, which is closed to the patient, is a very important parameter for patient safety. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Analysis of neutron production in passively scattered ion-beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Seunguk; Yoo, Seunghoon; Song, Yongkeun; Kim, Eunho; Shin, Jaeik; Han, Soorim; Wongyun Jung; Nam, Sanghee; Lee, Rena; Lee, Kitae; Cho, Sungho

    2017-01-01

    A new treatment facility for heavy ion therapy since 2010 was constructed. In the broad beam, a range shifter, ridge filter and multi leaf collimator (MLC) for the generation of the spread-out Bragg peak is used. In this case, secondary neutrons produced by the interactions of the ion field with beam-modifying devices (e.g. double-scattering system, beam shaping collimators and range compensators) are very important for patient safety. Therefore, these components must be carefully examined in the context of secondary neutron yield and associated secondary cancer risk. In this article, Monte Carlo simulation has been carried out with the FLUktuierende KAskade particle transport code, the fluence and distribution of neutron generation and the neutron dose equivalent from the broad beam components are compared using carbon and proton beams. As a result, it is confirmed that the yield of neutron production using a carbon beam from all components of the broad beam was higher than using a proton beam. The ambient dose by neutrons per heavy ion and proton ion from the MLC surface was 0.12 0.18 and 0.0067 0.0087 pSv, respectively, which shows that heavy ions generate more neutrons than protons. However, ambient dose per treatment 2 Gy, which means physical dose during treatment by ion beam, is higher than carbon beam because proton therapy needs more beam flux to make 2-Gy prescription dose. Therefore, the neutron production from the MLC, which is closed to the patient, is a very important parameter for patient safety. (authors)

  4. Nonlinear backward stimulated Raman scattering from electron beam acoustic modes in the kinetic regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L.; Daughton, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bowers, K. J.; Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Fernandez, J. C.; Roper, Q.

    2006-01-01

    The backward stimulated Raman scattering (BSRS) of a laser from electron beam acoustic modes (BAM) in the presence of self-consistent non-Maxwellian velocity distributions is examined by linear theory and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in one and two dimensions (1D and 2D). The BAM evolve from Langmuir waves (LW) as electron trapping modifies the distribution to a non-Maxwellian form that exhibits a beam component. Linear dispersion relations using the nonlinearly modified distribution from simulations are solved for the electrostatic modes involved in the parametric coupling. Results from linear analysis agree well with electrostatic spectra from simulations. It is shown that the intersection of the Stokes root with BAM (instead of LW) determines the matching conditions for BSRS at a nonlinear stage. As the frequency of the unstable Stokes mode decreases with increasing wave number, the damping rate and the phase velocity of BAM decreases with the phase velocity of the Stokes mode, providing a self-consistently evolving plasma linear response that favors continuation of the nonlinear frequency shift. Coincident with the emergence of BAM is a rapid increase in BSRS reflectivity. The details of the wave-particle interaction region in the electron velocity distribution determine the growth/damping rate of these electrostatic modes and the nonlinear frequency shift; in modeling this behavior, the use of sufficiently large numbers of particles in the simulations is crucial. Both the reflectivity scaling with laser intensity and the spectral features from simulations are discussed and are consistent with recent Trident experiments

  5. Measurements of refractive index and size of a spherical drop from Gaussian beam scattering in the primary rainbow region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Sun, Hui; Shen, Jianqi; Tropea, Cameron

    2018-03-01

    The primary rainbow observed when light is scattered by a spherical drop has been exploited in the past to measure drop size and relative refractive index. However, if higher spatial resolution is required in denser drop ensembles/sprays, and to avoid then multiple drops simultaneously appearing in the measurement volume, a highly focused beam is desirable, inevitably with a Gaussian intensity profile. The present study examines the primary rainbow pattern resulting when a Gaussian beam is scattered by a spherical drop and estimates the attainable accuracy when extracting size and refractive index. The scattering is computed using generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT) and Debye series decomposition of the Gaussian beam scattering. The results of these simulations show that the measurement accuracy is dependent on both the beam waist radius and the position of the drop in the beam waist.

  6. Virtual edge illumination and one dimensional beam tracking for absorption, refraction, and scattering retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittoria, Fabio A., E-mail: fabio.vittoria.12@ucl.ac.uk; Diemoz, Paul C. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, Malet Place, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Research Complex at Harwell, Harwell Oxford Campus, OX11 0FA Didcot (United Kingdom); Endrizzi, Marco; Olivo, Alessandro [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, Malet Place, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Wagner, Ulrich H.; Rau, Christoph [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Oxford Campus, OX11 0DE Didcot (United Kingdom); Robinson, Ian K. [Research Complex at Harwell, Harwell Oxford Campus, OX11 0FA Didcot (United Kingdom); London Centre for Nanotechnology, WC1H 0AH London (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-31

    We propose two different approaches to retrieve x-ray absorption, refraction, and scattering signals using a one dimensional scan and a high resolution detector. The first method can be easily implemented in existing procedures developed for edge illumination to retrieve absorption and refraction signals, giving comparable image quality while reducing exposure time and delivered dose. The second method tracks the variations of the beam intensity profile on the detector through a multi-Gaussian interpolation, allowing the additional retrieval of the scattering signal.

  7. Virtual edge illumination and one dimensional beam tracking for absorption, refraction, and scattering retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vittoria, Fabio A.; Diemoz, Paul C.; Endrizzi, Marco; Olivo, Alessandro; Wagner, Ulrich H.; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian K.

    2014-01-01

    We propose two different approaches to retrieve x-ray absorption, refraction, and scattering signals using a one dimensional scan and a high resolution detector. The first method can be easily implemented in existing procedures developed for edge illumination to retrieve absorption and refraction signals, giving comparable image quality while reducing exposure time and delivered dose. The second method tracks the variations of the beam intensity profile on the detector through a multi-Gaussian interpolation, allowing the additional retrieval of the scattering signal

  8. Construction of a scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials in undergraduate physics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBrake, Scott M.; Vineyard, Michael F.; Turley, Colin F.; Moore, Robert D.; Johnson, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy Union College, Schenectady, NY 12308 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    We have developed a new scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials with the 1.1-MV Pelletron accelerator at the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. The chamber was constructed from a ten-inch, Conflat, multi-port cross and includes a three-axis target manipulator and target ladder assembly, an eight-inch turbo pump, an Amptek X-ray detector, and multiple charged particle detectors. Recent projects performed by our undergraduate research team include proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) analyses of atmospheric aerosols collected with a nine-stage cascade impactor in Upstate New York. We will describe the construction of the chamber and discuss the results of some commissioning experiments.

  9. Construction of a scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials in undergraduate physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBrake, Scott M.; Vineyard, Michael F.; Turley, Colin F.; Moore, Robert D.; Johnson, Christopher

    2013-04-01

    We have developed a new scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials with the 1.1-MV Pelletron accelerator at the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. The chamber was constructed from a ten-inch, Conflat, multi-port cross and includes a three-axis target manipulator and target ladder assembly, an eight-inch turbo pump, an Amptek X-ray detector, and multiple charged particle detectors. Recent projects performed by our undergraduate research team include proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) analyses of atmospheric aerosols collected with a nine-stage cascade impactor in Upstate New York. We will describe the construction of the chamber and discuss the results of some commissioning experiments.

  10. Nonlinear two-stream interaction between a cold, relativistic electron beam and a collisional plasma-Astron experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newberger, B.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1979-05-01

    Experiments on the two-stream instability of a relativistic electron beam propagating through a neutral gas, carried out with the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Astron beam, have been analyzed using a nonlinear saturation model for a cold beam. The behavior of the observed microwave emission due to the instability is in good agreement with that of the beam energy loss. Collisions on the plasma electrons weaken the nonlinear state of the instability but do not stabilize the mode. The beam essentially acts as if it were cold, a result substantiated by linear theory for waves propagating along the beam. In order to predict the effect of both beam momentum scatter and plasma electron collisions on the stability of the mode in future experiments a full two-dimensional linear theory must be developed

  11. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off a deuterium target at the HERMES experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Movsisyan, Aram

    2011-05-15

    Deeply virtual Compton scattering is studied in this report, using all data collected at the HERMES experiment from 1996 to 2005. Azimuthal asymmetries with respect to beam-helicity, beam-charge and target polarization alone and also to their different combinations for hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons in deep-inelastic scattering from a both unpolarized and longitudinally polarized deuterium targets are measured. The asymmetries are attributed to the interference between the deeply virtual Compton scattering and Bethe-Heitler processes. The asymmetries are observed in the exclusive region -(1.5){sup 2} GeV{sup 2}beam-helicity asymmetry that is sensitive to the interference term is found to be substantial, but no significant t dependence is observed. The leading amplitude of the beam-charge asymmetry is substantial at large -t, but becomes small at small values of -t. The amplitudes of the beam-helicity asymmetry that are sensitive to the squared DVCS term are found to be consistent with zero. The deuteron Compton form factor H{sub 1} appears to have a similar behavior as H of the proton. (orig.)

  12. First years experience of LHC Beam Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, O R

    2011-01-01

    The LHC is equipped with a full suite of sophisticated beam instrumentation which has been essential for rapid commissioning, the safe increase in total stored beam power and the understanding of machine optics and accelerator physics phenomena. This paper will comment on all of these systems and on their contributions to the various stages of beam commissioning. It will include details on: the beam position system and its use for realtime global orbit feedback; the beam loss system and its role in machine protection; total and bunch by bunch intensity measurements; tune measurement and feedback; synchrotron light diagnostics for transverse beam size measurements, abort gap monitoring and longitudinal density measurements. Issues and problems encountered along the way will also be discussed together with the prospect for future upgrades.

  13. Scattering of a vector Bessel-Gaussian beam by a sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yao; Xi, Qiangli; Li, Renxian; Qin, Shitong; Ding, Chunying

    2018-01-01

    The interaction of a vector Bessel-Gaussian beam (VBGB) with a dielectric sphere is investigated in the framework of generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT). The electric field of a VBGB is derived using the angular spectrum decomposition method (ASDM), and the analytical expressions of beam shape coefficients (BSCs) are derived utilizing multipole expansion method using vector spherical harmonics. Various polarizations including linear, circular, radial, and azimuthal polarizations are considered. The far-field scattered intensities are numerically computed, and numerical results show that the beam parameters (including beam-waist radius w0, location of beam center, half-cone angle θb, and polarization type) strongly affect the far-field scattered intensities. The internal and near-surface fields are also calculated, and numerical results show that for smaller θb two curves formed by extreme peaks can be observed, and for larger θb such curves disappear and local enhancement of electric fields on the surface can be observed. Such results have important applications in various fields, including particle sizing, optical trapping and manipulation, etc.

  14. Stopping power and scattering angle calculations of charged particle beams through thin foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassiri, A.

    1991-03-01

    It is important to understand the effects of introducing foils into the path of charged particle beams. In the APS linac system, the intention is to insert thin foils before and after the positron generating target to protect the accelerating structures immediately before and after the target. Electron beams that pass through a dense material lose energy in collisions with the atomic electrons. The scattering path of electrons is much less straight than that of heavier particles (mu, pi meson, K meson, proton, etc.). After a short distance electrons tend to diffuse into the material, rather than proceeding in a rectilinear path

  15. Exploring a new strategy for nanofabrication: deposition by scattered Ga ions using focused ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Sarvesh K; Shukla, Neeraj; Kulkarni, Vishwas N

    2009-02-18

    We report a new strategy of nanofabrication using the focused ion beam (FIB)-based chemical vapor deposition method. It utilizes scattered Ga ions to decompose organometallic molecules of the precursor gas for depositing the metallic element on a surface with the advantage of producing uniform metallic coats on those surfaces of nanostructures which are not directly accessible to the primary beam. The method can be used to provide electrical contacts on inaccessible regions of prototype nanodevices, such as ion batteries, electrophoresis cells, cantilevers, etc, which have been demonstrated and explained by depositing Pt and W on different surfaces of 3D nanostructures.

  16. Distributed Strain Measurement along a Concrete Beam via Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in Optical Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo Bernini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural strain measurement of tension and compression in a 4 m long concrete beam was demonstrated with a distributed fiber-optic sensor portable system based on Brillouin scattering. Strain measurements provided by the fiber-optic sensor permitted to detect the formation of a crack in the beam resulting from the external applied load. The sensor system is valuable for structural monitoring applications, enabling the long-term performance and health of structures to be efficiently monitored.

  17. Large Logarithms in the Beam Normal Spin Asymmetry of Elastic Electron--Proton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Afanasev; Mykola Merenkov

    2004-06-01

    We study a parity-conserving single-spin beam asymmetry of elastic electron-proton scattering induced by an absorptive part of the two-photon exchange amplitude. It is demonstrated that excitation of inelastic hadronic intermediate states by the consecutive exchange of two photons leads to logarithmic and double-logarithmic enhancement due to contributions of hard collinear quasi-real photons. The asymmetry at small electron scattering angles is expressed in terms of the total photoproduction cross section on the proton, and is predicted to reach the magnitude of 20-30 parts per million. At these conditions and fixed 4-momentum transfers, the asymmetry is rising logarithmically with increasing electron beam energy, following the high-energy diffractive behavior of total photoproduction cross section on the proton.

  18. The single-beam funnel demonstration: Experiment and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, K.F.; Sander, O.R.; Bolme, G.O.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Guy, F.W.; Marquardt, J.H.; Sandoval, D.; Yuan, V.; Saadatmand, K.

    1991-01-01

    Accelerator concepts for heavy-ion fusion and for the transmutation of nuclear waste require small-emittance, high-current beams. Such applications include funnels in which high-current, like-charged particle beams are interlaced to double the beam current. The first experimental demonstration confirming the beam dynamics of the funnel principle (with contained emittance growth) was recently completed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A single leg of a prototype 5-MeV, H - funnel was successfully tested. This single-beam demonstration explored physics issues of a two-beam funnel. The experiment contained elements for emittance control, position control, and rf-deflection. Diagnostics allowed measurement of beam intensity, position and angle centroids, energy and phase centroids, transverse and longitudinal phase-space distributions. Results of the experiment will be presented along with comparisons to simulations

  19. A megavoltage scatter correction technique for cone-beam CT images acquired during VMAT delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boylan, C J; Marchant, T E; Rowbottom, C G; Stratford, J; Rodgers, J; Malik, J; Choudhury, A; Shrimali, R

    2012-01-01

    Kilovoltage cone-beam CT (kV CBCT) can be acquired during the delivery of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), in order to obtain an image of the patient during treatment. However, the quality of such CBCTs is degraded by megavoltage (MV) scatter from the treatment beam onto the imaging panel. The objective of this paper is to introduce a novel MV scatter correction method for simultaneous CBCT during VMAT, and to investigate its effectiveness when compared to other techniques. The correction requires the acquisition of a separate set of images taken during VMAT delivery, while the kV beam is off. These images—which contain only the MV scatter contribution on the imaging panel—are then used to correct the corresponding kV/MV projections. To test this method, CBCTs were taken of an image quality phantom during VMAT delivery and measurements of contrast to noise ratio were made. Additionally, the correction was applied to the datasets of three VMAT prostate patients, who also received simultaneous CBCTs. The clinical image quality was assessed using a validated scoring system, comparing standard CBCTs to the uncorrected simultaneous CBCTs and a variety of correction methods. Results show that the correction is able to recover some of the low and high-contrast signal to noise ratio lost due to MV scatter. From the patient study, the corrected CBCT scored significantly higher than the uncorrected images in terms of the ability to identify the boundary between the prostate and surrounding soft tissue. In summary, a simple MV scatter correction method has been developed and, using both phantom and patient data, is shown to improve the image quality of simultaneous CBCTs taken during VMAT delivery. (paper)

  20. Scattering and extinction of ion beams in a dusty plasma device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Collisions of ions with charged dust grains are important for the propagation of low frequency waves such as dust acoustic waves and dust ion-acoustic waves. The collision cross-sectional area of charged dust grains depends on the velocity of an ion beam. The collision cross-sectional area of charged dust grains with beam ions is measured. It is compared with the geometrical cross-sectional area of the grain. The experiment is performed in a dusty double-plasma device with glass beads of 8.9 μm in average diameter. The ion beam current and energy are measured with a directional retarding potential analyzer. It is observed that, when dust density inside the system is increased, the beam current ratio is reduced. From the reduction of the ion beam current, the effective cross-sectional area of the dust particle is estimated as a function of the beam energy

  1. Simulation of a complete inelastic neutron scattering experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Edwards, H; Nielsen, K; Skaarup, P; Lake, B

    2002-01-01

    A simulation of an inelastic neutron scattering experiment on the high-temperature superconductor La sub 2 sub - sub x Sr sub x CuO sub 4 is presented. The complete experiment, including sample, is simulated using an interface between the experiment control program and the simulation software package (McStas) and is compared with the experimental data. Simulating the entire experiment is an attractive alternative to the usual method of convoluting the model cross section with the resolution function, especially if the resolution function is nontrivial. (orig.)

  2. Neutron Scattering Experiments with the Unconventional Superconductor Uranium-Platinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, William Joseph

    The heavy fermion superconductor UPt3 has been studied extensively for nearly 30 years. Still key questions remain. Here, I report results of crystal growth and neutron scattering experiments on this important compound. Small angle neutron scattering from the superconducting vortex lattice reveals possible evidence for broken time reversal in the superconducting B-phase, and provides direction sensitive measurements of the temperature dependence of the London penetration depth, revealing details of nodes in the superconducting gap consistent with the E2u order parameter model. Measurements of the polarized neutron spin flipping ratio show that the temperature dependence of the spin susceptibility is temperature independent for fields parallel to the crystal c-axis and in the basal plane. Finally, inelastic scattering experiments exploring the coupling of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity reveal that this coupling is quasi elastic, rather than elastic as previously thought. In this thesis, I will describe the efforts to grow large single crystals for these experiments, the different neutron scattering arrangements used to make these measurements, and the experimental results.

  3. An experimental feasibility study on the use of scattering foil free beams for modulated electron radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, T; Alexander, A; Evans, M; Seuntjens, J

    2012-06-07

    The potential benefit of using scattering foil free beams for delivery of modulated electron radiotherapy is investigated in this work. Removal of the scattering foil from the beamline showed a measured bremsstrahlung tail dose reduction just beyond R(p) by a factor of 12.2, 6.9, 7.4, 7.4 and 8.3 for 6, 9, 12, 16 and 20 MeV beams respectively for 2 × 2 cm(2) fields defined on-axis when compared to the clinical beamline. Monte Carlo simulations were matched to measured data through careful tuning of source parameters and the modification of certain accelerator components beyond the manufacturer's specifications. An accelerator model based on the clinical beamline and one with the scattering foil removed were imported into a Monte Carlo-based treatment planning system (McGill Monte Carlo Treatment Planning). A treatment planning study was conducted on a test phantom consisting of a PTV and two distal organs at risk (OAR) by comparing a plan using the clinical beamline to a plan using a scattering foil free beamline. A DVH comparison revealed that for quasi-identical target coverage, the volume of each OAR receiving a given dose was reduced, thus reducing the dose deposited in healthy tissue.

  4. Characterization of Scattered X-Ray Photons in Dental Cone-Beam Computed Tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ching Yang

    Full Text Available Scatter is a very important artifact causing factor in dental cone-beam CT (CBCT, which has a major influence on the detectability of details within images. This work aimed to improve the image quality of dental CBCT through scatter correction.Scatter was estimated in the projection domain from the low frequency component of the difference between the raw CBCT projection and the projection obtained by extrapolating the model fitted to the raw projections acquired with 2 different sizes of axial field-of-view (FOV. The function for curve fitting was optimized by using Monte Carlo simulation. To validate the proposed method, an anthropomorphic phantom and a water-filled cylindrical phantom with rod inserts simulating different tissue materials were scanned using 120 kVp, 5 mA and 9-second scanning time covering an axial FOV of 4 cm and 13 cm. The detectability of the CT image was evaluated by calculating the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR.Beam hardening and cupping artifacts were observed in CBCT images without scatter correction, especially in those acquired with 13 cm FOV. These artifacts were reduced in CBCT images corrected by the proposed method, demonstrating its efficacy on scatter correction. After scatter correction, the image quality of CBCT was improved in terms of target detectability which was quantified as the CNR for rod inserts in the cylindrical phantom.Hopefully the calculations performed in this work can provide a route to reach a high level of diagnostic image quality for CBCT imaging used in oral and maxillofacial structures whilst ensuring patient dose as low as reasonably achievable, which may ultimately make CBCT scan a reliable and safe tool in clinical practice.

  5. Evaluation of the spectral distribution of X-ray beams from measurements on the scattered radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casnati, E.; Baraldi, C.

    1980-01-01

    Most of the phenomena activated by photons with energies below 100 keV show an apparent or real dependence on the quantum energy. Therefore, knowledge of the beam energy characteristics is of primary importance for interpretation of the irradiation results. The greatest difficulty arises from the high flux density of the beams usually employed which does not allow direct measurements of the beam. A method was developed which permits evaluation of the spectral distribution of the X-ray beam from a spectrometric measurement of the radiation scattered by a thin foil of a suitable metal. This makes possible a new and more rational approach to the measurement of X-rays in the energy range where the interaction parameters show a large photon energy dependence. The corrections required by the presence of some collateral effects, among which the most important is the coexistence of the coherent and incoherent scattering, must be evaluated. The knowledge of the spectral distribution is of immediate usefulness for studies of radiation damage in biological and other materials, for the calibration of radiation measuring instruments and for the improvement of the radiological instrumentation response which contributes to reducing the patient's dose. (H.K.)

  6. Thomson scattering diagnostic for the Microwave Tokamak Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, J.H.; Barter, J.D.; Sewall, N.R.; Jolly, J.J.; Schlander, L.F.

    1990-01-01

    The Thomson-scattering diagnostic system (TSS) on the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at LLNL routinely monitors electron temperature (T e ) and density. Typical measured values at the plasma center under clean conditions are 900 ± 70 eV and 1 to 2 x 10 14 (±30%) cm -3 . The TSS apparatus is compact, with all elements mounted on one sturdy, two-level optics table. Because of this, we maintain with minimum effort the alignment of both the ruby-laser input optics and the scattered-light collecting optics. Undesired background signals, e.g., plasma light as well as ruby-laser light scattered off obstacles and walls, are generally small compared with the Thomson-scattered signals we normally detect. In the MTX T e region, the TSS data are definitely fitted better when relativistic effects are included in the equations. Besides determining the temperature of the Maxwellian electron distribution, the system is designed to detect electron heating from GW-level free-electron laser (FEL) pulses by measuring large wavelength shifts of the scattered laser photons. TSS data suggest that we may indeed by able to detect these electrons, which can have energies up to 10 keV, according to computer simulation. 7 refs., 4 figs

  7. Experimental study of acoustic radiation force of an ultrasound beam on absorbing and scattering objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaeva, Anastasiia V., E-mail: niko200707@mail.ru; Kryzhanovsky, Maxim A.; Tsysar, Sergey A. [Department of Acoustics, Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kreider, Wayne [Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th St. Seattle WA 98105 (United States); Sapozhnikov, Oleg A. [Department of Acoustics, Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th St. Seattle WA 98105 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Acoustic radiation force is a nonlinear acoustic effect caused by the transfer of wave momentum to absorbing or scattering objects. This phenomenon is exploited in modern ultrasound metrology for measurement of the acoustic power radiated by a source and is used for both therapeutic and diagnostic sources in medical applications. To calculate radiation force an acoustic hologram can be used in conjunction with analytical expressions based on the angular spectrum of the measured field. The results of an experimental investigation of radiation forces in two different cases are presented in this paper. In one case, the radiation force of an obliquely incident ultrasound beam on a large absorber (which completely absorbs the beam) is considered. The second case concerns measurement of the radiation force on a spherical target that is small compared to the beam diameter.

  8. Studies of isotopic defined hydrogen beams scattering from Pd single-crystal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlam, Mihai; Steflea, Dumitru

    1999-01-01

    An experimental investigation of hydrogen isotopes interaction with Pd single-crystal surfaces has been carried out using molecular beam technique. The energy dependence of the sticking probability and its relation with the trapping probability into the precursor state is studied by integrating the scattered angular distribution of hydrogen isotopic defined beams from Pd (111) surfaces in the 40 - 400 K surface temperature range. The dependence has been evaluated by defining hydrogen molecular beams with different isotopic concentration - from the natural one until 5% D/(D + H) and different incident energies and directed onto a single - crystal Pd (111) surface. In the paper, we report the experimental results and some considerations related to them. (authors)

  9. Induction Accelerator Technology Choices for the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitner, M.A.; Celata, C.M.; Lee, E.P.; Logan, B.G.; Sabbi, G.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    Over the next three years the research program of the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF-VNL), a collaboration among LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL, is focused on separate scientific experiments in the injection, transport and focusing of intense heavy ion beams at currents from 100 mA to 1 A. As a next major step in the HIF-VNL program, we aim for a complete 'source-to-target' experiment, the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX). By combining the experience gained in the current separate beam experiments IBX would allow the integrated scientific study of the evolution of a single heavy ion beam at high current (∼1 A) through all sections of a possible heavy ion fusion accelerator: the injection, acceleration, compression, and beam focusing.This paper describes the main parameters and technology choices of the planned IBX experiment. IBX will accelerate singly charged potassium or argon ion beams up to 10 MeV final energy and a longitudinal beam compression ratio of 10, resulting in a beam current at target of more than 10 Amperes. Different accelerator cell design options are described in detail: Induction cores incorporating either room temperature pulsed focusing-magnets or superconducting magnets

  10. Technology choices for the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitner, M.A.; Celata, C.M.; Lee, E.P.; Sabbi, G.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    Over the next three years the research program of the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF-VNL), a collaboration among LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL, is focused on separate scientific experiments in the injection, transport and focusing of intense heavy ion beams at currents from 100 mA to 1 A. As a next major step in the HIF-VNL program, we aim for a complete ''source-to-target'' experiment, the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX). By combining the experience gained in the current separate beam experiments IBX would allow the integrated scientific study of the evolution of a single heavy ion beam at high current (∼1 A) through all sections of a possible heavy ion fusion accelerator: the injection, acceleration, compression, and beam focusing. This paper describes the main parameters and technology choices of the planned IBX experiment. IBX will accelerate singly charged potassium or argon ion beams up to 10 MeV final energy and a longitudinal beam compression ratio of 10, resulting in a beam current at target of more than 10 Amperes. Different accelerator cell design options are described in detail: Induction cores incorporating either room temperature pulsed focusing-magnets or superconducting magnets

  11. Technology choices for the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, M.A.; Celata, C.M.; Lee, E.P.; Sabbi, G.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2002-10-31

    Over the next three years the research program of the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF-VNL), a collaboration among LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL, is focused on separate scientific experiments in the injection, transport and focusing of intense heavy ion beams at currents from 100 mA to 1 A. As a next major step in the HIF-VNL program, we aim for a complete ''source-to-target'' experiment, the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX). By combining the experience gained in the current separate beam experiments IBX would allow the integrated scientific study of the evolution of a single heavy ion beam at high current ({approx}1 A) through all sections of a possible heavy ion fusion accelerator: the injection, acceleration, compression, and beam focusing. This paper describes the main parameters and technology choices of the planned IBX experiment. IBX will accelerate singly charged potassium or argon ion beams up to 10 MeV final energy and a longitudinal beam compression ratio of 10, resulting in a beam current at target of more than 10 Amperes. Different accelerator cell design options are described in detail: Induction cores incorporating either room temperature pulsed focusing-magnets or superconducting magnets.

  12. Measurement of the space potential of a high-temperature plasma by fast atomic beam scattering on an ion probe beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabantsev, A. A.; Taskayev, S. Yu. [AN SSSR, Novosibirsk (USSR). Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki

    1988-06-01

    In this work we carry out an analysis of the possibility of measuring the potential distribution of a high-temperature plasma by scattering fast atoms on an ion probe beam. The proposed method is based on the idea of determining the energy of the ion beam, which depends on the plasma potential, from the energy spectrum of the scattered atoms. Application of this method allows one to avoid a number of fundamental difficulties characteristic of plasma potential measurements which make use of heavy-ion probe beams. 34 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Measurement of the space potential of a high-temperature plasma by fast atomic beam scattering on an ion probe beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabantsev, A.A.; Taskayev, S.Yu.

    1989-01-01

    In this work we carry out an analysis of the possibility of measuring the potential distribution of a high-temperature plasma by scattering fast atoms on an ion probe beam. The proposed method is based on the idea of determining the energy of the ion beam, which depends on the plasma potential, from the energy spectrum of the scattered atoms. Application of this method allows one to avoid a number of fundamental difficulties characteristic of plasma potential measurements which make use of heavy-ion probe beams. 34 refs., 1 fig

  14. Gas Electron Multipler (GEM) detectors for parity-violating electron scattering experiments at Jefferson Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, John; Gnanvo, Kondo; Liyanage, Nilanga; Solid Collaboration; Moller Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The JLab Parity Violation In Deep Inelastic Scattering (PVDIS) experiment will use the upgraded 12 GeV beam and proposed Solenoidal Large Intensity Device (SoLID) to measure the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in DIS of polarized electrons with high precision in order to search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Unlike many prior Parity-Violating Electron Scattering (PVES) experiments, PVDIS is a single-particle tracking experiment. Furthermore the experiment's high luminosity combined with the SoLID spectrometer's open configuration creates high-background conditions. As such, the PVDIS experiment has the most demanding tracking detector needs of any PVES experiment to date, requiring precision detectors capable of operating at high-rate conditions in PVDIS's full production luminosity. Developments in large-area GEM detector R&D and SoLID simulations have demonstrated that GEMs provide a cost-effective solution for PVDIS's tracking needs. The integrating-detector-based JLab Measurement Of Lepton Lepton Electroweak Reaction (MOLLER) experiment requires high-precision tracking for acceptance calibration. Large-area GEMs will be used as tracking detectors for MOLLER as well. The conceptual designs of GEM detectors for the PVDIS and MOLLER experiments will be presented.

  15. A compact beam stop for a rare kaon decay experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belz, J.; Diwan, M.; Eckhause, M.; Guss, C.M.; Hancock, A.D.; Heinson, A.P.; Highland, V.L.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Irwin, G.M.; Kane, J.R.; Kettell, S.H.; Kuang, Y.; Lang, K.; McDonough, J.; McFarlane, W.K.; Molzon, W.R.; Riley, P.J.; Ritchie, J.L.; Schwartz, A.J.; Ware, B.; Welsh, R.E.; Winter, R.G.; Witkowski, M.; Wojcicki, S.G.; Worm, S.D. E-mail: worm@fnal.gov; Yamashita, A

    1999-06-01

    We describe the development and testing of a novel beam stop for use in a rare kaon decay experiment at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. The beam stop is located inside a dipole spectrometer magnet in close proximity to straw drift chambers and intercepts a high-intensity neutral hadron beam. The design process, involving both Monte Carlo simulations and beam tests of alternative beam-stop shielding arrangements, had the goal of minimizing the leakage of particles from the beam stop and the resulting hit rates in detectors, while preserving maximum acceptance for events of interest. The beam tests consisted of measurements of rates in drift chambers, scintillation counter hodoscopes, a gas threshold Cherenkov counter, and a lead glass array. Measurements were also made with a set of specialized detectors which were sensitive to low-energy neutrons, photons, and charged particles. Comparisons are made between these measurements and a detailed Monte Carlo simulation.

  16. Direct observation of beam bunching in BWO experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Morimoto, I; Maebara, S; Kishiro, J; Takayama, K; Horioka, K; Ishizuka, H; Kawasaki, S; Shiho, M

    2001-01-01

    Backward Wave Oscillation (BWO) experiments using a Large current Accelerator-1 (Lax-1) Induction Linac as a seed power source for an mm-wave FEL are under way. The Lax-1 is typically operated with a 1 MeV electron beam, a few kA of beam current, and a pulse length of 100 ns. In the BWO experiments, annular and solid beams are injected into a corrugated wave guide with guiding axial magnetic field of 1 T. In the BWO with annular beam an output power of 210 MW at 9.8 GHz was obtained. With a solid beam the output power was 130 MW, and an electron beam bunching with the frequency of 9.6-10.2 GHz was observed by a streak camera.

  17. DIAGNOSTICS FOR ION BEAM DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Ni, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30-mA K + beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (VISAR), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  18. Diagnostics for ion beam driven high energy density physics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Lidia, S; Ni, P A

    2010-10-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30 mA K(+) beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multichannel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  19. Optimum solution of dual-ring double-scattering system for an incident beam with given phase space for proton beam spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Takada, Y

    2002-01-01

    A systematic method is given for deriving optimum scatterer parameters for the dual-ring double-scattering system for the incident proton beam with the given phase space parameters. This is accomplished by relating it to the known optimum solution for zero-emittance beam. Limitations on the phase space parameters of the beam incident on the first scatterer have been clarified to obtain such valid solutions. It is shown that the dual-ring double-scattering method can be applied to an incident beam with emittance as large as 100-200 pi mm mrad. The effect of the change of phase space parameters on the lateral distribution has been investigated. It was found that the larger the emittance of the beam, the more sensitive the fluence distribution is to the change of phase space parameters. The effect of the different emittances of the incident beam in x-theta, y-phi spaces is discussed. It is shown that lateral distribution is sensitive to the misalignment of the beam.

  20. Shielding for radiation scattered dose distribution to the outside fields in patients treated with high energy radiotherapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung Sil Chu

    2001-01-01

    Scattered dose of therapeutic high energy radiation beams contributed significant unwanted dose to the patient. Measurement of radiation scattered dose outside fields and critical organs, like fetus position and testicle region, from chest or pelvic irradiation by large field of high energy radiation beam, was performed using an ionization chamber and film dosimetry. The scattered doses outside field were measured 5-10% of maximum doses in fields and exponentially decrease from field margins. The scattered photon dose received the uterus from thorax field irradiation and was measured about 1mGy/Gy of photon treatment dose. Shielding construction to reduce this scattered dose was investigated using lead sheet and blocks About 6 cm lead block shield reduced the scatter photon dose under 10mGy for 60Gy on abdomen field and almost reduced electron contamination. (author)

  1. On the impact of neutron beam divergence and scattering on the quality of transmission acquired tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvani, Maria Ines; Lopes, Ricardo T.; de Almeida, Gevaldo L.; Gonçalves, Marcelo José; Furieri, Rosanne C. A. A.

    2007-10-01

    The impact of the divergence of a thermal neutron beam and the scattered neutrons on the quality of tomographic images acquired by transmission have been evaluated by using a third generation tomographic system incorporating neutron collimators under several different arrangements. The system equipped with a gaseous position sensitive detector has been placed at the main channel outlet of the Argonauta Research Reactor in Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (CNEN-Brazil) which furnishes a thermal neutron flux of 2.3 × 105 n cm-2 s-1. Experiments have then been conducted using test-objects with well-known inner structure and composition to assess the influence of the collimators arrangement on the quality of the acquired images. Both, beam divergence and scattering - expected to spoil the image quality - have been reduced by using properly positioned collimators between the neutron source and the object, and in the gap between the object and the detector, respectively. The shadow cast by this last collimator on the projections used to reconstruct the tomographic images has been eliminated by a proper software specifically written for this purpose. Improvement of the tomographic images has been observed, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed approach to improve their quality by using properly positioned collimators.

  2. Optimizing cone beam CT scatter estimation in egs_cbct for a clinical and virtual chest phantom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot Thing, Rune; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image quality suffers from contamination from scattered photons in the projection images. Monte Carlo simulations are a powerful tool to investigate the properties of scattered photons.egs_cbct, a recent EGSnrc user code, provides the ability...

  3. Optimizing beam transport in rapidly compressing beams on the neutralized drift compression experiment – II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton D. Stepanov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II is an induction linac that generates intense pulses of 1.2 MeV helium ions for heating matter to extreme conditions. Here, we present recent results on optimizing beam transport. The NDCX-II beamline includes a 1-m-long drift section downstream of the last transport solenoid, which is filled with charge-neutralizing plasma that enables rapid longitudinal compression of an intense ion beam against space-charge forces. The transport section on NDCX-II consists of 28 solenoids. Finding optimal field settings for a group of solenoids requires knowledge of the envelope parameters of the beam. Imaging the beam on the scintillator gives the radius of the beam, but the envelope angle is not measured directly. We demonstrate how the parameters of the beam envelope (radius, envelop angle, and emittance can be reconstructed from a series of images taken by varying the B-field strengths of a solenoid upstream of the scintillator. We use this technique to evaluate emittance at several points in the NDCX-II beamline and for optimizing the trajectory of the beam at the entry of the plasma-filled drift section. Keywords: Charged-particle beams, Induction accelerators, Beam dynamics, Beam emittance, Ion beam diagnostics, PACS Codes: 41.75.-i, 41.85.Ja, 52.59.Sa, 52.59.Wd, 29.27.Eg

  4. Simple smoothing technique to reduce data scattering in physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levesque, L

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment involving motorized motion and a method to reduce data scattering from data acquisition. Jitter or minute instrumental vibrations add noise to a detected signal, which often renders small modulations of a graph very difficult to interpret. Here we describe a method to reduce scattering amongst data points from the signal measured by a photodetector that is motorized and scanned in a direction parallel to the plane of a rectangular slit during a computer-controlled diffraction experiment. The smoothing technique is investigated using subsets of many data points from the data acquisition. A limit for the number of data points in a subset is determined from the results based on the trend of the small measured signal to avoid severe changes in the shape of the signal from the averaging procedure. This simple smoothing method can be achieved using any type of spreadsheet software

  5. On the analysis of Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blostein, J.J.; Dawidowski, J.; Granada, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the different steps that must be followed for data processing in Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering Experiments. Firstly we discuss to what extent multiple scattering effects can affect the measured peak shape, concluding the an accurate calculation of these effects must be performed to extract the desired effective temperature from the experimental data. We present a Monte Carlo procedure to perform these corrections. Next, we focus our attention on experiments performed on light nuclei. We examine cases in which the desired information is obtained from the observed peak areas, and we analyze the procedure to obtain an effective temperature from the experimental peaks. As a consequence of the results emerging from those cases we trace the limits of validity of the convolution formalism usually employed, and propose a different treatment of the experimental data for this kind of measurements. (author)

  6. Magnitude and effects of X-ray scatter of a cone-beam micro-CT for small animal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Y.C. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China); Jan, M.L. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China); Chen, K.W. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Y.D. [Department of Nuclear Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Chuang, K.S. [Department of Nuclear Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Fu, Y.K. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: fufrank@iner.gov.tw

    2006-12-20

    We have developed a micro-CT system to provide high-resolution and anatomic information to combine with a microPET'' (registered) R4 system. This study was to evaluate the magnitude and effects of scatter for low kVp X-ray in this cone-beam micro-CT system. Slit collimators were used to simulate fan-beam micro-CT for comparison. The magnitudes of X-ray scatter were measured using the beam-stop method and were estimated by polynomial-fitting extrapolation to 0 mm size of stoppers. The scatter-to-primary ratio at center of the cone-beam system were 45% and 20% for rat and mouse phantoms, respectively, and were reduced to 5.86% and 4.2% in fan-beam geometric setup. The effects of X-ray scatter on image uniformity and contrast ratio were evaluated also. The uniformity response was examined by the profile of the reconstructed image. The degrees of 'cupping' in the fan-beam and cone-beam conditions were 1.75% and 3.81%, respectively, in rat phantom. A contrast phantom consisting of four inserts with physical densities similar to that of acrylic was used for measuring the effect of X-ray scatter on image contrast. Contrast ratios of the inserts and acrylic in cone-beam setup degraded 36.9% in average compared with fan-beam setup. A tumor-bearing mouse was scanned by the micro-CT system. The tumor-to-background contrast ratios were measured to be 0.331 and 0.249, respectively, with fan-beam and cone-beam setups.

  7. Library based x-ray scatter correction for dedicated cone beam breast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Linxi; Zhu, Lei; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The image quality of dedicated cone beam breast CT (CBBCT) is limited by substantial scatter contamination, resulting in cupping artifacts and contrast-loss in reconstructed images. Such effects obscure the visibility of soft-tissue lesions and calcifications, which hinders breast cancer detection and diagnosis. In this work, we propose a library-based software approach to suppress scatter on CBBCT images with high efficiency, accuracy, and reliability. Methods: The authors precompute a scatter library on simplified breast models with different sizes using the GEANT4-based Monte Carlo (MC) toolkit. The breast is approximated as a semiellipsoid with homogeneous glandular/adipose tissue mixture. For scatter correction on real clinical data, the authors estimate the breast size from a first-pass breast CT reconstruction and then select the corresponding scatter distribution from the library. The selected scatter distribution from simplified breast models is spatially translated to match the projection data from the clinical scan and is subtracted from the measured projection for effective scatter correction. The method performance was evaluated using 15 sets of patient data, with a wide range of breast sizes representing about 95% of general population. Spatial nonuniformity (SNU) and contrast to signal deviation ratio (CDR) were used as metrics for evaluation. Results: Since the time-consuming MC simulation for library generation is precomputed, the authors’ method efficiently corrects for scatter with minimal processing time. Furthermore, the authors find that a scatter library on a simple breast model with only one input parameter, i.e., the breast diameter, sufficiently guarantees improvements in SNU and CDR. For the 15 clinical datasets, the authors’ method reduces the average SNU from 7.14% to 2.47% in coronal views and from 10.14% to 3.02% in sagittal views. On average, the CDR is improved by a factor of 1.49 in coronal views and 2.12 in sagittal

  8. Library based x-ray scatter correction for dedicated cone beam breast CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Linxi; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew; Zhu, Lei

    2016-08-01

    The image quality of dedicated cone beam breast CT (CBBCT) is limited by substantial scatter contamination, resulting in cupping artifacts and contrast-loss in reconstructed images. Such effects obscure the visibility of soft-tissue lesions and calcifications, which hinders breast cancer detection and diagnosis. In this work, we propose a library-based software approach to suppress scatter on CBBCT images with high efficiency, accuracy, and reliability. The authors precompute a scatter library on simplified breast models with different sizes using the geant4-based Monte Carlo (MC) toolkit. The breast is approximated as a semiellipsoid with homogeneous glandular/adipose tissue mixture. For scatter correction on real clinical data, the authors estimate the breast size from a first-pass breast CT reconstruction and then select the corresponding scatter distribution from the library. The selected scatter distribution from simplified breast models is spatially translated to match the projection data from the clinical scan and is subtracted from the measured projection for effective scatter correction. The method performance was evaluated using 15 sets of patient data, with a wide range of breast sizes representing about 95% of general population. Spatial nonuniformity (SNU) and contrast to signal deviation ratio (CDR) were used as metrics for evaluation. Since the time-consuming MC simulation for library generation is precomputed, the authors' method efficiently corrects for scatter with minimal processing time. Furthermore, the authors find that a scatter library on a simple breast model with only one input parameter, i.e., the breast diameter, sufficiently guarantees improvements in SNU and CDR. For the 15 clinical datasets, the authors' method reduces the average SNU from 7.14% to 2.47% in coronal views and from 10.14% to 3.02% in sagittal views. On average, the CDR is improved by a factor of 1.49 in coronal views and 2.12 in sagittal views. The library-based scatter

  9. Isomer beam elastic scattering: 26mAl(p, p) for astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, D.; Shimizu, H.; Yamaguchi, H.; Abe, K.; Beliuskina, O.; Cha, S. M.; Chae, K. Y.; Chen, A. A.; Ge, Z.; Hayakawa, S.; Imai, N.; Iwasa, N.; Kim, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, M. J.; Kubono, S.; Kwag, M. S.; Liang, J.; Moon, J. Y.; Nishimura, S.; Oka, S.; Park, S. Y.; Psaltis, A.; Teranishi, T.; Ueno, Y.; Yang, L.

    2018-01-01

    The advent of radioactive ground-state beams some three decades ago ultimately sparked a revolution in our understanding of nuclear physics. However, studies with radioactive isomer beams are sparse and have often required sophisticated apparatuses coupled with the technologies of ground-state beams due to typical mass differences on the order of hundreds of keV and vastly different lifetimes for isomers. We present an application of a isomeric beam of 26mAl to one of the most famous observables in nuclear astrophysics: galactic 26Al. The characteristic decay of 26Al in the Galaxy was the first such specific radioactivity to be observed originating from outside the Earth some four decades ago. We present a newly-developed, novel technique to probe the structure of low-spin states in 27Si. Using the Center for Nuclear Study low-energy radioisotope beam separator (CRIB), we report on the measurement of 26mAl proton resonant elastic scattering conducted with a thick target in inverse kinematics. The preliminary results of this on-going study are presented.

  10. Experimental validation of the DPM Monte Carlo code using minimally scattered electron beams in heterogeneous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetty, Indrin J.; Moran, Jean M.; Nurushev, Teamor S.; McShan, Daniel L.; Fraass, Benedick A.; Wilderman, Scott J.; Bielajew, Alex F.

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive set of measurements and calculations has been conducted to investigate the accuracy of the Dose Planning Method (DPM) Monte Carlo code for electron beam dose calculations in heterogeneous media. Measurements were made using 10 MeV and 50 MeV minimally scattered, uncollimated electron beams from a racetrack microtron. Source distributions for the Monte Carlo calculations were reconstructed from in-air ion chamber scans and then benchmarked against measurements in a homogeneous water phantom. The in-air spatial distributions were found to have FWHM of 4.7 cm and 1.3 cm, at 100 cm from the source, for the 10 MeV and 50 MeV beams respectively. Energy spectra for the electron beams were determined by simulating the components of the microtron treatment head using the code MCNP4B. Profile measurements were made using an ion chamber in a water phantom with slabs of lung or bone-equivalent materials submerged at various depths. DPM calculations are, on average, within 2% agreement with measurement for all geometries except for the 50 MeV incident on a 6 cm lung-equivalent slab. Measurements using approximately monoenergetic, 50 MeV, 'pencil-beam'-type electrons in heterogeneous media provide conditions for maximum electronic disequilibrium and hence present a stringent test of the code's electron transport physics; the agreement noted between calculation and measurement illustrates that the DPM code is capable of accurate dose calculation even under such conditions. (author)

  11. Molecular beam studies of energy transfer in scattering from crystal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, W.L.

    1983-01-01

    The translational energy distributions and angular distributions of D 2 O produced from the reaction of incident D 2 and O 2 on a (111) platinum single crystal surface have been measured through the use of a molecular beam-surface scattering apparatus equipped with a time-of-flight spectrometer. The translation energies were measured over the surface temperature range T/sub s/ = 664 K - 913 K and at scattering angles of 7 0 and 40 0 from the surface normal. The D 2 O translational energy, , was found to be approximately half the equilibrium value over the temperature range examined, with /2k varying from 280 K to 480 K. These results are discussed in terms of a non-equilibrium desorption model. The two-photon ionization spectrometer was built to investigate the internal rotational and vibrational energy distributions of NO scattered from Pt(111) surfaces. The rotational energy distributions were measured over the crystal temperature range of T/sub s/ = 400 K - 1200 K. The translational energy distributions and angular distributions were measured using the time-of-flight spectrometer over the crystal temperature range of 400 K - 110 K and for beam translational energies of 0.046 eV, 0.11 eV and 0.24 eV, so that complete energy exchange information for translation, rotation and vibration is available for this gas-surface system. Significant energy transfer was observed in all three modes

  12. Development of a Thomson scattering diagnostic for the Caltech jet-target experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Byong Hoon; Greig, Amelia; Bellan, Paul

    2016-10-01

    A Thomson scattering diagnostic is being developed for studying the Caltech jet-target impact experiment. This experiment has a high-speed MHD-driven jet impact a dense, high-mass target cloud. The compression of the jet upon impact simulates the compression of an imploding liner. A preliminary bench top system consisting of a low power laser, lenses, a beam rotator, a monochromator, and a PMT is being used for measuring the Rayleigh and eventually Raman scattering signals from atmospheric pressure N2 and O2. The laser is modulated at 500 Hz to 1 kHz and lock-in techniques are used to recover the low-amplitude signal. For the actual pulsed plasma experiment, the low-power laser will be replaced by a high power Nd:YAG laser. The detector will consist of a double monochromator consisting of two single monochromators separated by a mask in the focal plane to block Rayleigh scattered light; detection will be by an intensified, gated camera. The diagnostic will be used to study the compression and heating that occurs when the jet plasma collides with a dense, high mass target cloud. Supported by USDOE Grant DE-AR0000565.

  13. Experiments on Ion Beam Space-Charge Neutralization with Pulsed Electron Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Herleb, U

    1998-01-01

    Space-charge neutralization of heavy ion beams with electron beam pulses generated by electron guns incorporating ferroelectric cathodes has been experimentally investigated. Several experiments are described, the results of which prove that the intensity of selected ion beam parts with defined charge states generated in a laser ion source can be increased by an order of magnitude. For elevated charge states the intensity amplification is more significant than for low charge states. A charge enhancement factor of four has been achieved by neutralization with pulsed electron beams for Al7+ ions generated from an aluminium target.

  14. Radioactive beam experiments using the Fragment Mass Analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, C.N.

    1994-04-01

    The Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) is a recoil mass spectrometer that has many potential applications in experiments with radioactive beams. The FMA can be used for spectroscopic studies of nuclei produced in reactions with radioactive beams. The FMA is also an ideal tool for studying radiative capture reactions of astrophysical interest, using inverse kinematics. The FMA has both mass and energy dispersion, which can be used to efficiently separate the reaction recoils from the primary beam. When used with radioactive beams, the FMA allows the recoils from radiative capture reactions to be detected in a low-background environment.

  15. Enhancement of image quality with a fast iterative scatter and beam hardening correction method for kV CBCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitz, Irmtraud; Hesse, Bernd-Michael; Nill, Simeon; Tuecking, Thomas; Oelfke, Uwe [DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The problem of the enormous amount of scattered radiation in kV CBCT (kilo voltage cone beam computer tomography) is addressed. Scatter causes undesirable streak- and cup-artifacts and results in a quantitative inaccuracy of reconstructed CT numbers, so that an accurate dose calculation might be impossible. Image contrast is also significantly reduced. Therefore we checked whether an appropriate implementation of the fast iterative scatter correction algorithm we have developed for MV (mega voltage) CBCT reduces the scatter contribution in a kV CBCT as well. This scatter correction method is based on a superposition of pre-calculated Monte Carlo generated pencil beam scatter kernels. The algorithm requires only a system calibration by measuring homogeneous slab phantoms with known water-equivalent thicknesses. In this study we compare scatter corrected CBCT images of several phantoms to the fan beam CT images acquired with a reduced cone angle (a slice-thickness of 14 mm in the isocenter) at the same system. Additional measurements at a different CBCT system were made (different energy spectrum and phantom-to-detector distance) and a first order approach of a fast beam hardening correction will be introduced. The observed, image quality of the scatter corrected CBCT images is comparable concerning resolution, noise and contrast-to-noise ratio to the images acquired in fan beam geometry. Compared to the CBCT without any corrections the contrast of the contrast-and-resolution phantom with scatter correction and additional beam hardening correction is improved by a factor of about 1.5. The reconstructed attenuation coefficients and the CT numbers of the scatter corrected CBCT images are close to the values of the images acquired in fan beam geometry for the most pronounced tissue types. Only for extreme dense tissue types like cortical bone we see a difference in CT numbers of 5.2%, which can be improved to 4.4% with the additional beam hardening correction. Cupping

  16. Development of Beam Conditions Monitor for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Dolenc Kittelmann, Irena; Mikuž, M

    2008-01-01

    If there is a failure in an element of the accelerator the resulting beam losses could cause damage to the inner tracking devices of the experiments. This thesis presents the work performed during the development phase of a protection system for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. The Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM) system is a stand-alone system designed to detect early signs of beam instabilities and trigger a beam abort in case of beam failures. It consists of two detector stations positioned at z=±1.84m from the interaction point. Each station comprises four BCM detector modules installed symmetrically around the beam pipe with sensors located at r=55 mm. This structure will allow distinguishing between anomalous events (beam gas and beam halo interactions, beam instabilities) and normal events due to proton-proton interaction by measuring the time-of-flight as well as the signal pulse amplitude from detector modules on the timescale of nanoseconds. Additionally, the BCM system aims to provide a coarse instan...

  17. A method for measuring coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering at a far off-axis high-energy neutrino beam target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brice, S. J. [Fermilab; Cooper, R. L. [Indiana U.; DeJongh, F. [Fermilab; Empl, A. [Houston U.; Garrison, L. M. [Indiana U.; Hime, A. [Los Alamos; Hungerford, E. [Houston U.; Kobilarcik, T. [Fermilab; Loer, B. [Fermilab; Mariani, C. [Virginia Tech.; Mocko, M. [Los Alamos; Muhrer, G. [Los Alamos; Pattie, R. [North Carolina State U.; Pavlovic, Z. [Los Alamos; Ramberg, E. [Fermilab; Scholberg, K. [Duke U.; Tayloe, R. [Indiana U.; Thornton, R. T. [Indiana U.; Yoo, J. [Fermilab; Young, A. [North Carolina State U.

    2014-04-03

    We present an experimental method for measuring the process of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CENNS). This method uses a detector situated transverse to a high-energy neutrino beam production target. This detector would be sensitive to the low-energy neutrinos arising from decay-at-rest pions in the target. We discuss the physics motivation for making this measurement and outline the predicted backgrounds and sensitivities using this approach. We report a measurement of neutron backgrounds as found in an off-axis surface location of the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) target. The results indicate that the Fermilab BNB target is a favorable location for a CENNS experiment.

  18. Electromagnetic scattering by multiple dielectric particles under the illumination of unpolarized high-order Bessel vortex beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mei Ping; Han, Yi Ping; Cui, Zhi Wei; Chen, An Tao

    2017-07-01

    This study investigates the electromagnetic scattering of a high-order Bessel vortex beam by multiple dielectric particles of arbitrary shape based on the surface integral equation (SIE) method. In Cartesian coordinates, the mathematical formulas are given for characterizing the electromagnetic field components of an arbitrarily incident high-order Bessel vortex beam. By using the SIE, a numerical scheme is formulated to find solutions for characterizing the electromagnetic scattering by multiple homogeneous particles of arbitrary shape and a home-made FORTRAN program is written. The presented theoretical derivations as well as the home-made program are validated by comparing to the scattering results of a Zero-Order Bessel Beam by the Generalized Lorenz-Mie theory. From our simulations, the beam's order, half-cone angles, and the ways of particles' arrangement have a great influence upon the differential scattering cross section (DSCS) for multiple particles. Furthermore, for a better understanding of the scattering characteristic in three dimension (3-D) space, the 3-D distribution of the DSCS for different cases is presented. It is anticipated that these results can be helpful to understand the scattering mechanisms of a high-order Bessel vortex beam on multiple dielectric particles of arbitrary shape.

  19. A model-based scatter artifacts correction for cone beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Luyao [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei 430074 (China); Vernekohl, Don; Xing, Lei, E-mail: lei@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Due to the increased axial coverage of multislice computed tomography (CT) and the introduction of flat detectors, the size of x-ray illumination fields has grown dramatically, causing an increase in scatter radiation. For CT imaging, scatter is a significant issue that introduces shading artifact, streaks, as well as reduced contrast and Hounsfield Units (HU) accuracy. The purpose of this work is to provide a fast and accurate scatter artifacts correction algorithm for cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging. Methods: The method starts with an estimation of coarse scatter profiles for a set of CBCT data in either image domain or projection domain. A denoising algorithm designed specifically for Poisson signals is then applied to derive the final scatter distribution. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations using thorax and abdomen phantoms with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, experimental Catphan phantom data, and in vivo human data acquired for a clinical image guided radiation therapy were performed. Scatter correction in both projection domain and image domain was conducted and the influences of segmentation method, mismatched attenuation coefficients, and spectrum model as well as parameter selection were also investigated. Results: Results show that the proposed algorithm can significantly reduce scatter artifacts and recover the correct HU in either projection domain or image domain. For the MC thorax phantom study, four-components segmentation yields the best results, while the results of three-components segmentation are still acceptable. The parameters (iteration number K and weight β) affect the accuracy of the scatter correction and the results get improved as K and β increase. It was found that variations in attenuation coefficient accuracies only slightly impact the performance of the proposed processing. For the Catphan phantom data, the mean value over all pixels in the residual image is reduced from −21.8 to −0.2 HU and 0.7 HU for projection

  20. Status of positron beams for dark photons experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valente Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High energy positron beams are an important tool for fixed-target experiments searching for new particles produced in the annihilation on atomic electrons of a target. The status of existing or planned infrastructures is reviewed.

  1. New X-ray beam position monitors with submicron resolution utilizing imaging of scattered X-rays at CHESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revesz, Peter; Temnykh, Alexander B.; Pauling, Alan K.

    2011-01-01

    At CHESS' A, F and G wiggler beam lines three new video beam position monitors (VBPMs) have been commissioned. These new VBPMs utilize X-rays scattered from the graphite filter (A and F line) or from a beryllium window (G-line) as the white wiggler beam passes through them. As the X-rays scatter in all directions from the scattering medium, a slit camera creates an image of the beam's footprint on a fluorescent screen. This image is then viewed by a CCD camera and analyzed using a computer program to calculate the intensity centroid, the beam profile and integrated intensity. These data are delivered to the CHESS signal archiving system for storage and display. The new systems employ digital cameras. These cameras are free of the noise inherent to the analog systems with long video signal connections. As a result, the beam position data delivered by the new systems are more reliable and accurate as shown by beam position traces using different beam position monitors on the same beam line.

  2. Time-dependent Second Order Scattering Theory for Weather Radar with a Finite Beam Width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Tanelli, Simone; Im, Eastwood; Ito, Shigeo; Oguchi, Tomohiro

    2006-01-01

    Multiple scattering effects from spherical water particles of uniform diameter are studied for a W-band pulsed radar. The Gaussian transverse beam-profile and the rectangular pulse-duration are used for calculation. An second-order analytical solution is derived for a single layer structure, based on a time-dependent radiative transfer theory as described in the authors' companion paper. When the range resolution is fixed, increase in footprint radius leads to increase in the second order reflectivity that is defined as the ratio of the second order return to the first order one. This feature becomes more serious as the range increases. Since the spaceborne millimeter-wavelength radar has a large footprint radius that is competitive to the mean free path, the multiple scattering effect must be taken into account for analysis.

  3. Electromagnetic scattering of a vector Bessel beam in the presence of an impedance cone

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2013-07-01

    The electromagnetic field scattering of a vector Bessel beam in the presence of an infinite circular cone with an impedance boundary on its surface is considered. The impinging field is normal to the tip of the cone and is expanded in terms of vector spherical wave functions; a Kontorovich-Lebedev (KL) transform is employed to expand the scattered fields. The problem is reduced to a singular integral equation with a variable coefficient of the non-convolution type. The singularities of the spectral function are deduced and representations for the field at the tip of the cone as well as other regions are given together with the conditions of validity of these representations. © 2013 IEEE.

  4. UCN up-scattering as a source of highly intense monochromatic pulsed beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauch, H.; Geltenborg, P.; Zimmer, O.

    2011-01-01

    The present proposal opens new possibilities to increase the usable neutron flux by advanced neutron cooling and phase space transformation methods. Thus a new instrument should be installed where the available neutron flux is used more efficiently. The essential point is an increase of phase space density and brilliance due to a more effective production of ultra-cold neutrons and a following transformation of these neutrons to higher energies. Recently reported progresses in the production of UCN's and in the up-scattering of such neutrons make the time mature to step towards a new method to produce high intense pulsed neutron beams. The up-scattering is made by fast moving Bragg crystals

  5. Plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, B.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, P.

    1993-04-01

    We intend to carry out a series of plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam facility at SLAC. These experiments will be the first to study the focusing of particle beams by plasma focusing devices in the parameter regime of interest for high energy colliders, and is expected to lead to plasma lens designs capable of unprecedented spot sizes. Plasma focusing of positron beams will be attempted for the first time. We will study the effects of lens aberrations due to various lens imperfections. Several approaches will be applied to create the plasma required including laser ionization and beam ionization of a working gas. At an increased bunch population of 2.5 x 10 10 , tunneling ionization of a gas target by an electron beam -- an effect which has never been observed before -- should be significant. The compactness of our device should prove to be of interest for applications at the SLC and the next generation linear colliders

  6. Plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barletta, B. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Chattopadhyay, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Chen, P. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)] [and others

    1993-04-01

    We intend to carry out a series of plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam facility at SLAC. These experiments will be the first to study the focusing of particle beams by plasma focusing devices in the parameter regime of interest for high energy colliders, and is expected to lead to plasma lens designs capable of unprecedented spot sizes. Plasma focusing of positron beams will be attempted for the first time. We will study the effects of lens aberrations due to various lens imperfections. Several approaches will be applied to create the plasma required including laser ionization and beam ionization of a working gas. At an increased bunch population of 2.5 {times} 10{sup 10}, tunneling ionization of a gas target by an electron beam -- an effect which has never been observed before -- should be significant. The compactness of our device should prove to be of interest for applications at the SLC and the next generation linear colliders.

  7. The Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) experiment reports 1993 run cycle. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrer, R.; Longshore, A.

    1995-06-01

    This year the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) ran an informal user program because the US Department of Energy planned to close LANSCE in FY1994. As a result, an advisory committee recommended that LANSCE scientists and their collaborators complete work in progress. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and a associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can Iter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. This year, a total of 127 proposals were submitted. The proposed experiments involved 229 scientists, 57 of whom visited LANSCE to participate in measurements. In addition, 3 (nuclear physics) participating research teams, comprising 44 scientists, carried out experiments at LANSCE. Instrument beam time was again oversubscribed, with 552 total days requested an 473 available for allocation

  8. The Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) experiment reports 1993 run cycle. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrer, R.; Longshore, A. [comps.

    1995-06-01

    This year the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) ran an informal user program because the US Department of Energy planned to close LANSCE in FY1994. As a result, an advisory committee recommended that LANSCE scientists and their collaborators complete work in progress. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and a associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can Iter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. This year, a total of 127 proposals were submitted. The proposed experiments involved 229 scientists, 57 of whom visited LANSCE to participate in measurements. In addition, 3 (nuclear physics) participating research teams, comprising 44 scientists, carried out experiments at LANSCE. Instrument beam time was again oversubscribed, with 552 total days requested an 473 available for allocation.

  9. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-08-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  10. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  11. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state

  12. Analytical description of photon beam phase spaces in inverse Compton scattering sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Curatolo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We revisit the description of inverse Compton scattering sources and the photon beams generated therein, emphasizing the behavior of their phase space density distributions and how they depend upon those of the two colliding beams of electrons and photons. The main objective is to provide practical formulas for bandwidth, spectral density, brilliance, which are valid in general for any value of the recoil factor, i.e. both in the Thomson regime of negligible electron recoil, and in the deep Compton recoil dominated region, which is of interest for gamma-gamma colliders and Compton sources for the production of multi-GeV photon beams. We adopt a description based on the center of mass reference system of the electron-photon collision, in order to underline the role of the electron recoil and how it controls the relativistic Doppler/boost effect in various regimes. Using the center of mass reference frame greatly simplifies the treatment, allowing us to derive simple formulas expressed in terms of rms momenta of the two colliding beams (emittance, energy spread, etc. and the collimation angle in the laboratory system. Comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations of inverse Compton scattering in various scenarios are presented, showing very good agreement with the analytical formulas: in particular we find that the bandwidth dependence on the electron beam emittance, of paramount importance in Thomson regime, as it limits the amount of focusing imparted to the electron beam, becomes much less sensitive in deep Compton regime, allowing a stronger focusing of the electron beam to enhance luminosity without loss of mono-chromaticity. A similar effect occurs concerning the bandwidth dependence on the frequency spread of the incident photons: in deep recoil regime the bandwidth comes out to be much less dependent on the frequency spread. The set of formulas here derived are very helpful in designing inverse Compton sources in diverse regimes, giving a

  13. Planning, performing and analyzing X-ray Raman scattering experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahle, Ch. J., E-mail: christoph.sahle@esrf.fr [Department of Physics, PO Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Mirone, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Niskanen, J.; Inkinen, J. [Department of Physics, PO Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Krisch, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Huotari, S. [Department of Physics, PO Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-02-03

    A summarising review of data treatment for non-resonant inelastic X-ray scattering data from modern synchrotron-based multi-analyzer spectrometers. A compilation of procedures for planning and performing X-ray Raman scattering (XRS) experiments and analyzing data obtained from them is presented. In particular, it is demonstrated how to predict the overall shape of the spectra, estimate detection limits for dilute samples, and how to normalize the recorded spectra to absolute units. In addition, methods for processing data from multiple-crystal XRS spectrometers with imaging capability are presented, including a super-resolution method that can be used for direct tomography using XRS spectra as the contrast. An open-source software package with these procedures implemented is also made available.

  14. Analytic image reconstruction from partial data for a single-scan cone-beam CT with scatter correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jonghwan; Pua, Rizza; Cho, Seungryong, E-mail: scho@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Insoo; Han, Bumsoo [EB Tech, Co., Ltd., 550 Yongsan-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-500 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: A beam-blocker composed of multiple strips is a useful gadget for scatter correction and/or for dose reduction in cone-beam CT (CBCT). However, the use of such a beam-blocker would yield cone-beam data that can be challenging for accurate image reconstruction from a single scan in the filtered-backprojection framework. The focus of the work was to develop an analytic image reconstruction method for CBCT that can be directly applied to partially blocked cone-beam data in conjunction with the scatter correction. Methods: The authors developed a rebinned backprojection-filteration (BPF) algorithm for reconstructing images from the partially blocked cone-beam data in a circular scan. The authors also proposed a beam-blocking geometry considering data redundancy such that an efficient scatter estimate can be acquired and sufficient data for BPF image reconstruction can be secured at the same time from a single scan without using any blocker motion. Additionally, scatter correction method and noise reduction scheme have been developed. The authors have performed both simulation and experimental studies to validate the rebinned BPF algorithm for image reconstruction from partially blocked cone-beam data. Quantitative evaluations of the reconstructed image quality were performed in the experimental studies. Results: The simulation study revealed that the developed reconstruction algorithm successfully reconstructs the images from the partial cone-beam data. In the experimental study, the proposed method effectively corrected for the scatter in each projection and reconstructed scatter-corrected images from a single scan. Reduction of cupping artifacts and an enhancement of the image contrast have been demonstrated. The image contrast has increased by a factor of about 2, and the image accuracy in terms of root-mean-square-error with respect to the fan-beam CT image has increased by more than 30%. Conclusions: The authors have successfully demonstrated that the

  15. Analytic image reconstruction from partial data for a single-scan cone-beam CT with scatter correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jonghwan; Pua, Rizza; Kim, Insoo; Han, Bumsoo; Cho, Seungryong

    2015-11-01

    A beam-blocker composed of multiple strips is a useful gadget for scatter correction and/or for dose reduction in cone-beam CT (CBCT). However, the use of such a beam-blocker would yield cone-beam data that can be challenging for accurate image reconstruction from a single scan in the filtered-backprojection framework. The focus of the work was to develop an analytic image reconstruction method for CBCT that can be directly applied to partially blocked cone-beam data in conjunction with the scatter correction. The authors developed a rebinned backprojection-filteration (BPF) algorithm for reconstructing images from the partially blocked cone-beam data in a circular scan. The authors also proposed a beam-blocking geometry considering data redundancy such that an efficient scatter estimate can be acquired and sufficient data for BPF image reconstruction can be secured at the same time from a single scan without using any blocker motion. Additionally, scatter correction method and noise reduction scheme have been developed. The authors have performed both simulation and experimental studies to validate the rebinned BPF algorithm for image reconstruction from partially blocked cone-beam data. Quantitative evaluations of the reconstructed image quality were performed in the experimental studies. The simulation study revealed that the developed reconstruction algorithm successfully reconstructs the images from the partial cone-beam data. In the experimental study, the proposed method effectively corrected for the scatter in each projection and reconstructed scatter-corrected images from a single scan. Reduction of cupping artifacts and an enhancement of the image contrast have been demonstrated. The image contrast has increased by a factor of about 2, and the image accuracy in terms of root-mean-square-error with respect to the fan-beam CT image has increased by more than 30%. The authors have successfully demonstrated that the proposed scanning method and image

  16. Scatter correction, intermediate view estimation and dose characterization in megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sramek, Benjamin Koerner

    The ability to deliver conformal dose distributions in radiation therapy through intensity modulation and the potential for tumor dose escalation to improve treatment outcome has necessitated an increase in localization accuracy of inter- and intra-fractional patient geometry. Megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging using the treatment beam and onboard electronic portal imaging device is one option currently being studied for implementation in image-guided radiation therapy. However, routine clinical use is predicated upon continued improvements in image quality and patient dose delivered during acquisition. The formal statement of hypothesis for this investigation was that the conformity of planned to delivered dose distributions in image-guided radiation therapy could be further enhanced through the application of kilovoltage scatter correction and intermediate view estimation techniques to megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging, and that normalized dose measurements could be acquired and inter-compared between multiple imaging geometries. The specific aims of this investigation were to: (1) incorporate the Feldkamp, Davis and Kress filtered backprojection algorithm into a program to reconstruct a voxelized linear attenuation coefficient dataset from a set of acquired megavoltage cone-beam CT projections, (2) characterize the effects on megavoltage cone-beam CT image quality resulting from the application of Intermediate View Interpolation and Intermediate View Reprojection techniques to limited-projection datasets, (3) incorporate the Scatter and Primary Estimation from Collimator Shadows (SPECS) algorithm into megavoltage cone-beam CT image reconstruction and determine the set of SPECS parameters which maximize image quality and quantitative accuracy, and (4) evaluate the normalized axial dose distributions received during megavoltage cone-beam CT image acquisition using radiochromic film and thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in anthropomorphic pelvic and head and

  17. Electron beam injection during active experiments. I - Electromagnetic wave emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winglee, R. M.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The wave emissions produced in Echo 7 experiment by active injections of electron beams were investigated to determine the properties of the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields for both the field-aligned and cross-field injection in such experiments and to evaluate the sources of free energy and relative efficiencies for the generation of the VLF and HF emissions. It is shown that, for typical beam energies in active experiments, electromagnetic effects do not substantially change the bulk properties of the beam, spacecraft charging, and plasma particle acceleration. Through simulations, beam-generated whistlers; fundamental z-mode and harmonic x-mode radiation; and electrostatic electron-cyclotron, upper-hybrid, Langmuir, and lower-hybrid waves were identified. The characteristics of the observed wave spectra were found to be sensitive to both the ratio of the electron plasma frequency to the cyclotron frequency and the angle of injection relative to the magnetic field.

  18. Optical beam deflection sensor: design and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, João M S; Marques, Renan B; Kitano, Cláudio; Rodrigues, Nicolau A S; Riva, Rudimar

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we present a double-pass optical beam deflection sensor and its optical design method. To accomplish that, a mathematical model was proposed and computational simulations were performed, in order to obtain the sensor's characteristic curves and to analyze its behavior as function of design parameters. The mathematical model was validated by comparison with the characteristic curves acquired experimentally. The sensor was employed to detect acoustic pulses generated by a pulsed laser in a sample surface, in order to show its potential for monitoring applications handling high energy input as laser welding or laser ablation.

  19. Interaction of a high-order Bessel beam with a submerged spherical ultrasound contrast agent shell - Scattering theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F G

    2010-03-01

    Acoustic scattering properties of ultrasound contrast agents are useful in extending existing or developing new techniques for biomedical imaging applications. A useful first step in this direction is to investigate the acoustic scattering of a new class of acoustic beams, known as helicoidal high-order Bessel beams, to improve the understanding of their scattering characteristics by an ultrasound contrast agent, which at present is very limited. The transverse acoustic scattering of a commercially available albuminoidal ultrasound contrast agent shell filled with air or a denser gas such as perfluoropropane and placed in a helicoidal Bessel beam of any order is examined numerically. The shell is assumed to possess an outer radius a=3.5 microns and a thickness of approximately 105 nm. Moduli of the total and resonance transverse acoustic scattering form functions are numerically evaluated in the bandwidth 0scattering of a helicoidal Bessel beam of order m1 so that the dynamics of contrast agents would be significantly altered. The main finding of the present theory is the suppression or enhancement for a particular resonance that may be used to advantage in imaging with ultrasound contrast agents for clinical applications. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  1. Multiple scattering of a zero-order Bessel beam with arbitrary incidence by an aggregate of uniaxial anisotropic spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.J.; Wu, Z.S.; Qu, T.; Shang, Q.C.; Bai, L.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the generalized multiparticle Mie theory, multiple scattering of an aggregate of uniaxial anisotropic spheres illuminated by a zero-order Bessel beam (ZOBB) with arbitrary propagation direction is investigated. The particle size and configuration are arbitrary. The arbitrary incident Bessel beam is expanded in terms of spherical vector wave functions (SVWFs). Utilizing the vector addition theorem of SVWFs, interactive and total scattering coefficients are derived through the continuous boundary conditions on which the interaction of the particles is considered. The accuracy of the theory and codes are verified by comparing results with those obtained for arbitrary plane wave incidence by CST simulation, and for ZOBB incidence by a numerical method. The effects of angle of incidence, pseudo-polarization angle, half-conical angle, beam center position, and permittivity tensor elements on the radar cross sections (RCSs) of several types of collective uniaxial anisotropic spheres, such as a linear chain, a 4×4×4 cube-shaped array, and other periodical structures consisting of massive spheres, are numerically analyzed. Selected results on the properties of typical particles such as TiO 2 , SiO 2 , or other particle lattices are calculated. This investigation could provide an effective test for further research on the scattering characteristics of an aggregate of anisotropic spheres by a high-order Bessel vortex beam. The results have important application in optical tweezers and particle manipulation. - Highlights: • Scattering of Bessel beam by an aggregate of uniaxial anisotropic spheres is studied. • The zero-order Bessel beam propagates and polarizes along arbitrary direction. • The accuracy of expansion coefficients, the scattering theory and codes is verified. • Effects of various parameters on scattering properties are numerically discussed. • Scattering properties of several type of periodical array are numerically analyzed.

  2. Hard two-photon contribution to elastic lepton-proton scattering determined by the OLYMPUS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, B.S.; Ice, L.D.; Khaneft, D.

    2016-12-01

    The OLYMPUS collaboration reports on a precision measurement of the positron-proton to electron-proton elastic cross section ratio, R 2γ , a direct measure of the contribution of hard two- photon exchange to the elastic cross section. In the OLYMPUS measurement, 2.01 GeV electron and positron beams were directed through a hydrogen gas target internal to the DORIS storage ring at DESY. A toroidal magnetic spectrometer instrumented with drift chambers and time-of-flight scintillators detected elastically scattered leptons in coincidence with recoiling protons over a scattering angle range of ∼20 to 80 . The relative luminosity between the two beam species was monitored using tracking telescopes of interleaved GEM and MWPC detectors at 12 , as well as symmetric Moeller/Bhabha calorimeters at 1.29 . A total integrated luminosity of 4.5 fb -1 was collected. In the extraction of R 2γ , radiative effects were taken into account using a Monte Carlo generator to simulate the convolutions of internal bremsstrahlung with experiment-specific conditions such as detector acceptance and reconstruction efficiency. The resulting values of R 2γ , presented here for a wide range of virtual photon polarization 0.456<ε<0.978, are smaller than some hadronic two-photon exchange calculations predict, but are in reasonable agreement with a subtracted dispersion model and a phenomenological fit to the form factor data.

  3. Hard two-photon contribution to elastic lepton-proton scattering determined by the OLYMPUS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, B.S. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ice, L.D. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Khaneft, D. [Mainz Univ. (Germany); Collaboration: OLYMPUS Collaboration; and others

    2016-12-15

    The OLYMPUS collaboration reports on a precision measurement of the positron-proton to electron-proton elastic cross section ratio, R{sub 2γ}, a direct measure of the contribution of hard two- photon exchange to the elastic cross section. In the OLYMPUS measurement, 2.01 GeV electron and positron beams were directed through a hydrogen gas target internal to the DORIS storage ring at DESY. A toroidal magnetic spectrometer instrumented with drift chambers and time-of-flight scintillators detected elastically scattered leptons in coincidence with recoiling protons over a scattering angle range of ∼20 to 80 . The relative luminosity between the two beam species was monitored using tracking telescopes of interleaved GEM and MWPC detectors at 12 , as well as symmetric Moeller/Bhabha calorimeters at 1.29 . A total integrated luminosity of 4.5 fb{sup -1} was collected. In the extraction of R{sub 2γ}, radiative effects were taken into account using a Monte Carlo generator to simulate the convolutions of internal bremsstrahlung with experiment-specific conditions such as detector acceptance and reconstruction efficiency. The resulting values of R{sub 2γ}, presented here for a wide range of virtual photon polarization 0.456<ε<0.978, are smaller than some hadronic two-photon exchange calculations predict, but are in reasonable agreement with a subtracted dispersion model and a phenomenological fit to the form factor data.

  4. Bremsstrahlung scattering calculations for the beam stops and collimators in the APS insertion-device beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Job, P.K.; Haeffner, D.R.; Shu, D.

    1994-12-01

    Bremsstrahlung is produced in the APS storage ring by the interaction of positrons with the residual gas molecules in the vacuum chamber of the storage ring. The bremsstrahlung production causes a serious challenge in shielding the insertion-device beamlines because the entire straight section (15 meters) is in the line of sight of the beamline. The radiation emerges in a narrow cone tangential to the beam path with the characteristic emission angle 1/γ, where γ is E/mc 2 which is the ratio of the kinetic energy to the rest mass for the positrons. This high-energy gamma radiation has an approximate 1/E spectrum with the maximum energy extending up to the particle energy (7 GeV for the APS). Bremsstrahlung, being high-energy photons, produces an electromagnetic shower when it encounters the beamline elements. A beamline element not thick enough to fully contain an electromagnetic shower can cause considerable scatter of the high-energy bremsstrahlung radiation. The low-energy component of the bremsstrahlung can also be scattered and create high dose rates in the first-optical and white-beam enclosures. The fully developed electromagnetic shower will have a photon spectrum almost independent of the material. The electromagnetic showers in the high-Z materials can also produce photoneutrons. This note reports the summary of EGS4 calculations performed on bremsstrahlung scattering from different beamline components in a typical APS insertion-device beamline. The related recommendations for shielding are also given. The shielding criterion adopted is a total dose rate of 2.5μSv/h (0.25 mrem/h) at 30 cm from the shield

  5. Multiple-scattering analysis of laser-beam propagation in the atmosphere and through obscurants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zardecki, A.; Gerstl, S.A.W.

    1983-01-01

    The general purpose, discrete-ordinates transport code TWOTRAN is applied to describe the propagation and multiple scattering of a laser beam in a nonhomogeneous aerosol medium. For the medium composed of smoke, haze, and a rain cloud, the problem of the target detectability in a realistic atmospheric scenario is addressed and solved. The signals reflected from the target vs the signals scattered from the smoke cloud are analyzed as a function of the smoke concentration. By calculating the average intensity and a correction factor in the x-y and r-z geometries, the consistency of the rectangular and cylindrical geometry models is assessed. Received power for a detector with a small field of view is computed on a sphere of 1-km radius around the laser source for the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory rural aerosol model with extinction coefficients of 4 km - 1 and 10 km - 1 . This computation allows us to study the received power as a function of the angle between the detector and source axes. The correction factor describing the multiple-scattering enhancement with respect to the simple Lambert-Beer law is introduced, and its calculation is employed to validate the use of the small-angle approximation for the transmissometer configuration. An outline of the theory for a finite field of view detector is followed by numerical results pertaining to the received power and intensity for various aerosol models. Recommendations regarding future work are also formulated

  6. Development of a system for simultaneously generating triple extreme conditions for neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimura, Shigeju

    1998-01-01

    We have developed new system available for controlling sample environment during the neutron scattering experiments. The system can simultaneously generate triple extreme conditions of low temperature, high magnetic field and high pressure. The system consists of : (1) a liquid-helium cryostat which enables the sample temperature range of 1.7 K to 200 K, (2) a superconducting magnet providing a vertical field up to 5 Tesla with antisymmetric split-coil geometry for polarized-beam experiments, and (3) a non-magnetic clamping high-pressure cell designed with the aim of generating hydrostatic pressure up to 2.5 Gpa. In the workshop, we will report the outline of the system and some results of performance tests using the system at JRR-3M of JAERI. (author)

  7. Development of a system for simultaneously generating triple extreme conditions for neutron scattering experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimura, Shigeju [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-10-01

    We have developed new system available for controlling sample environment during the neutron scattering experiments. The system can simultaneously generate triple extreme conditions of low temperature, high magnetic field and high pressure. The system consists of : (1) a liquid-helium cryostat which enables the sample temperature range of 1.7 K to 200 K, (2) a superconducting magnet providing a vertical field up to 5 Tesla with antisymmetric split-coil geometry for polarized-beam experiments, and (3) a non-magnetic clamping high-pressure cell designed with the aim of generating hydrostatic pressure up to 2.5 Gpa. In the workshop, we will report the outline of the system and some results of performance tests using the system at JRR-3M of JAERI. (author)

  8. Low-Dose and Scatter-Free Cone-Beam CT Imaging Using a Stationary Beam Blocker in a Single Scan: Phantom Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Dong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive imaging dose from repeated scans and poor image quality mainly due to scatter contamination are the two bottlenecks of cone-beam CT (CBCT imaging. Compressed sensing (CS reconstruction algorithms show promises in recovering faithful signals from low-dose projection data but do not serve well the needs of accurate CBCT imaging if effective scatter correction is not in place. Scatter can be accurately measured and removed using measurement-based methods. However, these approaches are considered unpractical in the conventional FDK reconstruction, due to the inevitable primary loss for scatter measurement. We combine measurement-based scatter correction and CS-based iterative reconstruction to generate scatter-free images from low-dose projections. We distribute blocked areas on the detector where primary signals are considered redundant in a full scan. Scatter distribution is estimated by interpolating/extrapolating measured scatter samples inside blocked areas. CS-based iterative reconstruction is finally carried out on the undersampled data to obtain scatter-free and low-dose CBCT images. With only 25% of conventional full-scan dose, our method reduces the average CT number error from 250 HU to 24 HU and increases the contrast by a factor of 2.1 on Catphan 600 phantom. On an anthropomorphic head phantom, the average CT number error is reduced from 224 HU to 10 HU in the central uniform area.

  9. Beam-dynamics design and performance of the rf deflector in the Los Alamos single-beam funnel experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guy, F.W.; Johnson, K.F.; Sander, O.R.

    1991-01-01

    Funnels in which two bunched ion beams are interlaced to form a single beam have been proposed for high-current low-emittance ion linacs. A well-designed funnel would produce a beam with twice the frequency and current and almost twice the brightness of each original beam. A single-beam funnel experiment exploring the beam- dynamics and physics issues of a discrete-element future has been completed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The only known beam-dynamics issue of concern in a two-beam funnel not addressed was the beam-beam interaction, which is negligible. The rf deflector, in which beam merging occurs, is a key component of a discrete-element funnel. We report the beam-dynamics design procedure and experimental results for the rf deflector. 8 refs., 5 figs

  10. Scattering of field-aligned beam ions upstream of Earth's bow shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kis

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Field-aligned beams are known to originate from the quasi-perpendicular side of the Earth's bow shock, while the diffuse ion population consists of accelerated ions at the quasi-parallel side of the bow shock. The two distinct ion populations show typical characteristics in their velocity space distributions. By using particle and magnetic field measurements from one Cluster spacecraft we present a case study when the two ion populations are observed simultaneously in the foreshock region during a high Mach number, high solar wind velocity event. We present the spatial-temporal evolution of the field-aligned beam ion distribution in front of the Earth's bow shock, focusing on the processes in the deep foreshock region, i.e. on the quasi-parallel side. Our analysis demonstrates that the scattering of field-aligned beam (FAB ions combined with convection by the solar wind results in the presence of lower-energy, toroidal gyrating ions at positions deeper in the foreshock region which are magnetically connected to the quasi-parallel bow shock. The gyrating ions are superposed onto a higher energy diffuse ion population. It is suggested that the toroidal gyrating ion population observed deep in the foreshock region has its origins in the FAB and that its characteristics are correlated with its distance from the FAB, but is independent on distance to the bow shock along the magnetic field.

  11. Scattering of field-aligned beam ions upstream of Earth's bow shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kis

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Field-aligned beams are known to originate from the quasi-perpendicular side of the Earth's bow shock, while the diffuse ion population consists of accelerated ions at the quasi-parallel side of the bow shock. The two distinct ion populations show typical characteristics in their velocity space distributions. By using particle and magnetic field measurements from one Cluster spacecraft we present a case study when the two ion populations are observed simultaneously in the foreshock region during a high Mach number, high solar wind velocity event. We present the spatial-temporal evolution of the field-aligned beam ion distribution in front of the Earth's bow shock, focusing on the processes in the deep foreshock region, i.e. on the quasi-parallel side. Our analysis demonstrates that the scattering of field-aligned beam (FAB ions combined with convection by the solar wind results in the presence of lower-energy, toroidal gyrating ions at positions deeper in the foreshock region which are magnetically connected to the quasi-parallel bow shock. The gyrating ions are superposed onto a higher energy diffuse ion population. It is suggested that the toroidal gyrating ion population observed deep in the foreshock region has its origins in the FAB and that its characteristics are correlated with its distance from the FAB, but is independent on distance to the bow shock along the magnetic field.

  12. Passively scattered proton beam entrance dosimetry with a plastic scintillation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Landon; Holmes, Charles; Sahoo, Narayan; Beddar, Sam

    2015-02-01

    We tested the feasibility of using plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) for proton entrance dosimetry. A PSD built with BCF-12 scintillating fiber was used to measure the absolute entrance dose of a passively scattered proton beam for energies ranging from 140 to 250 MeV, and for a range of spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) widths at two energies, to quantify the effect of ionization quenching on the response of the detector and to determine the necessity of Cerenkov radiation correction in proton beams. The overall accuracy and precision of the PSD was evaluated by measuring lateral beam profiles and comparing the results with profiles measured using film. The PSD under-responded owing to ionization quenching, exhibiting approximately a 7% loss of signal at the highest energy studied (250 MeV) and a 10% loss of signal at the lowest energy studied (140 MeV). For a given nominal energy, varying the SOBP width did not significantly alter the response of the PSD. Cerenkov radiation contributed negligibly to the PSD signal and can be safely ignored without introducing more than 1% error in the measured dose. Profiles measured with the PSD and film agreed to within the uncertainty of the detector, demonstrating good relative accuracy. Although correction factors were necessary to account for ionization quenching, the magnitude of the correction varied minimally over a broad range of energies; PSDs therefore represent a practical detector for proton entrance dosimetry.

  13. Passively scattered proton beam entrance dosimetry with a plastic scintillation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, Landon; Holmes, Charles; Sahoo, Narayan; Beddar, Sam

    2015-01-01

    We tested the feasibility of using plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) for proton entrance dosimetry. A PSD built with BCF-12 scintillating fiber was used to measure the absolute entrance dose of a passively scattered proton beam for energies ranging from 140 to 250 MeV, and for a range of spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) widths at two energies, to quantify the effect of ionization quenching on the response of the detector and to determine the necessity of Cerenkov radiation correction in proton beams. The overall accuracy and precision of the PSD was evaluated by measuring lateral beam profiles and comparing the results with profiles measured using film. The PSD under-responded owing to ionization quenching, exhibiting approximately a 7% loss of signal at the highest energy studied (250 MeV) and a 10% loss of signal at the lowest energy studied (140 MeV). For a given nominal energy, varying the SOBP width did not significantly alter the response of the PSD. Cerenkov radiation contributed negligibly to the PSD signal and can be safely ignored without introducing more than 1% error in the measured dose. Profiles measured with the PSD and film agreed to within the uncertainty of the detector, demonstrating good relative accuracy. Although correction factors were necessary to account for ionization quenching, the magnitude of the correction varied minimally over a broad range of energies; PSDs therefore represent a practical detector for proton entrance dosimetry. (paper)

  14. Self-pinched lithium beam transport experiments on SABRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, D.L.; Olson, C.L.; Poukey, J.W.; Shokir, I.; Cuneo, M.E.; Menge, P.R.; Johnston, R.R.; Welch, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    Self-pinched transport of ion beams has many advantages for ion-driven ICF applications involving high yield and energy production. The authors are currently preparing for a self-pinched lithium beam transport experiment on the SABRE accelerator. There are three transport elements that must eventually be demonstrated: (1) efficient lithium beam generation and ballistic transport to a focus at the self-pinched transport channel entrance; (2) self-pinched transport in the channel, requiring optimized injection conditions and gas breakdown; and (3) self-pinched transport of the equilibrated beam from the channel into free space, with associated aiming and stability considerations. In the present experiment, a hollow annular lithium beam from an applied-B extraction ion diode will be focused to small radius (r ≤ 2 cm) in a 60 cm long ballistic focus section containing argon gas at a pressure of a few Torr. The self-pinched transport channel will contain a low pressure background gas of 10--40 mTorr argon to allow sufficient net current to confine the beam for long distance transport. IPROP simulations are in progress to optimize the design of the ballistic and self-pinched transport sections. Progress on preparation of this lithium self-pinched transport experiment, including a discussion of transport system design, important gas breakdown issues, and diagnostics, will be presented

  15. A fully computerized multi-pass Fabry-Perot interferometer for Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohidar, H.; Berland, T.; Boger, F.; Joessang, T.; Feder, J.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a Multipass Fabry-Perot interforometer assembly for use in Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering experiments is reported. The optical alignment and the scattered signal data acquisition have been completely computerized. Digital scanning and alignment strategies of the Fabry-Perot resonator have been incorporated, which makes this instrument quite unique in this respect. The high contrast (∼10 10 ) and finesse (∼50) offered by this instrument makes it possible to detect Brillouin peaks from samples that have a small Brillouin scattering cross-section. As part of this system a compatible and precision sample chamber has been constructed, which has been designed to operate in the pressure and temperature ranges of 1-1000B and 20-150 o C, respectively. The cell has been constructed to be small and compact, but it still has a large heat capacity (∼250J/K) which ensures easy and stable temperature control of the liquid sample volume which has a size of 40 mm 3 . The achievable temperature stability is +-1mK and +-2mK for operating temperatures below and above 100 o C, respectively. The pressure stability is in the range of +-0.05B of the set pressure for pressures below 100B and it is +-0.05% for higher pressures up to 1000B. Both pressure and temperature are remotely monitored and controlled by a ND/100 computer. Special care has been taken in designing the optics of the pressure cell to ensure that both the primary and secondary reflections from the entrance window, as well as the main beam, go out of the scattering region in order to achieve higher signal-to-noise ratio in actual experiments

  16. First neutral beam injection experiments on KSTAR tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, S H; Chang, D H; Kim, T S; In, S R; Lee, K W; Jin, J T; Chang, D S; Oh, B H; Bae, Y S; Kim, J S; Park, H T; Watanabe, K; Inoue, T; Kashiwagi, M; Dairaku, M; Tobari, H; Hanada, M

    2012-02-01

    The first neutral beam (NB) injection system of the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak was partially completed in 2010 with only 1∕3 of its full design capability, and NB heating experiments were carried out during the 2010 KSTAR operation campaign. The ion source is composed of a JAEA bucket plasma generator and a KAERI large multi-aperture accelerator assembly, which is designed to deliver a 1.5 MW, NB power of deuterium at 95 keV. Before the beam injection experiments, discharge, and beam extraction characteristics of the ion source were investigated. The ion source has good beam optics in a broad range of beam perveance. The optimum perveance is 1.1-1.3 μP, and the minimum beam divergence angle measured by the Doppler shift spectroscopy is 0.8°. The ion species ratio is D(+):D(2)(+):D(3)(+) = 75:20:5 at beam current density of 85 mA/cm(2). The arc efficiency is more than 1.0 A∕kW. In the 2010 KSTAR campaign, a deuterium NB power of 0.7-1.5 MW was successfully injected into the KSTAR plasma with a beam energy of 70-90 keV. L-H transitions were observed within a wide range of beam powers relative to a threshold value. The edge pedestal formation in the T(i) and T(e) profiles was verified through CES and electron cyclotron emission diagnostics. In every deuterium NB injection, a burst of D-D neutrons was recorded, and increases in the ion temperature and plasma stored energy were found.

  17. First neutral beam injection experiments on KSTAR tokamaka)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, S. H.; Chang, D. H.; Kim, T. S.; In, S. R.; Lee, K. W.; Jin, J. T.; Chang, D. S.; Oh, B. H.; Bae, Y. S.; Kim, J. S.; Park, H. T.; Watanabe, K.; Inoue, T.; Kashiwagi, M.; Dairaku, M.; Tobari, H.; Hanada, M.

    2012-02-01

    The first neutral beam (NB) injection system of the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak was partially completed in 2010 with only 1/3 of its full design capability, and NB heating experiments were carried out during the 2010 KSTAR operation campaign. The ion source is composed of a JAEA bucket plasma generator and a KAERI large multi-aperture accelerator assembly, which is designed to deliver a 1.5 MW, NB power of deuterium at 95 keV. Before the beam injection experiments, discharge, and beam extraction characteristics of the ion source were investigated. The ion source has good beam optics in a broad range of beam perveance. The optimum perveance is 1.1-1.3 μP, and the minimum beam divergence angle measured by the Doppler shift spectroscopy is 0.8°. The ion species ratio is D+:D2+:D3+ = 75:20:5 at beam current density of 85 mA/cm2. The arc efficiency is more than 1.0 A/kW. In the 2010 KSTAR campaign, a deuterium NB power of 0.7-1.5 MW was successfully injected into the KSTAR plasma with a beam energy of 70-90 keV. L-H transitions were observed within a wide range of beam powers relative to a threshold value. The edge pedestal formation in the Ti and Te profiles was verified through CES and electron cyclotron emission diagnostics. In every deuterium NB injection, a burst of D-D neutrons was recorded, and increases in the ion temperature and plasma stored energy were found.

  18. 85: Representation of the lack of electronic equilibrium in high energy photon beams using modified scatter tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenwald, J.C.; Drouard, J.; Simonian, M.

    1987-01-01

    The lack of electronic equilibrium in high energy photon beams is significant in the build-up region, at the edge of the beams and at the edge of inhomogeneous structures. The authors propose to use the algorithms based on separation of primary and scatter and to include in the scatter tables a component representing the lack of electronic equilibrium for small depths and small field size. The value and limits of this approach are discussed and illustrated by several examples corresponding to different photon energies in the range 1 to 25 MV. Good agreement between calculations and measurements is obtained in most situations. 6 refs.; 5 figs

  19. Two-stream instability for a scattered beam propagating in a collisional plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newberger, B.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1979-01-01

    Significant progress was made in the understanding of the collisional stabilization of the high-frequency two-stream instability in a relativistic electron beam through a rigorous Vlasov treatment. Substantially different scaling with parameters are obtained in comparison with previous, essentially phenomenological, models and we have gained insight into the mechanism of the stabilization process. Further investigation of the 2-D case remains to be done. The issue of stabilization of the two-stream instability in finite geometry is as yet unexplored as is that of nonlinear saturation, by trapping, of the instability in the presence of momentum spread on the beam and collisions on the plasma electrons. These are important in the application of relativistic electron beams to the heating of dense plasmas and possibly in the interpretation of neutral gas propagation experiments. Extension of our research into these areas will necessarily rely on the investigations outlined above

  20. e+d- colliding beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiik, B.H.

    1980-12-01

    The author gives a review about e + e - experiments. Especially he considers tests of the electroweak theories, the search for the tau particle, the detection of new quarkonia and charmed and beauty particles, the hadron production in annihilation at high energies, the event topology and final state analysis, the evidence for gluons, as well as photon-photon interactions. (HSI)

  1. Electron scattering for exotic nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-04

    Nov 4, 2014 ... A brand-new electron scattering facility, the SCRIT Electron Scattering Facility, will soon start its operation at RIKEN RI Beam Factory, Japan. This is the ..... elastic scattering experiments to other short-lived isotopes once the elements are available from the ISOL system. 744. Pramana – J. Phys., Vol. 83, No.

  2. DARHT-II Long-Pulse Beam-Dynamics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Ekdahl, Carl; Bartsch, Richard; Bender, Howard; Briggs, Richard J; Broste, William; Carlson, Carl; Caudill, Larry; Chan, Kwok-Chi D; Chen Yu Jiuan; Dalmas, Dale; Durtschi, Grant; Eversole, Steven; Eylon, Shmuel; Fawley, William M; Frayer, Daniel; Gallegos, Robert J; Harrison, James; Henestroza, Enrique; Holzscheiter, M H; Houck, Timothy L; Hughes, Thomas P; Jacquez, Edward; Johnson, Douglas; Johnson, Jeffrey; Jones, Kenneth; McCuistian, Brian T; Meidinger, Alfred; Montoya, Nicholas; Mostrom, Chris; Moy, Kenneth; Nath, Subrata; Nielsen, Kurt; Oro, David; Rodriguez, Leroy; Rodriguez, Patrick; Rowton, Larry J; Sanchez, Manolito; Scarpetti, Raymond; Schauer, Martin; Schulze, Martin E; Simmons, David; Studebaker, Jan; Sturgess, Ronald; Sullivan, Gary; Swinney, Charles; Tang, Yan; Temple, Rodney; Tipton, Angela; Tom, C Y; Vernon Smith, H; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    When completed, the DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) will produce a 2-kA, 18-MeV electron beam with more than 1500-ns current/energy "flat-top." In initial tests DARHT-II has already accelerated beams with current pulse lengths from 500-ns to 1200-ns full-width at half maximum (FWHM) with more than1.2-kA, 12.5-MeV peak current and energy. Experiments are now underway with a ~2000-ns pulse length, but reduced current and energy. These pulse lengths are all significantly longer than any other multi-MeV LIA, and they define a novel regime for high-current beam dynamics, especially with regard to beam stability. Although the initial tests demonstrated absence of BBU, the pulse lengths were too short to test the predicted protection against ion-hose instability. The present experiments are designed to resolve these and other beam-dynamics issues with a ~2000-ns pulse length beam.

  3. Spin-noise spectroscopy of randomly moving spins in the model of light scattering: Two-beam arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, G. G.; Ryzhov, I. I.; Zapasskii, V. S.

    2018-01-01

    A strict analytical solution of the problem of spin-noise signal formation in a volume medium with randomly moving spin carriers is presented. The treatment is carried out in the model of light scattering in a medium with fluctuating inhomogeneity. Along with conventional single-beam geometry, we consider the two-beam arrangement, with the scattering field of the auxiliary (tilted) beam heterodyned on the photodetector illuminated by the main beam. It is shown that the spin-noise signal detected in the two-beam arrangement is highly sensitive to motion (diffusion) of the spin carriers within the illuminated volume and thus can provide additional information about the spin dynamics and spatial correlations of spin polarization in the volume media. Our quantitative estimates show that, under real experimental conditions, spin diffusion may strongly suppress the spin-noise signal in the two-beam geometry. The mechanism of this suppression is similar to that of the time-of-flight broadening with the critical distance determined by the period of two-beam spatial interference rather than by the beam diameter.

  4. SU-F-J-149: Beam and Cryostat Scatter Characteristics of the Elekta MR-Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duglio, M; Towe, S; Roberts, D [Elekta Limited, Crawley, West Sussex (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The Elekta MR-Linac combines a digital linear accelerator system with a 1.5T Philips MRI machine. This study aimed to determine key characteristic information regarding the MR-Linac beam and in particular it evaluated the effect of the MR cryostat on the out of field scatter dose. Methods: Tissue phantom ratios, profiles and depth doses were acquired in plastic water with an IC-profiler or with an MR compatible water tank using multiple system configurations (Full (B0= 1.5T), Full (B0=0T) and No cryostat). Additionally, an in-house CAD based Monte Carlo code based on Penelope was used to provide comparative data. Results: With the cryostat in place and B0=0T, the measured TPR for the MR Linac system was 0.702, indicating an energy of around 7MV. Without the cryostat, the measured TPR was 0.669. For the Full (B0=0T) case, out of field dose at a depth of 10 cm in the isocentric plane, 5 cm from the field edge was 0.8%, 3.1% and 5.4% for 3×3 cm{sup 2}, 10×10 cm{sup 2} and 20×20 cm{sup 2} fields respectively.The out of field dose (averaged between 5 cm and 10 cm beyond the field edges) in the “with cryostat” case is 0.78% (absolute difference) higher than without the cryostat for clinically relevant field sizes (i.e. 10×10 cm{sup 2}) and comparable to measured conventional 6MV treatment beams at a depth of 10 cm (within 0.1% between 5 cm and 6 cm from field edge). At dose maximum and at 5 cm from the field edge, the “with cryostat” out of field scatter for a 10×10 cm{sup 2} field is 1.5% higher than “without cryostat', with a modest increase (0.9%) compared to Agility 6MV in the same conditions. Conclusion: The study has presented typical characteristics of the MR-Linac beam and determined that out of field dose is comparable to conventional treatment beams. All authors are employed by Elekta Ltd., who are developing an MR-Linac.

  5. Proceedings of the workshop on scattering experiments under extreme conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, N.; Ikeda, H.; Ando, M.

    1991-10-01

    In the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK), as the research facilities, there are Photon Factory, the facility for utilizing the booster and University of Tokyo Meson Science Research Center. For the research on physical properties, it is very important to do structural analysis in a broad sense and to observe the behavior of quasiparticles in solids. The X-ray and pulsed neutrons required for these researches can be obtained in a single laboratory in KEK, and it is rare in the world. At this opportunity of the workshop on scattering experiments under extreme conditions, it is hoped that the positive interchange between both PF and booster groups will be carried out. The research on magnetic substances using X-ray is a most noteworthy utilization of synchrotron radiation. The discovery of X-ray resonance magnetic scattering by K. Namikawa is one of the remarkable researches using synchrotron radiation in the world. When the extreme conditions around samples are prepared, the quality of signals for the research on physical properties is to be heightened. In this report, the researches on physical properties under ultrahigh pressure and ultralow temperature are reported. (K.I.)

  6. NEUTRINO FACTORY AND BETA BEAM EXPERIMENTS AND DEVELOPMENT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALBRIGHT, C.; BERG, J.S.; FERNOW, R.; GALLARDO, J.; KAHN, S.; KIRK, H.; ET AL.

    2004-09-21

    The long-term prospects for fully exploring three-flavor mixing in the neutrino sector depend upon an ongoing and increased investment in the appropriate accelerator R&D. Two new concepts have been proposed that would revolutionize neutrino experiments, namely the Neutrino Factory and the Beta Beam facility. These new facilities would dramatically improve our ability to test the three-flavor mixing framework, measure CP violation in the lepton sector, and perhaps determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, and, if necessary, probe extremely small values of the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}. The stunning sensitivity that could be achieved with a Neutrino Factory is described, together with our present understanding of the corresponding sensitivity that might be achieved with a Beta Beam facility. In the Beta Beam case, additional study is required to better understand the optimum Beta Beam energy, and the achievable sensitivity. Neither a Neutrino Factory nor a Beta Beam facility could be built without significant R&D. An impressive Neutrino Factory R&D effort has been ongoing in the U.S. and elsewhere over the last few years and significant progress has been made towards optimizing the design, developing and testing the required accelerator components, and significantly reducing the cost. The recent progress is described here. There has been no corresponding activity in the U.S. on Beta Beam facility design and, given the very limited resources, there is little prospect of starting a significant U.S. Beta Beam R&D effort in the near future. However, the Beta Beam concept is interesting, and progress on its development in Europe should be followed. The Neutrino Factory R&D program has reached a critical stage in which support is required for two crucial international experiments and a third-generation international design study. If this support is forthcoming, a Neutrino Factory could be added to the Neutrino Community's road map in about a decade.

  7. Experiments of an intense H{sup -} ion beam acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, A.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Oka, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Asano, E.; Kawamoto, T.; Akiyama, R.; Kuroda, T.

    1995-08-01

    An intense H{sup -} beam of a single beamlet is extracted from a large multicusp plasma source operated with cesium seeding. The H{sup -} beams are accelerated up to 100keV by a single-stage or a two-stage electrode system. Spatial profiles of the beams are measured calorimetrically and a minimum beam divergence angle of 5mrad is achieved at a H{sup -} current density of 30mA/cm{sup 2} with a beam energy of 100keV. A ratio of an acceleration current to a H{sup -} current increases abruptly when a H{sup -} current saturates in the space charge limited region. This enhancement is mainly due to secondary electrons caused by the intersection of H{sup -} beams with an extraction grid. When an operating gas pressure decreases, the ratio of the acceleration current to the H{sup -} current decreases. This is related to a stripping loss of H{sup -} ions in the electrodes. A beam divergence angle becomes minimum when a ratio of V{sub acc} to V{sub ext} is set at a optimum value of 1.6 in the single-stage acceleration. This ratio is almost the same as that in the double-stage acceleration, where the optimum ratio of E{sub acc1}/E{sub ext} is 1.5. In the optimum E{sub acc1}/E{sub ext} ratio the divergence angle is not affected by V{sub acc2}. The divergence angle can be reduced by changing V{sub acc2} even if the ratio of E{sub acc1}/E{sub ext} is not optimized. The beam steering effect by permanent magnets buried in an extraction grid is observed in nine beamlets experiments. A simple calculation of a single particle trajectory gives a good approximation of the beam deflection angle. (author).

  8. Electron-beam lithography of gold nanostructures for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, Weisheng; Wang, Zhihong; Yang, Yang; Chen, Longqing; Syed, Ahad; Wong, Kimchong; Wang, Xianbin

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication of nanostructured substrates with precisely controlled geometries and arrangements plays an important role in studies of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Here, we present two processes based on electron-beam lithography to fabricate gold nanostructures for SERS. One process involves making use of metal lift-off and the other involves the use of the plasma etching. These two processes allow the successful fabrication of gold nanostructures with various kinds of geometrical shapes and different periodic arrangements. 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy) and Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules are used to probe SERS signals on the nanostructures. The SERS investigations on the nanostructured substrates demonstrate that the gold nanostructured substrates have resulted in large SERS enhancement, which is highly dependent on the geometrical shapes and arrangements of the gold nanostructures. (paper)

  9. Electron-beam lithography of gold nanostructures for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng

    2012-10-26

    The fabrication of nanostructured substrates with precisely controlled geometries and arrangements plays an important role in studies of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Here, we present two processes based on electron-beam lithography to fabricate gold nanostructures for SERS. One process involves making use of metal lift-off and the other involves the use of the plasma etching. These two processes allow the successful fabrication of gold nanostructures with various kinds of geometrical shapes and different periodic arrangements. 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy) and Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules are used to probe SERS signals on the nanostructures. The SERS investigations on the nanostructured substrates demonstrate that the gold nanostructured substrates have resulted in large SERS enhancement, which is highly dependent on the geometrical shapes and arrangements of the gold nanostructures. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  10. New Measurements of the Transverse Beam Asymmetry for Elastic Electron Scattering from Selected Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahamyan, S; Afanasev, A; Ahmed, Z; Albataineh, H; Aniol, K; Armstrong, D S; Armstrong, W; Arrington, J; Averett, T; Babineau, B; Bailey, S L; Barber, J; Barbieri, A; Beck, A; Bellini, V; Beminiwattha, R; Benaoum, H; Benesch, J; Benmokhtar, F; Bertin, P; Bielarski, T; Boeglin, W; Bosted, P; Butaru, F; Burtin, E; Cahoon, J; Camsonne, A; Canan, M; Carter, P; Chang, C C; Cates, G D; Chao, Y -C; Chen, C; Chen, J -P; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, E; Cisbani, E; Craver, B; Cusanno, F; Dalton, M M; De Leo, R; de Jager, K; Deconinck, W; Decowski, P; Deepa, D; Deng, X; Dutta, D; Etile, A; Ferdi, C; Feuerbach, J; Finn, J M; Flay, D; Franklin, G B; Friend, M; Frullani, S; Fuchey, E; Fuchs, S A; Fuoti, K; Garibaldi, F; Gasser, E; Gilman, R; Guisa, A; Glamazdin, A; Glesener, L E; Gomez, J; Gorchtein, M; Grames, J; Grimm, K; Gu, C; Hansen, O; Hansknecht, J; Hen, O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmes, R S; Holmstrom, T; Horowitz, C J; Hoskins, J; Huang, J; Humensky, T B; Hyde, C E; Ibrahim, H; Itard, F; Jen, C -M; Jensen, E; Jiang, X; Jin, G; Johnston, S; Katich, J; Kaufman, L J; Kelleher, A; Kliakhandler, K; King, P M; Kolarkar, A; Kowalski, S; Kuchina, E; Kumar, K S; Lagamba, L; Lambert, D; LaViolette, P; Leacock, J; Leckey IV, J; Lee, J H; LeRose, J J; Lhuillier, D; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Lubinsky, N; Mammei, J; Mammoliti, F; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Mazouz, M; McCormick, K; McCreary, A; McNulty, D; Meekins, D G; Mercado, L; Meziani, Z -E; Michaels, R W; Mihovilovic, M; Moffit, B; Monaghan, P; Muangma, N; Munoz-Camacho, C; Nanda, S; Nelyubin, V; Neyret, D; Nuruzzaman,; Oh, Y; Otis, K; Palmer, A; Parno, D; Paschke, K D; Phillips, S K; Poelker, M; Pomatsalyuk, R; Posik, M; Potokar, M; Prok, K; Puckett, A.J.R.; Qian, X; Qiang, Y; Quinn, B; Rakhman, A; Reimer, P E; Reitz, B; Riordan, S; Roche, J; Rogan, P; Ron, G; Russo, G; Saenboonruang, K; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Shahinyan, A; Silwal, R; Singh, J; Sirca, S; Slifer, K; Snyder, R; Solvignon, P; Souder, P A; Sperduto, M L; Subedi, R; Stutzman, M L; Suleiman, R; Sulkosky, V; Sutera, C M; Tobias, W A; Troth, W; Urciuoli, G M; Ulmer, P; Vacheret, A; Voutier, A; Waidyawansa, B; Wang, D; Wang, K; Wexler, J; Whitbeck, A; Wilson, R; Wojtsekhowski, B; Yan, X; Yao, H; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yim, V; Zana, L; Zhan, X; Zhang, J; Zhang, Y; Zheng, X; Ziskin, V; Zhu, P

    2012-11-05

    Here we have measured the beam-normal single-spin asymmetry A{sub n} in the elastic scattering of 1-3 GeV transversely polarized electrons from 1H and for the first time from 4He, 12C, and 208Pb. For 1H, 4He and 12C, the measurements are in agreement with calculations that relate An to the imaginary part of the two-photon exchange amplitude including inelastic intermediate states. Surprisingly, the 208Pb result is significantly smaller than the corresponding prediction using the same formalism. Our results suggest that a systematic set of new An measurements might emerge as a new and sensitive probe of the structure of heavy nuclei.

  11. De-squeeze the beams: the TOTEM and ATLAS/ALFA experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    A special week-long proton–proton run with larger beam sizes at the interaction point is intended to probe the p-p elastic scattering regime at small angles.   Nicola Turini, deputy spokesperson for TOTEM, in front of one of the experiment’s ‘Roman Pot’ detectors in the LHC tunnel. (Photo: Maximilien Brice/CERN) Usually, the motto of the LHC is “maximum luminosity”. But for a few days per year, the LHC ignores its motto to run at very low luminosity for the forward experiments. This week, the LHC will provide the TOTEM and ATLAS/ALFA experiments with data for a broad physics programme. The TOTEM experiment at Point 5 and the ATLAS/ALFA experiment at Point 1 study the elastic scattering of protons, which are not observable in normal operation runs. In the elastic scattering process, the two protons survive their encounter intact and only change directions by exchanging momentum. To allow this special run, the operators play with the so-c...

  12. Measurement of Compton scattering cross section during PrimEx-II Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Li; PrimEx Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The electron Compton scattering is the most known fundamental QED process, however, a precision measurement of its cross section for the beam energy above 1 GeV has been lacking up to now. An updated high precision measurement of the neutral pion lifetime via the Primakoff effect (PrimEx-II) experiment was performed in Hall B of Jefferson Lab in 2010. The experiment used small angle coherent photoproduction of π0's in the Coulomb field of a nucleus, i.e. the Primakoff effect, to determine the lifetime with a precision of less than 1.5 % . It therefore requires thorough understanding of the underlying systematic uncertainties. To facilitate that data for well known electromagnetic processes were taken concurrently with the photoproduction data. This analysis pertains to measuring the Compton scattering cross section, which occurs at similar kinematics as the primary process. The combination of the well established theory of this process with large collected statistics allowed to extract this cross section with high precision in an energy region of 4-5 GeV for 12C and 28Si targets. The results of this analysis will be presented. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contacts No. DE-FG02-03ER41528, NSF MRI PHY-0079840, Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, Mississippi State University and PrimEx collaboration.

  13. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering active gold nanoparticle/nanohole arrays fabricated through electron beam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsunghsueh; Lin, Yang-Wei

    2018-03-01

    Effective surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active substrates from gold nanoparticle and gold nanohole arrays were successfully fabricated through electron beam lithography with precise computer-aided control of the unit size and intergap distance. Their SERS performance was evaluated using 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA). These gold arrays yielded strong SERS signals under 785 nm laser excitation. The enhancement factors for 4-MBA molecules on the prepared gold nanoparticle and nanohole arrays maxed at 1.08 × 107 and 8.61 × 106, respectively. The observed increase in SERS enhancement was attributed to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) wavelength shifting toward the near-infrared regime when the gold nanohole diameter increased, in agreement with the theoretical prediction in this study. The contribution of LSPR to the Raman enhancement from nanohole arrays deposited on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass was elucidated by comparing SERS and transmission spectra. This simple fabrication procedure, which entails employing electron beam lithography and the controllability of the intergap distance, suggests highly promising uses of nanohole arrays as functional components in sensing and photonic devices.

  14. Exciting Science being done on the CG-2 Small Angle Neutron Scattering beam line at HFIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debeer-Schmitt, Lisa; Bailey, Kathy; Melnichenko, Yuri; Wignall, George; Littrell, Ken

    2010-03-01

    The small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) beam line, CG-2, has been in operation since 2007. CG-2 has been optimized so that structures from 0.5 to 200 nm can be thoroughly investigated. HFIR's cold source places the flux at CG-2 among the best in the world. Along with high flux, many varied sample environments can easily be integrated into the beam line which gives the user a versatile temperature range from 1.5 K to 1000K. In addition there are two cryomagents (horizontal 4.5 T and vertical 7 T), pressure cells and load frames available to users allowing for the availability of multiple configurations of experimental setups. Due to all the above equipment and the flux at CG-2, there have been many diverse and intriguing scientific developments. One such outcome is the study of flux- line lattices found in Type-II superconductors including the highly touted iron pnictides. Besides superconductors, other science studied on CG2 ranges from molecular self-assembly and interactions in complex fluids to phase separation, grain growth and orientation in metallurgical alloys.

  15. Dark Matter Search in a Beam-Dump eXperiment (BDX) at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battaglieri, M.

    2016-01-01

    MeV-GeV dark matter (DM) is theoretically well motivated but remarkably unexplored. This proposal presents the MeV-GeV DM discovery potential for a ∼ 1 m$^3$ segmented CsI(Tl) scintillator detector placed downstream of the Hall A beam-dump at Jefferson Lab, receiving up to 10 22 electrons-on-target (EOT) in 285 days. This experiment (Beam-Dump eXperiment or BDX) would be sensitive to elastic DM-electron and to inelastic DM scattering at the level of 10 counts per year, reaching the limit of the neutrino irreducible background. The distinct signature of a DM interaction will be an electromagnetic shower of few hundreds of MeV, together with a reduced activity in the surrounding active veto counters. A detailed description of the DM particle χ production in the dump and subsequent interaction in the detector has been performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Different approaches have been used to evaluate the expected backgrounds: the cosmogenic background has been extrapolated from the results obtained with a prototype detector running at INFN-LNS (Italy), while the beam-related background has been evaluated by GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. The proposed experiment will be sensitive to large regions of DM parameter space, exceeding the discovery potential of existing and planned experiments in the MeV-GeV DM mass range by up to two orders of magnitude.

  16. Dark Matter Search in a Beam-Dump eXperiment (BDX) at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglieri, M. [Univ. of Genova (Italy). National Institute for Nuclear Physics. et al

    2016-07-05

    MeV-GeV dark matter (DM) is theoretically well motivated but remarkably unexplored. This proposal presents the MeV-GeV DM discovery potential for a $\\sim$1 m$^3$ segmented CsI(Tl) scintillator detector placed downstream of the Hall A beam-dump at Jefferson Lab, receiving up to 10$^{22}$ electrons-on-target (EOT) in 285 days. This experiment (Beam-Dump eXperiment or BDX) would be sensitive to elastic DM-electron and to inelastic DM scattering at the level of 10 counts per year, reaching the limit of the neutrino irreducible background. The distinct signature of a DM interaction will be an electromagnetic shower of few hundreds of MeV, together with a reduced activity in the surrounding active veto counters. A detailed description of the DM particle $\\chi$ production in the dump and subsequent interaction in the detector has been performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Different approaches have been used to evaluate the expected backgrounds: the cosmogenic background has been extrapolated from the results obtained with a prototype detector running at INFN-LNS (Italy), while the beam-related background has been evaluated by GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. The proposed experiment will be sensitive to large regions of DM parameter space, exceeding the discovery potential of existing and planned experiments in the MeV-GeV DM mass range by up to two orders of magnitude.

  17. A new method for x-ray scatter correction: first assessment on a cone-beam CT experimental setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinkel, J [CEA-LETI MINATEC, Division of Micro Technologies for Biology and Healthcare, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Gerfault, L [CEA-LETI MINATEC, Division of Micro Technologies for Biology and Healthcare, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Esteve, F [INSERM U647-RSRM, ESRF, BP200, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Dinten, J-M [CEA-LETI MINATEC, Division of Micro Technologies for Biology and Healthcare, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France)

    2007-08-07

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) enables three-dimensional imaging with isotropic resolution and a shorter acquisition time compared to a helical CT scanner. Because a larger object volume is exposed for each projection, scatter levels are much higher than in collimated fan-beam systems, resulting in cupping artifacts, streaks and quantification inaccuracies. In this paper, a general method to correct for scatter in CBCT, without supplementary on-line acquisition, is presented. This method is based on scatter calibration through off-line acquisition combined with on-line analytical transformation based on physical equations, to adapt calibration to the object observed. The method was tested on a PMMA phantom and on an anthropomorphic thorax phantom. The results were validated by comparison to simulation for the PMMA phantom and by comparison to scans obtained on a commercial multi-slice CT scanner for the thorax phantom. Finally, the improvements achieved with the new method were compared to those obtained using a standard beam-stop method. The new method provided results that closely agreed with the simulation and with the conventional CT scanner, eliminating cupping artifacts and significantly improving quantification. Compared to the beam-stop method, lower x-ray doses and shorter acquisition times were needed, both divided by a factor of 9 for the same scatter estimation accuracy.

  18. Asymmetry measurements in nucleon--nucleon scattering with polarized beams and targets at ZGS to Fermilab energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakosawa, A.

    1977-01-01

    Results of various asymmetry measurements in nucleon-nucleon scattering with polarized beams and targets at ZGS energies are presented. A possible direct-channel resonance in the pp system is discussed. Most of the discussion above ZGS energies are aimed at future measurements

  19. Measurement of high-Q2 deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chekanov, S.; Kooijman, P.

    2006-01-01

    The cross sections for charged and neutral current deep inelastic scattering in e+p collisions with a longitudinally polarised positron beam have been measured using the ZEUS detector at HERA. The results, based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 23.8 pb−1 at , are given for both

  20. Measurement of charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Nicholass, D.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cindolo, F.; Corradi, M.; Iacobucci, G.; Margotti, A.; Nania, R.; Polini, A.; Antonelli, S.; Basile, M.; Bindi, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Contin, A.; Pasquale, S. De; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Bartsch, D.; Brock, I.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Jungst, M.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Samson, U.; Schonberg, V.; Shehzadi, R.; Wlasenko, M.; Brook, N. H.; Heath, G. P.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Singh, I.; Capua, M.; Fazio, S.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Tassi, E.; Kim, J. Y.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Kamaluddin, B.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Ning, Y.; Ren, Z.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Galas, A.; Olkiewicz, K.; Pawlik, B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bold, T.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Kisielewska, D.; Lukasik, J.; Przybycien, M.; Suszycki, L.; Kotanski, A.; Slominski, W.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Blohm, C.; Bonato, A.; Borras, K.; Ciesielski, R.; Coppola, N.; Fourletova, J.; Geiser, A.; Gottlicher, P.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Huttmann, A.; Januschek, F.; Kahle, B.; Katkov, I. I.; Klein, U.; Kotz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohr, B.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Miglioranzi, S.; Montanari, A.; Namsoo, T.; Notz, D.; Parenti, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Schneekloth, U.; Spiridonov, A.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Theedt, T.; Ukleja, J.; Wolf, G.; Wrona, K.; Yagues Molina, A. G.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Drugakov, V.; Lohmann, W.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Dobur, D.; Karstens, F.; Vlasov, N. N.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Dunne, W.; Forrest, M.; Rosin, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Gialas, I.; Papageorgiu, K.; Holm, U.; Klanner, R.; Lohrmann, E.; Perrey, H.; Schleper, P.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Sztuk, J.; Stadie, H.; Turcato, M.; Foudas, C.; Fry, C.; Long, K. R.; Tapper, A. D.; Matsumoto, T.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Aushev, V.; Bachynska, O.; Borodin, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kozulia, A.; Libov, V.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Makarenko, I.; Sorokin, Iu.; Verbytskyi, A.; Volynets, O.; Son, D.; de Favereau, J.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Barreiro, F.; Glasman, C.; Jimenez, M.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Ron, E.; Soares, M.; Terron, J.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Zambrana, M.; Corriveau, F.; Schwartz, J.; Walsh, R.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Stifutkin, A.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Khein, L. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Kollar, D.; Reisert, B.; Schmidke, W. B.; Grigorescu, G.; Keramidas, A.; Kooijman, P.; Pellegrino, A.; Tiecke, H.; Vazquez, M.; Brummer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Lee, A.; Ling, T. Y.; Allfrey, P. D.; Bell, M. A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Ferrando, J.; Foster, B.; Gwenlan, C.; Horton, K.; Oliver, K.; Robertson, A.; Walczak, R.; Bertolin, A.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Longhin, A.; Stanco, L.; Bellan, P.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S.; Oh, B. Y.; Raval, A.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cole, J. E.; Hart, J. C.; Abramowicz, H.; Ingbir, R.; Kananov, S.; Stern, A.; Kuze, M.; Maeda, J.; Hori, R.; Kagawa, S.; Okazaki, N.; Tawara, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Kaji, H.; Kitamura, S.; Ota, O.; Ri, Y. D.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Monaco, V.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Arneodo, M.; Ruspa, M.; Fourletov, S.; Stewart, T. P.; Boutle, S. K.; Butterworth, J. M.; Jones, T. W.; Loizides, J. H.; Wing, M.; Brzozowska, B.; Ciborowski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kulinski, P.; Luzniak, P.; Malka, J.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Perlanski, W.; Tymieniecka, T.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Ukleja, A.; Eisenberg, Y.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Brownson, E.; Reeder, D. D.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Wolfe, H.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Hartner, G.; Menary, S.; Noor, U.; Standage, J.; Whyte, J.

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e(-)p collisions with longitudinally polarised electron beams are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 175 pb(-1) collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a

  1. List of publications resulting from the Neutron Beam Scattering Programme supported by the Science and Engineering Research Council for 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    The paper lists the references of publications resulting from the Neutron Beam Scattering Programme supported by the Science and Engineering Research Council, covering the year 1984, but also including publications from 1983 not given in the previous issue of this listing. (author)

  2. Project and construction of energy degrading and scattering plates for electron beam radiotherapy for skin diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva

    2010-01-01

    There are many radiosensitive epidermotropics diseases such as mycosis fungo-ids and the syndrome of Sezary, coetaneous neoplasics originated from type T lymphocytes. Several studies indicate the eradication of the disease when treated with linear accelerators emitting electron beams with energies between 4 to 10 MeV. However, this treatment technique presents innumerable technical challenges since the disease in general reaches all patient's body, becoming necessary not only a very large field size radiation beam, but also deliver superficial doses limited to the skin depth. To reach the uniformity in the dose distribution, many techniques had already been developed. Based on these previous studies and guided by the report no. 23 of the American Association of Physicists in Medi-cine (AAPM), the present study developed an energy scattering and degrading plates and made dosimetry (computational and experimental), supplying subsidies for a future installation of Total Skin Electron Therapy (TSET) at the Servico de Radioterapia do Hospital das Clinicas de Sao Paulo. As part of the plates design, first of all, the energy spectrum of the 6 MeV electron beam of the VARIAN 2100C accelerator was reconstructed through Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNP4C code and based on experimental data. Once the spectrum is built, several materials were analyzed for the plates design based on radial and axial dose distribution, production of rays-x and dose attenuation. The simulation results were validated by experimental measurements in order to obtain a large field of radiation with 200 cm x 80 cm that meets the specifications of the AAPM protocol. (author)

  3. Soft X-ray generation via inverse compton scattering between high quality electron beam and high power laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masakazu Washio; Kazuyuki Sakaue; Yoshimasa Hama; Yoshio Kamiya; Tomoko Gowa; Akihiko Masuda; Aki Murata; Ryo Moriyama; Shigeru Kashiwagi; Junji Urakawa

    2007-01-01

    High quality beam generation project based on High-Tech Research Center Project, which has been approved by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in 1999, has been conducted by advance research institute for science and engineering, Waseda University. In the project, laser photo-cathode RF-gun has been selected for the high quality electron beam source. RF cavities with low dark current, which were made by diamond turning technique, have been successfully manufactured. The low emittance electron beam was realized by choosing the modified laser injection technique. The obtained normalized emmitance was about 3 m.mrad at 100 pC of electron charge. The soft x-ray beam generation with the energy of 370 eV, which is in the energy region of so-called water window, by inverse Compton scattering has been performed by the collision between IR laser and the low emmitance electron beams. (Author)

  4. Experimental study of Rayleigh scattering with a ruby laser beam: relative variation of scattered light with the number of scattering center and the gases nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, Charles

    1973-06-01

    The experimental variation of the scattered light with the number of scattering centers and with the refraction index of gases is in agreement with the theoretical Rayleigh scattering. A direct calibration System gives the absolute value of the Rayleigh ratio. The experimental value appears to be half of the theoretical one. (author) [fr

  5. Empirical binary tomography calibration (EBTC) for the precorrection of beam hardening and scatter for flat panel CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmer, Rainer; Kachelriess, Marc

    2011-04-01

    Scatter and beam hardening are prominent artifacts in x-ray CT. Currently, there is no precorrection method that inherently accounts for tube voltage modulation and shaped prefiltration. A method for self-calibration based on binary tomography of homogeneous objects, which was proposed by B. Li et al. ["A novel beam hardening correction method for computed tomography," in Proceedings of the IEEE/ICME International Conference on Complex Medical Engineering CME 2007, pp. 891-895, 23-27 May 2007], has been generalized in order to use this information to preprocess scans of other, nonbinary objects, e.g., to reduce artifacts in medical CT applications. Further on, the method was extended to handle scatter besides beam hardening and to allow for detector pixel-specific and ray-specific precorrections. This implies that the empirical binary tomography calibration (EBTC) technique is sensitive to spectral effects as they are induced by the heel effect, by shaped prefiltration, or by scanners with tube voltage modulation. The presented method models the beam hardening correction by using a rational function, while the scatter component is modeled using the pep model of B. Ohnesorge et al. ["Efficient object scatter correction algorithm for third and fourth generation CT scanners," Eur. Radiol. 9(3), 563-569 (1999)]. A smoothness constraint is applied to the parameter space to regularize the underdetermined system of nonlinear equations. The parameters determined are then used to precorrect CT scans. EBTC was evaluated using simulated data of a flat panel cone-beam CT scanner with tube voltage modulation and bow-tie prefiltration and using real data of a flat panel cone-beam CT scanner. In simulation studies, where the ground truth is known, the authors' correction model proved to be highly accurate and was able to reduce beam hardening by 97% and scatter by about 75%. Reconstructions of measured data showed significantly less artifacts than the standard reconstruction

  6. Track reconstruction for the Mu3e experiment based on a novel Multiple Scattering fit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozlinskiy Alexandr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mu3e experiment is designed to search for the lepton flavor violating decay μ+ → e+e+e−. The aim of the experiment is to reach a branching ratio sensitivity of 10−16. In a first phase the experiment will be performed at an existing beam line at the Paul-Scherrer Institute (Switzerland providing 108 muons per second, which will allow to reach a sensitivity of 2 · 10−15. The muons with a momentum of about 28 MeV/c are stopped and decay at rest on a target. The decay products (positrons and electrons with energies below 53MeV are measured by a tracking detector consisting of two double layers of 50 μm thin silicon pixel sensors. The high granularity of the pixel detector with a pixel size of 80 μm × 80 μm allows for a precise track reconstruction in the high multiplicity environment of the Mu3e experiment, reaching 100 tracks per reconstruction frame of 50 ns in the final phase of the experiment. To deal with such high rates and combinatorics, the Mu3e track reconstruction uses a novel fit algorithm that in the simplest case takes into account only the multiple scattering, which allows for a fast online tracking on a GPU based filter farm. An implementation of the 3-dimensional multiple scattering fit based on hit triplets is described. The extension of the fit that takes into account energy losses and pixel size is used for offline track reconstruction. The algorithm and performance of the offline track reconstruction based on a full Geant4 simulation of the Mu3e detector are presented.

  7. Probe experiment characterizing 30-MHz radio wave scatter in the high-latitude ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, M.; Gorokhov, N.; Tanaka, Y.; Yamagishi, H.; Hansen, T.

    1999-07-01

    A probe experiment, consisting of radio links between a common 30-MHz transmitter located at Murmansk, Russia, and two receivers used as the imaging riometer (two-dimensional 64 multiple-beam antenna) located at Ny Ålesund, Svalbard, and Tjornes, Iceland, was carried out to characterize wave scatter in the high-latitude ionosphere. They are nearly aligned with and perpendicular to the geomagnetic meridian, respectively. In experiments conducted in March-April 1994, the 30-MHz probe signals were identified at nighttime more frequently than during the day at both receiver stations during periods of increased geomagnetic activity near the path midpoints, indicating that a relationship between the propagation path and the location of the auroral oval controls signal identification. For the nighttime propagation paths within or crossing through the auroral oval, duty cycles of the probe signals were roughly correlated with increases in geomagnetic activity. Their arrival directions showed a spread with a dominant power on the low elevation and a normal distribution in azimuth. These results indicate that the probe signals are characterized as nonmeteoric "auroral E" scatter caused by irregular, large-scale profiles of electron density enhancements at the lower edge of the ionosphere. However, on 2 days of weak geomagnetic activity, strong probe signals with bursty behavior were identified by an extremely high duty cycle (˜98%) for the nighttime meridian path only, and their arrival directions showed an isotropic spread in azimuth. Such nonmeteoric probe signals are characterized as "coherent" scatter caused by small-scale (˜5 m) field-aligned irregularities in electron density in the E region ionosphere, related to "sporadic E" occurrence.

  8. Patient-specific scatter correction in clinical cone beam computed tomography imaging made possible by the combination of Monte Carlo simulations and a ray tracing algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot Thing, Rune; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image quality is limited by scattered photons. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations provide the ability of predicting the patient-specific scatter contamination in clinical CBCT imaging. Lengthy simulations prevent MC-based scatter correction from...

  9. Scaled beam merging experiment for heavy ion inertial fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Seidl

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Transverse beam combining is a cost-saving option employed in many designs for heavy ion fusion drivers. However, the resultant transverse phase space dilution must be minimized so as not to sacrifice focusability at the target. A prototype combining experiment has been completed employing four 3-mA Cs^{+} beams injected at 160 keV. The focusing elements upstream of the merge consist of four quadrupoles and a final combined-function element (quadrupole and dipole. Following the merge, the resultant single beam is transported in a single alternating gradient channel where the subsequent evolution of the distribution function is diagnosed. The results are in fair agreement with particle-in-cell simulations. They indicate that for some heavy ion fusion driver designs, the phase space dilution from merging is acceptable.

  10. Beam current transformer (BCT) for experiment WA1/2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    In experiment WA1/2, a 400 GeV proton beam from the SPS was directed at a target, downstream of which a hadron line selected, in several narrow momentum bands, a beam of either pi+ and K+ or pi- and K-. These neutrino-parent particles, before entering a 292 m long decay tunnel, passed through a set of 2 BCTs of a design seen here. They measured the hadron intensity (10^10 to 10^11 particles/pulse) with a precision of the order of 1%. There were 2 of them, for enhanced precision and confidence. After the discovery of neutral currents in the Gargamelle-experiment, WA1/2 was the first follow-up, high-precision experiment (Z.Phys.C35, 443-452, 1987 and Z.Phys.C45, 361-379, 1990). See also 7706516X.

  11. The neutrino factory and beta beam experiments and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, C.; Barger, V.; Beacom, J.F.; Berg, J.S.; Black, E.; Blondel, A.; Bogacz, S.; Brice, S.; Caspi, S.; Chou, W.; Cummings, M.; Fernow, R.; Finley, D.; Gallardo,; Geer, S.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.; Goodman, M.; Harris, D.; Huber, Patrick; Jansson, A.; Johnstone, C.; /Fermilab /Wisconsin U., Madison /Brookhaven /IIT, Chicago /Geneva U.

    2004-11-01

    The long-term prospects for fully exploring three-flavor mixing in the neutrino sector depend upon an ongoing and increased investment in the appropriate accelerator R&D. Two new concepts have been proposed that would revolutionize neutrino experiments, namely the Neutrino Factory and the Beta Beam facility. These new facilities would dramatically improve our ability to test the three-flavor mixing framework, measure CP violation in the lepton sector, and perhaps determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, and, if necessary, probe extremely small values of the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}. The stunning sensitivity that could be achieved with a Neutrino Factory is described, together with our present understanding of the corresponding sensitivity that might be achieved with a Beta Beam facility. In the Beta Beam case, additional study is required to better understand the optimum Beta Beam energy, and the achievable sensitivity. Neither a Neutrino Factory nor a Beta Beam facility could be built without significant R&D. An impressive Neutrino Factory R&D effort has been ongoing in the U.S. and elsewhere over the last few years and significant progress has been made towards optimizing the design, developing and testing the required accelerator components, and significantly reducing the cost. The recent progress is described here.

  12. New generation of cryogen free advanced superconducting magnets for neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirichek, O; Adroja, D T; Manuel, P; Bewley, R I; Brown, J; Kouzmenko, G; Wotherspoon, R

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in superconducting technology and cryocooler refrigeration have resulted in a new generation of advanced superconducting magnets for neutron beam applications. These magnets have outstanding parameters such as high homogeneity and stability at highest magnetic fields possible, a reasonably small stray field, low neutron scattering background and larger exposure to neutron detectors. At the same time the pulse tube refrigeration technology provides a complete re-condensing regime which allows to minimise the requirements for cryogens without introducing additional noise and mechanical vibrations. The magnets can be used with dilution refrigerator insert which expands the temperature range from 20mK to 300K. Here we are going to present design, test results and the operational data of the 14T magnet for neutron diffraction and the 9T wide angle chopper magnet for neutron spectroscopy developed by Oxford Instruments in collaboration with ISIS neutron source. First scientific results obtained from the neutron scattering experiments with these magnets are also going to be discussed.

  13. Virtual neutron scattering experiments - Training and preparing students for large-scale facility experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Hougaard Overgaard

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dansk Vi beskriver, hvordan virtuelle eksperimenter kan udnyttes i et læringsdesign ved at forberede de studerende til hands-on-eksperimenter ved storskalafaciliteter. Vi illustrerer designet ved at vise, hvordan virtuelle eksperimenter bruges på Niels Bohr Institutets kandidatkursus om neutronspredning. I den sidste uge af kurset, rejser studerende til et storskala neutronspredningsfacilitet for at udføre neutronspredningseksperimenter. Vi bruger studerendes udsagn om deres oplevelser til at argumentere for, at arbejdet med virtuelle experimenter forbereder de studerende til at engagere sig mere frugtbart med eksperimenter ved at lade dem fokusere på fysikken og relevante data i stedet for instrumenternes funktion. Vi hævder, at det er, fordi de kan overføre deres erfaringer med virtuelle eksperimenter til rigtige eksperimenter. Vi finder dog, at læring stadig er situeret i den forstand, at kun kendskab til bestemte eksperimenter overføres. Vi afslutter med at diskutere de muligheder, som virtuelle eksperimenter giver. English We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering. In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus on physics and data rather than the overwhelming instrumentation. We argue that this is because they can transfer their virtual experimental experience to the real-life situation. However, we also find that learning is still situated in the sense that only knowledge of particular experiments is transferred. We proceed to

  14. Verification of Compton scattering spectrum of a 662 keV photon beam scattered on a cylindrical steel target using MCNP5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thanh, Tran Thien; Nguyen, Vo Hoang; Chuong, Huynh Dinh; Tran, Le Bao; Tam, Hoang Duc; Binh, Nguyen Thi; Tao, Chau Van

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the possible application of a 137 Cs low-radioactive source (5 mCi) and a NaI(Tl) detector for measuring the saturation thickness of solid cylindrical steel targets. In order to increase the reliability of the obtained experimental results and to verify the detector response function of Compton scattering spectrum, simulation using Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP5) code is performed. The obtained results are in good agreement with the response functions of the simulation scattering and experimental scattering spectra. On the basis of such spectra, the saturation depth of a steel cylinder is determined by experiment and simulation at about 27 mm using gamma energy of 662 keV ( 137 Cs) at a scattering angle of 120°. This study aims at measuring the diameter of solid cylindrical objects by gamma-scattering technique. - Highlights: • This study aims a possible application a 137 Cs low-radioactive source (5 mCi) and a NaI(Tl) detector for measuring the saturation thickness of solid cylindrical steel targets by gamma-scattering technique. • Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP5) code is performed to verify on the detector response function of Compton scattering spectrum. • The results show a good agreement in response function of the experimental and simulation scattering spectra. • The saturation depth of a steel cylinder is determined by experiment and simulation at about 27 mm using gamma energy of 662 keV ( 137 Cs) at a scattering angle of 120°.

  15. Analysis of forward scattering of an acoustical zeroth-order Bessel beam from rigid complicated (aspherical) structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Chai, Yingbin; Gong, Zhixiong; Marston, Philip L.

    2017-10-01

    The forward scattering from rigid spheroids and endcapped cylinders with finite length (even with a large aspect ratio) immersed in a non-viscous fluid under the illumination of an idealized zeroth-order acoustical Bessel beam (ABB) with arbitrary angles of incidence is calculated and analyzed in the implementation of the T-matrix method (TTM). Based on the present method, the incident coefficients of expansion for the incident ABB are derived and simplifying methods are proposed for the numerical accuracy and computational efficiency according to the geometrical symmetries. A home-made MATLAB software package is constructed accordingly, and then verified and validated for the ABB scattering from rigid aspherical obstacles. Several numerical examples are computed for the forward scattering from both rigid spheroids and finite cylinder, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratios, the half-cone angles of ABBs, the incident angles and the dimensionless frequencies. The rectangular patterns of target strength in the (β, θs) domain (where β is the half-cone angle of the ABB and θs is the scattered polar angle) and local/total forward scattering versus dimensionless frequency are exhibited, which could provide new insights into the physical mechanisms of Bessel beam scattering by rigid spheroids and finite cylinders. The ray diagrams in geometrical models for the scattering in the forward half-space and the optical cross-section theorem help to interpret the scattering mechanisms of ABBs. This research work may provide an alternative for the partial wave series solution under certain circumstances interacting with ABBs for complicated obstacles and benefit some related works in optics and electromagnetics.

  16. A novel patch-field design using an optimized grid filter for passively scattered proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yupeng; Zhang Xiaodong; Dong Lei; Mohan, Radhe

    2007-01-01

    For tumors with highly complex shapes, a 'patching' strategy is often used in passively scattered proton therapy to match the sharp distal edge of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) of the patch field to the lateral penumbra of the through field at 50% dose level. The differences in the dose gradients at the distal edge and at the lateral penumbra could cause hot and cold doses at the junction. In this note, we describe an algorithm developed to optimize the range compensator design to yield a more uniform dose distribution at the junction. The algorithm is based on the fact that the distal fall-off of the SOBP can be tailored using a grid filter that is placed perpendicular to the beam's path. The filter is optimized so that the distal fall-off of the patch field complements the lateral penumbra fall-off of the through field. In addition to optimizing the fall-off, the optimization process implicitly accounts for the limitations of conventional compensator design algorithms. This algorithm uses simple ray tracing to determine the compensator shape and ignore scatter. The compensated dose distribution may therefore differ substantially from the intended dose distribution, especially when complex heterogeneities are encountered, such as those in the head and neck. In such a case, an adaptive optimization strategy can be used to optimize the 'grid' filter locally considering the tissue heterogeneities. The grid filter thus obtained is superimposed on the original range compensator so that the composite compensator leads to a more uniform dose distribution at the patch junction. An L-shaped head and neck tumor was used to demonstrate the validity of the proposed algorithm. A robustness analysis with focus on range uncertainty effect is carried out. (note)

  17. Measurements of beam-ion confinement during tangential beam-driven instabilities in PBX [Princeton Beta Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Kaita, R.; Takahashi, H.; Gammel, G.; Hammett, G.W.; Kaye, S.

    1987-01-01

    During tangential injection of neutral beams into low density tokamak plasmas with β > 1% in the Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX), instabilities are observed that degrade the confinement of beam ions. Neutron, charge-exchange, and diamagnetic loop measurements are examined in order to identify the mechanism or mechanisms responsible for the beam-ion transport. The data suggest a resonant interaction between the instabilities and the parallel energetic beam ions. Evidence for some nonresonant transport also exists

  18. Experiment of laser thomson scattering at HL-1 tokamak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Henian; Chen Jiafu; Yan Derong; Liu Aiping; Shi Peilan; Wang Wei; Liu Xiaomei

    1989-05-01

    The structure and performance of the Ruby Laser Thomson Scattering apparatus for HL-1 tokamak device is described. The method of acquisition and calibration of multichannel scattered signals are presented. Examples of measured electron temperature T. with experimental error are given

  19. SCATTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broome, J.

    1965-11-01

    The programme SCATTER is a KDF9 programme in the Egtran dialect of Fortran to generate normalized angular distributions for elastically scattered neutrons from data input as the coefficients of a Legendre polynomial series, or from differential cross-section data. Also, differential cross-section data may be analysed to produce Legendre polynomial coefficients. Output on cards punched in the format of the U.K. A. E. A. Nuclear Data Library is optional. (author)

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of fast neutron scattering experiments including DD-breakup neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, D.; Siebert, B.R.L.

    1993-06-01

    The computational simulation of the deuteron breakup in a scattering experiment has been investigated. Experimental breakup spectra measured at 16 deuteron energies and at 7 angles for each energy served as the data base. Analysis of these input data and of the conditions of the scattering experiment made it possible to reduce the input data. The use of one weighted breakup spectrum is sufficient to simulate the scattering spectra at one incident neutron energy. A number of tests were carried out to prove the validity of this result. The simulation of neutron scattering on carbon, including the breakup, was compared with measured spectra. Differences between calculated and measured spectra were for the most part within the experimental uncertainties. Certain significant deviations can be attributed to erroneous scattering cross sections taken from an evaluation and used in the simulation. Scattering on higher-lying states in [sup 12]C can be analyzed by subtracting the simulated breakup-scattering from the experimental spectra. (orig.)

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of fast neutron scattering experiments including DD-breakup neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, D.; Siebert, B.R.L.

    1993-06-01

    The computational simulation of the deuteron breakup in a scattering experiment has been investigated. Experimental breakup spectra measured at 16 deuteron energies and at 7 angles for each energy served as the data base. Analysis of these input data and of the conditions of the scattering experiment made it possible to reduce the input data. The use of one weighted breakup spectrum is sufficient to simulate the scattering spectra at one incident neutron energy. A number of tests were carried out to prove the validity of this result. The simulation of neutron scattering on carbon, including the breakup, was compared with measured spectra. Differences between calculated and measured spectra were for the most part within the experimental uncertainties. Certain significant deviations can be attributed to erroneous scattering cross sections taken from an evaluation and used in the simulation. Scattering on higher-lying states in 12 C can be analyzed by subtracting the simulated breakup-scattering from the experimental spectra. (orig.)

  2. Impact of using scatter-mimicking beams instead of standard beams to measure penetration when assessing the protective value of radiation-protective garments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A Kyle; Pasciak, Alexander S; Wagner, Louis K

    2018-03-01

    Use standardized methods to determine how assessment of protective value of radiation-protective garments changes under conditions employing standard beam qualities, scatter-mimicking primary beams, and a modified H p (10) measurement. The shielding properties of radiation-protective garments depend on the spectrum of beam energies striking the garment and the attenuation properties of materials used to construct the garment, including x-ray fluorescence produced by these materials. In this study the primary beam spectra employed during clinical interventional radiology and cardiology procedures (clinical primary beams, CPB) were identified using radiation dose structured reports (RDSR) and fluoroscope log data. Monte Carlo simulation was used to determine the scattered radiation spectra produced by these CPB during typical clinical application. For these scattered spectra, scatter-mimicking primary beams (SMPB) were determined using numerical optimization-based spectral reconstruction that adjusted kV and filtration to produce the SMPB that optimally matched the scattered spectrum for each CPB. The penetration of a subset of SMPB through four radiation-protective garments of varying compositions and nominal thicknesses was measured using a geometry specified by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The diagnostic radiological index of protection (DRIP), which increases with increasing penetration through a garment, was calculated using these measurements. Penetration through the same garments was measured for standard beams specified by the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM). Finally, 10 mm of PMMA was affixed to the inside of each garment and the DRIP remeasured in this configuration to simulate H p (10). The SMPB based on actual CPB were in general characterized by lower kV (range 60-76) and higher half-value layer (HVL, range 3.44-4.89 mm Al) than standard beam qualities specified by ASTM (kV range 70-85; HVL range 3.4-4.0 mm Al

  3. Ion power balance in neutral beam heated discharges on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Patrick William

    In this dissertation, ion power balance is studied in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). In order to fully understand all the terms in the power balance equation, an experiment was conducted in which the input power of the NSTX discharges was modulated using the neutral beam input power. Individual neutral beam sources were turned on or off to increase or decrease the input power. The modulations were designed to create a localized perturbation in the fast ion phase space distribution. Measurements were taken with diagnostics on NSTX including the neutral particle analyzer (NPA), the NSTX Thomson scattering diagnostic (MPTS) and the charge exchange diagnostic (CHERS), which measure the ion and electron density and temperature. Reconstructions of the plasma equilibrium were made using the LRDFIT code and power balance was calculated using the TRANSP transport code. The TRANSP code inputs the electron and ion temperatures and densities, and calculates the various power balance terms. Excess ion heating is shown to exist for some neutral beam heated discharges on NSTX. When all three neutral beam sources are on, the total power outflow through the various loss terms exceeds the input power calculated through classical heating of the ions by the slowing down of the neutral beams. The excess heating is approximately 0.5 MW of power, which represents 8% of the total power put into the plasma from the neutral beams. This excess heating occurs at the same time as an increase in the amplitude of high frequency compressional Alfven eigenmodes (CAEs) with frequencies of 0.5--1.4 MHz. The CAE amplitudes coincide both temporally and spatially with the onset of the excess heating. The high-k microwave scattering diagnostic and magnetic pickup coils were used to estimate the amplitudes of these modes. Full orbit calculations were then performed using these modes, which demonstrate that thermal ions can be heated by the CAEs. The Edge Neutral Density Diagnostic (ENDD

  4. Atomic-Beam Magnetic Resonance Experiments at ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the atomic-beam magnetic resonance (ABMR) experiments at ISOLDE is to map the nuclear behaviour in wide regions of the nuclear chart by measuring nuclear spins and moments of ground and isomeric states. This is made through an investigation of the atomic hyperfine structure of free, neutral atoms in a thermal atomic-beam using radio-frequency techniques. On-line operation allows the study of short-lived nuclei far from the region of beta-stability.\\\\ \\\\ The ABMR experiments on the |2S^1 ^2 elements Rb, Cs, Au and Fr have been completed, and present efforts are directed towards the elements with an open p-shell and on the rare-earth elements.\\\\ \\\\ The experimental data obtained are compared with results from model calculations, giving information on the single-particle structure and on the nuclear shape parameters.

  5. Neutral beam control systems for the Tandem Mirror Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, R.I.

    1979-01-01

    The Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) is presently developing the technology and approaches which will be used in larger fusion systems. This paper describes some of the designs which were used in creating the control system for the TMX neutral beams. To create a system of controls that would work near these large, rapid switching current sources required a mixture of different technologies: fiberoptic data transmission, printed circuit and wirewrap techniques, etc

  6. A polarized hydrogen/deuterium atomic beam source for internal target experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczerba, D.; Buuren, L.D. van; Brand, J.F.J. van den; Bulten, H.J.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Klous, S.; Kolster, H.; Lang, J.; Mul, F.; Poolman, H.R.; Simani, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    A high-brightness hydrogen/deuterium atomic beam source is presented. The apparatus, previously used in electron scattering experiments with tensor-polarized deuterium (Ferro-Luzzi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 2630; van den Brand et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78 (1997) 1235; Zhou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1998) 687; Bouwhuis et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1999) 3755), was configured as a source for internal target experiments to measure single- and double-polarization observables, with either polarized hydrogen or vector/tensor polarized deuterium. The atomic beam intensity was enhanced by a factor of ∼2.5 by optimizing the Stern-Gerlach focusing system using high tip-field (∼1.5 T) rare-earth permanent magnets, and by increasing the pumping speed in the beam-formation chamber. Fluxes of (5.9±0.2)x10 16 1 H/s were measured in a diameter 12 mmx122 mm compression tube with its entrance at a distance of 27 cm from the last focusing element. The total output flux amounted to (7.6±0.2)x10 16 1 H/s

  7. Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering at High Q2 with Longitudinally Polarised Lepton Beams at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kramer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Malinovski, E.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Pandurovic, M.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zlebcik, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2012-01-01

    Inclusive e\\pmp single and double differential cross sections for neutral and charged current deep inelastic scattering processes are measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The data were taken at a centre-of-mass energy of \\surds = 319GeV with a total integrated luminosity of 333.7 pb-1 shared between two lepton beam charges and two longitudinal lepton polarisation modes. The differential cross sections are measured in the range of negative fourmomentum transfer squared, Q2, between 60 and 50 000GeV2, and Bjorken x between 0.0008 and 0.65. The measurements are combined with earlier published unpolarised H1 data to improve statistical precision and used to determine the structure function xF_3^gammaZ. A measurement of the neutral current parity violating structure function F_2^gammaZ is presented for the first time. The polarisation dependence of the charged current total cross section is also measured. The new measurements are well described by a next-to-leading order QCD fit based on all published H1 inclusi...

  8. Limiting cases of the small-angle scattering approximation solutions for the propagation of laser beams in anisotropic scattering media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Box, M. A.; Deepak, A.

    1981-01-01

    The propagation of photons in a medium with strongly anisotropic scattering is a problem with a considerable history. Like the propagation of electrons in metal foils, it may be solved in the small-angle scattering approximation by the use of Fourier-transform techniques. In certain limiting cases, one may even obtain analytic expressions. This paper presents some of these results in a model-independent form and also illustrates them by the use of four different phase-function models. Sample calculations are provided for comparison purposes

  9. Few-body experiments with polarized beams and polarized targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    A survey is presented concerning recent polarization experiments in the elastic p-d, p- 3 He, and p- 4 He systems. Mention is made of selected neutron experiments. The nominal energy range is 10 to 1000 MeV. Recent results and interpretations of the p-d system near 10 MeV are discussed. New experiments on the energy dependence of back angle p-d tensor polarization are discussed with respect to resolution of discrepancies and difficulty of theoretical interpretation. Progress is noted concerning multiple scattering interpretation of forward p-d deuteron polarization. Some new results are presented concerning the p- 3 He system and higher energy p- 4 He polarization experiments. 52 references

  10. Oblate Field-Reversed Configuration Experiments with Neutral Beam Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    T., II; Gi, K.; Umezawa, T.; Inomoto, M.; Ono, Y.

    2011-11-01

    The effect of energetic beam ions on oblate Field-Reversed Configurations (FRCs) has been studied experimentally in the TS-4 plasma merging device. In order to examine its kinetic effects, we developed an economical pulsed Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) system by using a washer gun plasma source and finally attained the beam power of 0.6 MW (15 kV, 40 A) for its pulse length of 0.5 ms, longer than the FRC lifetime in TS-4. The Monte Carlo simulation indicates that the tangential NB ions of 15 keV are trapped between the magnetic axis and the separatrix. We found that two merging high-s (s is plasma size normalized by ion gyroradius) hydrogen spheromaks with opposite helicities relaxed into the large scale FRC with poloidal flux as high as 15 mWb under the assistance of the NBI. Without the assistance of NBI, however, they did not relax to an FRC but to another spheromak. These facts suggest some ion kinetic effects such as toroidal ion flow are essential to FRC stability. Recently, two new NB sources with acceleration voltage and current of 15 kV and 20 A were installed on the TS-4 device on the midplane for tangential injection, increasing the beam power over 1 MW. We will start the upgraded FRC experiments using the 1 MW NBI for ion flow control.

  11. Set of thermal neutron-scattering experiments for the Weapons Neutron Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, R.M.

    1975-12-01

    Six classes of experiments form the base of a program of thermal neutron scattering at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) Facility. Three classes are to determine the average microscopic positions of atoms in materials and three are to determine the microscopic vibrations of these atoms. The first three classes concern (a) powder sample neutron diffraction, (b) small angle scattering, and (c) single crystal Laue diffraction. The second three concern (d) small kappa inelastic scattering, (e) scattering surface phonon measurements, and (f) line widths. An instrument to couple with the WNR pulsed source is briefly outlined for each experiment

  12. TH-A-18C-04: Ultrafast Cone-Beam CT Scatter Correction with GPU-Based Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Bai, T [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Yan, H; Ouyang, L; Wang, J; Pompos, A; Jiang, S; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Zhou, L [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Scatter artifacts severely degrade image quality of cone-beam CT (CBCT). We present an ultrafast scatter correction framework by using GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and prior patient CT image, aiming at automatically finish the whole process including both scatter correction and reconstructions within 30 seconds. Methods: The method consists of six steps: 1) FDK reconstruction using raw projection data; 2) Rigid Registration of planning CT to the FDK results; 3) MC scatter calculation at sparse view angles using the planning CT; 4) Interpolation of the calculated scatter signals to other angles; 5) Removal of scatter from the raw projections; 6) FDK reconstruction using the scatter-corrected projections. In addition to using GPU to accelerate MC photon simulations, we also use a small number of photons and a down-sampled CT image in simulation to further reduce computation time. A novel denoising algorithm is used to eliminate MC scatter noise caused by low photon numbers. The method is validated on head-and-neck cases with simulated and clinical data. Results: We have studied impacts of photo histories, volume down sampling factors on the accuracy of scatter estimation. The Fourier analysis was conducted to show that scatter images calculated at 31 angles are sufficient to restore those at all angles with <0.1% error. For the simulated case with a resolution of 512×512×100, we simulated 10M photons per angle. The total computation time is 23.77 seconds on a Nvidia GTX Titan GPU. The scatter-induced shading/cupping artifacts are substantially reduced, and the average HU error of a region-of-interest is reduced from 75.9 to 19.0 HU. Similar results were found for a real patient case. Conclusion: A practical ultrafast MC-based CBCT scatter correction scheme is developed. The whole process of scatter correction and reconstruction is accomplished within 30 seconds. This study is supported in part by NIH (1R01CA154747-01), The Core Technology Research

  13. Electron Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaodong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Shaw, J.J.; Bahri, C.

    1990-01-01

    Electron scattering is one of the best probes available to us to probe the nucleus. It has revealed to us, with unprecedented accuracy, the charge and current distributions of nuclei. It has provided us with positive evidence for meson exchange currents. It was used to 'discover' the quark and it revealed to us that nucleons may be modified in the nuclear environment (EMC Effect). In short, electron scattering has revolutionized the study of nuclear physics. Several recent developments will insure that electron beams which will soon become availabe at CEBAF, Bates and elsewhere will make high-precision coincidence experiments possible. As the technology is becoming available, we are just beginning to exploit polarization degrees of freedom in our experiments. In this paper, we will introduce the formalism of electron scattering, review what we have learned in the past and look ahead toward the future

  14. Study of the possibility to use dp-elastic scattering for the Nuclotron external deuteron beam polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurchin, Yu.V.; Isupov, A.Yu.; Khrenov, A.N.; Kiselev, A.S.; Ladygin, V.P.; Reznikov, S.G.; Vasil'ev, T.A.; Janek, M.; Karachuk, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    A selection of dp-elastic scattering events at energies of 1.6 and 2.0 GeV by using scintillation counters has been performed. The procedure of the CH 2 -C subtraction has been established. The dependence of the elastic events yield on the filter thickness has been investigated. This method can be used to develop the efficient high-energy deuteron beam polarimetry

  15. Applications of FASTBUS to beam diagnostics and experiment data systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machen, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    A five-year effort by the North American NIM Committee, in collaboration with the ESONE Committee of European Laboratories, has resulted in a specification for the FASTBUS modular high-speed data-acquisition system. The system is designed around an emitter-coupled logic (ECL) 32-bit data bus for asynchronous data transmission at 100 ns per transaction. Initial applications of FASTBUS will be in experiment data systems at accelerator facilities worldwide--beam diagnostic data systems on the accelerator side and particle-beam experiment data systems in the experimental area. As the specification (and the resulting hardware and software) matures, real-time machine-control applications will become possible. This paper discusses the near-term use of FASTBUS in accelerator beam-diagnostics instrumentation systems, where an extra increment in system throughput and front-end processing speed can produce a greater understanding of the physical phenomena under study. The arguments and conclusions may be equally well applied to other similar data-handling problems requiring high bandwidth in the data system

  16. Beam Tests of the Balloon-Borne ATIC Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganel, O.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Ahn, E. J.; Ampe, J.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Case, G.; Chang, J.; Ellison, S.; Fazely, A.; Gould, R.

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon-borne experiment is designed to perform cosmic-ray elemental spectra measurement from 50 GeV to 100 TeV for nuclei from hydrogen to iron. These measurements are expected to provide crucial hints about some of the most fundamental questions in astroparticle physics today. ATTIC'S design centers on an 18 radiation length (X(sub Omnicron)) deep bismuth germanate (BGO) calorimeter, preceded by a 0.75 lambda(sub int) graphite target. In September 1999 the ATIC detector was exposed to high-energy beams at CERN's SPS accelerator, within the framework of the development program for the Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS). In December 2000 - January 2001, ATIC flew on the first of a series of long duration balloon (LDB) flights from McMurdo Station, Antarctica. We present here results from the 1999 beam-tests, including energy resolutions for electrons and protons at several beam energies from 100 GeV to 375 GeV, as well as signal linearity and collection efficiency estimates. We show how these results compare with expectations based on simulations, and their expected impacts on mission performance.

  17. Beam tests of the balloon-borne ATIC experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ganel, O; Ahn, H S; Ampe, J; Bashindzhagian, G L; Case, G; Chang, H; Ellison, S; Fazely, A; Gould, R; Granger, D; Gunasingha, R M; Guzik, T G; Han, Y J; Isbert, J; Kim, H J; Kim, K C; Kim, S K; Kwon, Y; Panasyuk, M Y; Panov, A; Price, B; Samsonov, G; Schmidt, W K H; Sen, M; Seo, E S; Sina, R; Sokolskaya, N; Stewart, M; Voronin, A; Wagner, D; Wang, J Z; Wefel, J P; Wu, J; Zatsepin, V

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon-borne experiment is designed to perform cosmic-ray elemental spectra measurements from 50 GeV to 100 TeV for nuclei from hydrogen to iron. These measurements are expected to provide information about some of the most fundamental questions in astroparticle physics today. ATIC's design centers on an 18 radiation length (X0) deep bismuth germanate (BGO) calorimeter, preceded by a 0.75λint graphite target. In September 1999, the ATIC detector was exposed to high-energy beams at CERN's SPS accelerator within the framework of the development program for the Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS). In December 2000–January 2001 and again in December 2002–January 2003, ATIC flew on the first two of a series of long-duration balloon (LDB) flights from McMurdo Station, Antarctica. We present here results from the 1999 beam tests, including energy resolutions for electrons and protons at several beam energies from 100 to 375 G...

  18. Clinical experience with routine diode dosimetry for electron beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Fontenla, Doracy P.; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Electron beam radiotherapy is frequently administered based on clinical setups without formal treatment planning. We felt, therefore, that it was important to monitor electron beam treatments by in vivo dosimetry to prevent errors in treatment delivery. In this study, we present our clinical experience with patient dose verification using electron diodes and quantitatively assess the dose perturbations caused by the diodes during electron beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A commercial diode dosimeter was used for the in vivo dose measurements. During patient dosimetry, the patients were set up as usual by the therapists. Before treatment, a diode was placed on the patient's skin surface and secured with hypoallergenic tape. The patient was then treated and the diode response registered and stored in the patient radiotherapy system database via our in-house software. A customized patient in vivo dosimetry report showing patient details, expected and measured dose, and percent difference was then generated and printed for analysis and record keeping. We studied the perturbation of electron beams by diodes using film dosimetry. Beam profiles at the 90% prescription isodose depths were obtained with and without the diode on the beam central axis, for 6-20 MeV electron beams and applicator/insert sizes ranging from a 3-cm diameter circular field to a 25 x 25 cm open field. Results: In vivo dose measurements on 360 patients resulted in the following ranges of deviations from the expected dose at the various anatomic sites: Breast (222 patients) -20.3 to +23.5% (median deviation 0%); Head and Neck (63 patients) -21.5 to +14.8% (median -0.7%); Other sites (75 patients) -17.6 to +18.8% (median +0.5%). Routine diode dosimetry during the first treatment on 360 patients (460 treatment sites) resulted in 11.5% of the measurements outside our acceptable ±6% dose deviation window. Only 3.7% of the total measurements were outside ±10% dose deviation. Detailed

  19. Calculation of radiative corrections to virtual compton scattering - absolute measurement of the energy of Jefferson Lab. electron beam (hall A) by a magnetic method: arc project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, D.

    1998-11-01

    This thesis presents the radiative corrections to the virtual compton scattering and the magnetic method adopted in the Hall A at Jefferson Laboratory, to measure the electrons beam energy with an accuracy of 10 4 . The virtual compton scattering experiments allow the access to the generalised polarizabilities of the protons. The extraction of these polarizabilities is obtained by the experimental and theoretical cross sections comparison. That's why the systematic errors and the radiative effects of the experiments have to be controlled very seriously. In this scope, a whole calculation of the internal radiative corrections has been realised in the framework of the quantum electrodynamic. The method of the dimensional regularisation has been used to the treatment of the ultraviolet and infra-red divergences. The absolute measure method of the energy, takes into account the magnetic deviation, made up of eight identical dipoles. The energy is determined from the deviation angle calculation of the beam and the measure of the magnetic field integral along the deviation

  20. Laser-driven proton beams applied to radiobiological experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yogo, Akifumi

    2012-01-01

    The proton accelerators based on the high intensity laser system generate shorter and higher pulse beams compared to the conventional particle accelerators used for the cancer therapy. To demonstrate the radiobiological effects of the new proton beams, the program to develop a biological irradiation instrument for the DNA double-strand break was started in the fiscal year 2008. A prototype instrument was made by making use of the J-KAREN (JAEA Kansai Advanced Relativistic Engineering) laser beam. Polyimide thin film targets were used to irradiate A-549 cells. The DNA double-strand break was tested by the fluorescence spectrometry. In the second year the quantitative yield of the DNA double-strand break and its proton dose dependence were measured. The results indicated that they were comparative to the cases of the conventional particle accelerators. In the fiscal year of 2010 the design of the magnetic field for the energy selection has been changed. The new irradiation instrument, the main part of which is only about 40 cm in length as illustrated in the figure, has been constructed and tested. The experiment has been carried out using the human cancer cells (HSG) and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) has been quantitatively evaluated by the colony assay for varied distribution of the proton beam energy. The survival fractions plotted against the dose were in good agreement with the case of 3 He beam. RBE was found not to be changed up to 1x10 7 Gy/s. Stability of the energy peak, half width and the proton density has been confirmed for this very compact instrument. (S. Funahashi)

  1. Electroweak parameters from a high statistics neutrino nucleon scattering experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blondel, A.; Boeckmann, P.; Burkhardt, H.; Dydak, F.; Grant, A.L.; Hagelberg, R.; Hughes, E.W.; Krasny, W.; Para, A.; Taureg, H.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wotschack, J. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Bluemer, H.; Brummel, H.D.; Buchholz, P.; Duda, J.; Kampschulte, B.; Kleinknecht, K.; Knobloch, J.; Mueller, E.; Renk, B. (Dortmund Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Physik); Belusevic, R.; Falkenburg, B.; Geiges, R.; Geweniger, C.; Hepp, V.; Keilwerth, H.; Tittel, K. (Heidelberg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Hochenergiephysik); Abramowicz, H.; Guyot, C.; Merlo, J.P.; Perez, P.; Perrier, F.; Schuller, J.P.; Turlay, R.; Vallage, B. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. de Physique des Particules Elementaires); Krolikowski, J.; Lipniacka, A. (Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. Fizyki Doswiadczalnej)

    1990-01-01

    The final results from the WA 1/2 neutrino experiment in the 1984 CERN 160 GeV narrow band beam are presented. The ratios R{sub nu} and Rsub(anti nu) of neutral to charged current interaction rates of neutrinos and antineutrinos in iron are measured to be R{sub nu}{equals}0.3072 {plus minus} 0.0033 and Rsub(anti nu)=0.382 {plus minus} 0.016. A value of the electroweak parameter sin{sup 2} theta{sub w}=1-m{sub W}{sup 2}/m{sub Z}{sup 2} is extracted from R{sub nu}. The result is sin{sup 2}/theta{sub w}=0.228+0.013(m{sub c}=1.5) {plus minus} 0.005(exp.){plus minus}0.003(theor.) where m{sub c} is the mass of the charmed quark in GeV for m{sub t}=60 GeV, M{sub H}=100 GeV, rho=1. Combining R{sub nu} and Rsub(anti nu), one obtains a value for rho=0.991 {plus minus} 0.023(m{sub c}=1.5){plus minus}0.020(exp.). Alternatively, R{sub nu} and Rsub(anti nu) yield a precise value of the ratio of intermediate vector boson masses m{sub W}/m{sub Z}=0.880-0.007 (m{sub c}-1.5){plus minus}0.002(exp.){plus minus}0.002(theor.). Comparison of these results with those from direct measurements of the vector boson masses are presented. In a model-independent analysis the left- and right-handed neutral current coupling constants, g{sub L}{sup 2} and g{sub R}{sup 2}, are determined. (orig.).

  2. Long baseline Super-Beam experiments in Europe within LAGUNA

    CERN Document Server

    Coloma, Pilar; Pascoli, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    We explore the physics reach of several possible configurations for a Super-Beam experiment in Europe, focusing on the possibilities of discovering $\\theta_{13}$, CP violation in the leptonic sector and the ordering of neutrino mass eigenstates. We consider the three different detector technologies: Water \\v{C}erenkov, Liquid Argon and Liquid Scintillator, and seven possible sites in Europe which would be able to host such a detector underground. The distances to these sites from CERN, where the beam would be originated, go from 130 km to 2300 km. The neutrino flux is optimized in each case as to match the first oscillation peak for each of the baselines under consideration. We also study the impact of several experimental factors in the performance of each detector technology. These include the reconstruction efficiencies for quasi-elastic events, the rejection efficiencies for the neutral-current backgrounds, the ratio between running times in neutrino and antineutrino modes and the systematic uncertainties...

  3. Size constraints on a Majorana beam-splitter interferometer: Majorana coupling and surface-bulk scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røising, Henrik Schou; Simon, Steven H.

    2018-03-01

    Topological insulator surfaces in proximity to superconductors have been proposed as a way to produce Majorana fermions in condensed matter physics. One of the simplest proposed experiments with such a system is Majorana interferometry. Here we consider two possibly conflicting constraints on the size of such an interferometer. Coupling of a Majorana mode from the edge (the arms) of the interferometer to vortices in the center of the device sets a lower bound on the size of the device. On the other hand, scattering to the usually imperfectly insulating bulk sets an upper bound. From estimates of experimental parameters, we find that typical samples may have no size window in which the Majorana interferometer can operate, implying that a new generation of more highly insulating samples must be explored.

  4. The National Facility for Small-Angle Neutron Scattering - five years' operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, W.C.; Bunick, G.J.; Child, H.R.; Hayter, J.B.; Lin, J.S.; Maddox, L.; Spooner, S.; Wignall, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    At the time of this Conference on Neutron Scattering, the ORNL-NSF-DOE National Facility for Small-Angle Neutron Scattering will have been operating routinely in a full-time user mode for nearly five years. The Facility, located at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL, is part of the National Center for Small-Angle Scattering Research. Operating experience and scientific highlights for the past five years are surveyed. (orig.)

  5. Experiments with a double solenoid system: Measurements of the 6He + p Resonant Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pampa Condori R.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A recent experiment has been performed in the double solenoid system Radioactive Ion Beams in Brasil (RIBRAS by impinging a pure 6He secondary beam on a thick CH2 target to measure the 6He + p excitation function. Results of this experiment will be presented.

  6. A fast filter processor as a part of the trigger logic in an elastic scattering experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenyon Gjerpe, I.

    1981-01-01

    A fast special purpose processor as a part of the trigger logic in an elastic scattering experiment is described. The decision to incorporate such a processor was taken because the trigger rate was estimated to be an order of magnitude higher than the date taking capability of the on-line minicomputer, a NORD 10. The processor is capable of checking the coplanarity and the opening angle of the two outgoing tracks within about 100 μs. This is done with a spatial resolution of 1 mm by using two points each track given by 3 MWPCs. For comparison this is two orders of magnitude faster than the same algorithm coded in assembly language on a PDP 11/40. The main contribution to this increased speed is due to extensive use of pipelining and parallelism. When running with the processor in the trigger, 75% more elastic events per incoming beam particle were collected, and 3 times as many elastic events per trigger were recorded on to tape for further in-depth analysis, than previously. Due to major improvements in the primary trigger logic this was less than the gain initially anticipated. A first version of the processor was designed and constructed in the CERN DD division by J. Joosten, M. Letheren and B. Martin under the supervision of C. Verkerk. The author was involved in the final design, construction and testing, and subsequently was responsible for the intergration, programming and running of the processor in the experiment. (orig.)

  7. First measurement of isoscalar giant resonances in a stored-beam experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Zamora

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A new technique developed for measuring nuclear reactions at low momentum transfer with stored beams in inverse kinematics was successfully used to study isoscalar giant resonances. The experiment was carried out at the experimental heavy-ion storage ring (ESR at the GSI facility using a stored 58Ni beam at 100 MeV/u and an internal helium gas-jet target. In these measurements, inelastically scattered α-recoils at very forward center-of-mass angles (θcm≤1.5° were detected with a dedicated setup, including ultra-high vacuum compatible detectors. Experimental results indicate a dominant contribution of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance at this very forward angular range. It was found that the monopole contribution exhausts 79−11+12% of the energy-weighted sum rule (EWSR, which agrees with measurements performed in normal kinematics. This opens up the opportunity to investigate the giant resonances in a large domain of unstable and exotic nuclei in the near future. It is a fundamental milestone towards new nuclear reaction studies with stored ion beams.

  8. The confinement of dilute populations of beam ions in the national spherical torus experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Miah, M.; Darrow, D.; Le Blanc, B.; Medley, S.; Roquemore, A.L.; Cecil, F.E.

    2003-01-01

    Short ∼3 ms pulses of 80 keV deuterium neutrals are injected at three different tangency radii into the national spherical torus experiment. The confinement is studied as a function of tangency radius, plasma current (between 0.4 and 1.0 MA), and toroidal field (between 2.5 and 5.0 kG). The jump in neutron emission during the pulse is used to infer prompt losses of beam ions. In the absence of MHD, the neutron data show the expected dependences on beam angle and plasma current; the average jump in the neutron signal is 88±39% of the expected jump. The decay of the neutron and neutral particle signals following the blip are compared to the expected classical deceleration to detect losses on a 10 ms timescale. The temporal evolution of these signals are consistent with Coulomb scattering rates, implying an effective beam-ion confinement time > or ∼ 100 ms. The confinement is insensitive to the toroidal field despite large values of ρ∇B/B < or ∼(0.25), so any effects of non-conservation of the adiabatic invariant μ are smaller than the experimental error. (author)

  9. Thermal management and prototype testing of Compton scattering X-ray beam position monitor for the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. H.; Yang, B. X.; Collins, J. T.; Ramanathan, M.

    2017-02-01

    Accurate and stable x-ray beam position monitors (XBPMs) are key elements in obtaining the desired user beam stability in the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade. In the next-generation XBPMs for the canted-undulator front ends, where two undulator beams are separated by 1.0 mrad, the lower beam power (changes through the interface via thermal simulations, the thermal contact resistance (TCR) of TIMs at an interface between two solid materials under even contact pressure must be known. This paper addresses the TCR measurements of several TIMs, including gold, silver, pyrolytic graphite sheet, and 3D graphene foam. In addition, a prototype of a Compton-scattering XBPM with diamond blades was installed at APS Beamline 24-ID-A in May 2015 and has been tested. This paper presents the design of the Compton-scattering XBPM, and compares thermal simulation results obtained for the diamond blade of this XBPM by the finite element method with in situ empirical measurements obtained by using reliable infrared technology.

  10. Scattering by ensembles of small particles experiment, theory and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafson, B.Aa.S.

    1980-01-01

    A hypothetical selfconsistent picture of evolution of prestellar interstellar dust through a comet phase leades to predictions about the composition of the circum-solar dust cloud. Scattering properties of thus resulting conglomerates with a bird's-nest type of structure are investigated using a micro-wave analogue technique. Approximate theoretical methods of general interest are developed which compared favorably with the experimental results. The principal features of scattering of visible radiation by zodiacal light particles are reasonably reproduced. A component which is suggestive of β-meteoroids is also predicted. (author)

  11. Scattering by ensembles of small particles experiment, theory and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, B. A. S.

    1980-01-01

    A hypothetical self consistent picture of evolution of prestellar intertellar dust through a comet phase leads to predictions about the composition of the circum-solar dust cloud. Scattering properties of thus resulting conglomerates with a bird's-nest type of structure are investigated using a micro-wave analogue technique. Approximate theoretical methods of general interest are developed which compared favorably with the experimental results. The principal features of scattering of visible radiation by zodiacal light particles are reasonably reproduced. A component which is suggestive of (ALPHA)-meteoroids is also predicted.

  12. Monte Carlo study of the effects of system geometry and antiscatter grids on cone-beam CT scatter distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Badal, A.; Kyprianou, I. S.; Stayman, J. W.; Vaquero, J. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The proliferation of cone-beam CT (CBCT) has created interest in performance optimization, with x-ray scatter identified among the main limitations to image quality. CBCT often contends with elevated scatter, but the wide variety of imaging geometry in different CBCT configurations suggests that not all configurations are affected to the same extent. Graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are employed over a range of imaging geometries to elucidate the factors governing scatter characteristics, efficacy of antiscatter grids, guide system design, and augment development of scatter correction. Methods: A MC x-ray simulator implemented on GPU was accelerated by inclusion of variance reduction techniques (interaction splitting, forced scattering, and forced detection) and extended to include x-ray spectra and analytical models of antiscatter grids and flat-panel detectors. The simulator was applied to small animal (SA), musculoskeletal (MSK) extremity, otolaryngology (Head), breast, interventional C-arm, and on-board (kilovoltage) linear accelerator (Linac) imaging, with an axis-to-detector distance (ADD) of 5, 12, 22, 32, 60, and 50 cm, respectively. Each configuration was modeled with and without an antiscatter grid and with (i) an elliptical cylinder varying 70–280 mm in major axis; and (ii) digital murine and anthropomorphic models. The effects of scatter were evaluated in terms of the angular distribution of scatter incident upon the detector, scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), artifact magnitude, contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and visual assessment. Results: Variance reduction yielded improvements in MC simulation efficiency ranging from ∼17-fold (for SA CBCT) to ∼35-fold (for Head and C-arm), with the most significant acceleration due to interaction splitting (∼6 to ∼10-fold increase in efficiency). The benefit of a more extended geometry was evident by virtue of a larger air gap—e.g., for a 16 cm

  13. Monte Carlo study of the effects of system geometry and antiscatter grids on cone-beam CT scatter distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Badal, A; Kyprianou, I S; Stayman, J W; Vaquero, J J; Siewerdsen, J H

    2013-05-01

    The proliferation of cone-beam CT (CBCT) has created interest in performance optimization, with x-ray scatter identified among the main limitations to image quality. CBCT often contends with elevated scatter, but the wide variety of imaging geometry in different CBCT configurations suggests that not all configurations are affected to the same extent. Graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are employed over a range of imaging geometries to elucidate the factors governing scatter characteristics, efficacy of antiscatter grids, guide system design, and augment development of scatter correction. A MC x-ray simulator implemented on GPU was accelerated by inclusion of variance reduction techniques (interaction splitting, forced scattering, and forced detection) and extended to include x-ray spectra and analytical models of antiscatter grids and flat-panel detectors. The simulator was applied to small animal (SA), musculoskeletal (MSK) extremity, otolaryngology (Head), breast, interventional C-arm, and on-board (kilovoltage) linear accelerator (Linac) imaging, with an axis-to-detector distance (ADD) of 5, 12, 22, 32, 60, and 50 cm, respectively. Each configuration was modeled with and without an antiscatter grid and with (i) an elliptical cylinder varying 70-280 mm in major axis; and (ii) digital murine and anthropomorphic models. The effects of scatter were evaluated in terms of the angular distribution of scatter incident upon the detector, scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), artifact magnitude, contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and visual assessment. Variance reduction yielded improvements in MC simulation efficiency ranging from ∼17-fold (for SA CBCT) to ∼35-fold (for Head and C-arm), with the most significant acceleration due to interaction splitting (∼6 to ∼10-fold increase in efficiency). The benefit of a more extended geometry was evident by virtue of a larger air gap-e.g., for a 16 cm diameter object, the SPR reduced

  14. Geant4 simulations of NIST beam neutron lifetime experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valete, Daniel; Crawford, Bret; BL2 Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    A free neutron is unstable and its decay is described by the Standard Model as the transformation of a down quark into an up quark through the weak interaction. Precise measurements of the neutron lifetime test the validity of the theory of the weak interaction and provide useful information for the predictions of the theory of Big Bang nucleosynthesis of the primordial helium abundance in the universe and the number of different types of light neutrinos Nν. The predominant experimental methods for determination of the neutron lifetime are commonly called `beam' and `bottle' methods, and the most recent uses of each method do not agree with each other within their stated uncertainties. An improved experiment of the beam technique, which uses magnetic and electric fields to trap and guide the decay protons of a beam of cold neutrons to a detector, is in progress at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD with a precision goal of 0.1. I acknowledge the support of the Cross-Diciplinary Institute at Gettysburg College.

  15. Cylindrical target Li-beam-driven hohlraum experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derzon, M.S.; Aubert, J.; Chandler, G.A.

    1998-06-01

    The authors performed a series of experiments on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) in May, 1994, and obtained a brightness temperature of 61 ± 2 eV for an ion-beam heated hohlraum. The hohlraum was a 4-mm-diameter, right-circular cylinder with a 1.5-mm-thick gold wall, a low-density CH foam fill, and a 1.5- or 3-mm-diameter diagnostic aperture in the top. The nominal parameters of the radially-incident PBFA II Li ion beam were 9 MeV peak energy (∼10 MeV at the gas cell) at the target at a peak power of 2.5 ± 0.3 TW/cm 2 and a 15 ns pulse width. Azimuthal variations in intensity of a factor of 3, with respect to the mean, were observed. Nonuniformities in thermal x-ray emission across the area of the diagnostic hole were also observed. Time-dependent hole-closure velocities were measured: the time-averaged velocity of ∼2 cm/micros is in good agreement with sound speed estimates. Unfolded x-ray spectra and brightness temperatures as a function of time are reported and compared to simulations. Hole closure corrections are discussed with comparisons between XRD and bolometer measurements. Temperature scaling with power on target is also presented

  16. Elastic scattering of surface plasmon polaritons: Modeling and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Coello, V.

    1998-01-01

    excitation wavelengths (594 and 633 nm) and different metal (silver and gold) films. The near-field optical images obtained are related to the calculated SPP intensity distributions demonstrating that the model developed can be successfully used in studies of SPP elastic scattering, e.g., to design...

  17. Terrestrial effects on dark matter-electron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emken, Timon; Kouvaris, Chris; Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2017-01-01

    techniques involving detection of dark matter-electron scattering offer new sensitivity to sub-GeV dark matter. Typically however it is implicitly assumed that the dark matter is not altered as it traverses the Earth to arrive at the detector. In this paper we study in detail the effects of terrestrial...

  18. CAPTAIN-Minerνa. Neutrino-Argon Scattering in a Medium-Energy Neutrino Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauger, Christopher M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-29

    The NuMI facility at Fermilab is currently providing an extremely intense beam of neutrinos for the NOνA, MINERνA and MINOS+ experiments. By installing the 5-ton CAPTAIN liquid argon TPC in front of the MINERνA detector in the NuMI beamline and combining the data from the CAPTAIN, MINERνA and MINOS+ detectors, a broad program of few-GeV neutrino cross section measurements on argon can be pursued. These measurements will be extremely helpful for future oscillation experiments. By directly comparing the cross sections on argon to MINERνA’s scintillator (CH) target, a new level of precision can be achieved in the measurements of the effects of the nucleus on neutrino interactions. These effects are of interest to not only the particle physics but also the nuclear physics community. This document describes in detail the physics goals of the CAPTAIN-MINERνA experiment, in addition to a first estimate of the technical resources required to install, commission and operate the CAPTAIN detector in front of the MINERVA detector.

  19. Projection correlation based view interpolation for cone beam CT: primary fluence restoration in scatter measurement with a moving beam stop array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Hao; Mou Xuanqin; Tang Shaojie; Xu Qiong; Zankl, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Scatter correction is an open problem in x-ray cone beam (CB) CT. The measurement of scatter intensity with a moving beam stop array (BSA) is a promising technique that offers a low patient dose and accurate scatter measurement. However, when restoring the blocked primary fluence behind the BSA, spatial interpolation cannot well restore the high-frequency part, causing streaks in the reconstructed image. To address this problem, we deduce a projection correlation (PC) to utilize the redundancy (over-determined information) in neighbouring CB views. PC indicates that the main high-frequency information is contained in neighbouring angular projections, instead of the current projection itself, which provides a guiding principle that applies to high-frequency information restoration. On this basis, we present the projection correlation based view interpolation (PC-VI) algorithm; that it outperforms the use of only spatial interpolation is validated. The PC-VI based moving BSA method is developed. In this method, PC-VI is employed instead of spatial interpolation, and new moving modes are designed, which greatly improve the performance of the moving BSA method in terms of reliability and practicability. Evaluation is made on a high-resolution voxel-based human phantom realistically including the entire procedure of scatter measurement with a moving BSA, which is simulated by analytical ray-tracing plus Monte Carlo simulation with EGSnrc. With the proposed method, we get visually artefact-free images approaching the ideal correction. Compared with the spatial interpolation based method, the relative mean square error is reduced by a factor of 6.05-15.94 for different slices. PC-VI does well in CB redundancy mining; therefore, it has further potential in CBCT studies.

  20. MUST: A silicon strip detector array for radioactive beam experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Blumenfeld, Y; Sauvestre, J E; Maréchal, F; Ottini, S; Alamanos, N; Barbier, A; Beaumel, D; Bonnereau, B; Charlet, D; Clavelin, J F; Courtat, P; Delbourgo-Salvador, P; Douet, R; Engrand, M; Ethvignot, T; Gillibert, A; Khan, E; Lapoux, V; Lagoyannis, A; Lavergne, L; Lebon, S; Lelong, P; Lesage, A; Le Ven, V; Lhenry, I; Martin, J M; Musumarra, A; Pita, S; Petizon, L; Pollacco, E; Pouthas, J; Richard, A; Rougier, D; Santonocito, D; Scarpaci, J A; Sida, J L; Soulet, C; Stutzmann, J S; Suomijärvi, T; Szmigiel, M; Volkov, P; Voltolini, G

    1999-01-01

    A new and innovative array, MUST, based on silicon strip technology and dedicated to the study of reactions induced by radioactive beams on light particles is described. The detector consists of 8 silicon strip - Si(Li) telescopes used to identify recoiling light charged particles through time of flight, energy loss and energy measurements and to determine precisely their scattering angle through X, Y position measurements. Each 60x60 mm sup 2 double sided silicon strip detector with 60 vertical and 60 horizontal strips yields an X-Y position resolution of 1 mm, an energy resolution of 50 keV, a time resolution of around 1 ns and a 500 keV energy threshold for protons. The backing Si(Li) detectors stop protons up to 25 MeV with a resolution of approximately 50 keV. CsI crystals read out by photo-diodes which stop protons up to 70 MeV are added to the telescopes for applications where higher energy particles need to be detected. The dedicated electronics in VXIbus standard allow us to house the 968 logic and a...

  1. Beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on the unpolarised proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Laboratory of Physics; Akopov, N. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); Akopov, Z. [DESY Hamburg (DE)] (and others)

    2012-03-15

    Beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries in the hard exclusive leptoproduction of real photons from an unpolarised hydrogen target by a 27.6 GeV lepton beam are extracted from the HERMES data set of 2006-2007 using a missing-mass event selection technique. The asymmetry amplitudes extracted from this data set are more precise than those extracted from the earlier data set of 1996-2005 previously analysed in the same manner by HERMES. The results from the two data sets are compatible with each other. Results from these combined data sets are extracted and constitute the most precise asymmetry amplitude measurements made in the HERMES kinematic region using a missing-mass event selection technique. (orig.)

  2. Simulation of complete neutron scattering experiments: from model systems to liquid germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugouvieux, V.

    2004-11-01

    In this thesis, both theoretical and experimental studies of liquids are done. Neutron scattering enables structural and dynamical properties of liquids to be investigated. On the theoretical side, molecular dynamics simulations are of great interest since they give positions and velocities of the atoms and the forces acting on each of them. They also enable spatial and temporal correlations to be computed and these quantities are also available from neutron scattering experiments. Consequently, the comparison can be made between results from molecular dynamics simulations and from neutron scattering experiments, in order to improve our understanding of the structure and dynamics of liquids. However, since extracting reliable data from a neutron scattering experiment is difficult, we propose to simulate the experiment as a whole, including both instrument and sample, in order to gain understanding and to evaluate the impact of the different parasitic contributions (absorption, multiple scattering associated with elastic and inelastic scattering, instrument resolution). This approach, in which the sample is described by its structure and dynamics as computed from molecular dynamics simulations, is presented and tested on isotropic model systems. Then liquid germanium is investigated by inelastic neutron scattering and both classical and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. This enables us to simulate the experiment we performed and to evaluate the influence of the contributions from the instrument and from the sample on the detected signal. (author)

  3. Optimisation of beam-pipe shielding for MUCH detector of CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.; Farooq, M.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is one of the major scientific pillars of FAIR. The main goal of the experiment is to explore the Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) phase diagram in the regions of high baryonic densities and moderate temperatures in the beam energy range of 10-45 AGeV. This includes also the search for the critical point, the first order deconfinement phase transition from the hadronic matter to the partonic matter and the study of equation-of-state of dense baryonic matter. The CBM research program comprises a comprehensive scan of observables, beam energies and collision systems. The observables includes low-mass dilepton pairs, charmonia and open charm, but also collective flow of rare and bulk particles, correlations and fluctuations. Some of the particles under study have low cross-sections (like charm) or small branching ratios (like low-mass vector mesons). Therefore, in order to compensate for the low yield the measurements have to be performed at very high reaction rates of up to about 10 MHz. These conditions demand for fast and radiation hard detectors and associated fast electronics, readout and online event reconstruction. Low material budget is required with in the detector acceptance to avoid multiple scattering which would limit high-precision measurements

  4. In vitro irradiation station for broad beam radiobiological experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wéra, A.-C.; Riquier, H.; Heuskin, A.-C.; Michiels, C.; Lucas, S.

    2011-01-01

    The study of the interaction of charged particles with living matter is of prime importance to the fields of radiotherapy, radioprotection and space radiobiology. Particle accelerators and their associated equipment are proven to be helpful tools in performing basic science in all these fields. Indeed, they can accelerate virtually any ions to a given energy and flux and let them interact with living matter either in vivo or in vitro. In this context, the University of Namur has developed a broad beam in vitro irradiation station for use in radiobiological experiments. Cells are handled in GLP conditions and can be irradiated at various fluxes with ions ranging from hydrogen to carbon. The station is mounted on a 2 MV tandem accelerator, and the energy range can be set up in the linear energy transfer (LET) ranges that are useful for radiobiological experiments. This paper describes the current status of the hardware that has been developed, and presents results related to its performance in term of dose-rate, energy range and beam uniformity for protons, alpha particles and carbon ions. The results of clonogenic assays of A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells irradiated with protons and alpha particles are also presented and compared with literature.

  5. WE-DE-207B-12: Scatter Correction for Dedicated Cone Beam Breast CT Based On a Forward Projection Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, L; Zhu, L [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (Georgia); Vedantham, S; Karellas, A [University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The image quality of dedicated cone-beam breast CT (CBBCT) is fundamentally limited by substantial x-ray scatter contamination, resulting in cupping artifacts and contrast-loss in reconstructed images. Such effects obscure the visibility of soft-tissue lesions and calcifications, which hinders breast cancer detection and diagnosis. In this work, we propose to suppress x-ray scatter in CBBCT images using a deterministic forward projection model. Method: We first use the 1st-pass FDK-reconstructed CBBCT images to segment fibroglandular and adipose tissue. Attenuation coefficients are assigned to the two tissues based on the x-ray spectrum used for imaging acquisition, and is forward projected to simulate scatter-free primary projections. We estimate the scatter by subtracting the simulated primary projection from the measured projection, and then the resultant scatter map is further refined by a Fourier-domain fitting algorithm after discarding untrusted scatter information. The final scatter estimate is subtracted from the measured projection for effective scatter correction. In our implementation, the proposed scatter correction takes 0.5 seconds for each projection. The method was evaluated using the overall image spatial non-uniformity (SNU) metric and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) with 5 clinical datasets of BI-RADS 4/5 subjects. Results: For the 5 clinical datasets, our method reduced the SNU from 7.79% to 1.68% in coronal view and from 6.71% to 3.20% in sagittal view. The average CNR is improved by a factor of 1.38 in coronal view and 1.26 in sagittal view. Conclusion: The proposed scatter correction approach requires no additional scans or prior images and uses a deterministic model for efficient calculation. Evaluation with clinical datasets demonstrates the feasibility and stability of the method. These features are attractive for clinical CBBCT and make our method distinct from other approaches. Supported partly by NIH R21EB019597, R21CA134128

  6. Resonance scattering of a dielectric sphere illuminated by electromagnetic Bessel non-diffracting (vortex) beams with arbitrary incidence and selective polarizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitri, F.G., E-mail: F.G.Mitri@ieee.org [Chevron, Area 52 Technology–ETC, 5 Bisbee Ct., Santa Fe, NM 87508 (United States); Li, R.X., E-mail: rxli@mail.xidian.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Xidian University, Xi’an 710071 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Information Sensing and Understanding, Xidian University, Xi’an 710071 (China); Guo, L.X. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Xidian University, Xi’an 710071 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Information Sensing and Understanding, Xidian University, Xi’an 710071 (China); Ding, C.Y. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Xidian University, Xi’an 710071 (China)

    2015-10-15

    A complete description of vector Bessel (vortex) beams in the context of the generalized Lorenz–Mie theory (GLMT) for the electromagnetic (EM) resonance scattering by a dielectric sphere is presented, using the method of separation of variables and the subtraction of a non-resonant background (corresponding to a perfectly conducting sphere of the same size) from the standard Mie scattering coefficients. Unlike the conventional results of standard optical radiation, the resonance scattering of a dielectric sphere in air in the field of EM Bessel beams is examined and demonstrated with particular emphasis on the EM field’s polarization and beam order (or topological charge). Linear, circular, radial, azimuthal polarizations as well as unpolarized Bessel vortex beams are considered. The conditions required for the resonance scattering are analyzed, stemming from the vectorial description of the EM field using the angular spectrum decomposition, the derivation of the beam-shape coefficients (BSCs) using the integral localized approximation (ILA) and Neumann–Graf’s addition theorem, and the determination of the scattering coefficients of the sphere using Debye series. In contrast with the standard scattering theory, the resonance method presented here allows the quantitative description of the scattering using Debye series by separating diffraction effects from the external and internal reflections from the sphere. Furthermore, the analysis is extended to include rainbow formation in Bessel beams and the derivation of a generalized formula for the deviation angle of high-order rainbows. Potential applications for this analysis include Bessel beam-based laser imaging spectroscopy, atom cooling and quantum optics, electromagnetic instrumentation and profilometry, optical tweezers and tractor beams, to name a few emerging areas of research.

  7. Experimental setup for deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) experiment in hall A at Jefferson Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camsonne, A.

    2005-11-01

    The Hall A Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) experiment used the 5.757 GeV polarized electron beam available at Jefferson Laboratory and ran from september until december 2004. Using the standard Hall A left high resolution spectrometer three kinematical points were taken at a fixed x b (jorken) = 0.32 value for three Q 2 values: 1.5 GeV 2 , 1.91 GeV 2 , 2.32 GeV 2 . An electromagnetic Lead Fluoride calorimeter and a proton detector scintillator array designed to work at a luminosity of 10 37 cm -2 s -1 were added to ensure the exclusivity of the DVCS reaction. In addition to the new detectors new custom electronics was used: a calorimeter trigger module which determines if an electron photon coincidence has occurred and a sampling system allowing to deal with pile-up events during the offline analysis. Finally the data from the kinematic at Q 2 = 2.32 GeV 2 and s = 5.6 GeV 2 allowed to get a preliminary result for the exclusive π 0 electroproduction on the proton. (author)

  8. Polarized electron beams elastically scattered by atoms as a tool for testing fundamental predictions of quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapor, Maurizio

    2018-03-29

    Quantum information theory deals with quantum noise in order to protect physical quantum bits (qubits) from its effects. A single electron is an emblematic example of a qubit, and today it is possible to experimentally produce polarized ensembles of electrons. In this paper, the theory of the polarization of electron beams elastically scattered by atoms is briefly summarized. Then the POLARe program suite, a set of computer programs aimed at the calculation of the spin-polarization parameters of electron beams elastically interacting with atomic targets, is described. Selected results of the program concerning Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms are presented together with the comparison with experimental data about the Sherman function for low kinetic energy of the incident electrons (1.5eV-350eV). It is demonstrated that the quantum-relativistic theory of the polarization of electron beams elastically scattered by atoms is in good agreement with experimental data down to energies smaller than a few eV.

  9. Fragmentation and nucleon structure in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering at the HERMES experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jossten, Sylvester Johannes

    2013-10-15

    Multiplicities for the semi-inclusive production of each charge state of {pi}{sup {+-}} and K{sup {+-}} mesons in deep-inelastic scattering are presented as a function of the kinematic quantities x, Q{sup 2}, z and P{sub h} {sub perpendicular} {sub to}. The multiplicities were extracted from data collected by the HERMES experiment at the HERA storage ring using 27.6 GeV electron and positron beams on a hydrogen or deuterium gas target. These results for identified hadrons constitute the most precise measurement to date, and will significantly enhance our understanding of the proton structure, as well as the fragmentation process in deep-inelastic scattering. Furthermore, the 3D binning at an unprecedented level of precision provides a handle to help disentangle the transverse momentum structure of both. The high level of precision coupled with an intermediate energy regime requires a careful study of the complex interaction between the experimental systematics, theoretical uncertainties, and the applicability of the factorization theorem within the standard framework of leading-twist collinear QCD. This is illustrated by the extraction of the valence quark ratio d{sub {nu}}/u{sub {nu}} at leading-order in {alpha}{sub s}. These results show a strong z-dependence below z {approx} 0.30, which could be interpreted as evidence for factorization breaking. This evidence weakens somewhat when isospin invariance of the fragmentation functions is assumed to be broken. Additionally, the multiplicities for the semi-inclusive production of {pi}{sup 0} mesons in deep-inelastic scattering are presented as a function of z. These multiplicities were extracted from the same data sample as used for the charged meson results. The neutral pion multiplicity is the same as the average charged pion multiplicity, up to z {approx} 0.70. This is consistent with isospin invariance below z {approx} 0.70. The results at high values of z show strong signs of isospin symmetry breaking.

  10. The influence of current neutralization and multiple Coulomb scattering on the spatial dynamics of resistive sausage instability of a relativistic electron beam propagating in ohmic plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, E. K.; Manuilov, A. S.; Petrov, V. S.; Klyushnikov, G. N.; Chernov, S. V.

    2017-06-01

    The influence of the current neutralization process, the phase mixing of the trajectories of electrons and multiple Coulomb scattering of electrons beam on the atoms of the background medium on the spatial increment of the growth of sausage instability of a relativistic electron beam propagating in ohmic plasma channel has been considered. It has been shown that the amplification of the current neutralization leads to a significant increase in this instability, and phase mixing and the process of multiple scattering of electrons beam on the atoms of the background medium are the stabilizing factor.

  11. Laboratory Experiments Enabling Electron Beam use in Tenuous Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miars, G.; Leon, O.; Gilchrist, B. E.; Delzanno, G. L.; Castello, F. L.; Borovsky, J.

    2017-12-01

    A mission concept is under development which involves firing a spacecraft-mounted electron beam from Earth's magnetosphere to connect distant magnetic field lines in real time. To prevent excessive spacecraft charging and consequent beam return, the spacecraft must be neutralized in the tenuous plasma environment of the magnetosphere. Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations suggest neutralization can be accomplished by emitting a neutral plasma with the electron beam. Interpretation of these simulations also led to an ion emission model in which ion current is emitted from a quasi-neutral plasma as defined by the space charge limit [1,2]. Experiments were performed at the University of Michigan's Plasmadynamics and Electric Propulsion Laboratory (PEPL) to help validate the ion emission model. A hollow cathode plasma contactor was used as a representative spacecraft and charged with respect to the chamber walls to examine the effect of spacecraft charging on ion emission. Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA) measurements were performed to understand ion flow velocity as this parameter relates directly to the expected space charge limit. Planar probe measurements were also made to identify where ion emission primarily occurred and to determine emission current density levels. Evidence of collisions within the plasma (particularly charge exchange collisions) and a simple model predicting emitted ion velocities are presented. While a detailed validation of the ion emission model and of the simulation tools used in [1,2] is ongoing, these measurements add to the physical understanding of ion emission as it may occur in the magnetosphere. 1. G.L. Delzanno, J.E. Borovsky, M.F. Thomsen, J.D. Moulton, and E.A. MacDonald, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics 120, 3647, 2015. 2. G.L. Delzanno, J.E. Borovsky, M.F. Thomsen, and J.D. Moulton, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics 120, 3588, 2015. ________________________________ * This work is supported by Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  12. Possible effect of static surface disorder on diffractive scattering of H2 from Ru(0001): Comparison between theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroes, G J; Wijzenbroek, Mark; Manson, J R

    2017-12-28

    Specific features of diffractive scattering of H 2 from metal surfaces can serve as fingerprints of the reactivity of the metal towards H 2 , and in principle theory-experiment comparisons for molecular diffraction can help with the validation of semi-empirical functionals fitted to experiments of sticking of H 2 on metals. However, a recent comparison of calculated and Debye-Waller (DW) extrapolated experimental diffraction probabilities, in which the theory was done on the basis of a potential energy surface (PES) accurately describing sticking to Ru(0001), showed substantial discrepancies, with theoretical and experimental probabilities differing by factors of 2 and 3. We demonstrate that assuming a particular amount of random static disorder to be present in the positions of the surface atoms, which can be characterized through a single parameter, removes most of the discrepancies between experiment and theory. Further improvement might be achievable by improving the accuracy of the DW extrapolation, the model of the H 2 rotational state distribution in the experimental beams, and by fine-tuning the PES. However, the question of whether the DW model is applicable to attenuation of diffractive scattering in the presence of a sizable van der Waals well (depth ≈ 50 meV) should also receive attention, in addition to the question of whether the amount of static surface disorder effectively assumed in the modeling by us could have been present in the experiments.

  13. Steel research using neutron beam techniques. In-situ neutron diffraction, small-angle neutron scattering and residual stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sueyoshi, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Katsumi; Sato, Kaoru; Nakagaito, Tatsuya; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Arakaki, Yu; Tomota, Yo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the neutron beam techniques have been applied for steel researches and industrial applications. In particular, the neutron diffraction is a powerful non-destructive method that can analyze phase transformation and residual stress inside the steel. The small-angle neutron scattering is also an effective method for the quantitative evaluation of microstructures inside the steel. In this study, in-situ neutron diffraction measurements during tensile test and heat treatment were conducted in order to investigate the deformation and transformation behaviors of TRIP steels. The small-angle neutron scattering measurements of TRIP steels were also conducted. Then, the neutron diffraction analysis was conducted on the high strength steel weld joint in order to investigate the effect of the residual stress distribution on the weld cracking. (author)

  14. Beam Dynamics Studies for a Laser Acceleration Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Spencer, James; Noble, Robert; Palmer, Dennis T; Siemann, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The NLC Test Accelerator at SLAC was built to address various beam dynamics issues for the Next Linear Collider. An S-Band RF gun, originally proposed for the NLCTA, is being installed together with a large-angle extraction line at 60 MeV. This is followed by a matching section, final focus and buncher for the laser acceleration experiment, E163. The laser-electron interaction area is followed by a broad range, high resolution spectrometer (HES) for electron bunch analysis. The RF gun is discussed in another paper. We discuss only the beam dynamics and high resolution analysis system at 6 MeV based on using Parmela and high-order Transport for bunch charges from 50 pC to 1 nC. Beyond the diagnostics, this system uses the emittance compensating solenoids and a low energy, high resolution spectrometer (LES) to help tune for best operating point and match to the linac. Optical symmetries in the design of the 25.5° extraction line provide 1:1 phase space transfer without linear dispersion or use of sextu...

  15. Beam stopper and ion source for SECAR experiments at FRIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Austin; Liu, Yuan; Smith, Michael; Kozub, Raymond

    2017-09-01

    The SEparator for CApture Reactions (SECAR) being built at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is optimized for direct measurements of low energy capture reactions important in novae, supernovae, X-ray bursts, and other astrophysical environments. SECAR is designed to have a performance that significantly exceeds that of all previous recoil separators used for astrophysics measurements, and when completed will be the flagship apparatus for the FRIB nuclear astrophysics community. For these experiments, rare isotope beams produced via fast fragmentation will be stopped, ionized, and subsequently reaccelerated up to energies of 3 MeV/u. A system with a solid stopper coupled to an ion source is currently being designed at ORNL for use at FRIB. This system has no rate limitation and is expected to produce the highest rates of certain isotopes, such as 15O and 11C. A description of the solid stopper system will be presented. This research is supported by the Office of Nuclear Physics in the US Department of Energy Office of Science.

  16. Development and performance test of a system available for generating multiple extreme conditions for neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Shinji; Fukui, Susumu; Moriai, Atsushi; Ohtomo, Akitoshi; Ichimura, Shigeki; Onodera, Akifumi; Amita, F.; Katano, Susumu

    1998-01-01

    We have developed unique system available for controlling sample environment during the neutron scattering experiments. The system can simultaneously generate triple extreme conditions of low temperature, high magnetic field and high pressure. The system consists of: (i) a liquid-helium cryostat variable for sample temperature from 1.7 K to 200 K, (ii) a superconducting magnet providing a vertical field up to ±5 T with an antisymmetric split-coil geometry for polarized-beam experiments, and (iii) a non-magnetic piston-cylinder high-pressure cell designed with the aim of generating hydrostatic pressure up to 2.5 GPa. In the presentation, we will report the outline of the system and some results of performance tests at KURRI and JRR-3M of JAERI. (author)

  17. MUST: A silicon strip detector array for radioactive beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, Y.; Auger, F.; Sauvestre, J.E.; Marechal, F.; Ottini, S.; Alamanos, N.; Barbier, A.; Beaumel, D.; Bonnereau, B.; Charlet, D.; Clavelin, J.F.; Courtat, P.; Delbourgo-Salvador, P.; Douet, R.; Engrand, M.; Ethvignot, T.; Gillibert, A.; Khan, E.; Lapoux, V.; Lagoyannis, A.; Lavergne, L.; Lebon, S.; Lelong, P.; Lesage, A.; Le Ven, V.; Lhenry, I.; Martin, J.M.; Musumarra, A.; Pita, S.; Petizon, L.; Pollacco, E.; Pouthas, J.; Richard, A.; Rougier, D.; Santonocito, D.; Scarpaci, J.A.; Sida, J.L.; Soulet, C.; Stutzmann, J.S.; Suomijaervi, T.; Szmigiel, M.; Volkov, P.; Voltolini, G.

    1999-01-01

    A new and innovative array, MUST, based on silicon strip technology and dedicated to the study of reactions induced by radioactive beams on light particles is described. The detector consists of 8 silicon strip - Si(Li) telescopes used to identify recoiling light charged particles through time of flight, energy loss and energy measurements and to determine precisely their scattering angle through X, Y position measurements. Each 60x60 mm 2 double sided silicon strip detector with 60 vertical and 60 horizontal strips yields an X-Y position resolution of 1 mm, an energy resolution of 50 keV, a time resolution of around 1 ns and a 500 keV energy threshold for protons. The backing Si(Li) detectors stop protons up to 25 MeV with a resolution of approximately 50 keV. CsI crystals read out by photo-diodes which stop protons up to 70 MeV are added to the telescopes for applications where higher energy particles need to be detected. The dedicated electronics in VXIbus standard allow us to house the 968 logic and analog channels of the array in one crate placed adjacent to the reaction chamber and fully remote controlled, including pulse visualization on oscilloscopes. A stand alone data acquisition system devoted to the MUST array has been developed. Isotope identification of light charged particles over the full energy range has been achieved, and the capability of the system to measure angular distributions of states populated in inverse kinematics reactions has been demonstrated

  18. Influence of incoherent scattering on stochastic deflection of high-energy negative particle beams in bent crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirillin, I.V. [Akhiezer Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Science Center ' ' Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' ' , Kharkov (Ukraine); Shul' ga, N.F. [Akhiezer Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Science Center ' ' Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' ' , Kharkov (Ukraine); V.N. Karazin Kharkov National University, Kharkov (Ukraine); Bandiera, L. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Guidi, V.; Mazzolari, A. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Ferrara (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    An investigation on stochastic deflection of high-energy negatively charged particles in a bent crystal was carried out. On the basis of analytical calculation and numerical simulation it was shown that there is a maximum angle at which most of the beam is deflected. The existence of a maximum, which is taken in the correspondence of the optimal radius of curvature, is a novelty with respect to the case of positively charged particles, for which the deflection angle can be freely increased by increasing the crystal length. This difference has to be ascribed to the stronger contribution of incoherent scattering affecting the dynamics of negative particles that move closer to atomic nuclei and electrons. We therefore identified the ideal parameters for the exploitation of axial confinement for negatively charged particle beam manipulation in future high-energy accelerators, e.g., ILC or muon colliders. (orig.)

  19. Results from the OPERA experiment at the CNGS beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhin, A

    2015-01-01

    The OPERA experiment at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory is searching for ν μ → ν τ oscillations in appearance mode in the CNGS neutrino beam. Four ν τ candidate events have been found so far, using a sub-sample of data from the 2008-2012 runs. Given the number of analysed events and the low background, ν μ → ν τ oscillations are established with a significance of 4.2 σ. In this paper the data analysis is discussed, with emphasis on the background constraints obtained using dedicated data-driven control samples. We present also the analysis of the τ neutrino and electron neutrino data in the framework of the 3+1 sterile neutrino model. The measurement of the muon charge ratio in the collected cosmic ray sample is also reported. (paper)

  20. Results from the OPERA experiment at the CNGS beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauri N.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The OPERA experiment at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory was designed to study vμ → vτ oscillations in appearance mode in the CNGS neutrino beam. Five vτ candidate events have been observed, allowing to assess the discovery of vμ → vτ transitions in the atmospheric sector with a significance of 5.1σ. In this paper the vτ data analysis will be discussed, with emphasis on the background constraints obtained using dedicated data-driven control samples. Results on the search for vμ → vτ oscillations, on the search for sterile neutrino mixing and on the atmospheric muon charge ratio will also be presented.

  1. The MICE Muon Beam on ISIS and the beam-line instrumentation of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bogomilov, M.; Kolev, D.; Russinov, I.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Wang, L.; Xu, F.Y.; Zheng, S.X.; Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Ferri, F.; Lucchini, G.; Mazza, R.; Paleari, F.; Strati, F.; Palladino, V.; Cecchet, G.; de Bari, A.; Capponi, M.; Cirillo, A.; Iaciofano, A.; Manfredini, A.; Parisi, M.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Kuno, Y.; Sakamoto, H.; Sato, A.; Yano, T.; Yoshida, M.; Ishimoto, S.; Suzuki, S.; Yoshimura, K.; Filthaut, F.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoni, S.; Gruber, P.; Hanke, K.; Haseroth, H.; Janot, P.; Lombardi, A.; Ramberger, S.; Vretenar, M.; Bene, P.; Blondel, A.; Cadoux, F.; Graulich, J.S.; Grichine, V.; Gschwendtner, E.; Masciocchi, F.; Sandstrom, R.; Verguilov, V.; Wisting, H.; Petitjean, C.; Seviour, R.; Alexander, J.; Charnley, G.; Collomb, N.; Griffiths, S.; Martlew, B.; Moss, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Oates, A.; Owens, P.; White, C.; York, S.; Adams, D.; Apsimon, R.; Barclay, P.; Baynham, D.E.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Courthold, M.; Drumm, P.; Edgecock, R.; Hayler, T.; Hills, M.; Ivaniouchenkov, Y.; Jones, A.; Lintern, A.; MacWaters, C.; Nelson, C.; Nichols, A.; Preece, R.; Ricciardi, S.; Rochford, J.H.; Rogers, C.; Spensley, W.; Tarrant, J.; Tilley, K.; Watson, S.; Wilson, A.; Forrest, D.; Soler, F.J.P.; Walaron, K.; Cooke, P.; Gamet, R.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Barber, G.; Clark, D.; Clark, I.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Fish, A.; Hare, R.; Greenwood, S.; Jamdagni, A.; Kasey, V.; Khaleeq, M.; Leaver, J.; Long, K.; McKigney, E.; Matsushita, T.; Pasternak, J.; Sashalmi, T.; Savidge, T.; Takahashi, M.; Blackmore, V.; Carlisle, T.; Cobb, J.H.; Lau, W.; Rayner, M.; Tunnell, C.D.; Witte, H.; Yang, S.; Booth, C.N.; Hodgson, P.; Howlett, L.; Nicholson, R.; Overton, E.; Robinson, M.; Smith, P.; Adey, D.; Back, J.; Boyd, S.; Harrison, P.; Ellis, M.; Kyberd, P.; Littlefield, M.; Nebrensky, J.J.; Bross, A.D.; Geer, S.; Neuffer, D.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Cummings, M.A.C.; Roberts, T.J.; DeMello, A.; Green, M.A.; Li, D.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.S.; Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P.; Huang, D.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D.M.; Snopok, P.; Torun, Y.; Blot, S.; Kim, Y.K.; Bravar, U.; Onel, Y.; Cline, D.; Fukui, Y.; Lee, K.; Yang, X.; Rimmer, R.A.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Gregoire, G.; Hart, T.L.; Sanders, D.A.; Summers, D.J.; Coney, L.; Fletcher, R.; Hanson, G.G.; Heidt, C.; Gallardo, J.; Kahn, S.; Kirk, H.; Palmer, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling as a technique for the reduction of the phase-space volume occupied by a muon beam. Ionization cooling channels are required for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. MICE will evaluate in detail the performance of a single lattice cell of the Feasibility Study 2 cooling channel. The MICE Muon Beam has been constructed at the ISIS synchrotron at RAL, and in MICE Step I, it has been characterized using the MICE beam-instrumentation system. In this paper, the MICE Muon Beam and beam-line instrumentation are described. The muon rate is presented as a function of the beam loss generated by the MICE target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. For a 1 V signal from the ISIS beam-loss monitors downstream of our target we obtain a 30 KHz muon rate, with a neglible pion contamination in the beam.

  2. The MICE Muon Beam on ISIS and the beam-line instrumentation of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogomilov, M. [University of Sofia (Bulgaria); et al.

    2012-05-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling as a technique for the reduction of the phase-space volume occupied by a muon beam. Ionization cooling channels are required for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. MICE will evaluate in detail the performance of a single lattice cell of the Feasibility Study 2 cooling channel. The MICE Muon Beam has been constructed at the ISIS synchrotron at RAL, and in MICE Step I, it has been characterized using the MICE beam-instrumentation system. In this paper, the MICE Muon Beam and beam-line instrumentation are described. The muon rate is presented as a function of the beam loss generated by the MICE target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. For a 1 V signal from the ISIS beam-loss monitors downstream of our target we obtain a 30 KHz instantaneous muon rate, with a neglible pion contamination in the beam.

  3. pF3D Simulations of Large Outer-Beam Brillouin Scattering from NIF Rugby Hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Steven; Strozzi, David; Chapman, Thomas; Amendt, Peter

    2015-11-01

    We assess the cause of large outer-beam stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in a NIF shot with a rugby-shaped hohlraum, which has less wall surface loss and thus higher x-ray drive than a cylindrical hohlraum of the same radius. This shot differed from a prior rugby shot with low SBS in three ways: outer beam pointing, split-pointing of the four beams within each outer-beam quadruplet, and a small amount of neon added to the hohlraum helium fill gas. We use pF3D, a massively-parallel, paraxial-envelope laser plasma interaction code, with plasma profiles from the radiation-hydrodynamics code Lasnex. We determine which change between the two shots increased the SBS by adding them one at a time to the simulations. We compare the simulations to experimental data for total SBS power, its spatial distribution at the lens, and the SBS spectrum. For each shot, we use profiles from Lasnex simulations with and without a model for mix at the hohlraum wall-gas interface. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Release number LLNL-ABS-674893.

  4. Transverse beam diagnostics for the XUV seeding experiment at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boedewadt, Joern

    2011-12-15

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FEL) offer intense, transversely coherent, and ultra short radiation pulses in the extreme ultraviolet, the soft- and the hard-X-ray spectral range. Undulator radiation from spontaneous emission is amplified. Due to the stochastic emission process, the radiation exhibits a low temporal coherence, and the structure of the amplified radiation in the temporal and in the spectral domain shows large shot-to-shot fluctuations. In order to improve the temporal coherence, an external radiation pulse is used to induce (or seed) the FEL process. With this, only a defined wavelength range within the FEL bandwidth is amplified provided that the irradiance of the external radiation exceeds the noise level of the FEL amplifier. In addition to the improved longitudinal coherence, a seeded FEL provides the possibility to perform pump-probe experiments with an expected temporal resolution of the order of the pulse durations. In order to experimentally proof this statement, a test experiment for direct HHG-seeding at wavelength below 40 nm was installed at the free-electron laser facility FLASH at DESY. Crucial for the seeded operation of an FEL is the six-dimensional laser-electron overlap of the seed laser pulses with the electron bunches. Hence, dedicated diagnostics to measure and mechanisms to control the overlap are essential. Within this thesis, a transport beamline for the seed laser beam and the transverse diagnostics for seed laser- and the electron-beam were developed and commissioned. Results of the performance of the seed injection beamline are presented, and first measurements of the seeded operation of the FEL are analyzed and evaluated. (orig.)

  5. A beam halo event of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Experiment

    2014-01-01

    Beam halo events: These occur as a single beam of protons is circulating in one direction in LHC, just passing through ATLAS. An outlier particle hits a part of the detector causing a spray of particles.

  6. SHiP: a new multipurpose beam-dump experiment at the SPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijkstra H.B.

    2016-01-01

    to be constructed beam-dump facility at the CERN SPS. The SHiP Technical Proposal has been submitted to the CERN SPS Committee in April 2015. The 400 GeV/c proton beam extracted from the SPS will be dumped on a heavy target with the aim of integrating 2 × 1020 proton on target in five years. A detector located downstream of the target, based on a long vacuum tank followed by a spectrometer and particle identification detectors, will allow probing a variety of models with light long-lived exotic particles and masses below a few GeV/c2. The main focus will be the physics of the so-called Hidden Portals, i.e. search for Dark Photons, Light scalars and pseudo-scalars, and Heavy Neutral Leptons (HNL. The sensitivity to HNL will allow for the first time to probe, in the mass range between the kaon and the charm meson mass, a coupling range for which Baryogenesis and active neutrino masses could also be explained. Integrated in SHiP is an Emulsion Cloud Chamber, already used in the OPERA experiment, which will allow to study active neutrino cross-sections and angular distributions. In particular SHiP can distinguish between vτ and v̄τ, and their deep inelastic scattering cross sections will be measured with statistics three orders of magnitude larger than currently available.

  7. Water structure as a function of temperature from X-ray scattering experiments and ab initio molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hura, Greg; Russo, Daniela; Glaeser, Robert M.; Head-Gordon, Teresa; Krack, Matthias; Parrinello, Michele

    2003-01-01

    We present high-quality X-ray scattering experiments on pure water taken over a temperature range of 2 to 77 C using a synchrotron beam line at the advanced light source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The ALS X-ray scattering intensities are qualitatively different in trend of maximum intensity over this temperature range compared to older X-ray experiments. While the common procedure is to report both the intensity curve and radial distribution function(s), the proper extraction of the real-space pair correlation functions from the experimental scattering is very difficult due to uncertainty introduced in the experimental corrections, the proper weighting of OO, OH, and HH contributions, and numerical problems of Fourier transforming truncated data in Q-space. Instead, we consider the direct calculation of X-ray scattering spectra using electron densities derived from density functional theory based on real-space configurations generated with classical water models. The simulation of the experimental intensity is therefore definitive for determining radial distribution functions over a smaller Q-range. We find that the TIP4P, TIP5P and polarizable TIP4P-Pol2 water models, with DFT-LDA densities, show very good agreement with the experimental intensities, and TIP4P-Pol2 in particular shows quantitative agreement over the full temperature range. The resulting radial distribution functions from TIP4P-Pol2 provide the current best benchmarks for real-space water structure over the biologically relevant temperature range studied here

  8. The first experience with LHC beam gas ionization monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Sapinski, M; Dehning, B; Guerrero, A; Patecki, M; Versteegen, R

    2012-01-01

    The Beam Gas Ionization Monitors (BGI) are used to measure beam emittance on LHC. This paper describes the detectors and their operation and discusses the issues met during the commissioning. It also discusses the various calibration procedures used to correct for non-uniformity of Multi-Channel plates and to correct the beam size for effects affecting the electron trajectory after ionization.

  9. Experiments with Fermilab polarized proton and polarized antiproton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokosawa, A.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize activities concerning the Fermilab polarized beams. They include a brief description of the polarized-beam facility, measurements of beam polarization by polarimeters, asymmetry measurements in the π degree production at high p perpendicular and in the Λ (Σ degree), π ± , π degree production at large x F , and Δσ L (pp, bar pp) measurements. 18 refs

  10. Analysing neutron scattering data using McStas virtual experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udby, L.; Willendrup, Peter Kjær; Bergbäck Knudsen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    With the intention of developing a new data analysis method using virtual experiments we have built a detailed virtual model of the cold triple-axis spectrometer RITA-II at PSI, Switzerland, using the McStas neutron ray-tracing package. The parameters characterising the virtual instrument were...... carefully tuned against real experiments. In the present paper we show that virtual experiments reproduce experimentally observed linewidths within 1–3% for a variety of samples. Furthermore we show that the detailed knowledge of the instrumental resolution found from virtual experiments, including sample...

  11. Beam-specific planning volumes for scattered-proton lung radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flampouri, S.; Hoppe, B. S.; Slopsema, R. L.; Li, Z.

    2014-08-01

    This work describes the clinical implementation of a beam-specific planning treatment volume (bsPTV) calculation for lung cancer proton therapy and its integration into the treatment planning process. Uncertainties incorporated in the calculation of the bsPTV included setup errors, machine delivery variability, breathing effects, inherent proton range uncertainties and combinations of the above. Margins were added for translational and rotational setup errors and breathing motion variability during the course of treatment as well as for their effect on proton range of each treatment field. The effect of breathing motion and deformation on the proton range was calculated from 4D computed tomography data. Range uncertainties were considered taking into account the individual voxel HU uncertainty along each proton beamlet. Beam-specific treatment volumes generated for 12 patients were used: a) as planning targets, b) for routine plan evaluation, c) to aid beam angle selection and d) to create beam-specific margins for organs at risk to insure sparing. The alternative planning technique based on the bsPTVs produced similar target coverage as the conventional proton plans while better sparing the surrounding tissues. Conventional proton plans were evaluated by comparing the dose distributions per beam with the corresponding bsPTV. The bsPTV volume as a function of beam angle revealed some unexpected sources of uncertainty and could help the planner choose more robust beams. Beam-specific planning volume for the spinal cord was used for dose distribution shaping to ensure organ sparing laterally and distally to the beam.

  12. π-Helium-4 scattering experiment at 5GeV/c. Data processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotte, Philippe.

    1978-01-01

    The context of this work is an experiment realised at CERN, with the object to search pre-existing isobaric states in helium nucleus, by means of the study of scattering reactions of π - with simultaneous observation of recoil nucleus ( 3 He or 3 H) and forward pion. In this work, only the study of recoil detectors is done. This one, described with many details consists of a set of four wire chamber planes, two planes of semiconductors and two scintillators planes. The performances of this set of detectors are presented in regard to identification of recoil particle, energy and recoil angle measurements. A 'missing mass' analysis of the events of the experiment is done. Preliminary results of elastic and inelastic scattering are given. For elastic scattering a qualitative comparison is done with the multiple scattering Glauber formalism [fr

  13. Experiments in Special Relativity Using Compton Scattering of Gamma Rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelstaff, P. A.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Some simple undergraduate laboratory experiments are described, which verify the energy-momentum relationship of special relativity. These experiments have been designed either to be used as classroom demonstrations or to be carried out by second-year students. (Author/JN)

  14. Comparison of scattering experiments using synchrotron radiation with Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerlach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Mueller, P.; Ulm, G.

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo techniques are powerful tools to simulate the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. One of the most widespread simulation program packages is Geant4. Almost all physical interaction processes can be included. However, it is not evident what accuracy can be obtained by a simulation. In this work, results of scattering experiments using monochromatized synchrotron radiation in the X-ray regime are quantitatively compared to the results of simulations using Geant4. Experiments were performed for various scattering foils made of different materials such as copper and gold. For energy-dispersive measurements of the scattered radiation, a cadmium telluride detector was used. The detector was fully characterized and calibrated with calculable undispersed as well as monochromatized synchrotron radiation. The obtained quantum efficiency and the response functions are in very good agreement with the corresponding Geant4 simulations. At the electron storage ring BESSY II the number of incident photons in the scattering experiments was measured with a photodiode that had been calibrated against a cryogenic radiometer, so that a direct comparison of scattering experiments with Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 was possible. It was shown that Geant4 describes the photoeffect, including fluorescence as well as the Compton and Rayleigh scattering, with high accuracy, resulting in a deviation of typically less than 20%. Even polarization effects are widely covered by Geant4, and for Doppler broadening of Compton-scattered radiation the extension G4LECS can be included, but the fact that both features cannot be combined is a limitation. For most polarization-dependent simulations, good agreement with the experimental results was found, except for some orientations where Rayleigh scattering was overestimated in the simulation.

  15. Comparison of scattering experiments using synchrotron radiation with Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Müller, P.; Ulm, G.

    2009-09-01

    Monte Carlo techniques are powerful tools to simulate the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. One of the most widespread simulation program packages is Geant4. Almost all physical interaction processes can be included. However, it is not evident what accuracy can be obtained by a simulation. In this work, results of scattering experiments using monochromatized synchrotron radiation in the X-ray regime are quantitatively compared to the results of simulations using Geant4. Experiments were performed for various scattering foils made of different materials such as copper and gold. For energy-dispersive measurements of the scattered radiation, a cadmium telluride detector was used. The detector was fully characterized and calibrated with calculable undispersed as well as monochromatized synchrotron radiation. The obtained quantum efficiency and the response functions are in very good agreement with the corresponding Geant4 simulations. At the electron storage ring BESSY II the number of incident photons in the scattering experiments was measured with a photodiode that had been calibrated against a cryogenic radiometer, so that a direct comparison of scattering experiments with Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 was possible. It was shown that Geant4 describes the photoeffect, including fluorescence as well as the Compton and Rayleigh scattering, with high accuracy, resulting in a deviation of typically less than 20%. Even polarization effects are widely covered by Geant4, and for Doppler broadening of Compton-scattered radiation the extension G4LECS can be included, but the fact that both features cannot be combined is a limitation. For most polarization-dependent simulations, good agreement with the experimental results was found, except for some orientations where Rayleigh scattering was overestimated in the simulation.

  16. Comparison of scattering experiments using synchrotron radiation with Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Krumrey, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: Michael.Krumrey@ptb.de; Cibik, L.; Mueller, P.; Ulm, G. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-09-11

    Monte Carlo techniques are powerful tools to simulate the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. One of the most widespread simulation program packages is Geant4. Almost all physical interaction processes can be included. However, it is not evident what accuracy can be obtained by a simulation. In this work, results of scattering experiments using monochromatized synchrotron radiation in the X-ray regime are quantitatively compared to the results of simulations using Geant4. Experiments were performed for various scattering foils made of different materials such as copper and gold. For energy-dispersive measurements of the scattered radiation, a cadmium telluride detector was used. The detector was fully characterized and calibrated with calculable undispersed as well as monochromatized synchrotron radiation. The obtained quantum efficiency and the response functions are in very good agreement with the corresponding Geant4 simulations. At the electron storage ring BESSY II the number of incident photons in the scattering experiments was measured with a photodiode that had been calibrated against a cryogenic radiometer, so that a direct comparison of scattering experiments with Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 was possible. It was shown that Geant4 describes the photoeffect, including fluorescence as well as the Compton and Rayleigh scattering, with high accuracy, resulting in a deviation of typically less than 20%. Even polarization effects are widely covered by Geant4, and for Doppler broadening of Compton-scattered radiation the extension G4LECS can be included, but the fact that both features cannot be combined is a limitation. For most polarization-dependent simulations, good agreement with the experimental results was found, except for some orientations where Rayleigh scattering was overestimated in the simulation.

  17. Deeply virtual Compton scattering and its beam charge asymmetry in e{sup {+-}}p collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Aldaya Martin, M. [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (RO)] (and others)

    2009-07-15

    A measurement of elastic deeply virtual Compton scattering {gamma}{sup *}p{yields}{gamma}p using e{sup +}p and e{sup -}p collision data recorded with the H1 detector at HERA is presented. The analysed data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 306 pb{sup -1}, almost equally shared between both beam charges. The cross section is measured as a function of the virtuality Q{sup 2} of the exchanged photon and the centre-of-mass energy W of the {gamma}{sup *}p system in the kinematic domain 6.5 < Q{sup 2} < 80 GeV{sup 2}, 30beam charge asymmetry is extracted for the first time in the low Bjorken x kinematic domain. The observed asymmetry is attributed to the interference between Bethe-Heitler and deeply virtual Compton scattering processes. Experimental results are discussed in the context of two different models, one based on generalised parton distributions and one based on the dipole approach. (orig.)

  18. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering and its Beam Charge Asymmetry in $e^{\\pm} p$ Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Alimujiang, K.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zus, R.

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of elastic deeply virtual Compton scattering gamma* p -> gamma p using e^+ p and e^- p collision data recorded with the H1 detector at HERA is presented. The analysed data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 306 pb^-1, almost equally shared between both beam charges. The cross section is measured as a function of the virtuality Q^2 of the exchanged photon and the centre-of-mass energy W of the gamma* p system in the kinematic domain 6.5 < Q^2 < 80 GeV^2, 30 < W < 140 GeV and |t| < 1 GeV^2, where t denotes the squared momentum transfer at the proton vertex. The cross section is determined differentially in t for different Q^2 and W values and exponential t-slope parameters are derived. Using e^+ p and e^- p data samples, a beam charge asymmetry is extracted for the first time in the low Bjorken x kinematic domain. The observed asymmetry is attributed to the interference between Bethe-Heitler and deeply virtual Compton scattering processes. Experimental results are dis...

  19. Expected damage to accelerator equipment due to the impact of the full LHC beam: beam instrumentation, experiments and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Burkart, Florian

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the biggest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world, designed to collide two proton beams with particle momentum of 7 TeV/c each. The stored energy of 362MJ in each beam is sufficient to melt 500 kg of copper or to evaporate about 300 liter of water. An accidental release of even a small fraction of the beam energy can cause severe damage to accelerator equipment. Reliable machine protection systems are necessary to safely operate the accelerator complex. To design a machine protection system, it is essential to know the damage potential of the stored beam and the consequences in case of a failure. One (catastrophic) failure would be, if the entire beam is lost in the aperture due to a problem with the beam dumping system. This thesis presents the simulation studies, results of a benchmarking experiment, and detailed target investigation, for this failure case. In the experiment, solid copper cylinders were irradiated with the 440GeV proton beam delivered by the ...

  20. Dust-concentration measurement based on Mie scattering of a laser beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoyu; Shi, Yunbo; Wang, Tian; Sun, Xu

    2017-01-01

    To realize automatic measurement of the concentration of dust particles in the air, a theory for dust concentration measurement was developed, and a system was designed to implement the dust concentration measurement method based on laser scattering. In the study, the principle of dust concentration detection using laser scattering is studied, and the detection basis of Mie scattering theory is determined. Through simulation, the influence of the incident laser wavelength, dust particle diameter, and refractive index of dust particles on the scattered light intensity distribution are obtained for determining the scattered light intensity curves of single suspended dust particles under different characteristic parameters. A genetic algorithm was used to study the inverse particle size distribution, and the reliability of the measurement system design is proven theoretically. The dust concentration detection system, which includes a laser system, computer circuitry, air flow system, and control system, was then implemented according to the parameters obtained from the theoretical analysis. The performance of the designed system was evaluated. Experimental results show that the system performance was stable and reliable, resulting in high-precision automatic dust concentration measurement with strong anti-interference ability.

  1. Forward and backward scattering experiments in ultra-cold Rubidium atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampel, Nir Shlomo

    project, we have studied coherent forward scattering in the form of a memory experiment. In such an experiment we convert the input light pulse to an atomic excitation, and at a later time convert back the atomic excitation into the retrieved light pulse. In the first project, we investigate the source...

  2. Analysing neutron scattering data using McStas virtual experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udby, L.; Willendrup, P.K.; Knudsen, E.; Niedermayer, Ch.; Filges, U.; Christensen, N.B.; Farhi, E.; Wells, B.O.; Lefmann, K.

    2011-01-01

    With the intention of developing a new data analysis method using virtual experiments we have built a detailed virtual model of the cold triple-axis spectrometer RITA-II at PSI, Switzerland, using the McStas neutron ray-tracing package. The parameters characterising the virtual instrument were carefully tuned against real experiments. In the present paper we show that virtual experiments reproduce experimentally observed linewidths within 1-3% for a variety of samples. Furthermore we show that the detailed knowledge of the instrumental resolution found from virtual experiments, including sample mosaicity, can be used for quantitative estimates of linewidth broadening resulting from, e.g., finite domain sizes in single-crystal samples.

  3. Computational study of scattering of a zero-order Bessel beam by large nonspherical homogeneous particles with the multilevel fast multipole algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minglin; Wu, Yueqian; Sheng, Xinqing; Ren, Kuan Fang

    2017-12-01

    Computation of scattering of shaped beams by large nonspherical particles is a challenge in both optics and electromagnetics domains since it concerns many research fields. In this paper, we report our new progress in the numerical computation of the scattering diagrams. Our algorithm permits to calculate the scattering of a particle of size as large as 110 wavelengths or 700 in size parameter. The particle can be transparent or absorbing of arbitrary shape, smooth or with a sharp surface, such as the Chebyshev particles or ice crystals. To illustrate the capacity of the algorithm, a zero order Bessel beam is taken as the incident beam, and the scattering of ellipsoidal particles and Chebyshev particles are taken as examples. Some special phenomena have been revealed and examined. The scattering problem is formulated with the combined tangential formulation and solved iteratively with the aid of the multilevel fast multipole algorithm, which is well parallelized with the message passing interface on the distributed memory computer platform using the hybrid partitioning strategy. The numerical predictions are compared with the results of the rigorous method for a spherical particle to validate the accuracy of the approach. The scattering diagrams of large ellipsoidal particles with various parameters are examined. The effect of aspect ratios, as well as half-cone angle of the incident zero-order Bessel beam and the off-axis distance on scattered intensity, is studied. Scattering by asymmetry Chebyshev particle with size parameter larger than 700 is also given to show the capability of the method for computing scattering by arbitrary shaped particles.

  4. Ion beam probe diagnostic system for the LITE experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stufflebeam, J.H.; Jennings, W.C.; Hickok, R.L.

    1974-11-01

    The problem of defocusing of the ion beam by the strong gradients in the magnetic field was discussed. It was shown this can be overcome by a linear field lens to shape the initial beam, or by proper selection of the size and position of the secondary ion detector. The results of the preliminary beam alignment were presented and the favorable comparison of the scaling formula and computer simulation was evident

  5. Electron beam energy monitoring using thermoluminescent dosimeters and electron back scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Vinod; Gray, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Periodic checks of megavoltage electron beam quality are a fundamental requirement in ensuring accurate radiotherapy treatment delivery. In the present work, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) positioned on either side of a lead sheet at the surface of a water equivalent phantom were used to monitor electron beam quality using the electron backscattering method. TLD100 and TLD100H were evaluated as upstream detectors and TLD200, TLD400 and TLD500 were evaluated as downstream detectors. The evaluation assessed the test sensitivity and correlation, long and short term reproducibility, dose dependence and glow curve features. A prototype of an in-air jig suitable for use in postal TLD dose audits was also developed and an initial evaluation performed. The results indicate that the TLD100-TLD200 combination provides a sensitive and reproducible method to monitor electron beam quality. The light weight and easily fabricated in-air jig was found to produce acceptable results and has the potential to be used by radiation monitoring agencies to carry out TLD postal quality assurance audits, similar to audits presently being conducted for photon beams. -- Highlights: ► Monitoring electron beam quality via electron backscattering was investigated. ► Different thermoluminescent materials were evaluated as detectors. ► A TLD100-TLD200 combination produced the most sensitive and reproducible results. ► An in-air jig was evaluated to allow measurements via postal dose audits

  6. Results of a neutrino oscillation experiment performed at a meson factory beam-stop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.W.

    1989-04-01

    This document describes a neutrino oscillation experiment performed at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. The oscillation mode searched for is /bar /nu///sub μ/ → /bar /nu///sub e/. The first chapter is a review of the known properties of the neutrino and a description of the phenomenon of neutrino oscillation. Previous experimental limits on this unobserved phenomenon are also given. The second chapter describes the experimental apparatus used by the E645 experiment to detect neutrinos produced in the LAMPF beam stop. The salient features of the detector are its large mass (20 tons of CH 2 ), its fine segmentation (to allow good particle tracking), good energy resolution, its recording of the history both before and after tracks appear in the detector, an active cosmic-ray anticoincidence shield, and 2000 gm/cm 2 of passive cosmic-ray shielding. It is located 26.8 m from the neutrino source, which has a mean neutrino energy of 40 MeV. The third chapter details the reduction of the 1.3 million event data sample to a 49 event sample of neutrino candidates. Principle backgrounds are Michel electrons from stopping cosmic-ray muons and protons from np elastic scattering by cosmic-ray neutrons. The fourth chapter explains how background levels from neutrino-nuclear scattering are predicted. The result of a maximum-likelihood analysis reveals no evidence for oscillation. 90% confidence levels are set at δm 2 = .10 eV 2 for large mixing and sin 2 (2θ) = .014 for large δm 2 . 82 refs., 18 figs., 55 tabs

  7. Object-oriented data analysis framework for neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Jiro; Nakatani, Takeshi; Ohhara, Takashi; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Yonemura, Masao; Morishima, Takahiro; Aoyagi, Tetsuo; Manabe, Atsushi; Otomo, Toshiya

    2009-01-01

    Materials and Life Science Facility (MLF) of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) is one of the facilities that provided the highest intensity pulsed neutron and muon beams. The MLF computing environment design group organizes the computing environments of MLF and instruments. It is important that the computing environment is provided by the facility side, because meta-data formats, the analysis functions and also data analysis strategy should be shared among many instruments in MLF. The C++ class library, named Manyo-lib, is a framework software for developing data reduction and analysis softwares. The framework is composed of the class library for data reduction and analysis operators, network distributed data processing modules and data containers. The class library is wrapped by the Python interface created by SWIG. All classes of the framework can be called from Python language, and Manyo-lib will be cooperated with the data acquisition and data-visualization components through the MLF-platform, a user interface unified in MLF, which is working on Python language. Raw data in the event-data format obtained by data acquisition systems will be converted into histogram format data on Manyo-lib in high performance, and data reductions and analysis are performed with user-application software developed based on Manyo-lib. We enforce standardization of data containers with Manyo-lib, and many additional fundamental data containers in Manyo-lib have been designed and developed. Experimental and analysis data in the data containers can be converted into NeXus file. Manyo-lib is the standard framework for developing analysis software in MLF, and prototypes of data-analysis softwares for each instrument are being developed by the instrument teams.

  8. Experiments with electron beam injection in ionosphere plasma and rare gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykovskij, V.F.; Meshkov, I.N.; Seleznev, I.A.; Syresin, E.M.

    2003-01-01

    The active experiment 'Electron' is intended for the electron beam injection from a meteorological rocket in the ionosphere plasma. The beam is injected in the ionosphere plasma at a current of 0.5 A and an energy of 6.5 - 8 keV. The energy spectra are given for the plasma electrons and ions. The radio-wave spectrum is measured in a RF frequency range of 100-500 MHz. The radio wave traversing through the electron beam injection region is discussed. The laboratory experiments are performed with the electron beam injection in a rare gas to model the active outer-space experiments

  9. Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

  10. Manipulations of Double Electron Beams within One RF Period for Seeded SM-LWFA Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Feng; Cline, David B; Kimura, Wayne D; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2005-01-01

    Although seeded SM-LWFA only requires one electron beam to initiate the laser wakefield, it would be highly desirable to have a second electron beam traveling after the first one to probe the accelerated electrons. To create and preserve significant amount of wakefield in the STELLA SM-LWFA experiment, the first e-beam needs to be tiny (<40 microns FWHM) in size and short in length within the plasma. To probe the wakefield which is damped within 10 ps for certain plasma density, the separation between the first and second beams needs to be within one RF period and the second e-beam must have smaller energy spread and smaller size. Design of double beams in one RF period to meet the strict requirements and the preliminary beam study at BNL-ATF facility are presented. The scheme of double beams with ATF bunch compressor is also discussed.

  11. RHIC BEAM ABORT KICKER POWER SUPPLY SYSTEM COMMISSIONING EXPERIENCE AND REMAINING ISSUES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZHANG, W.; AHRENS, L.A.; MI, J.; OERTER, B.; SANDERS, R.; SANDBERG, J.

    2001-01-01

    The RHIC Beam Abort Kicker Power Supply Systems commissioning experience and the remaining issues will be reported in this paper. The RHIC Blue Ring Beam Abort Kicker Power Supply System initial commissioning took place in June 1999. Its identical system in Yellow Ring was brought on line during Spring 2000. Each of the RHIC Beam Abort Kicker Power Supply Systems consists of five high voltage modulators and subsystems. These systems are critical devices for RHIC machine protection and environmental protection. They are required to be effective, reliable and operating with sufficient redundancy to safely abort the beam to its beam dump at the end of accumulation or at any time when they are commanded. To deflect 66 GeV ion beam to the beam absorbers, the RHIC Beam Abort Kicker Power Supply Systems were operated at 22 kV level. The RHIC 2000 commissioning run was very successful

  12. Binary moving-blocker-based scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography with width-truncated projections: proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho; Fahimian, Benjamin P; Xing, Lei

    2017-03-21

    This paper proposes a binary moving-blocker (BMB)-based technique for scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). In concept, a beam blocker consisting of lead strips, mounted in front of the x-ray tube, moves rapidly in and out of the beam during a single gantry rotation. The projections are acquired in alternating phases of blocked and unblocked cone beams, where the blocked phase results in a stripe pattern in the width direction. To derive the scatter map from the blocked projections, 1D B-Spline interpolation/extrapolation is applied by using the detected information in the shaded regions. The scatter map of the unblocked projections is corrected by averaging two scatter maps that correspond to their adjacent blocked projections. The scatter-corrected projections are obtained by subtracting the corresponding scatter maps from the projection data and are utilized to generate the CBCT image by a compressed-sensing (CS)-based iterative reconstruction algorithm. Catphan504 and pelvis phantoms were used to evaluate the method's performance. The proposed BMB-based technique provided an effective method to enhance the image quality by suppressing scatter-induced artifacts, such as ring artifacts around the bowtie area. Compared to CBCT without a blocker, the spatial nonuniformity was reduced from 9.1% to 3.1%. The root-mean-square error of the CT numbers in the regions of interest (ROIs) was reduced from 30.2 HU to 3.8 HU. In addition to high resolution, comparable to that of the benchmark image, the CS-based reconstruction also led to a better contrast-to-noise ratio in seven ROIs. The proposed technique enables complete scatter-corrected CBCT imaging with width-truncated projections and allows reducing the acquisition time to approximately half. This work may have significant implications for image-guided or adaptive radiation therapy, where CBCT is often used.

  13. Digital beam position monitor for the HAPPEX experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherlon Kauffman; John Musson; Hai Dong; Lisa Kaufman; Arne Freyberger

    2005-05-01

    The proposed HAPPEX experiment at CEBAF employs a three cavity monitor system for high precision (1um), high bandwidth (100 kHz) position measurements. This is performed using a cavity triplet consisting of two TM110-mode cavities (one each for X and Y planes) combined with a conventional TM010-mode cavity for a phase and magnitude reference. Traditional systems have used the TM010 cavity output to directly down convert the BPM cavity signals to base band. The multi-channel HAPPEX digital receiver simultaneously I/Q samples each cavity and extracts position using a CORDIC algorithm. The hardware design consists of a RF receiver daughter board and a digital processor motherboard that resides in a VXI crate. The daughter board down converts 1.497 GHz signals from the TM010 cavity and X and Y signals from the TM110 cavities to 3 MHz and extracts the quadrature digital signals. The motherboard processes this data and computes beam intensity and X-Y positions with resolution of 1um, 100 kHz output bandwidth, and overall latency of 1us. The results are available in both the analog and digital format.

  14. Digital Beam Position Monitor for the Happex Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.R. Kauffman; H. Dong; A. Freyberger; L. Kaufman; J. Musson

    2005-05-16

    The proposed HAPPEX experiment at CEBAF employs a three cavity monitor system for high-precision (1 mm), high-bandwidth (100 kHz) position measurements. This is performed using a cavity triplet consisting of two TM110-mode cavities (one each for X and Y planes) combined with a conventional TM-010-mode cavity for a phase and magnitude reference. Traditional systems have used the TM010 cavity output to directly down convert the BPM cavity signals to base band. The Multi-channel HAPPEX digital receiver simultaneously I/Q samples each cavity and extracts position using a CORDIC algorithm. The hardware design consists of a digital receiver daughter board and digital processor motherboard that resides in a VXI crate. The daughter board down converts 1.497 GHz signals from the TM010 cavity and X and Y signals from the TM110 cavities to 4 MHz, and extracts the quadrature digital signals. The motherboard processes this data and computes beam intensity and X-Y positions with a resolution of one mm, 100 kHz output bandwidth, and overall latency of ten microseconds. The results are available in both analog and digital format.

  15. Studies of Optical Beam Phase-Conjugation and Electromagnetic Scattering Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-05

    Figueroa, W. Gai, R. Konecny, J. Norem , P. Schoessow, and J. Simpson, Phys. Rev. Lett., 61, p.98, 1988. 3.41 "Direct measurement of beam-induced fields in...accelerating structures," H. Figueroa, W. Gai, R. Konecny, J. Norem , A. Ruggiero, P. Shoessow, and J. Simpson, Phys. Rev. Lett., 60, 2144 (1988

  16. The Beam and Detector for the NA48 Neutral Kaon CP Violation Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Fanti, V; Marras, D; Musa, L; Nappi, A; Batley, J Richard; Bevan, A; Dosanjh, R S; Galik, R; Gershon, T; Hay, B; Kalmus, George Ernest; Katvars, S; Lazzeroni, C; Moore, R; Munday, D J; Needham, M D; Olaiya, E; Parker, M A; Patel, M; Slater, M; Takach, S; White, T O; Wotton; Bal, F; Barr, G; Bocquet, G; Bremer, J; Brodier-Yourstone, P; Buchholz, P; Burns, M; Ceccucci, A; Clément, M; Cuhadar-Donzelsmann, T; Cundy, Donald C; Doble, Niels; Falaleev, V; Formenti, F; Funk, W; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Grafström, P; Hallgren, B; Kapusta, P; Kesseler, G; Kubischta, Werner; Iwanski, W; Lacourt, A; Laverriere, G; Linser, G; Ljuslin, C; Marchioro, A; Mast, M; Matheys, J P; Morel, M; Norton, A; Orlic, J P; Panzer-Steindel, B; Schinzel, D; Seidl, W; Taureg, H; Tarlé, J C; Velasco, M; Vossnack, O; Wahl, H; Wertelaers, P; Weterings, J; Cheshkov, C; Gaponenko, A; Goudzovski, E; Khristov, P Z; Kalinin, A; Kekelidze, V D; Kozhevnikov, Yu; Madigozhin, D T; Molokanova, N A; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Tkatchev, A; Zinchenko, A I; Boyle, O; Knowles, I; Martin, V; Parsons, H; Peach, K J; Sacco, R; Veitch, E; Walker, A; Carassiti, V; Contalbrigo, M; Cotta-Ramusino, A; Dalpiaz, P; Damiani, C; Duclos, J; Ferretti, P; Frabetti, P L; Gianoli, A; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Porcu, M; Rossi, F; Savrié, M; Scarpa, M; Simani, C; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Collazuol, G; Graziani, G; Iacopini, E; Lenti, M; Martelli, F; Michetti, A; Ruggiero, G; Veltri, M; Becker, H G; Behler, M; Blümer, H; Coward, D; Ebersberger, C; Eppard, K; Eppard, M; Fox, H; Geib, K H; Hirstius, A; Kalter, A; Kleinknecht, K; Koch, U; Köpke, L; Lopes da Silva, P; Luitz, S; Marouelli, P; Masetti, L; Melzer-Pellmann, I; Moosbrugger, U; Morales-Morales, C; Peters, A; Renk, B; Scheidt, J; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, S A; Schönharting, V; Schué, Yu; Staeck, J; Wanke, R; Wilhelm, R; Winhart, A; Wittgen, M; Zeitnitz, O; Dabrowski, A; Fonseca-Martin, T; Chollet, J C; Crépé, S; de La Taille, C; Fayard, L; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Martin-Chassard, G; Ocariz, J; Unal, G; Wingerter-Seez, I; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Bordacchini, F; Cenci, P; Imbergamo, E; Lariccia, P; Lubrano, P; Mestvirishvili, A; Papi, A; Pepé, M; Piccini, M; Punturo, M; Talamonti, C; Tondini, F; Bertanza, L; Calafiura, P; Carosi, R; Casali, R; Cerri, C; Cirilli, M; Costantini, F; Fantechi, R; Fidecaro, Francesco; Fiorini, L; Giudici, S; Gorini, B; Laico, F; Lamanna, G; Mannelli, I; Marzulli, V; Passuello, D; Pierazzini, G M; Raffaelli, F; Sozzi, M; Tripiccione, R; Anvar, S; Bédérède, D; Bugeon, F; Chèze, J B; Cogan, J; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Durand, D; Edard, S; Fallou, J L; Formica, A; Gosset, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Heitzmann, J; Le Provost, H; Louis, F; Mandzhavidze, I; Mazzucato, E; Migliori, A; Mur, M; Peyaud, B; Schanne, S; Steinkamp, O; Tarte, Gérard; Turlay, René; Vallage, B; Holder, M; Augustin, I; Bender, M; Maier, A; Schwarz, I; Ziolkowski, M; Arcidiacono, R; Barberis, P L; Benotto, F; Bertolino, F; Biino, C; Brunasso, O; Cartiglia, N; Clemencic, M; Dattola, D; Goy-Lopez, S; Govi, G; Guida, R; Marchetto, F; Menichetti, E; Palestini, S; Pastrone, N; Chlopik, A; Guzik, Z; Nassalski, J P; Rondio, E; Szleper, M; Wislicki, W; Wronka, S; Dibon, Heinz; Fischer, G; Jeitler, Manfred; Markytan, Manfred; Mikulec, I; Neuhofer, G; Pernicka, M; Taurok, Anton; Widhalm, L

    2007-01-01

    The Beam and Detector, used for the NA48 experiment, devoted to the measurement of $Re(\\epsilon^{\\prime}/\\epsilon)$, and for the NA48/1 experiment on rare K_S and neutral hyperon decays, are described.

  17. Validation of large-angle scattering data via shadow-bar experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, S., E-mail: ohnishi@nmri.go.jp [National Maritime Research Institute, 6-38-1, Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0004 (Japan); Tamaki, S.; Murata, I. [Osaka University, 1-14-16-1, Yamadaoka, Suita-si, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • An experiment to validate large-angle scattering cross section is conducted. • Pieces of Nb foil are set behind a shadow bar to obtain the {sup 92m}Nb production rates. • The results calculated using ENDF/B-VI library data exhibit a 57% overestimation. • The adjustment of cross section in large-angle region makes the C/E close to 1. - Abstract: An experiment emphasizing the influence of large-angle scattering on nuclear data was conducted, in which a Fe shadow bar and a Fe slab target were placed before a deuterium–tritium fusion (DT) neutron source. Two Nb foils were set on both sides of the shadow bar in order to monitor the neutron source intensity and to measure the neutrons scattered from the slab target. The {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92m}Nb reaction rate of the foil was measured following the DT neutron irradiation and calculated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transportation code. The {sup 92m}Nb production rates calculated using data from the JEFF-3.1 and JENDL-4.0 libraries agreed with that measured in the experiment, while the result calculated using data from the ENDF/B-VI library exhibited a 57% overestimation. Because the sensitivity of the {sup 92m}Nb production rate to the scattering angular distribution was large in the angular region between scattering direction cosines of −0.9 and −0.4, the scattering angular distribution was adjusted in that region. This adjustment resulted in a calculation-to-experiment ratio close to 1, but had little influence on the existing integral benchmark experiment.

  18. Density functional simulation of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering experiments in liquids: acetonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, Johannes; Kooser, Kuno; Koskelo, Jaakko; Käämbre, Tanel; Kunnus, Kristjan; Pietzsch, Annette; Quevedo, Wilson; Hakala, Mikko; Föhlisch, Alexander; Huotari, Simo; Kukk, Edwin

    2016-09-21

    In this paper we report an experimental and computational study of liquid acetonitrile (H 3 C-C[triple bond, length as m-dash]N) by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the N K-edge. The experimental spectra exhibit clear signatures of the electronic structure of the valence states at the N site and incident-beam-polarization dependence is observed as well. Moreover, we find fine structure in the quasielastic line that is assigned to finite scattering duration and nuclear relaxation. We present a simple and light-to-evaluate model for the RIXS maps and analyze the experimental data using this model combined with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. In addition to polarization-dependence and scattering-duration effects, we pinpoint the effects of different types of chemical bonding to the RIXS spectrum and conclude that the H 2 C-C[double bond, length as m-dash]NH isomer, suggested in the literature, does not exist in detectable quantities. We study solution effects on the scattering spectra with simulations in liquid and in vacuum. The presented model for RIXS proved to be light enough to allow phase-space-sampling and still accurate enough for identification of transition lines in physical chemistry research by RIXS.

  19. A Study of Diffractive Scattering with the ATLAS and ALFA Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2097773

    This thesis presents a study of diffractive scattering of high-energy protons. Hadronic diffraction is not well-understood and many alternative approaches exist. The Monte Carlo event generator Pythia 8 follows a Pomeron-based approach, where the invariant mass of the diffractive system and the squared momentum transfer $t$ of the system is set up according to a phenomenological Pomeron flux parameterization, which is parameterized by the super-critical Pomeron trajectory, $\\alpha(t) = 1 + \\varepsilon + \\alpha' t$, where the intercept parameter $\\varepsilon$ and the slope parameter $\\alpha'$ can be tuned by the user. A fast detector response simulation of the ALFA and ATLAS detectors has been developed in the Rivet toolkit for the purposes of this thesis. The developed simulation framework is able to handle the beam transport of diffractively scattered protons as well as impose the kinematic acceptance of the ALFA detector which was found to be approximately $\\xi \\lesssim 0.22$, with a pseudorapidity coverag...

  20. An object-specific and dose-sparing scatter correction approach for a dedicated cone-beam breast CT system using a parallel-hole collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Burkett, George, Jr.; Boone, John M.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray scatter is a common cause of image artifacts for cone-beam CT systems due to the expanded field of view and degrades the quantitative accuracy of measured Hounsfield Units (HU). Due to the strong dependency of scatter on the object being scanned, it is crucial to measure the scatter signal for each object. We propose to use a beam pass array (BPA) composed of parallel-holes within a tungsten plate to measure scatter for a dedicated breast CT system. A complete study of the performance of the BPA was conducted. The goal of this study was to explore the feasibility of measuring and compensating for the scatter signal for each individual object. Different clinical study schemes were investigated, including a full rotation scan with BPA and discrete projections acquired with BPA followed by interpolation for full rotation. Different sized cylindrical phantoms and a breast shaped polyethylene phantom were used to test for the robustness of the proposed method. Physically measured scatter signals were converted into scatter to primary ratios (SPRs) at discrete locations through the projection image. A complete noise-free 2D SPR was generated from these discrete measurements. SPR results were compared to Monte Carlo simulation results and scatter corrected CT images were quantitatively evaluated for "cupping" artifact. With the proposed method, a reduction of up to 47 HU of "cupping" was demonstrated. In conclusion, the proposed BPA method demonstrated effective and accurate objectspecific scatter correction with the main advantage of dose-sparing compared to beam stop array (BSA) approaches.

  1. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-04: Characterization of Fan Beam Coded Aperture Coherent Scatter Spectral Imaging Methods for Differentiation of Normal and Neoplastic Breast Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, R; Albanese, K; Lakshmanan, M; Greenberg, J; Kapadia, A [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, Carl E Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study intends to characterize the spectral and spatial resolution limits of various fan beam geometries for differentiation of normal and neoplastic breast structures via coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging techniques. In previous studies, pencil beam raster scanning methods using coherent scatter computed tomography and selected volume tomography have yielded excellent results for tumor discrimination. However, these methods don’t readily conform to clinical constraints; primarily prolonged scan times and excessive dose to the patient. Here, we refine a fan beam coded aperture coherent scatter imaging system to characterize the tradeoffs between dose, scan time and image quality for breast tumor discrimination. Methods: An X-ray tube (125kVp, 400mAs) illuminated the sample with collimated fan beams of varying widths (3mm to 25mm). Scatter data was collected via two linear-array energy-sensitive detectors oriented parallel and perpendicular to the beam plane. An iterative reconstruction algorithm yields images of the sample’s spatial distribution and respective spectral data for each location. To model in-vivo tumor analysis, surgically resected breast tumor samples were used in conjunction with lard, which has a form factor comparable to adipose (fat). Results: Quantitative analysis with current setup geometry indicated optimal performance for beams up to 10mm wide, with wider beams producing poorer spatial resolution. Scan time for a fixed volume was reduced by a factor of 6 when scanned with a 10mm fan beam compared to a 1.5mm pencil beam. Conclusion: The study demonstrates the utility of fan beam coherent scatter spectral imaging for differentiation of normal and neoplastic breast tissues has successfully reduced dose and scan times whilst sufficiently preserving spectral and spatial resolution. Future work to alter the coded aperture and detector geometries could potentially allow the use of even wider fans, thereby making coded

  2. Space-Time Windowing of Angle-Beam Wavefield Data to Characterize Scattering from Defects (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-12

    baseline alignment [4] is helpful to compensate for temporal and spatial misalignment, neither the incident waves nor scattered waves from geometrical...4 mm notch emanating from a 6.35 mm diameter through-hole. As can be seen from Figure 2, the 2nd and 3rd incident shear wave skips interfere with...energy curve need to be time- aligned to the current wavefield before the baseline and current energy curves can be compared; this time alignment corrects

  3. Electric field measurements at near-atmospheric pressure by coherent Raman scattering of laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Tsuyohito; Kobayashi, Kazunobu; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Mueller, Sarah; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Electric field measurements at near-atmospheric pressure environments based on electric-field induced Raman scattering are applied to repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharges. The results have revealed that the peak electric field near the centre of the gap is almost independent of the applied voltage. Minimum sustainable voltage measurements suggests that, at each discharge pulse, charged particles that remain from the previous pulse serve as discharge seeds and play an important role for generation of uniform glow-like discharges.

  4. Design of a Paraxial Inverse Compton Scattering Diagnostic for an Intense Relativistic Electron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    same energy range [26-29]. After the scattered photons are produced at z = 34.5 m they begin to propagate forward in a cone with a half angle of θs...34 Xray "Energy"(keV)" LIF" HOPG" PET" ADP" TAP" RAP" KAP" ODPB" Figure 7. Bragg angle plotted as a function crystal materials and X-ray energy. The

  5. Process of cracking in reinforced concrete beams (simulation and experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Shardakov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of experimental and theoretical investigations of the mechanisms of crack formation in reinforced concrete beams subjected to quasi-static bending. The boundary-value problem has been formulated in the framework of brittle fracture mechanics and solved using the finite-element method. Numerical simulation of the vibrations of an uncracked beam and a beam with cracks of different size serves to determine the pattern of changes in the spectrum of eigenfrequencies observed during crack evolution. A series of sequential quasi-static 4-point bend tests leading to the formation of cracks in a reinforced concrete beam were performed. At each loading step, the beam was subjected to an impulse load to induce vibrations. Two stages of cracking were detected. During the first stage the nonconservative process of deformation begins to develope, but has not visible signs. The second stage is an active cracking, which is marked by a sharp change in eingenfrequencies. The boundary of a transition from one stage to another is well registered. The vibration behavior was examined for the ordinary concrete beams and the beams strengthened with a carbon-fiber polymer. The obtained results show that the vibrodiagnostic approach is an effective tool for monitoring crack formation and assessing the quality of measures aimed at strengthening concrete structures

  6. A Simple Scatter Reduction Method in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Dental and Maxillofacial Applications Based on Monte Carlo Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalinee Thanasupsombat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of images obtained from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT is important in diagnosis and treatment planning for dental and maxillofacial applications. However, X-ray scattering inside a human head is one of the main factors that cause a drop in image quality, especially in the CBCT system with a wide-angle cone-beam X-ray source and a large area detector. In this study, the X-ray scattering distribution within a standard head phantom was estimated using the Monte Carlo method based on Geant4. Due to small variation of low-frequency scattering signals, the scattering signals from the head phantom can be represented as the simple predetermined scattering signals from a patient’s head and subtracted the projection data for scatter reduction. The results showed higher contrast and less cupping artifacts on the reconstructed images of the head phantom and real patients. Furthermore, the same simulated scattering signals can also be applied to process with higher-resolution projection data.

  7. Characteristics of fiber-optic radiation sensor for passive scattering proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, J.; Kim, M.; Jeong, J.; Lim, Y.; Lee, S. B.; Shin, D.; Yoon, M.

    2017-11-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the characteristics of a fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS) that detects the fluorescence light produced by proton beam and to verify its effectiveness in proton therapy quality assurance (QA). Various characteristics of the FORS were investigated, such as the linearity of its relationships to the sensitive length of fiber for the proton beams of intermediate ranges (165.46 and 178.37 MeV) and to the measured dose, as well as its dose rate dependence. In addition, patient specific precription dose QA was conducted for five patients actually undergoing proton therapy and the results were compared with the doses measured using an ion chamber. The results show that the signal of the FORS is linearly related to the sensitive length of fiber and to the irradiated dose in the range from 1 to 500 cGy. The QA results obtained using the FORS system showed good agreement with the corresponding ion chamber results, with an average difference of 0.40% and a standard deviation of 0.35%. The FORS was dose-rate independent for proton currents up to 5 Gy/min. The profiles of various proton beams obtained using an array of FORS, which were measured as an application of the developed dosimetric system, closely agreed with the profiles acquired using EBT3 film. In summary, the experimental results of FORS demonstrated its effectiveness for use in various proton therapy QA tests.

  8. Determination of nuclear moments in experiments on charged particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrynkiewicz, A.Z.

    Nuclear magnetic moment measurements by in-beam perturbed angular correlation method are discussed, with special emphasis on the use of transient fields. Measurements on states in several sd and dsup(5/2) nuclei are reported [fr

  9. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center LANSCE experiment reports 1989 run cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyer, D.K.; DiStravolo, M.A. (comps.)

    1990-10-01

    This report contains a listing and description of experiments carried on at the LANSCE neutron scattering facility in the following areas: High Density Powder Diffraction; Neutron Powder Diffractometer, (NPD); Single Crystal Diffractometer, (SCD); Low-Q Diffractometer, (LQD); Surface Profile Analysis Reflectometer, (SPEAR); Filter Difference Spectrometer, (FDS); and Constant-Q Spectrometer.

  10. Measurements and modeling of Raman side-scatter in ICF experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Pierre; Rosenberg, M. J.; Chapman, T.; Short, R. W.; Seka, W.; Solodov, A.; Goyon, C.; Hohenberger, M.; Moody, J. D.; Regan, S. P.; Myatt, J. F.

    2017-10-01

    Raman side-scatter, whereby the Raman scattered light is resonant at its turning point in a density gradient, was identified experimentally in planar-target experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in conditions relevant to the direct-drive scheme of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). This process was found to be one of the principal sources of supra-thermal electrons in such conditions, which can preheat the target and reduce its compressibility. We have developed a new semi-analytical model of the instability, which describes both its convective and absolute aspects; we derived quantitative estimates of the amplification region in typical ICF regimes, which highlights the need for sufficiently large laser spots to allow the instability to develop. Full-scale simulations of these experiments using the laser-plasma interaction code ``pF3d'' show SRS side-scatter largely dominating over back-scatter, and reproduce the essential features observed in the experiments and derived in the theory; we provide extrapolations to the case of spherical geometries relevant to direct-drive and discuss implications for indirect-drive ICF experiments. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Laser Light Scattering, from an Advanced Technology Development Program to Experiments in a Reduced Gravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William V.; Tscharnuter, Walther W.; Macgregor, Andrew D.; Dautet, Henri; Deschamps, Pierre; Boucher, Francois; Zuh, Jixiang; Tin, Padetha; Rogers, Richard B.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1994-01-01

    Recent advancements in laser light scattering hardware are described. These include intelligent single card correlators; active quench/active reset avalanche photodiodes; laser diodes; and fiber optics which were used by or developed for a NASA advanced technology development program. A space shuttle experiment which will employ aspects of these hardware developments is previewed.

  12. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center LANSCE experiment reports 1989 run cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyer, D.K.; DiStravolo, M.A.

    1990-10-01

    This report contains a listing and description of experiments carried on at the LANSCE neutron scattering facility in the following areas: High Density Powder Diffraction; Neutron Powder Diffractometer, (NPD); Single Crystal Diffractometer, (SCD); Low-Q Diffractometer, (LQD); Surface Profile Analysis Reflectometer, (SPEAR); Filter Difference Spectrometer, (FDS); and Constant-Q Spectrometer

  13. A Study of Particle Beam Spin Dynamics for High Precision Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, Andrew J. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States)

    2017-05-01

    In the search for physics beyond the Standard Model, high precision experiments to measure fundamental properties of particles are an important frontier. One group of such measurements involves magnetic dipole moment (MDM) values as well as searching for an electric dipole moment (EDM), both of which could provide insights about how particles interact with their environment at the quantum level and if there are undiscovered new particles. For these types of high precision experiments, minimizing statistical uncertainties in the measurements plays a critical role. \\\\ \\indent This work leverages computer simulations to quantify the effects of statistical uncertainty for experiments investigating spin dynamics. In it, analysis of beam properties and lattice design effects on the polarization of the beam is performed. As a case study, the beam lines that will provide polarized muon beams to the Fermilab Muon \\emph{g}-2 experiment are analyzed to determine the effects of correlations between the phase space variables and the overall polarization of the muon beam.

  14. SU-E-T-375: Passive Scattering to Pencil-Beam-Scanning Comparison for Medulloblastoma Proton Therapy: LET Distributions and Radiobiological Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giantsoudi, D; MacDonald, S; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the linear energy transfer (LET) distributions between passive scattering and pencil beam scanning proton radiation therapy techniques for medulloblastoma patients and study the potential radiobiological implications. Methods: A group of medulloblastoma patients, previously treated with passive scattering (PS) proton craniospinal irradiation followed by prosterior fossa or involved field boost, were selected from the patient database of our institution. Using the beam geometry and planning computed tomography (CT) image sets of the original treatment plans, pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment plans were generated for the cranial treatment for each patient, with average beam spot size of 8mm (sigma in air at isocenter). 3-dimensional dose and LET distributions were calculated by Monte Carlo methods (TOPAS) both for the original passive scattering and new pencil beam scanning treatment plans. LET volume histograms were calculated for the target and OARs and compared for the two delivery methods. Variable RBE weighted dose distributions and volume histograms were also calculated using a variable dose and LET-based model. Results: Better dose conformity was achieved with PBS planning compared to PS, leading to increased dose coverage for the boost target area and decreased average dose to the structures adjacent to it and critical structures outside the whole brain treatment field. LET values for the target were lower for PBS plans. Elevated LET values for OARs close to the boosted target areas were noticed, due to end of range of proton beams falling inside these structures, resulting in higher RBE weighted dose for these structures compared to the clinical RBE value of 1.1. Conclusion: Transitioning from passive scattering to pencil beam scanning proton radiation treatment can be dosimetrically beneficial for medulloblastoma patients. LET–guided treatment planning could contribute to better decision making for these cases, especially for

  15. Measurement of charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (US)] (and others)

    2008-12-15

    Measurements of the cross sections for charged current deep inelastic scattering in e{sup -}p collisions with longitudinally polarised electron beams are presented. The measurements are based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 175 pb{sup -1} collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV. The total cross section is given for positively and negatively polarised electron beams. The differential cross-sections d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}, d{sigma}/dx and d{sigma}/dy are presented for Q{sup 2}>200 GeV{sup 2}. The double-differential cross-section d{sup 2}{sigma}/dxdQ{sup 2} is presented in the kinematic range 280

  16. Electron Beam Design and Calibration for the Solid/Liquid Lithium Divertor Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Michael; Flauta, R.; Gray, T. K.; Kim, J.; Lau, C. Y.; Lee, M. B.; Neumann, M. J.; Surla, V.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2008-11-01

    An electron beam has been developed as part of the Solid/Liquid Lithium Divertor Experiment (SLiDE) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The purpose of the SLiDE apparatus is to examine the motion of liquid lithium under fusion relevant heat loads and magnetic fields. To mimic the heat fluxes present in the divertor of a fusion machine, a linear sheet beam is utilized which can operate over a range of applied magnetic fields and power levels. With steady state operation up to 15kW input power, the beam can produce peak heat fluxes of 10 MW/m^2 and heat flux gradients comparable to those found in fusion experiments. The design of the electron beam was developed using commercial beam transport codes and the final design is diagnosed with a two-lead Faraday cup. Beam performance and characteristics are presented.

  17. Note: versatile sample stick for neutron scattering experiments in high electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkowiak, M; White, J S; Rønnow, H M; Prša, K

    2014-02-01

    We present a versatile high voltage sample stick that fits into all cryomagnets and standard cryostats at the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, and which provides a low effort route to neutron scattering experiments that combine electric field with low temperature and magnetic field. The stick allows for voltages up to 5 kV and can be easily adapted for different scattering geometries. We discuss the design consideration and thermal behavior of the stick, and give one example to showcase the abilities of the device.

  18. Study of the elastic scattering differential cross sections of a proton beam by a cesium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Maddarsi, Mohamed.

    1978-01-01

    The elastic differential cross section of H + on Cs is studied experimentally and theoretically. The experimental device is described, after which the differential cross-section values obtained as a function of the laboratory angle are given for four incident energies: 13.4 eV, 15.1 eV, 17.7 eV and 24.2 eV. By means of an interaction potential of the quasi-molecule H + Cs the differential cross sections are calculated for the same incident energies; this calculation uses the semi-classical method of stationary phases which shows clearly the limits of conventional description and the changes introduced by quantum effects. Very good agreement is obtained between theoretical and experimental results, which shows that elastic scattering is very little perturbed by inelastic channels in this energy range. The estimated inelastic cross section at 24 eV is about 1.9 10 -15 cm 2 , corresponding to 1.6% of the scattering process [fr

  19. Analysis of material characteristics for the construction of energy degrading and scattering plates for electron beam skin radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Yoriyaz, Helio; Siqueira, Paulo T.D.; Antunes, Paula C.G.; Furnari, Laura; Santos, Gabriela R.

    2009-01-01

    There are many radiosensitive diseases associated to the skin such as mycosis fungoids and the syndrome of Sezary that are part of a sub-group of cutaneous diseases type T-cell lymphoma. Several studies indicate the eradication of the disease when treated with linear accelerators emitting electron beams with energies between 4 to 10 MeV. However, this treatment technique presents innumerable technical challenges since the disease in general reaches all patient's body, becoming necessary a very large field size radiation beam, and also, it should deliver superficial doses limited to the skin depth. To reach the uniformity in the dose distribution, many techniques had already been developed. Based on these previous studies and guided by the report nr. 23 of the AAPM (American Association of Physicists in Medicine), the present study will develop an energy scattering and degrading plates, supplying subsidies for a future installation for skin treatment at the - Servico de Radioterapia do Hospital das Clinicas de Sao Paulo. As part of the plates design, first of all, the energy spectrum of the 6 MeV electron beam of the VARIAN 2100C accelerator was reconstructed through Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNP4C code and based on experimental data. Once the spectrum is built the design of the plates has been performed analyzing several materials, shapes and dimensions most adequate on the basis of radial and axial dose distribution, production of rays-x and dose attenuation. The simulations will be validated with experimental measurements using copper and aluminum. (author)

  20. Out-of-Field Dose Equivalents Delivered by Passively Scattered Therapeutic Proton Beams for Clinically Relevant Field Configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wroe, Andrew; Clasie, Ben; Kooy, Hanne; Flanz, Jay; Schulte, Reinhard; Rosenfeld, Anatoly

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Microdosimetric measurements were performed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, to assess the dose equivalent external to passively delivered proton fields for various clinical treatment scenarios. Methods and Materials: Treatment fields evaluated included a prostate cancer field, cranial and spinal medulloblastoma fields, ocular melanoma field, and a field for an intracranial stereotactic treatment. Measurements were completed with patient-specific configurations of clinically relevant treatment settings using a silicon-on-insulator microdosimeter placed on the surface of and at various depths within a homogeneous Lucite phantom. The dose equivalent and average quality factor were assessed as a function of both lateral displacement from the treatment field edge and distance downstream of the beam's distal edge. Results: Dose-equivalent value range was 8.3-0.3 mSv/Gy (2.5-60-cm lateral displacement) for a typical prostate cancer field, 10.8-0.58 mSv/Gy (2.5-40-cm lateral displacement) for the cranial medulloblastoma field, 2.5-0.58 mSv/Gy (5-20-cm lateral displacement) for the spinal medulloblastoma field, and 0.5-0.08 mSv/Gy (2.5-10-cm lateral displacement) for the ocular melanoma field. Measurements of external field dose equivalent for the stereotactic field case showed differences as high as 50% depending on the modality of beam collimation. Average quality factors derived from this work ranged from 2-7, with the value dependent on the position within the phantom in relation to the primary beam. Conclusions: This work provides a valuable and clinically relevant comparison of the external field dose equivalents for various passively scattered proton treatment fields

  1. First experiences of beam presence detection based on dedicated beam position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalal, A.; Gabourin, S.; Gasior, M.; Todd, B.

    2012-01-01

    High intensity particle beam injection into the LHC is only permitted when a low intensity pilot beam is already circulating in the LHC. This requirement addresses some of the risks associated with high intensity injection, and is enforced by a so-called Beam Presence Flag (BPF) system which is part of the interlock chain between the LHC and its injector complex. For the 2010 LHC run, the detection of the presence of this pilot beam was implemented using the LHC Fast Beam Current Transformer (FBCT) system. However, the primary function of the FBCTs, that is reliable measurement of beam currents, did not allow the BPF system to satisfy all quality requirements of the LHC Machine Protection System (MPS). Safety requirements associated with high intensity injections triggered the development of a dedicated system, based on Beam Position Monitors (BPM). This system was meant to work first in parallel with the FBCT BPF system and eventually replace it. At the end of 2010 and in 2011, this new BPF implementation based on BPMs was designed, built, tested and deployed. This paper reviews both the FBCT and BPM implementation of the BPF system, outlining the changes during the transition period. The paper briefly describes the testing methods, focuses on the results obtained from the tests performed during the end of 2010 LHC run and shows the changes made for the BPM BPF system deployment in LHC in 2011. Whilst the system has been proved to work with a threshold of 6*10 8 charges, it has been implemented with a threshold of 2*10 9 charges to protect the LHC. (authors)

  2. Beam studies and experimental facility for the AWAKE experiment at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracco, Chiara; Gschwendtner, Edda; Petrenko, Alexey; Timko, Helga; Argyropoulos, Theodoros; Bartosik, Hannes; Bohl, Thomas; Esteban Müller, Juan; Goddard, Brennan; Meddahi, Malika; Pardons, Ans; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Velotti, Francesco M.; Vincke, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    A Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment has been proposed as an approach to eventually accelerate an electron beam to the TeV energy range in a single plasma section. To verify this novel technique, a proof of principle R and D experiment, AWAKE, is planned at CERN using 400 GeV proton bunches from the SPS. An electron beam will be injected into the plasma cell to probe the accelerating wakefield. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the CNGS facility profiting from existing infrastructure where only minor modifications need to be foreseen. The design of the experimental area and the proton and electron beam lines are shown. The achievable SPS proton bunch properties and their reproducibility have been measured and are presented. - Highlights: • A proton driven plasma wakefield experiment using the first time protons as drive beam is proposed. • The integration of AWAKE experiment, the proton, laser and electron beam line in an existing CERN facility is demonstrated. • The necessary modifications in the experimental facility are presented. • Proton beam optics and a new electron beam line are adapted to match with the required beam parameters. • Short high-intensity bunches were studied in the SPS to guide the design parameters of the AWAKE project

  3. Operational experience with synchrotron light interferometers for CEBAF experimental beam lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavel Chevtsov

    2006-10-24

    Beam size and energy spread monitoring systems based on Synchrotron Light Interferometers (SLI) have been in operations at Jefferson Lab for several years. A non-invasive nature and a very high (a few mm) resolution of SLI make these instruments valuable beam diagnostic tools for the CEBAF accelerator. This presentation describes the evolution of the Synchrotron Light Interferometer at Jefferson Lab and highlights our extensive experience in the installation and operation of the SLI for CEBAF experimental beam lines.

  4. Generation and application of soft-X-ray by means of inverse compton scattering between high quality election beam and IR laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washio, M.; Sakaue, K.; Hama, Y.; Kamiya, Y.; Moriyama, R.; Hezume, K.; Saito, T.; Kuroda, R.; Kashiwagi, S.; Ushida, K.; Hayano, H.; Urakawa, J.

    2006-01-01

    High quality beam generation project based on High-Tech Research Center Project, which has been approved by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in 1999, has been conducted by advance research institute for science and engineering, Waseda University. In the project, laser photo-cathode RF-gun has been selected for the high quality electron beam source. RF cavities with low dark current, which were made by diamond turning technique, have been successfully manufactured. The low emittance electron beam was realized by choosing the modified laser injection technique. The obtained normalized emittance was about 3 mm·mrad at 100 pC of electron charge. The soft X-ray beam generation with the energy of 370 eV, which is in the energy region of so-called 'water window', by inverse Compton scattering has been performed by the collision between IR laser and the low emittance electron beams. (authors)

  5. Inelastic neutron scattering experiments with the monochromatic imaging mode of the RITA-II spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Lefmann, Kim; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech

    2006-01-01

    to perform real inelastic neutron scattering experiments. We present the results from inelastic powder, single crystal dispersion and single crystal constant energy mapping experiments. The advantages and complications of performing these experiments are discussed along with a comparison between the imaging......Recently a monochromatic multiple data taking mode has been demonstrated for diffraction experiments using a RITA type cold neutron spectrometer with a multi-bladed analyser and a position-sensitive detector. Here, we show how this mode can be used in combination with a flexible radial collimator...

  6. ‘Rutherford’s experiment’ on alpha particles scattering: the experiment that never was

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, M.; Robotti, N.; Verna, G.

    2018-05-01

    The so-called Rutherford’s experiment, as it is outlined in many physics textbooks, is a case in point of the flaws around the history at the educational level of one of the decisive event of modern physics: the discovery that the atom has a nucleus. This paper shows that this alleged experiment is a very approximate and very partial synthesis of a series of different particle scattering experiments, starting with that carried out by Rutherford in 1906 and ending with Geiger and Marsden’s 1913 experiments.

  7. Development of a silicon microstrip detector with single photon sensitivity for fast dynamic diffraction experiments at a synchrotron radiation beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakcheev, A.; Aulchenko, V.; Kudashkin, D.; Shekhtman, L.; Tolochko, B.; Zhulanov, V.

    2017-06-01

    Time-resolved experiments on the diffraction of synchrotron radiation (SR) from crystalline materials provide information on the evolution of a material structure after a heat, electron beam or plasma interaction with a sample under study. Changes in the material structure happen within a microsecond scale and a detector with corresponding parameters is needed. The SR channel 8 of the VEPP-4M storage ring provides radiation from the 7-pole wiggler that allows to reach several tens photons within one μs from a tungsten crystal for the most intensive diffraction peak. In order to perform experiments that allow to measure the evolution of tungsten crystalline structure under the impact of powerful laser beam, a new detector is developed, that can provide information about the distribution of a scattered SR flux in space and its evolution in time at a microsecond scale. The detector is based on the silicon p-in-n microstrip sensor with DC-coupled metal strips. The sensor contains 1024 30 mm long strips with a 50 μm pitch. 64 strips are bonded to the front-end electronics based on APC128 ASICs. The APC128 ASIC contains 128 channels that consist of a low noise integrator with 32 analogue memory cells each. The integrator equivalent noise charge is about 2000 electrons and thus the signal from individual photons with energy above 40 keV can be observed. The signal can be stored at the analogue memory with 10 MHz rate. The first measurements with the beam scattered from a tungsten crystal with energy near 60 keV demonstrated the capability of this prototype to observe the spatial distribution of the photon flux with the intensity from below one photon per channel up to 0~10 photons per channel with a frame rate from 10 kHz up to 1 MHz.

  8. Supersonic molecular beam experiments on surface chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Michio

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of a molecule and a surface is important in various fields, and in particular in complex systems like biomaterials and their related chemistry. However, the detailed understanding of the elementary steps in the surface chemistry, for example, stereodynamics, is still insufficient even for simple model systems. In this Personal Account, I review our recent studies of chemical reactions on single-crystalline Cu and Si surfaces induced by hyperthermal oxygen molecular beams and by oriented molecular beams, respectively. Studies of oxide formation on Cu induced by hyperthermal molecular beams demonstrate a significant role of the translational energy of the incident molecules. The use of hyperthermal molecular beams enables us to open up new chemical reaction paths specific for the hyperthermal energy region, and to develop new methods for the fabrication of thin films. On the other hand, oriented molecular beams also demonstrate the possibility of understanding surface chemical reactions in detail by varying the orientation of the incident molecules. The steric effects found on Si surfaces hint at new ways of material fabrication on Si surfaces. Controlling the initial conditions of incoming molecules is a powerful tool for finely monitoring the elementary step of the surface chemical reactions and creating new materials on surfaces. Copyright © 2014 The Chemical Society of Japan and Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Study of MPI based on parallel MOM on PC clusters for EM-beam scattering by 2-D PEC rough surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Ma; Li-Xin, Guo; An-Qi, Wang

    2009-01-01

    This paper firstly applies the finite impulse response filter (FIR) theory combined with the fast Fourier transform (FFT) method to generate two-dimensional Gaussian rough surface. Using the electric field integral equation (EFIE), it introduces the method of moment (MOM) with RWG vector basis function and Galerkin's method to investigate the electromagnetic beam scattering by a two-dimensional PEC Gaussian rough surface on personal computer (PC) clusters. The details of the parallel conjugate gradient method (CGM) for solving the matrix equation are also presented and the numerical simulations are obtained through the message passing interface (MPI) platform on the PC clusters. It finds significantly that the parallel MOM supplies a novel technique for solving a two-dimensional rough surface electromagnetic-scattering problem. The influences of the root-mean-square height, the correlation length and the polarization on the beam scattering characteristics by two-dimensional PEC Gaussian rough surfaces are finally discussed. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  10. Revision of tissue-maximum ratio and scatter-maximum ratio concepts for cobalt 60 and higher energy x-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, F.M.; Sewchand, W.; Lee, J.; Williamson, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of tissue-maximum ratios (TMR) as a basis of dose computations has posed problems when applied to the whole range of clinically used megavoltage beams. Another problem is the definition of scatter-maximum ratio (SMR) which assumes a value of zero at the depth of maximum dose. This paper describes new methods of measuring collimator and phantom scatter correction factors. The definitions of TMR and SMR are modified in order to compute phantom scatter at any depth, including depth of maximum dose. The revised concept is basic and general enough that it can be applied to x-ray beams of any energy, fields of any shape and isocentric as well as non-isocentric modes of treatment

  11. Diagnostic suite of the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, M. C., E-mail: mthompson@trialphaenergy.com; Gota, H.; Putvinski, S.; Tuszewski, M.; Binderbauer, M. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The C-2U experiment at Tri Alpha Energy studies the evolution of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas sustained by neutral beam injection. Data on the FRC plasma performance are provided by a comprehensive suite of diagnostics that includes magnetic sensors, interferometry, Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, bolometry, reflectometry, neutral particle analyzers, and fusion product detectors. While many of these diagnostic systems were inherited from the preceding experiment C-2, C-2U has a variety of new and upgraded diagnostic systems: multi-chord far-infrared polarimetry, multiple fast imaging cameras with selectable atomic line filters, proton detector arrays, and 100 channel bolometer units capable of observing multiple regions of the spectrum simultaneously. In addition, extensive ongoing work focuses on advanced methods of measuring separatrix shape and plasma current profile that will facilitate equilibrium reconstruction and active control of the FRC plasma.

  12. Parity violation asymmetry in the inelastic electron-proton scattering at the A4 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capozza, Luigi; Glaeser, Boris; Mora Espi, Maria Carmen [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Balaguer Rios, David; Diefenbach, Juergen; Imai, Yoshio; Kabuss, Eva-Maria; Lee, Jeong-Han; Schilling, Ernst; Harrach, Dietrich von; Weinrich, Christoph [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Baunack, Sebastian [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); PRISMA Cluster of Excellence, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Maas, Frank [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); PRISMA Cluster of Excellence, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The A4 experiment at the MAMI accelerator facility at Mainz studies the nucleon structure by measuring single spin asymmetries in the electron-proton scattering. The apparatus was designed for measuring asymmetries in the elastic scattering, separating elastic and inelastic events by measuring the energy of the scattered particles in an homogeneous PbF{sub 2} electromagnetic calorimeter. However, also inelastic events have been recorded during the measurements and contain threshold pion production and Δ(1232) resonance excitation. In order to extract parity violation asymmetries from these data, background contributions to the energy spectrum need to be estimated in MC simulations. An update of the A4 MC containing the contribution of π{sup 0} decay gammas from double-pion production is presented.

  13. An Innovative Beam Halo Monitor system for the CMS experiment at the LHC: Design, Commissioning and First Beam Results

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00344917; Dabrowski, Anne

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a multi-purpose experiment situated at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The CMS has the mandate of searching new physics and making precise measurements of the already known mechanisms by using data produced by collisions of high-energy particles. To ensure high quality physics data taking, it is important to monitor and ensure the quality of the colliding particle beams. This thesis presents the research and design, the integration and the first commissioning results of a novel Beam Halo Monitor (BHM) that was designed and built for the CMS experiment. The BHM provides an online, bunch-by-bunch measurement of background particles created by interactions of the proton beam with residual gas molecules in the vacuum chamber or with collimator material upstream of the CMS, separately for each beam. The system consists of two arrays of twenty direction-sensitive detectors that are distributed azimuthally around the outer forward shielding of the CMS experiment. Each detector is ...

  14. Simulating the Beam-line at CERN's ISOLDE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    McGrath, Casey

    2013-01-01

    Maximizing the optical matching along portions of the ISOLDE beam-line and automating this procedure will make it easier for scientists to determine what the strengths of the electrical elds of each beam-line element should be in order to reduce particle loss. Simulations are run using a program called MAD-X, however, certain issues were discovered that hindered an immediate success of the simulations. Specifically, the transfer matrices for electrostatic components like the switchyards, kickers, and electric quadrupoles were missing from the original coding. The primary aim of this project was to design these components using AutoCAD and then extract the transfer matrices using SIMION. Future work will then implement these transfer matrices into the MAD-X code to make the simulations of the beam-line more accurate.

  15. Saturation of Backward Stimulated Scattering of a Laser Beam in the Kinetic Regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Bowers, K. J.; Daughton, W.; Rose, H. A.

    2007-01-01

    Stimulated Raman (SRS) and Brillouin scattering (SBS) are examined in the kinetic regime using particle-in-cell simulations. Wave front bowing of electron-plasma waves (ion-acoustic waves) from trapped particle nonlinear frequency shift is observed in the SRS (SBS) regime for the first time. Self-focusing from trapped particle modulational instability (TPMI) is shown to occur in 2D and 3D SRS simulations. The key physics of SRS saturation is identified as a combination of wave front bowing, TPMI, and self-focusing: Bowing marks the beginning of SRS saturation and self-focusing terminates SRS. Ion-acoustic wave bowing also contributes to SBS saturation. Velocity diffusion by transverse modes and rapid loss of hot electrons in regions of small transverse extent formed from self-focusing dissipate wave energy and increase Landau damping, despite trapping that reduces Landau damping initially

  16. Opportunities for parity violating electron scattering experiments at the planned MESA facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulenbacher, Kurt

    2011-11-01

    We suggest to start an accelerator physics project called the Mainz Energy recovering Superconducting Accelerator (MESA) as an extension to our experimental facilities. MESA may allow to introduce an innovative internal target regime based on the ERL principle. A second mode of operation will be to use an external polarized electron beam for parity violating experiments.

  17. Low-energy photon scattering and photoactivation experiments: selected recent results from the Stuttgart Dynamitron facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kneiss, U

    2002-01-01

    Photon scattering off bound nuclear states (nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF)) and photoactivation of long-lived isomers are complementary to one another and share the principal advantage of a well-known reaction mechanism. The experimental progress achieved during the last years allows nowadays experiments of tremendously increased sensitivity opening new fields of applications. In the present lecture recent results are summarized from experiments performed at the well-established Bremsstrahlung photon scattering and photoactivation facilities of the 4.3 MV Stuttgart Dynamitron accelerator. Three current topics are discussed in details: The systematics of E1 two-phonon excitations of the type (2 sup + x 3 sup -) in nuclei near shell closures; the first observation of a population inversion of nuclear states, the precondition for a possible gamma-laser, by feeding from higher-lying photo-excited states (NRF experiments on sup 1 sup 0 sup 3 Rh); and the photoactivation of long-lived isomers. Here first resu...

  18. Experiments with beams of exotic nuclei at GSI and FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emling, Hans

    2006-01-01

    The facility for antiproton and ion research FAIR will provide the international science community with a technically novel and in many respects unique accelerator system for a multi-faceted physics program. Rare-isotope beams of much improved quality together with advanced experimental concepts promise detailed experimental investigations of nuclei far away from stability. A brief description of the rare-isotope beam facility at FAIR is presented, which allows to extend substantially the current successful experimental program with exotic nuclei at GSI. (author)

  19. Floppy disc units for data collection from neutron beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, J.W.

    1976-02-01

    The replacement of paper tape output facilities on neutron beam equipment on DIDO and PLUTO reactors by floppy discs will improve reliability and provide a more manageable data storage medium. The cost of floppy disc drives is about the same as a tape punch and printer and less than other devices such as a magnetic tape. Suitable floppy disc controllers are not at present available and a unit was designed as a directly pluggable replacement for paper tape punches. This design was taken as the basis in the development of a prototype unit for use in neutron beam equipment. The circuit operation for this prototype unit is described. (author)

  20. Beam polarimetry in the CBELSA/TAPS experiment; Strahlpolarimetrie am CBELSA/TAPS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kammer, Susanne

    2010-02-19

    In the identification of nucleon resonances polarization observables play an important role. For the photoproduction experiments of the CBELAS/TAPS assembly at the accelerator facility ELSA in the framework of this thesis linearly and circularly polarized were realized and prepared. Linearly polarized photons were produced on a diamond crystal under usage of the coherent bremsstrahlung. By alignment of the crystal in the bremsstrahlung coherent intensity increasements in form of pronounced edges could be generated. The number of the polarized photons lying in the increasement determines in comparison to the incoherently produced background the degree of polarization. The position of the coherent edge could be tuned by means of control distributions to an arbitrary position in the measured energy spectrum as well as the degree of polarization of the photons optimized. For the production of circularly polarized photons longitudinally polarized electrons on the bremsstrahlung target are required. The polarization transfer of the bremsstrahlung process is uniquely given by the QED, so that the degree of polarization of the photons can be determined via a measurement of the electron-beam polarization. With this goal a for the first time in the CBELSA/TAPS applied momentum-selecting Moeller polarimeter was developed and integrated in the photon-tagging facility. Via a change of the beam helicity the counting-rate asymmetry for parallely and antiparallely beam and target electrons was measured and the degree of polarization of the electrons at beam energies of 2350 MeV determined to typically above 60%. By means of dedicated test measurements and simulations the functionality of the Moeller polarimeter was checked and the relative systematic uncertainty determined to 1%. Since 2007 the Moeller polarimeter essential for the double-polarization experiments is in current operation. Finally a method was sketched, in which via the known cross-section asymmetry of the

  1. Void fraction measurements in two-phase flow by transmission and scattering of a neutrons beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, M.C.L.

    1984-01-01

    Calibration curves have been obtained which supply average values of void fraction (α) of water-steam two-phase mixtures for bubble, slug, annular and invert annular flow states. The measurements were carried out in simulated models of lucite-air for the steady-state, using the techniques of transmission and diffusion of a thermal neutrons beam. The calibration curves obtained were used for measurements of void fraction in a circuit containing two-phase water-air mixtures, in upward concurrent flow, for slug flow (P sub(max) = 1,06 bar) and annular flow (P sub(max) = 1,33 bar), using the same techniques. In both of the systems, a test section made up of an aluminium (99,9%) tube was used with internal diameter of 25,25 mm and 2,0 mm wall thichness. The beam of neutrons was obtained from a 5 Ci isotopic Am-Be source, thermalised in a cylindrical moderator of paraffin of 500 mm diameter (with H/D=1) which was covered by 2 mm thick cadmium sheets and having in its centre a parallepeliped made from high density polyethilene with the dimensions 240 x 240 x 144 mm. The neutrons escape through a rectangular collimator of 53,0 x 25,25 mm, with a length of 273 mm cut out of a single block of borated paraffin (32% of H 3 BO 3 ). The experimental results are in good agreement with theorical models in published literature. (Author) [pt

  2. Characterisation of the Muon Beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Back, J.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V.J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C.N.; Bowring, D.; Boyd, S.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A.D.; Capponi, M.; Carlisle, T.; Cecchet, G.; Charnley, G.; Cobb, J.H.; Colling, D.; Collomb, N.; Coney, L.; Cooke, P.; Courthold, M.; Cremaldi, L.M.; DeMello, A.; Dick, A.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Fayer, S.; Filthaut, F.; Fish, A.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Fletcher, R.; Forrest, D.; Francis, V.; Freemire, B.; Fry, L.; Gallagher, A.; Gamet, R.; Gourlay, S.; Grant, A.; Graulich, J.S.; Griffiths, S.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, O.M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harrison, P.; Hart, T.L.; Hartnett, T.; Hayler, T.; Heidt, C.; Hills, M.; Hodgson, P.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishimoto, S.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D.M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kim, Y.K.; Kolev, D.; Kuno, Y.; Kyberd, P.; Lau, W.; Leaver, J.; Leonova, M.; Li, D.; Lintern, A.; Littlefield, M.; Long, K.; Lucchini, G.; Luo, T.; Macwaters, C.; Martlew, B.; Martyniak, J.; Middleton, S.; Moretti, A.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Nebrensky, J.J.; Neuffer, D.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, R.; Nugent, J.C.; Onel, Y.; Orestano, D.; Overton, E.; Owens, P.; Palladino, V.; Palmer, R.B.; Pasternak, J.; Pastore, F.; Pidcott, C.; Popovic, M.; Preece, R.; Prestemon, S.; Rajaram, D.; Ramberger, S.; Rayner, M.A.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Roberts, T.J.; Robinson, M.; Rogers, C.; Ronald, K.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, R.; Rusinov, I.; Sakamoto, H.; Sanders, D.A.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Smith, P.J.; Snopok, P.; Soler, F.J.P.; Stanley, T.; Summers, D.J.; Takahashi, M.; Tarrant, J.; Taylor, I.; Tortora, L.; Torun, Y.; Tsenov, R.; Tunnell, C.D.; Vankova, G.; Verguilov, V.; Virostek, S.; Vretenar, M.; Walaron, K.; Watson, S.; White, C.; Whyte, C.G.; Wilson, A.; Wisting, H.; Zisman, M.

    2013-01-01

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/c, have emittances of approximately 1.5--2.3 \\pi mm-rad horizontally and 0.6--1.0 \\pi mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90--190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE.

  3. Experiments on Ion Space-Charge Neutralization with Pulsed Electron Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Herleb, U

    1996-01-01

    The method of space-charge neutralization of heavy ion beams with electron beam pulses generated with electron guns incorporating ferroelectric cathodes has been experimentally investigated. Several experiments are described, the results of which prove that the intensity of selected ion beam parts with defined charge states generated in a laser ion source may be increased by one order of magnitude. For elevated charge states the intensity amplification is more significant than for low charge states. For $Al^(7+)$ ions from an aluminium target a charge enhancement by a factor of 4 has been achieved by electron beam focusing.

  4. Characterisation of the muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D.; Barclay, P.; Bayliss, V.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Courthold, M.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Hayler, T.; Hills, M.; Lintern, A.; Macwaters, C.; Nichols, A.; Preece, R.; Ricciardi, S.; Rogers, C.; Stanley, T.; Tarrant, J.; Watson, S.; Wilson, A. [Harwell Oxford, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Adey, D.; Back, J.; Boyd, S.; Harrison, P.; Pidcott, C.; Taylor, I. [University of Warwick, Department of Physics, Coventry (United Kingdom); Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Barber, G.; Colling, D.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Fayer, S.; Fish, A.; Hunt, C.; Leaver, J.; Long, K.; Martyniak, J.; Middleton, S.; Pasternak, J.; Richards, A.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Takahashi, M. [Imperial College London, Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, London (United Kingdom); Asfandiyarov, R.; Blondel, A.; Graulich, J.S.; Karadzhov, Y.; Verguilov, V.; Wisting, H. [Universite de Geneve, DPNC, Section de Physique, Geneva (Switzerland); De Bari, A.; Cecchet, G. [Sezione INFN Pavia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, Pavia (Italy); Bayes, R.; Forrest, D.; Nugent, J.C.; Soler, F.J.P.; Walaron, K. [The University of Glasgow, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Lucchini, G. [Sezione INFN Milano Bicocca (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica G. Occhialini, Milano (Italy); Blackmore, V.J.; Carlisle, T.; Cobb, J.H.; Lau, W.; Rayner, M.A.; Tunnell, C.D. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Blot, S.; Kim, Y.K. [University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institute, Chicago, IL (United States); Bogomilov, M.; Kolev, D.; Rusinov, I.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova, G. [St. Kliment Ohridski University of Sofia, Department of Atomic Physics, Sofia (Bulgaria); Booth, C.N.; Hodgson, P.; Nicholson, R.; Overton, E.; Robinson, M.; Smith, P.J. [University of Sheffield, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Bowring, D.; DeMello, A.; Gourlay, S.; Li, D.; Prestemon, S.; Virostek, S.P.; Zisman, M.S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bravar, U. [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Bross, A.D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, R. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Capponi, M.; Iaciofano, A.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Tortora, L. [Sezione INFN Roma Tre e Dipartimento di Fisica, Roma (Italy); Charnley, G.; Collomb, N.; Gallagher, A.; Grant, A.; Griffiths, S.; Hartnett, T.; Martlew, B.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Owens, P.; White, C. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Coney, L.; Fletcher, R.; Hanson, G.G.; Heidt, C. [University of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Cooke, P.; Gamet, R. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Cremaldi, L.M.; Hart, T.L.; Luo, T.; Sanders, D.A.; Summers, D.J. [University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Dick, A.J.; Ronald, K.; Whyte, C.G. [University of Strathclyde, Department of Physics, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Filthaut, F. [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D.M.; Rajaram, D.; Snopok, P.; Torun, Y. [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Hansen, O.M.; Ramberger, S.; Vretenar, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Ishimoto, S. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kuno, Y.; Sakamoto, H. [Osaka University, Graduate School of Science, Department of Physics, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan); Kyberd, P.; Littlefield, M.; Nebrensky, J.J. [Brunel University, Uxbridge (United Kingdom); Onel, Y. [University of Iowa, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa City, IA (United States); Palladino, V. [Universita Federico II, Sezione INFN Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Napoli (Italy); Palmer, R.B. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (US); Roberts, T.J. [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (US); Collaboration: The MICE Collaboration

    2013-10-15

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/c, have emittances of approximately 1.2-2.3 {pi} mm-rad horizontally and 0.6-1.0 {pi} mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90-190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE. (orig.)

  5. Characterisation of the muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, D.; Barclay, P.; Bayliss, V.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Courthold, M.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Hayler, T.; Hills, M.; Lintern, A.; Macwaters, C.; Nichols, A.; Preece, R.; Ricciardi, S.; Rogers, C.; Stanley, T.; Tarrant, J.; Watson, S.; Wilson, A.; Adey, D.; Back, J.; Boyd, S.; Harrison, P.; Pidcott, C.; Taylor, I.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Barber, G.; Colling, D.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Fayer, S.; Fish, A.; Hunt, C.; Leaver, J.; Long, K.; Martyniak, J.; Middleton, S.; Pasternak, J.; Richards, A.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Takahashi, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Blondel, A.; Graulich, J.S.; Karadzhov, Y.; Verguilov, V.; Wisting, H.; De Bari, A.; Cecchet, G.; Bayes, R.; Forrest, D.; Nugent, J.C.; Soler, F.J.P.; Walaron, K.; Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Lucchini, G.; Blackmore, V.J.; Carlisle, T.; Cobb, J.H.; Lau, W.; Rayner, M.A.; Tunnell, C.D.; Blot, S.; Kim, Y.K.; Bogomilov, M.; Kolev, D.; Rusinov, I.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova, G.; Booth, C.N.; Hodgson, P.; Nicholson, R.; Overton, E.; Robinson, M.; Smith, P.J.; Bowring, D.; DeMello, A.; Gourlay, S.; Li, D.; Prestemon, S.; Virostek, S.P.; Zisman, M.S.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A.D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, R.; Capponi, M.; Iaciofano, A.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Tortora, L.; Charnley, G.; Collomb, N.; Gallagher, A.; Grant, A.; Griffiths, S.; Hartnett, T.; Martlew, B.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Owens, P.; White, C.; Coney, L.; Fletcher, R.; Hanson, G.G.; Heidt, C.; Cooke, P.; Gamet, R.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Hart, T.L.; Luo, T.; Sanders, D.A.; Summers, D.J.; Dick, A.J.; Ronald, K.; Whyte, C.G.; Filthaut, F.; Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D.M.; Rajaram, D.; Snopok, P.; Torun, Y.; Hansen, O.M.; Ramberger, S.; Vretenar, M.; Ishimoto, S.; Kuno, Y.; Sakamoto, H.; Kyberd, P.; Littlefield, M.; Nebrensky, J.J.; Onel, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palmer, R.B.; Roberts, T.J.

    2013-01-01

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/c, have emittances of approximately 1.2-2.3 π mm-rad horizontally and 0.6-1.0 π mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90-190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE. (orig.)

  6. Experience with High-Intensity Beam Scraping and Tail Population at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S; Burkart, F; Bruce, R; Mirarchi, D; Salvachua, B; Valentino, G; Wollmann, D

    2013-01-01

    The population of beam tails at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a source of concern for the operation at higher beam energies and intensities when even small fractions of the beam could represent a potential danger is case of slow or fast losses, e.g. caused by orbit transients or by collimator movements. Different studies have been performed using the technique of collimator scans to probe the beam tail population in different conditions. The experience accumulated during the operation at 3.5 TeV and 4 TeV is reviewed.

  7. Simulation of Planned Neutral Beam Heating Experiments in SSPX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, R. L.; Hill, D. N.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Casper, T. A.

    2006-10-01

    Recent results from the SSPX spheromak (peak Te 350eV) provide strong motivation for adding auxiliary heating to study energy transport and pressure limits. We are now procuring two 25keV 900kW neutral beam sources from Budker Institute in Russia. In parallel, we are using the CORSICA transport code to examine the effect of beam input geometry of the efficiency of neutral beam heating in a spheromak such as SSPX. A new fast-ion orbit-following algorithm was recently added to CORSICA to account for the low field, low aspect-ratio magnetic topology of the spheromak configuration [1]. We find a significant increase in fast ion confinement and subsequent plasma heating as the injection angle moves from strictly radial to more tangential injection. Variation of the heating rate with magnetic field, plasma density, and confinement time were also examined. The schedule for proposed beam installation and development of suitable target plasmas and diagnostics also will be presented. [1] L.D. Pearlstein, et al., Proceedings 33rd EPS Conf. on Plasma Physics, Rome (2006)

  8. Overview of Target Development for Next Generation Radioactive Beam Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolen, Jerry

    2014-09-01

    With the increased intensities of radioactive ion beams at present and future facilities a wide variety of target technologies are being brought to bear for the experimental studies undertaken with these beams. For astrophysical reaction studies, classical thin foil targets are still going to be extensively used, mainly as hydrogen- or deuterium-rich plastics (or metals). But more complex target systems such as windowless gas jets, liquid or cryogenic solid targets are being developed. Cryogenic gas cells have also been employed though one must contend with issues relating to the windows used. Active targets usually integrated with time projection chambers are being used with rare beams for their high detection efficiency and also for low energy processes. In an active target, the gas acts as both a target and detector and allows for investigations of nuclear structure and transfer reactions with very high efficiency and at high resolution due to the thickness of the target. Polarized targets, in the form of gas-phase, foil, and crystal targets, are being used and further developed for use at rare isotope facilities. And finally, in heavy-element research, more exotic beams even at moderate intensities can be used with the standard 208Pb as well as exotic actinide targets to perhaps open previously unanticipated reaction channels for the production, chemistry, and spectroscopic studies of isotopes of the heaviest elements. For use with high quality secondary beams, very small samples of rare actinide isotopes in conjunction with high efficiency gamma ray detectors can be used for such research. This talk will be an overview to introduce the topics to be covered in detail in the contributions to this mini-symposium. Prepared in collaboration with John P. Greene, Physics Division, ANL. With the increased intensities of radioactive ion beams at present and future facilities a wide variety of target technologies are being brought to bear for the experimental studies

  9. Diffuse scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostorz, G. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Angewandte Physik, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    While Bragg scattering is characteristic for the average structure of crystals, static local deviations from the average lattice lead to diffuse elastic scattering around and between Bragg peaks. This scattering thus contains information on the occupation of lattice sites by different atomic species and on static local displacements, even in a macroscopically homogeneous crystalline sample. The various diffuse scattering effects, including those around the incident beam (small-angle scattering), are introduced and illustrated by typical results obtained for some Ni alloys. (author) 7 figs., 41 refs.

  10. Molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendelbury, J.M.; Smith, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Studies with directed collision-free beams of particles continue to play an important role in the development of modern physics and chemistry. The deflections suffered by such beams as they pass through electric and magnetic fields or laser radiation provide some of the most direct information about the individual constituents of the beam; the scattering observed when two beams intersect yields important data about the intermolecular forces responsible for the scattering. (author)

  11. Evaluation of a method for correction of scatter radiation in thorax cone beam CT; Evaluation d'une methode de correction du rayonnement diffuse en tomographie du thorax avec faisceau conique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinkel, J.; Dinten, J.M. [CEA Grenoble (DTBS/STD), Lab. d' Electronique et de Technologie de l' Informatique, LETI, 38 (France); Esteve, F. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2004-07-01

    Purpose: Cone beam CT (CBCT) enables three-dimensional imaging with isotropic resolution. X-ray scatter estimation is a big challenge for quantitative CBCT imaging of thorax: scatter level is significantly higher on cone beam systems compared to collimated fan beam systems. The effects of this scattered radiation are cupping artefacts, streaks, and quantification inaccuracies. The beam stops conventional scatter estimation approach can be used for CBCT but leads to a significant increase in terms of dose and acquisition time. At CEA-LETI has been developed an original scatter management process without supplementary acquisition. Methods and Materials: This Analytical Plus Indexing-based method (API) of scatter correction in CBCT is based on scatter calibration through offline acquisitions with beam stops on lucite plates, combined to an analytical transformation issued from physical equations. This approach has been applied with success in bone densitometry and mammography. To evaluate this method in CBCT, acquisitions from a thorax phantom with and without beam stops have been performed. To compare different scatter correction approaches, Feldkamp algorithm has been applied on rough data corrected from scatter by API and by beam stops approaches. Results: The API method provides results in good agreement with the beam stops array approach, suppressing cupping artefact. Otherwise influence of the scatter correction method on the noise in the reconstructed images has been evaluated. Conclusion: The results indicate that the API method is effective for quantitative CBCT imaging of thorax. Compared to a beam stops array method it needs a lower x-ray dose and shortens acquisition time. (authors)

  12. Laser cooled ion beams and strongly coupled plasmas for precision experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussmann, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This cumulative thesis summarizes experimental and theoretical results on cooling of ion beams using single-frequency, single-mode tabletop laser systems. It consists of two parts. One deals with experiments on laser-cooling of ion beams at relativistic energies, the other with simulations of stopping and sympathetic cooling of ions for precision in-trap experiments. In the first part, experimental results are presented on laser-cooling of relativistic C 3+ ion beams at a beam energy of 122 MeV/u, performed at the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at GSI. The main results presented in this thesis include the first attainment of longitudinally space-charge dominated relativistic ion beams using pure laser-cooling. The second part lists theoretical results on stopping and sympathetic cooling of ions in a laser-cooled one-component plasma of singly charged 24 Mg ions, which are confined in a three-dimensional harmonic trap potential. (orig.)

  13. Low energy positron scattering from helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, J.P.; Jones, A.; Caradonna, P.; Makochekanwa, C.; Buckman, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    A new experiment has been developed for high resolution studies of positron scattering from atoms and molecules. Based on the Surko trap technology, a pulsed positron beam has been used to obtain preliminary measurements of low energy, differential elastic scattering cross sections from helium. The operation of the beamline is described and preliminary absolute cross section values for scattering energies of 5, 10 and 15 eV are presented and compared with contemporary theoretical calculations

  14. True beam commissioning experience at Nordland Hospital Trust, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daci, Lulzime; Malkaj, Partizan

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the measured of all photon beam data of first Varian True Beam version 2.0 slim model, recently commissioned at Nordland Hospital Trust, Bodø. To compare and evaluate the possibility of beam matching with the Clinac2300, for the energies of 6MV and 15 MV. Materials/Methods: Measurements of PDD, OAR, and Output factors were realized with the IBA Blue-phantom with different detectors and evaluated between them for all photon energies: 6MV, 15MV, 6MV FFF and 10MV FFF. The ionization chambers used were Pin Point CC01, CC04, Semiflex CC13 and photon diode by Iba dosimetry. The data were processed using Beizer algorithm with a resolution of 1 mm. The measured depth dose curves, diagonals, OAR, and output factors were imported into Eclipse in order to calculate beam data for the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA version 10.0.28) for both the dataset measured with CC04 and CC13 and compared. The model head of 23EX was selected as the most near model to True Beam as a restriction of our version of Aria. It was seen that better results were achieved with the CC04 measured data as a result of better resolution. For the biggest field after 10 cm depth a larger difference is seen between measured and calculated for both dataset, but it is within the criteria for acceptance. Results: The Beam analysis criteria of 2 mm at 50% dose is achieved for all the fields accept for 40x40 that is within 3%. Depth difference at maximum dose is within 1 mm for all the fields and dose difference at 100 mm and 200 mm is lower than 1% for or all the fields. The PDD between two machines for all the fields differ after Dmax with less than 1%. For profiles in the field zone and outside field the difference is within 1% for all the fields. In the penumbra region the difference is from 2% up to 12% for big fields. As for diagonals they differ as a result of the head construction at the edge of the field and the penumbra region. The output factors differ for big fields within 5% and

  15. Experience with high-energy electron beam therapy at the University of Chicago

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griem, M.L.; Kuchnir, F.T.; Lanzl, L.H.; Skaggs, L.S.; Sutton, H.G.; Tokars, R.

    1979-01-01

    Current utilization of the linear accelerator as well as 5-year cumulative experience in radiotherapy is presented. Cutaneous lymphomas and mammary gland carcinomas were the prime experience region; however, cancers at other locations were treated with mixed-beam therapy; employing fast neutrons and photon beams. The technique appears promising for abdominal tumors and deep-seated malignancies. Carcinoma of the pancreas responds favorably to this technique

  16. Neutron Brillouin scattering experiments with pulsed neutrons on high resolution chopper spectrometer HRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, S; Yokoo, T; Endoh, Y; Kawana, D; Kaneko, Y; Tokura, Y; Fujita, M; Yoshida, K; Saito, K; Inami, N; Takeichi, Y; Ono, K

    2014-01-01

    We improved the High Resolution Chopper Spectrometer (HRC), which is installed at MLF in J-PARC, in order to perform neutron Brillouin scattering (NBS) experiments, and successfully demonstrated a feasibility of this method. Gapless spin-wave excitations were observed in La 0.8 Sr 0.2 MnO 3 , which were in good agreement with previous results using single crystals, on the other hand, a large energy gap in the ferromagnetic spin waves was found in SrRuO 3 . Spin-wave peaks in a permanent magnet Nd 2 Fe 14 B were on the dispersion curve determined previously using a single crystal. Excitations, so-called fast sound, in liquid D 2 O were in a good agreement with previous inelastic neutron scattering experiments and the dispersion curve were extended to the lower Q region.

  17. The tagged photon beam polarization of the jet target experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, N.; Muccifora, V.

    1989-01-01

    The applicability of the residual electron selection method to the tagging method of the jet target laboratory has been studied. With this end in view the behaviour of the polarized bremsstrahlung cross section in the range considered has been analysed, while the polarization increase by means of the RES has been evaluated. The vertical conditions of the focusing of the tagging spectrometer as a function of energy have been determined. Finally the gamma beam density and the tagging efficiency have been calculated

  18. A moving blocker-based strategy for simultaneous megavoltage and kilovoltage scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography image acquired during volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Luo; Lee, Huichen Pam; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a moving blocker-based approach in estimating and correcting megavoltage (MV) and kilovoltage (kV) scatter contamination in kV cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquired during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods and materials: During the concurrent CBCT/VMAT acquisition, a physical attenuator (i.e., “blocker”) consisting of equally spaced lead strips was mounted and moved constantly between the CBCT source and patient. Both kV and MV scatter signals were estimated from the blocked region of the imaging panel, and interpolated into the unblocked region. A scatter corrected CBCT was then reconstructed from the unblocked projections after scatter subtraction using an iterative image reconstruction algorithm based on constraint optimization. Experimental studies were performed on a Catphan® phantom and an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom to demonstrate the feasibility of using a moving blocker for kV–MV scatter correction. Results: Scatter induced cupping artifacts were substantially reduced in the moving blocker corrected CBCT images. Quantitatively, the root mean square error of Hounsfield units (HU) in seven density inserts of the Catphan phantom was reduced from 395 to 40. Conclusions: The proposed moving blocker strategy greatly improves the image quality of CBCT acquired with concurrent VMAT by reducing the kV–MV scatter induced HU inaccuracy and cupping artifacts

  19. Investigation of Laser Beam Combining and Clean-Up via Seeded Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in Multimode Optical Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Choi, Bryan

    2000-01-01

    .... Beam combining in multimode fibers via SBS is being considered as a method of combining low power laser beams into a single beam having higher power and superior spatial coherence for applications...

  20. Elastic Scattering and Total Cross-Section in p+p reactions as measured by the LHC Experiment TOTEM at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Csörgö, Tamás; Aspell, P; Atanassov, I; Avati, V; Baechler, J; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Bossini, E; Bozzo, M; Brogi, P; Brücken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F S; Calicchio, M; Catanesi, M G; Covault, C; Csanád, M; Deile, M; Dimovasili, E; Doubek, M; Eggert, K; Eremin, V; Ferretti, R; Ferro, F; Fiergolski, A; Garcia, F; Giani, S; Greco, V; Grzanka, L; Heino, J; Hilden, T; Intonti, M R; Janda, M; Kaspar, J; Kopal, J; Kundrát, V; Kurvinen, K; Lami, S; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Leszko, T; Lippmaa, E; Lokajícek, M; Lo Vetere, M; Lucas Rodríguez, F; Macrí, M; Magaletti, L; Magazzù, G; Mercadante, A; Meucci, M; Minutoli, S; Nemes, F; Niewiadomski, H; Noschis, E; Novák, T; Oliveri, E; Oljemark, F; Orava, R; Oriunno, M; Österberg, K; Palazzi, P; Perrot, A-L; Pedreschi, E; Petäjäjärvi, J; Procházka, J; Quinto, M; Radermacher, E; Radicioni, E; Ravotti, F; Robutti, E; Ropelewski, L; Ruggiero, G; Saarikko, H; Sanguinetti, G; Santroni, A; Scribano, A; Sette, G; Snoeys, W; Spinella, F; Sziklai, J; Taylor, C; Turini, N; Vacek, V; Vítek, M; Welti, J; Whitmore, J

    2012-01-01

    Proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured by the TOTEM experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at $\\sqrt{s} = 7 $ TeV in special runs with the Roman Pot detectors placed as close to the outgoing beam as seven times the transverse beam size. The differential cross-section measurements are reported in the |t|-range of 0.36 to 2.5 GeV$^2$. Extending the range of data to low t values from 0.02 to 0.33 GeV$^2$,and utilizing the luminosity measurements of CMS, the total proton-proton cross section at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV is measured to be $(98.3 \\pm 0.2^{stat} \\pm 2.8^{syst})$ mb.

  1. Method for more accurate transmittance measurements of low-angle scattering samples using an integrating sphere with an entry port beam diffuser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Annica M.; Jonsson, Andreas; Jonsson, Jacob C.; Roos, Arne

    2011-01-01

    For most integrating sphere measurements, the difference in light distribution between a specular reference beam and a diffused sample beam can result in significant errors. The problem becomes especially pronounced in integrating spheres that include a port for reflectance or diffuse transmittance measurements. The port is included in many standard spectrophotometers to facilitate a multipurpose instrument, however, absorption around the port edge can result in a detected signal that is too low. The absorption effect is especially apparent for low-angle scattering samples, because a significant portion of the light is scattered directly onto that edge. In this paper, a method for more accurate transmittance measurements of low-angle light-scattering samples is presented. The method uses a standard integrating sphere spectrophotometer, and the problem with increased absorption around the port edge is addressed by introducing a diffuser between the sample and the integrating sphere during both reference and sample scan. This reduces the discrepancy between the two scans and spreads the scattered light over a greater portion of the sphere wall. The problem with multiple reflections between the sample and diffuser is successfully addressed using a correction factor. The method is tested for two patterned glass samples with low-angle scattering and in both cases the transmittance accuracy is significantly improved.

  2. 3D reconstruction of carbon nanotube networks from neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdavi, Mostafa; Baniassadi, Majid; Baghani, Mostafa; Dadmun, Mark; Tehrani, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Structure reconstruction from statistical descriptors, such as scattering data obtained using x-rays or neutrons, is essential in understanding various properties of nanocomposites. Scattering based reconstruction can provide a realistic model, over various length scales, that can be used for numerical simulations. In this study, 3D reconstruction of a highly loaded carbon nanotube (CNT)-conducting polymer system based on small and ultra-small angle neutron scattering (SANS and USANS, respectively) data was performed. These light-weight and flexible materials have recently shown great promise for high-performance thermoelectric energy conversion, and their further improvement requires a thorough understanding of their structure-property relationships. The first step in achieving such understanding is to generate models that contain the hierarchy of CNT networks over nano and micron scales. The studied system is a single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly (styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). SANS and USANS patterns of the different samples containing 10, 30, and 50 wt% SWCNTs were measured. These curves were then utilized to calculate statistical two-point correlation functions of the nanostructure. These functions along with the geometrical information extracted from SANS data and scanning electron microscopy images were used to reconstruct a representative volume element (RVE) nanostructure. Generated RVEs can be used for simulations of various mechanical and physical properties. This work, therefore, introduces a framework for the reconstruction of 3D RVEs of high volume faction nanocomposites containing high aspect ratio fillers from scattering experiments. (paper)

  3. End-to-End Beam Simulations for the New Muon G-2 Experiment at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korostelev, Maxim [Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Bailey, Ian [Lancaster U.; Herrod, Alexander [Liverpool U.; Morgan, James [Fermilab; Morse, William [RIKEN BNL; Stratakis, Diktys [RIKEN BNL; Tishchenko, Vladimir [RIKEN BNL; Wolski, Andrzej [Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the new muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab is to measure the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon with an unprecedented uncertainty of 140 ppb. A beam of positive muons required for the experiment is created by pion decay. Detailed studies of the beam dynamics and spin polarization of the muons are important to predict systematic uncertainties in the experiment. In this paper, we present the results of beam simulations and spin tracking from the pion production target to the muon storage ring. The end-to-end beam simulations are developed in Bmad and include the processes of particle decay, collimation (with accurate representation of all apertures) and spin tracking.

  4. An assessment of the secondary neutron dose in the passive scattering proton beam facility of the national cancer center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Eun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Gyuseong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Se Byeong [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to assess the additional neutron effective dose during passive scattering proton therapy. Monte Carlo code (Monte Carlo N-Particle 6) simulation was conducted based on a precise modeling of the National Cancer Center's proton therapy facility. A three-dimensional neutron effective dose profile of the interior of the treatment room was acquired via a computer simulation of the 217.8-MeV proton beam. Measurements were taken with a 3He neutron detector to support the simulation results, which were lower than the simulation results by 16% on average. The secondary photon dose was about 0.8% of the neutron dose. The dominant neutron source was deduced based on flux calculation. The secondary neutron effective dose per proton absorbed dose ranged from 4.942 ± 0.031 mSv/Gy at the end of the field to 0.324 ± 0.006 mSv/Gy at 150 cm in axial distance.

  5. Inclusive deep inelastic scattering at high Q{sup 2} with longitudinally polarised lepton beams at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2012-06-15

    Inclusive e{sup {+-}}p single and double differential cross sections for neutral and charged current deep inelastic scattering processes are measured with the H1 detector at HERA. The data were taken at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=319 GeV with a total integrated luminosity of 333.7 pb{sup -1} shared between two lepton beam charges and two longitudinal lepton polarisation modes. The differential cross sections are measured in the range of negative four-momentum transfer squared, Q{sup 2}, between 60 and 50000 GeV{sup 2}, and Bjorken x between 0.0008 and 0.65. The measurements are combined with earlier published unpolarised H1 data to improve statistical precision and used to determine the structure function xF{sup {gamma}}{sup Z}{sub 3}. A measurement of the neutral current parity violating structure function F{sup {gamma}}{sup Z}{sub 2} is presented for the first time. The polarisation dependence of the charged current total cross section is also measured. The new measurements are well described by a next-to-leading order QCD fit based on all published H1 inclusive cross section data which are used to extract the parton distribution functions of the proton.

  6. Adsorption of n-butane on graphene/Ru(0001)—A molecular beam scattering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivapragasam, Nilushni; Nayakasinghe, Mindika T.; Burghaus, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption kinetics/dynamics of n-butane on graphene, physical vapor deposited on Ru(0001) (hereafter G/Ru), and bare Ru(0001) (hereafter Ru) are discussed. The chemical activity of the supported-graphene as well as the support was probed by thermal desorption spectroscopy (adsorption kinetics). In addition and to the best of our knowledge, for the first time, molecular beam scattering data of larger molecules were collected for graphene (probing the adsorption dynamics). Furthermore, samples were inspected by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. At the measuring conditions used here, n-butane adsorption kinetics/dynamics are molecular and nonactivated. Binding energies of butane on Ru and G/Ru are indistinguishable within experimental uncertainty. Thus, G/Ru is “kinetically transparent.” Initial adsorption probabilities, S 0 , of n-butane decrease with increasing impact energy (0.76–1.72 eV) and are adsorption temperature independent for both Ru and G/Ru, again consistent with molecular adsorption. Also, S 0 of Ru and G/Ru are indistinguishable within experimental uncertainty. Thus, G/Ru is “dynamically transparent.” Coverage dependent adsorption probabilities indicate precursor effects for graphene/Ru.

  7. Crossed-beam scattering studies of electron-transfer processes between the dication CO2(2+) and neutral CO2: electronic states of reactants and products involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabka, Jan; Ricketts, Claire L; Schröder, Detlef; Roithová, Jana; Schwarz, Helmut; Thissen, Roland; Dutuit, Odile; Price, Stephen D; Herman, Zdenek

    2010-06-17

    Crossed-beam scattering experiments were carried out at collision energies of 4.51 and 2.71 eV to elucidate the electronic states involved in the nondissociative and dissociative electron-transfer reactions observed following CO(2)(2+)/CO(2) collisions. Specifically, we focus on the observation that, in the dissociative electron-transfer reaction, forming CO(+), the majority of the CO(+) product ions are formed via electron capture by the CO(2)(2+) rather than via ejection of an electron from the neutral CO(2) reaction partner. The main channels resulting in nondissociative electron transfer are reactions of the ground (X(3)Sigma(g)(-)) and excited states of CO(2)(2+) to give different combinations of the ground and excited states of the product pair of CO(2)(+) ions in which the combination AA appears to be significant. The CO(+) ions appear mainly to arise from slow dissociation of CO(2)(+)(b(4)Pi(u)) formed following electron capture by the ground state of the dication reactant (X(3)Sigma(g)(-)), with possible contributions from electron capture by higher triplet excited states of the dication.

  8. Reactive scattering of H2 from Cu(100): comparison of dynamics calculations based on the specific reaction parameter approach to density functional theory with experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sementa, L; Wijzenbroek, M; van Kolck, B J; Somers, M F; Al-Halabi, A; Busnengo, H F; Olsen, R A; Kroes, G J; Rutkowski, M; Thewes, C; Kleimeier, N F; Zacharias, H

    2013-01-28

    We present new experimental and theoretical results for reactive scattering of dihydrogen from Cu(100). In the new experiments, the associative desorption of H(2) is studied in a velocity resolved and final rovibrational state selected manner, using time-of-flight techniques in combination with resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization laser detection. Average desorption energies and rotational quadrupole alignment parameters were obtained in this way for a number of (v = 0, 1) rotational states, v being the vibrational quantum number. Results of quantum dynamics calculations based on a potential energy surface computed with a specific reaction parameter (SRP) density functional, which was derived earlier for dihydrogen interacting with Cu(111), are compared with the results of the new experiments and with the results of previous molecular beam experiments on sticking of H(2) and on rovibrationally elastic and inelastic scattering of H(2) and D(2) from Cu(100). The calculations use the Born-Oppenheimer and static surface approximations. With the functional derived semi-empirically for dihydrogen + Cu(111), a chemically accurate description is obtained of the molecular beam experiments on sticking of H(2) on Cu(100), and a highly accurate description is obtained of rovibrationally elastic and inelastic scattering of D(2) from Cu(100) and of the orientational dependence of the reaction of (v = 1, j = 2 - 4) H(2) on Cu(100). This suggests that a SRP density functional derived for H(2) interacting with a specific low index face of a metal will yield accurate results for H(2) reactively scattering from another low index face of the same metal, and that it may also yield accurate results for H(2) interacting with a defected (e.g., stepped) surface of that same metal, in a system of catalytic interest. However, the description that was obtained of the average desorption energies, of rovibrationally elastic and inelastic scattering of H(2) from Cu(100), and of the

  9. Hard two-photon contribution to elastic lepton-proton scattering determined by the OLYMPUS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasell, D. K.; OLYMPUS Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    The OLYMPUS collaboration has recently made a precise measurement of the positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross section ratio, R 2γ, over a wide range of the virtual photon polarization, 0.456 fits to the available form factor data. The motivation for measuring R 2γ will be presented followed by a description of the OLYMPUS experiment. The importance of radiative corrections in the analysis will be shown also. Then we will present the OLYMPUS results and compare with results from two similar experiments and theoretical calculations.

  10. Complete experiment for dp and 3He,d backward elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekalo, M.P.; Piskunov, N.M.; Sitnik, I.M.

    1997-01-01

    The problem of the complete experiment in backward elastic scattering of particles with spins of 1 and 1/2 is considered. For the first time all possible effects caused by polarization of one or two initial and one final particles are touched upon. The minimal set of measurements allowing to reconstruct each of four amplitudes describing this process is suggested. Some observables are expected to be sensitive to such deuteron peculiarities as possible P-wave components. The developed technique is a good tool to calculate easily the expectations in the Impulse Approximation for any observables. The geography of the complete experiment is briefly discussed

  11. Prompt neutrino results from a proton beam dump experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, P.; Dydak, F.; Guyot, C.; Hagelberg, R.; Merlo, J.P.; Ranjard, F.; Rothberg, J.; Steinberger, J.; Taureg, H.; Rueden, W. von; Wahl, H.; Williams, R.W.; Wotschack, J. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Bluemer, H.; Buchholz, P.; Duda, J.; Eisele, F.; Kleinknecht, K.; Knobloch, J.; Pollmann, D.; Pszola, B.; Renk, B. (Dortmund Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik); Belusevic, R.; Falkenburg, B.; Flottmann, T.; Groot, J.G.H. de; Geweniger, C.; Hepp, V.; Keilwerth, H.; Tittel, K. (Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hochenergiephysik); Debu, P.; Para, A.; Perez, P.; Peyaud, B.; Rander, J.; Schuller, J.P.; Turlay, R. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Abramowicz, H.; Krolikowski, J. (Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. Fizyki Doswiadczalnej)

    1992-10-01

    A study of prompt neutrino events from 400 GeV protons on a beam-dump is presented. The ratio of electron- to muon-neutrino rates in 0.86{+-}0.14, in agreement with e-{mu} universality. The anti-neutrino to neutrino flux ratio is anti {nu}{sub {mu}}/{nu}{sub {mu}}=0.81{+-}0.19. The absolute rates and distributions observed are shown to be in quantitative agreement with the known properties of charmed-quark production in hadron collisions. (orig.).

  12. Progress On The Thomson Scattering Diagnostic For The Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, A.; Emami, T.; Davies, R.; Frank, J.; Hopson, J.; Karama, J.; James, R. W.; Hopson, J.; Paolino, R. N.; Sandri, E.; Turk, J.; Wicke, M.; Cgapl Team

    2017-10-01

    A high-performance spectrometer utilizing volume-phase-holographic (VPH) grating and a charge coupled device (CCD) camera with a range of 380-1090 nm and resolution of 1024x1024 has been assembled on HPX at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Laboratory (CGAPL). This spectrometer will collect doppler shifted photons, emitted from the plasma by the first harmonic (1064 nm) of a 2.5 J Nd:YAG laser. Direct measurements of the plasma's temperature and density will be determined using HPX's Thomson Scattering (TS) single spatial point diagnostic system. A zero order half wave plate rotates the polarization of the second harmonic TS laser beam when operating at a wavelength of 532 nm. A linear actuated periscope has been constructed to remotely redirect the beam so that 532 and 1064 nm wavelengths can both be used. TS has the capability of determining plasma properties on short time scales and will be used to create a robust picture of the internal plasma parameters. Operating at both 532 and 1064 nm results in a self-consistent measurement and better use our existing spectrometer and soon to be constructed polychrometer. A prototype spectrometer has been constructed to explore the Andor CCD camera's resolution and sensitivity. The current status of the diagnostic development, spectrometer, and collection optics system will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY17.

  13. Theoretical analysis and experiment performance of slow-light based on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Hongyan; Zhong Kun; Zhang Ru; Lang Peilin

    2011-01-01

    Slow light technology will play a key role in future all-optical communication. The slow-light technology based on stimulated Brillouin scattering has become a research highlight because of its additional advantages, such as compatibility of the devices with existing telecommunication systems, room-temperature operation, and tunable at arbitrary wavelengths. According to the propagation of a cw pulse through a Brillouin fiber amplifier, whose frequency is near the Stokes resonance, via three-wave coupling equations, both pump depletion and fiber losses taken into consideration, the principle of how slow-light effect based on stimulated Brillouin scattering produced and the mathematical expression of time delay are strictly deduced. A delay of 8 ns is obtained when the input Stokes pulse is 200ns and the SBS (stimulated Brillouin scattering) gain G is ∼18 in our designed experiment of SBS slow-light system. Then the extent of transformation from pump waves to Stokes waves is measured using MATLAB numerical simulation according to the experiment dates, based on the relation between output pump light power and input pump light power and also the relation between output Stokes light power and input pump light power. And the relation between the input light power and propagation distance is discussed as well. Finally the relation between slow light pulse delay and SBS gain is also obtained.